WorldWideScience

Sample records for bilayered tissue engineered

  1. Design and characterization of a tissue-engineered bilayer scaffold for osteochondral tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoni, Paolo; Lazzarini, Erica; Ceseracciu, Luca; Barone, Alberto C; Quarto, Rodolfo; Scaglione, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Treatment of full-thickness cartilage defects relies on osteochondral bilayer grafts, which mimic the microenvironment and structure of the two affected tissues: articular cartilage and subchondral bone. However, the integrity and stability of the grafts are hampered by the presence of a weak interphase, generated by the layering processes of scaffold manufacturing. We describe here the design and development of a bilayer monolithic osteochondral graft, avoiding delamination of the two distinct layers but preserving the cues for selective generation of cartilage and bone. A highly porous polycaprolactone-based graft was obtained by combining solvent casting/particulate leaching techniques. Pore structure and interconnections were designed to favour in vivo vascularization only at the bony layer. Hydroxyapatite granules were added as bioactive signals at the site of bone regeneration. Unconfined compressive tests displayed optimal elastic properties and low residual deformation of the graft after unloading (< 3%). The structural integrity of the graft was successfully validated by tension fracture tests, revealing high resistance to delamination, since fractures were never displayed at the interface of the layers (n = 8). Ectopic implantation of grafts in nude mice, after seeding with bovine trabecular bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, resulted in thick areas of mature bone surrounding ceramic granules within the bony layer, and a cartilaginous alcianophilic matrix in the chondral layer. Vascularization was mostly observed in the bony layer, with a statistically significant higher blood vessel density and mean area. Thus, the easily generated osteochondral scaffolds, since they are mechanically and biologically functional, are suitable for tissue-engineering applications for cartilage repair. PMID:23172816

  2. Bioglass®/chitosan-polycaprolactone bilayered composite scaffolds intended for osteochondral tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qingqing; Nooeaid, Patcharakamon; Detsch, Rainer; Roether, Judith A; Dong, Yanming; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-12-01

    Polymer-coated 45S5 Bioglass(®) (BG)/chitosan-polycaprolactone (BG/CS-PCL) bilayered composite scaffolds were prepared via foam replication and freeze-drying techniques for application in osteochondral tissue engineering. The CS-PCL coated and uncoated BG scaffolds were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the coated scaffolds were significantly improved in comparison to uncoated scaffolds. The bioactivity and biodegradation behavior of scaffolds were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 28 days. The interface between the BG scaffold and the polymer coating layer was observed by SEM and a suitable interpenetration of the polymer into the scaffold struts was found. The effects of coated and uncoated BG scaffolds on MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were evaluated by cell viability, adhesion and proliferation. PMID:24677705

  3. The development of a tissue-engineered tracheobronchial epithelial model using a bilayered collagen-hyaluronate scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Cian; Cavanagh, Brenton; Unger, Ronald E; Kirkpatrick, C James; O'Dea, Shirley; O'Brien, Fergal J; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2016-04-01

    Today, chronic respiratory disease is one of the leading causes of mortality globally. Epithelial dysfunction can play a central role in its pathophysiology. The development of physiologically-representative in vitro model systems using tissue-engineered constructs might improve our understanding of epithelial tissue and disease. This study sought to engineer a bilayered collagen-hyaluronate (CHyA-B) scaffold for the development of a physiologically-representative 3D in vitro tracheobronchial epithelial co-culture model. CHyA-B scaffolds were fabricated by integrating a thin film top-layer into a porous sub-layer with lyophilisation. The film layer firmly connected to the sub-layer with delamination occurring at stresses of 12-15 kPa. Crosslinked scaffolds had a compressive modulus of 1.9 kPa and mean pore diameters of 70 μm and 80 μm, depending on the freezing temperature. Histological analysis showed that the Calu-3 bronchial epithelial cell line attached and grew on CHyA-B with adoption of an epithelial monolayer on the film layer. Immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR studies demonstrated that the CHyA-B scaffolds facilitated Calu-3 cell differentiation, with enhanced mucin expression, increased ciliation and the formation of intercellular tight junctions. Co-culture of Calu-3 cells with Wi38 lung fibroblasts was achieved on the scaffold to create a submucosal tissue analogue of the upper respiratory tract, validating CHyA-B as a platform to support co-culture and cellular organisation reminiscent of in vivo tissue architecture. In summary, this study has demonstrated that CHyA-B is a promising tool for the development of novel 3D tracheobronchial co-culture in vitro models with the potential to unravel new pathways in drug discovery and drug delivery. PMID:26871888

  4. Cell and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    “Cell and Tissue Engineering” introduces the principles and new approaches in cell and tissue engineering. It includes both the fundamentals and the current trends in cell and tissue engineering, in a way useful both to a novice and an expert in the field. The book is composed of 13 chapters all of which are written by the leading experts. It is organized to gradually assemble an insight in cell and tissue function starting form a molecular nano-level, extending to a cellular micro-level and finishing at the tissue macro-level. In specific, biological, physiological, biophysical, biochemical, medical, and engineering aspects are covered from the standpoint of the development of functional substitutes of biological tissues for potential clinical use. Topics in the area of cell engineering include cell membrane biophysics, structure and function of the cytoskeleton, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and mechanotransduction. In the area of tissue engineering the focus is on the in vitro cultivation of ...

  5. Engineering Complex Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mikos, Antonios G.; Herring, Susan W.; OCHAREON, PANNEE; Elisseeff, Jennifer; Lu, Helen H.; Kandel, Rita; Schoen, Frederick J.; Toner, Mehmet; Mooney, David; ATALA, ANTHONY; VAN DYKE, MARK E.; Kaplan, David; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    This article summarizes the views expressed at the third session of the workshop “Tissue Engineering—The Next Generation,” which was devoted to the engineering of complex tissue structures. Antonios Mikos described the engineering of complex oral and craniofacial tissues as a “guided interplay” between biomaterial scaffolds, growth factors, and local cell populations toward the restoration of the original architecture and function of complex tissues. Susan Herring, reviewing osteogenesis and ...

  6. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  7. Tissue Engineering in Dentistry.

    OpenAIRE

    Neel, E. A.; W. Chrzanowski; Salih, V. M.; Kim, H. W.; Knowles, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. Data The authors used “PUBMED” to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., “tissue engineering”, “approaches”, “strategies” “dentistry”, “dental stem cells”, “dentino-pulp complex”, “guided tissue rege...

  8. Tissue engineered periodontal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartold, P M; Gronthos, S; Ivanovski, S; Fisher, A; Hutmacher, D W

    2016-02-01

    Attainment of periodontal regeneration is a significant clinical goal in the management of advanced periodontal defects arising from periodontitis. Over the past 30 years numerous techniques and materials have been introduced and evaluated clinically and have included guided tissue regeneration, bone grafting materials, growth and other biological factors and gene therapy. With the exception of gene therapy, all have undergone evaluation in humans. All of the products have shown efficacy in promoting periodontal regeneration in animal models but the results in humans remain variable and equivocal concerning attaining complete biological regeneration of damaged periodontal structures. In the early 2000s, the concept of tissue engineering was proposed as a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration based on molecular and cell biology. At this time, tissue engineering was a new and emerging field. Now, 14 years later we revisit the concept of tissue engineering for the periodontium and assess how far we have come, where we are currently situated and what needs to be done in the future to make this concept a reality. In this review, we cover some of the precursor products, which led to our current position in periodontal tissue engineering. The basic concepts of tissue engineering with special emphasis on periodontal tissue engineering products is discussed including the use of mesenchymal stem cells in bioscaffolds and the emerging field of cell sheet technology. Finally, we look into the future to consider what CAD/CAM technology and nanotechnology will have to offer. PMID:25900048

  9. Enamel Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Masaki J.; Hata, Ken-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    For a long time metal and resin have been investigated as potential sources to replace enamel. In our laboratory, we are focusing on producing enamel by tissue engineering methods as these techniques are believed to be an extremely powerful approach to replacing enamel. This goal has remained elusive until recently when we finally identified a new tissue engineering method to generate enamel using a specialized enamel organ culture technique and transplantation system. However, two problems s...

  10. Silk: A Potential Medium for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sobajo, Cassandra; Behzad, Farhad; Yuan, Xue-Feng; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Human skin is a complex bilayered organ that serves as a protective barrier against the environment. The loss of integrity of skin by traumatic experiences such as burns and ulcers may result in considerable disability or ultimately death. Therefore, in skin injuries, adequate dermal substitutes are among primary care targets, aimed at replacing the structural and functional properties of native skin. To date, there are very few single application tissue-engineered dermal construct...

  11. Regulating tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Lloyd-Evans

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a radical new approach to the repair and replacement of damaged or diseased body tissues. Cells, often seeded into or shaped around a biomaterial matrix, are used to replace damaged or diseased tissue or stimulate repair by the body. Because it is an area of tremendous focus and achievement, there is a risk that technical developments will outstrip the capacity of existing regulatory frameworks to cope with these novel products. Australia, the USA, and Canada are somewhat ahead of Japan in establishing a feasible regulatory approach. All four are currently ahead of the European Union (EU, but individual European countries and the EU as a whole are catching up. However, for the foreseeable future, it may still be possible in certain European countries to use autologous cell therapies in hospitals and market allogeneic tissue-engineered products, especially skin replacements, without regulatory control.

  12. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    OpenAIRE

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L.; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2011-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promisin...

  13. Engineering a bilayered hydrogel to control ASC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Zamora, David O; Suggs, Laura J; Christy, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Natural polymers over the years have gained more importance because of their host biocompatibility and ability to interact with cells in vitro and in vivo. An area of research that holds promise in regenerative medicine is the combinatorial use of novel biomaterials and stem cells. A fundamental strategy in the field of tissue engineering is the use of three-dimensional scaffold (e.g., decellularized extracellular matrix, hydrogels, micro/nano particles) for directing cell function. This technology has evolved from the discovery that cells need a substrate upon which they can adhere, proliferate, and express their differentiated cellular phenotype and function. More recently, it has also been determined that cells not only use these substrates for adherence, but also interact and take cues from the matrix substrate (e.g., extracellular matrix, ECM). Therefore, the cells and scaffolds have a reciprocal connection that serves to control tissue development, organization, and ultimate function. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are mesenchymal, non-hematopoetic stem cells present in adipose tissue that can exhibit multi-lineage differentiation and serve as a readily available source of cells (i.e. pre-vascular endothelia and pericytes). Our hypothesis is that adipose-derived stem cells can be directed toward differing phenotypes simultaneously by simply co-culturing them in bilayered matrices. Our laboratory is focused on dermal wound healing. To this end, we created a single composite matrix from the natural biomaterials, fibrin, collagen, and chitosan that can mimic the characteristics and functions of a dermal-specific wound healing ECM environment. PMID:22664758

  14. Biomaterials in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, J A

    1995-06-01

    Biomaterials play a pivotal role in field of tissue engineering. Biomimetic synthetic polymers have been created to elicit specific cellular functions and to direct cell-cell interactions both in implants that are initially cell-free, which may serve as matrices to conduct tissue regeneration, and in implants to support cell transplantation. Biomimetic approaches have been based on polymers endowed with bioadhesive receptor-binding peptides and mono- and oligosaccharides. These materials have been patterned in two- and three-dimensions to generate model multicellular tissue architectures, and this approach may be useful in future efforts to generate complex organizations of multiple cell types. Natural polymers have also played an important role in these efforts, and recombinant polymers that combine the beneficial aspects of natural polymers with many of the desirable features of synthetic polymers have been designed and produced. Biomaterials have been employed to conduct and accelerate otherwise naturally occurring phenomena, such as tissue regeneration in wound healing in the otherwise healthy subject; to induce cellular responses that might not be normally present, such as healing in a diseased subject or the generation of a new vascular bed to receive a subsequent cell transplant; and to block natural phenomena, such as the immune rejection of cell transplants from other species or the transmission of growth factor signals that stimulate scar formation. This review introduces the biomaterials and describes their application in the engineering of new tissues and the manipulation of tissue responses. PMID:9634795

  15. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  16. Stereolithography in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2014-03-01

    Several recent research efforts have focused on use of computer-aided additive fabrication technologies, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing, rapid prototyping, solid freeform fabrication, or three-dimensional printing technologies, to create structures for tissue engineering. For example, scaffolds for tissue engineering may be processed using rapid prototyping technologies, which serve as matrices for cell ingrowth, vascularization, as well as transport of nutrients and waste. Stereolithography is a photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology that involves computer-driven and spatially controlled irradiation of liquid resin. This technology enables structures with precise microscale features to be prepared directly from a computer model. In this review, use of stereolithography for processing trimethylene carbonate, polycaprolactone, and poly(D,L-lactide) poly(propylene fumarate)-based materials is considered. In addition, incorporation of bioceramic fillers for fabrication of bioceramic scaffolds is reviewed. Use of stereolithography for processing of patient-specific implantable scaffolds is also discussed. In addition, use of photopolymerization-based rapid prototyping technology, known as two-photon polymerization, for production of tissue engineering scaffolds with smaller features than conventional stereolithography technology is considered. PMID:24306145

  17. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  18. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  19. Injectable Tissue-Engineered Soft Tissue for Tissue Augmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Sung-Mi; You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Soft tissue augmentation is a process of implanting tissues or materials to treat wrinkles or soft tissue defects in the body. Over the years, various materials have evolved to correct soft tissue defects, including a number of tissues and polymers. Autogenous dermis, autogenous fat, autogenous dermis-fat, allogenic dermis, synthetic implants, and fillers have been widely accepted for soft tissue augmentations. Tissue engineering technology has also been introduced and opened a new venue of o...

  20. Computational Modeling in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in tissue engineering is the translation of biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of tissue engineering. This volume discusses computational modeling tools that allow studying the biological complexity in a more quantitative way. More specifically, computational tools can help in:  (i) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering product, e.g. by adapting scaffold design to optimize micro-environmental signals or by adapting selection criteria to improve homogeneity of the selected cell population; (ii) quantifying and optimizing the tissue engineering process, e.g. by adapting bioreactor design to improve quality and quantity of the final product; and (iii) assessing the influence of the in vivo environment on the behavior of the tissue engineering product, e.g. by investigating vascular ingrowth. The book presents examples of each...

  1. Integrated Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Haikel, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    "Integrated Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering" features all aspects from fundamental principles to current technological advances in biomaterials at the macro/micro/nano/molecular scales suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The book is unique as it provides all important aspects dealing with the basic science involved in structure and properties, techniques and technological innovations in material processing and characterizations, and applications of biomaterials in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Adipose Tissue Engineering for Soft Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jennifer H.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Lee, Kyongbum; Marra, Kacey G.; Rubin, J. Peter; Yoo, James J; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for soft tissue defects caused by various pathologies and trauma include autologous grafting and commercially available fillers. However, these treatment methods present a number of challenges and limitations, such as donor-site morbidity and volume loss over time. As such, improved therapeutic modalities need to be developed. Tissue engineering techniques offer novel solutions to these problems through development of bioactive tissue constructs that can regenerat...

  3. Biomaterials & scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal J. O'Brien

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Every day thousands of surgical procedures are performed to replace or repair tissue that has been damaged through disease or trauma. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE aims to regenerate damaged tissues by combining cells from the body with highly porous scaffold biomaterials, which act as templates for tissue regeneration, to guide the growth of new tissue. This article describes the functional requirements, and types, of materials used in developing state of the art of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Furthermore, it describes the challenges and where future research and direction is required in this rapidly advancing field.

  4. Tissue Engineering of the Penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish N. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders, cancer, trauma, or other conditions of the genitourinary tract can lead to significant organ damage or loss of function, necessitating eventual reconstruction or replacement of the damaged structures. However, current reconstructive techniques are limited by issues of tissue availability and compatibility. Physicians and scientists have begun to explore tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies for repair and reconstruction of the genitourinary tract. Tissue engineering allows the development of biological substitutes which could potentially restore normal function. Tissue engineering efforts designed to treat or replace most organs are currently being undertaken. Most of these efforts have occurred within the past decade. However, before these engineering techniques can be applied to humans, further studies are needed to ensure the safety and efficacy of these new materials. Recent progress suggests that engineered urologic tissues and cell therapy may soon have clinical applicability.

  5. Challenges in Soft Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Yuksel, Eser; Choo, Joshua; Wettergreen, Matthew; Liebschner, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Soft tissue engineering strategies targeting restoration of volume loss have inherent critical challenges as they relate to the problem of restoration of defects with a high volume to surface ratio. We outline the problems associated with the limitations of translational applications regarding soft tissue engineering strategies as follows: cell survival, mechanical challenges: macroenvironment (scaffold collapse and on-the-shelf availability), compositional considerations: microenvironment, i...

  6. Commercial considerations in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansbridge, Jonathan

    2006-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a field with immense promise. Using the example of an early tissue-engineered skin implant, Dermagraft, factors involved in the successful commercial development of devices of this type are explored. Tissue engineering has to strike a balance between tissue culture, which is a resource-intensive activity, and business considerations that are concerned with minimizing cost and maximizing customer convenience. Bioreactor design takes place in a highly regulated environment, so factors to be incorporated into the concept include not only tissue culture considerations but also matters related to asepsis, scaleup, automation and ease of use by the final customer. Dermagraft is an allogeneic tissue. Stasis preservation, in this case cryopreservation, is essential in allogeneic tissue engineering, allowing sterility testing, inventory control and, in the case of Dermagraft, a cellular stress that may be important for hormesis following implantation. Although the use of allogeneic cells provides advantages in manufacturing under suitable conditions, it raises the spectre of immunological rejection. Such rejection has not been experienced with Dermagraft. Possible reasons for this and the vision of further application of allogeneic tissues are important considerations in future tissue-engineered cellular devices. This review illustrates approaches that indicate some of the criteria that may provide a basis for further developments. Marketing is a further requirement for success, which entails understanding of the mechanism of action of the procedure, and is illustrated for Dermagraft. The success of a tissue-engineered product is dependent on many interacting operations, some discussed here, each of which must be performed simultaneously and well. PMID:17005024

  7. Tissue Engineering of the Penis

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Manish N.; Atala, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorders, cancer, trauma, or other conditions of the genitourinary tract can lead to significant organ damage or loss of function, necessitating eventual reconstruction or replacement of the damaged structures. However, current reconstructive techniques are limited by issues of tissue availability and compatibility. Physicians and scientists have begun to explore tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies for repair and reconstruction of the genitourinary tract. Tissu...

  8. Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    MILICA RADISIC; GORDANA VUNJAK-NOVAKOVIC

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick),compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3) can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of p...

  9. Neovaskularisation und Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen The, Hoang

    2010-01-01

    Präfabrikation von axial neovaskularisierten Hautlappen, die einen weiteren Entwicklungsschritt in der rekonstruktiven Chirurgie darstellen und durch deren Anwendung auf den Bereich des “Tissue Engineerings“ sich vitale, dreidimensionale Strukturen originalgetreu züchten lassen. In experimentellen Studien am Kaninchen wurde die Neovaskularisation bei 156 Bauchhautlappen mit unterschiedlichen Modellvarianten des implantierten Gefäßstiels nach 4, 8, 12, 16 und 20 Tagen der Präfabrikation unters...

  10. Bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Cameron R. M.; Goriainov, Vitali; Gibbs, David; Kanczler, Janos; Tare, Rahul S; Richard O. C. Oreffo

    2015-01-01

    Medical advances have led to a welcome increase in life expectancy. However, accompanying longevity introduces new challenges: increases in age-related diseases and associated reductions in quality of life. The loss of skeletal tissue that can accompany trauma, injury, disease or advancing years can result in significant morbidity and significant socio-economic cost and emphasise the need for new, more reliable skeletal regeneration strategies. To address the unmet need for bone augmentation,...

  11. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age. PMID:23562167

  12. Material for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vetrík, Miroslav; Pařízek, Martin; Policianová, Olivia; Hlídková, Helena; Přádný, Martin; Hrubý, Martin; Lisá, Věra; Bačáková, Lucie

    Bratislava : Young Scientists Council of Polymer Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences, 2016. s. 77. ISBN 978-80-970923-8-2. [Bratislava Young Polymer Scientists workshop /6./ - BYPoS 2016. 14.03.2016-18.03.2016, Ždiar] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : black orlon * bone tissue * tissue engineering Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C)

  13. Engineering a Bilayered Hydrogel to Control ASC Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Natesan, Shanmugasundaram; Zamora, David O.; Suggs, Laura J.; Christy, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural polymers over the years have gained more importance because of their host biocompatibility and ability to interact with cells in vitro and in vivo. An area of research that holds promise in regenerative medicine is the combinatorial use of novel biomaterials and stem cells. A fundamental strategy in the field of tissue engineering is the use of three-dimensional scaffold (e.g., decellularized extracellular matrix, hydrogels, micro/nano particles) for directing cell function. This tech...

  14. The edge engineering of topological Bi(111) bilayer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao; Liu, Hai-Wen; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Fa; Feng, Ji

    2014-01-01

    A topological insulator is a novel quantum state, characterized by symmetry-protected non-trivial edge/surface states. Our first-principle simulations show the significant effects of the chemical decoration on edge states of topological Bi(111) bilayer nanoribbon, which remove the trivial edge state and recover the Dirac linear dispersion of topological edge state. By comparing the edge states with and without chemical decoration, the Bi(111) bilayer nanoribbon offers a simple system for asse...

  15. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers. PMID:26911859

  16. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yufei; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is revealed that, the thermal conductivity of randomly bonded bilayer graphene decreases monotonically with the increase of interlayer bonding density, however, for the regularly bonded bilayer graphene structure the thermal conductivity possesses unexpectedly non-monotonic dependence on the interlayer bonding density. The results suggest that the thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene depends not only on the interlayer bonding density, but also on the detailed topological configuration of the interlayer bonding. The underlying mechanism for this abnormal phenomenon is identified by means of phonon spectral energy density, participation ratio and mode weight factor analysis. The large tunability of thermal conductivity of bilayer graphene through rational interlayer bonding arrangement paves the way to achieve other desired properties for potential nanoelectronics applications involving graphene layers.

  17. Tissue engineering and its implications in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Parimala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a novel and highly exciting field of research. With tissue engineering techniques it may be possible to repair damaged tissues or even create replacement organs. This article reviews the principles underlying key tissue engineering strategies and the typical components used. Examples of tissue engineering include passive approaches, such as dental implants, and inductive approaches, in which specific molecular signals are used to activate cells.

  18. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Zhang; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B.

    2012-01-01

    Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery) and/or the body (transdermal delivery). In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commerc...

  19. Polyelectrolyte Multilayers in Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Larkin, Adam L.; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2011-01-01

    The layer-by-layer assembly of sequentially adsorbed, alternating polyelectrolytes has become increasingly important over the past two decades. The ease and versatility in assembling polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) has resulted in numerous wide ranging applications of these materials. More recently, PEMs are being used in biological applications ranging from biomaterials, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery. The ability to manipulate the chemical, physical, surface...

  20. Photoacoustic microscopy in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Cai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic tomography (PAT is an attractive modality for noninvasive, volumetric imaging of scattering media such as biological tissues. By choosing the ultrasonic detection frequency, PAT enables scalable spatial resolution with an imaging depth of up to ∼7 cm while maintaining a high depth-to-resolution ratio of ∼200 and consistent optical absorption contrasts. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM, the microscopic embodiment of PAT, aims to image at millimeter depth and micrometer-scale resolution. PAM is well-suited for characterizing three-dimensional scaffold-based samples, including scaffolds themselves, cells, and blood vessels, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Here we review our previous work on applications of PAM in tissue engineering and then discuss its future developments.

  1. Tissue engineering the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurrier, Ryan G; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2013-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) results from the loss of a highly specialized organ, the small intestine. SBS and its current treatments are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Production of tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from the patient's own cells could restore normal intestinal function via autologous transplantation. Improved understanding of intestinal stem cells and their niche have been coupled with advances in tissue engineering techniques. Originally described by Vacanti et al of Massachusetts General Hospital, TESI has been produced by in vivo implantation of organoid units. Organoid units are multicellular clusters of epithelium and mesenchyme that may be harvested from native intestine. These clusters are loaded onto a scaffold and implanted into the host omentum. The scaffold provides physical support that permits angiogenesis and vasculogenesis of the developing tissue. After a period of 4 weeks, histologic analyses confirm the similarity of TESI to native intestine. TESI contains a differentiated epithelium, mesenchyme, blood vessels, muscle, and nerve components. To date, similar experiments have proved successful in rat, mouse, and pig models. Additional experiments have shown clinical improvement and rescue of SBS rats after implantation of TESI. In comparison with the group that underwent massive enterectomy alone, rats that had surgical anastomosis of TESI to their shortened intestine showed improvement in postoperative weight gain and serum B12 values. Recently, organoid units have been harvested from human intestinal samples and successfully grown into TESI by using an immunodeficient mouse host. Current TESI production yields approximately 3 times the number of cells initially implanted, but improvements in the scaffold and blood supply are being developed in efforts to increase TESI size. Exciting new techniques in stem cell biology and directed cellular differentiation may generate additional sources of autologous intestinal

  2. Tissue engineering of cartilages using biomatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melrose, J.; Chuang, C.; Whitelock, J.

    2008-01-01

    cartilage engineering approaches and many of these are discussed and their in vitro and in vivo applications covered in this review. Tissue engineering is entering an exciting era; significant advances have been made; however, many technical challenges remain to be solved before this technology becomes......Tissue engineering is an exciting new cross-disciplinary methodology which applies the principles of engineering and structure-function relationships between normal and pathological tissues to develop biological substitute to restore, maintain or improve tissue function. Tissue engineering...

  3. Robustly Engineering Thermal Conductivity of Bilayer Graphene by Interlayer Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoliang Zhang; Yufei Gao; Yuli Chen; Ming Hu

    2016-01-01

    Graphene and its bilayer structure are the two-dimensional crystalline form of carbon, whose extraordinary electron mobility and other unique features hold great promise for nanoscale electronics and photonics. Their realistic applications in emerging nanoelectronics usually call for thermal transport manipulation in a controllable and precise manner. In this paper we systematically studied the effect of interlayer covalent bonding, in particular different interlay bonding arrangement, on the...

  4. 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Dylan Jack; Tan, Yu; Jia, Jia; Yao, Hai; Mei, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims to fabricate functional tissue for applications in regenerative medicine and drug testing. More recently, 3D printing has shown great promise in tissue fabrication with a structural control from micro- to macro-scale by using a layer-by-layer approach. Whether through scaffold-based or scaffold-free approaches, the standard for 3D printed tissue engineering constructs is to provide a biomimetic structural environment that facilitates tissue formation and promotes host ...

  5. Membrane supported scaffold : architectures for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bettahalli, Narasimha Murthy Srivatsa

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering aims at restoring or regenerating a damaged tissue. Often the tissue recreation occurs by combining cells, derived from a patient biopsy, onto a 3D porous matrix, functioning as a scaffold. One of the current limitations of tissue engineering is the inability to provide sufficient nutrient and oxygen supply in developing 3D in-vitro culture. In human body the vasculature is embedded into almost every tissues and organs. They transport blood, and thus nutrients and waste pro...

  6. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Amezcua; Ajay Shirolkar; Carolyn Fraze; David A. Stout

    2016-01-01

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possib...

  7. Lymphatic Tissue Engineering Progress and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Hitchcock, Thomas; Niklason, Laura

    2008-01-01

    In the last 5 years major advances have been made in the field of tissue engineering. However, while engineering of tissues from nearly every major system in the body have been studied and improved, little has been done with the engineering of viable lymphatic tissues. Recent advances in understanding of lymphatic biology have allowed the easy isolation of pure lymphatic cell cultures, increasing, in turn, the ability to study lymphatic biology in greater detail. This has allowed the elucidat...

  8. Engineering vascular development for tissue regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rivron, Nicolas Clemens

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim at restoring a damaged tissue by recreating in vitro or promoting its regeneratin in vovo. The vasculature is central to these therapies for the irrigation of the defective tissue (oxygen, nutrients or circulating regenerative cells) and as an inductive, trophic embedded organ. This thesis describes the in vitro formation of biological vascular networks for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In a first part, we show the ...

  9. Biomimetic strategies for engineering composite tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Robinson, Jennifer; Lu, Helen

    2016-08-01

    The formation of multiple tissue types and their integration into composite tissue units presents a frontier challenge in regenerative engineering. Tissue-tissue synchrony is crucial in providing structural support for internal organs and enabling daily activities. This review highlights the state-of-the-art in composite tissue scaffold design, and explores how biomimicry can be strategically applied to avoid over-engineering the scaffold. Given the complexity of biological tissues, determining the most relevant parameters for recapitulating native structure-function relationships through strategic biomimicry will reduce the burden for clinical translation. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts in composite tissue engineering will enable integrative and functional repair of common soft tissue injuries and lay the foundation for total joint or limb regeneration. PMID:27010653

  10. Engineering Complex Orthopaedic Tissues via Strategic Biomimicry

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Lu, Helen H.

    2014-01-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, whereby overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a tra...

  11. Imaging in cellular and tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hanry

    2013-01-01

    Details on specific imaging modalities for different cellular and tissue engineering applications are scattered throughout articles and chapters in the literature. Gathering this information into a single reference, Imaging in Cellular and Tissue Engineering presents both the fundamentals and state of the art in imaging methods, approaches, and applications in regenerative medicine. The book underscores the broadening scope of imaging applications in cellular and tissue engineering. It covers a wide range of optical and biological applications, including the repair or replacement of whole tiss

  12. Engineered magnetic domain textures in exchange bias bilayer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, Alexander; Hankemeier, Sebastian; Holzinger, Dennis; Müglich, Nicolas David; Staeck, Philipp; Frömter, Robert; Oepen, Hans Peter; Ehresmann, Arno

    2016-07-01

    A magnetic domain texture has been deterministically engineered in a topographically flat exchange-biased (EB) thin film system. The texture consists of long-range periodically arranged unit cells of four individual domains, characterized by individual anisotropies, individual geometry, and with non-collinear remanent magnetizations. The texture has been engineered by a sequence of light-ion bombardment induced magnetic patterning of the EB layer system. The magnetic texture's in-plane spatial magnetization distribution and the corresponding domain walls have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA). The influence of magnetic stray fields emerging from neighboring domain walls and the influence of the different anisotropies of the adjacent domains on the Néel type domain wall core's magnetization rotation sense and widths were investigated. It is shown that the usual energy degeneracy of clockwise and counterclockwise rotating magnetization through the walls is revoked, suppressing Bloch lines along the domain wall. Estimates of the domain wall widths for different domain configurations based on material parameters determined by vibrating sample magnetometry were quantitatively compared to the SEMPA data.

  13. 3-dimensional bioprinting for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bon Kang; Choi, Dong Jin; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Min Sup; Kang, Chang Mo; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3D) printing technologies, referred to as additive manufacturing (AM) or rapid prototyping (RP), have acquired reputation over the past few years for art, architectural modeling, lightweight machines, and tissue engineering applications. Among these applications, tissue engineering field using 3D printing has attracted the attention from many researchers. 3D bioprinting has an advantage in the manufacture of a scaffold for tissue engineering applications, because of rapid-fabrication, high-precision, and customized-production, etc. In this review, we will introduce the principles and the current state of the 3D bioprinting methods. Focusing on some of studies that are being current application for biomedical and tissue engineering fields using printed 3D scaffolds. PMID:27114828

  14. Fibrin for tissue engineering of cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Eyrich, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s a plethora of research approaches towards cartilage engineering for plastic and reconstructive surgery have been undertaken. However, a general standard method for generation of cartilage tissue equivalent is still lacking. The goal of this thesis is based on the project �Bavarian Research Cooperation for Tissue Engineering and Rapid Prototyping� (ForTEPro) for development of individually customized implants for facial and reconstructive surgery. The main o...

  15. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Wolff, Anders; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2016-01-01

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing of the PVA mould was combined with a salt leaching process. In this case, the sacrificial PVA mould, defining a structured network- architecture of micro-channels, was filled with salt crystals to defin...

  16. Mechanostimulation Protocols for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Govoni; Claudio Muscari; Emanuele Giordano; Carlo Guarnieri

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the inability of self-replacement by a damaged myocardium, alternative strategies to heart transplantation have been explored within the last decades and cardiac tissue engineering/regenerative medicine is among the present challenges in biomedical research. Hopefully, several studies witness the constant extension of the toolbox available to engineer a fully functional, contractile, and robust cardiac tissue using different combinations of cells, template bioscaffolds, and biophysic...

  17. Introduction to tissue engineering applications and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Birla, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Covering a progressive medical field, Tissue Engineering describes the innovative process of regenerating human cells to restore or establish normal function in defective organs. As pioneering individuals look ahead to the possibility of generating entire organ systems, students may turn to this textbook for a comprehensive understanding and preparation for the future of regenerative medicine. This book explains chemical stimulations, the bioengineering of specific organs, and treatment plans for chronic diseases. It is a must-read for tissue engineering students and practitioners.

  18. Composite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    Biomaterial and scaffold development underpins the advancement of tissue engineering. Traditional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) are weak and non-osteoconductive. For bone tissue engineering, polymer-based composite scaffolds containing bioceramics such as hydroxyapatite can be produced and used. The bioceramics can be either incorporated in the scaffolds as a dispersed secondary phase or form a thin coating on the po...

  19. Promising material for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vetrík, Miroslav; Pařízek, Martin; Policianová, Olivia; Hlídková, Helena; Přádný, Martin; Lisá, Věra; Bačáková, Lucie; Hrubý, Martin

    Yokohama : IUPAC, 2015. 245 /2P-110/. [International Conference on Advanced Polymers via Macromolecular Engineering /11./ - APME 2015. 18.10.2015-22.10.2015, Yokohama] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) FR-TI4/625 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : Orlon * polyacrylonitrile * tissue engineering Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics (FGU-C)

  20. Decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Chang, David W.; Zhang, Qixu

    2013-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds that represent native extracellular matrix (ECM) properties of musculofascial tissues have great importance in musculofascial tissue engineering. However, detailed characterization of musculofascial tissues’ ECM (particularly, of fascia) from large animals is still lacking. In this study, we developed a decellularization protocol for processing pig composite musculofascial tissues. Decellularized muscle (D-muscle) and decellularized fascia (D-fascia), which are two important c...

  1. Composite Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Guilak, Farshid

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering remains a promising therapeutic strategy for the repair or regeneration of diseased or damaged tissues. Previous approaches have typically focused on combining cells and bioactive molecules (e.g., growth factors, cytokines, and DNA fragments) with a biomaterial scaffold that function as a template to control the geometry of the newly formed tissue, while facilitating the attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of embedded cells. Biomaterial scaffolds also play a cruc...

  2. Cell interactions in bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pirraco, Rogério; Marques, A. P.; Reis, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Bone fractures, where the innate regenerative bone response is compromised, represent between 4 and 8 hundred thousands of the total fracture cases, just in the United States. Bone tissue engineering (TE) brought the notion that, in cases such as those, it was preferable to boost the healing process of bone tissue instead of just adding artificial parts that could never properly replace the native tissue. However, despite the hype, bone TE so far could not live up to its promises and...

  3. Cell interactions in bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Pirraco, R. P.; Marques, A. P.; Reis, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Bone fractures, where the innate regenerative bone response is compromised, represent between 4 and 8 hundred thousands of the total fracture cases, just in the United States. Bone tissue engineering (TE) brought the notion that, in cases such as those, it was preferable to boost the healing process of bone tissue instead of just adding artificial parts that could never properly replace the native tissue. However, despite the hype, bone TE so far could not live up to its promises and...

  4. Electrospun gelatin biopapers as substrate for in vitro bilayer models of blood-brain barrier tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischel, Lauren L; Coneski, Peter N; Lundin, Jeffrey G; Wu, Peter K; Giller, Carl B; Wynne, James; Ringeisen, Brad R; Pirlo, Russell K

    2016-04-01

    Gaining a greater understanding of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for improvement in drug delivery, understanding pathologies that compromise the BBB, and developing therapies to protect the BBB. In vitro human tissue models are valuable tools for studying these issues. The standard in vitro BBB models use commercially available cell culture inserts to generate bilayer co-cultures of astrocytes and endothelial cells (EC). Electrospinning can be used to produce customized cell culture substrates with optimized material composition and mechanical properties with advantages over off-the-shelf materials. Electrospun gelatin is an ideal cell culture substrate because it is a natural polymer that can aid cell attachment and be modified and degraded by cells. Here, we have developed a method to produce cell culture inserts with electrospun gelatin "biopaper" membranes. The electrospun fiber diameter and cross-linking method were optimized for the growth of primary human endothelial cell and primary human astrocyte bilayer co-cultures to model human BBB tissue. BBB co-cultures on biopaper were characterized via cell morphology, trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER), and permeability to FITC-labeled dextran and compared to BBB co-cultures on standard cell culture inserts. Over longer culture periods (up to 21 days), cultures on the optimized electrospun gelatin biopapers were found to have improved TEER, decreased permeability, and permitted a smaller separation between co-cultured cells when compared to standard PET inserts. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 901-909, 2016. PMID:26650896

  5. Engineering skeletal muscle tissue in bioreactor systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Yang; Li Dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective To give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) related to skeletal muscle and kinds of bioreactor environment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection A total of 106 articles were selected from several hundred original articles or reviews.The content of selected articles is in accordance with our purpose and the authors are authorized scientists in the study of engineered muscle tissue in bioreactor.Results Skeletal muscle TE is a promising interdisciplinary field which aims at the reconstruction of skeletal muscle loss.Although numerous studies have indicated that engineering skeletal muscle tissue may be of great importance in medicine in the near future,this technique still represents a limited degree of success.Since tissue-engineered muscle constructs require an adequate connection to the vascular system for efficient transport of oxygen,carbon dioxide,nutrients and waste products.Moreover,functional and clinically applicable muscle constructs depend on adequate neuromuscular junctions with neural calls.Third,in order to engineer muscle tissue successfully,it may be beneficial to mimic the in vivo environment of muscle through association with adequate stimuli from bioreactors.Conclusion Vascular system and bioreactors are necessary for development and maintenance of engineered muscle in order to provide circulation within the construct.

  6. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jeong Min [Department of Preventive and Social Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Hwang, Yu-Shik [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Mantalaris, Anathathios, E-mail: yshwang@khu.ac.k [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  7. Stem cells in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tissue engineering has been one of the most promising areas of research, providing a potential clinical application to cure bone defects. Recently, various stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs), bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs), adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) have received extensive attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their distinct biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineages. The application of these stem cells to bone tissue engineering requires inducing in vitro differentiation of these cells into bone forming cells, osteoblasts. For this purpose, efficient in vitro differentiation towards osteogenic lineage requires the development of well-defined and proficient protocols. This would reduce the likelihood of spontaneous differentiation into divergent lineages and increase the available cell source for application to bone tissue engineering therapies. This review provides a critical examination of the various experimental strategies that could be used to direct the differentiation of ESC, BM-MSC, UCB-MSC, ADSC, MDSC and DPSC towards osteogenic lineages and their potential applications in tissue engineering, particularly in the regeneration of bone. (topical review)

  8. Engineering complex orthopaedic tissues via strategic biomimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Dovina; Mosher, Christopher Z; Boushell, Margaret K; Lu, Helen H

    2015-03-01

    The primary current challenge in regenerative engineering resides in the simultaneous formation of more than one type of tissue, as well as their functional assembly into complex tissues or organ systems. Tissue-tissue synchrony is especially important in the musculoskeletal system, wherein overall organ function is enabled by the seamless integration of bone with soft tissues such as ligament, tendon, or cartilage, as well as the integration of muscle with tendon. Therefore, in lieu of a traditional single-tissue system (e.g., bone, ligament), composite tissue scaffold designs for the regeneration of functional connective tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone) are being actively investigated. Closely related is the effort to re-establish tissue-tissue interfaces, which is essential for joining these tissue building blocks and facilitating host integration. Much of the research at the forefront of the field has centered on bioinspired stratified or gradient scaffold designs which aim to recapitulate the structural and compositional inhomogeneity inherent across distinct tissue regions. As such, given the complexity of these musculoskeletal tissue units, the key question is how to identify the most relevant parameters for recapitulating the native structure-function relationships in the scaffold design. Therefore, the focus of this review, in addition to presenting the state-of-the-art in complex scaffold design, is to explore how strategic biomimicry can be applied in engineering tissue connectivity. The objective of strategic biomimicry is to avoid over-engineering by establishing what needs to be learned from nature and defining the essential matrix characteristics that must be reproduced in scaffold design. Application of this engineering strategy for the regeneration of the most common musculoskeletal tissue units (e.g., bone-ligament-bone, muscle-tendon-bone, cartilage-bone) will be discussed in this review. It is anticipated that these exciting efforts will

  9. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone

  10. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V. P., E-mail: tervp@ngs.ru; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  11. Nanostructured Biomaterials for Tissue Engineered Bone Tissue Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bressan Eriberto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering strategies are emerging as attractive alternatives to autografts and allografts in bone tissue reconstruction, in particular thanks to their association with nanotechnologies. Nanostructured biomaterials, indeed, mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM of the natural bone, creating an artificial microenvironment that promotes cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. At the same time, the possibility to easily isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from different adult tissues together with their multi-lineage differentiation potential makes them an interesting tool in the field of bone tissue engineering. This review gives an overview of the most promising nanostructured biomaterials, used alone or in combination with MSCs, which could in future be employed as bone substitutes. Recent works indicate that composite scaffolds made of ceramics/metals or ceramics/polymers are undoubtedly more effective than the single counterparts in terms of osteoconductivity, osteogenicity and osteoinductivity. A better understanding of the interactions between MSCs and nanostructured biomaterials will surely contribute to the progress of bone tissue engineering.

  12. Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovic, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells are the building blocks for all other cells in an organism. The human body has about 200 different types of cells and any of those cells can be produced by a stem cell. This fact emphasizes the significance of stem cells in transplantational medicine, regenerative therapy and bioengineering. Whether embryonic or adult, these cells can be used for the successful treatment of a wide range of diseases that were not treatable before, such as osteogenesis imperfecta in children, different forms of leukemias, acute myocardial infarction, some neural damages and diseases, etc. Bioengineering, e.g. successful manipulation of these cells with multipotential capacity of differentiation toward appropriate patterns and precise quantity, are the prerequisites for successful outcome and treatment. By combining in vivo and in vitro techniques, it is now possible to manage the wide spectrum of tissue damages and organ diseases. Although the stem-cell therapy is not a response to all the questions, it provides more...

  13. Composite tissue engineering on polycaprolactone nanofiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Courtney R; Han, Li; Andrady, Anthony; Caballero, Montserrat; Jack, Megan C; Collins, James B; Saba, Salim C; Loboa, Elizabeth G; Cairns, Bruce A; van Aalst, John A

    2009-05-01

    Tissue engineering has largely focused on single tissue-type reconstruction (such as bone); however, the basic unit of healing in any clinically relevant scenario is a compound tissue type (such as bone, periosteum, and skin). Nanofibers are submicron fibrils that mimic the extracellular matrix, promoting cellular adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Stem cell manipulation on nanofiber scaffolds holds significant promise for future tissue engineering. This work represents our initial efforts to create the building blocks for composite tissue reflecting the basic unit of healing. Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers were electrospun using standard techniques. Human foreskin fibroblasts, murine keratinocytes, and periosteal cells (4-mm punch biopsy) harvested from children undergoing palate repair were grown in appropriate media on PCL nanofibers. Human fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells were osteoinduced on PCL nanofibers. Cell growth was assessed with fluorescent viability staining; cocultured cells were differentiated using antibodies to fibroblast- and keratinocyte-specific surface markers. Osteoinduction was assessed with Alizarin red S. PCL nanofiber scaffolds supported robust growth of fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and periosteal cells. Cocultured periosteal cells (with fibroblasts) and keratinocytes showed improved longevity of the keratinocytes, though growth of these cell types was randomly distributed throughout the scaffold. Robust osteoinduction was noted on PCL nanofibers. Composite tissue engineering using PCL nanofiber scaffolds is possible, though the major obstacles to the trilaminar construct are maintaining an appropriate interface between the tissue types and neovascularization of the composite structure. PMID:19387150

  14. Evaluation of the tissue reaction to a new bilayered collagen matrix in vivo and its translation to the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates a new collagen matrix that is designed with a bilayered structure in order to promote guided tissue regeneration and integration within the host tissue. This material induced a mild tissue reaction when assessed in a murine model and was well integrated within the host tissue, persisting in the implantation bed throughout the in vivo study. A more porous layer was rapidly infiltrated by host mesenchymal cells, while a layer designed to be a barrier allowed cell attachment and host tissue integration, but at the same time remained impermeable to invading cells for the first 30 days of the study. The tissue reaction was favorable, and unlike a typical foreign body response, did not include the presence of multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, or granulation tissue. In the context of translation, we show preliminary results from the clinical use of this biomaterial applied to soft tissue regeneration in the treatment of gingival tissue recession and exposed roots of human teeth. Such a condition would greatly benefit from guided tissue regeneration strategies. Our findings demonstrate that this material successfully promoted the ingrowth of gingival tissue and reversed gingival tissue recession. Of particular importance is the fact that the histological evidence from these human studies corroborates our findings in the murine model, with the barrier layer preventing unspecific tissue ingrowth, as the scaffold becomes infiltrated by mesenchymal cells from adjacent tissue into the porous layer. Also in the clinical situation no multinucleated giant cells, no granulation tissue and no evidence of a marked inflammatory response were observed. In conclusion, this bilayered matrix elicits a favorable tissue reaction, demonstrates potential as a barrier for preferential tissue ingrowth, and achieves a desirable therapeutic result when applied in humans for soft tissue regeneration.

  15. Evaluation of the tissue reaction to a new bilayered collagen matrix in vivo and its translation to the clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Barbeck, Mike; Kirkpatrick, C James [REPAIR-Lab, Institute of Pathology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Schlee, Markus [Bayreuther Strasse 39, D-91301, Forchheim (Germany); Webber, Matthew J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Willershausen, Ines [Institute for Dental Material Sciences and Technology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany); Balic, Ela; Goerlach, Christoph [Geistlich Pharma AG, Wolhusen (Switzerland); Stupp, Samuel I [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry, and Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Sader, Robert A, E-mail: ghanaati@uni-mainz.de [Clinic for Maxillofacial and Plastic Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Am Main (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    This study evaluates a new collagen matrix that is designed with a bilayered structure in order to promote guided tissue regeneration and integration within the host tissue. This material induced a mild tissue reaction when assessed in a murine model and was well integrated within the host tissue, persisting in the implantation bed throughout the in vivo study. A more porous layer was rapidly infiltrated by host mesenchymal cells, while a layer designed to be a barrier allowed cell attachment and host tissue integration, but at the same time remained impermeable to invading cells for the first 30 days of the study. The tissue reaction was favorable, and unlike a typical foreign body response, did not include the presence of multinucleated giant cells, lymphocytes, or granulation tissue. In the context of translation, we show preliminary results from the clinical use of this biomaterial applied to soft tissue regeneration in the treatment of gingival tissue recession and exposed roots of human teeth. Such a condition would greatly benefit from guided tissue regeneration strategies. Our findings demonstrate that this material successfully promoted the ingrowth of gingival tissue and reversed gingival tissue recession. Of particular importance is the fact that the histological evidence from these human studies corroborates our findings in the murine model, with the barrier layer preventing unspecific tissue ingrowth, as the scaffold becomes infiltrated by mesenchymal cells from adjacent tissue into the porous layer. Also in the clinical situation no multinucleated giant cells, no granulation tissue and no evidence of a marked inflammatory response were observed. In conclusion, this bilayered matrix elicits a favorable tissue reaction, demonstrates potential as a barrier for preferential tissue ingrowth, and achieves a desirable therapeutic result when applied in humans for soft tissue regeneration.

  16. Airway tissue engineering for congenital laryngotracheal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Elizabeth; Lesage, Flore; Butler, Colin R; Hynds, Robert E; Hewitt, Richard; Janes, Sam M; Deprest, Jan A; Coppi, Paolo De

    2016-06-01

    Regenerative medicine offers hope of a sustainable solution for severe airway disease by the creation of functional, immunocompatible organ replacements. When considering fetuses and newborns, there is a specific spectrum of airway pathologies that could benefit from cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. While hypoplastic lungs associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) could benefit from cellular based treatments aimed at ameliorating lung function, patients with upper airway obstruction could take advantage from a de novo tissue engineering approach. Moreover, the international acceptance of the EXIT procedure as a means of securing the precarious neonatal airway, together with the advent of fetal surgery as a method of heading off postnatal co-morbidities, offers the revolutionary possibility of extending the clinical indication for tissue-engineered airway transplantation to infants affected by diverse severe congenital laryngotracheal malformations. This article outlines the necessary basic components for regenerative medicine solutions in this potential clinical niche. PMID:27301606

  17. Bone tissue engineering using 3D printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Bose

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of additive manufacturing technologies in the mid 1980s, many applications benefited from the faster processing of products without the need for specific tooling or dies. However, the application of such techniques in the area of biomedical devices has been slow due to the stringent performance criteria and concerns related to reproducibility and part quality, when new technologies are in their infancy. However, the use of additive manufacturing technologies in bone tissue engineering has been growing in recent years. Among the different technology options, three dimensional printing (3DP is becoming popular due to the ability to directly print porous scaffolds with designed shape, controlled chemistry and interconnected porosity. Some of these inorganic scaffolds are biodegradable and have proven ideal for bone tissue engineering, sometimes even with site specific growth factor/drug delivery abilities. This review article focuses on recent advances in 3D printed bone tissue engineering scaffolds along with current challenges and future directions.

  18. Composite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial and scaffold development underpins the advancement of tissue engineering. Traditional scaffolds based on biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid and poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid are weak and non-osteoconductive. For bone tissue engineering, polymer-based composite scaffolds containing bioceramics such as hydroxyapatite can be produced and used. The bioceramics can be either incorporated in the scaffolds as a dispersed secondary phase or form a thin coating on the pore surface of polymer scaffolds. This bioceramic phase renders the scaffolds bioactive and also strengthens the scaffolds. There are a number of methods that can be used to produce bioceramic-polymer composite scaffolds. This paper gives an overview of our efforts in developing composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Tissue engineering: current strategies and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-04-01

    Novel therapies resulting from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may offer new hope for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical issues. Currently, patients with diseased and injured organs are often treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and as the number of new cases of organ failure increases. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that can restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. In addition, the stem cell field is a rapidly advancing part of regenerative medicine, and new discoveries in this field create new options for this type of therapy. For example, new types of stem cells, such as amniotic fluid and placental stem cells that can circumvent the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cells, have been discovered. The process of therapeutic cloning and the creation of induced pluripotent cells provide still other potential sources of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering applications. Although stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors that make use of autologous, adult cells have already entered the clinical setting, indicating that regenerative medicine holds much promise for the future. PMID:22111050

  20. Drug releasing systems in cardiovascular tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Chello, Massimo; Trombetta, Marcella; Rainer, Alberto; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Heart disease and atherosclerosis are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of suitable autologous grafts has produced a need for artificial grafts; however, current artificial grafts carry significant limitations, including thrombosis, infection, limited durability and the inability to grow. Tissue engineering of blood vessels, cardiovascular structures and whole organs is a promising approach for creating replacement tissues to repair congenital defects ...

  1. Injectable Biomaterials for Adipose Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D. Adam; Christman, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue engineering has recently gained significant attention from materials scientists as a result of the exponential growth of soft tissue filler procedures being performed within the clinic. While several injectable materials are currently being marketed for filling subcutaneous voids, they often face limited longevity due to rapid resorption. Their inability to encourage natural adipose formation or ingrowth necessitates repeated injections for a prolonged effect, and thus classifi...

  2. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Joseph M.; Welter, Jean F.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment...

  3. Tissue Engineering: Current Strategies and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Jennifer L.; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2011-01-01

    Novel therapies resulting from regenerative medicine and tissue engineering technology may offer new hope for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical issues. Currently, patients with diseased and injured organs are often treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and as the number of new cases of organ failure increases. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue eng...

  4. Tissue engineering and regeneration of lymphatic structures

    OpenAIRE

    Weitman, Evan; Cuzzone, Daniel; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering is the process by which biological structures are recreated using a combination of molecular signals, cellular components and scaffolds. Although the perceived potential of this approach to reconstruct damaged or missing tissues is seemingly limitless, application of these ideas in vivo has been more difficult than expected. However, despite these obstacles, important advancements have been reported for a number of organ systems, including recent reports on the lymphatic sy...

  5. Nanofibers and their applications in tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Vasita, Rajesh; Katti, Dhirendra S

    2006-01-01

    Developing scaffolds that mimic the architecture of tissue at the nanoscale is one of the major challenges in the field of tissue engineering. The development of nanofibers has greatly enhanced the scope for fabricating scaffolds that can potentially meet this challenge. Currently, there are three techniques available for the synthesis of nanofibers: electrospinning, self-assembly, and phase separation. Of these techniques, electrospinning is the most widely studied technique and has also dem...

  6. Tissue Engineering Strategies for the Regeneration of Orthopaedic Interfaces: Interface Tissue Engineering Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Helen H.; Subramony, Siddarth D.; Boushell, Margaret K.; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    A major focus in the field of orthopaedic tissue engineering is the development of tissue engineered bone and soft tissue grafts with biomimetic functionality to allow for their translation to the clinical setting. One of the most significant challenges of this endeavor is promoting the biological fixation of these grafts with each other as well as the implant site. Such fixation requires strategic biomimicry to be incorporated into the scaffold design in order to re-establish the critical st...

  7. Peptide Amphiphiles in Corneal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miotto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interest in effort towards creating alternative therapies have led to exciting breakthroughs in the attempt to bio-fabricate and engineer live tissues. This has been particularly evident in the development of new approaches applied to reconstruct corneal tissue. The need for tissue-engineered corneas is largely a response to the shortage of donor tissue and the lack of suitable alternative biological scaffolds preventing the treatment of millions of blind people worldwide. This review is focused on recent developments in corneal tissue engineering, specifically on the use of self-assembling peptide amphiphiles for this purpose. Recently, peptide amphiphiles have generated great interest as therapeutic molecules, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we introduce this rapidly developing field, and examine innovative applications of peptide amphiphiles to create natural bio-prosthetic corneal tissue in vitro. The advantages of peptide amphiphiles over other biomaterials, namely their wide range of functions and applications, versatility, and transferability are also discussed to better understand how these fascinating molecules can help solve current challenges in corneal regeneration.

  8. Articular cartilage: from formation to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero-Espinosa, Sandra; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Foster, E Johan; Weder, Christoph

    2016-05-26

    Hyaline cartilage is the nonlinear, inhomogeneous, anisotropic, poro-viscoelastic connective tissue that serves as friction-reducing and load-bearing cushion in synovial joints and is vital for mammalian skeletal movements. Due to its avascular nature, low cell density, low proliferative activity and the tendency of chondrocytes to de-differentiate, cartilage cannot regenerate after injury, wear and tear, or degeneration through common diseases such as osteoarthritis. Therefore severe damage usually requires surgical intervention. Current clinical strategies to generate new tissue include debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte transplantation, and mosaicplasty. While articular cartilage was predicted to be one of the first tissues to be successfully engineered, it proved to be challenging to reproduce the complex architecture and biomechanical properties of the native tissue. Despite significant research efforts, only a limited number of studies have evolved up to the clinical trial stage. This review article summarizes the current state of cartilage tissue engineering in the context of relevant biological aspects, such as the formation and growth of hyaline cartilage, its composition, structure and biomechanical properties. Special attention is given to materials development, scaffold designs, fabrication methods, and template-cell interactions, which are of great importance to the structure and functionality of the engineered tissue. PMID:26923076

  9. Translational challenges in bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    The research performed for this thesis focused at strategies to improve bone graft substitutes for future clinical applicability. We started by investigating the value of cell based tissue engineered constructs. First we showed that at the ectopic location, bone formation was only present when BLI s

  10. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan, E-mail: Yuanyuan_liu@shu.edu.cn; Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  11. New trends in spinal cord tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubinová, Šárka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2015), s. 129-145. ISSN 1479-6708 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1309 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : biomaterial * cell therapy * regenerative medicine * spinal cord injury * stem cells scaffold * tissue engineering Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  12. Biodegradable synthetic polymers for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunatillake P. A.

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews biodegradable synthetic polymers focusing on their potential in tissue engineering applications. The major classes of polymers are briefly discussed with regard to synthesis, properties and biodegradability, and known degradation modes and products are indicated based on studies reported in the literature. A vast majority of biodegradable polymers studied belongs to the polyester family, which includes polyglycolides and polylactides. Some disadvantages of these polymers in tissue engineering applications are their poor biocompatibility, release of acidic degradation products, poor processability and loss of mechanical properties very early during degradation. Other degradable polymers such as polyorthoesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, and polyurethanes are also discussed and their advantages and disadvantages summarised. With advancements in tissue engineering it has become necessary to develop polymers that meet more demanding requirements. Recent work has focused on developing injectable polymer compositions based on poly (propylene fumarate and poly (anhydrides to meet these requirements in orthopaedic tissue engineering. Polyurethanes have received recent attention for development of degradable polymers because of their great potential in tailoring polymer structure to achieve mechanical properties and biodegradability to suit a variety of applications.

  13. Principles of Tissue Engineering for Food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, M.; Weele, van der Cor

    2014-01-01

    The technology required for tissue-engineering food is the same as for medical applications, and in fact is derived from it. There are major differences in the implementation of those technologies, primarily related to the enormous scale required for food production and the different economical fram

  14. Glycogen-based materials for tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rabyk, Mariia; Hrubý, Martin; Vetrík, Miroslav; Kučka, Jan; Pospíšilová, Aneta; Štěpánek, Petr

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2013. P8. ISBN 978-80-85009-76-7. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /5./. 12.07.2013-13.07.2013, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * tissue engineering Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Injectable biomaterials for adipose tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose tissue engineering has recently gained significant attention from materials scientists as a result of the exponential growth of soft tissue filler procedures being performed within the clinic. While several injectable materials are currently being marketed for filling subcutaneous voids, they often face limited longevity due to rapid resorption. Their inability to encourage natural adipose formation or ingrowth necessitates repeated injections for a prolonged effect and thus classifies them as temporary fillers. As a result, a significant need for injectable materials that not only act as fillers but also promote in vivo adipogenesis is beginning to be realized. This paper will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of commercially available soft tissue fillers. It will then summarize the current state of research using injectable synthetic materials, biopolymers and extracellular matrix-derived materials for adipose tissue engineering. Furthermore, the successful attributes observed across each of these materials will be outlined along with a discussion of the current difficulties and future directions for adipose tissue engineering. (paper)

  16. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. PMID:26711880

  17. Tissue Engineering by Intrinsic Vascularization in an In Vivo Tissue Engineering Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Weiqing; Marre, Diego; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Morrison, Wayne A; Lim, Shiang Y

    2016-01-01

    In reconstructive surgery, there is a clinical need for an alternative to the current methods of autologous reconstruction which are complex, costly and trade one defect for another. Tissue engineering holds the promise to address this increasing demand. However, most tissue engineering strategies fail to generate stable and functional tissue substitutes because of poor vascularization. This paper focuses on an in vivo tissue engineering chamber model of intrinsic vascularization where a perfused artery and a vein either as an arteriovenous loop or a flow-through pedicle configuration is directed inside a protected hollow chamber. In this chamber-based system angiogenic sprouting occurs from the arteriovenous vessels and this system attracts ischemic and inflammatory driven endogenous cell migration which gradually fills the chamber space with fibro-vascular tissue. Exogenous cell/matrix implantation at the time of chamber construction enhances cell survival and determines specificity of the engineered tissues which develop. Our studies have shown that this chamber model can successfully generate different tissues such as fat, cardiac muscle, liver and others. However, modifications and refinements are required to ensure target tissue formation is consistent and reproducible. This article describes a standardized protocol for the fabrication of two different vascularized tissue engineering chamber models in vivo. PMID:27286267

  18. A study on DPL model of heat transfer in bi-layer tissues during MFH treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, P; Rai, K N

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer model subjected to Fourier and non-Fourier boundary conditions for bi-layer tissues has been solved using finite element Legendre wavelet Galerkin method (FELWGM) during magnetic fluid hyperthermia. FELWGM localizes small scale variation of solution and fast switching of functional bases. It has been observed that moderate hyperthermia temperature range (41-46°C) can be better achieved in spherical symmetric coordinate system and treatment method will be independent of the Fourier and non-Fourier boundary conditions used. The effect of phase-lag times has been observed only in tumor region. FCC FePt magnetic nano-particle produces more effective treatment with respect to other magnetic nano-particles. The effect of variability of magnetic heat source parameters (magnetic induction, frequency, diameter of magnetic nano-particles, volume fractional of magnetic nano-particles and ligand layer thickness) has been investigated. The physical property of these parameters has been described in detail during magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatment and also discussed the clinical application of MFH in Oncology. PMID:27289539

  19. Giant electrocaloric effect in PZT bilayer thin films by utilizing the electric field engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiandong; Li, Weili; Cao, Wenping; Hou, Yafei; Yu, Yang; Fei, Weidong

    2016-04-01

    The enhancement of the electrocaloric effect (ECE) was achieved by the amplifying effect of applied electric field through devising the thin films' structure. The PbZr0.95Ti0.05O3/PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 bilayer structured thin films were fabricated on a Pt(111)/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate using sol-gel method. The ΔS = 20.5 J K-1 kg-1 and ΔT = 24.8 K for bilayer thin films is achieved around 125 °C much below Tc, which is caused by the amplifying electric field induced phase transition of OAFE/RFE in PZr0.95Ti0.05O3 layer. It is also worth mentioning that the films exhibit outstanding ECE at room temperature; ΔS = 11.9 J K-1 kg-1 and ΔT = 10.7 K are observed, which are attributed to the effect of amplifying electric field in PbZr0.95Ti0.05O3 layer and RFE/TFE at morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) in PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 layer. This result indicates that to amplify the local electric field engineering and to maximize the number of coexisting phases in heterostructures or multilayer thin films may be an effective way for cooling applications.

  20. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  1. The Role of Bioreactors in Tissue Engineering for Musculoskeletal Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Oragui, Emeka; Nannaparaju, Madhusudhan; Khan, Wasim S.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering involves using the principles of biology, chemistry and engineering to design a ‘neotissue’ that augments a malfunctioning in vivo tissue. The main requirements for functional engineered tissue include reparative cellular components that proliferate on a biocompatible scaffold grown within a bioreactor that provides specific biochemical and physical signals to regulate cell differentiation and tissue assembly. We discuss the role of bioreactors in tissue engineering and eva...

  2. 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrycky, Christian; Wang, Zongjie; Kim, Keekyoung; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies. PMID:26724184

  3. Multimodal evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Joseph M; Welter, Jean F

    2013-02-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has promise as a biological solution and a disease modifying treatment for arthritis. Although cartilage can be generated by TE, substantial inter- and intra-donor variability makes it impossible to guarantee optimal, reproducible results. TE cartilage must be able to perform the functions of native tissue, thus mechanical and biological properties approaching those of native cartilage are likely a pre-requisite for successful implantation. A quality-control assessment of these properties should be part of the implantation release criteria for TE cartilage. Release criteria should certify that selected tissue properties have reached certain target ranges, and should be predictive of the likelihood of success of an implant in vivo. Unfortunately, it is not currently known which properties are needed to establish release criteria, nor how close one has to be to the properties of native cartilage to achieve success. Achieving properties approaching those of native cartilage requires a clear understanding of the target properties and reproducible assessment methodology. Here, we review several main aspects of quality control as it applies to TE cartilage. This includes a look at known mechanical and biological properties of native cartilage, which should be the target in engineered tissues. We also present an overview of the state of the art of tissue assessment, focusing on native articular and TE cartilage. Finally, we review the arguments for developing and validating non-destructive testing methods for assessing TE products. PMID:23606823

  4. Cardiac tissue engineering in magnetically actuated scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tissue engineering offers new possibilities for the functional and structural restoration of damaged or lost heart tissue by applying cardiac patches created in vitro. Engineering such functional cardiac patches is a complex mission, involving material design on the nano- and microscale as well as the application of biological cues and stimulation patterns to promote cell survival and organization into a functional cardiac tissue. Herein, we present a novel strategy for creating a functional cardiac patch by combining the use of a macroporous alginate scaffold impregnated with magnetically responsive nanoparticles (MNPs) and the application of external magnetic stimulation. Neonatal rat cardiac cells seeded within the magnetically responsive scaffolds and stimulated by an alternating magnetic field of 5 Hz developed into matured myocardial tissue characterized by anisotropically organized striated cardiac fibers, which preserved its features for longer times than non-stimulated constructs. A greater activation of AKT phosphorylation in cardiac cell constructs after applying a short-term (20 min) external magnetic field indicated the efficacy of magnetic stimulation to actuate at a distance and provided a possible mechanism for its action. Our results point to a synergistic effect of magnetic field stimulation together with nanoparticulate features of the scaffold surface as providing the regenerating environment for cardiac cells driving their organization into functionally mature tissue. (paper)

  5. Application of Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells have become an important source of seed cells for tissue engineering because they are relatively easy to expand in vitro and can be induced to differentiate into various cell types in vitro or in vivo. In the current stage, most stem cell researches focus on in vitro studies, including in vitro induction and phenotype characterization. Our center has made a great deal of effort in the in vivo study by using stem cells as seed cells for tissue construction. We have used bone marrow stem cells (BMS...

  6. Strain-Engineered Low-Density InAs Bilayer Quantum Dots for Single Photon Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhan-Guo; LIU Guo-Jun; LI Lin; FENG Ming; LI Mei; LU Peng; ZOU Yong-Gang; LI Lian-He; GAO Xin

    2010-01-01

    @@ We investigate the growth of strain-engineered low-density InAs bilayer quantum dots(BQDs)on GaAs bymolecular beam epitaxy.Owing to increasing dot size and In composition of the upper QDs,low-density BQDs in a GaAs matrix with an emission wavelength up to 1.4 μm at room temperature are achieved.Such a wavelength is larger than that of conventional QDs in a GaAs matrix(generally of about 1.3 μm).The optical properties of the BQDs are sensitive to annealing temperature used after spacer layer growth.Significant decrease of integrated PL intensity is observed as the annealing temperature increases.At IO K,single photon emission from the BQDs with wavelength around 1.3μm is observed.

  7. Strain-Engineered Low-Density InAs Bilayer Quantum Dots for Single Photon Emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the growth of strain-engineered low-density InAs bilayer quantum dots (BQDs) on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. Owing to increasing dot size and In composition of the upper QDs, low-density BQDs in a GaAs matrix with an emission wavelength up to 1.4 μm at room temperature are achieved. Such a wavelength is larger than that of conventional QDs in a GaAs matrix (generally of about 1.3 μm). The optical properties of the BQDs are sensitive to annealing temperature used after spacer layer growth. Significant decrease of integrated PL intensity is observed as the annealing temperature increases. At 10K, single photon emission from the BQDs with wavelength around 1.3 μm is observed. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  8. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-03-09

    Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue.We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of 'tumor engineering', that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. In 1993, Vacanti and Langer cast a spotlight on the growing gap between patients in need of organ transplants and the amount of available donor organs; they reaffirmed that tissue engineering could eventually address this problem by 'applying principles of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes. Mortality figures and direct health care costs for cancer patients rival those of patients who experience organ failure. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (Source: American Cancer Society) and it is estimated that direct medical costs for cancer patients approach $100B yearly in the United States alone (Source: National Cancer Institute). In addition, any promising therapy that emerges from the laboratory costs roughly $1.7B to take from bench to bedside. Whereas we have indeed waged war on

  9. Tissue engineering and regeneration using biodegradable scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Zhang, Y

    2015-12-01

    A number of people across the world suffer from various diseases or genetic defects and many of these patients die because of the lack of the availability of ideal tissue substitute and/or treatment. An important aspect of the disease is its association with the loss of tissue function. Many end-stage diseases and/or complete organ failure often require total or partial organ transplantation to restore functionality. However, such transplantation surgeries are not always successful because of the organ/ tissue rejection and also the scarcity of donors. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering aim to improve or repair the function of a dysfunctional tissue or organ. In spite of the many advances in tissue engineering methods, the field of regenerative medicine still awaits acceptable designs of bioscaffolds that are clinically tenable. Design of scaffolds and the nature of biomaterial used to make the scaffolds dictate cell behavior and function. Several approaches are currently being tried to optimize the design and improve the quality of the biomaterials. Innervation, vascularization and proper cell differentiation that are influenced by the biomaterials, are few challenges that need to be optimized along with the choice of stem cells that can be employed. Extracellular matrix scaffolds have proven to be a better choice for cartilage and bone repair while the fibrin, polyglycolate and polylactate etc are still being developed. Future research and technological innovations are still needed for a better choice of biomaterials that can support the tissue regeneration without causing any immune or inflammatory response from the host and which last for longer periods. PMID:25634586

  10. Transport limits in defect-engineered LaAlO3/SrTiO3 bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Gunkel, F.; Wicklein, S.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Meuffels, P.; Brinks, P; Huijben, M.; Waser, R.; Dittmann, R.

    2014-01-01

    The electrical properties of the metallic interface in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) bilayers are investigated with focus on the role of cationic defects in thin film STO. Systematic growth-control of the STO thin film cation stoichiometry (defect-engineering) yields a relation between cationic defects in the STO layer and electronic properties of the bilayer-interface. Hall measurements reveal a stoichiometry-effect primarily on the electron mobility. The results indicate an enhancement of scatter...

  11. Electrospun Nanofibrous Materials for Neural Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Shuan Lee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomaterials processed by the electrospinning technique has gained considerable interest for neural tissue engineering applications. The tissue engineering strategy is to facilitate the regrowth of nerves by combining an appropriate cell type with the electrospun scaffold. Electrospinning can generate fibrous meshes having fiber diameter dimensions at the nanoscale and these fibers can be nonwoven or oriented to facilitate neurite extension via contact guidance. This article reviews studies evaluating the effect of the scaffold’s architectural features such as fiber diameter and orientation on neural cell function and neurite extension. Electrospun meshes made of natural polymers, proteins and compositions having electrical activity in order to enhance neural cell function are also discussed.

  12. Tissue engineering: an option for esophageal replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zani, Augusto; Pierro, Agostino; Elvassore, Nicola; De Coppi, Paolo

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal replacement is required in several pediatric surgical conditions, like long-gap esophageal atresia. Although several techniques have been described to bridge the gap, all of them could be followed by postoperative complications. Esophageal tissue engineering could represent a valid alternative thanks to the recent advances in biomaterial science and cellular biology. Numerous attempts to shape a new esophagus in vitro have been described in the last decade. Herein, we review the main studies on the experimental use of nonabsorbable and absorbable materials as well as the development of cellularized patches. Furthermore, we describe the future perspectives of esophageal tissue engineering characterized by the use of stem cells seeded on new biopolymers. This opens to the construction of a functional allograft that could allow an anatomical replacement that grows with the children and does not severely impair their anatomy. PMID:19103424

  13. Nanofiber Scaffold Gradients for Interfacial Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalingam, Murugan; Young, Marian F.; Thomas, Vinoy; Sun, Limin; Chow, Laurence C.; Tison, Christopher K.; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Miles, William C.; Simon, Carl G.

    2012-01-01

    We have designed a 2-spinnerette device that can directly electrospin nanofiber scaffolds containing a gradient in composition that can be used to engineer interfacial tissues such as ligament and tendon. Two types of nanofibers are simultaneously electrospun in an overlapping pattern to create a nonwoven mat of nanofibers containing a composition gradient. The approach is an advance over previous methods due to its versatility - gradients can be formed from any materials that can be electros...

  14. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  15. Tissue Engineering Strategies in Ligament Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caglar Yilgor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues that connect bones to other bones and their injuries are frequently encountered in the clinic. The current clinical approaches in ligament repair and regeneration are limited to autografts, as the gold standard, and allografts. Both of these techniques have their own drawbacks that limit the success in clinical setting; therefore, new strategies are being developed in order to be able to solve the current problems of ligament grafting. Tissue engineering is a novel promising technique that aims to solve these problems, by producing viable artificial ligament substitutes in the laboratory conditions with the potential of transplantation to the patients with a high success rate. Direct cell and/or growth factor injection to the defect site is another current approach aiming to enhance the repair process of the native tissue. This review summarizes the current approaches in ligament tissue engineering strategies including the use of scaffolds, their modification techniques, as well as the use of bioreactors to achieve enhanced regeneration rates, while also discussing the advances in growth factor and cell therapy applications towards obtaining enhanced ligament regeneration.

  16. Oxygen Delivering Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Ashley L.; Rindone, Alexandra N.; Grayson, Warren L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has provided promising strategies for regenerating tissue defects, but few TE approaches have been translated for clinical applications. One major barrier in TE is providing adequate oxygen supply to implanted tissue scaffolds, since oxygen diffusion from surrounding vasculature in vivo is limited to the periphery of the scaffolds. Moreover, oxygen is also an important signaling molecule for controlling stem cell differentiation within TE scaffolds. Various technologies have been developed to increase oxygen delivery in vivo and enhance the effectiveness of TE strategies. Such technologies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, perfluorocarbon- and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, and oxygen-generating, peroxide-based materials. Here, we provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms and how these technologies have been utilized for in vivo TE applications. Emerging technologies and future prospects for oxygen delivery in TE are also discussed to evaluate the progress of this field towards clinical translation.

  17. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is a method in which materials in solution are formed into nano- and micro-sized continuous fibers. Recent interest in this technique stems from both the topical nature of nanoscale material fabrication and the considerable potential for use of these nanoscale fibres in a range of applications including, amongst others, a range of biomedical applications processes such as drug delivery and the use of scaffolds to provide a framework for tissue regeneration in both soft and hard tissue applications systems. The objectives of this review are to describe the theory behind the technique, examine the effect of changing the process parameters on fiber morphology, and discuss the application and impact of electrospinning on the fields of vascular, neural, bone, cartilage, and tendon/ligament tissue engineering.

  18. Application of inkjet printing to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Thomas; Xu, Tao; Damon, Brook; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2006-09-01

    Recent advances in organ printing technology for applications relating to medical interventions and organ replacement are described. Organ printing refers to the placement of various cell types into a soft scaffold fabricated according to a computer-aided design template using a single device. Computer aided scaffold topology design has recently gained attention as a viable option to achieve function and mass transport requirements within tissue engineering scaffolds. An exciting advance pioneered in our laboratory is that of simultaneous printing of cells and biomaterials, which allows precise placement of cells and proteins within 3-D hydrogel structures. This advance raises the possibility of spatially controlling not only the scaffold structure, but also the type of tissue that can be grown within the scaffold and the thickness of the tissue as capillaries and vessels could be constructed within the scaffolds. Here we summarize recent advances in printing cells and materials using the same device. PMID:16941443

  19. [Tissue engineered skin and regenerative wound repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chun-mao; Wang, Xin-gang

    2013-04-01

    Various skin defects resulting from mechanical injury, burns, chronic ulcers, and resection of tumor etc. are very common in clinic. The traditional treatment measure, such as grafting of autologous split-thickness skin remains the gold standard. However, its limitations are obvious, such as shortage of donor sites, creation of new injury, and scar formation. To realize regenerative or scarless repair of tissue defects has always been the dream of human being. The advent of tissue engineered skin (TES) provides an ideal access to tissue regeneration. After decades of development, several kinds of TES products have been developed and used in clinic, with promising effects. However, a large number of basic scientific problems regarding TES, as well as difficulties in translation of basic research to bedside should be taken into serious consideration. This article presents a comprehensive overview of strategies of construction of TES, the role of TES in regenerative wound repair, and its opportunities and challenges. PMID:23985197

  20. Construction of Tissue Engineering Artificial Cornea with Skin Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan LIU; Yan JIN

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction The clinical need for an alternative to donor corneal tissue has encouraged much interests in recent years. An artificial cornea must fulfill the functions of the cornea it replaces. More recently, the idea of a bio-engineered cornea has risen. Corneal equivalents have been reconstructed by tissue engineering method. Aim of this study is to construct an artificial rabbit cornea by employing tissue engineering method and to determine if skin stem cells have a role in tissue engineered cornea construction.

  1. Biomaterial systems for orthopedic tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerke, Erik David

    2003-06-01

    The World Health Organization has estimated that one out of seven Americans suffers from a musculoskeletal impairment, annually incurring 28.6 million musculoskeletal injuries---more than half of all injuries. Bone tissue engineering has evolved rapidly to address this continued health concern. In the last decade, the focus of orthopedic biomaterials design has shifted from the use of common engineering metals and plastics to smart materials designed to mimic nature and elicit favorable bioresponse. Working within this new paradigm, this thesis explores unique chemical and materials systems for orthopedic tissue engineering. Improving on current titanium implant technologies, porous titanium scaffolds were utilized to better approximate the mechanical and structural properties of natural bone. These foam scaffolds were enhanced with bioactive coatings, designed to enhance osteoblastic implant colonization. The biopolymer poly(L-lysine) was incorporated into both hydroxypatite and octacalcium phosphate mineral phases to create modified organoapatite and pLys-CP coatings respectively. These coatings were synthesized and characterized on titanium surfaces, including porous structures such as titanium mesh and titanium foam. In addition, in vitro osteoblastic cell culture experiments probed the biological influences of these coatings. Organoapatite (OA) accelerated preosteoblastic colonization of titanium mesh and improved cellular ingrowth into titanium foam. Alternatively, the thin, uniform pLys-CP coating demonstrated significant potential as a substrate for chemically binding biological molecules and supramolecular assemblies. Biologically, pLys-CP demonstrated enhanced cellular attachment over titanium and inorganic calcium phosphate controls. Supramolecular self-assembled nanofiber assemblies were also explored both as stand-alone tissue engineering gels and as titanium coatings. Self-supporting nanofiber gels induced accelerated, biomimetic mineralization

  2. Synthetic biodegradable functional polymers for tissue engineering: a brief review

    OpenAIRE

    BaoLin, GUO; Ma, Peter X.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffolds play a crucial role in tissue engineering. Biodegradable polymers with great processing flexibility are the predominant scaffolding materials. Synthetic biodegradable polymers with well-defined structure and without immunological concerns associated with naturally derived polymers are widely used in tissue engineering. The synthetic biodegradable polymers that are widely used in tissue engineering, including polyesters, polyanhydrides, polyphosphazenes, polyurethane, and poly (glyce...

  3. Heterogeneity of Scaffold Biomaterials in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Edgar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering (TE offers a potential solution for the shortage of transplantable organs and the need for novel methods of tissue repair. Methods of TE have advanced significantly in recent years, but there are challenges to using engineered tissues and organs including but not limited to: biocompatibility, immunogenicity, biodegradation, and toxicity. Analysis of biomaterials used as scaffolds may, however, elucidate how TE can be enhanced. Ideally, biomaterials should closely mimic the characteristics of desired organ, their function and their in vivo environments. A review of biomaterials used in TE highlighted natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and decellularized organs as sources of scaffolding. Studies of discarded organs supported that decellularization offers a remedy to reducing waste of donor organs, but does not yet provide an effective solution to organ demand because it has shown varied success in vivo depending on organ complexity and physiological requirements. Review of polymer-based scaffolds revealed that a composite scaffold formed by copolymerization is more effective than single polymer scaffolds because it allows copolymers to offset disadvantages a single polymer may possess. Selection of biomaterials for use in TE is essential for transplant success. There is not, however, a singular biomaterial that is universally optimal.

  4. Elastomeric PGS scaffolds in arterial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kee-Won; Wang, Yadong

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading cause of mortality in the US and especially, coronary artery disease increases with an aging population and increasing obesity. Currently, bypass surgery using autologous vessels, allografts, and synthetic grafts are known as a commonly used for arterial substitutes. However, these grafts have limited applications when an inner diameter of arteries is less than 6 mm due to low availability, thrombotic complications, compliance mismatch, and late intimal hyperplasia. To overcome these limitations, tissue engineering has been successfully applied as a promising alternative to develop small-diameter arterial constructs that are nonthrombogenic, robust, and compliant. Several previous studies have developed small-diameter arterial constructs with tri-lamellar structure, excellent mechanical properties and burst pressure comparable to native arteries. While high tensile strength and burst pressure by increasing collagen production from a rigid material or cell sheet scaffold, these constructs still had low elastin production and compliance, which is a major problem to cause graft failure after implantation. Considering these issues, we hypothesized that an elastometric biomaterial combined with mechanical conditioning would provide elasticity and conduct mechanical signals more efficiently to vascular cells, which increase extracellular matrix production and support cellular orientation. The objective of this report is to introduce a fabrication technique of porous tubular scaffolds and a dynamic mechanical conditioning for applying them to arterial tissue engineering. We used a biodegradable elastomer, poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS) for fabricating porous tubular scaffolds from the salt fusion method. Adult primary baboon smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded on the lumen of scaffolds, which cultured in our designed pulsatile flow bioreactor for 3 weeks. PGS scaffolds had consistent thickness and randomly distributed macro

  5. Biomaterials and tissue engineering in reconstructive surgery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D F Williams

    2003-06-01

    This paper provides an account of the rationale for the development of implantable medical devices over the last half-century and explains the criteria that have controlled the selection of biomaterials for these critical applications. In spite of some good successes and excellent materials, there are still serious limitations to the performance of implants today, and the paper explains these limitations and develops this theme in order to describe the recent innovations in tissue engineering, which involves a different approach to reconstruction of the body.

  6. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Brenda M.; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or “big questions” were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state-of-the-art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  7. Tissue engineering of cartilage in space

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Lisa E.; Langer, Robert; Martin, Ivan; Pellis, Neal R.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    1997-01-01

    Tissue engineering of cartilage, i.e., the in vitro cultivation of cartilage cells on synthetic polymer scaffolds, was studied on the Mir Space Station and on Earth. Specifically, three-dimensional cell-polymer constructs consisting of bovine articular chondrocytes and polyglycolic acid scaffolds were grown in rotating bioreactors, first for 3 months on Earth and then for an additional 4 months on either Mir (10−4–10−6 g) or Earth (1 g). This mission provided a unique opportunity to study the...

  8. Tumor Engineering: The Other Face of Tissue Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghajar, Cyrus M; Bissell, Mina J

    2010-03-09

    Advances in tissue engineering have been accomplished for years by employing biomimetic strategies to provide cells with aspects of their original microenvironment necessary to reconstitute a unit of both form and function for a given tissue.We believe that the most critical hallmark of cancer is loss of integration of architecture and function; thus, it stands to reason that similar strategies could be employed to understand tumor biology. In this commentary, we discuss work contributed by Fischbach-Teschl and colleagues to this special issue of Tissue Engineering in the context of 'tumor engineering', that is, the construction of complex cell culture models that recapitulate aspects of the in vivo tumor microenvironment to study the dynamics of tumor development, progression, and therapy on multiple scales. We provide examples of fundamental questions that could be answered by developing such models, and encourage the continued collaboration between physical scientists and life scientists not only for regenerative purposes, but also to unravel the complexity that is the tumor microenvironment. In 1993, Vacanti and Langer cast a spotlight on the growing gap between patients in need of organ transplants and the amount of available donor organs; they reaffirmed that tissue engineering could eventually address this problem by 'applying principles of engineering and the life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes. Mortality figures and direct health care costs for cancer patients rival those of patients who experience organ failure. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States (Source: American Cancer Society) and it is estimated that direct medical costs for cancer patients approach $100B yearly in the United States alone (Source: National Cancer Institute). In addition, any promising therapy that emerges from the laboratory costs roughly $1.7B to take from bench to bedside. Whereas we have indeed waged war on

  9. Myocardial tissue engineering using electrospun nanofiber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Cho, Je-Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Emerging trends for cardiac tissue engineering are focused on increasing the biocompatibility and tissue regeneration ability of artificial heart tissue by incorporating various cell sources and bioactive molecules. Although primary cardiomyocytes can be successfully implanted, clinical applications are restricted due to their low survival rates and poor proliferation. To develop successful cardiovascular tissue regeneration systems, new technologies must be introduced to improve myocardial regeneration. Electrospinning is a simple, versatile technique for fabricating nanofibers. Here, we discuss various biodegradable polymers (natural, synthetic, and combinatorial polymers) that can be used for fiber fabrication. We also describe a series of fiber modification methods that can increase cell survival, proliferation, and migration and provide supporting mechanical properties by mimicking micro-environment structures, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM). In addition, the applications and types of nanofiber-based scaffolds for myocardial regeneration are described. Finally, fusion research methods combined with stem cells and scaffolds to improve biocompatibility are discussed. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(1): 26-36] PMID:26497579

  10. Patterned melt electrospun substrates for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, Paul D; Joergensen, Nanna T [School of Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Bassett Cr East, Southampton SO16 7PX (United Kingdom); Groll, Juergen; Moeller, Martin [Deutsches Wollforschungsinstitut, Pauwelsstrasse 8, D 52074 Aachen (Germany)], E-mail: dalton@dwi.rwth-aachen.de

    2008-09-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds can be built with patterning techniques that allow discrete placement of structures. In this study, electrospun fibres are collected in focused spots; the patterning and drawing of a cell adhesive scaffold is shown. Blends of biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) and PCL were melt electrospun onto glass collectors, and the optimal electrospinning parameters determined. The quality of the fibre was largely influenced by the flow rate of the melt to the spinneret; however, this can be adjusted with the voltage. A collection distance between 3 cm and 5 cm was optimal, and at 10 cm the fibres became unfocused in their deposition although the diameter remained similar (0.96 {+-} 0.19 {mu}m). Aligned lines of electrospun fibres 200-400 {mu}m in width could be applied onto the slide with an x-y stage, continuously and discretely. Lines of electrospun fibres could be applied on top of one another and were very uniform in diameter. Fibroblasts adhered primarily in the fibre region, due to the poor cell adhesion to the PEG substrate. Improvements in depositing hydrophilic electrospun fibres that wet and adhere to in vitro substrates and the use of stage automation for the writing interface could provide scaffold-building devices suitable for tissue engineering applications.

  11. Expediting the transition from replacement medicine to tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Coury, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, an expansive interpretation of “Tissue Engineering” is proposed which is in congruence with classical and recent published definitions. I further simplify the definition of tissue engineering as: “Exerting systematic control of the body’s cells, matrices and fluids.” As a consequence, many medical therapies not commonly considered tissue engineering are placed in this category because of their effect on the body’s responses. While the progress of tissue engineering strategies...

  12. Development and progress of engineering of skeletal muscle tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, GQ; Liao, H.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering skeletal muscle tissue remains still a challenge, and numerous studies have indicated that this technique may be of great importance in medicine in the near future. This article reviews some of the recent findings resulting from tissue engineering science related to the contractile behavior and the phenotypes of muscle tissue cells in different three-dimensional environment, and discusses how tissue engineering could be used to create and regenerate skeletal muscle, as well as the...

  13. Tissue engineering skeletal muscle for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payumo, Francis C.; Kim, Hyun D.; Sherling, Michael A.; Smith, Lee P.; Powell, Courtney; Wang, Xiao; Keeping, Hugh S.; Valentini, Robert F.; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    With current technology, tissue-engineered skeletal muscle analogues (bioartificial muscles) generate too little active force to be clinically useful in orthopaedic applications. They have been engineered genetically with numerous transgenes (growth hormone, insulinlike growth factor-1, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor), and have been shown to deliver these therapeutic proteins either locally or systemically for months in vivo. Bone morphogenetic proteins belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily are osteoinductive molecules that drive the differentiation pathway of mesenchymal cells toward the chondroblastic or osteoblastic lineage, and stimulate bone formation in vivo. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells endogenously expressing bone morphogenetic proteins might serve as a vehicle for systemic bone morphogenetic protein delivery in vivo, proliferating skeletal myoblasts (C2C12) were transduced with a replication defective retrovirus containing the gene for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (C2BMP-6). The C2BMP-6 cells constitutively expressed recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6 and synthesized bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, based on increased alkaline phosphatase activity in coincubated mesenchymal cells. C2BMP-6 cells did not secrete soluble, bioactive recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-6, but retained the bioactivity in the cell layer. Therefore, genetically-engineered skeletal muscle cells might serve as a platform for long-term delivery of osteoinductive bone morphogenetic proteins locally.

  14. Preparation and characterization of electrospun PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers and dextran/gelatin hydrogels for skin tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-feng Pan

    Full Text Available In this study, two different biomaterials were fabricated and their potential use as a bilayer scaffold for skin tissue engineering applications was assessed. The upper layer biomaterial was a Poly(ε-caprolactone-co-lactide/Poloxamer (PLCL/Poloxamer nanofiber membrane fabricated using electrospinning technology. The PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers (PLCL/Poloxamer, 9/1 exhibited strong mechanical properties (stress/strain values of 9.37 ± 0.38 MPa/187.43 ± 10.66% and good biocompatibility to support adipose-derived stem cells proliferation. The lower layer biomaterial was a hydrogel composed of 10% dextran and 20% gelatin without the addition of a chemical crosslinking agent. The 5/5 dextran/gelatin hydrogel displayed high swelling property, good compressive strength, capacity to present more than 3 weeks and was able to support cells proliferation. A bilayer scaffold was fabricated using these two materials by underlaying the nanofibers and casting hydrogel to mimic the structure and biological function of native skin tissue. The upper layer membrane provided mechanical support in the scaffold and the lower layer hydrogel provided adequate space to allow cells to proliferate and generate extracellular matrix. The biocompatibility of bilayer scaffold was preliminarily investigated to assess the potential cytotoxicity. The results show that cell viability had not been affected when cocultured with bilayer scaffold. As a consequence, the bilayer scaffold composed of PLCL/Poloxamer nanofibers and dextran/gelatin hydrogels is biocompatible and possesses its potentially high application prospect in the field of skin tissue engineering.

  15. Adipose tissue extract promotes adipose tissue regeneration in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zijing; Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Lu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    An adipose tissue engineering chamber model of spontaneous adipose tissue generation from an existing fat flap has been described. However, the chamber does not completely fill with adipose tissue in this model. Here, the effect of adipose tissue extract (ATE) on adipose tissue regeneration was investigated. In vitro, the adipogenic and angiogenic capacities of ATE were evaluated using Oil Red O and tube formation assays on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs), respectively. In vivo, saline or ATE was injected into the adipose tissue engineering chamber 1 week after its implantation. At different time points post-injection, the contents were morphometrically, histologically, and immunohistochemically evaluated, and the expression of growth factors and adipogenic genes was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time PCR. With the exception of the baseline control group, in which fat flaps were not inserted into a chamber, the total volume of fat flap tissue increased significantly in all groups, especially in the ATE group. Better morphology and structure, a thinner capsule, and more vessels were observed in the ATE group than in the control group. Expression of angiogenic growth factors and adipogenic markers were significantly higher in the ATE group. ATE therefore significantly promoted adipose tissue regeneration and reduced capsule formation in an adipose tissue engineering chamber model. These data suggest that ATE provides a more angiogenic and adipogenic microenvironment for adipose tissue formation by releasing various cytokines and growth factors that also inhibit capsule formation. PMID:26678825

  16. A modular approach to cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Brendan M; Sefton, Michael V

    2010-10-01

    Functional cardiac tissue was prepared using a modular tissue engineering approach with the goal of creating vascularized tissue. Rat aortic endothelial cells (RAEC) were seeded onto submillimeter-sized modules made of type I bovine collagen supplemented with Matrigel™ (25% v/v) embedded with cardiomyocyte (CM)-enriched neonatal rat heart cells and assembled into a contractile, macroporous, sheet-like construct. Modules (without RAEC) cultured in 10% bovine serum (BS) were more contractile and responsive to external stimulus (lower excitation threshold, higher maximum capture rate, and greater en face fractional area changes) than modules cultured in 10% fetal BS. Incorporating 25% Matrigel in the matrix reduced the excitation threshold and increased the fractional area change relative to collagen only modules (without RAEC). A coculture medium, containing 10% BS, low Mg2+ (0.814mM), and normal glucose (5.5mM), was used to maintain RAEC junction morphology (VE-cadherin) and CM contractility, although the responsiveness of CM was attenuated with RAEC on the modules. Macroporous, sheet-like module constructs were assembled by partially immobilizing a layer of modules in alginate gel until day 8, with or without RAEC. RAEC/CM module sheets were electrically responsive; however, like modules with RAEC this responsiveness was attenuated relative to CM-only sheets. Muscle bundles coexpressing cardiac troponin I and connexin-43 were evident near the perimeter of modules and at intermodule junctions. These results suggest the potential of the modular approach as a platform for building vascularized cardiac tissue. PMID:20504074

  17. Biodegradable Polymers in Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon E. Govaert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The use ofdegradable polymers in medicine largely started around the mid 20th century with their initial use as in vivo resorbing sutures. Thorough knowledge on this topic as been gained since then and the potential applications for these polymers were, and still are, rapidly expanding. After improving the properties of lactic acid-based polymers, these were no longer studied only from a scientific point of view, but also for their use in bone surgery in the 1990s. Unfortunately, after implanting these polymers, different foreign body reactions ranging from the presence of white blood cells to sterile sinuses with resorption of the original tissue were observed. This led to the misconception that degradable polymers would, in all cases, lead to inflammation and/or osteolysis at the implantation site. Nowadays, we have accumulated substantial knowledge on the issue of biocompatibility of biodegradable polymers and are able to tailor these polymers for specific applications and thereby strongly reduce the occurrence of adverse tissue reactions. However, the major issue of biofunctionality, when mechanical adaptation is taken into account, has hitherto been largely unrecognized. A thorough understanding of how to improve the biofunctionality, comprising biomechanical stability, but also visualization and sterilization of the material, together with the avoidance of fibrotic tissue formation and foreign body reactions, may greatly enhance the applicability and safety of degradable polymers in a wide area of tissue engineering applications. This review will address our current understanding of these biofunctionality factors, and will subsequently discuss the pitfalls remaining and potential solutions to solve these problems.

  18. Textile Technologies and Tissue Engineering: A Path Toward Organ Weaving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Tamayol, Ali; Bagherifard, Sara; Serex, Ludovic; Mostafalu, Pooria; Faramarzi, Negar; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Textile technologies have recently attracted great attention as potential biofabrication tools for engineering tissue constructs. Using current textile technologies, fibrous structures can be designed and engineered to attain the required properties that are demanded by different tissue engineering applications. Several key parameters such as physiochemical characteristics of fibers, microarchitecture, and mechanical properties of the fabrics play important roles in the effective use of textile technologies in tissue engineering. This review summarizes the current advances in the manufacturing of biofunctional fibers. Different textile methods such as knitting, weaving, and braiding are discussed and their current applications in tissue engineering are highlighted. PMID:26924450

  19. Bioprinted Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are focusing on bioprinting technology as a viable option to overcome current difficulties in cartilage tissue engineering. Bioprinting enables a three-dimensional (3-D), free-form, computer-designed structure using biomaterials, biomolecules, and/or cells. The inner and outer shape of a scaffold can be controlled by this technology with great precision. Here, we introduce a hybrid bioprinting technology that is a co-printing process of multiple materials including high-strength synthetic polymer and cell-laden hydrogel. The synthetic polymer provides mechanical support for shape maintenance and load bearing, while the hydrogel provides the biological environment for artificial cartilage regeneration. This chapter introduces the procedures for printing of a 3-D scaffold using our hybrid bioprinting technology and includes the source materials for preparation of 3-D printing. PMID:26445837

  20. Scaffolds for central nervous system tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Spector, Myron; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS) lead to severe and permanent neurological deficits and to date there is no universally accepted treatment. Owing to the profound impact, extensive studies have been carried out aiming at reducing inflammatory responses and overcoming the inhibitory environment in the CNS after injury so as to enhance regeneration. Artificial scaffolds may provide a suitable environment for axonal regeneration and functional recovery, and are of particular importance in cases in which the injury has resulted in a cavitary defect. In this review we discuss development of scaffolds for CNS tissue engineering, focusing on mechanism of CNS injuries, various biomaterials that have been used in studies, and current strategies for designing and fabricating scaffolds.

  1. The fundamental of tissue engineering: new scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to regenerate new bone for skeletal use is a major clinical need. In this study, two novel porous calcium phosphate materials pure HA and biphasic HA/β-Tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) were evaluated as potential scaffolds for cell-seeded bone substitutes using human osteoblast-like cells (HOS) and primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). A high rate of proliferation was observed on both scaffolds. A greater increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP - an indicator of osteoblast differentiation) was observed on HA//β-TCP compared to HA. This observation indicates that HA/TCP may play a role in inducing osteoblastic differentiation. Although further evaluation is required both materials show potential as innovative synthetic substitutes for tissue engineered scaffolds. (Author)

  2. Functional tissue engineering of ligament healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Shan-Ling

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ligaments and tendons are dense connective tissues that are important in transmitting forces and facilitate joint articulation in the musculoskeletal system. Their injury frequency is high especially for those that are functional important, like the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL of the knee as well as the glenohumeral ligaments and the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder. Because the healing responses are different in these ligaments and tendons after injury, the consequences and treatments are tissue- and site-specific. In this review, we will elaborate on the injuries of the knee ligaments as well as using functional tissue engineering (FTE approaches to improve their healing. Specifically, the ACL of knee has limited capability to heal, and results of non-surgical management of its midsubstance rupture have been poor. Consequently, surgical reconstruction of the ACL is regularly performed to gain knee stability. However, the long-term results are not satisfactory besides the numerous complications accompanied with the surgeries. With the rapid development of FTE, there is a renewed interest in revisiting ACL healing. Approaches such as using growth factors, stem cells and scaffolds have been widely investigated. In this article, the biology of normal and healing ligaments is first reviewed, followed by a discussion on the issues related to the treatment of ACL injuries. Afterwards, current promising FTE methods are presented for the treatment of ligament injuries, including the use of growth factors, gene delivery, and cell therapy with a particular emphasis on the use of ECM bioscaffolds. The challenging areas are listed in the future direction that suggests where collection of energy could be placed in order to restore the injured ligaments and tendons structurally and functionally.

  3. Biomimetic nanoclay scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambre, Avinash Harishchandra

    Tissue engineering offers a significant potential alternative to conventional methods for rectifying tissue defects by evoking natural regeneration process via interactions between cells and 3D porous scaffolds. Imparting adequate mechanical properties to biodegradable scaffolds for bone tissue engineering is an important challenge and extends from molecular to macroscale. This work focuses on the use of sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) to design polymer composite scaffolds having enhanced mechanical properties along with multiple interdependent properties. Materials design beginning at the molecular level was used in which Na-MMT clay was modified with three different unnatural amino acids and further characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD). Based on improved bicompatibility with human osteoblasts (bone cells) and intermediate increase in d-spacing of MMT clay (shown by XRD), 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was further used to prepare biopolymer (chitosan-polygalacturonic acid complex) scaffolds. Osteoblast proliferation in biopolymer scaffolds containing 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay was similar to biopolymer scaffolds containing hydroxyapatite (HAP). A novel process based on biomineralization in bone was designed to prepare 5-aminovaleric acid modified clay capable of imparting multiple properties to the scaffolds. Bone-like apatite was mineralized in modified clay and a novel nanoclay-HAP hybrid (in situ HAPclay) was obtained. FTIR spectroscopy indicated a molecular level organic-inorganic association between the intercalated 5-aminovaleric acid and mineralized HAP. Osteoblasts formed clusters on biopolymer composite films prepared with different weight percent compositions of in situ HAPclay. Human MSCs formed mineralized nodules on composite films and mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) in composite scaffolds without the use of osteogenic supplements. Polycaprolactone (PCL), a synthetic polymer, was

  4. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Niu; Weimin Guo; Shufeng Han; Yun Zhu; Shuyun Liu; Quanyi Guo

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a ...

  5. Endochondral bone tissue engineering using embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jukes, Jojanneke M.; Both, Sanne Karijn; Leusink, Anouk; Sterk, Lotus M. Th.; Blitterswijk, van, W.J.; Boer, de, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells can provide an unlimited supply of pluripotent cells for tissue engineering applications. Bone tissue engineering by directly differentiating ES cells (ESCs) into osteoblasts has been unsuccessful so far. Therefore, we investigated an alternative approach, based on the process of endochondral ossification. A cartilage matrix was formed in vitro by mouse ESCs seeded on a scaffold. When these cartilage tissue-engineered constructs (CTECs) were implanted s.c., the cartilage ...

  6. Biodegradable Polymer-Based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sultana, Naznin

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the principles, methods and applications of biodegradable polymer based scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. The general principle of bone tissue engineering is reviewed and the traditional and novel scaffolding materials, their properties and scaffold fabrication techniques are explored. By acting as temporary synthetic extracellular matrices for cell accommodation, proliferation, and differentiation, scaffolds play a pivotal role in tissue engineering. This book does not only provide the comprehensive summary of the current trends in scaffolding design but also presents the new trends and directions for scaffold development for the ever expanding tissue engineering applications.

  7. Straining mode-dependent collagen remodeling in engineered cardiovascular tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Marion, M.H. van; Hanemaaijer, R.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Similar to native cardiovascular tissues, the mechanical properties of engineered cardiovascular constructs depend on the composition and quality of the extracellular matrix, which is a net result of matrix remodeling processes within the tissue. To improve tissue remodeling, and hence tissue mechan

  8. Scaffold Sheet Design Strategy for Soft Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Tang; Dipendra Gyawali; Yi Zhang; Paul Thevenot; Tran, Richard T.; Jian Yang

    2010-01-01

    Creating heterogeneous tissue constructs with an even cell distribution and robust mechanical strength remain important challenges to the success of in vivo tissue engineering. To address these issues, we are developing a scaffold sheet tissue engineering strategy consisting of thin (~200 μm), strong, elastic, and porous crosslinked urethane- doped polyester (CUPE) scaffold sheets that are bonded together chemically or through cell culture. Suture retention of the tissue constructs (four shee...

  9. Utilizing stem cells for three-dimensional neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Cho, Yongku; Li, Xue-Jun; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-05-26

    Three-dimensional neural tissue engineering has made great strides in developing neural disease models and replacement tissues for patients. However, the need for biomimetic tissue models and effective patient therapies remains unmet. The recent push to expand 2D neural tissue engineering into the third dimension shows great potential to advance the field. Another area which has much to offer to neural tissue engineering is stem cell research. Stem cells are well known for their self-renewal and differentiation potential and have been shown to give rise to tissues with structural and functional properties mimicking natural organs. Application of these capabilities to 3D neural tissue engineering may be highly useful for basic research on neural tissue structure and function, engineering disease models, designing tissues for drug development, and generating replacement tissues with a patient's genetic makeup. Here, we discuss the vast potential, as well as the current challenges, unique to integration of 3D fabrication strategies and stem cells into neural tissue engineering. We also present some of the most significant recent achievements, including nerve guidance conduits to facilitate better healing of nerve injuries, functional 3D biomimetic neural tissue models, physiologically relevant disease models for research purposes, and rapid and effective screening of potential drugs. PMID:26890524

  10. Bioactive polymers for cardiac tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Samuel Thomas

    2007-05-01

    Prevalent in the US and worldwide, acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) can cause ischemic injuries to the heart that persist and lead to progressive degradation of the organ. Tissue engineering techniques exploiting biomaterials present a hopeful means of treating these injuries, either by mechanically stabilizing the injured ventricle, or by fostering cell growth to replace myocytes lost to damage. This thesis describes the development and testing of a synthetic extracellular matrix for cardiac tissue engineering applications. The first stage of this process was using an advanced finite element model of an injured ovine left ventricle to evaluate the potential benefits of injecting synthetic materials into the heart. These simulations indicated that addition of small amounts non-contractile material (on the order of 1--5% total wall volume) to infarct border zone regions reduced pathological systolic fiber stress to levels near those found in normal remote regions. Simulations also determined that direct addition to the infarct itself caused increases in ventricle ejection fraction while the underlying performance of the pump, ascertained by the Starling relation, was not improved. From these theoretical results, biomaterials were developed specifically for injection into the injured myocardium, and were characterized and tested for their mechanical properties and ability to sustain the proliferation of a stem cell population suitable for transplantation. Thermoresponsive synthetic copolymer hydrogels consisting of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid, p(NIPAAm-co-AAc), crosslinked with protease degradable amino acid sequences and modified with integrin binding ligands were synthesized, characterized in vitro, and used for myocardial implantation. These injectable materials could maintain a population of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in both two dimensional and three dimensional culture, and when tested in vivo in a murine infarct model they

  11. Expediting the transition from replacement medicine to tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coury, Arthur J

    2016-06-01

    In this article, an expansive interpretation of "Tissue Engineering" is proposed which is in congruence with classical and recent published definitions. I further simplify the definition of tissue engineering as: "Exerting systematic control of the body's cells, matrices and fluids." As a consequence, many medical therapies not commonly considered tissue engineering are placed in this category because of their effect on the body's responses. While the progress of tissue engineering strategies is inexorable and generally positive, it has been subject to setbacks as have many important medical therapies. Medical practice is currently undergoing a transition on several fronts (academics, start-up companies, going concerns) from the era of "replacement medicine" where body parts and functions are replaced by mechanical, electrical or chemical therapies to the era of tissue engineering where health is restored by regeneration generation or limitation of the body's tissues and functions by exploiting our expanding knowledge of the body's biological processes to produce natural, healthy outcomes. PMID:27047677

  12. Acellular organ scaffolds for tumor tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guller, Anna; Trusova, Inna; Petersen, Elena; Shekhter, Anatoly; Kurkov, Alexander; Qian, Yi; Zvyagin, Andrei

    2015-12-01

    Rationale: Tissue engineering (TE) is an emerging alternative approach to create models of human malignant tumors for experimental oncology, personalized medicine and drug discovery studies. Being the bottom-up strategy, TE provides an opportunity to control and explore the role of every component of the model system, including cellular populations, supportive scaffolds and signalling molecules. Objectives: As an initial step to create a new ex vivo TE model of cancer, we optimized protocols to obtain organ-specific acellular matrices and evaluated their potential as TE scaffolds for culture of normal and tumor cells. Methods and results: Effective decellularization of animals' kidneys, ureter, lungs, heart, and liver has been achieved by detergent-based processing. The obtained scaffolds demonstrated biocompatibility and growthsupporting potential in combination with normal (Vero, MDCK) and tumor cell lines (C26, B16). Acellular scaffolds and TE constructs have been characterized and compared with morphological methods. Conclusions: The proposed methodology allows creation of sustainable 3D tumor TE constructs to explore the role of organ-specific cell-matrix interaction in tumorigenesis.

  13. Transport limits in defect-engineered LaAlO3/SrTiO3 bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunkel, Felix; Wicklein, Sebastian; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Meuffels, Paul; Brinks, Peter; Huijben, Mark; Rijnders, Guus; Waser, Rainer; Dittmann, Regina

    2015-01-21

    The electrical properties of the metallic interface in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (LAO/STO) bilayers are investigated with focus on the role of cationic defects in thin film STO. Systematic growth-control of the STO thin film cation stoichiometry (defect-engineering) yields a relation between cationic defects in the STO layer and electronic properties of the bilayer-interface. Hall measurements reveal a stoichiometry-effect primarily on the electron mobility. The results indicate an enhancement of scattering processes in as-grown non-stoichiometric samples indicating an increased density of defects. Furthermore, we discuss the thermodynamic processes and defect-exchange reactions at the LAO/STO-bilayer interface determined in high temperature equilibrium. By quenching defined defect states from high temperature equilibrium, we finally connect equilibrium thermodynamics with room temperature transport. The results are consistent with the defect-chemistry model suggested for LAO/STO interfaces. Moreover, they reveal an additional healing process of extended defects in thin film STO. PMID:25469599

  14. An Ultrastructural Analysis of Collagen in Tissue Engineered Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Shannon L. M.; Vaughn, Megann E.; Niklason, Laura E.

    2007-01-01

    Collagen is the structural molecule that is most correlated with strength in blood vessels. In this study, we compared the properties of collagen in engineered and native blood vessels. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to image sections of engineered and native arteries. Band periodicities of engineered and native collagen fibrils indicated that spacing between collagen molecules was similar in engineered and native tissues. Engineered arteries, however, had thinner collagen fi...

  15. Molecular design of biodegradable polymers for tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rypáček, František; Kubies, Dana; Machová, Luďka; Proks, Vladimír; Popelka, Štěpán

    Myconos : Aegean Conferences, 2002. s. 75. [Symposium on Tissue Engineering Science : Critical Elements in the Research Development Continuum. 19.05.2002-23.05.2002, Myconos] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4050202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : biodegradable polymers * tissue engineering Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  16. Perspectives of Chitin and Chitosan Nanofibrous Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakumar, R.; Nair, S. V.; Furuike, T.; Tamura, H.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarized the preparation and tissue engineering applications of chitin and chitosan based nanofibers. Additional studies are necessary before clinical applications and for commercialization of the chitin and chitosan based nanofibers. We hope that this review article will bring new innovative types of chitin and chitosan nanofibers for tissue engineering applications in the future.

  17. Translational Approaches in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Jeremy J

    2007-01-01

    This landmark book identifies the current and forthcoming roadblocks to scientific research and technological development in stem cell research, tissue engineering, wound healing, and in-vivo animal models. The book is the first to focus on the translational aspect of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and bridges the gap between laboratory discovery and clinical applications.

  18. Tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Dabra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a major public health issue and the development of effective therapies to treat the disease and regenerate periodontal tissue is an important goal of today′s medicine. Regeneration of periodontal tissue is perhaps one of the most complex process to occur in the body. Langer and colleagues proposed tissue engineering as a possible technique for regenerating the lost periodontal tissues. Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field, which involves the application of the principles and methods of engineering and life sciences to help in the development of biological substitutes to restore, maintain or improve the function of damaged tissues and organs. A Google/Medline search was conducted and relevant literature evaluating the potential role of the tissue engineering in periodontal regeneration, which included histological studies and controlled clinical trials, was reviewed. A comprehensive search was designed. The articles were independently screened for eligibility. Articles with authentic controls and proper randomization and pertaining specifically to their role in periodontal regeneration were included. The available literature was analyzed and compiled. The analysis indicate tissue engineering to be a promising, as well as an effective novel approach to reconstruct and engineer the periodontal apparatus. Here, we represent several articles, as well as recent texts that make up a special and an in-depth review on the subject. The purpose behind writing this brief review has been to integrate the evidence of research related to tissue engineering so as to implement them in our daily practice.

  19. Low oxygen concentrations impair tissue development in tissue-engineered cardiovascular constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlimmeren, M.A.A. van; Driessen-Mol, A.; Oomens, C.W.J.; Broek, M. van den; Stoop, R.; Bouten, C.V.C.; Baaijens, F.P.T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering has shown considerable progress, but in vitro tissue conditioning to stimulate the development of a functional extracellular matrix still needs improvement. We investigated the environmental factor oxygen concentration for its potential to increase the amount of col

  20. Assessment of tissue ingrowth rates in polyurethane scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramrattan, N.N.; Heijkants, R.G.J.C.; Tienen, T.G. van; Schouten, A.J.; Veth, R. P. H.; Buma, P

    2005-01-01

    The continuous development of new biomaterials for tissue engineering and the enhancement of tissue ingrowth into existing scaffolds, using growth factors, create the necessity for developing adequate tools to assess tissue ingrowth rates into porous biomaterials. Current histomorphometric techniques evaluating rates of tissue ingrowth tend either to measure the overall tissue content in an entire sample or to depend on the user to indicate a front of tissue ingrowth. Neither method is partic...

  1. Assessment of tissue ingrowth rates in polyurethane scaffolds for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Ramrattan, Navin N.; Heijkants, Ralf G.J.C.; van Tienen, Tony G.; Schouten, Arend Jan; Veth, Rene P.H.; Buma, Pieter; Ramrattan, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    The continuous development of new biomaterials for tissue engineering and the enhancement of tissue ingrowth into existing scaffolds, using growth factors, create the necessity for developing adequate tools to assess tissue ingrowth rates into porous biomaterials. Current histomorphometric techniques evaluating rates of tissue ingrowth tend either to measure the overall tissue content in an entire sample or to depend on the user to indicate a front of tissue ingrowth. Neither method is partic...

  2. Powder-based 3D printing for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunello, G; Sivolella, S; Meneghello, R; Ferroni, L; Gardin, C; Piattelli, A; Zavan, B; Bressan, E

    2016-01-01

    Bone tissue engineered 3-D constructs customized to patient-specific needs are emerging as attractive biomimetic scaffolds to enhance bone cell and tissue growth and differentiation. The article outlines the features of the most common additive manufacturing technologies (3D printing, stereolithography, fused deposition modeling, and selective laser sintering) used to fabricate bone tissue engineering scaffolds. It concentrates, in particular, on the current state of knowledge concerning powder-based 3D printing, including a description of the properties of powders and binder solutions, the critical phases of scaffold manufacturing, and its applications in bone tissue engineering. Clinical aspects and future applications are also discussed. PMID:27086202

  3. Cell-scaffold interactions in the bone tissue engineering triad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Murphy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering has emerged as one of the leading fields in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The success of bone tissue engineering relies on understanding the interplay between progenitor cells, regulatory signals, and the biomaterials/scaffolds used to deliver them – otherwise known as the tissue engineering triad. This review will discuss the roles of these fundamental components with a specific focus on the interaction between cell behaviour and scaffold structural properties. In terms of scaffold architecture, recent work has shown that pore size can affect both cell attachment and cellular invasion. Moreover, different materials can exert different biomechanical forces, which can profoundly affect cellular differentiation and migration in a cell type specific manner. Understanding these interactions will be critical for enhancing the progress of bone tissue engineering towards clinical applications.

  4. Lentivirus delivery by adsorption to tissue engineering scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Seungjin; Salvay, David M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds capable of localized gene delivery are being investigated for numerous regenerative medicine applications and as model systems for fundamental studies of tissue formation. In this manuscript, we investigate the delivery of lentivirus from a tissue engineering scaffold using a surface immobilization strategy. PLG was employed as the biomaterial for delivery, which has been widely used for a number of tissue engineering applications. The virus was immobilized by freezing a...

  5. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Cittadella Vigodarzere, Giorgio; Mantero, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field. Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only succes...

  6. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgio eCittadella Vigodarzere; Sara eMantero

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field.Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only success...

  7. Tissue Engineering for the Neonatal and Pediatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Amulya K.; Ackbar, Richard; Höllwarth, Micheal E.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the surgical specialties, the remit of the pediatric surgeon encompasses the widest range of organ systems and includes disorders from the fetus to the adolescent. As such, the recent emergence of tissue engineering is of particular interest to the pediatric surgical community. The individual challenges of tissue engineering depend largely on the nature and function of the target tissue. In general, the main issues currently under investigation include the sourcing of an appropriate ce...

  8. Cryopreservation of Cell/Scaffold Tissue-Engineered Constructs

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, Pedro F.; Dias, Ana F.; Reis, Rui L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of cryopreservation over the functionality of tissue-engineered constructs, analyzing the survival and viability of cells seeded, cultured, and cryopreserved onto 3D scaffolds. Further, it also evaluated the effect of cryopreservation over the properties of the scaffold material itself since these are critical for the engineering of most tissues and in particular, tissues such as bone. For this purpose, porous scaffolds, namely fiber meshes based o...

  9. Molecular Tissue Engineering:Concepts,Status and Challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Tissue engineering has confronted many difficulties mainly as follows:1)How to modulate the adherence,proliferation,and oriented differentiation of seed cells, especially that of stemcells. 2) Massive preparation and sustained controllable delivery of tissue inducing factors or plasmid DNA, such as growth factors, angiogenesis stimulators,and so on. 3) Development of "intelligent biomimetic materials" as extracellular matrix with a good superficial and structural compatibility as well as biological activity to stimulate predictable, controllable and desirable responses under defined conditions.Molecular biology is currently one of the most exciting fields of research across life sciences,and the advances in it also bring a bright future for tissue engineering to overcome these difficulties.In recent years,tissue engineering benefits a lot from molecular biology.Only a comprehensive understanding of the involved ingredients of tissue engineering (cells,tissue inducing factors,genes,biomaterials) and the subtle relationships between them at molecular level can lead to a successful manipulation of reparative processes and a better biological substitute.Molecular tissue engineering,the offspring of the tissue engineering and molecular biology,has gained an increasing importance in recent years.It offers the promise of not simply replacing tissue,but improving the restoration.The studies presented in this article put forward this new concept for the first time and provide an insight into the basic principles,status and challenges of this emerging technology.

  10. Interfacial Engineering Importance of Bilayered ZnO Cathode Buffer on the Photovoltaic Performance of Inverted Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Rohan B; Ambade, Swapnil B; Mane, Rajaram S; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2015-04-22

    The role of cathode buffer layer (CBL) is crucial in determining the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs). The hallmarks of a promising CBL include high transparency, ideal energy levels, and tendency to offer good interfacial contact with the organic bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) layers. Zinc oxide (ZnO), with its ability to form numerous morphologies in juxtaposition to its excellent electron affinity, solution processability, and good transparency is an ideal CBL material for IOSCs. Technically, when CBL is sandwiched between the BHJ active layer and the indium-tin-oxide (ITO) cathode, it performs two functions, namely, electron collection from the photoactive layer that is effectively carried out by morphologies like nanoparticles or nanoridges obtained by ZnO sol-gel (ZnO SG) method through an accumulation of individual nanoparticles and, second, transport of collected electrons toward the cathode, which is more effectively manifested by one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures like ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs). This work presents the use of bilayered ZnO CBL in IOSCs of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6, 6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) to overcome the limitations offered by a conventionally used single layer CBL. We found that the PCE of IOSCs with an appropriate bilayer CBL comprising of ZnO NRs/ZnO SG is ∼18.21% higher than those containing ZnO SG/ZnO NRs. We believe that, in bilayer ZnO NRs/ZnO SG, ZnO SG collects electrons effectively from photoactive layer while ZnO NRs transport them further to ITO resulting significant increase in the photocurrent to achieve highest PCE of 3.70%. The enhancement in performance was obtained through improved interfacial engineering, enhanced electrical properties, and reduced surface/bulk defects in bilayer ZnO NRs/ZnO SG. This study demonstrates that the novel bilayer ZnO CBL approach of electron collection/transport would overcome crucial interfacial recombination issues and

  11. Exploring the Islamic Perspective on Tissue Engineering Principles and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munirah, S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is related to the replacement, restoration, repair and/or regeneration of tissues/organs that are tailored to the needs of the individual patient. The potential applications of tissue engineering are being unveiled with much hype and expectations among the scientists and the public at large. The demand for engineered tissues may increase considerably, but the progress has been slow due to scientific and technical challenges that linked to moral, religious, philosophical, political and economic aspects. There are ongoing debates on certain aspects that seem to indicate that scientists maybe “playing God”. This article briefly analyses tissue engineering principles and the discourse surrounding it. Subsequently, the author briefly reflects on the Islamic perspectives, both for and against the technology. The discussions serve to provide a platform on how best to achieve a consensus that adequately deals with the scientific reality and the Islamic moral and legal jurisprudence that surrounds the technology.

  12. Ethical considerations in tissue engineering research: Case studies in translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Hannah B; McQuilling, John P; King, Nancy M P

    2016-04-15

    Tissue engineering research is a complex process that requires investigators to focus on the relationship between their research and anticipated gains in both knowledge and treatment improvements. The ethical considerations arising from tissue engineering research are similarly complex when addressing the translational progression from bench to bedside, and investigators in the field of tissue engineering act as moral agents at each step of their research along the translational pathway, from early benchwork and preclinical studies to clinical research. This review highlights the ethical considerations and challenges at each stage of research, by comparing issues surrounding two translational tissue engineering technologies: the bioartificial pancreas and a tissue engineered skeletal muscle construct. We present relevant ethical issues and questions to consider at each step along the translational pathway, from the basic science bench to preclinical research to first-in-human clinical trials. Topics at the bench level include maintaining data integrity, appropriate reporting and dissemination of results, and ensuring that studies are designed to yield results suitable for advancing research. Topics in preclinical research include the principle of "modest translational distance" and appropriate animal models. Topics in clinical research include key issues that arise in early-stage clinical trials, including selection of patient-subjects, disclosure of uncertainty, and defining success. The comparison of these two technologies and their ethical issues brings to light many challenges for translational tissue engineering research and provides guidance for investigators engaged in development of any tissue engineering technology. PMID:26282436

  13. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  14. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering.

  15. Nano scaffolds and stem cell therapy in liver tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Laila M.; Fawzy, Sherin M.

    2015-08-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have been constantly developing of late due to the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Although stem cells hold great potential for the treatment of many injuries and degenerative diseases, several obstacles must be overcome before their therapeutic application can be realized. These include the development of advanced techniques to understand and control functions of micro environmental signals and novel methods to track and guide transplanted stem cells. A major complication encountered with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to engraft to target tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to address those challenges. Combinations of stem cell therapy and nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have achieved significant advances. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various features to control stem cell fate decisions. Fabrication of Nano fiber cell scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can guide stem cells to proceed to heal damaged tissues. In this paper, current and emergent approach based on stem cells in the field of liver tissue engineering is presented for specific application. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering opens new perspectives in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the potential to control stem cell behavior with the physical and chemical characteristics of the engineered scaffold environment.

  16. Mesoscopic Fluorescence Molecular Tomography for Evaluating Engineered Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mehmet S; Chen, Chao-Wei; Ji, Robin; Zhao, Lingling; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc B; Fisher, John P; Chen, Yu; Intes, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Optimization of regenerative medicine strategies includes the design of biomaterials, development of cell-seeding methods, and control of cell-biomaterial interactions within the engineered tissues. Among these steps, one paramount challenge is to non-destructively image the engineered tissues in their entirety to assess structure, function, and molecular expression. It is especially important to be able to enable cell phenotyping and monitor the distribution and migration of cells throughout the bulk scaffold. Advanced fluorescence microscopic techniques are commonly employed to perform such tasks; however, they are limited to superficial examination of tissue constructs. Therefore, the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from the development of molecular imaging techniques which are capable of non-destructive imaging of three-dimensional cellular distribution and maturation within a tissue-engineered scaffold beyond the limited depth of current microscopic techniques. In this review, we focus on an emerging depth-resolved optical mesoscopic imaging technique, termed laminar optical tomography (LOT) or mesoscopic fluorescence molecular tomography (MFMT), which enables longitudinal imaging of cellular distribution in thick tissue engineering constructs at depths of a few millimeters and with relatively high resolution. The physical principle, image formation, and instrumentation of LOT/MFMT systems are introduced. Representative applications in tissue engineering include imaging the distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells embedded in hydrogels, imaging of bio-printed tissues, and in vivo applications. PMID:26645079

  17. [Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2002-12-01

    Ocular surface reconstruction by tissue engineering using somatic stem cells is a second-generation modality. In order to treat bilaterally affected, severe ocular surface disorders, we investigated the transplantation of two types of cultivated mucosal epithelia: allogenic corneal epithelial stem cells, and autologous oral mucosal epithelial cells. For this, first, we summarized the clinical results of allogenic keratoepithelioplasty and limbal transplantation. In addition, we showed that the immunological shift from Th1 to Th2 by using keyhole limpet hemocyanin was effective in suppressing the incidence of immunological rejection. Second, we investigated the transplantation of cultivated human corneal epithelial stem cells onto amniotic membrane. The cultivated sheet was created by co-culture with 3T3 fibroblasts, using the air-lift method, in cultivating the corneal epithelial stem cell on the amniotic membrane. These cultivated cells demonstrated positive keratin 3 and 12 specific to in vivo corneal epithelium, tight junction related proteins, and telomerase activity. The transplanted allogenic human corneal epithelial sheet survived on the corneal surface in all cases, and was quite effective for achieving ocular surface stability in the acute phase of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid, or chemical injury. However, a few cases developed immunological rejection or opportunistic infection. Third, to establish the transplantation of the autologous cultivated oral mucosal epithelial sheet, we performed animal experiments using rabbits. In vitro oral mucosal epithelial sheet showed histology similar to that of in vivo corneal epithelial sheet. It expressed positive keratin 3 as well. Since the autologous transplantation of this sheet survived on the ocular surface with the recovery of corneal transparency, a cultivated oral mucosal epithelium may become a substitute for corneal epithelium. Fourth, we created a cultivated human corneal

  18. Orthopaedic Interface Tissue Engineering for the Biological Fixation of Soft Tissue Grafts

    OpenAIRE

    Moffat, Kristen L.; Wang, I-Ning Elaine; Rodeo, Scott A.; Lu, Helen H.

    2009-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering is a promising new strategy aimed at the regeneration of tissue interfaces and ultimately enabling the biological fixation of soft tissue grafts utilized in orthopaedic repair and sports medicine. Many ligaments and tendons with direct insertions into subchondral bone exhibit a complex enthesis consisting of several distinct yet continuous regions of soft tissue, noncalcified fibrocartilage, calcified fibrocartilage and bone. Regeneration of this multi-tissue inte...

  19. Tissue Engineered Medical Products (TEMPs): Historische ontwikkelingen en toekomstverwachtingen

    OpenAIRE

    Wassenaar C; Geertsma RE; LGM; VTV

    2001-01-01

    In addition to medical devices, pharmaceutical products and human tissues/organs for transplantation, a relatively new group of products for medical applications can be defined. These products, referred to as Tissue Engineered Medical Products (TEMPs), are constructed by the incorporation of human or animal tissues or cells into or on a carrier (matrix) material. The ultimate aim is to replace affected tissues (or organs) in cases where the limited repair mechanisms offered by the human organ...

  20. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Domingos; Dinuccio Dinucci; Stefania Cometa; Michele Alderighi; Paulo Jorge Bártolo; Federica Chiellini

    2009-01-01

    The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaff...

  1. A Review of Three-Dimensional Printing in Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Nick A; Seshadri, Dhruv R; Dhavalikar, Prachi S; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technologies have led to a rapid expansion of applications from the creation of anatomical training models for complex surgical procedures to the printing of tissue engineering constructs. In addition to achieving the macroscale geometry of organs and tissues, a print layer thickness as small as 20 μm allows for reproduction of the microarchitectures of bone and other tissues. Techniques with even higher precision are currently being investigated to enable reproduction of smaller tissue features such as hepatic lobules. Current research in tissue engineering focuses on the development of compatible methods (printers) and materials (bioinks) that are capable of producing biomimetic scaffolds. In this review, an overview of current 3D printing techniques used in tissue engineering is provided with an emphasis on the printing mechanism and the resultant scaffold characteristics. Current practical challenges and technical limitations are emphasized and future trends of bioprinting are discussed. PMID:26857350

  2. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  3. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearn, Jason T.; Kinneberg, Kirsten R.C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products. PMID:21625053

  4. Dental Tissue Engineering: a New Approach to Dental Tissue Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Battistella, Elisa; Mele, Silvia; Rimondini, Lia

    2010-01-01

    Remineralization of enamel represents a useful tool to counteract the loss of mineral tissue due to bacteria metabolism and foods and drinks ingestion. The technologies now available are based on the substitution of hydroxyapatite with fluor-hydroxyapatite in order to reduce solubility. The use of nanotechnology as well as the crystallization of hydroxypaptite starting from amorphous compound are effective strategies to gain mineralization even if they fail to reconstruct the histological and...

  5. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: What Have We Learned in Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies that underpin tissue engineering as a research field were developed with the aim of producing functional human cartilage in vitro. Much of our practical experience with three-dimensional cultures, tissue bioreactors, scaffold materials, stem cells, and differentiation protocols was gained using cartilage as a model system. Despite these advances, however, generation of engineered cartilage matrix with the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of mature articular cartilage has not yet been achieved. Currently, the major obstacles to synthesis of clinically useful cartilage constructs are our inability to control differentiation to the extent needed, and the failure of engineered and host tissues to integrate after construct implantation. The aim of this chapter is to distil from the large available body of literature the seminal approaches and experimental techniques developed for cartilage tissue engineering and to identify those specific areas requiring further research effort. PMID:26445827

  6. The combination of meltblown and electrospinning for bone tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Erben, J.; Pilařová, K.; Sanetrník, F.; Chvojka, J.; Jenčová, V.; Blažková, L.; Havlíček, J.; Novák, O.; Mikeš, P.; Prosecká, Eva; Lukáš, D.; Kuželová Kostaková, E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 143, mar 15 (2015), s. 172-176. ISSN 0167-577X Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : meltblown * electrospinning * tissue engineering * polycaprolactone Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.489, year: 2014

  7. Environmental regulation of valvulogenesis: implications for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riem Vis, Paul W; Kluin, Jolanda; Sluijter, Joost P G; van Herwerden, Lex A; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing research efforts aim at improving the creation of tissue-engineered heart valves for in vivo systemic application. Hence, in vitro studies concentrate on optimising culture protocols incorporating biological as well as biophysical stimuli for tissue development. Important lessons can be drawn from valvulogenesis to mimic natural valve development in vitro. Here, we review the up-to-date status of valvulogenesis, focussing on the biomolecular and biophysical regulation of semilunar valve development. In addition, we discuss potential benefits of incorporating concepts derived from valvulogenesis, as well as alternative approaches, in tissue-engineering protocols, to improve in vitro valve development. The combined efforts from clinicians, cell biologists and engineers are required to implement and evaluate these approaches to achieve optimised protocols for heart-valve tissue engineering. PMID:20637649

  8. Production of extracellular matrix powder for tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanambar Sadighi

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The results show that our decellularization method produced an adipose ECM scaffold rich of collagen fibers, suitable and effective substrate for use in soft tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  9. Artificial implant materials - role of biomaterials in the tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecture presents different materials applicable in production of implants. All these materials should be sterilized, however some of them can be modified using by irradiation (e.g. polymers). Numerous examples of tissue engineering are presented

  10. Tissue Engineering for Intervertebral Disk Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, VYL; Chan, D; Chan, BP; Cheung, KMC; Tam, V

    2011-01-01

    Many challenges confront intervertebral disk engineering owing to complexity and the presence of extraordinary stresses. Rebuilding a disk of native function could be useful for removal of the symptoms and correction of altered spine kinematics. Improvement in understanding of disk properties and techniques for disk engineering brings promise to the fabrication of a functional motion segment for the treatment of disk degeneration. Increasing sophistication of techniques available in biomedica...

  11. 3D Nanoprinting Technologies for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering recovers an original function of tissue by replacing the damaged part with a new tissue or organ regenerated using various engineering technologies. This technology uses a scaffold to support three-dimensional (3D tissue formation. Conventional scaffold fabrication methods do not control the architecture, pore shape, porosity, or interconnectivity of the scaffold, so it has limited ability to stimulate cell growth and to generate new tissue. 3D printing technologies may overcome these disadvantages of traditional fabrication methods. These technologies use computers to assist in design and fabrication, so the 3D scaffolds can be fabricated as designed and standardized. Particularly, because nanofabrication technology based on two-photon absorption (2PA and on controlled electrospinning can generate structures with submicron resolution, these methods have been evaluated in various areas of tissue engineering. Recent combinations of 3D nanoprinting technologies with methods from molecular biology and cell dynamics have suggested new possibilities for improved tissue regeneration. If the interaction between cells and scaffold system with biomolecules can be understood and controlled and if an optimal 3D environment for tissue regeneration can be realized, 3D nanoprinting will become an important tool in tissue engineering.

  12. Development of Cell-Responsive Nanophase Hydroxyapatite for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Murugan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaffold plays a critical role in engineering bone tissues by providing necessary structural support for the cells to accommodate and guiding their growth in the three dimensional (3D space. Therefore, designing scaffold that mimic composition and structural aspects of the bone is of great importance to promote cell adhesion, cell-matrix interactions, osteointegration, tissue formation and continued function. Nanophase hydroxyapatite (HA is a class of bioceramic material that mimics the bone mineral in composition and structure and possesses unique capabilities for surface interactions with biological entities than conventional HA; therefore, it can be used as a scaffolding system in engineering bone tissues. This article reports synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of nanophase HA for use in bone tissue engineering and how the nanophase characteristics help the HA to promote cells/tissue growth with suitable experimental examples.

  13. Tissue Engineering for the Neonatal and Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya K. Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Of all the surgical specialties, the remit of the pediatric surgeon encompasses the widest range of organ systems and includes disorders from the fetus to the adolescent. As such, the recent emergence of tissue engineering is of particular interest to the pediatric surgical community. The individual challenges of tissue engineering depend largely on the nature and function of the target tissue. In general, the main issues currently under investigation include the sourcing of an appropriate cell source, design of biomaterials for guided tissue growth, provision of a biomolecular stimulus to enhance cellular functions and the development of bioreactors to allow for prolonged periods of cell culture under specific physiological conditions. This review aims to provide a general overview of tissue engineering in the major organ systems, including the cardiovascular, digestive, urinary, respiratory, musculoskeletal, nervous, integumentary and lymphatic systems. Special attention is paid to pediatrics as well as recent clinical applications.

  14. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Jason T Shearn; Kinneberg, Kirsten R. C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; David L Butler

    2011-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve ...

  15. Translational Models for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Sah, Robert L.; Ratcliffe, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health–sponsored workshop “Translational Models for Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine” was held to describe the utility of various translational models for engineered tissues and regenerative medicine therapies targeting intervertebral disc, cartilage, meniscus, ligament, tendon, muscle, and bone. Participants included leaders in the various topics, as well as National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration. The Food and Dru...

  16. Repair of sciatic nerve defects using tissue engineered nerves

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Caishun; Lv, Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we constructed tissue-engineered nerves with acellular nerve allografts in Sprague-Dawley rats, which were prepared using chemical detergents-enzymatic digestion and mechanical methods, in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells of Wistar rats cultured in vitro, to repair 15 mm sciatic bone defects in Wistar rats. At postoperative 12 weeks, electrophysiological detection results showed that the conduction velocity of regenerated nerve after repair with tissue-engine...

  17. 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering produced by microfabrication technology

    OpenAIRE

    Carletti, Eleonora

    2009-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques (RP) hold great promise for designing 3-dimensional (3-D) regular and ordered scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. With these techniques, good architecture reproducibility as well as porosity control of the structure can be obtained. This work dealt with the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds with regular micrometric geometry by using an in-house built microfabrication system. Poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLA), poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid...

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neural Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Park, In-Hyun; Zhu, Yiqian; Patel, Shyam; Daley, George Q.; Song, Li

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapies and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent and represent a valuable system to investigate iPSC differentiation and therapeutic potential. Here we derived NCSCs from human iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and investigated the potential of NCSCs for neural tissue engineering. The differentiation of iPSCs and the expansion of derived NCSCs varied in different cell lines, but all NCSC l...

  19. Three-dimensional bioprinting in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guifang; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2016-02-01

    With the advances of stem cell research, development of intelligent biomaterials and three-dimensional biofabrication strategies, highly mimicked tissue or organs can be engineered. Among all the biofabrication approaches, bioprinting based on inkjet printing technology has the promises to deliver and create biomimicked tissue with high throughput, digital control, and the capacity of single cell manipulation. Therefore, this enabling technology has great potential in regenerative medicine and translational applications. The most current advances in organ and tissue bioprinting based on the thermal inkjet printing technology are described in this review, including vasculature, muscle, cartilage, and bone. In addition, the benign side effect of bioprinting to the printed mammalian cells can be utilized for gene or drug delivery, which can be achieved conveniently during precise cell placement for tissue construction. With layer-by-layer assembly, three-dimensional tissues with complex structures can be printed using converted medical images. Therefore, bioprinting based on thermal inkjet is so far the most optimal solution to engineer vascular system to the thick and complex tissues. Collectively, bioprinting has great potential and broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The future advances of bioprinting include the integration of different printing mechanisms to engineer biphasic or triphasic tissues with optimized scaffolds and further understanding of stem cell biology. PMID:26466597

  20. A bioreactor system for clinically relevant bone tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Franciscus Wilhelmus

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering of bone by combining mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with a suitable ceramic carrier provides a potential alternative for autologous bone grafts. However, for large scale-production, the current two dimensional (2D) multiplication process in tissue culture flasks has some serious dr

  1. Engineered Polymeric Hydrogels for 3D Tissue Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials are widely used in a wide range of biomedical applications due to their unique properties, such as biocompatibility, multi-tunability and easy fabrication. Specifically, polymeric hydrogel materials are extensively utilized as therapeutic implants and therapeutic vehicles for tissue regeneration and drug delivery systems. Recently, hydrogels have been developed as artificial cellular microenvironments because of the structural and physiological similarity to native extracellular matrices. With recent advances in hydrogel materials, many researchers are creating three-dimensional tissue models using engineered hydrogels and various cell sources, which is a promising platform for tissue regeneration, drug discovery, alternatives to animal models and the study of basic cell biology. In this review, we discuss how polymeric hydrogels are used to create engineered tissue constructs. Specifically, we focus on emerging technologies to generate advanced tissue models that precisely recapitulate complex native tissues in vivo.

  2. Engineering spinal fusion: evaluating ceramic materials for cell based tissue engineered approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this thesis was to advance the development of tissue engineered posterolateral spinal fusion by investigating the potential of calcium phosphate ceramic materials to support cell based tissue engineered bone formation. This was accomplished by developing several novel model syst

  3. Engineering Cell and Tissue Mechanical Microenvironments for Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Tsou, Danielle An-Chi

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of tissue engineering is to create technologies that will improve or replace biological function of diseased or damaged cells and tissues. The purpose of my thesis work is to determine how the mechanical properties of the murine microenvironment, specifically matrix stiffness, can affect the function and behavior of cells and tissues. Previous research has shown that stiffness is a powerful mechanical property; it is associated with breast and liver cancer, and can also be ...

  4. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been e...

  5. Characterization of Sulfated Alginate Hybrid Gels for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Aaen, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a field aiming to replace damaged tissue while reducing the great need of organ donors the world is facing today. Alginates are linear co-polymers consisting of the two monosaccharides β-D-mannuronic acid (M), and its 5-epimer α-L-guluronic acid (G). They can form hydrogels, and are candidates for use in tissue engineering scaffolds. Alginate is readily available at a low cost, and its hydrogels meet requirements of scaffolds such as mechanical strength and good biocomp...

  6. Biomaterial based cardiac tissue engineering and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyer, Locke Davenport; Montgomery, Miles; Zhao, Yimu; Xiao, Yun; Conant, Genevieve; Korolj, Anastasia; Radisic, Milica

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, necessitating the development of effective treatment strategies. A myocardial infarction involves the blockage of a coronary artery leading to depletion of nutrient and oxygen supply to cardiomyocytes and massive cell death in a region of the myocardium. Cardiac tissue engineering is the growth of functional cardiac tissue in vitro on biomaterial scaffolds for regenerative medicine application. This strategy relies on the optimization of the complex relationship between cell networks and biomaterial properties. In this review, we discuss important biomaterial properties for cardiac tissue engineering applications, such as elasticity, degradation, and induced host response, and their relationship to engineered cardiac cell environments. With these properties in mind, we also emphasize in vitro use of cardiac tissues for high-throughput drug screening and disease modelling. PMID:25989939

  7. Smooth muscle strips for intestinal tissue engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Walthers

    Full Text Available Functionally contracting smooth muscle is an essential part of the engineered intestine that has not been replicated in vitro. The purpose of this study is to produce contracting smooth muscle in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle organization. We employed intact smooth muscle strips and compared them to dissociated smooth muscle cells in culture for 14 days. Cells isolated by enzymatic digestion quickly lost maturity markers for smooth muscle cells and contained few enteric neural and glial cells. Cultured smooth muscle strips exhibited periodic contraction and maintained neural and glial markers. Smooth muscle strips cultured for 14 days also exhibited regular fluctuation of intracellular calcium, whereas cultured smooth muscle cells did not. After implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds, smooth muscle strip constructs expressed high levels of smooth muscle maturity markers as well as enteric neural and glial cells. Intact smooth muscle strips may be a useful component for engineered intestinal smooth muscle.

  8. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Barthes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells’ behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future.

  9. Cell Microenvironment Engineering and Monitoring for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine: The Recent Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthes, Julien; Özçelik, Hayriye; Hindié, Mathilde; Ndreu-Halili, Albana; Hasan, Anwarul

    2014-01-01

    In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, the conditions in the immediate vicinity of the cells have a direct effect on cells' behaviour and subsequently on clinical outcomes. Physical, chemical, and biological control of cell microenvironment are of crucial importance for the ability to direct and control cell behaviour in 3-dimensional tissue engineering scaffolds spatially and temporally. In this review, we will focus on the different aspects of cell microenvironment such as surface micro-, nanotopography, extracellular matrix composition and distribution, controlled release of soluble factors, and mechanical stress/strain conditions and how these aspects and their interactions can be used to achieve a higher degree of control over cellular activities. The effect of these parameters on the cellular behaviour within tissue engineering context is discussed and how these parameters are used to develop engineered tissues is elaborated. Also, recent techniques developed for the monitoring of the cell microenvironment in vitro and in vivo are reviewed, together with recent tissue engineering applications where the control of cell microenvironment has been exploited. Cell microenvironment engineering and monitoring are crucial parts of tissue engineering efforts and systems which utilize different components of the cell microenvironment simultaneously can provide more functional engineered tissues in the near future. PMID:25143954

  10. Current approaches to electrospun nanofibers for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultimate goal of tissue engineering is to replace damaged tissues by applying engineering technology and the principles of life sciences. To successfully engineer a desirable tissue, three main elements of cells, scaffolds and growth factors need to be harmonized. Biomaterial-based scaffolds serve as a critical platform both to support cell adhesion and to deliver growth factors. Various methods of fabricating scaffolds have been investigated. One recently developed method that is growing in popularity is called electrospinning. Electrospinning is known for its capacity to make fibrous and porous structures that are similar to natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Other advantages to electrospinning include its ability to create relatively large surface to volume ratios, its ability to control fiber size from micro- to nano-scales and its versatility in material choice. Although early work with electrospun fibers has shown promise in the regeneration of certain types of tissues, further modification of their chemical, biological and mechanical properties would permit future advancements. In this paper, current approaches to the development of modular electrospun fibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering are discussed. Their chemical and physical characteristics can be tuned for the regeneration of specific target tissues by co-spinning of multiple materials and by post-modification of the surface of electrospun fibers. In addition, topology or structure can also be controlled to elicit specific responses from cells and tissues. The selection of proper polymers, suitable surface modification techniques and the control of the dimension and arrangement of the fibrous structure of electrospun fibers can offer versatility and tissue specificity, and therefore provide a blueprint for specific tissue engineering applications. (paper)

  11. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  12. Extraction and Assembly of Tissue-Derived Gels for Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Uriel, Shiri; Labay, Edwardine; Francis-Sedlak, Megan; Moya, Monica L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Ervin, Natalia; Cankova, Zdravka; Eric M Brey

    2008-01-01

    Interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell function. Cells cultured in, or on, three-dimensional ECM recapitulate similar features to those found in vivo that are not present in traditional two-dimensional culture. In addition, both natural and synthetic materials containing ECM components have shown promise in a number of tissue engineering applications. Current materials available for cell culture and tissue engineering do not adequately refle...

  13. Growing Tissues in Real and Simulated Microgravity: New Methods for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Ulbrich, Claudia; Nils E. Magnusson; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that could be achieved by culturing cells in Space or by devices created to simulate microgravity on Earth. Understanding the biology of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures is very important for...

  14. Biocompatible magnetic core-shell nanocomposites for engineered magnetic tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Arco, Laura; Rodriguez, Ismael A.; Carriel, Victor; Bonhome-Espinosa, Ana B.; Campos, Fernando; Kuzhir, Pavel; Duran, Juan D. G.; Lopez-Lopez, Modesto T.

    2016-04-01

    The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare biocompatible core-shell nanostructures consisting of a polymeric core and a magnetic shell, which are used for this purpose. We show that using a core-shell architecture is doubly advantageous. First, gravitational settling for core-shell nanocomposites is slower because of the reduction of the composite average density connected to the light polymer core. Second, the magnetic response of core-shell nanocomposites can be tuned by changing the thickness of the magnetic layer. The incorporation of the composites into biopolymer hydrogels containing cells results in magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues whose mechanical properties can be controlled by external magnetic forces. Indeed, we obtain a significant increase of the viscoelastic moduli of the engineered tissues when exposed to an external magnetic field. Because the composites are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, the prepared bio-artificial tissue-like constructs also display excellent ex vivo cell viability and proliferation. When implanted in vivo, the engineered tissues show good biocompatibility and outstanding interaction with the host tissue. Actually, they only cause a localized transitory inflammatory reaction at the implantation site, without any effect on other organs. Altogether, our results suggest that the inclusion of magnetic core-shell nanocomposites into biomaterials would enable tissue engineering of artificial substitutes whose mechanical properties could be tuned to match those of the potential target tissue. In a wider perspective, the good biocompatibility and magnetic behavior of the composites could be beneficial for many other applications.The inclusion of magnetic nanoparticles into biopolymer matrixes enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive engineered tissues. Here we

  15. Skeletal muscle tissue engineering: strategies for volumetric constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio eCittadella Vigodarzere

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by high metabolic requirements, defined structure and high regenerative potential. As such, it constitutes an appealing platform for tissue engineering to address volumetric defects, as proven by recent works in this field.Several issues common to all engineered constructs constrain the variety of tissues that can be realized in vitro, principal among them the lack of a vascular system and the absence of reliable cell sources; as it is, the only successful tissue engineering constructs are not characterized by active function, present limited cellular survival at implantation and possess low metabolic requirements.Recently, functionally competent constructs have been engineered, with vascular structures supporting their metabolic requirements. In addition to the use of biochemical cues, physical means, mechanical stimulation and the application of electric tension have proven effective in stimulating the differentiation of cells and the maturation of the constructs; while the use of co-cultures provided fine control of cellular developments through paracrine activity. This review will provide a brief analysis of some of the most promising improvements in the field, with particular attention to the techniques that could prove easily transferable to other branches of tissue engineering.

  16. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:25771021

  17. Novel opportunities and challenges offered by nanobiomaterials in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Gelain

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio GelainBioscience and Biotechnology Department, University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan, ItalyAbstract: Over the last decades, tissue engineering has demonstrated an unquestionable potential to regenerate damaged tissues and organs. Some tissue-engineered solutions recently entered the clinics (eg, artificial bladder, corneal epithelium, engineered skin, but most of the pathologies of interest are still far from being solved. The advent of stem cells opened the door to large-scale production of “raw living matter” for cell replacement and boosted the overall sector in the last decade. Still reliable synthetic scaffolds fairly resembling the nanostructure of extracellular matrices, showing mechanical properties comparable to those of the tissues to be regenerated and capable of being modularly functionalized with biological active motifs, became feasible only in the last years thanks to newly introduced nanotechnology techniques of material design, synthesis, and characterization. Nanostructured synthetic matrices look to be the next generation scaffolds, opening new powerful pathways for tissue regeneration and introducing new challenges at the same time. We here present a detailed overview of the advantages, applications, and limitations of nanostructured matrices with a focus on both electrospun and self-assembling scaffolds.Keywords: self-assembling peptide, electrospinning, tissue engineering, functionalization

  18. Coaxial electrospun fibers: applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Huang, Jiangnan; Yu, Guoqiang; Cardenas, Romel; Wei, Suying; Wujcik, Evan K; Guo, Zhanhu

    2016-09-01

    Coelectrospinning and emulsion electrospinning are two main methods for preparing core-sheath electrospun nanofibers in a cost-effective and efficient manner. Here, physical phenomena and the effects of solution and processing parameters on the coaxial fibers are introduced. Coaxial fibers with specific drugs encapsulated in the core can exhibit a sustained and controlled release. Their exhibited high surface area and three-dimensional nanofibrous network allows the electrospun fibers to resemble native extracellular matrices. These features of the nanofibers show that they have great potential in drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and many other agents have been successfully encapsulated into coaxial fibers for drug delivery. A main advantage of the core-sheath design is that after the process of electrospinning and release, these drugs remain bioactive due to the protection of the sheath. Applications of coaxial fibers as scaffolds for tissue engineering include bone, cartilage, cardiac tissue, skin, blood vessels and nervous tissue, among others. A synopsis of novel coaxial electrospun fibers, discussing their applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering, is covered pertaining to proteins, growth factors, antibiotics, and other drugs and applications in the fields of bone, cartilage, cardiac, skin, blood vessel, and nervous tissue engineering, respectively. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:654-677. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1391 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26848106

  19. Electrospun Scaffolds for Corneal Tissue Engineering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Kong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Corneal diseases constitute the second leading cause of vision loss and affect more than 10 million people globally. As there is a severe shortage of fresh donated corneas and an unknown risk of immune rejection with traditional heterografts, it is very important and urgent to construct a corneal equivalent to replace pathologic corneal tissue. Corneal tissue engineering has emerged as a practical strategy to develop corneal tissue substitutes, and the design of a scaffold with mechanical properties and transparency similar to that of natural cornea is paramount for the regeneration of corneal tissues. Nanofibrous scaffolds produced by electrospinning have high surface area–to-volume ratios and porosity that simulate the structure of protein fibers in native extra cellular matrix (ECM. The versatilities of electrospinning of polymer components, fiber structures, and functionalization have made the fabrication of nanofibrous scaffolds with suitable mechanical strength, transparency and biological properties for corneal tissue engineering feasible. In this paper, we review the recent developments of electrospun scaffolds for engineering corneal tissues, mainly including electrospun materials (single and blended polymers, fiber structures (isotropic or anisotropic, functionalization (improved mechanical properties and transparency, applications (corneal cell survival, maintenance of phenotype and formation of corneal tissue and future development perspectives.

  20. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  1. Osteoblasts and their applications in bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupani A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Asha Rupani1, Richard Balint2, Sarah H Cartmell1,21Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, UK; 2Materials Science Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: Tissue engineering is an emerging therapy that offers a new solution to patients suffering from bone loss. It utilizes cells derived from such sources as a patient's own bone or bone marrow, which are laboratory-isolated, grown (so they multiply in number, and placed onto a degradable material, or scaffold, that has mechanical/chemical properties appropriate to the bone section that it is replacing. The cells plus the scaffold are then grown in a container, or bioreactor, which is necessary as it provides the correct environment required for the cells to proliferate, differentiate, and to produce extracellular matrix. The following review focuses on the use of osteoblasts for bone tissue engineering.Keywords: osteoblast, bone, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, orthopaedic

  2. Gelatin-Based Materials in Ocular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Rose

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin has been used for many years in pharmaceutical formulation, cell culture and tissue engineering on account of its excellent biocompatibility, ease of processing and availability at low cost. Over the last decade gelatin has been extensively evaluated for numerous ocular applications serving as cell-sheet carriers, bio-adhesives and bio-artificial grafts. These different applications naturally have diverse physical, chemical and biological requirements and this has prompted research into the modification of gelatin and its derivatives. The crosslinking of gelatin alone or in combination with natural or synthetic biopolymers has produced a variety of scaffolds that could be suitable for ocular applications. This review focuses on methods to crosslink gelatin-based materials and how the resulting materials have been applied in ocular tissue engineering. Critical discussion of recent innovations in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine will highlight future opportunities for gelatin-based materials in ophthalmology.

  3. Protein turnover during in vitro tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiyao; Chang, Zhen; Oliveira, Gisele; Xiong, Maiyer; Smith, Lloyd M; Frey, Brian L; Welham, Nathan V

    2016-03-01

    Repopulating acellular biological scaffolds with phenotypically appropriate cells is a promising approach for regenerating functional tissues and organs. Under this tissue engineering paradigm, reseeded cells are expected to remodel the scaffold by active protein synthesis and degradation; however, the rate and extent of this remodeling remain largely unknown. Here, we present a technique to measure dynamic proteome changes during in vitro remodeling of decellularized tissue by reseeded cells, using vocal fold mucosa as the model system. Decellularization and recellularization were optimized, and a stable isotope labeling strategy was developed to differentiate remnant proteins constituting the original scaffold from proteins newly synthesized by reseeded cells. Turnover of matrix and cellular proteins and the effects of cell-scaffold interaction were elucidated. This technique sheds new light on in vitro tissue remodeling and the process of tissue regeneration, and is readily applicable to other tissue and organ systems. PMID:26724458

  4. Application of adult stem cells in neural tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihong Piao; Wei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTIVE:To investigate the progress in finding,isolation and culture.proliferation and differentiation,and application in neural tissue engineering of adult stem cells(ASCs).DATA SOURCES:Using the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering".we searched the PubMed for adult stem ceils-related studies published in English from January 2001 to August 2006.Meanwhile,we also performed a China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI)search for homochronous correlative literatures on the computer by inputting the terms"adult stem cells,nerve,tissue engineering"in Chinese.texts were searched for.Inclusive criteria:①Literatures about the sources,distribution,culture.proliferation and differentiation.and application in the repair of neural ASCs by tissue engineering.②Articles recommended either by randomized.blind or by other methods were not excluded.Exclusive criteria:①Embryonic stem cells.②Review,repetitive study,case report,Meta analysis. DATA EXTRACTION:Totally 1 278 articles related to ASCs were collected,32 were involved and the other 1 246 were excluded. DATA SYNTHESIS:Adult stem cell has the ability of self-renewal.unceasing proliferation and transdifferentiation.It has wide source,which does not involved in ethical problems.It has advantages over embryonic stem cell.Studies on the isolation and culture,induction and differentiation and application in neural ASCs by tissue engineering contribute to obtaining considerable ASCs,so as to provide experimental and theoretical bases for CONCLUSION:ASCs play a very important role in neural tissue engineering.

  5. Colorectal tissue engineering: prerequisites, current status and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denost, Quentin; Adam, Jean-Philippe; Rullier, Eric; Bareille, Reine; Montembault, Alexandra; David, Laurent; Bordenave, Laurence

    2013-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tissue engineering has emerged over the past 20 years and was often focused on esophagus, stomach or small intestine, whereas bioengineering researches of colorectal tissue are scarce. However, some promising results have been obtained in animal models. Refinements should be performed in scaffold and cell source selection to allow smooth muscle layer regeneration. Indeed, synthetic and natural polymers such as small intestinal submucosa and collagen sponge seeded with organoid units or smooth muscle cells did not allow smooth muscle regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue seeded on composite scaffold could represent an interesting way to achieve this goal. This article reviews potential indications, current status and perspectives of tissue engineering in the area of colorectal surgery. PMID:23895077

  6. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  7. Biomimetic Polymers for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Brisa; Martinelli, Valentina; Jeong, Mark; Bosi, Susanna; Lapasin, Romano; Taylor, Matthew R G; Long, Carlin S; Shandas, Robin; Park, Daewon; Mestroni, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure is a morbid disorder characterized by progressive cardiomyocyte (CM) dysfunction and death. Interest in cell-based therapies is growing, but sustainability of injected CMs remains a challenge. To mitigate this, we developed an injectable biomimetic Reverse Thermal Gel (RTG) specifically engineered to support long-term CM survival. This RTG biopolymer provided a solution-based delivery vehicle of CMs, which transitioned to a gel-based matrix shortly after reaching body temperature. In this study we tested the suitability of this biopolymer to sustain CM viability. The RTG was biomolecule-functionalized with poly-l-lysine or laminin. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM) and adult rat ventricular myocytes (ARVM) were cultured in plain-RTG and biomolecule-functionalized-RTG both under 3-dimensional (3D) conditions. Traditional 2D biomolecule-coated dishes were used as controls. We found that the RTG-lysine stimulated NRVM to spread and form heart-like functional syncytia. Regarding cell contraction, in both RTG and RTG-lysine, beating cells were recorded after 21 days. Additionally, more than 50% (p value < 0.05; n = 5) viable ARVMs, characterized by a well-defined cardiac phenotype represented by sarcomeric cross-striations, were found in the RTG-laminin after 8 days. These results exhibit the tremendous potential of a minimally invasive CM transplantation through our designed RTG-cell therapy platform. PMID:27073119

  8. Biomolecular localization: Applications in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znidarsic, William John

    A carrier material designed for in vivo implantation of cells can be chemically modified to present ligands that interact with cell surface receptors and guide new tissue formation. This study presents a versatile technique for modification of alginate matrices that relies upon molecular coating of nanoparticle surfaces, using a layer-by-layer deposition technique, followed by dispersion of these particles with the alginate gel matrix. The deposition technique results in nanoparticle coatings that present a variety of biological information including organic molecules (e.g. amines, polyacrylic acid (PAA), phosphoproteins, collagen, albumin, and growth factors) and inorganic calcium phosphate (e.g. hydroxyapatite). Results show that incorporation of coated nanoparticles can stimulate cell proliferation when compared with incorporation of un-coated particles and/or free molecules. Because cells incorporated within the volume of the alginate matrix present cell surface receptors that are spatially distributed on the nano-scale, the observed stimulation in proliferation may be a result of changes in local concentration of molecules that are coated on the nanoparticles rather than added in "free form". In the repair of maxillofacial defects, alginate gels are used clinically for the delivery and localization of stem cells. Similar techniques for three-dimensional localization of biomolecules within these constructs may possibly prove beneficial in stimulating positive biological outcomes in vivo.

  9. Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle Organoids for Reversible Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman; DelTatto, Michael; Shansky, Janet; Lemaire, Julie; Chang, Albert; Payumo, Francis; Lee, Peter; Goodyear, Amy; Raven, Latasha

    1996-01-01

    Genetically modified murine skeletal myoblasts were tissue engineered in vitro into organ-like structures (organoids) containing only postmitotic myofibers secreting pharmacological levels of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). Subcutaneous organoid Implantation under tension led to the rapid and stable appearance of physiological sera levels of rhGH for up to 12 weeks, whereas surgical removal led to its rapid disappearance. Reversible delivery of bioactive compounds from postimtotic cells in tissue engineered organs has several advantages over other forms of muscle gene therapy.

  10. HEPATIC TISSUE ENGINEERING (MODERN STATE OF THIS PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Gulay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article it was discussed the problem of creation implanted hepatic tissue engineering designs as a modern stage of complex investigation for working out bioartifi cial liver support systems. It was determined that for the positive decision of numerous biological and technological problems it is necessary: to use matrices with determined properties, which mimic properties of hepatic extracellular matrix; to use technology for stereotype sowing of these matrices by both parenchymal and non-parenchymal hepatic cells and to improve the technologies for making and assembling of hepatic tissue-engineering designs.

  11. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Alyssa A. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Larson, Jeffery C. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Garson, III, Alfred B. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Guan, Huifeng [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fisher, John P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Brey, Eric M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  12. Outlook for Tissue Engineering of the Tympanic Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Fernandez, Maria A; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2015-01-21

    Tympanic membrane perforation is a common problem leading to hearing loss. Despite the autoregenerative activity of the eardrum, chronic perforations require surgery using different materials, from autologous tissue - fascia, cartilage, fat or perichondrium - to paper patch. However, both, surgical procedures (myringoplasty or tympanoplasty) and the materials employed, have a number of limitations. Therefore, the advances in this field are incorporating the principles of tissue engineering, which includes the use of scaffolds, biomolecules and cells. This discipline allows the development of new biocompatible materials that reproduce the structure and mechanical properties of the native tympanic membrane, while it seeks to implement new therapeutic approaches that can be performed in an outpatient setting. Moreover, the creation of an artificial tympanic membrane commercially available would reduce the duration of the surgery and costs. The present review analyzes the current treatment of tympanic perforations and examines the techniques of tissue engineering, either to develop bioartificial constructs, or for tympanic regeneration by using different scaffold materials, bioactive molecules and cells. Finally, it considers the aspects regarding the design of scaffolds, release of biomolecules and use of cells that must be taken into account in the tissue engineering of the eardrum. The possibility of developing new biomaterials, as well as constructs commercially available, makes tissue engineering a discipline with great potential, capable of overcoming the drawbacks of current surgical procedures. PMID:26557361

  13. Outlook for tissue engineering of the tympanic membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Villar-Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tympanic membrane perforation is a common problem leading to hearing loss. Despite the autoregenerative activity of the eardrum, chronic perforations require surgery using different materials, from autologous tissue - fascia, cartilage, fat or perichondrium - to paper patch. However, both, surgical procedures (myringoplasty or tympanoplasty and the materials employed, have a number of limitations. Therefore, the advances in this field are incorporating the principles of tissue engineering, which includes the use of scaffolds, biomolecules and cells. This discipline allows the development of new biocompatible materials that reproduce the structure and mechanical properties of the native tympanic membrane, while it seeks to implement new therapeutic approaches that can be performed in an outpatient setting. Moreover, the creation of an artificial tympanic membrane commercially available would reduce the duration of the surgery and costs. The present review analyzes the current treatment of tympanic perforations and examines the techniques of tissue engineering, either to develop bioartificial constructs, or for tympanic regeneration by using different scaffold materials, bioactive molecules and cells. Finally, it considers the aspects regarding the design of scaffolds, release of biomolecules and use of cells that must be taken into account in the tissue engineering of the eardrum. The possibility of developing new biomaterials, as well as constructs commercially available, makes tissue engineering a discipline with great potential, capable of overcoming the drawbacks of current surgical procedures.

  14. Controlling the structural and functional anisotropy of engineered cardiac tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm s−1, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN mm−2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. (paper)

  15. Partially Nanofibrous Architecture of 3D Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Guobao; Ma, Peter X.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal tissue-engineering scaffold should provide suitable pores and appropriate pore surface to induce desired cellular activities and to guide 3D tissue regeneration. In the present work, we have developed macroporous polymer scaffolds with varying pore wall architectures from smooth (solid), microporous, partially nanofibrous, to entirely nanofibrous ones. All scaffolds are designed to have well-controlled interconnected macropores, resulting from leaching sugar sphere template. We exami...

  16. Review: Polymeric-Based 3D Printing for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Geng-Hsi; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing, also referred to as additive manufacturing, is a technology that allows for customized fabrication through computer-aided design. 3D printing has many advantages in the fabrication of tissue engineering scaffolds, including fast fabrication, high precision, and customized production. Suitable scaffolds can be designed and custom-made based on medical images such as those obtained from computed tomography. Many 3D printing methods have been employed for tissue ...

  17. Tissue Engineering Bone Using Autologous Progenitor Cells in the Peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Jinhui Shen; Ashwin Nair; Ramesh Saxena; Cheng Cheng Zhang; Joseph Borrelli; Liping Tang

    2014-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts, there remains a need for novel methods to improve the ossification of scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Based on a common phenomenon and known pathological conditions of peritoneal membrane ossification following peritoneal dialysis, we have explored the possibility of regenerating ossified tissue in the peritoneum. Interestingly, in addition to inflammatory cells, we discovered a large number of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the periton...

  18. Tissue engineering of bone: the reconstructive surgeon's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Kneser, U; Schaefer, D. J.; Polykandriotis, E; Horch, R E

    2007-01-01

    Bone defects represent a medical and socioeconomic challenge. Different types of biomaterials are applied for reconstructive indications and receive rising interest. However, autologous bone grafts are still considered as the gold standard for reconstruction of extended bone defects. The generation of bioartificial bone tissues may help to overcome the problems related to donor site morbidity and size limitations. Tissue engineering is, according to its historic definition, an “interdisciplin...

  19. Outlook for Tissue Engineering of the Tympanic Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Villar-Fernandez, Maria A.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Tympanic membrane perforation is a common problem leading to hearing loss. Despite the autoregenerative activity of the eardrum, chronic perforations require surgery using different materials, from autologous tissue - fascia, cartilage, fat or perichondrium - to paper patch. However, both, surgical procedures (myringoplasty or tympanoplasty) and the materials employed, have a number of limitations. Therefore, the advances in this field are incorporating the principles of tissue engineering, w...

  20. Today Prospects for Tissue Engineering Therapeutic Approach in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In dental practice there is an increasing need for predictable therapeutic protocols able to regenerate tissues that, due to inflammatory or traumatic events, may suffer from loss of their function. One of the topics arising major interest in the research applied to regenerative medicine is represented by tissue engineering and, in particular, by stem cells. The study of stem cells in dentistry over the years has shown an exponential increase in literature. Adult mesenchymal stem cells have r...

  1. A Novel Albumin-Based Tissue Scaffold for Autogenic Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei-Shan; -Liang Lee, I.; Yu, Wei-Lin; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Jane, Wann-Neng; Shen, Hsin-Hsin

    2014-07-01

    Tissue scaffolds provide a framework for living tissue regeneration. However, traditional tissue scaffolds are exogenous, composed of metals, ceramics, polymers, and animal tissues, and have a defined biocompatibility and application. This study presents a new method for obtaining a tissue scaffold from blood albumin, the major protein in mammalian blood. Human, bovine, and porcine albumin was polymerised into albumin polymers by microbial transglutaminase and was then cast by freeze-drying-based moulding to form albumin tissue scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy and material testing analyses revealed that the albumin tissue scaffold possesses an extremely porous structure, moderate mechanical strength, and resilience. Using a culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a model, we showed that MSCs can be seeded and grown in the albumin tissue scaffold. Furthermore, the albumin tissue scaffold can support the long-term osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. These results show that the albumin tissue scaffold exhibits favourable material properties and good compatibility with cells. We propose that this novel tissue scaffold can satisfy essential needs in tissue engineering as a general-purpose substrate. The use of this scaffold could lead to the development of new methods of artificial fabrication of autogenic tissue substitutes.

  2. Hydrogel Bioprinted Microchannel Networks for Vascularization of Tissue Engineering Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertassoni, Luiz E.; Cecconi, Martina; Manoharan, Vijayan; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Hjortnaes, Jesper; Cristino, Ana Luiza; Barabaschi, Giada; Demarchi, Danilo; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization remains a critical challenge in tissue engineering. The development of vascular networks within densely populated and metabolically functional tissues facilitate transport of nutrients and removal of waste products, thus preserving cellular viability over a long period of time. Despite tremendous progress in fabricating complex tissue constructs in the past few years, approaches for controlled vascularization within hydrogel based engineered tissue constructs have remained limited. Here, we report a three dimensional (3D) micromolding technique utilizing bioprinted agarose template fibers to fabricate microchannel networks with various architectural features within photo cross linkable hydrogel constructs. Using the proposed approach, we were able to successfully embed functional and perfusable microchannels inside methacrylated gelatin (GelMA), star poly (ethylene glycol-co-lactide) acrylate (SPELA), poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) and poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels at different concentrations. In particular, GelMA hydrogels were used as a model to demonstrate the functionality of the fabricated vascular networks in improving mass transport, cellular viability and differentiation within the cell-laden tissue constructs. In addition, successful formation of endothelial monolayers within the fabricated channels was confirmed. Overall, our proposed strategy represents an effective technique for vascularization of hydrogel constructs with useful applications in tissue engineering and organs on a chip. PMID:24860845

  3. Growing tissues in real and simulated microgravity: new methods for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Aleshcheva, Ganna; Wise, Petra; van Loon, Jack; Ulbrich, Claudia; Magnusson, Nils E; Infanger, Manfred; Bauer, Johann

    2014-12-01

    Tissue engineering in simulated (s-) and real microgravity (r-μg) is currently a topic in Space medicine contributing to biomedical sciences and their applications on Earth. The principal aim of this review is to highlight the advances and accomplishments in the field of tissue engineering that could be achieved by culturing cells in Space or by devices created to simulate microgravity on Earth. Understanding the biology of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular structures is very important for a more complete appreciation of in vivo tissue function and advancing in vitro tissue engineering efforts. Various cells exposed to r-μg in Space or to s-μg created by a random positioning machine, a 2D-clinostat, or a rotating wall vessel bioreactor grew in the form of 3D tissues. Hence, these methods represent a new strategy for tissue engineering of a variety of tissues, such as regenerated cartilage, artificial vessel constructs, and other organ tissues as well as multicellular cancer spheroids. These aggregates are used to study molecular mechanisms involved in angiogenesis, cancer development, and biology and for pharmacological testing of, for example, chemotherapeutic drugs or inhibitors of neoangiogenesis. Moreover, they are useful for studying multicellular responses in toxicology and radiation biology, or for performing coculture experiments. The future will show whether these tissue-engineered constructs can be used for medical transplantations. Unveiling the mechanisms of microgravity-dependent molecular and cellular changes is an up-to-date requirement for improving Space medicine and developing new treatment strategies that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals. PMID:24597549

  4. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  5. The interplay between tissue growth and scaffold degradation in engineered tissue constructs

    KAUST Repository

    O’Dea, R. D.

    2012-09-18

    In vitro tissue engineering is emerging as a potential tool to meet the high demand for replacement tissue, caused by the increased incidence of tissue degeneration and damage. A key challenge in this field is ensuring that the mechanical properties of the engineered tissue are appropriate for the in vivo environment. Achieving this goal will require detailed understanding of the interplay between cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and scaffold degradation. In this paper, we use a mathematical model (based upon a multiphase continuum framework) to investigate the interplay between tissue growth and scaffold degradation during tissue construct evolution in vitro. Our model accommodates a cell population and culture medium, modelled as viscous fluids, together with a porous scaffold and ECM deposited by the cells, represented as rigid porous materials. We focus on tissue growth within a perfusion bioreactor system, and investigate how the predicted tissue composition is altered under the influence of (1) differential interactions between cells and the supporting scaffold and their associated ECM, (2) scaffold degradation, and (3) mechanotransduction-regulated cell proliferation and ECM deposition. Numerical simulation of the model equations reveals that scaffold heterogeneity typical of that obtained from μCT scans of tissue engineering scaffolds can lead to significant variation in the flow-induced mechanical stimuli experienced by cells seeded in the scaffold. This leads to strong heterogeneity in the deposition of ECM. Furthermore, preferential adherence of cells to the ECM in favour of the artificial scaffold appears to have no significant influence on the eventual construct composition; adherence of cells to these supporting structures does, however, lead to cell and ECM distributions which mimic and exaggerate the heterogeneity of the underlying scaffold. Such phenomena have important ramifications for the mechanical integrity of

  6. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  7. Burn Injury: A Challenge for Tissue Engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yerneni LK

    2009-01-01

    growth of human keratinocyte stem cells capable of producing epithelia for large-scale grafting in burns and maintain long-term functionality as a self-renewing tissue. The normal functioning of such an in vitro constructed graft under long-term artificial growth conditions is limited by the difficulties of maintaining the epidermal stem cell compartment. An apparent answer to this problem of stem cell depletion during autograft preparation would be to start with a pure population of progenitor stem cells and derive sustainable autograft from them. We have been aiming to this solution and currently attempting to isolate a pool of epidermal progenitor cells using Mebiol gel, which is a Thermo-Reversible Gelation polymer and was shown by others to support the growth of multi-potent skin-derived epithelial progenitor-1 cells. Additionally, the usefulness of Mebiol gel in maintaining epidermal stem cell compartment without FBS and/or animal origin feeder cells is being investigated by our group.

  8. Role of tissue engineering in dental pulp regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Sial

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer′s disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental pulp is considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that dental pulp stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The dental pulp stem cells are highly proliferative. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental pulp an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review discusses fundamental concepts of stem cell biology and tissue engineering within the context of regenerative dentistry.

  9. A review of rapid prototyping techniques for tissue engineering purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peltola, Sanna M.; Melchels, Ferry P. W.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Kellomaki, Minna

    2008-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is a common name for several techniques, which read in data from computer-aided design (CAD) drawings and manufacture automatically three-dimensional objects layer-by-layer according to the virtual design. The utilization of RP in tissue engineering enables the production of t

  10. Chitosan Scaffolds Containing Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Clara R.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van Clemens A.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffolds derived from natural polysaccharides are very promising in tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine, as they resemble glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we have prepared freeze-dried composite scaffolds of chitosan (CHT) and hyaluronic aci

  11. Mathematically defined tissue engineering scaffold architectures prepared by stereolithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchels, Ferry P. W.; Bertoldi, Katia; Gabbrielli, Ruggero; Velders, Aldrik H.; Feijen, Jan; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2010-01-01

    The technologies employed for the preparation of conventional tissue engineering scaffolds restrict the materials choice and the extent to which the architecture can be designed. Here we show the versatility of stereolithography with respect to materials and freedom of design. Porous scaffolds are d

  12. Current opportunities and challenges in skeletal muscle tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Merel; Harmsen, Martin C; van Luyn, Marja J A; Werker, Paul M N

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give a concise review of the current state of the art in tissue engineering (TE) of skeletal muscle and the opportunities and challenges for future clinical applicability. The endogenous progenitor cells of skeletal muscle, i.e. satellite cells, show a high pronenes

  13. Anisotropic porous polymer foams for potential guided tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasoju, Naresh; Kubies, Dana; Rypáček, František

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2013. L21. ISBN 978-80-85009-76-7. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /5./. 12.07.2013-13.07.2013, Prague] R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : tissue engineering * polymer Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Artificial biodegradable materials for tissue engineering: synthesis and biomimetic modification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotelnikov, Ilya; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Novotná, Katarína; Kučka, Jan; Bačáková, Lucie; Proks, Vladimír; Rypáček, František

    Prague : Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry AS CR, 2013. L22. ISBN 978-80-85009-76-7. [Workshop "Career in Polymers" /5./. 12.07.2013-13.07.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : tissue engineering * biodegradable materials Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  15. Tissue engineering approaches for studying the effect of biochemical and physiological stimuli on cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Vergara, Andrea Carolina

    Tissue engineering (TE) approaches have emerged as an alternative to traditional tissue and organ replacements. The aim of this work was to contribute to the understanding of the effects of cell-material and endothelial cell (EC) paracrine signaling on cell responses using poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels as a material platform. Three TE applications were explored. First, the effect of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) identity was evaluated for vocal fold restoration. Second, the influence of GAG identity was explored and a novel approach for stable endothelialization was developed for vascular graft applications. Finally, EC paracrine signaling in the presence of cyclic stretch, and hydrophobicity and inorganic content were studied for osteogenic applications. In terms of vocal fold restoration, it was found that vocal fold fibroblast (VFF) phenotype and extracellular matrix (ECM) production were impacted by GAG identity. VFF phenotype was preserved in long-term cultured hydrogels containing high molecular weight hyaluronan (HAHMW). Furthermore, collagen I deposition, fibronectin production and smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) expression in PEG-HA, PEG-chondroitin sulfate C and PEG-heparan sulfate (HS) gels suggest that CSC and HS may be undesirable for vocal fold implants. Regarding vascular graft applications, the impact of GAG identity on smooth muscle cell (SMC) foam cell formation was explored. Results support the increasing body of literature that suggests a critical role for dermatan sulfate (DS)-bearing proteoglycans in early atherosclerosis. In addition, an approach for fabricating bi-layered tissue engineering vascular grafts (TEVGs) with stable endothelialization was validated using PEGDA as an intercellular “cementing” agent between adjacent endothelial cells (ECs). Finally, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation toward osteogenic like cells was evaluated. ECM and cell phenotypic data showed that elevated scaffold inorganic

  16. Integration of PCL and PLA in a monolithic porous scaffold for interface tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaffaro, Roberto; Lopresti, Francesco; Botta, Luigi; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Ghersi, Giulio

    2016-10-01

    A novel bi-layered multiphasic scaffold (BLS) have been fabricated for the first time by combining melt mixing, compression molding and particulate leaching. One layer has been composed by polylactic acid (PLA) presenting pore size in the range of 90-110µm while the other layer has been made of polycaprolactone (PCL) with pores ranging from 5 to 40µm. The different chemo-physical properties of the two biopolymers combined with the tunable pore architecture permitted to realize monolithic functionally graded scaffolds engineered to be potentially used for interface tissues regenerations. BLS have been characterized from a morphological and a mechanical point of view. In particular, mechanical tests have been carried out both in air and immersing the specimens in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution at 37°C, in order to evaluate the elastic modulus and the interlayer adhesion strength. Fibroblasts and osteoblasts have been cultured and co-cultured in order to investigate the cells permeation trough the different layers. The results indicate that the presented method is appropriate for the preparation of multiphasic porous scaffolds with tunable morphological and mechanical characteristics. Furthermore, the cells seeded were found to grow with a different trend trough the different layers thus demonstrating that the presented device has good potential to be used in interface tissue regeneration applications. PMID:27442921

  17. Monitoring cell profile in tissue engineered constructs by OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Wood, Mairead A.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Guyot, Elvire; Dubois, Arnaud; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-04-01

    Despite significant progress in tissue engineering over the last decade, the development of real-time, non-destructive tools for monitoring the development of engineered tissues remains a great challenge. To date, the evaluation of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production in response to various culture conditions depends upon traditional DNA, RNA and protein analysis which requires extraction of cell components from constructs resulting in loss of tissue morphology and integrity. In this study, we report how optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be exploited to monitor cell profiles in real-time and in a non-destructive manner. Scaffolds made from poly(lactic acid) (PLLA) with various porosities were scanned by OCT. A local porosity analysis method has been developed to quantify the porosity change. The hypothesis is whether the local porosity analysis can correlate with the tissue growth within the scaffold following seeding of the cells within it. Bone cells have been grown in the PLLA scaffolds under different culture conditions. The OCT images of these scaffolds have been collected. It has been found that the porosity of the cultured scaffold-cell constructs reduced under different culture conditions compared to blank scaffolds. A decrease in light penetration depth in OCT images has also been observed. There existed a good relationship between the local porosity and tissue growth. It has been demonstrated that the mean local porosity based on OCT images can become a unique method to correlate and monitor tissue growth.

  18. Vascular tissue engineering by computer-aided laser micromachining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, Anand; Narayan, Roger J

    2010-04-28

    Many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds are not suitable for fabricating scaffolds with patient-specific attributes. For example, many conventional technologies for fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds do not provide control over overall scaffold geometry or over cell position within the scaffold. In this study, the use of computer-aided laser micromachining to create scaffolds for vascular tissue networks was investigated. Computer-aided laser micromachining was used to construct patterned surfaces in agarose or in silicon, which were used for differential adherence and growth of cells into vascular tissue networks. Concentric three-ring structures were fabricated on agarose hydrogel substrates, in which the inner ring contained human aortic endothelial cells, the middle ring contained HA587 human elastin and the outer ring contained human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Basement membrane matrix containing vascular endothelial growth factor and heparin was to promote proliferation of human aortic endothelial cells within the vascular tissue networks. Computer-aided laser micromachining provides a unique approach to fabricate small-diameter blood vessels for bypass surgery as well as other artificial tissues with complex geometries. PMID:20308108

  19. Biomineralization of Engineered Spider Silk Protein-Based Composite Materials for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Materials based on biodegradable polyesters, such as poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT or poly(butylene terephthalate-co-poly(alkylene glycol terephthalate (PBTAT, have potential application as pro-regenerative scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Herein, the preparation of films composed of PBT or PBTAT and an engineered spider silk protein, (eADF4(C16, that displays multiple carboxylic acid moieties capable of binding calcium ions and facilitating their biomineralization with calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate is reported. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on films mineralized with calcium phosphate show enhanced levels of alkaline phosphatase activity suggesting that such composites have potential use for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Cardiovascular tissue engineering and regeneration based on adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parvizi, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the pre-clinical field is rapidly progressing in search of new therapeutic modalities that replace or complement current medication to treat cardiovascular disease. Among these are the single or combined use of stem cells, biomaterials and instructive factors, which together form the triad of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapy is a promising approach for repair, remodeling and even regenerate tissue of otherwise irreparable damage, such as after myocard...

  1. 3D printing of functional biomaterials for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Xuanyi; Gou, Maling; Mei, Deqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-08-01

    3D printing is emerging as a powerful tool for tissue engineering by enabling 3D cell culture within complex 3D biomimetic architectures. This review discusses the prevailing 3D printing techniques and their most recent applications in building tissue constructs. The work associated with relatively well-known inkjet and extrusion-based bioprinting is presented with the latest advances in the fields. Emphasis is put on introducing two relatively new light-assisted bioprinting techniques, including digital light processing (DLP)-based bioprinting and laser based two photon polymerization (TPP) bioprinting. 3D bioprinting of vasculature network is particularly discussed for its foremost significance in maintaining tissue viability and promoting functional maturation. Limitations to current bioprinting approaches, as well as future directions of bioprinting functional tissues are also discussed. PMID:27043763

  2. Cell sheet approach for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Utoh, Rie; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo

    2014-09-28

    After the biotech medicine era, regenerative medicine is expected to be an advanced medicine that is capable of curing patients with difficult-to-treat diseases and physically impaired function. Our original scaffold-free cell sheet-based tissue engineering technology enables transplanted cells to be engrafted for a long time, while fully maintaining their viability. This technology has already been applied to various diseases in the clinical setting, including the cornea, esophagus, heart, periodontal ligament, and cartilage using autologous cells. Transplanted cell sheets not only replace the injured tissue and compensate for impaired function, but also deliver growth factors and cytokines in a spatiotemporal manner over a prolonged period, which leads to promotion of tissue repair. Moreover, the integration of stem cell biology and cell sheet technology with sufficient vascularization opens possibilities for fabrication of human three-dimensional vascularized dense and intact tissue grafts for regenerative medicine to parenchymal organs. PMID:24858800

  3. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  4. Biocomposite nanofibres and osteoblasts for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanofibres and nanocomposites are highly promising recent additions to materials in relation to tissue engineering. Mimicking the architecture of an extracellular matrix is one of the major challenges for tissue engineering. An operationally simple electrospinning technique was used to fabricate polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHA/Col) biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds to provide mechanical support and to direct the growth of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) for tissue engineering of bone. Biocomposite nanofibres constructed with PCL, nHA and collagen type I combinations gave fibre diameters around 189 ± 0.026 to 579 ± 272 nm and pore sizes 2-35 μm. Resulting nanofibrous scaffolds were highly porous (>80%) structures and provided a sufficient open pore structure for cell occupancy whilst allowing free transport of nutrients and metabolic waste products; moreover, vascular in-growth was facilitated. The pore organization was determined by the deposition process, including interconnections of the fibre network. The mineralization was significantly increased (55%) in PCL/nHA/Col biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds after 10 days of culture and appeared as minerals synthesized by osteoblast cells. The unique nanoscale biocomposite system had inherent surface functionalization for hFOB adhesion, migration, proliferation and mineralization to form a bone tissue for the regeneration of bone defects

  5. Cellular strategies to promote vascularisation in tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Costa-Almeida

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vascularisation is considered to be one of the greatest challenges in tissue engineering. Different strategies exist but cell-based approaches have emerged as a promising therapy to achieve successful vascularisation. The use of endothelial cells to engineer vascularised tissues has been extensively investigated. This field of research has evolved with the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells, a subpopulation with a high regenerative potential. However, the survival of endothelial cell populations alone seems to be impaired. To overcome this problem, co-culture systems, involving supporting cells, like mural cells, fibroblasts, or more tissue-specific cells have been developed. Endothelial cells benefit from the extracellular matrix components and growth factors produced by the supporting cells, which results in neovessel stabilisation and maturation. The use of endothelial progenitor cells in co-culture systems appears to be a promising strategy to promote vascularisation in approaches of increasing complexity. Herein, the authors provide an overview of the cellular strategies that can be used for increasing vascularisation in tissue engineering and regeneration.

  6. Biocomposite nanofibres and osteoblasts for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, J.; Vadgama, P.; Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2007-02-01

    Nanofibres and nanocomposites are highly promising recent additions to materials in relation to tissue engineering. Mimicking the architecture of an extracellular matrix is one of the major challenges for tissue engineering. An operationally simple electrospinning technique was used to fabricate polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHA/Col) biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds to provide mechanical support and to direct the growth of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) for tissue engineering of bone. Biocomposite nanofibres constructed with PCL, nHA and collagen type I combinations gave fibre diameters around 189 ± 0.026 to 579 ± 272 nm and pore sizes 2-35 µm. Resulting nanofibrous scaffolds were highly porous (>80%) structures and provided a sufficient open pore structure for cell occupancy whilst allowing free transport of nutrients and metabolic waste products; moreover, vascular in-growth was facilitated. The pore organization was determined by the deposition process, including interconnections of the fibre network. The mineralization was significantly increased (55%) in PCL/nHA/Col biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds after 10 days of culture and appeared as minerals synthesized by osteoblast cells. The unique nanoscale biocomposite system had inherent surface functionalization for hFOB adhesion, migration, proliferation and mineralization to form a bone tissue for the regeneration of bone defects.

  7. Biocomposite nanofibres and osteoblasts for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, J [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Vadgama, P [IRC in Biomedical Materials, Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom); Kumar, T S Sampath [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India); Ramakrishna, S [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore)

    2007-02-07

    Nanofibres and nanocomposites are highly promising recent additions to materials in relation to tissue engineering. Mimicking the architecture of an extracellular matrix is one of the major challenges for tissue engineering. An operationally simple electrospinning technique was used to fabricate polycaprolactone/nanohydroxyapatite/collagen (PCL/nHA/Col) biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds to provide mechanical support and to direct the growth of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) for tissue engineering of bone. Biocomposite nanofibres constructed with PCL, nHA and collagen type I combinations gave fibre diameters around 189 {+-} 0.026 to 579 {+-} 272 nm and pore sizes 2-35 {mu}m. Resulting nanofibrous scaffolds were highly porous (>80%) structures and provided a sufficient open pore structure for cell occupancy whilst allowing free transport of nutrients and metabolic waste products; moreover, vascular in-growth was facilitated. The pore organization was determined by the deposition process, including interconnections of the fibre network. The mineralization was significantly increased (55%) in PCL/nHA/Col biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds after 10 days of culture and appeared as minerals synthesized by osteoblast cells. The unique nanoscale biocomposite system had inherent surface functionalization for hFOB adhesion, migration, proliferation and mineralization to form a bone tissue for the regeneration of bone defects.

  8. Optically Controlled Oscillators in an Engineered Bioelectric Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Harold M.; Zhang, Hongkang; Werley, Christopher A.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2016-07-01

    Complex electrical dynamics in excitable tissues occur throughout biology, but the roles of individual ion channels can be difficult to determine due to the complex nonlinear interactions in native tissue. Here, we ask whether we can engineer a tissue capable of basic information storage and processing, where all functional components are known and well understood. We develop a cell line with four transgenic components: two to enable collective propagation of electrical waves and two to enable optical perturbation and optical readout of membrane potential. We pattern the cell growth to define simple cellular ring oscillators that run stably for >2 h (˜104 cycles ) and that can store data encoded in the direction of electrical circulation. Using patterned optogenetic stimulation, we probe the biophysical attributes of this synthetic excitable tissue in detail, including dispersion relations, curvature-dependent wave front propagation, electrotonic coupling, and boundary effects. We then apply the biophysical characterization to develop an optically reconfigurable bioelectric oscillator. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering bioelectric tissues capable of complex information processing with optical input and output.

  9. Destructive fat tissue engineering using photodynamic and selective photothermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Yanina, Irina Yu.; Simonenko, Georgy V.

    2009-02-01

    Destructive fat tissue engineering could be realized using the optical method, which provides reduction of regional or site-specific accumulations of subcutaneous adipose tissue on the cell level. We hypothesize that light irradiation due to photodynamic and selective photothermal effects may lead to fat cell lypolytic activity (the enhancement of lipolysis of cell triglycerides due to expression of lipase activity and cell release of free fat acids (FFAs) due to temporal cell membrane porosity), and cell delayed killing due to apoptosis caused by the induced fat cell stress and/or limited cell necrosis.

  10. 3D-Printed Biopolymers for Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing technology has recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to the ability of making a three-dimensional object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D-printed biopolymers, which combine the 3D printing technology and biopolymers, have shown great potential in tissue engineering applications and are receiving significant attention, which has resulted in the development of numerous research programs regarding the material systems which are available for 3D printing. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of biopolymer materials, including natural biopolymer-based materials and synthetic biopolymer-based materials prepared using 3D printing technology, and some future challenges and applications of this technology are discussed.

  11. Biodegradable polymeric microcarriers with controllable porous structure for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xudong; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ding, Wenjun; Gan, Zhihua

    2009-12-01

    Porous microspheres fabricated by biodegradable polymers show great potential as microcarriers for cell cultivation in tissue engineering. Herein biodegradable poly(DL-lactide) (PLA) was used to fabricate porous microspheres through a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The influence of fabrication parameters, such as the stirring speed of the primary and secondary emulsion, the polymer concentration of the oil phase, and solvent type, as well as the post-hydrolysis treatment of the porous structure of the PLA microspheres are discussed. Good attachment and an active spread of MG-63 cells on the microspheres is observed, which indicates that the PLA microspheres with controllable porous structure are of great potential as cell delivery carriers for tissue engineering. PMID:19821453

  12. Biomaterials mediated microRNA delivery for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, M; Sainitya, R; Kalyanaraman, V; Dhivya, S; Selvamurugan, N

    2015-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering is an alternative strategy to overcome the problems associated with traditional treatments for bone defects. A number of bioactive materials along with new techniques like porous scaffold implantation, gene delivery, 3D organ printing are now-a-days emerging for traditional bone grafts and metal implants. Studying the molecular mechanisms through which these biomaterials induce osteogenesis is an equally hot field. Biomaterials could determine the fate of a cell via microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and play an essential role for regulation of cell specific lineages including osteogenesis. Thus, this review focuses the recent trends on establishing a link of biomaterials with miRNAs and their delivery for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:25543062

  13. Bioreactor-free tissue engineering: directed tissue assembly by centrifugal casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Markwald, Roger R; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-02-01

    Casting is a process by which a material is introduced into a mold while it is liquid, allowed to solidify in a predefined shape inside the mold, and then removed to give a fabricated object, part or casing. Centrifugal casting could be defined as a process of molding using centrifugal forces. Although the centrifugal casting technology has a long history in metal manufacturing and in the plastics industry, only recently has this technology attracted the attention of tissue engineers. Initially, centrifugation was used to optimize cell seeding on a solid scaffold. More recently, centrifugal casting has been used to create tubular scaffolds and both tubular and flat multilayered, living tissue constructs. These newer applications were enabled by a new class of biocompatible in situ crosslinkable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix. Herein the authors summarize the state of the art of centrifugal casting technology in tissue engineering, they outline associated technological challenges, and they discuss the potential future for clinical applications. PMID:18194071

  14. Proving the suitability of magnetoelectric stimuli for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    C. Ribeiro; Correia, Vítor Manuel Gomes; Martins, P.; Gama, F. M.; Lanceros-Méndez, S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach for tissue engineering applications based on the use of magnetoelectric materials is presented. This work proves that magnetoelectric Terfenol-D/poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) composites are able to provide mechanical and electrical stimuli to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells and that those stimuli can be remotely triggered by an applied magnetic field. Cell proliferation is enhanced up to 25% when cells are cultured under mechanical (up to 110 ppm) and electrica...

  15. Hyaluronic acid-based scaffold for central neural tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiumei; He, Jin; Wang, Ying; CUI, FU-ZHAI

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) regeneration with central neuronal connections and restoration of synaptic connections has been a long-standing worldwide problem and, to date, no effective clinical therapies are widely accepted for CNS injuries. The limited regenerative capacity of the CNS results from the growth-inhibitory environment that impedes the regrowth of axons. Central neural tissue engineering has attracted extensive attention from multi-disciplinary scientists in recent years, and ma...

  16. Chitosan Scaffolds Containing Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Clara R.; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S.; Moroni, Lorenzo; Reis, Rui L.; Blitterswijk, van, C.A.; Karperien, Marcel; Mano, João F.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffolds derived from natural polysaccharides are very promising in tissue engineering applications and regenerative medicine, as they resemble glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we have prepared freeze-dried composite scaffolds of chitosan (CHT) and hyaluronic acid (HA) in different weight ratios containing either no HA (control) or 1%, 5%, or 10% of HA. We hypothesized that HA could enhance structural and biological properties of CHT scaffolds. To test thi...

  17. Electrospun Cartilage-Derived Matrix Scaffolds for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Garrigues, N. William; Little, Dianne; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; David S Ruch; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Macroscale scaffolds created from cartilage-derived matrix (CDM) demonstrate chondroinductive properties, but many fabrication methods do not allow for control of nanoscale architecture. In this regard, electrospun scaffolds have shown significant promise for cartilage tissue engineering. However, nanofibrous materials generally exhibit a relatively small pore size and require techniques such as multi-layering or the inclusion of sacrificial fibers to enhance cellular infiltration. The object...

  18. Neural tissue engineering using embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Willerth, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    With the recent start of the first clinical trial evaluating a human embryonic stem cell-derived therapy for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury, it is important to review the current literature examining the use of embryonic stem cells for neural tissue engineering applications with a focus on diseases and disorders that affect the central nervous system. Embryonic stem cells exhibit pluripotency and thus can differentiate into any cell type found in the body, including those found in ...

  19. Bridging the Divide between Neuroprosthetic Design, Tissue Engineering and Neurobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Jennie Leach; Achyuta, Anil Kumar H.; Murthy, Shashi K

    2010-01-01

    Neuroprosthetic devices have made a major impact in the treatment of a variety of disorders such as paralysis and stroke. However, a major impediment in the advancement of this technology is the challenge of maintaining device performance during chronic implantation (months to years) due to complex intrinsic host responses such as gliosis or glial scarring. The objective of this review is to bring together research communities in neurobiology, tissue engineering, and neuroprosthetics to addre...

  20. Magnetic scaffolds enriched with bioactive nanoparticles for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Ziv-Polat, Ofra; Shahar, Abraham; Last, David; Mardor, Yael; Margel, Shlomo

    2012-03-01

    Novel magnetic fibrin hydrogel scaffolds for cell implantation and tissue engineering are reported. The magnetic scaffolds are produced by the interaction between thrombin-conjugated maghemite nanoparticles of narrow size distribution and fibrinogen. These scaffolds, enriched with growth factor conjugated fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles, provide a supporting 3D environment for massive proliferation of various cell types, and can be successfully visualized by MRI. PMID:23184719

  1. Tissue engineered heart valves based on human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, D.; Hoerstrup, S P

    2006-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clinically used valve replacements including mechanical valves as well as fixed biological xeno- or homografts are associated with several major disadvantages. Alternatively, tissue engineering aims at the fabrication of autologous living cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow and to repair, particularly for paediatric applications. Therefore, autologous cells are harvested and seeded ont...

  2. Tissue engineered heart valves based on human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, D.; Hoerstrup, S P

    2007-01-01

    Valvular heart disease is still a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Clinically used valve replacements including mechanical valves as well as fixed biological xeno- or homografts are associated with several major disadvantages. Alternatively, tissue engineering aims at the fabrication of autologous living cardiovascular replacements with the potential to grow and to repair, particularly for paediatric applications. Therefore, autologous cells are harvested and seeded ont...

  3. Developments in bone tissue engineering research for spinal fusion

    OpenAIRE

    van Gaalen, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Many orthopaedic procedures require fusion of a bony defect. Sometimes a bone graft is needed for this fusion. Autograft bone is considered the golden standard. The harvesting of this bone is time consuming and may have serious side effects, such as chronic donor site pain. Available alternatives are reviewed and discussed based on their benefits and drawbacks. As an alternative, bone Tissue Engineering (TE), i.e. osteoprogenitor cells seeded on porous ceramic scaffolds, for spinal fusion was...

  4. Gellan gum : hydroxyapatite composite hydrogels for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Manda-guiba, G. M.; Oliveira, Mariana B.; Mano, J. F.; Marques, A. P.; Oliveira, Joaquim M.; Correlo, V.M.; Reis, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    The modification of polymeric matrices by adding calcium-phosphate derivatives has been proven an effective strategy for tailoring the properties of scaffolds employed in bone tissue engineering. In this regard and, considering the biomechanics of bone as well as the durotactic response of osteoblasts, this study builds on the hypothesis that the preparation of novel Gellan Gum (GG)-Hydroxyapatite (HA) hydrogel composites could benefit the mechanical profile of matrices as well as the cell-su...

  5. Extracellular matrix, mechanotransduction and structural hierarchies in heart tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Kevin K; Ingber, Donald E.

    2007-01-01

    The spatial and temporal scales of cardiac organogenesis and pathogenesis make engineering of artificial heart tissue a daunting challenge. The temporal scales range from nanosecond conformational changes responsible for ion channel opening to fibrillation which occurs over seconds and can lead to death. Spatial scales range from nanometre pore sizes in membrane channels and gap junctions to the metre length scale of the whole cardiovascular system in a living patient. Synchrony over these sc...

  6. Design of Electrical Stimulation Bioreactors for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, N.; Marsano, A.; Cannizzaro, C; Voldman, J.; Vunjak-Novakovic, G.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown to improve functional assembly of cardiomyocytes in vitro for cardiac tissue engineering. Carbon electrodes were found in past studies to have the best current injection characteristics. The goal of this study was to develop rational experimental design principles for the electrodes and stimulation regime, in particular electrode configuration, electrode ageing, and stimulation amplitude. Carbon rod electrodes were compared via electrochemical impedance s...

  7. From Stem to Roots: tissue engineering in Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Chandki, Rita; Kala, M.; Banthia, Priyank; Banthia, Ruchi

    2012-01-01

    The vitality of dentin-pulp complex is fundamental to the life of tooth and is a priority for targeting clinical management strategies. Loss of the tooth, jawbone or both, due to periodontal disease, dental caries, trauma or some genetic disorders, affects not only basic mouth functions but aesthetic appearance and quality of life. One novel approach to restore tooth structure is based on biology: regenerative endodontic procedure by application of tissue engineering. Regenerative endodontics...

  8. Polymeric Materials for Tissue Engineering of Arterial Substitutes

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Swathi; QU, ZHENG; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. Synthetic polymeric materials, while providing the appropriate mechanical strength, lack the compliance and biocompatibility that bioresorbable and naturally occurring protein polymers offer. Vascular tissue engineering approaches have emerged in order to meet the challen...

  9. Enhancing Clinical Islet Transplantation through Tissue Engineering Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldo, Jaime A.; Weaver, Jessica D; Stabler, Cherie L

    2010-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation (CIT), the infusion of allogeneic islets within the liver, has the potential to provide precise and sustainable control of blood glucose levels for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The success and long-term outcomes of CIT, however, are limited by obstacles such as a nonoptimal transplantation site and severe inflammatory and immunological responses to the transplant. Tissue engineering strategies are poised to combat these challenges. In this review, emerging ...

  10. A Novel Seeding and Conditioning Bioreactor for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schulte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple efforts have been made to develop small-diameter tissue engineered vascular grafts using a great variety of bioreactor systems at different steps of processing. Nevertheless, there is still an extensive need for a compact all-in-one system providing multiple and simultaneous processing. The aim of this project was to develop a new device to fulfill the major requirements of an ideal system that allows simultaneous seeding, conditioning, and perfusion. The newly developed system can be actuated in a common incubator and consists of six components: a rotating cylinder, a pump, a pulse generator, a control unit, a mixer, and a reservoir. Components that are in direct contact with cell media, cells, and/or tissue allow sterile processing. Proof-of-concept experiments were performed with polyurethane tubes and collagen tubes. The scaffolds were seeded with fibroblasts and endothelial cells that were isolated from human saphenous vein segments. Scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry showed better seeding success of polyurethane scaffolds in comparison to collagen. Conditioning of polyurethane tubes with 100 dyn/cm2 resulted in cell detachments, whereas a moderate conditioning program with stepwise increase of shear stress from 10 to 40 dyn/cm2 induced a stable and confluent cell layer. The new bioreactor is a powerful tool for quick and easy testing of various scaffold materials for the development of tissue engineered vascular grafts. The combination of this bioreactor with native tissue allows testing of medical devices and medicinal substances under physiological conditions that is a good step towards reduction of animal testing. In the long run, the bioreactor could turn out to produce tissue engineered vascular grafts for human applications “at the bedside”.

  11. Silk fibroin porous scaffolds for nucleus pulposus tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Chao; Yang, Qiang [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhu, Meifeng [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Du, Lilong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Zhang, Jiamin [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ma, Xinlong [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Xu, Baoshan, E-mail: xubaoshan99@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin 300211 (China); Wang, Lianyong, E-mail: wly@nankai.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are structurally complex tissue that hold the vertebrae together and provide mobility to spine. The nucleus pulposus (NP) degeneration often results in degenerative IVD disease that is one of the most common causes of back and neck pain. Tissue engineered nucleus pulposus offers an alternative approach to regain the function of the degenerative IVD. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of porous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds fabricated by paraffin-sphere-leaching methods with freeze-drying in the application of nucleus pulposus regeneration. The prepared scaffold possessed high porosity of 92.38 ± 5.12% and pore size of 165.00 ± 8.25 μm as well as high pore interconnectivity and appropriate mechanical properties. Rabbit NP cells were seeded and cultured on the SF scaffolds. Scanning electron microscopy, histology, biochemical assays and mechanical tests revealed that the porous scaffolds could provide an appropriate microstructure and environment to support adhesion, proliferation and infiltration of NP cells in vitro as well as the generation of extracellular matrix. The NP cell–scaffold construction could be preliminarily formed after subcutaneously implanted in a nude mice model. In conclusion, The SF porous scaffold offers a potential candidate for tissue engineered NP tissue. - Highlights: • Paraffin microsphere-leaching method is used to fabricate silk fibroin scaffold. • The scaffold has appropriate mechanical property, porosity and pore size • The scaffold supports growth and infiltration of nucleus pulposus cells. • Nucleus pulposus cells can secrete extracellular matrix in the scaffolds. • The scaffold is a potential candidate for tissue engineered nucleus pulposus.

  12. Recent advances in application of biosensors in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Nurunnabi, Md; Morshed, Mahboob; Paul, Arghya; Polini, Alessandro; Kuila, Tapas; Al Hariri, Moustafa; Lee, Yong-kyu; Jaffa, Ayad A

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25165697

  13. Recent Advances in Application of Biosensors in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwarul Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors research is a fast growing field in which tens of thousands of papers have been published over the years, and the industry is now worth billions of dollars. The biosensor products have found their applications in numerous industries including food and beverages, agricultural, environmental, medical diagnostics, and pharmaceutical industries and many more. Even though numerous biosensors have been developed for detection of proteins, peptides, enzymes, and numerous other biomolecules for diverse applications, their applications in tissue engineering have remained limited. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in application of novel biosensors in cell culture and tissue engineering, for example, real-time detection of small molecules such as glucose, lactose, and H2O2 as well as serum proteins of large molecular size, such as albumin and alpha-fetoprotein, and inflammatory cytokines, such as IFN-g and TNF-α. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advancements in biosensors for tissue engineering applications.

  14. Cardiac tissue engineering and regeneration using cell-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrefai MT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad T Alrefai,1–3 Divya Murali,4 Arghya Paul,4 Khalid M Ridwan,1,2 John M Connell,1,2 Dominique Shum-Tim1,2 1Division of Cardiac Surgery, 2Division of Surgical Research, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Abstract: Stem cell therapy and tissue engineering represent a forefront of current research in the treatment of heart disease. With these technologies, advancements are being made into therapies for acute ischemic myocardial injury and chronic, otherwise nonreversible, myocardial failure. The current clinical management of cardiac ischemia deals with reestablishing perfusion to the heart but not dealing with the irreversible damage caused by the occlusion or stenosis of the supplying vessels. The applications of these new technologies are not yet fully established as part of the management of cardiac diseases but will become so in the near future. The discussion presented here reviews some of the pioneering works at this new frontier. Key results of allogeneic and autologous stem cell trials are presented, including the use of embryonic, bone marrow-derived, adipose-derived, and resident cardiac stem cells. Keywords: stem cells, cardiomyocytes, cardiac surgery, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, heart, scaffolds, organoids, cell sheet and tissue engineering

  15. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G; Khademhosseini, Ali [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Jabbari, Esmaiel, E-mail: alik@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  16. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness these interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behavior. Here, we review two- and three-dimensional (2- and 3D) nanoscale tissue engineering technologies, and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffold technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D. However, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and that can control the temporal changes in the cellular microenvironment. (topical review)

  17. Gene delivery in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Y L; Chen, X G; W T, Godbey

    2015-11-01

    As a promising strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, gene delivery has been used for regenerative medicine applications to create or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Gene delivery has been successfully performed ex vivo and in vivo in these applications. Excellent proliferation capabilities and differentiation potentials render certain cells as excellent candidates for ex vivo gene delivery for regenerative medicine applications, which is why multipotent and pluripotent cells have been intensely studied in this vein. In this review, gene delivery is discussed in detail, along with its applications to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. A definition of a stem cell is compared to a definition of a stem property, and both provide the foundation for an in-depth look at gene delivery investigations from a germ lineage angle. PMID:25557560

  18. Band Gap Modulation of Bilayer MoS2 Under Strain Engineering and Electric Field: A Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Ilyasov, Victor V.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate band-gap tuning in bilayer MoS2 by an external electric field and by applied biaxial strain. Our calculations show that the band gaps of bilayer MoS2 can be tuned by the perpendicular electric field or biaxial strain. The band gaps of bilayer MoS2 decrease with increasing applied electric field or biaxial strain. When the electric field was introduced, electronic levels are split due to the separation of the valence sub-band and the conduction sub-band states. Our calculations also show that the change in the band gap of bilayer MoS2 is due to the separation of electronic levels by electric field via the Stark effect. At the electric field E_{Field} = 5.5 V/nm or biaxial strain ɛ = 15%, bilayer MoS2 becomes metallic. The semiconductor-metal phase transition in bilayer MoS2 plays an important role in its application for nanodevices.

  19. Band Gap Modulation of Bilayer MoS2 Under Strain Engineering and Electric Field: A Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Chuong V.; Hieu, Nguyen N.; Ilyasov, Victor V.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate band-gap tuning in bilayer MoS2 by an external electric field and by applied biaxial strain. Our calculations show that the band gaps of bilayer MoS2 can be tuned by the perpendicular electric field or biaxial strain. The band gaps of bilayer MoS2 decrease with increasing applied electric field or biaxial strain. When the electric field was introduced, electronic levels are split due to the separation of the valence sub-band and the conduction sub-band states. Our calculations also show that the change in the band gap of bilayer MoS2 is due to the separation of electronic levels by electric field via the Stark effect. At the electric field E_{Field} = 5.5 V/nm or biaxial strain \\varepsilon = 15%, bilayer MoS2 becomes metallic. The semiconductor-metal phase transition in bilayer MoS2 plays an important role in its application for nanodevices.

  20. Engineering Parameters in Bioreactor’s Design: A Critical Aspect in Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Salehi-Nik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioreactors are important inevitable part of any tissue engineering (TE strategy as they aid the construction of three-dimensional functional tissues. Since the ultimate aim of a bioreactor is to create a biological product, the engineering parameters, for example, internal and external mass transfer, fluid velocity, shear stress, electrical current distribution, and so forth, are worth to be thoroughly investigated. The effects of such engineering parameters on biological cultures have been addressed in only a few preceding studies. Furthermore, it would be highly inefficient to determine the optimal engineering parameters by trial and error method. A solution is provided by emerging modeling and computational tools and by analyzing oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrient and metabolism waste material transports, which can simulate and predict the experimental results. Discovering the optimal engineering parameters is crucial not only to reduce the cost and time of experiments, but also to enhance efficacy and functionality of the tissue construct. This review intends to provide an inclusive package of the engineering parameters together with their calculation procedure in addition to the modeling techniques in TE bioreactors.

  1. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahini A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; 7School of Material Science and Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, USA Abstract: Bone healing can be significantly expedited by applying electrical stimuli in the injured region. Therefore, a three-dimensional (3D ceramic conductive tissue engineering scaffold for large bone defects that can locally deliver the electrical stimuli is highly desired. In the present study, 3D conductive scaffolds were prepared by employing a biocompatible conductive polymer, ie, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene poly(4-styrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS, in the optimized nanocomposite of gelatin and bioactive glass. For in vitro analysis, adult human mesenchymal stem cells were seeded in the scaffolds. Material characterizations using hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance, in vitro degradation, as well as thermal and mechanical analysis showed that incorporation of PEDOT:PSS increased the physiochemical stability of the composite, resulting in improved mechanical properties and biodegradation resistance. The outcomes indicate that PEDOT:PSS and polypeptide chains have close interaction, most likely by forming salt bridges between arginine side chains and sulfonate groups. The morphology of the scaffolds and cultured human mesenchymal stem cells were observed and analyzed via scanning electron microscope, micro-computed tomography, and confocal fluorescent

  2. Tissue engineering of urinary bladder – current state of art and future perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Adamowicz, Jan; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tissue engineering and biomaterials science currently offer the technology needed to replace the urinary tract wall. This review addresses current achievements and barriers for the regeneration of the urinary blad- der based on tissue engineering methods. Materials and methods Medline was search for urinary bladder tissue engineering regenerative medicine and stem cells. Results Numerous studies to develop a substitute for the native urinary bladder wall us- ing the tissue engine...

  3. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, António J; Oliveira, Joaquim M; Martins, Albino; Teixeira, Fábio G; Silva, Nuno A; Neves, Nuno M; Sousa, Nuno; Reis, Rui L

    2013-01-01

    Tissue and organ repair still represents a clinical challenge. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) is an emerging field focused on the development of alternative therapies for tissue/organ repair. This highly multidisciplinary field, in which bioengineering and medicine merge, is based on integrative approaches using scaffolds, cell populations from different sources, growth factors, nanomedicine, gene therapy, and other techniques to overcome the limitations that currently exist in the clinics. Indeed, its overall objective is to induce the formation of new functional tissues, rather than just implanting spare parts. This chapter aims at introducing the reader to the concepts and techniques of TERM. It begins by explaining how TERM have evolved and merged into TERM, followed by a short overview of some of its key aspects such as the combinations of scaffolds with cells and nanomedicine, scaffold processing, and new paradigms of the use of stem cells for tissue repair/regeneration, which ultimately could represent the future of new therapeutic approaches specifically aimed at clinical applications. PMID:24083429

  4. Scanning-fiber-based imaging method for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias C.; Whited, Bryce M.; Mitchell, Josh; Vogt, William C.; Criswell, Tracy; Rylander, Christopher; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Soker, Shay; Wang, Ge; Xu, Yong

    2012-06-01

    A scanning-fiber-based method developed for imaging bioengineered tissue constructs such as synthetic carotid arteries is reported. Our approach is based on directly embedding one or more hollow-core silica fibers within the tissue scaffold to function as micro-imaging channels (MIC). The imaging process is carried out by translating and rotating an angle-polished fiber micro-mirror within the MIC to scan excitation light across the tissue scaffold. The locally emitted fluorescent signals are captured using an electron multiplying CCD camera and then mapped into fluorophore distributions according to fiber micro-mirror positions. Using an optical phantom composed of fluorescent microspheres, tissue scaffolds, and porcine skin, we demonstrated single-cell-level imaging resolution (20 to 30 μm) at an imaging depth that exceeds the photon transport mean free path by one order of magnitude. This result suggests that the imaging depth is no longer constrained by photon scattering, but rather by the requirement that the fluorophore signal overcomes the background ``noise'' generated by processes such as scaffold autofluorescence. Finally, we demonstrated the compatibility of our imaging method with tissue engineering by visualizing endothelial cells labeled with green fluorescent protein through a ~500 μm thick and highly scattering electrospun scaffold.

  5. Robotic Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Organ Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    The aim of tissue engineering (TE) is to restore tissue and organ functions with minimal host rejection. TE is seen as a future solution to solve the crisis of donor organs for transplant, which faces a shortage expected only to increase in the future. In this innovation, a flexible and configurable scaffold has been conceived that mechanically stresses cells that are seeded on it, stimulating them to increased growth. The influence of mechanical stress/ loading on cell growth has been observed on all forms of cells. For example, for cartilages, studies in animals, tissue explants, and engineered tissue scaffolds have all shown that cartilage cells (chondrocytes) modify their extracellular matrix in response to loading. The chondrocyte EMC production response to dynamics of the physical environment (in vivo cartilage development) illustrates a clear benefit (better growth) when stressed. It has been shown that static and dynamic compression regulates PRG4 biosynthesis by cartilage explants. Mechanical tissue stimulation is beneficial and (flexible) scaffolds with movable components, which are able to induce mechanical stimulation, offer advantages over the fixed, rigid scaffold design. In addition to improved cell growth from physical/mechanical stimulation, additional benefits include the ability to increase in size while preserving shape, or changing shape. By making scaffolds flexible, allowing relative movement between their components, adding sensing (e.g., for detecting response of cells to drug release and to mechanical actions), building controls for drug release and movement, and building even simple algorithms for mapping sensing to action, these structures can actually be made into biocompatible and biodegradable robots. Treating them as robots is a perspective shift that may offer advantages in the design and exploitation of these structures of the future.

  6. Building Biocompatible Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering of the Brain and Spinal Cord

    OpenAIRE

    Bjugstad, Kimberly B.; Craig Lanning; Jennifer Wagner; Aurand, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies employing biomaterials have made great progress in the last few decades. However, the tissues of the brain and spinal cord pose unique challenges due to a separate immune system and their nature as soft tissue. Because of this, neural tissue engineering for the brain and spinal cord may require re-establishing biocompatibility and functionality of biomaterials that have previously been successful for tissue engineering in the body. The goal of this review is to b...

  7. Vital roles of stem cells and biomaterials in skin tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hilmi, Abu Bakar; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering essentially refers to technology for growing new human tissue and is distinct from regenerative medicine. Currently, pieces of skin are already being fabricated for clinical use and many other tissue types may be fabricated in the future. Tissue engineering was first defined in 1987 by the United States National Science Foundation which critically discussed the future targets of bioengineering research and its consequences. The principles of tissue engineering are to initia...

  8. Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 μm/900 μm for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ∼0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 μm and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research. (paper)

  9. Prospect of Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizeh-Mitra Yousefi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been the subject of many studies in recent years, ranging from basic science that looks into MSCs properties to studies that aim for developing bioengineered tissues and organs. Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs have been the focus of most studies due to the inherent potential of these cells to differentiate into various cell types. Although, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of cellular differentiation. These cells are another attractive stem cell source because of their ability to be reprogramed, allowing the generation of multiple cell types from a single cell. This paper briefly covers various types of stem cell sources that have been used for tissue engineering applications, with a focus on bone regeneration. Then, an overview of some recent studies making use of MSC-seeded 3D scaffold systems for bone tissue engineering has been presented. The emphasis has been placed on the reported scaffold properties that tend to improve MSCs adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation outcomes.

  10. Coaxial additive manufacture of biomaterial composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornock, R; Beirne, S; Thompson, B; Wallace, G G

    2014-06-01

    An inherent difficulty associated with the application of suitable bioscaffolds for tissue engineering is the incorporation of adequate mechanical characteristics into the materials which recapitulate that of the native tissue, whilst maintaining cell proliferation and nutrient transfer qualities. Biomaterial composites fabricated using rapid prototyping techniques can potentially improve the functionality and patient-specific processing of tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work, a technique for the coaxial melt extrusion printing of core-shell scaffold structures was designed, implemented and assessed with respect to the repeatability, cell efficacy and scaffold porosity obtainable. Encapsulated alginate hydrogel/thermoplastic polycaprolactone (Alg-PCL) cofibre scaffolds were fabricated. Selective laser melting was used to produce a high resolution stainless steel 316 L coaxial extrusion nozzle, exhibiting diameters of 300 μm/900 μm for the inner and outer nozzles respectively. We present coaxial melt extrusion printed scaffolds of Alg-PCL cofibres with ~0.4 volume fraction alginate, with total fibre diameter as low as 600 μm and core material offset as low as 10% of the total diameter. Furthermore the tuneability of scaffold porosity, pore size and interconnectivity, as well as the preliminary inclusion, compatibility and survival of an L-929 mouse fibroblast cell-line within the scaffolds were explored. This preliminary cell work highlighted the need for optimal material selection and further design reiteration in future research. PMID:24658021

  11. Bioreactors for tissue engineering--a new role for perfusionists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistino, Joseph J

    2003-09-01

    Tissue engineering is an exciting new area of medicine with rapid growth and expansion over the last decade. It has the potential to have a profound impact on the practice of medicine and influence the economic development in the industry of biotechnology. In almost every specialty of medicine, the ability to generate replacement cells and develop tissues will change the focus from artificial organs and transplantation to growing replacement organs from the patient's own stem cells. Once these organs are at a size that requires perfusion to maintain oxygen and nutrient delivery, then automated perfusion systems termed "bioreactors" will be necessary to sustain the organ until harvesting. The design of these "bioreactors" will have a crucial role in the maintenance of cellular function throughout the growth period. The perfusion schemes necessary to determine the optimal conditions have not been well elucidated and will undergo extensive research over the next decade. The key to progress in this endeavor will development of long-term perfusion techniques and identifying the ideal pressures, flow rates, type of flow (pulsatile/nonpulsatile), and perfusate solution. Perfusionists are considered experts in the field of whole body perfusion, and it is possible that they can participate in the development and operation of these "bioreactors." Additional education of perfusionists in the area of tissue engineering is necessary in order for them to become integral parts of this exciting new area of medicine. PMID:14653420

  12. Soy Protein Scaffold Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Karen B.

    Developing functional biomaterials using highly processable materials with tailorable physical and bioactive properties is an ongoing challenge in tissue engineering. Soy protein is an abundant, natural resource with potential use for regenerative medicine applications. Preliminary studies show that soy protein can be physically modified and fabricated into various biocompatible constructs. However, optimized soy protein structures for tissue regeneration (i.e. 3D porous scaffolds) have not yet been designed. Furthermore, little work has established the in vivo biocompatibility of implanted soy protein and the benefit of using soy over other proteins including FDA-approved bovine collagen. In this work, freeze-drying and 3D printing fabrication processes were developed using commercially available soy protein to create porous scaffolds that improve cell growth and infiltration compared to other soy biomaterials previously reported. Characterization of scaffold structure, porosity, and mechanical/degradation properties was performed. In addition, the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on various designed soy scaffolds was analyzed. Biological characterization of the cell-seeded scaffolds was performed to assess feasibility for use in liver tissue regeneration. The acute and humoral response of soy scaffolds implanted in an in vivo mouse subcutaneous model was also investigated. All fabricated soy scaffolds were modified using thermal, chemical, and enzymatic crosslinking to change properties and cell growth behavior. 3D printing allowed for control of scaffold pore size and geometry. Scaffold structure, porosity, and degradation rate significantly altered the in vivo response. Freeze-dried soy scaffolds had similar biocompatibility as freeze-dried collagen scaffolds of the same protein content. However, the soy scaffolds degraded at a much faster rate, minimizing immunogenicity. Interestingly, subcutaneously implanted soy scaffolds affected blood

  13. Tissue engineering as a potential alternative or adjunct to surgical reconstruction in treating pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boennelycke, M; Gräs, Søren; Lose, G

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering strategies could potentially provide attractive alternatives to surgical reconstruction of native tissue or the use of surgical implants in treating pelvic organ prolapse (POP).......Cell-based tissue engineering strategies could potentially provide attractive alternatives to surgical reconstruction of native tissue or the use of surgical implants in treating pelvic organ prolapse (POP)....

  14. Advantages of Sheep Infrapatellar Fat Pad Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Parviz; Soleimanirad, Jafar; Roshangar, Leila; Shafaei, Hajar; Jarolmasjed, Seyedhosein; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study has been to evaluate adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) from infrapatellar fat pad and characterize their cell surface markers using anti-human antibodies, as adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) have great potential for cellular therapies to restore injured tissues. Methods: Adipose tissue was obtained from infrapatellar fat pad of sheep. Surface markers evaluated by flow cytometry. In order to evaluate cell adhesion, the Polycaprolactone (PCL) was sterilized under Ultraviolet (UV) light and about 1×105 cells were seeded on PCL. Then, ASCs- PCL construct were evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (Mira3 Te Scan, Czech Republic). Results: We showed that adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs) maintain their fibroblastic-like morphology during different subcultures and cell adhesion. They were positive for CD44 and CD90 markers and negative for CD31 and Cd45 markers by human antibodies. Conclusion: Our results suggest that ASCs surface markers can be characterized by anti-human antibodies in sheep. As stem cells, they can be used in tissue engineering. PMID:27123425

  15. Electrospinning polymer blends for biomimetic scaffolds for ACL tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Vanessa Lizeth

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is one of the most common knee injuries. Current ACL reconstructive strategies consist of using an autograft or an allograft to replace the ligament. However, limitations have led researchers to create tissue engineered grafts, known as scaffolds, through electrospinning. Scaffolds made of natural and synthetic polymer blends have the potential to promote cell adhesion while having strong mechanical properties. However, enzymes found in the knee are known to degrade tissues and affect the healing of intra-articular injuries. Results suggest that the natural polymers used in this study modify the thermal properties and tensile strength of the synthetic polymers when blended. Scanning electron microscopy display bead-free and enzyme biodegradability of the fibers. Raman spectroscopy confirms the presence of the natural and synthetic polymers in the scaffolds while, amino acid analysis present the types of amino acids and their concentrations found in the natural polymers.

  16. Poly(caprolactone) based magnetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañobre-López, M.; Piñeiro-Redondo, Y.; De Santis, R.; Gloria, A.; Ambrosio, L.; Tampieri, A.; Dediu, V.; Rivas, J.

    2011-04-01

    Synthetic scaffolds for tissue engineering coupled to stem cells represent a promising approach aiming to promote the regeneration of large defects of damaged tissues or organs. Magnetic nanocomposites formed by a biodegradable poly(caprolactone) (PCL) matrix and superparamagnetic iron doped hydroxyapatite (FeHA) nanoparticles at different PCL/FeHA compositions have been successfully prototyped, layer on layer, through 3D bioplotting. Magnetic measurements, mechanical testing, and imaging were carried out to calibrate both model and technological processing in the magnetized scaffold prototyping. An amount of 10% w/w of magnetic FeHA nanoparticles represents a reinforcement for PCL matrix, however, a reduction of strain at failure is also observed. Energy loss (absorption) measurements under a radio-frequency applied magnetic field were performed in the resulting magnetic scaffolds and very promising heating properties were observed, making them very useful for potential biomedical applications.

  17. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki Dong; Wang, Xiumei; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Kyung Min; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    We introduce our active experts' communications and reviews (Part II) of 2015 Korea-China Joint Symposium on Biomimetic Medical Materials in Republic of Korea, which reflect their perspectives on current research trends of biomimetic medical materials for tissue regeneration in both Korea and China. The communications covered three topics of biomimetics, i.e., 1) hydrogel for therapeutics and extracellular matrix environments, 2) design of electrical polymers for communications between electrical sources and biological systems and 3) design of biomaterials for nerve tissue engineering. The reviews in the Part II will cover biomimetics of 3D bioprinting materials, surface modifications, nano/micro-technology as well as clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage. PMID:27026826

  18. Micro and nanotechnologies in heart valve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Saliba, John; Pezeshgi Modarres, Hassan; Bakhaty, Ahmed; Nasajpour, Amir; Mofrad, Mohammad R K; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Due to the increased morbidity and mortality resulting from heart valve diseases, there is a growing demand for off-the-shelf implantable tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs). Despite the significant progress in recent years in improving the design and performance of TEHV constructs, viable and functional human implantable TEHV constructs have remained elusive. The recent advances in micro and nanoscale technologies including the microfabrication, nano-microfiber based scaffolds preparation, 3D cell encapsulated hydrogels preparation, microfluidic, micro-bioreactors, nano-microscale biosensors as well as the computational methods and models for simulation of biological tissues have increased the potential for realizing viable, functional and implantable TEHV constructs. In this review, we aim to present an overview of the importance and recent advances in micro and nano-scale technologies for the development of TEHV constructs. PMID:27414719

  19. Biomimetic strengthening polylactide scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guofu; MOU Shenzhou; ZHOU Lingping; LIAO Susan; YIN Zhimin; CUI Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,a new polylactide(PLA)-based scaffold composite by biomimetic synthesis was designed.The novel composite mainly consists ofnano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA),which is the main inorganic content in natural bone tissue for the PLA.The crystal degree of the n-HA in the composite is low and the crystal size is very small,which is similar to that of natural bone.The compressive strength of the composite is higher than that of the PLA scaffold.Using the osteoblast culture technique,we detected cell behaviors on the biomaterial in vitro by SEM,and the cell affinity of the composite was found to be higher than that of the PLA scaffold.The biomimetic three-dimensional porous composite can serve as a kind of excellent scaffold material for bone tissue engineering because of its microstructure and properties.

  20. Synthesis of electroactive tetraaniline grafted polyethylenimine for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shilei; Han, Lu; Cai, Muhang; Li, Luhai; Wei, Yan

    2015-07-01

    Tetraaniline grafted polyethylenimine (AT-PEI) was successfully synthesized in this study. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR) Spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of carboxyl-capped aniline tetramer (AT-COOH) and AT-PEI. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to characterize the absorption spectrum of the obtained AT-PEI samples. The morphology of AT-PEI copolymers in aqueous solution was determined by Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, AT-PEI copolymers demonstrated excellent solubility in aqueous solution and possessed electroactivity by cyclic voltammogram (CV) curves, which showed its potential application in the field of tissue engineering.

  1. The influence of environmental factors on bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpalski, Caroline; Sagebin, Fabio; Barbaro, Marissa; Warren, Stephen M

    2013-05-01

    Bone repair and regeneration are dynamic processes that involve a complex interplay between the substrate, local and systemic cells, and the milieu. Although each constituent plays an integral role in faithfully recreating the skeleton, investigators have long focused their efforts on scaffold materials and design, cytokine and hormone administration, and cell-based therapies. Only recently have the intangible aspects of the milieu received their due attention. In this review, we highlight the important influence of environmental factors on bone tissue engineering. PMID:23165885

  2. Nanoscale biomaterial interface modification for advanced tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, various stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been found to have considerable potential for application in tissue engineering and future advanced therapies due to their biological capability to differentiate into specific lineages. Modified surface properties, such as composition, nano-roughness and wettability, affect the most important processes at the biomaterial interface. The aim of the present is work is to study the stem cells' (MSCs) adhesive potential, morphology, phenotypical characteristics in in vitro tests, and to distinguish betwen the different factors influencing the cell/biomaterial interaction, such as nano-topography, surface chemistry and surface free energy.

  3. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force

    OpenAIRE

    Ingra Mannhardt; Kaja Breckwoldt; David Letuffe-Brenière; Sebastian Schaaf; Herbert Schulz; Christiane Neuber; Anika Benzin; Tessa Werner; Alexandra Eder; Thomas Schulze; Birgit Klampe; Torsten Christ; Marc N. Hirt; Norbert Huebner; Alessandra Moretti1

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histological...

  4. Human engineered heart tissue: Analysis of contractile force

    OpenAIRE

    Mannhardt, I.; Breckwoldt, K.; Letuffe-Breniere, D.; Schaaf, S. van der; H. Schulz; Neuber, C.; Benzin, A.; Werner, T; Eder, A.; Schulze, T.; Klampe, B.; Christ, T; Hirt, M.N.; Huebner, N; Moretti, A.

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histological...

  5. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Domingos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaffolds with controlled internal/external geometry for TE applications.The BioExtruder is a low-cost system that uses a proper fabrication code based on the ISO programming language enabling the fabrication of multimaterial scaffolds. Poly(ε-caprolactone was the material chosen to produce porous scaffolds, made by layers of directionally aligned microfilaments. Chemical, morphological, and in vitro biological evaluation performed on the polymeric constructs revealed a high potential of the BioExtruder to produce 3D scaffolds with regular and reproducible macropore architecture, without inducing relevant chemical and biocompatibility alterations of the material.

  6. Polycaprolactone Scaffolds Fabricated via Bioextrusion for Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Marco; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Cometa, Stefania; Alderighi, Michele; Bártolo, Paulo Jorge; Chiellini, Federica

    2009-01-01

    The most promising approach in Tissue Engineering involves the seeding of porous, biocompatible/biodegradable scaffolds, with donor cells to promote tissue regeneration. Additive biomanufacturing processes are increasingly recognized as ideal techniques to produce 3D structures with optimal pore size and spatial distribution, providing an adequate mechanical support for tissue regeneration while shaping in-growing tissues. This paper presents a novel extrusion-based system to produce 3D scaffolds with controlled internal/external geometry for TE applications.The BioExtruder is a low-cost system that uses a proper fabrication code based on the ISO programming language enabling the fabrication of multimaterial scaffolds. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) was the material chosen to produce porous scaffolds, made by layers of directionally aligned microfilaments. Chemical, morphological, and in vitro biological evaluation performed on the polymeric constructs revealed a high potential of the BioExtruder to produce 3D scaffolds with regular and reproducible macropore architecture, without inducing relevant chemical and biocompatibility alterations of the material. PMID:20126577

  7. Tissue Engineering Strategies as Tools for Personalized Meningioma Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Letizia; Della Puppa, Alessandro; D'Avella, Domenico; Isola, Maurizio; Scienza, Renato; Gardin, Chiara; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacogenomics, the science of how genetic makeup influences an individual's reaction to drugs, is an innovative tool for providing critical insights into how a patient will respond to a particular treatment. In the present work, we constructed cancer-like tissues to be used as tools for determining the most effective drug for an individual patient. Using tissue engineering strategies, we generated two different solid tumor-like tissues in vitro, a neuronal tumor (meningioma) and a nonmelanoma skin cancer. Samples were tested by both histological and genetic approaches (using a comparative genomic hybridization array, and the relative World Health Organization classification of the samples was compared with the results obtained by the molecular analyses. Our data confirmed the ability of the cells to maintain their phenotype in three-dimensional scaffolds as well as the strong relationship between chromosomal alterations and histological malignancy grades. We then validated the in vitro construction of tumor-like tissues as a potential tool for developing personalized drug treatments. PMID:25894852

  8. Epidermal stem cells and skin tissue engineering in hairfollicle regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The reconstitution of a fully organized and functionalhair follicle from dissociated cells propagated underdefined tissue culture conditions is a challenge stillpending in tissue engineering. The loss of hair folliclescaused by injuries or pathologies such as alopecia notonly affects the patients' psychological well-being, butalso endangers certain inherent functions of the skin. Itis then of great interest to find different strategies aimingto regenerate or neogenerate the hair follicle underconditions proper of an adult individual. Based uponcurrent knowledge on the epithelial and dermal cells andtheir interactions during the embryonic hair generationand adult hair cycling, many researchers have tried toobtain mature hair follicles using different strategies andapproaches depending on the causes of hair loss. Thisreview summarizes current advances in the differentexperimental strategies to regenerate or neogenerate hairfollicles, with emphasis on those involving neogenesisof hair follicles in adult individuals using isolated cellsand tissue engineering. Most of these experiments wereperformed using rodent cells, particularly from embryonicor newborn origin. However, no successful strategy togenerate human hair follicles from adult cells has yetbeen reported. This review identifies several issues thatshould be considered to achieve this objective. Perhapsthe most important challenge is to provide threedimensionalculture conditionsmimicking the structure ofliving tissue. Improving culture conditions that allow theexpansion of specific cells while protecting their inductiveproperties, as well as methods for selecting populationsof epithelial stem cells, should give us the necessary toolsto overcome the difficulties that constrain human hairfollicle neogenesis. An analysis of patent trends showsthat the number of patent applications aimed at hairfollicle regeneration and neogenesis has been increasingduring the last decade. This field is attractive not only

  9. Engineered Biomaterials to Enhance Stem Cell-Based Cardiac Tissue Engineering and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Waters, Renae; Roula, Boustany; Dana, Rahbani; Yara, Seif; Alexandre, Toubia; Paul, Arghya

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Since adult cardiac cells are limited in their proliferation, cardiac tissue with dead or damaged cardiac cells downstream of the occluded vessel does not regenerate after myocardial infarction. The cardiac tissue is then replaced with nonfunctional fibrotic scar tissue rather than new cardiac cells, which leaves the heart weak. The limited proliferation ability of host cardiac cells has motivated investigators to research the potential cardiac regenerative ability of stem cells. Considerable progress has been made in this endeavor. However, the optimum type of stem cells along with the most suitable matrix-material and cellular microenvironmental cues are yet to be identified or agreed upon. This review presents an overview of various types of biofunctional materials and biomaterial matrices, which in combination with stem cells, have shown promises for cardiac tissue replacement and reinforcement. Engineered biomaterials also have applications in cardiac tissue engineering, in which tissue constructs are developed in vitro by combining stem cells and biomaterial scaffolds for drug screening or eventual implantation. This review highlights the benefits of using biomaterials in conjunction with stem cells to repair damaged myocardium and give a brief description of the properties of these biomaterials that make them such valuable tools to the field. PMID:26953627

  10. Does UV irradiation affect polymer properties relevant to tissue engineering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Claudia; Tessmar, Jörg; Lucke, Andrea; Schnell, Edith; Schmeer, Georg; Blunk, Torsten; Göpferich, Achim

    2001-10-01

    For most tissue engineering approaches aiming at the repair or generation of living tissues the interaction of cells and polymeric biomaterials is of paramount importance. Prior to contact with cells or tissues, biomaterials have to be sterilized. However, many sterilization procedures such as steam autoclave or heat sterilization are known to strongly affect polymer properties. UV irradiation is used as an alternative sterilization method in many tissue engineering laboratories on a routine basis, however, potential alterations of polymer properties have not been extensively considered. In this study we investigated the effects of UV irradiation on spin-cast films made from biodegradable poly( D, L-lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol)-monomethyl ether diblock copolymers (Me.PEG-PLA) which have recently been developed for controlled cell-biomaterial interaction. After 2 h of UV irradiation, which is sufficient for sterilization, no alterations in cell adhesion to polymer films were detected, as demonstrated with 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This correlated with unchanged film topography and molecular weight distribution. However, extended UV irradiation for 5-24 h elicited drastic responses regarding Me.PEG-PLA polymer properties and interactions with biological elements: Large increases in unspecific protein adsorption and subsequent cell adhesion were observed. Changes in polymer surface properties could be correlated with the observed alterations in cell/protein-polymer interactions. Atomic force microscopy analysis of polymer films revealed a marked "smoothing" of the polymer surface after UV irradiation. Investigations using GPC, 1H-NMR, mass spectrometry, and a PEG-specific colorimetric assay demonstrated that polymer film composition was time-dependently affected by exposure to UV irradiation, i.e., that large amounts of PEG were lost from the copolymer surface. The data indicate that sterilization using UV irradiation for 2 h is an appropriate technique for the

  11. Engineering Electronic Structure of a Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Bi(111) Bilayer on Sb Nanofilms by Quantum Confinement Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Guang; Wang, Zhengfei; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Xu, Caizhi; Xu, SuYang; Miller, Thomas; Hasan, M Zahid; Liu, Feng; Chiang, Tai-Chang

    2016-03-22

    We report on the fabrication of a two-dimensional topological insulator Bi(111) bilayer on Sb nanofilms via a sequential molecular beam epitaxy growth technique. Our angle-resolved photoemission measurements demonstrate the evolution of the electronic band structure of the heterostructure as a function of the film thickness and reveal the existence of a two-dimensional spinful massless electron gas within the top Bi bilayer. Interestingly, our first-principles calculation extrapolating the observed band structure shows that, by tuning down the thickness of the supporting Sb films into the quantum dimension regime, a pair of isolated topological edge states emerges in a partial energy gap at 0.32 eV above the Fermi level as a consequence of quantum confinement effect. Our results and methodology of fabricating nanoscale heterostructures establish the Bi bilayer/Sb heterostructure as a platform of great potential for both ultra-low-energy-cost electronics and surface-based spintronics. PMID:26932368

  12. Combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix and adipose-derived stem cells for adipose tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A.; Zhang, Qixu; Elisabeth K. Beahm

    2013-01-01

    Repair of soft-tissue defects resulting from lumpectomy or mastectomy has become an important rehabilitation process for breast cancer patients. This study aimed to provide an adipose tissue engineering platform for soft-tissue defect repair by combining decellularized human adipose tissue extracellular matrix (hDAM) and human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). To derive hDAM, incised human adipose tissues underwent a decellularization process. Effective cell removal and lipid removal were p...

  13. Bio-functionalized PCL nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface properties of scaffolds such as hydrophilicity and the presence of functional groups on the surface of scaffolds play a key role in cell adhesion, proliferation and migration. Different modification methods for hydrophilicity improvement and introduction of functional groups on the surface of scaffolds have been carried out on synthetic biodegradable polymers, for tissue engineering applications. In this study, alkaline hydrolysis of poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibrous scaffolds was carried out for different time periods (1 h, 4 h and 12 h) to increase the hydrophilicity of the scaffolds. The formation of reactive groups resulting from alkaline hydrolysis provides opportunities for further surface functionalization of PCL nanofibrous scaffolds. Matrigel was attached covalently on the surface of an optimized 4 h hydrolyzed PCL nanofibrous scaffolds and additionally the fabrication of blended PCL/matrigel nanofibrous scaffolds was carried out. Chemical and mechanical characterization of nanofibrous scaffolds were evaluated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, contact angle, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile measurement. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation study was carried out after seeding nerve precursor cells (NPCs) on different scaffolds. Results of cell proliferation assay and SEM studies showed that the covalently functionalized PCL/matrigel nanofibrous scaffolds promote the proliferation and neurite outgrowth of NPCs compared to PCL and hydrolyzed PCL nanofibrous scaffolds, providing suitable substrates for nerve tissue engineering.

  14. Sonication induced silk fibroin cryogels for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, P. U.; Jain, E.; Hixon, K. R.; Eberlin, C. T.; Sell, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we report a method to form macroporous silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds through a combination of ultrasonication followed by cryogelation at subzero temperatures. The resultant sonication induced SF cryogels encompassed larger pore sizes (151 ± 56 μm) and higher mechanical stability (127.15 ± 24.71 kPa) than their hydrogel counterparts made at room temperature. Furthermore, the addition of dopants like Manuka honey and bone char in SF cryogels did not affect cryogel synthesis but decreased the pore size in a concentration dependent manner. With no crack propagation at 50% strain and promising stability under cyclic loads, mineralization and cellular infiltration potential were analyzed for bone tissue engineering purposes. Although the scaffolds showed limited mineralization, encouraging cellular infiltration results yield promise for other tissue engineering applications. The use of mild processing conditions, a simplistic procedure, and the lack of organic solvents or chemical cross-linkers renders the combination of sonication and cryogelation as an attractive fabrication technique for 3D SF macroporous scaffolds.

  15. Bridging the divide between neuroprosthetic design, tissue engineering and neurobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie Leach

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic devices have made a major impact in the treatment of a variety of disorders such as paralysis and stroke. However, a major impediment in the advancement of this technology is the challenge of maintaining device performance during chronic implantation (months to years due to complex intrinsic host responses such as gliosis or glial scarring. The objective of this review is to bring together research communities in neurobiology, tissue engineering, and neuroprosthetics to address the major obstacles encountered in the translation of neuroprosthetics technology into long-term clinical use. This article draws connections between specific challenges faced by current neuroprosthetics technology and recent advances in the areas of nerve tissue engineering and neurobiology. Within the context of the device-nervous system interface and central nervous system (CNS implants, areas of synergistic opportunity are discussed, including platforms to present cells with multiple cues, controlled delivery of bioactive factors, three-dimensional constructs and in vitro models of gliosis and brain injury, nerve regeneration strategies, and neural stem/progenitor cell (NPC biology. Finally, recent insights gained from the fields of developmental neurobiology and cancer biology are discussed as examples of exciting new biological knowledge that may provide fresh inspiration towards novel technologies to address the complexities associated with long-term neuroprosthetic device performance.

  16. Review: photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Burdick, Jason A

    2007-10-01

    Photopolymerizable and degradable biomaterials are finding widespread application in the field of tissue engineering for the engineering of tissues such as bone, cartilage, and liver. The spatial and temporal control afforded by photoinitiated polymerizations has allowed for the development of injectable materials that can deliver cells and growth factors, as well as for the fabrication of scaffolding with complex structures. The materials developed for these applications range from entirely synthetic polymers (e.g., poly(ethylene glycol)) to purely natural polymers (e.g., hyaluronic acid) that are modified with photoreactive groups, with degradation based on the hydrolytic or enzymatic degradation of bonds in the polymer backbone or crosslinks. The degradation behavior also ranges from purely bulk to entirely surface degrading, based on the nature of the backbone chemistry and type of degradable units. The mechanical properties of these polymers are primarily based on factors such as the network crosslinking density and polymer concentration. As we better understand biological features necessary to control cellular behavior, smarter materials are being developed that can incorporate and mimic many of these factors. PMID:17658993

  17. Evaluation of immunocompatibility of tissue-engineered periosteum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Lin; Wang Shuanke; Xia Yayi; Liu Jia; He Jing; Wang Xin [Orthopaedic Institute of the 2nd Hospital of Lanzhou University, 80 CuiYingMen, ChengGuan District, Lanzhou City, 730030 (China); Zhao Junli, E-mail: bonezl@qq.com [Department of Nephrology, the 2nd Hospital of Lanzhou University, 80 CuiYingMen, ChengGuan District, Lanzhou City, 730030 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Tissue-engineered periosteum (TEP) and 'intramembranous ossification' may be an alternative approach to bone tissue engineering. In the previous study we attained successful bone defect reparation with homemade TEP in an allogenic rabbit model. But its allogenic immunocompatibility remained unknown. In this study TEP was constructed by seeding osteogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells of rabbit onto porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). A mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was applied to evaluate the in vitro immunogenicity. The ratio of CD4{sup +}/CD8{sup +} T-lymphocytes was tested kinetically to evaluate the systematic reaction of the TEP allograft, and a histological examination was performed to investigate local inflammation and ectopic osteogenesis. MLR indicated that TEP had a higher in vitro immunostimulation than SIS (p < 0.05). The ratios of CD4{sup +}/CD8{sup +} lymphocytes increased in both TEP and SIS implanted groups in 2 weeks, followed by a decrease to a normal level from 2 to 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed modest lymphocyte infiltration for no more than 2 weeks. Moreover, subcutaneous ectopic ossification was observed in TEP allograft animals (8/12). Our findings imply that TEP has a certain immune reaction for the allograft, but it is not severe enough to impact osteogenesis in the allogenic rabbit model.

  18. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 2015: A Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobma, Holly; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-04-01

    This may be the most exciting time ever for the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM). After decades of progress, it has matured, integrated, and diversified into entirely new areas, and it is starting to make the pivotal shift toward translation. The most exciting science and applications continue to emerge at the boundaries of disciplines, through increasingly effective interactions between stem cell biologists, bioengineers, clinicians, and the commercial sector. In this "Year in Review," we highlight some of the major advances reported over the last year (Summer 2014-Fall 2015). Using a methodology similar to that established in previous years, we identified four areas that generated major progress in the field: (i) pluripotent stem cells, (ii) microtissue platforms for drug testing and disease modeling, (iii) tissue models of cancer, and (iv) whole organ engineering. For each area, we used some of the most impactful articles to illustrate the important concepts and results that advanced the state of the art of TERM. We conclude with reflections on emerging areas and perspectives for future development in the field. PMID:26714410

  19. Study on Different Modification Methods of Collagen for Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xin-yu

    2008-01-01

    Because of the excellent biocompatibility and its specific amino sequences, collagen is an ideal biomedical material for tissue engineering applications. But collagen is usually lack of mechanical strength to form a rigid 3-D matrix and lack of ability to resist collagenase. In order to be a tissue engineering scaffold, collagen must strengthen its structures by modifying with chemical crosslinkers. Chemical crosslinkers used for modif-ying collagen fibers include glutaraldehyde (GA), epoxy compounds (PC) and carbodiim-ides (EDC). The aim of this study is to choose the best chemical crosslinker from the three reagents. In terms of the resistance to collagenase degradation, chemical cross-link-ing with PC provided the best protection; in terms of the mechanical characterization, chemical cross-linking with GA provided the best;and in terms of the biocompatibility, chemical cross-linking with EDC provided the best. There is not a reagent which has all merits for collagen crosslinking, so we should select the crosslinking reagent as the de-mands of use ask.

  20. Evaluation of immunocompatibility of tissue-engineered periosteum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissue-engineered periosteum (TEP) and 'intramembranous ossification' may be an alternative approach to bone tissue engineering. In the previous study we attained successful bone defect reparation with homemade TEP in an allogenic rabbit model. But its allogenic immunocompatibility remained unknown. In this study TEP was constructed by seeding osteogenically induced mesenchymal stem cells of rabbit onto porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). A mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was applied to evaluate the in vitro immunogenicity. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocytes was tested kinetically to evaluate the systematic reaction of the TEP allograft, and a histological examination was performed to investigate local inflammation and ectopic osteogenesis. MLR indicated that TEP had a higher in vitro immunostimulation than SIS (p +/CD8+ lymphocytes increased in both TEP and SIS implanted groups in 2 weeks, followed by a decrease to a normal level from 2 to 4 weeks. Histological examination revealed modest lymphocyte infiltration for no more than 2 weeks. Moreover, subcutaneous ectopic ossification was observed in TEP allograft animals (8/12). Our findings imply that TEP has a certain immune reaction for the allograft, but it is not severe enough to impact osteogenesis in the allogenic rabbit model.

  1. Mechanobiology and Mechanotherapy of Adipose Tissue-Effect of Mechanical Force on Fat Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi; Gao, Jianhua; Ogawa, Rei

    2015-12-01

    Our bodies are subjected to various mechanical forces, which in turn affect both the structure and function of our bodies. In particular, these mechanical forces play an important role in tissue growth and regeneration. Adipocytes and adipose-derived stem cells are both mechanosensitive and mechanoresponsive. The aim of this review is to summarize the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis. PubMed was used to search for articles using the following keywords: mechanobiology, adipogenesis, adipose-derived stem cells, and cytoskeleton. In vitro and in vivo experiments have shown that adipogenesis is strongly promoted/inhibited by various internal and external mechanical forces, and that these effects are mediated by changes in the cytoskeleton of adipose-derived stem cells and/or various signaling pathways. Thus, adipose tissue engineering could be enhanced by the careful application of mechanical forces. It was shown recently that mature adipose tissue regenerates in an adipose tissue-engineering chamber. This observation has great potential for the reconstruction of soft tissue deficiencies, but the mechanisms behind it remain to be elucidated. On the basis of our understanding of mechanobiology, we hypothesize that the chamber removes mechanical force on the fat that normally impose high cytoskeletal tension. The reduction in tension in adipose stem cells triggers their differentiation into adipocytes. The improvement in our understanding of the relationship between mechanobiology and adipogenesis means that in the near future, we may be able to increase or decrease body fat, as needed in the clinic, by controlling the tension that is loaded onto fat. PMID:26894003

  2. PLDLA/PCL-T Scaffold for Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Andrea Rodrigues; Moda, Marlon; Cattani, Silvia Mara de Melo; de Santana, Gracy Mara; Barbieri, Juliana Abreu; Munhoz, Monique Moron; Cardoso, Túlio Pereira; Barbo, Maria Lourdes Peris; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Duek, Eliana Aparecida de Rezende

    2013-04-01

    The inability of the avascular region of the meniscus to regenerate has led to the use of tissue engineering to treat meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of fibrochondrocytes preseeded on PLDLA/PCL-T [poly(L-co-D,L-lactic acid)/poly(caprolactone-triol)] scaffolds to stimulate regeneration of the whole meniscus. Porous PLDLA/PCL-T (90/10) scaffolds were obtained by solvent casting and particulate leaching. Compressive modulus of 9.5±1.0 MPa and maximum stress of 4.7±0.9 MPa were evaluated. Fibrochondrocytes from rabbit menisci were isolated, seeded directly on the scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days. New Zealand rabbits underwent total meniscectomy, after which implants consisting of cell-free scaffolds or cell-seeded scaffolds were introduced into the medial knee meniscus; the negative control group consisted of rabbits that received no implant. Macroscopic and histological evaluations of the neomeniscus were performed 12 and 24 weeks after implantation. The polymer scaffold implants adapted well to surrounding tissues, without apparent rejection, infection, or chronic inflammatory response. Fibrocartilaginous tissue with mature collagen fibers was observed predominantly in implants with seeded scaffolds compared to cell-free implants after 24 weeks. Similar results were not observed in the control group. Articular cartilage was preserved in the polymeric implants and showed higher chondrocyte cell number than the control group. These findings show that the PLDLA/PCL-T 90/10 scaffold has potential for orthopedic applications since this material allowed the formation of fibrocartilaginous tissue, a structure of crucial importance for repairing injuries to joints, including replacement of the meniscus and the protection of articular cartilage from degeneration. PMID:23593566

  3. Transport Advances in Disposable Bioreactors for Liver Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Gerardo; Patzer, John F.; Gerlach, Jörg Christian

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a devastating diagnosis with an overall survival of approximately 60%. Liver transplantation is the therapy of choice for ALF patients but is limited by the scarce availability of donor organs. The prognosis of ALF patients may improve if essential liver functions are restored during liver failure by means of auxiliary methods because liver tissue has the capability to regenerate and heal. Bioartificial liver (BAL) approaches use liver tissue or cells to provide ALF patients with liver-specific metabolism and synthesis products necessary to relieve some of the symptoms and to promote liver tissue regeneration. The most promising BAL treatments are based on the culture of tissue engineered (TE) liver constructs, with mature liver cells or cells that may differentiate into hepatocytes to perform liver-specific functions, in disposable continuous-flow bioreactors. In fact, adult hepatocytes perform all essential liver functions. Clinical evaluations of the proposed BALs show that they are safe but have not clearly proven the efficacy of treatment as compared to standard supportive treatments. Ambiguous clinical results, the time loss of cellular activity during treatment, and the presence of a necrotic core in the cell compartment of many bioreactors suggest that improvement of transport of nutrients, and metabolic wastes and products to or from the cells in the bioreactor is critical for the development of therapeutically effective BALs. In this chapter, advanced strategies that have been proposed over to improve mass transport in the bioreactors at the core of a BAL for the treatment of ALF patients are reviewed.

  4. Polycaprolactone scaffold engineered for sustained release of resveratrol: therapeutic enhancement in bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Kamath MS; Ahmed SS; Dhanasekaran M; Winkins Santosh S

    2013-01-01

    Manjunath Srinivas Kamath,1 Shiek SSJ Ahmed,2 M Dhanasekaran,3 S Winkins Santosh11Department of Biotechnology, School of Bioengineering, SRM University, 2Department of Biotechnology, Chettinad Hospital and Research Institute, 3Department of Stem Cells, Life Line Rigid Hospital Pvt Ltd, Kilpauk, Tamil Nadu, IndiaAbstract: Biomaterials-based three-dimensional scaffolds are being extensively investigated in bone tissue engineering. A potential scaffold should be osteoconductive, osteoinductive, ...

  5. Biological and engineering design considerations for vascular tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs)

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Cristina E.; Achneck, Hardean E.; Reichert, William M.; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable advances have occurred in the development of tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) to repair or replace injured blood vessels, or as in vitro systems for drug toxicity testing. Here we summarize approaches to produce TEBVs and review current efforts to (1) identify suitable cell sources for the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells, (2) design the scaffold to mimic the arterial mechanical properties and (3) regulate the functional state of the cells of the vessel wall. I...

  6. Control of Scar Tissue Formation in the Cornea: Strategies in Clinical and Corneal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation.

  7. Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Guryanov, Ivan D.; Yendluri, Raghuvara; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2016-03-01

    Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur without changes in viability and cytoskeleton formation. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability evaluation in rats has confirmed that the scaffolds promote the formation of novel blood vessels around the implantation sites. The scaffolds show excellent resorption within six weeks after implantation in rats. Neo-vascularization observed in newly formed connective tissue placed near the scaffold allows for the complete restoration of blood flow. These phenomena indicate that the halloysite-doped scaffolds are biocompatible as demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The chitosan-gelatine-agarose doped clay nanotube nanocomposite scaffolds fabricated in this work are promising candidates for tissue engineering applications.Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur

  8. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  9. Chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xianshuo; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Chen, Yong; Cao, Yang; Yu, Xiaolong

    2015-12-01

    A novel composite scaffold based on chitosan-collagen/organomontmorillonite (CS-COL/OMMT) was prepared to improve swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio, biomineralization and mechanical properties for use in tissue engineering applications. In order to expend the basal spacing, montmorillonite (MMT) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and was characterized by XRD, TGA and FTIR. The results indicated that the anionic surfactants entered into interlayer of MMT and the basal spacing of MMT was expanded to 3.85 nm. The prepared composite scaffolds were characterized by FTIR, XRD and SEM. The swelling ratio, biodegradation ratio and mechanical properties of composite scaffolds were also studied. The results demonstrated that the scaffold decreased swelling ratio, degradation ratio and improved mechanical and biomineralization properties because of OMMT.

  10. Polyelectrolyte-complex nanostructured fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current work, polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering have been synthesized and a mechanism of their formation has been investigated. The scaffolds are synthesized using polygalacturonic acid and chitosan using the freeze drying methodology. Highly interconnected pores of sizes in the range of 5-20 μm are observed in the scaffolds. The thickness of the fibers was found to be in the range of 1-2 μm. Individual fibers have a nanogranular structure as observed using AFM imaging. In these scaffolds, PEC nanoparticles assemble together at the interface of ice crystals during freeze drying process. Further investigation shows that the freezing temperature and concentration have a remarkable effect on structure of scaffolds. Biocompatibility studies show that scaffold containing chitosan, polygalacturonic acid and hydroxyapatite promotes cell adhesion and proliferation. On the other hand, cells on scaffolds fabricated without hydroxyapatite nanoparticles showed poor adhesion.

  11. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S., E-mail: smsilva@ineb.up.pt [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal); Rodriguez, M.A.; Pena, P.; De Aza, A.H.; De Aza, S. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, 28049-Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ferraz, M.P. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude da Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Rua Carlos da Maia, 296, 4200-150 Porto (Portugal); Monteiro, F.J. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-01

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  12. The influence of hydrostatic pressure on tissue engineered bone development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neßler, K H L; Henstock, J R; El Haj, A J; Waters, S L; Whiteley, J P; Osborne, J M

    2016-04-01

    The hydrostatic pressure stimulation of an appropriately cell-seeded porous scaffold within a bioreactor is a promising method for engineering bone tissue external to the body. We propose a mathematical model, and employ a suite of candidate constitutive laws, to qualitatively describe the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure on the quantity of minerals deposited in such an experimental setup. By comparing data from numerical simulations with experimental observations under a number of stimulation protocols, we suggest that the response of bone cells to an applied pressure requires consideration of two components; (i) a component describing the cell memory of the applied stimulation, and (ii) a recovery component, capturing the time cells require to recover from high rates of mineralisation. PMID:26796221

  13. Building Biocompatible Hydrogels for Tissue Engineering of the Brain and Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Bjugstad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering strategies employing biomaterials have made great progress in the last few decades. However, the tissues of the brain and spinal cord pose unique challenges due to a separate immune system and their nature as soft tissue. Because of this, neural tissue engineering for the brain and spinal cord may require re-establishing biocompatibility and functionality of biomaterials that have previously been successful for tissue engineering in the body. The goal of this review is to briefly describe the distinctive properties of the central nervous system, specifically the neuroimmune response, and to describe the factors which contribute to building polymer hydrogels compatible with this tissue. These factors include polymer chemistry, polymerization and degradation, and the physical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel. By understanding the necessities in making hydrogels biocompatible with tissue of the brain and spinal cord, tissue engineers can then functionalize these materials for repairing and replacing tissue in the central nervous system.

  14. A novel seamless elastic scaffold for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Chung, Eunna; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Young Ha; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-engineered vascular grafts have been investigated as a substitute for prosthetic vascular grafts. The current scaffolds have several limitations due to weak mechanical properties in withstanding the pressure of blood vessel. A gel-spinning molding device including three-separate drivers that make a cylindrical shaft turn on its axis, orbit, and concurrently move up and down was developed for preparing seamless fibrous tubular scaffolds for vascular grafts. A seamless double-layered tubular scaffold, which was composed of an outer fibrous network and inner porous layer, was fabricated by using the device for the spinning of poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL, 50:50) solution as a gel state on a rotating cylindrical shaft that had been dip-coated with the mixture of PLCL solution and NaCl particles. A scaffold that had an inner layer fabricated with 30% salts, below 20 mum in salt size, and more than 100 microm in thickness, was found to be optimal from a blood leakage test. The burst pressures of the scaffolds were more than 900 mmHg. The scaffolds exhibited 550-670% elongation-at-break. The measured circumferential and longitudinal tensile strengths of the scaffolds were 3.62 +/- 0.68 and 2.64 +/- 0.41 MPa, respectively. The suture retention strength of the scaffold was measured to be 7.68 +/- 0.75 N. These mechanically strong and elastic properties of the newly developed scaffolds provide an important basis for blood vessel tissue engineering. PMID:20178686

  15. Ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Catherine Kyleen

    Generation of living tissues through tissue engineering can be achieved via incorporation of cells into synthetic scaffolds designed to facilitate new tissue formation. Necessary characteristics of a scaffold include biocompatibility, high porosity with controllable pore size and interconnectivity, moldability, chemical and mechanical stability, and structural homogeneity. Hydrogels often possess many of the necessary characteristics and thus are favorable candidates for scaffolding. Alginate hydrogels are commonly made by ionically crosslinking with calcium ions from CaCl2 or CaSO4. These hydrogels are favored for their mild gel formation, however the gelation rate is rapid and uncontrollable (fast-gelation), resulting in varying crosslinking density throughout the gel. In this work, structurally homogeneous calcium alginate hydrogels were formed via a slow-gelation system that utilizes uniform mixing of CaCO3 with sodium alginate solution, and the addition of slowly hydrolyzing D-gluconic acid lactone to slowly release calcium ions for crosslinking. Homogeneity and mechanical properties of these hydrogels were shown to be superior to those of fast-gelled hydrogels. Gelation rate was controlled through the incorporation of CaSO4, and by varying total calcium content, polymer concentration and gelation temperature. Control over mechanical properties and diffusivity was demonstrated in the homogeneous hydrogels by adjusting compositional variables. Consistent control over solute diffusivity through gel discs reflected the structural homogeneity of the gels. To overcome the instability of ionically crosslinked gels in tissue culture medium, a method was developed to control the hydrogel dimensions by adjusting the ionic concentration of the medium. Stability of the hydrogels in this controlled environment was characterized through swelling experiments and mechanical testing. To provide for scaffold degradation and thereby promote tissue growth, alginate lyase was

  16. Surface modified electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Venugopal, J.; Chan, Casey K.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2008-11-01

    The development of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds with surface properties that dominate interactions between the material and biological environment is of great interest in biomedical applications. In this regard, poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by an electrospinning process and surface modified by a simple plasma treatment process for enhancing the Schwann cell adhesion, proliferation and interactions with nanofibers necessary for nerve tissue formation. The hydrophilicity of surface modified PCL nanofibrous scaffolds (p-PCL) was evaluated by contact angle and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Naturally derived polymers such as collagen are frequently used for the fabrication of biocomposite PCL/collagen scaffolds, though the feasibility of procuring large amounts of natural materials for clinical applications remains a concern, along with their cost and mechanical stability. The proliferation of Schwann cells on p-PCL nanofibrous scaffolds showed a 17% increase in cell proliferation compared to those on PCL/collagen nanofibrous scaffolds after 8 days of cell culture. Schwann cells were found to attach and proliferate on surface modified PCL nanofibrous scaffolds expressing bipolar elongations, retaining their normal morphology. The results of our study showed that plasma treated PCL nanofibrous scaffolds are a cost-effective material compared to PCL/collagen scaffolds, and can potentially serve as an ideal tissue engineered scaffold, especially for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  17. Surface modified electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of biodegradable polymeric scaffolds with surface properties that dominate interactions between the material and biological environment is of great interest in biomedical applications. In this regard, poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous scaffolds were fabricated by an electrospinning process and surface modified by a simple plasma treatment process for enhancing the Schwann cell adhesion, proliferation and interactions with nanofibers necessary for nerve tissue formation. The hydrophilicity of surface modified PCL nanofibrous scaffolds (p-PCL) was evaluated by contact angle and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Naturally derived polymers such as collagen are frequently used for the fabrication of biocomposite PCL/collagen scaffolds, though the feasibility of procuring large amounts of natural materials for clinical applications remains a concern, along with their cost and mechanical stability. The proliferation of Schwann cells on p-PCL nanofibrous scaffolds showed a 17% increase in cell proliferation compared to those on PCL/collagen nanofibrous scaffolds after 8 days of cell culture. Schwann cells were found to attach and proliferate on surface modified PCL nanofibrous scaffolds expressing bipolar elongations, retaining their normal morphology. The results of our study showed that plasma treated PCL nanofibrous scaffolds are a cost-effective material compared to PCL/collagen scaffolds, and can potentially serve as an ideal tissue engineered scaffold, especially for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  18. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannhardt, Ingra; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Letuffe-Brenière, David; Schaaf, Sebastian; Schulz, Herbert; Neuber, Christiane; Benzin, Anika; Werner, Tessa; Eder, Alexandra; Schulze, Thomas; Klampe, Birgit; Christ, Torsten; Hirt, Marc N; Huebner, Norbert; Moretti, Alessandra; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Hansen, Arne

    2016-07-12

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histologically and functionally. HiPSC-CM in EHTs showed well-developed sarcomeric organization and alignment, and frequent mitochondria. Systematic contractility analysis (26 concentration-response curves) reveals that EHTs replicated canonical response to physiological and pharmacological regulators of inotropy, membrane- and calcium-clock mediators of pacemaking, modulators of ion-channel currents, and proarrhythmic compounds with unprecedented precision. The analysis demonstrates a high degree of similarity between hiPSC-CM in EHT format and native human heart tissue, indicating that human EHTs are useful for preclinical drug testing and disease modeling. PMID:27211213

  19. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingra Mannhardt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM. This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histologically and functionally. HiPSC-CM in EHTs showed well-developed sarcomeric organization and alignment, and frequent mitochondria. Systematic contractility analysis (26 concentration-response curves reveals that EHTs replicated canonical response to physiological and pharmacological regulators of inotropy, membrane- and calcium-clock mediators of pacemaking, modulators of ion-channel currents, and proarrhythmic compounds with unprecedented precision. The analysis demonstrates a high degree of similarity between hiPSC-CM in EHT format and native human heart tissue, indicating that human EHTs are useful for preclinical drug testing and disease modeling.

  20. Tissue Engineered Skeletal Myofibers can Directly "Sense" Gravitational Force Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Shansky, J.; DelTatto, M.; Lee, Peter; Meir, J.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term manned space flight requires a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy resulting from microgravity. Atrophy most likely results from changes at both the systemic level (e.g. decreased circulating growth hormone, increased circulating glucocorticoids) and locally (e.g. decreased myofiber resting tension). Differentiated skeletal myofibers in tissue culture have provided a model system over the last decade for gaining a better understanding of the interactions of exogenous growth factors, endogenous growth factors, and muscle fiber tension in regulating protein turnover rates and muscle cell growth. Tissue engineering these cells into three dimensional bioartificial muscle (BAM) constructs has allowed us to extend their use to Space flight studies for the potential future development of countermeasures. Embryonic avian muscle cells were isolated and BAMs tissue engineered as described previously. The myoblasts proliferate and fuse into aligned postmitotic myofibers after ten to fourteen days in vitro. A cylindrical muscle-like structure containing several thousand myofibers is formed which is approximately 30 mm in length, 2-3 mm in diameter, and attached at each end. For the Space Shuttle experiments, the BAMs were transferred to 55 mL bioreactor cartridges (6 BAMs/cartridge). At Kennedy Space Center, the cartridges were mounted in two Space Tissue Loss (STL) Modules (three to four cartridges per Module) and either maintained as ground controls or loaded in a Mid-Deck locker of the Space Shuttle. The BAM cartridges were continuously perfused during the experiment at 1.5 mL/ min with tissue culture medium. Eighteen BAMs were flown for nine days on Mission STS66 while eighteen BAMs served as ground controls. The complete experiment was repeated on Mission STS77 with twenty four BAMs in each group. BAMs could be maintained in a healthy state for at least 30 days in the perfusion bioreactor cartridges. The BAM muscle fibers directly detected both the

  1. Photochemical bonding of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice to rat muscle layer for esophageal tissue engineering: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Barbara P.; Sato, M.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Kochevar, Irene E.; Redmond, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    Bilayered tube structures consist of epithelial cell-seeded collagen lattice and muscle layer have been fabricated for esophageal tissue engineering. Good adhesion between layers in order to facilitate cell infiltration and neovascularization in the collagen lattice is required. Previous efforts include using other bioglues such as fibrin glue and silicone tube as the physical support. However, the former is subjected to chances of transmitting blood-born infectious disease and is time consuming while the latter requires a second surgical procedure. The current project aimed to bond the cell-seeded collagen lattice to muscle layer using photochemical bonding, which has previously been demonstrated a rapid and non-thermal procedure in bonding collagenous tissues. Rat esophageal epithelial cells were seeded on collagen lattice and together with the latissimus dorsi muscle layer, were exposed to a photosensitizer rose Bengal at the bonding surface. An argon laser was used to irradiate the approximated layers. Bonding strength was measured during the peeling test of the collagen layer from the muscle layer. Post-bonding cell viability was assessed using a modified NADH-diaphorase microassay. A pilot in vivo study was conducted by directly bonding the cell-seeded collagen layer onto the muscle flap in rats and the structures were characterized histologically. Photochemical bonding was found to significantly increase the adherence at the bonding interface without compromising the cell viability. This indicates the feasibility of using the technique to fabricate multi-layered structures in the presence of living cells. The pilot animal study demonstrated integration of the collagen lattice with the muscle layer at the bonding interface although the subsequent surgical manipulation disturbed the integration at some region. This means that an additional procedure removing the tube could be avoided if the approximation and thus the bonding are optimized. Cell infiltration

  2. Polyacylurethanes as Novel Degradable Cell Carrier Materials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Jan Schouten

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycaprolactone (PCL polyester and segmented aliphatic polyester urethanes based on PCL soft segment have been thoroughly investigated as biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although proven beneficial as long term implants, these materials degrade very slowly and are therefore not suitable in applications in which scaffold support is needed for a shorter time. A recently developed class of polyacylurethanes (PAUs is expected to fulfill such requirements. Our aim was to assess in vitro the degradation of PAUs and evaluate their suitability as temporary scaffold materials to support soft tissue repair. With both a mass loss of 2.5–3.0% and a decrease in molar mass of approx. 35% over a period of 80 days, PAUs were shown to degrade via both bulk and surface erosion mechanisms. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy was successfully applied to study the extent of PAUs microphase separation during in vitro degradation. The microphase separated morphology of PAU1000 (molar mass of the oligocaprolactone soft segment = 1000 g/mol provided this polymer with mechano-physical characteristics that would render it a suitable material for constructs and devices. PAU1000 exhibited excellent haemocompatibility in vitro. In addition, PAU1000 supported both adhesion and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and this could be further enhanced by pre-coating of PAU1000 with fibronectin (Fn. The contact angle of PAU1000 decreased both with in vitro degradation and by incubation in biological fluids. In endothelial cell culture medium the contact angle reached 60°, which is optimal for cell adhesion. Taken together, these results support the application of PAU1000 in the field of soft tissue repair as a temporary degradable scaffold.

  3. Exploring Instructive Physiological Signaling with the Bioelectric Tissue Simulation Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietak, Alexis; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectric cell properties have been revealed as powerful targets for modulating stem cell function, regenerative response, developmental patterning, and tumor reprograming. Spatio-temporal distributions of endogenous resting potential, ion flows, and electric fields are influenced not only by the genome and external signals but also by their own intrinsic dynamics. Ion channels and electrical synapses (gap junctions) both determine, and are themselves gated by, cellular resting potential. Thus, the origin and progression of bioelectric patterns in multicellular tissues is complex, which hampers the rational control of voltage distributions for biomedical interventions. To improve understanding of these dynamics and facilitate the development of bioelectric pattern control strategies, we developed the BioElectric Tissue Simulation Engine (BETSE), a finite volume method multiphysics simulator, which predicts bioelectric patterns and their spatio-temporal dynamics by modeling ion channel and gap junction activity and tracking changes to the fundamental property of ion concentration. We validate performance of the simulator by matching experimentally obtained data on membrane permeability, ion concentration and resting potential to simulated values, and by demonstrating the expected outcomes for a range of well-known cases, such as predicting the correct transmembrane voltage changes for perturbation of single cell membrane states and environmental ion concentrations, in addition to the development of realistic transepithelial potentials and bioelectric wounding signals. In silico experiments reveal factors influencing transmembrane potential are significantly different in gap junction-networked cell clusters with tight junctions, and identify non-linear feedback mechanisms capable of generating strong, emergent, cluster-wide resting potential gradients. The BETSE platform will enable a deep understanding of local and long-range bioelectrical dynamics in tissues, and

  4. Exploring Instructive Physiological Signaling with the Bioelectric Tissue Simulation Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietak, Alexis; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectric cell properties have been revealed as powerful targets for modulating stem cell function, regenerative response, developmental patterning, and tumor reprograming. Spatio-temporal distributions of endogenous resting potential, ion flows, and electric fields are influenced not only by the genome and external signals but also by their own intrinsic dynamics. Ion channels and electrical synapses (gap junctions) both determine, and are themselves gated by, cellular resting potential. Thus, the origin and progression of bioelectric patterns in multicellular tissues is complex, which hampers the rational control of voltage distributions for biomedical interventions. To improve understanding of these dynamics and facilitate the development of bioelectric pattern control strategies, we developed the BioElectric Tissue Simulation Engine (BETSE), a finite volume method multiphysics simulator, which predicts bioelectric patterns and their spatio-temporal dynamics by modeling ion channel and gap junction activity and tracking changes to the fundamental property of ion concentration. We validate performance of the simulator by matching experimentally obtained data on membrane permeability, ion concentration and resting potential to simulated values, and by demonstrating the expected outcomes for a range of well-known cases, such as predicting the correct transmembrane voltage changes for perturbation of single cell membrane states and environmental ion concentrations, in addition to the development of realistic transepithelial potentials and bioelectric wounding signals. In silico experiments reveal factors influencing transmembrane potential are significantly different in gap junction-networked cell clusters with tight junctions, and identify non-linear feedback mechanisms capable of generating strong, emergent, cluster-wide resting potential gradients. The BETSE platform will enable a deep understanding of local and long-range bioelectrical dynamics in tissues, and

  5. Polycaprolactone scaffold engineered for sustained release of resveratrol: therapeutic enhancement in bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath MS

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Manjunath Srinivas Kamath,1 Shiek SSJ Ahmed,2 M Dhanasekaran,3 S Winkins Santosh11Department of Biotechnology, School of Bioengineering, SRM University, 2Department of Biotechnology, Chettinad Hospital and Research Institute, 3Department of Stem Cells, Life Line Rigid Hospital Pvt Ltd, Kilpauk, Tamil Nadu, IndiaAbstract: Biomaterials-based three-dimensional scaffolds are being extensively investigated in bone tissue engineering. A potential scaffold should be osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic for enhanced bone formation. In this study, a three-dimensional porous polycaprolactone (PCL scaffold was engineered for prolonged release of resveratrol. Resveratrol-loaded albumin nanoparticles (RNP were synthesized and entrapped into a PCL scaffold to form PCL-RNP by a solvent casting and leaching method. An X-ray diffraction study of RNP and PCL-RNP showed that resveratrol underwent amorphization, which is highly desired in drug delivery. Furthermore, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that resveratrol was not chemically modified during the entrapment process. Release of resveratrol from PCL-RNP was sustained, with a cumulative release of 64% at the end of day 12. The scaffold was evaluated for its bone-forming potential in vitro using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for 16 days. Alkaline phosphatase activity assayed on days 8 and 12 showed a significant increase in activity (1.6-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively induced by PCL-RNP compared with the PCL scaffold (the positive control. Moreover, von Kossa staining for calcium deposits on day 16 showed increased mineralization in PCL-RNP. These results suggest PCL-RNP significantly improves mineralization due to its controlled and prolonged release of resveratrol, thereby increasing the therapeutic potential in bone tissue engineering.Keywords: therapeutic scaffolds, polycaprolactone scaffolds, bone tissue engineering, resveratrol, albumin nanoparticles

  6. [Research progress in peri-implant soft tissue engineering augmentation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, T T; Yu, H Q; Wen, C J; Guo, T Q; Zhou, Y M; Peng, H M

    2016-05-01

    The sufficiency of hard and soft tissue at the implant site is the guarantee of long-term function, health and the appearance of implant denture. Problem of soft tissue recession at the implant site has always been bothering dentists. Traditional methods for augmentation of soft tissue such as gingival transplantation have disadvantages of instability of the increased soft-tissue and more trauma. Lately the methods that base on tissue engineering to increase the soft tissue of peri-implant sites have drawn great attention. This review focuses on the current methods of peri-implant restoration through tissue engineering, seed cells, biological scaffolds and cytokines. PMID:27220393

  7. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-01

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process. PMID:26855751

  8. 1984: On monitoring cell fate in three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leferink, Anne Marijke

    2014-01-01

    In cartilage and bone engineering there is a high need for methods to replace traditional tissue and organ transplantation approaches to overcome the currently faced problems of donor shortage and invasiveness of the transplantation procedure. Although many promising advances have been made in the past decades in in vitro tissue engineering, quality control remains a challenge. Most conventional methods to assess the quality of a tissue engineered construct, e.g. by studying cell fate and tis...

  9. Histological and histochemical evaluation of human oral mucosa constructs developed by tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Quevedo, M.C.; Alaminos, M.; Capitan, L.M.; Moreu, G.; Garzon, I.; Crespo, P.V.; Campos, A.

    2007-01-01

    Reconstruction of large oral mucosa defects is often challenging, since the shortage of healthy oral mucosa to replace the excised tissues is very common. In this context, tissue engineering techniques may provide a source of autologous tissues available for transplant in these patients. In this work, we developed a new model of artificial oral mucosa generated by tissue engineering using a fibrin-agarose scaffold. For that purpose, we generated primary cultures of human oral mucosa ...

  10. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Barzegari; Amir Ata Saei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplantation has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods: In this review article, we intend to hig...

  11. Mechanical Modulation of Nascent Stem Cell Lineage Commitment in Tissue Engineering Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Min Jae; Dean, David; Tate, Melissa L Knothe

    2013-01-01

    Taking inspiration from tissue morphogenesis in utero, this study tests the concept of using tissue engineering scaffolds as delivery devices to modulate emergent structure-function relationships at early stages of tissue genesis. We report on the use of a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, advanced manufacturing methods, and experimental fluid mechanics (micro-piv and strain mapping) for the prospective design of tissue engineering scaffold geometries that deliver spatiall...

  12. Polycaprolactone thin films for retinal tissue engineering and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steedman, Mark Rory

    This dissertation focuses on the development of polycaprolactone thin films for retinal tissue engineering and drug delivery. We combined these thin films with techniques such as micro and nanofabrication to develop treatments for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a disease that leads to the death of rod and cone photoreceptors. Current treatments are only able to slow or limit the progression of the disease, and photoreceptors cannot be regenerated or replaced by the body once lost. The first experiments presented focus on a potential treatment for AMD after photoreceptor death has occurred. We developed a polymer thin film scaffold technology to deliver retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to the affected area of the eye. Earlier research showed that RPCs destined to become photoreceptors are capable of incorporating into a degenerated retina. In our experiments, we showed that RPC attachment to a micro-welled polycaprolactone (PCL) thin film surface enhanced the differentiation of these cells toward a photoreceptor fate. We then used our PCL thin films to develop a drug delivery device capable of sustained therapeutic release over a multi-month period that would maintain an effective concentration of the drug in the eye and eliminate the need for repeated intraocular injections. We first investigated the biocompatibility of PCL in the rabbit eye. We injected PCL thin films into the anterior chamber or vitreous cavity of rabbit eyes and monitored the animals for up to 6 months. We found that PCL thin films were well tolerated in the rabbit eye, showing no signs of chronic inflammation due to the implant. We then developed a multilayered thin film device containing a microporous membrane. We loaded these devices with lyophilized proteins and quantified drug elution for 10 weeks, finding that both bovine serum albumin and immunoglobulin G elute from these devices with zero order release kinetics. These experiments demonstrate that PCL is an extremely useful

  13. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  14. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaarathy, V. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 138673 (Singapore); Venugopal, J., E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Gandhimathi, C. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ramakrishna, S. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-11-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  15. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  16. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 1...

  17. Cobalt doped proangiogenic hydroxyapatite for bone tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Roy, Bibhas; Agarwal, Tarun; Giri, Supratim; Pramanik, Krishna; Pal, Kunal; Ray, Sirsendu S; Maiti, Tapas K; Banerjee, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    The present study delineates the synthesis and characterization of cobalt doped proangiogenic-osteogenic hydroxyapatite. Hydroxyapatite samples, doped with varying concentrations of bivalent cobalt (Co(2+)) were prepared by the ammoniacal precipitation method and the extent of doping was measured by ICP-OES. The crystalline structure of the doped hydroxyapatite samples was confirmed by XRD and FTIR studies. Analysis pertaining to the effect of doped hydroxyapatite on cell cycle progression and proliferation of MG-63 cells revealed that the doping of cobalt supported the cell viability and proliferation up to a threshold limit. Furthermore, such level of doping also induced differentiation of the bone cells, which was evident from the higher expression of differentiation markers (Runx2 and Osterix) and better nodule formation (SEM study). Western blot analysis in conjugation with ELISA study confirmed that the doped HAp samples significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in MG-63 cells. The analysis described here confirms the proangiogenic-osteogenic properties of the cobalt doped hydroxyapatite and indicates its potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:26478356

  18. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Doornfontein 2028 (South Africa); DST/CSIR National Centre for Nanostructured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2015-05-22

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  19. Preparation of hybrid biomaterials for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Conceição Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering has evolved from the use of biomaterials for bone substitution that fulfill the clinical demands of biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-immunogeneity, structural strength and porosity. Porous scaffolds have been developed in many forms and materials, but few reached the need of adequate physical, biological and mechanical properties. In the present paper we report the preparation of hybrid porous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/bioactive glass through the sol-gel route, using partially and fully hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol, and perform structural characterization. Hybrids containing PVA and bioactive glass with composition 58SiO2-33CaO-9P2O5 were synthesized by foaming a mixture of polymer solution and bioactive glass sol-gel precursor solution. Sol-gel solution was prepared from mixing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS, triethylphosphate (TEP, and calcium chloride as chemical precursors. The hybrid composites obtained after aging and drying at low temperature were chemically and morphologically characterized through infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The degree of hydrolysis of PVA, concentration of PVA solution and different PVA-bioglass composition ratios affect the synthesis procedure. Synthesis parameters must be very well combined in order to allow foaming and gelation. The hybrid scaffolds obtained exhibited macroporous structure with pore size varying from 50 to 600 µm.

  20. Aligned and random nanofibrous nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Doustgani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract  Aligned and random nanocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds were electrospun from polycaprolactone (PCL, poly (vinyl alcohol (PVA and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHA. The morphology and mechanical characteristics of the nanofibers were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fibers with an average diameter of 123 ± 32 nm and 339 ± 107 nm for aligned and random nanofibers, respectively. The mechanical data indicated the higher tensile strength and elastic modulus of aligned nanofibers. The in vitro biocompatibility of aligned and random nanofibrous scaffolds was also assessed by growing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, and investigating the proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP on different nanofibrous scaffolds. Our  findings  showed  that  the  alignment  orientation  of  nanofibers  enhanced  the osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. The in vitro results showed that the aligned biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds of PCL/nHA/PVA could be a potential substrate for tissue engineering applications, especially in the field of artificial bone implant.

  1. Fabrication of polylactide nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhabela, Vuyiswa J.; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2015-05-01

    Highly porous three-dimensional polylactide (PLA) scaffolds were obtained from PLA incorporated with different amounts of chitosan-modified montmorillonite (CS-MMT), through solvent casting and particulate leaching method. The processed scaffolds were tested in vitro for their possible application in bone tissue engineering. Scaffolds were characterized by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB SEM), Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR), and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) to study their structure and intermolecular interactions. Bioresorbability tests in simulated body fluid (pH 7.4) were conducted to assess the response of the scaffolds in a simulated physiological condition. The FIB SEM images of the scaffolds showed a porous architecture with gradual change in morphology with increasing CS-MMT concentration. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of both PLA and CS-MMT particles on the surface of the scaffolds. XRD showed that the crystalline unit cell type was the same for all the scaffolds, and crystallinity decreased with an increase in CS-MMT concentration. The scaffolds were found to be bioresorbable, with rapid bioresorbability on the scaffolds with a high CS-MMT concentration.

  2. Laser processing of ormosils for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matei, A.; Zamfirescu, M.; Radu, C.; Dinescu, M.; Buruiana, E. C.; Buruiana, T.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Hybrid methacrylates based on silane derivates (ormosils) have been considered for applications in electronics, microtechnology, corrosion resistant coatings, dentistry, and biomedical implants. The presence of both inorganic chains, responsible for chemical and thermal stability, hardness, and transparency, and organic groups, which bring new advantages such as the possibility of functionalization and easy, low temperature processing, can result in the appearance of unique properties. 2D structures of hybrid polymers were produced by Two Photon Polymerization (2PP). A Ti: Sapphire laser having 200 fs pulse duration and 2 kHz repetition rate, working at a wavelength of 775 nm, was used for the 2PP experiments. The biocompatibility of the obtained structures (scaffolds) was tested in different cell cultures, which is a first step toward exploring their potential for applications in tissue engineering. Cells morphology, adhesion, and alignment were studied on polymeric structures with different shapes, obtained in various experimental conditions. Their interaction with normal human epidermal melanocytes (NHEM) and dysplastic oral keratinocytes (DOK) was investigated, with the aim of obtaining an epidermal graft.

  3. Invention and business performance in the tissue-engineering industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangarkar, Nitin; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2003-12-01

    Tissue engineering is a young and interdisciplinary scientific discipline but it offers exciting opportunities to improve the quality of health care for hundreds of thousands of patients. Lured by its potential, several start-up companies, pharmaceutical corporations, and medical device enterprises alike are investing heavily in this sector. Invention is a key driver of competition in this sector. In this study, we aim to explain the variation in inventive output across the different firms in the sector. Our major premise is that firms that forge alliances will be able to tap into the expertise of their partners and thus improve their chances of inventive output. We further argue that alliances that enable technology acquisition or learning will enhance the inventive output of firms more than other kinds of alliances. We measure the inventive output of a company by the number of patents filed. On the basis of a preliminary analysis of seven companies, we find support for the hypotheses. We also argue that, to achieve commercial success, firms need to manage time to market (through alliances or otherwise), have a global outlook, nurture their financial resources, and attain critical mass through mergers. PMID:14670118

  4. Chitosan-chitin nanocrystal composite scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxian; Zheng, Huanjun; Chen, Juan; Li, Shuangli; Huang, Jianfang; Zhou, Changren

    2016-11-01

    Chitin nanocrystals (CNCs) with length and width of 300 and 20nm were uniformly dispersed in chitosan (CS) solution. The CS/CNCs composite scaffolds prepared utilizing a dispersion-based freeze dry approach exhibit significant enhancement in compressive strength and modulus compared with pure CS scaffold both in dry and wet state. A well-interconnected porous structure with size in the range of 100-200μm and over 80% porosity are found in the composite scaffolds. The crystal structure of CNCs is retained in the composite scaffolds. The incorporation of CNCs leads to increase in the scaffold density and decrease in the water swelling ratio. Moreover, the composite scaffolds are successfully applied as scaffolds for MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells, showing their excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. The results of fluorescent micrographs images reveal that CNCs can markedly promote the cell adhesion and proliferation of the osteoblast on CS. The biocompatible composite scaffolds with enhanced mechanical properties have potential application in bone tissue engineering. PMID:27516335

  5. Proton micromachining of substrate scaffolds for cellular and tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional patterns (grooves and ridges) were micromachined in PMMA using a 600 keV proton beam from the nuclear microscopy facility at the Research Centre for Nuclear Microscopy, National University of Singapore. Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts (ATCC CCL92, Rockville, MD) have been seeded onto these patterns, and the following observations have been made: (a) Cells were not found in the grooves (depth 9 μm, width 6.6 μm); (b) Cells were highly aligned and elongated on narrow ridges (4.2 μm wide), with the degree of alignment and elongation reduced for wider ridges. The underlying mechanism responsible of this cellular behaviour is assumed to be induced by the mechanical restrictions imposed by the topographic features on cellular migration, cell adhesion and concomitant changes in the cytoskeletal. The use of topographical stimuli to regulate cell function is an area of high potential, with implications in the engineering of tissue for spare-part surgery. Proton micromachining, which has the unique advantage of being the only technique capable of direct-write 3D micromachining at sub-cellular dimensions has unique advantages in this area of research

  6. High intensity focused ultrasound as a tool for tissue engineering: Application to cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nover, Adam B; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; O'Connell, Grace D; Ateshian, Gerard A; Konofagou, Elisa E; Hung, Clark T

    2016-02-01

    This article promotes the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) as a tool for affecting the local properties of tissue engineered constructs in vitro. HIFU is a low cost, non-invasive technique used for eliciting focal thermal elevations at variable depths within tissues. HIFU can be used to denature proteins within constructs, leading to decreased permeability and potentially increased local stiffness. Adverse cell viability effects remain restricted to the affected area. The methods described in this article are explored through the scope of articular cartilage tissue engineering and the fabrication of osteochondral constructs, but may be applied to the engineering of a variety of different tissues. PMID:26724968

  7. A cost-minimization analysis of tissue-engineered constructs for corneal endothelial transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-En Tan

    Full Text Available Corneal endothelial transplantation or endothelial keratoplasty has become the preferred choice of transplantation for patients with corneal blindness due to endothelial dysfunction. Currently, there is a worldwide shortage of transplantable tissue, and demand is expected to increase further with aging populations. Tissue-engineered alternatives are being developed, and are likely to be available soon. However, the cost of these constructs may impair their widespread use. A cost-minimization analysis comparing tissue-engineered constructs to donor tissue procured from eye banks for endothelial keratoplasty was performed. Both initial investment costs and recurring costs were considered in the analysis to arrive at a final tissue cost per transplant. The clinical outcomes of endothelial keratoplasty with tissue-engineered constructs and with donor tissue procured from eye banks were assumed to be equivalent. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to simulate various possible scenarios, and to determine the robustness of the results. A tissue engineering strategy was cheaper in both investment cost and recurring cost. Tissue-engineered constructs for endothelial keratoplasty could be produced at a cost of US$880 per transplant. In contrast, utilizing donor tissue procured from eye banks for endothelial keratoplasty required US$3,710 per transplant. Sensitivity analyses performed further support the results of this cost-minimization analysis across a wide range of possible scenarios. The use of tissue-engineered constructs for endothelial keratoplasty could potentially increase the supply of transplantable tissue and bring the costs of corneal endothelial transplantation down, making this intervention accessible to a larger group of patients. Tissue-engineering strategies for corneal epithelial constructs or other tissue types, such as pancreatic islet cells, should also be subject to similar pharmacoeconomic analyses.

  8. Novel nano-rough polymers for cartilage tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasundaram G

    2014-04-01

    , the present in vitro results of increased chondrocyte functions on NPU and NPCL suggest these materials may be suitable for numerous polymer-based cartilage tissue-engineering applications and, thus, deserve further investigation.Keywords: chondrocytes, polyurethane, polycaprolactone, nano-roughened polymers, cartilage applications

  9. Electrospun gelatin/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) fibrous scaffold modified with calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Rajzer, Izabella; Menaszek, Elzbieta; Kwiatkowski, Ryszard; Castaño Linares, Óscar; Planell Estany, Josep Anton

    2014-01-01

    In this study gelatin (Gel) modified with calcium phosphate nanoparticles (SG5) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were used to prepare a 3D bi-layer scaffold by collecting electrospun PCL and gelatin/SG5 fibers separately in the same collector. The objective of this study was to combine the desired properties of PCL and Gel/SG5 in the same scaffold in order to enhance mineralization, thus improving the ability of the scaffold to bond to the bone tissue. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourie...

  10. Graphene and its nanostructure derivatives for use in bone tissue engineering: Recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadjou, Nasrin; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine represent areas of increasing interest because of the major progress in cell and organ transplantation, as well as advances in materials science and engineering. Tissue-engineered bone constructs have the potential to alleviate the demand arising from the shortage of suitable autograft and allograft materials for augmenting bone healing. Graphene and its derivatives have attracted much interest for applications in bone tissue engineering. For this purpose, this review focuses on more recent advances in tissue engineering based on graphene-biomaterials from 2013 to May 2015. The purpose of this article was to give a general description of studies of nanostructured graphene derivatives for bone tissue engineering. In this review, we highlight how graphene family nanomaterials are being exploited for bone tissue engineering. Firstly, the main requirements for bone tissue engineering were discussed. Then, the mechanism by which graphene based materials promote new bone formation was explained, following which the current research status of main types of nanostructured scaffolds for bone tissue engineering was reviewed and discussed. In addition, graphene-based bioactive glass, as a potential drug/growth factor carrier, was reviewed which includes the composition-structure-drug delivery relationship and the functional effect on the tissue-stimulation properties. Also, the effect of structural and textural properties of graphene based materials on development of new biomaterials for production of bone implants and bone cements were discussed. Finally, the present review intends to provide the reader an overview of the current state of the graphene based biomaterials in bone tissue engineering, its limitations and hopes as well as the future research trends for this exciting field of science. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1250-1275, 2016. PMID:26748447

  11. Microfabrication of complex porous tissue engineering scaffolds using 3D projection stereolithography

    OpenAIRE

    Gauvin, Robert; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Nichol, Jason W.; Bae, Hojae; Chen, Shaochen; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The success of tissue engineering will rely on the ability to generate complex, cell seeded three-dimensional (3D) structures. Therefore, methods that can be used to precisely engineer the architecture and topography of scaffolding materials will represent a critical aspect of functional tissue engineering. Previous approaches for 3D scaffold fabrication based on top-down and process driven methods are often not adequate to produce complex structures due to the lack of control on scaffold arc...

  12. Macrophages Play a Key Role in Angiogenesis and Adipogenesis in a Mouse Tissue Engineering Model

    OpenAIRE

    Debels, Heidi; Galea, Laurence; Han, Xiao-Lian; Palmer, Jason; van Rooijen, Nico; Morrison, Wayne; Abberton, Keren

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described a mouse adipose tissue engineering model using a silicon chamber enclosing the superficial epigastric pedicle in a Matrigel based environment. We have shown that when Zymosan, a sterile inflammatory agent, is added to the chamber, angiogenesis and adipogenesis are significantly improved. As Zymosan interacts with toll-like receptors on macrophages, the role of macrophages in new tissue development in the tissue engineering chamber was assessed. Morphological and h...

  13. Treatment of Chronic Periodontal Defects with Tissue Engineering: A Pilot Study in Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe most desirable goal of periodontal therapy is to restore the architecture and function of the periodontal tissues, which lost due to inflammatory periodontal diseases or trauma. Although a variety of periodontal procedures advocated, the regenerative and reconstructive therapy with more predictability and less technique sensitivity is still lacking.Periodontal tissue engineering is becoming a new paradigm for periodontal regeneration. The in vitro experiments on periodontal tissue engineer...

  14. Mechanochemical synthesis evaluation of nanocrystalline bone-derived bioceramic powder using for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Amirsalar Khandan; Ebrahim Karamian; Morteza Bonakdarchian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Bone tissue engineering proposes a suitable way to regenerate lost bones. Different materials have been considered for use in bone tissue engineering. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a significant success of bioceramics as a bone tissue repairing biomaterial. Among different bioceramic materials, recent interest has been risen on fluorinated hydroxyapatites, (FHA, Ca 10 (PO 4 ) 6 F x (OH) 2−x ). Fluorine ions can promote apatite formation and improve the stability of HA in the biological...

  15. Tissue engineering in animal models for urinary diversion: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Marije Sloff; Rob de Vries; Paul Geutjes; Joanna IntHout; Merel Ritskes-Hoitinga; Egbert Oosterwijk; Wout Feitz

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) approaches may provide alternatives for gastrointestinal tissue in urinary diversion. To continue to clinically translatable studies, TERM alternatives need to be evaluated in (large) controlled and standardized animal studies. Here, we investigated all evidence for the efficacy of tissue engineered constructs in animal models for urinary diversion. Studies investigating this subject were identified through a systematic search of three diffe...

  16. Novel mechanically competent polysaccharide scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the scaffold-based bone regeneration approach critically depends on the biomaterial's mechanical and biological properties. Cellulose and its derivatives are inherently associated with exceptional strength and biocompatibility due to their β-glycosidic linkage and extensive hydrogen bonding. This polymer class has a long medical history as a dialysis membrane, wound care system and pharmaceutical excipient. Recently cellulose-based scaffolds have been developed and evaluated for a variety of tissue engineering applications. In general porous polysaccharide scaffolds in spite of many merits lack the necessary mechanical competence needed for load-bearing applications. The present study reports the fabrication and characterization of three-dimensional (3D) porous sintered microsphere scaffolds based on cellulose derivatives using a solvent/non-solvent sintering approach for load-bearing applications. These 3D scaffolds exhibited a compressive modulus and strength in the mid-range of human trabecular bone and underwent degradation resulting in a weight loss of 10–15% after 24 weeks. A typical stress–strain curve for these scaffolds showed an initial elastic region and a less-stiff post-yield region similar to that of native bone. Human osteoblasts cultured on these scaffolds showed progressive growth with time and maintained expression of osteoblast phenotype markers. Further, the elevated expression of alkaline phosphatase and mineralization at early time points as compared to heat-sintered poly(lactic acid–glycolic acid) control scaffolds with identical pore properties affirmed the advantages of polysaccharides and their potential for scaffold-based bone regeneration.

  17. Indirect Low-Intensity Ultrasonic Stimulation for Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Hyoungshin Park; Michael C. Yip; Beata Chertok; Joseph Kost; James B. Kobler; Robert Langer; Zeitels, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound (LIUS) treatment has been shown to increase mass transport, which could benefit tissue grafts during the immediate postimplant period, when blood supply to the implanted tissue is suboptimal. In this in vitro study, we investigated effects of LIUS stimulation on dye diffusion, proliferation, metabolism, and tropomyosin expression of muscle cells (C2C12) and on tissue viability and gene expression of human adipose tissue organoids. We found that LIUS increased dye diff...

  18. Corneal Tissue Engineering: Recent Advances and Future Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Ghezzi, Chiara E.; Rnjak-Kovacina, Jelena; Kaplan, David L

    2015-01-01

    To address the growing need for corneal transplants two main approaches are being pursued: allogenic and synthetic materials. Allogenic tissue from human donors is currently the preferred choice; however, there is a worldwide shortage in donated corneal tissue. In addition, tissue rejection often limits the long-term success of this approach. Alternatively, synthetic homologs to donor corneal grafts are primarily considered temporary replacements until suitable donor tissue becomes available,...

  19. Computational model-informed design and bioprinting of cell-patterned constructs for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Aurélie; Skvortsov, Gözde Akdeniz; Hafezi, Forough; Ferraris, Eleonora; Patterson, Jennifer; Koç, Bahattin; Van Oosterwyck, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly advancing tissue engineering technology that holds great promise for the regeneration of several tissues, including bone. However, to generate a successful 3D bone tissue engineering construct, additional complexities should be taken into account such as nutrient and oxygen delivery, which is often insufficient after implantation in large bone defects. We propose that a well-designed tissue engineering construct, that is, an implant with a specific spatial pattern of cells in a matrix, will improve the healing outcome. By using a computational model of bone regeneration we show that particular cell patterns in tissue engineering constructs are able to enhance bone regeneration compared to uniform ones. We successfully bioprinted one of the most promising cell-gradient patterns by using cell-laden hydrogels with varying cell densities and observed a high cell viability for three days following the bioprinting process. In summary, we present a novel strategy for the biofabrication of bone tissue engineering constructs by designing cell-gradient patterns based on a computational model of bone regeneration, and successfully bioprinting the chosen design. This integrated approach may increase the success rate of implanted tissue engineering constructs for critical size bone defects and also can find a wider application in the biofabrication of other types of tissue engineering constructs. PMID:27187017

  20. The potential of tissue engineering for developing alternatives to animal experiments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B M; Leenaars, Marlies; Tra, Joppe; Huijbregtse, Robbertjan; Bongers, Erik; Jansen, John A; Gordijn, Bert; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2015-07-01

    An underexposed ethical issue raised by tissue engineering is the use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research. Even though this research results in suffering and loss of life in animals, tissue engineering also has great potential for the development of alternatives to animal experiments. With the objective of promoting a joint effort of tissue engineers and alternative experts to fully realise this potential, this study provides the first comprehensive overview of the possibilities of using tissue-engineered constructs as a replacement of laboratory animals. Through searches in two large biomedical databases (PubMed, Embase) and several specialised 3R databases, 244 relevant primary scientific articles, published between 1991 and 2011, were identified. By far most articles reviewed related to the use of tissue-engineered skin/epidermis for toxicological applications such as testing for skin irritation. This review article demonstrates, however, that the potential for the development of alternatives also extends to other tissues such as other epithelia and the liver, as well as to other fields of application such as drug screening and basic physiology. This review discusses which impediments need to be overcome to maximise the contributions that the field of tissue engineering can make, through the development of alternative methods, to the reduction of the use and suffering of laboratory animals. PMID:23554402

  1. Surface Modification using Plasma treatments and Adhesion Peptide for Durable Tissue-Engineered Heart Valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial heart valves are used in valvular heart diseases, but these valves have disadvantages that they cannot grow, repair and remodel. In current study, the strategies to development of in vitro cultured functional tissue by tissue engineering is available to heart valve disease. In the point of using viable autolougous cells, tissue engineered heart valves have some advantage to include that they can repair, remodel, and grow. Because heart valve is placed under the strong shear stress condition by pumping of heart, the durability of tissue-engineered heart valves is now questionable. The purpose of the study is to evaluate of the durability of tissue engineered heart valve with surface modified scaffolds under hemodynamic conditions

  2. Adipogenic differentiation of scaffold-bound human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC) for soft tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose tissue engineering, instead of tissue substitution, often uses autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASC). These cells are known to improve graft integration and to support neovascularization of scaffolds when seeded onto biomaterials. In this study we thought to engineer adipose tissue using scaffold-bound hASC, since they can be differentiated into the adipocyte cell lineage and used for soft tissue regeneration. We show here by microscopy and gene expression of the peroxysome proliferator-activated receptor gene (PPARγ2) that hASC growing on polypropylene fibrous scaffolds as well as on three-dimensional nonwoven scaffolds can be turned into adipose tissue within 19 days. Freshly isolated hASC displayed a higher differentiation potential than hASC cultured for eight passages. In addition, we proved a modified alginate microcapsule to directly induce adipogenic differentiation of incorporated hASC. The results may help to improve long-term success of adipose tissue regeneration, especially for large-scale soft tissue defects, and support the development of cell–scaffold combinations which can be shaped individually and directly induce the adipogenic differentiation of incorporated hASC at the site of implantation. (paper)

  3. Factors Promoting Increased Rate of Tissue Regeneration: The Zebrafish Fin as a Tool for Examining Tissue Engineering Design Concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Boominathan, Vijay P.; Ferreira, Tracie L.

    2012-01-01

    Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that requ...

  4. 3D conductive nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Shahini A; Yazdimamaghani M; Walker KJ; Eastman MA; Hatami-Marbini H; Smith BJ; Ricci JL; Madihally SV; Vashaee D; Tayebi L

    2013-01-01

    Aref Shahini,1 Mostafa Yazdimamaghani,2 Kenneth J Walker,2 Margaret A Eastman,3 Hamed Hatami-Marbini,4 Brenda J Smith,5 John L Ricci,6 Sundar V Madihally,2 Daryoosh Vashaee,1 Lobat Tayebi2,7 1School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, 2School of Chemical Engineering, 3Department of Chemistry, 4School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA; 6Department of Bio...

  5. Applications of molecular self-assembly in tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Daniel Anton

    This thesis studied the application of three self-assembling molecular systems, as potential biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Cholesteryl-(L-lactic acid)n molecules form thermotropic liquid crystals, which could be coated onto the inner and outer pores of biodegradable PLLA scaffolds, while retaining the lamellar order of the neat material. Primary bovine chondrocytes were cultured on these structures, demonstrating improved attachment and extended retention of phenotype on the C-LA-coated scaffolds. No difference in fibronectin adsorption to C-LA and PLLA surfaces was observed, suggesting a strong role for cholesterol in influencing cell phenotype. A family of peptide-amphiphiles, bearing the "RGD" adhesion sequence from fibronectin, was also assessed in the contexts of cartilage and bladder repair. These molecules self-assemble into one-dimensional fibers, with diameters of 6--8 nm, and lengths of 500 nm or greater. Chondrocytes were seeded and cultured on covalently-crosslinked PA gels and embedded within calcium-triggered PA gels. Cells became dormant over time, but remained viable, suggesting an inappropriate display of the adhesion sequence to cells. A family of "branched" PA molecules with lysine dendron headgroups was designed, in an effort to increase the spatial separation between molecules in the assembled state, and to theoretically improve epitope accessibility. These molecules coated reliably onto PGA fiber scaffolds, and dramatically increased the attachment of human bladder smooth muscle cells, possibly through better epitope display or electrostatic attraction. They also formed strong gels with several negatively-charged biologically-relevant macromolecules. In a third system, amphiphilic segmented dendrimers based on phenylene vinylene and L-lysine entered cells through an endocytic pathway with no discernible toxic effect on cell proliferation or morphology. These amphiphiles formed complex aggregates in aqueous solution, likely

  6. Sonic Hedgehog-activated engineered blood vessels enhance bone tissue formation

    OpenAIRE

    N C Rivron; Raiss, C.C.; Liu, J.; Nandakumar, A.; Sticht, C; Gretz, N; Truckenmuller, R.K.; Rouwkema, J.; Blitterswijk, van, W.J.

    2012-01-01

    Large bone defects naturally regenerate via a highly vascularized tissue which progressively remodels into cartilage and bone. Current approaches in bone tissue engineering are restricted by delayed vascularization and fail to recapitulate this stepwise differentiation toward bone tissue. Here, we use the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) to induce the in vitro organization of an endothelial capillary network in an artificial tissue. We show that endogenous Hedgehog activity regulates angiogenic...

  7. Combining regenerative medicine strategies to provide durable reconstructive options: auricular cartilage tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Jessop, Zita M.; Javed, Muhammad; Otto, Iris A.; Combellack, Emman J.; Morgan, Siân; Breugem, Corstiaan C; Archer, Charles W.; Khan, Ilyas M.; Lineaweaver, William C.; Kon, Moshe; Malda, Jos; Whitaker, Iain S

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in regenerative medicine place us in a unique position to improve the quality of engineered tissue. We use auricular cartilage as an exemplar to illustrate how the use of tissue-specific adult stem cells, assembly through additive manufacturing and improved understanding of postnatal tissue maturation will allow us to more accurately replicate native tissue anisotropy. This review highlights the limitations of autologous auricular reconstruction, including donor site morbidity...

  8. Engineering complex tissue-like microgel arrays for evaluating stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermani, Enrico; Shaki, Hossein; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Mehrali, Mehdi; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Development of tissue engineering scaffolds with native-like biology and microarchitectures is a prerequisite for stem cell mediated generation of off-the-shelf-tissues. So far, the field of tissue engineering has not full-filled its grand potential of engineering such combinatorial scaffolds for engineering functional tissues. This is primarily due to the many challenges associated with finding the right microarchitectures and ECM compositions for optimal tissue regeneration. Here, we have developed a new microgel array to address this grand challenge through robotic printing of complex stem cell-laden microgel arrays. The developed microgel array platform consisted of various microgel environments that where composed of native-like cellular microarchitectures resembling vascularized and bone marrow tissue architectures. The feasibility of our array system was demonstrated through localized cell spreading and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into complex tissue-like structures. In summary, we have developed a tissue-like microgel array for evaluating stem cell differentiation within complex and heterogeneous cell microenvironments. We anticipate that the developed platform will be used for high-throughput identification of combinatorial and native-like scaffolds for tissue engineering of functional organs. PMID:27465860

  9. Colloquium: Modeling the dynamics of multicellular systems: Application to tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosztin, Ioan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly evolving discipline that aims at building functional tissues to improve or replace damaged ones. To be successful in such an endeavor, ideally, the engineering of tissues should be based on the principles of developmental biology. Recent progress in developmental biology suggests that the formation of tissues from the composing cells is often guided by physical laws. Here a comprehensive computational-theoretical formalism is presented that is based on experimental input and incorporates biomechanical principles of developmental biology. The formalism is described and it is shown that it correctly reproduces and predicts the quantitative characteristics of the fundamental early developmental process of tissue fusion. Based on this finding, the formalism is then used toward the optimization of the fabrication of tubular multicellular constructs, such as a vascular graft, by bioprinting, a novel tissue engineering technology.

  10. The Ability of Tissue Engineered Skin Accelerating the Closure of Different Wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionIn the past several decades, a number of reseacher have described the principal efficacy of tissue engineered skin to promote wound healing of venous and diabetic ulcers. But the true value of tissue-engineered skin products in different wound care remains yet to be more clearly defined. In this trial, we analysis the effective of tissue-engineered skin (ActivSkin) in the management of burns, donor sites and ulcers, which were also the frequently injury caused with warfare, disaster and terror...

  11. A perspective on the clinical translation of scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew J; Khan, Omar F; Sydlik, Stefanie A; Tang, Benjamin C; Langer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Scaffolds have been broadly applied within tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to regenerate, replace, or augment diseased or damaged tissue. For a scaffold to perform optimally, several design considerations must be addressed, with an eye toward the eventual form, function, and tissue site. The chemical and mechanical properties of the scaffold must be tuned to optimize the interaction with cells and surrounding tissues. For complex tissue engineering, mass transport limitations, vascularization, and host tissue integration are important considerations. As the tissue architecture to be replaced becomes more complex and hierarchical, scaffold design must also match this complexity to recapitulate a functioning tissue. We outline these design constraints and highlight creative and emerging strategies to overcome limitations and modulate scaffold properties for optimal regeneration. We also highlight some of the most advanced strategies that have seen clinical application and discuss the hurdles that must be overcome for clinical use and commercialization of tissue engineering technologies. Finally, we provide a perspective on the future of scaffolds as a functional contributor to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25201605

  12. Electromechanical Oscillations in Bilayer Graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Benameur, Muhammed M.; Gargiulo, Fernando; Manzeli, Sajedeh; Autès, Gabriel; Tosun, Mahmut; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems constitute a class of devices lying at the interface between fundamental research and technological applications. Realizing nanoelectromechanical devices based on novel materials such as graphene allows studying their mechanical and electromechanical characteristics at the nanoscale and addressing fundamental questions such as electron–phonon interaction and bandgap engineering. In this work, we realize electromechanical devices using single and bilayer graphene ...

  13. Adipose Tissue Engineering - In vitro Development of a subcutaneous fat layer and a vascularized adipose tissue construct utilizing extracellular matrix structures

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Katharina Julia

    2014-01-01

    Each year millions of plastic and reconstructive procedures are performed to regenerate soft tissue defects after, for example, traumata, deep burns or tumor resections. Tissue engineered adipose tissue grafts are a promising alternative to autologous fat transfer or synthetic implants to meet this demand for adipose tissue. Strategies of tissue engineering, especially the use of cell carriers, provide an environment for better cell survival, an easier positioning and supplemented with the ap...

  14. Creation of a Large Adipose Tissue Construct in Humans Using a Tissue-engineering Chamber: A Step Forward in the Clinical Application of Soft Tissue Engineering☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Wayne A.; Marre, Diego; Grinsell, Damien; Batty, Andrew; Trost, Nicholas; O'Connor, Andrea J.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is currently exploring new and exciting avenues for the repair of soft tissue and organ defects. Adipose tissue engineering using the tissue engineering chamber (TEC) model has yielded promising results in animals; however, to date, there have been no reports on the use of this device in humans. Five female post mastectomy patients ranging from 35 to 49 years old were recruited and a pedicled thoracodorsal artery perforator fat flap ranging from 6 to 50 ml was harvested, transposed onto the chest wall and covered by an acrylic perforated dome-shaped chamber ranging from 140 to 350 cm3. Magnetic resonance evaluation was performed at three and six months after chamber implantation. Chambers were removed at six months and samples were obtained for histological analysis. In one patient, newly formed tissue to a volume of 210 ml was generated inside the chamber. One patient was unable to complete the trial and the other three failed to develop significant enlargement of the original fat flap, which, at the time of chamber explantation, was encased in a thick fibrous capsule. Our study provides evidence that generation of large well-vascularized tissue engineered constructs using the TEC is feasible in humans. PMID:27211566

  15. Human Cardiac Tissue Engineering: From Pluripotent Stem Cells to Heart Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Christopher P.; Shadrin, Ilya Y.; Carlson, Aaron L.; Bursac, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Engineered cardiac tissues hold great promise for use in drug and toxicology screening, in vitro studies of human physiology and disease, and as transplantable tissue grafts for myocardial repair. In this review, we discuss recent progress in cell-based therapy and functional tissue engineering using pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and we describe methods for delivery of cells into the injured heart. While significant hurdles remain, notable advances have been made in the methods to derive large numbers of pure human cardiomyocytes, mature their phenotype, and produce and implant functional cardiac tissues, bringing the field a step closer to widespread in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25599018

  16. Polyurethane-based scaffolds for myocardial tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiono, Valeria; Mozetic, Pamela; Boffito, Monica; Sartori, Susanna; Gioffredi, Emilia; Silvestri, Antonella; Rainer, Alberto; Giannitelli, Sara Maria; Trombetta, Marcella; Nurzynska, Daria; Di Meglio, Franca; Castaldo, Clotilde; Miraglia, Rita; Montagnani, Stefania; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-02-01

    Bi-layered scaffolds with a 0°/90° lay-down pattern were prepared by melt-extrusion additive manufacturing (AM) using a poly(ester urethane) (PU) synthesized from poly(ε-caprolactone) diol, 1,4-butandiisocyanate and l-lysine ethyl ester dihydrochloride chain extender. Rheological analysis and differential scanning calorimetry of the starting material showed that compression moulded PU films were in the molten state at a higher temperature than 155°C. The AM processing temperature was set at 155°C after verifying the absence of PU thermal degradation phenomena by isothermal thermogravimetry analysis and rheological characterization performed at 165°C. Scaffolds highly reproduced computer-aided design geometry and showed an elastomeric-like behaviour which is promising for applications in myocardial regeneration. PU scaffolds supported the adhesion and spreading of human cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs), whereas they did not stimulate CPC proliferation after 1-14 days culture time. In the future, scaffold surface functionalization with bioactive peptides/proteins will be performed to specifically guide CPC behaviour. PMID:24501673

  17. 45S5 Bioactive Glass-Based Composite Scaffolds with Polymer Coatings for Bone Tissue Engineering Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a rapidly developing interdisciplinary field. An effective approach to bone tissue engineering aims to restore the function of damaged bone tissue or to regenerate bone tissue with the aid of scaffolds made from engineered biomaterials. The scaffolds should act as temporary matrices for cell attachment, proliferation, migration, differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition, with consequent bone ingrowth until the new bone tissue is totally restored or regener...

  18. The development of the collagen fibre network in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs in vivo. Engineered cartilage reorganises fibre network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Paetzold

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For long term durability of tissue-engineered cartilage implanted in vivo, the development of the collagen fibre network orientation is essential as well as the distribution of collagen, since expanded chondrocytes are known to synthesise collagen type I. Typically, these properties differ strongly between native and tissue-engineered cartilage. Nonetheless, the clinical results of a pilot study with implanted tissue-engineered cartilage in pigs were surprisingly good. The purpose of this study was therefore to analyse if the structure and composition of the artificial cartilage tissue changes in the first 52 weeks after implantation. Thus, collagen network orientation and collagen type distribution in tissue-engineered cartilage-carrier-constructs implanted in the knee joints of Göttinger minipigs for 2, 26 or 52 weeks have been further investigated by processing digitised microscopy images of histological sections. The comparison to native cartilage demonstrated that fibre orientation over the cartilage depth has a clear tendency towards native cartilage with increasing time of implantation. After 2 weeks, the collagen fibres of the superficial zone were oriented parallel to the articular surface with little anisotropy present in the middle and deep zones. Overall, fibre orientation and collagen distribution within the implants were less homogenous than in native cartilage tissue. Despite a relatively low number of specimens, the consistent observation of a continuous approximation to native tissue is very promising and suggests that it may not be necessary to engineer the perfect tissue for implantation but rather to provide an intermediate solution to help the body to heal itself.

  19. A glycosaminoglycan based, modular tissue scaffold system for rapid assembly of perfusable, high cell density, engineered tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Tiruvannamalai-Annamalai

    Full Text Available The limited ability to vascularize and perfuse thick, cell-laden tissue constructs has hindered efforts to engineer complex tissues and organs, including liver, heart and kidney. The emerging field of modular tissue engineering aims to address this limitation by fabricating constructs from the bottom up, with the objective of recreating native tissue architecture and promoting extensive vascularization. In this paper, we report the elements of a simple yet efficient method for fabricating vascularized tissue constructs by fusing biodegradable microcapsules with tunable interior environments. Parenchymal cells of various types, (i.e. trophoblasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, hepatocytes were suspended in glycosaminoglycan (GAG solutions (4%/1.5% chondroitin sulfate/carboxymethyl cellulose, or 1.5 wt% hyaluronan and encapsulated by forming chitosan-GAG polyelectrolyte complex membranes around droplets of the cell suspension. The interior capsule environment could be further tuned by blending collagen with or suspending microcarriers in the GAG solution These capsule modules were seeded externally with vascular endothelial cells (VEC, and subsequently fused into tissue constructs possessing VEC-lined, inter-capsule channels. The microcapsules supported high density growth achieving clinically significant cell densities. Fusion of the endothelialized, capsules generated three dimensional constructs with an embedded network of interconnected channels that enabled long-term perfusion culture of the construct. A prototype, engineered liver tissue, formed by fusion of hepatocyte-containing capsules exhibited urea synthesis rates and albumin synthesis rates comparable to standard collagen sandwich hepatocyte cultures. The capsule based, modular approach described here has the potential to allow rapid assembly of tissue constructs with clinically significant cell densities, uniform cell distribution, and endothelialized, perfusable channels.

  20. A Bilayer Engineered Skin Substitute for Wound Repair in an Irradiation-Impeded Healing Model on Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hilmi, A.B.; Hassan, Asma; Halim, Ahmad Sukari

    2015-01-01

    Objective: An engineered skin substitute is produced to accelerate wound healing by increasing the mechanical strength of the skin wound via high production of collagen bundles. During the remodeling stage of wound healing, collagen deposition is the most important event. The collagen deposition process may be altered by nutritional deficiency, diabetes mellitus, microbial infection, or radiation exposure, leading to impaired healing. This study describes the fabrication of an engineered bila...

  1. Peptide nanofibers for engineering tissues and immune system

    OpenAIRE

    Mammadov, Rashad

    2014-01-01

    Ankara : Materials Science and Nanotechnology Program of The Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2014. Thesis (Ph.D.) -- Bilkent University, 2014. Includes bibliographical refences 161-174. Mammadov, Rashad Ph. D.

  2. Developing bioactive composite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun

    bone-like apatite/collagen composite coating. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were used to evaluate the cellular behaviors on these biomimetic coatings. Cell morphologies on the surfaces of PLLA films and scaffolds, PLLA films and scaffolds with apatite coating, and PLLA films and scaffolds with apatite/collagen composite coating were studied by SEM. Cell viability was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrasodium bromide (MTT) assay. In addition, differentiated cell function was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggested that the apatite coating and apatite/collagen composite coating fabricated through the accelerated biomimetic processes could improve the interactions between osteoblasts and PLLA. The composite coating was more effective than apatite coating in improving such interactions. PLLA scaffolds coated with submicron collagen fibrils and submicron apatite paticulates are expected to be one of the promising 3D substrates for bone tissue engineering. To facilitate coating into scaffolds, the flowing condition was introduced into the accelerated biomimetic process. The apatite formed in the different sites in the scaffold was characterized using SEM. It was found that the accelerated biomimetic process performed in the flowing condition yielded more uniform spatial distribution of apatite particles than that in the regular shaking condition. This work provides a novel condition for obtaining uniform spatial distribution of bone-like apatite within the scaffolds in a timely manner, which is expected to facilitate uniform distribution of attached cells within the scaffoldsin vitro and in vivo.

  3. Cartilage Tissue Engineering: the effect of different biomaterials, cell types and culture methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.C.M. Marijnissen (Willem)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractChapter 1 outlines the normal structure and composition of articular cartilage and the inefficient spontaneous healing response after focal damage. Current surgical treatment options are briefly discussed and tissue engineering techniques for the repair of articular cartilage defects

  4. Advances in pulmonary therapy and drug development: Lung tissue engineering to lung-on-a-chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doryab, Ali; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Salehi-Najafabadi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Lung disease is one of the major causes of death, and the rate of pulmonary diseases has been increasing for decades. Although lung transplantation is the only treatment for majority of patients, this method has been limited due to lack of donors. Therefore, recently, attentions have increased to some new strategies with the aid of tissue engineering and microfluidics techniques not only for the functional analysis, but also for drug screening. In fact, in tissue engineering, the engineered tissue is able to grow by using the patient's own cells without intervention in the immune system. On the other hand, microfluidics devices are applied in order to evaluate drug screenings, function analysis and toxicity. This article reviews new advances in lung tissue engineering and lung-on-a-chip. Furthermore, future directions, difficulties and drawbacks of pulmonary therapy in these areas are discussed. PMID:26875777

  5. Investigation of particle-functionalized tissue engineering scaffolds using X-ray tomographic microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, J V; Andersen, M Ø; Howard, K A;

    2008-01-01

    A low-density, porous chitosan/poly-(dl-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microparticle composite scaffold was produced by thermally induced phase separation followed by lyophilization, to provide a bicontinuous microstructure potentially suitable for tissue engineering and locally controlled drug...

  6. Tissue engineered vascular grafts: Origins, development, and current strategies for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrashid, Ehsan; McCoy, Christopher C; Youngwirth, Linda M; Kim, Jina; Manson, Roberto J; Otto, James C; Lawson, Jeffrey H

    2016-04-15

    Since the development of a dependable and durable synthetic non-autogenous vascular conduit in the mid-twentieth century, the field of vascular surgery has experienced tremendous growth. Concomitant with this growth, development in the field of bioengineering and the development of different tissue engineering techniques have expanded the armamentarium of the surgeon for treating a variety of complex cardiovascular diseases. The recent development of completely tissue engineered vascular conduits that can be implanted for clinical application is a particularly exciting development in this field. With the rapid advances in the field of tissue engineering, the great hope of the surgeon remains that this conduit will function like a true blood vessel with an intact endothelial layer, with the ability to respond to endogenous vasoactive compounds. Eventually, these engineered tissues may have the potential to supplant older organic but not truly biologic technologies, which are used currently. PMID:26216054

  7. 3D-printed fluidic networks as vasculature for engineered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinstlinger, Ian S; Miller, Jordan S

    2016-05-24

    Fabrication of vascular networks within engineered tissue remains one of the greatest challenges facing the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering. Historically, the structural complexity of vascular networks has limited their fabrication in tissues engineered in vitro. Recently, however, key advances have been made in constructing fluidic networks within biomaterials, suggesting a strategy for fabricating the architecture of the vasculature. These techniques build on emerging technologies within the microfluidics community as well as on 3D printing. The freeform fabrication capabilities of 3D printing are allowing investigators to fabricate fluidic networks with complex architecture inside biomaterial matrices. In this review, we examine the most exciting 3D printing-based techniques in this area. We also discuss opportunities for using these techniques to address open questions in vascular biology and biophysics, as well as for engineering therapeutic tissue substitutes in vitro. PMID:27173478

  8. Synthetic electrophysiology: optically controlled oscillators in an engineered bioelectric tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Harold; Zhang, Hongkang; Werley, Christopher; Cohen, Adam

    Multicellular electrical dynamics underlie crucial physiological functions, but the complexity of natural bioelectricity can obscure the relation of individual components (proteins, cells) to emergent system-level dynamics. Here we introduce optopatch-spiking HEK(OS-HEK) tissue, a minimal synthetic bioelectric tissue with 4 transgenic components that supports optical initiation of propagating electrical waves as well direct optical voltage readout. In conjunction with a home-built inverted microscope capable of patterned illumination, we use this tissue to probe the biophysical attributes of this excitable bioelectric medium, including dispersion relations, curvature-dependent wavefront propagation, electrotonic coupling, and effects of boundaries. We then used chemical patterning to define cellular circuits that support controllable oscillations and which retain memory for more than 2 hours (corresponding to 104 oscillations), constituting a substrate for binary bioelectric data storage. Finally, we use optical patterning of boundary conditions in a physically homogeneous tissue to design dynamically reconfigurable oscillators.

  9. Lymphatic Vascular Regeneration : The Next Step in Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huethorst, Eline; Krebber, Merle M; Fledderus, Joost O; Gremmels, Hendrik; Xu, Yan Juan; Pei, Jiayi; Verhaar, Marianne C; Cheng, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays a crucial role in interstitial fluid drainage, lipid absorption, and immunological defense. Lymphatic dysfunction results in lymphedema, fluid accumulation, and swelling of soft tissues, as well as a potentially impaired immune response. Lymphedema significantly reduces qu

  10. Role of tissue engineering in dental pulp regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Shruti Sial; Sunit Kumar Jurel; Singh, Raghuwar D.; Durga S Gupta; Mayank Singh

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells constitute the source of differentiated cells for the generation of tissues during development, and for regeneration of tissues that are diseased or injured postnatally. In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that span from Alzheimer′s disease to cardiac ischemia to bone or tooth loss. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are prima...

  11. Electrospun gelatin/poly(ε-caprolactone) fibrous scaffold modified with calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study gelatin (Gel) modified with calcium phosphate nanoparticles (SG5) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were used to prepare a 3D bi-layer scaffold by collecting electrospun PCL and gelatin/SG5 fibers separately in the same collector. The objective of this study was to combine the desired properties of PCL and Gel/SG5 in the same scaffold in order to enhance mineralization, thus improving the ability of the scaffold to bond to the bone tissue. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) measurements confirmed that SG5 nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the fibrous gelatin matrix. The composite Gel/SG5/PCL scaffold exhibited more enhanced mechanical properties than individual Gel and Gel/SG5 scaffolds. The presence of SG5 nanoparticles accelerated the nucleation and growth of apatite crystals on the surface of the composite Gel/SG5/PCL scaffold in simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteoblast response in vitro to developed electrospun scaffolds (PCL and Gel/SG5/PCL) was investigated by using normal human primary NHOst cell lines. NHOst cell culture studies showed that higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and better mineralization were obtained in the case of composite materials than in pure PCL scaffolds. The mechanically strong PCL scaffold served as a skeleton, while the Gel/SG5 fibers facilitated cell spreading and mineralization of the scaffold. - Highlights: • Bi-layer scaffolds were produced by electrospinning method. • The addition of nanoparticles enhanced the bioactivity of scaffold. • Bi-layer scaffold enhanced ALP activity and NHOst cell mineralization

  12. Electrospun gelatin/poly(ε-caprolactone) fibrous scaffold modified with calcium phosphate for bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajzer, Izabella, E-mail: irajzer@ath.bielsko.pl [University of Bielsko-Biala (ATH), Department of Mechanical Engineering Fundamentals, Division of Materials Engineering, Willowa 2 Street, 43-309 Bielsko-Biała (Poland); Menaszek, Elżbieta [Jagiellonian University (UJ), Collegium Medicum, Department of Cytobiology, Medyczna 9 Street, 30-068 Cracow (Poland); Kwiatkowski, Ryszard [University of Bielsko-Biala (ATH), Faculty of Materials and Environmental Sciences, Institute of Textile Engineering and Polymer Materials, Willowa 2 Street, 43-309 Bielsko-Biała (Poland); Planell, Josep A.; Castano, Oscar [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Biomaterials for Regenerative Therapies, Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC), Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER-BBN The Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    In this study gelatin (Gel) modified with calcium phosphate nanoparticles (SG5) and polycaprolactone (PCL) were used to prepare a 3D bi-layer scaffold by collecting electrospun PCL and gelatin/SG5 fibers separately in the same collector. The objective of this study was to combine the desired properties of PCL and Gel/SG5 in the same scaffold in order to enhance mineralization, thus improving the ability of the scaffold to bond to the bone tissue. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) measurements confirmed that SG5 nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the fibrous gelatin matrix. The composite Gel/SG5/PCL scaffold exhibited more enhanced mechanical properties than individual Gel and Gel/SG5 scaffolds. The presence of SG5 nanoparticles accelerated the nucleation and growth of apatite crystals on the surface of the composite Gel/SG5/PCL scaffold in simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteoblast response in vitro to developed electrospun scaffolds (PCL and Gel/SG5/PCL) was investigated by using normal human primary NHOst cell lines. NHOst cell culture studies showed that higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and better mineralization were obtained in the case of composite materials than in pure PCL scaffolds. The mechanically strong PCL scaffold served as a skeleton, while the Gel/SG5 fibers facilitated cell spreading and mineralization of the scaffold. - Highlights: • Bi-layer scaffolds were produced by electrospinning method. • The addition of nanoparticles enhanced the bioactivity of scaffold. • Bi-layer scaffold enhanced ALP activity and NHOst cell mineralization.

  13. Model-guided bone tissue engineering: from bench to bedside via in silico modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-01-01

    The creation of man-made living implants is the holy grail of tissue engineering (TE). As basic science advances, one of the major challenges in TE is the translation of the increasing biological knowledge on complex cell and tissue behavior into a predictive and robust engineering process. Mastering this complexity is an essential step towards clinical applications of TE. Computational modeling allows to study the biological complexity in a more integrative and quantitative way. Specifically...

  14. A Review on Implications of Tissue Engineering in Different Fields of Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Fahime Tabatabaei

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry has been a field dominated by a constant improvement of synthetic biomaterials. Tissue engineering of tooth is coming to change the panel of the dental materials such as restorative materials and implants. Certainly, it is the largest transition in history of dental materials science in terms of accepting this new and exciting technology. The objective of this article is to present various implications of tissue engineering in different fields of dentistry. To achieve this goal, a r...

  15. Biodegradable CSMA/PECA/Graphene Porous Hybrid Scaffold for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Jinfeng; Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Zhang, Xiaoning; Qian, ZhiYong

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the limited repair capacity of articular cartilage, it is essential to develop tissue-engineered cartilage for patients suffering from joint disease and trauma. Herein, we prepared a novel hybrid scaffold composed of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-ε-caprolactone-acryloyl chloride (MPEG-PCL-AC, PECA was used as abbreviation for MPEG-PCL-AC) and graphene oxide (GO) and evaluated its potential application in cartilage tissue engineering. To ...

  16. Combinatorial Method/High Throughput Strategies for Hydrogel Optimization in Tissue Engineering Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Callahan, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Combinatorial method/high throughput strategies, which have long been used in the pharmaceutical industry, have recently been applied to hydrogel optimization for tissue engineering applications. Although many combinatorial methods have been developed, few are suitable for use in tissue engineering hydrogel optimization. Currently, only three approaches (design of experiment, arrays and continuous gradients) have been utilized. This review highlights recent work with each approach. The benefi...

  17. Small-diameter biodegradable scaffolds for functional vascular tissue engineering in the mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Jason D.; Nelson, Gregory N.; Brennan, Matthew P.; Mirensky, Tamar L.; Yi, Tai; Hazlett, Ty; Tellides, George; Sinusas, Albert J.; Pober, Jordan S.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Breuer, Christopher K

    2007-01-01

    The development of neotissue in tissue engineered vascular grafts remains poorly understood. Advances in mouse genetic models have been highly informative in the study of vascular biology, but have been inaccessible to vascular tissue engineers due to technical limitations on the use of mouse recipients. To this end, we have developed a method for constructing sub-1mm internal diameter (I.D.) biodegradable scaffolds utilizing a dual cylinder chamber molding system and a hybrid polyester seala...

  18. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hanke; Chokri Cherif; Wolfgang Pompe; Michael Gelinsky; Armin Springer; Birgit Mrozik; Anja Walther; Birgit Hoyer

    2012-01-01

    Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechani...

  19. Nanocomposite Scaffold for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Effects of Carbon Nanotube Surface Functionalization

    OpenAIRE

    Chahine, Nadeen O.; Collette, Nicole M.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Genetos, Damian C.; Loots, Gabriela G

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and bioc...

  20. Scaffoldless Tissue-engineered Dental Pulp Cell Constructs for Endodontic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Syed-Picard, F.N.; Ray, H.L.; Kumta, P.N.; Sfeir, C.

    2014-01-01

    A major cause of apical periodontitis after endodontic treatment is the bacterial infiltration which could have been challenged by the presence of a vital pulp. In this study, self-assembled, scaffoldless, three-dimensional (3D) tissues were engineered from dental pulp cells (DPCs) and assessed as a device for pulp regeneration. These engineered tissues were placed into the canal space of human tooth root segments that were capped on one end with calcium phosphate cement, and the entire syste...

  1. Multilayered Scaffolds for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering Based on Bioactive Glass and Biodegradable Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Nooeaid, Patcharakamon

    2014-01-01

    Injuries of the articular cartilage may penetrate to the underlying subchondral bone, forming osteochondral defects which have a limited capacity of self-regeneration. Accompanied with limited surgical treatments and the fact that the causes are not understood well, an approach based in tissue engineering becomes a promising strategy for osteochondral repair. Such tissue engineering approaches are based on the combination of synthetic scaffolds, suitable cell sources and active molecules or g...

  2. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Dai; Zongjie Wang; Roya Samanipour; Kyo-in Koo; Keekyoung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a mesenchymal stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. Compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), ASCs can be derived from more sources and are harvested more easily. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering scaffolds are better able to mimic the in vivo cellular microenvironment, which benefits the localization, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs. Therefore, tissue-engineered ASCs ...

  3. Dinosaur’s feather and chicken’s tooth? Tissue engineering of the integument

    OpenAIRE

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Hou, Lianhai; Chen, Pei-ji; Wu, Ping; Patel, Nila; Chen, YiPing

    2001-01-01

    The integument forms the interface between animals and the environment. During evolution, diverse integument and integument appendages have evolved to adapt animals to different niches. The formation of these different integument forms is based on the acquisition of novel developmental mechanisms. This is the way Nature does her tissue/organ engineering and experiments. To do tissue engineering of the integument in the new century for medical applications, we need to learn more principles fro...

  4. Design of bifurcation junctions in artificial vascular vessels additively manufactured for skin tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    X. Han; Bibb, R; Harris, R.

    2015-01-01

    Construction of an artificial vascular network ready for its additive manufacturing is an important task in tissue engineering. This paper presents a set of simple mathematical algorithms for the computer-aided design of complex three dimensional vascular networks. Firstly various existing mathematical methods from the literature are reviewed and simplified for the convenience of applications in tissue engineering. This leads to a complete and step by step method for the construction of an ar...

  5. Design considerations and challenges for mechanical stretch bioreactors in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ying; Ferdous, Zannatul

    2016-05-01

    With the increase in average life expectancy and growing aging population, lack of functional grafts for replacement surgeries has become a severe problem. Engineered tissues are a promising alternative to this problem because they can mimic the physiological function of the native tissues and be cultured on demand. Cyclic stretch is important for developing many engineered tissues such as hearts, heart valves, muscles, and bones. Thus a variety of stretch bioreactors and corresponding scaffolds have been designed and tested to study the underlying mechanism of tissue formation and to optimize the mechanical conditions applied to the engineered tissues. In this review, we look at various designs of stretch bioreactors and common scaffolds and offer insights for future improvements in tissue engineering applications. First, we summarize the requirements and common configuration of stretch bioreactors. Next, we present the features of different actuating and motion transforming systems and their applications. Since most bioreactors must measure detailed distributions of loads and deformations on engineered tissues, techniques with high accuracy, precision, and frequency have been developed. We also cover the key points in designing culture chambers, nutrition exchanging systems, and regimens used for specific tissues. Since scaffolds are essential for providing biophysical microenvironments for residing cells, we discuss materials and technologies used in fabricating scaffolds to mimic anisotropic native tissues, including decellularized tissues, hydrogels, biocompatible polymers, electrospinning, and 3D bioprinting techniques. Finally, we present the potential future directions for improving stretch bioreactors and scaffolds. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:543-553, 2016. PMID:26929197

  6. Bio-inspired 3D microenvironments: a new dimension in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Chelsea M; Alge, Daniel L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2016-04-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been a foundational element of the tissue engineering paradigm since the inception of the field. Over the years there has been a progressive move toward the rational design and fabrication of bio-inspired materials that mimic the composition as well as the architecture and 3D structure of tissues. In this review, we chronicle advances in the field that address key challenges in tissue engineering as well as some emerging applications. Specifically, a summary of the materials and chemistries used to engineer bio-inspired 3D matrices that mimic numerous aspects of the extracellular matrix is provided, along with an overview of bioprinting, an additive manufacturing approach, for the fabrication of engineered tissues with precisely controlled 3D structures and architectures. To emphasize the potential clinical impact of the bio-inspired paradigm in biomaterials engineering, some applications of bio-inspired matrices are discussed in the context of translational tissue engineering. However, focus is also given to recent advances in the use of engineered 3D cellular microenvironments for fundamental studies in cell biology, including photoresponsive systems that are shedding new light on how matrix properties influence cell phenotype and function. In an outlook for future work, the need for high-throughput methods both for screening and fabrication is highlighted. Finally, microscale organ-on-a-chip technologies are highlighted as a promising area for future investment in the application of bio-inspired microenvironments. PMID:26942469

  7. Stem Cells & Regenerative Medicine - From molecular embryology to tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Maria J. Barrero and Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte sign a very interesting paper on EMBO reports (Regenerating the epigenome, EMBO reports 12:208-215, 2011 where they point out that Organisms have evolved two strategies by which to achieve this: the maintenance of adult stem cells and the induction of stemcell properties in differentiated cells. In both cases, cells must undergo extensive epigenetic reprogramming to attain the specialized functions of the new tissue. Ultimately, the regenerative capacity of a tissue might depend on the plasticity of the cellular epigenome, which determines the ability of the cell to respond to injuryrelated signals. Understanding this epigenetic plasticity will allow the development of strategies to stimulate the regeneration of damaged tissues and organs in humans...

  8. Evaluation of the implant type tissue-engineered cartilage by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Fujihara, Yuko; Yamaoka, Hisayo; Nishizawa, Satoru; Nagata, Satoru; Ogasawara, Toru; Asawa, Yukiyo; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2012-02-01

    The tissue-engineered cartilages after implantation were nonuniform tissues which were mingling with biodegradable polymers, regeneration cartilage and others. It is a hard task to evaluate the biodegradation of polymers or the maturation of regenerated tissues in the transplants by the conventional examination. Otherwise, scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) system specially developed to measure the tissue acoustic properties at a microscopic level. In this study, we examined acoustic properties of the tissue-engineered cartilage using SAM, and discuss the usefulness of this devise in the field of tissue engineering. We administered chondrocytes/atelocollagen mixture into the scaffolds of various polymers, and transplanted the constructs in the subcutaneous areas of nude mice for 2 months. We harvested them and examined the sound speed and the attenuation in the section of each construct by the SAM. As the results, images mapping the sound speed exhibited homogenous patterns mainly colored in blue, in all the tissue-engineered cartilage constructs. Contrarily, the images of the attenuation by SAM showed the variation of color ranged between blue and red. The low attenuation area colored in red, which meant hard materials, were corresponding to the polymer remnant in the toluidine blue images. The localizations of blue were almost similar with the metachromatic areas in the histology. In conclusion, the SAM is regarded as a useful tool to provide the information on acoustic properties and their localizations in the transplants that consist of heterogeneous tissues with various components. PMID:22138383

  9. An Update to Space Biomedical Research: Tissue Engineering in Microgravity Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Barzegari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The severe need for constructing replacement tissues in organ transplantation has necessitated the development of tissue engineering approaches and bioreactors that can bring these approaches to reality. The inherent limitations of conventional bioreactors in generating realistic tissue constructs led to the devise of the microgravity tissue engineering that uses Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV bioreactors initially developed by NASA. Methods: In this review article, we intend to highlight some major advances and accomplishments in the rapidly-growing field of tissue engineering that could not be achieved without using microgravity. Results: Research is now focused on assembly of 3 dimensional (3D tissue fragments from various cell types in human body such as chondrocytes, osteoblasts, embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, hepatocytes and pancreas islet cells. Hepatocytes cultured under microgravity are now being used in extracorporeal bioartificial liver devices. Tissue constructs can be used not only in organ replacement therapy, but also in pharmaco-toxicology and food safety assessment. 3D models of various cancers may be used in studying cancer development and biology or in high-throughput screening of anticancer drug candidates. Finally, 3D heterogeneous assemblies from cancer/immune cells provide models for immunotherapy of cancer. Conclusion: Tissue engineering in (simulated microgravity has been one of the stunning impacts of space research on biomedical sciences and their applications on earth.

  10. The rotator cuff: from bench to bedside. Developments in tissue engineering, surgical techniques and pathogenetic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longo, U.G.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis originates from the difficulties in the management of patients with rotator cuff tears. Since tendon healing rate is relatively slow compared with other connective tissues, we reviewed the available literature on tissue engineered biological augmentation for tendon healing, including gro

  11. Magnetic resonance microscopy for monitoring osteogenesis in tissue-engineered construct in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huihui [Bioengineering Department (MC 063), University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7052 (United States); Othman, Shadi F [Bioengineering Department (MC 063), University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7052 (United States); Hong Liu [Bioengineering Department (MC 063), University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7052 (United States); Peptan, Ioana A [Bioengineering Department (MC 063), University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7052 (United States); Magin, Richard L [Bioengineering Department (MC 063), University of Illinois at Chicago, 851 South Morgan Street, Chicago, IL 60607-7052 (United States)

    2006-02-07

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) is used to monitor osteogenesis in tissue-engineered constructs. Measurements of the developing tissue's MR relaxation times (T{sub 1} and T{sub 2}), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and elastic shear modulus were conducted over a 4-week growth period using an 11.74 T Bruker spectrometer with an imaging probe adapted for MR elastography (MRE). Both the relaxation times and the ADC show a statistically significant decrease after only one week of tissue development while the tissue stiffness increases progressively during the first two weeks of in vitro growth. The measured MR parameters are correlated with histologically monitored osteogenic tissue development. This study shows that MRM can provide quantitative data with which to characterize the growth and development of tissue-engineered bone.

  12. Sequential use of human-derived medium supplements favours cardiovascular tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Riem Vis, PW; Sluijter, JPG; Soekhradj - Soechit, RS Sarita; Herwerden, van, LA; Kluin, J; Bouten, CVC Carlijn

    2012-01-01

    Abstract For clinical application of tissue engineering strategies, the use of animal-derived serum in culture medium is not recommended, because it can evoke immune responses in patients. We previously observed that human platelet-lysate (PL) is favourable for cell expansion, but generates weaker tissue as compared to culture in foetal bovine serum (FBS). We investigated if human serum (HS) is a better human supplement to increase tissue strength. Cells were isolated from venous grafts of 10...

  13. Use of perfusion bioreactors and large animal models for long bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Gardel, Leandro. S.; Serra, L. A.; Reis, R. L.; Gomes, Manuela E.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) strategies for generation of new bone tissue includes the combined use of autologous or heterologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and three-dimensional (3D) scaffold materials serving as structural support for the cells, that develop into tissue-like substitutes under appropriate in vitro culture conditions. This approach is very important due to the limitations and risks associated with autologous, as well as allogenic bone graf...

  14. Generation of eX vivo-vascularized Muscle Engineered Tissue (X-MET)

    OpenAIRE

    Carosio, Silvia; Barberi, Laura; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Nicoletti, Carmine; Prete, Zaccaria Del; Musarò, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The object of this study was to develop an in vitro bioengineered three-dimensional vascularized skeletal muscle tissue, named eX-vivo Muscle Engineered Tissue (X-MET). This new tissue contains cells that exhibit the characteristics of differentiated myotubes, with organized contractile machinery, undifferentiated cells, and vascular cells capable of forming "vessel-like" networks. X-MET showed biomechanical properties comparable with that of adult skeletal muscles; thus it more closely mimic...

  15. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kettiger H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helene Kettiger,1,* Angela Schipanski,2,* Peter Wick,2 Jörg Huwyler1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, St Gallen, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. Keywords: biodistribution, cellular transport, cellular uptake, endocytosis, engineered nanomaterials, nanosafety

  16. Solid freeform fabrication of bone tissue engineering scaffolds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Zhuo; YAN Yongnian; ZHANG Renji; CHEN Lifeng; WANG Li

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONTissue engineering is a promising approach to large segmental bone repair fortrauma, replacement surgery, skeletal deficiency or abnormal development. Thefabrication of bone regeneration scaffolds with appropriate bone conductive property,bone inductive property, biodegradation property and mechanical properties is thecrux of this approach.

  17. Tissue-engineering as an adjunct to pelvic reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jangö, Hanna

    ) (MPEG-PLGA) and electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) - with or without seeded muscle stem cells in the form of autologous fresh muscle fiber fragments (MFFs).To simulate different POP repair scenarios different animal models were used. In Study 1 and 2, MPEG-PLGA was evaluated in a native tissue repair...

  18. Tissue Engineering of Cartilage on Ground-Based Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleshcheva, Ganna; Bauer, Johann; Hemmersbach, Ruth;

    2016-01-01

    Investigations under simulated microgravity offer the opportunity for a better understanding of the influence of altered gravity on cells and the scaffold-free threedimensional (3D) tissue formation. To investigate the shortterm influence, human chondrocytes were cultivated for 2h, 4 h, 16 h, and...

  19. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  20. Angiogenesis in tissue engineering: from concept to the vascularization of scaffold construct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angiogenesis, the formation of micro-vascular network from the preexisting vascular vessels, has been studied in the connection to the normal developmental process as well as numerous diseases. In tissue engineering research, angiogenesis is also essential to promote micro-vascular network inside engineered tissue constructs, mimicking a functional blood vessel in vivo. Micro-vascular network can be used to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation, nutrient transfer and waste removal. One of the problems faced by angiogenesis researchers is to find suitable in vitro assays and methods for assessing the effect of regulators on angiogenesis and micro-vessel formation. The assay would be reliable and repeatable with easily quantifiable with physiologically relevant. This review aims to highlights recent advanced and future challenges in developing and using an in vitro angiogenesis assay for the application on biomedical and tissue engineering research

  1. An Overview of Tissue Engineering as an Alternative for Toxicity Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrod, Mathew; Chau, David Yi San

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that combines aspects of biology, material sciences, engineering and medicine - the ultimate goal being able to fabricate replacement tissues and/or organs for an ageing population. However, parallel to this milestone, is the exploitation of the biomimetic constructs as feasible alternatives to in vivo/ex vivo toxicity testing models due to their accurate representation of innate tissue and organs. Herein, we summarise a range of concepts within tissue engineering with a particular emphasis on biological material selection and implications to animal testing. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page. PMID:27096693

  2. Angiogenesis in tissue engineering: from concept to the vascularization of scaffold construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirah Ishak, Siti; Pangestu Djuansjah, J. R.; Kadir, M. R. Abdul; Sukmana, Irza

    2014-06-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of micro-vascular network from the preexisting vascular vessels, has been studied in the connection to the normal developmental process as well as numerous diseases. In tissue engineering research, angiogenesis is also essential to promote micro-vascular network inside engineered tissue constructs, mimicking a functional blood vessel in vivo. Micro-vascular network can be used to maintain adequate tissue oxygenation, nutrient transfer and waste removal. One of the problems faced by angiogenesis researchers is to find suitable in vitro assays and methods for assessing the effect of regulators on angiogenesis and micro-vessel formation. The assay would be reliable and repeatable with easily quantifiable with physiologically relevant. This review aims to highlights recent advanced and future challenges in developing and using an in vitro angiogenesis assay for the application on biomedical and tissue engineering research.

  3. Electrospun nanofibers of collagen-chitosan and P(LLA-CL) for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiumei; CHEN Zonggang; Hans J.Weber

    2007-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers could be used to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in native tissue.In tissue engineering,the ECM could be used as tissue engineering scaffold to solve tissue engineering prob-lems.In this paper,poly(L-lactid-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)] nanofibers and collagen-chitosan complex nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning.Results of the experi-ments showed that the mechanical properties of the collagen- chitosan complex nanofibers varied with the collagen content in the complex.It was also found that the biodegradability of P(LLA-CL) nanofibers was faster than its membrane and that smooth muscle cells (SMC) grow faster on collagen nanofibers than on P(LLA-CL) nanofibers.

  4. Novel nano-rough polymers for cartilage tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Balasundaram G; Storey DM; Webster TJ

    2014-01-01

    Ganesan Balasundaram,1 Daniel M Storey,1 Thomas J Webster2,31Surfatek, Longmont, CO, USA; 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: This study presents an innovative method for creating a highly porous surface with nanoscale roughness on biologically relevant polymers, specifically polyurethane (PU) and polycaprolactone (PCL). Nanoembossed polyur...

  5. Tissue Engineering Applications for Ligament and Tendon Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.C.H.; GOH; H.W.; OU; YANG; Z.G.; GE; S.L.; TOH

    2005-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are subjected to high physiological loads. As such, injuries due to high impact activities are common. Due to the avascular nature of these connective tissues, the healing rate is rather slow. Currently the therapeutic options to treat tendon and ligament injuries are autografts, allografts and prosthetic devices. However, there are many disadvantages in using biological grafts, as well as concerns over long-term performance of synthetic prostheses. Therefore, further research for alte...

  6. Prospect of Stem Cells in Bone Tissue Engineering: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Azizeh-Mitra Yousefi; James, Paul F.; Rosa Akbarzadeh; Aswati Subramanian; Conor Flavin; Hassane Oudadesse

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been the subject of many studies in recent years, ranging from basic science that looks into MSCs properties to studies that aim for developing bioengineered tissues and organs. Adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been the focus of most studies due to the inherent potential of these cells to differentiate into various cell types. Although, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represents a paradigm shift in our u...

  7. Mulberry improvements via plastid transformation and tissue culture engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Umate, Pavan

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro tissue culture and micropropagation studies for Morus spp., a pivotal sericulture plant, are well established. The rapid and reproducible in vitro response to plant growth regulator treatments has emerged as an essential complement of transformation studies for this plant species. A major area of study is the use of protoplast culture and fusion techniques where advantages to mulberry improvement can be applied. The advancements in genetic transformation of mulberry are reviewed,...

  8. Tissue Engineering of Muscles and Cartilages Using Polyelectrolyte Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Hyuck Joon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    The prevalent nature of osteoarthritis that causes the erosion of joint surfaces and loss of mobility and muscle dystrophy that weakens the musculoskeletal system and hampers locomotion underlies the importance of developing functional replacement or regeneration of muscle and cartilage tissues. Polyelectrolyte gels have high potential as cellular scaffolds due to characteristic properties similar to biological matrixes. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that polyelectroly...

  9. Electrical stimulation directs engineered cardiac tissue to an age-matched native phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Lasher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying structural features of native myocardium in engineered tissue is essential for creating functional tissue that can serve as a surrogate for in vitro testing or the eventual replacement of diseased or injured myocardium. We applied three-dimensional confocal imaging and image analysis to quantitatively describe the features of native and engineered cardiac tissue. Quantitative analysis methods were developed and applied to test the hypothesis that environmental cues direct engineered tissue toward a phenotype resembling that of age-matched native myocardium. The analytical approach was applied to engineered cardiac tissue with and without the application of electrical stimulation as well as to age-matched and adult native tissue. Individual myocytes were segmented from confocal image stacks and assigned a coordinate system from which measures of cell geometry and connexin-43 spatial distribution were calculated. The data were collected from 9 nonstimulated and 12 electrically stimulated engineered tissue constructs and 5 postnatal day 12 and 7 adult hearts. The myocyte volume fraction was nearly double in stimulated engineered tissue compared to nonstimulated engineered tissue (0.34 ± 0.14 vs 0.18 ± 0.06 but less than half of the native postnatal day 12 (0.90 ± 0.06 and adult (0.91 ± 0.04 myocardium. The myocytes under electrical stimulation were more elongated compared to nonstimulated myocytes and exhibited similar lengths, widths, and heights as in age-matched myocardium. Furthermore, the percentage of connexin-43-positive membrane staining was similar in the electrically stimulated, postnatal day 12, and adult myocytes, whereas it was significantly lower in the nonstimulated myocytes. Connexin-43 was found to be primarily located at cell ends for adult myocytes and irregularly but densely clustered over the membranes of nonstimulated, stimulated, and postnatal day 12 myocytes. These findings support our hypothesis and reveal

  10. Electroactive Tissue Scaffolds with Aligned Pores as Instructive Platforms for Biomimetic Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Hardy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissues in the body are hierarchically structured composite materials with tissue-specific chemical and topographical properties. Here we report the preparation of tissue scaffolds with macroscopic pores generated via the dissolution of a sacrificial supramolecular polymer-based crystal template (urea from a biodegradable polymer-based scaffold (polycaprolactone, PCL. Furthermore, we report a method of aligning the supramolecular polymer-based crystals within the PCL, and that the dissolution of the sacrificial urea yields scaffolds with macroscopic pores that are aligned over long, clinically-relevant distances (i.e., centimeter scale. The pores act as topographical cues to which rat Schwann cells respond by aligning with the long axis of the pores. Generation of an interpenetrating network of polypyrrole (PPy and poly(styrene sulfonate (PSS in the scaffolds yields electroactive tissue scaffolds that allow the electrical stimulation of Schwann cells cultured on the scaffolds which increases the production of nerve growth factor (NGF.

  11. Stromal Cells in Dense Collagen Promote Cardiomyocyte and Microvascular Patterning in Engineered Human Heart Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Meredith A; Tran, Dominic; Coulombe, Kareen L K; Razumova, Maria; Regnier, Michael; Murry, Charles E; Zheng, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering is a strategy to replace damaged contractile tissue and model cardiac diseases to discover therapies. Current cardiac and vascular engineering approaches independently create aligned contractile tissue or perfusable vasculature, but a combined vascularized cardiac tissue remains to be achieved. Here, we sought to incorporate a patterned microvasculature into engineered heart tissue, which balances the competing demands from cardiomyocytes to contract the matrix versus the vascular lumens that need structural support. Low-density collagen hydrogels (1.25 mg/mL) permit human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) to form a dense contractile tissue but cannot support a patterned microvasculature. Conversely, high collagen concentrations (density ≥6 mg/mL) support a patterned microvasculature, but the hESC-CMs lack cell-cell contact, limiting their electrical communication, structural maturation, and tissue-level contractile function. When cocultured with matrix remodeling stromal cells, however, hESC-CMs structurally mature and form anisotropic constructs in high-density collagen. Remodeling requires the stromal cells to be in proximity with hESC-CMs. In addition, cocultured cardiac constructs in dense collagen generate measurable active contractions (on the order of 0.1 mN/mm(2)) and can be paced up to 2 Hz. Patterned microvascular networks in these high-density cocultured cardiac constructs remain patent through 2 weeks of culture, and hESC-CMs show electrical synchronization. The ability to maintain microstructural control within engineered heart tissue enables generation of more complex features, such as cellular alignment and a vasculature. Successful incorporation of these features paves the way for the use of large scale engineered tissues for myocardial regeneration and cardiac disease modeling. PMID:26955856

  12. Tissue Engineering of Injectable Soft tissue Filler: Using Adipose Stem Cells and Micronized Acellular Dermal Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Gyeol; Lim, Jin Soo

    2009-01-01

    In this study of a developed soft tissue filler, adipose tissue equivalents were constructed using adipose stem cells (ASCs) and micronized acellular dermal matrix (Alloderm). After labeling cultured human ASCs with fluorescent green protein and attaching them to micronized Alloderm (5×105 cells/1 mg), ASC-Alloderm complexes were cultured in adipogenic differentiation media for 14 days and then injected into the dorsal cranial region of nude male mice. The viabilities of ASCs in micronized Al...

  13. Biomimetic approaches in bone tissue engineering: Integrating biological and physicomechanical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Yague, Marc A; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; McNamara, Laoise; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I; Pandit, Abhay; Biggs, Manus J

    2015-04-01

    The development of responsive biomaterials capable of demonstrating modulated function in response to dynamic physiological and mechanical changes in vivo remains an important challenge in bone tissue engineering. To achieve long-term repair and good clinical outcomes, biologically responsive approaches that focus on repair and reconstitution of tissue structure and function through drug release, receptor recognition, environmental responsiveness and tuned biodegradability are required. Traditional orthopedic materials lack biomimicry, and mismatches in tissue morphology, or chemical and mechanical properties ultimately accelerate device failure. Multiple stimuli have been proposed as principal contributors or mediators of cell activity and bone tissue formation, including physical (substrate topography, stiffness, shear stress and electrical forces) and biochemical factors (growth factors, genes or proteins). However, optimal solutions to bone regeneration remain elusive. This review will focus on biological and physicomechanical considerations currently being explored in bone tissue engineering. PMID:25236302

  14. A biomimetic three-dimensional woven composite scaffold for functional tissue engineering of cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutos, Franklin T.; Freed, Lisa E.; Guilak, Farshid

    2007-02-01

    Tissue engineering seeks to repair or regenerate tissues through combinations of implanted cells, biomaterial scaffolds and biologically active molecules. The rapid restoration of tissue biomechanical function remains an important challenge, emphasizing the need to replicate structural and mechanical properties using novel scaffold designs. Here we present a microscale 3D weaving technique to generate anisotropic 3D woven structures as the basis for novel composite scaffolds that are consolidated with a chondrocyte-hydrogel mixture into cartilage tissue constructs. Composite scaffolds show mechanical properties of the same order of magnitude as values for native articular cartilage, as measured by compressive, tensile and shear testing. Moreover, our findings showed that porous composite scaffolds could be engineered with initial properties that reproduce the anisotropy, viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity of native articular cartilage. Such scaffolds uniquely combine the potential for load-bearing immediately after implantation in vivo with biological support for cell-based tissue regeneration without requiring cultivation in vitro.

  15. Decellularized Human Maxillary Sinus Schneiderian Membrane as a Potential Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh KhajehAhmadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biological matrix has received special attention in recent medical and biological researches. Cells of tissue are supported by extracellular matrix (ECM. Extracellular matrix is used as a scaffold for morphogenesis, proliferation, migration, and differentiation in tissue engineering. Extracellular matrix of natural tissues can be used as a scaffold for reconstructing biological tissues in tissue engineering. Human maxillary sinus membrane consists of cells and ECM which contain collagen, elastin, and proteoglycans. Collagen can be used as a natural scaffold via high level of biocompatibility. Materials & Methods: In this study, Human maxillary sinus membrane were decellularized by two techniques , physical method (liquid nitrogen and chemical procedures via increment concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS in three groups. The samples were fixed with Bouin's fixator, and then were stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin. decellularised Human maxillary sinus membrane was evaluated with scanning electrone microscope.Results: Histological evaluation of decellularized scaffolds revealed that cells of the schneiderian membrane tissues were completely removed via concentration of 1% of SDS. Scanning Electrone Microscope (SEM (Leo-VP1450, Germany of the scaffolds indicated that collagen fibers of connective tissue remained intact. In 0.5 and 0.1% concentrations of SDS, few cells were observed at peripheral of ECM, so decellularization process was not complete. Conclusion: According to the results, scaffolds prepared from Human Maxillary Sinus Membrane could be used as a suitable scaffold for In vitro investigation and reconstruction and tissue engineering.

  16. Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrix: Basic Characteristics and Current Applications in Orthopedic Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixiang; Zhu, Yun; Li, Jia; Guo, Quanyi; Peng, Jiang; Liu, Shichen; Yang, Jianhua; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic and intricate microenvironment with excellent biophysical, biomechanical, and biochemical properties, which can directly or indirectly regulate cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as plays key roles in homeostasis and regeneration of tissues and organs. The ECM has attracted a great deal of attention with the rapid development of tissue engineering in the field of regenerative medicine. Tissue-derived ECM scaffolds (also referred to as decellularized tissues and whole organs) are considered a promising therapy for the repair of musculoskeletal defects, including those that are widely used in orthopedics, although there are a few shortcomings. Similar to tissue-derived ECM scaffolds, cell-derived ECM scaffolds also have highly advantageous biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular their ability to be produced in vitro from a number of different cell types. Furthermore, cell-derived ECM scaffolds more closely resemble native ECM microenvironments. The products of cell-derived ECM have a wide range of biomedical applications; these include reagents for cell culture substrates and biomaterials for scaffolds, hybrid scaffolds, and living cell sheet coculture systems. Although cell-derived ECM has only just begun to be investigated, it has great potential as a novel approach for cell-based tissue repair in orthopedic tissue engineering. This review summarizes and analyzes the various types of cell-derived ECM products applied in cartilage, bone, and nerve tissue engineering in vitro or in vivo and discusses future directions for investigation of cell-derived ECM. PMID:26671674

  17. Factors promoting increased rate of tissue regeneration: the zebrafish fin as a tool for examining tissue engineering design concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boominathan, Vijay P; Ferreira, Tracie L

    2012-12-01

    Student interest in topics of tissue engineering is increasing exponentially as the number of universities offering programs in bioengineering are on the rise. Bioengineering encompasses all of the STEM categories: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Inquiry-based learning is one of the most effective techniques for promoting student learning and has been demonstrated to have a high impact on learning outcomes. We have designed program outcomes for our bioengineering program that require tiered activities to develop problem solving skills, peer evaluation techniques, and promote team work. While it is ideal to allow students to ask unique questions and design their own experiments, this can be difficult for instructors to have reagents and supplies available for a variety of activities. Zebrafish can be easily housed, and multiple variables can be tested on a large enough group to provide statistical value, lending them well to inquiry-based learning modules. We have designed a laboratory activity that takes observation of fin regeneration to the next level: analyzing conditions that may impact regeneration. Tissue engineers seek to define the optimum conditions to grow tissue for replacement parts. The field of tissue engineering is likely to benefit from understanding natural mechanisms of regeneration and the factors that influence the rate of regeneration. We have outlined the results of varying temperature on fin regeneration and propose other inquiry modules such as the role of pH in fin regeneration. Furthermore, we have provided useful tools for developing critical thinking and peer review of research ideas, assessment guidelines, and grading rubrics for the activities associated with this exercise. PMID:23244692

  18. Repair of acutely injured spinal cord through constructing tissue-engineered neural complex in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Yu; GUO Qing-shan; WANG Ai-min; WU Si-yu; XING Shu-xing; ZHANG Zhong-rong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To construct tissue-engineered neural complex in vitro and study its effect in repairing acutely injured spinal cord in adult rats. Methods: Neural stem cells were harvested from the spinal cord of embryo rats and propagated in vitro. Then the neural stem cells were seeded into polyglycolic acid scaffolds and co-cultured with extract of embryonic spinal cord in vitro. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and scanning electron microscope were used to observe the microstructure of this complex. Animal model of spine semi-transection was made and tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted by surgical intervention. Six weeks after transplantation, functional evaluation and histochemistry were applied to evaluate the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction. Results: The tissue-engineered neural complex had a distinct structure, which contained neonatal neurons, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. After tissue-engineered neural complex was implanted into the injured spinal cord, the cell components such as neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, could survive and keep on developing. The adult rats suffering from spinal cord injury got an obvious neurological recovery in motor skills. Conclusions: The tissue-engineered neural complex appears to have therapeutic effects on the functional recovery and anatomic reconstruction of the adult rats with spinal cord injury.

  19. Microablation of collagen-based substrates for soft tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noting the abundance and importance of collagen as a biomaterial, we have developed a facile method for the production of a dense fibrillar extracellular matrix mimicking collagen–elastin hybrids with tunable mechanical properties. Through the use of excimer-laser technology, we have optimized conditions for the ablation of collagen lamellae without denaturation of protein, maintenance of fibrillar ultrastructure and preservation of native D-periodicity. Strengths of collagen–elastin hybrids ranged from 0.6 to 13 MPa, elongation at break from 9 to 70% and stiffness from 2.9 to 94 MPa, allowing for the design of a wide variety of tissue specific scaffolds. Further, large (centimeter scale) lamellae can be fabricated and embedded with recombinant elastin to generate collagen–elastin hybrids. Exposed collagen in hybrids act as cell adhesive sites for rat mesenchymal stem cells that conform to ablate waveforms. The ability to modulate these features allows for the generation of a class of biopolymers that can architecturally and physiologically replicate native tissue. (communication)

  20. Berry phase transition in twisted bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Johannes C.; Smirnov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Hennrik; Haug, Rolf J.

    2016-09-01

    The electronic dispersion of a graphene bilayer is highly dependent on rotational mismatch between layers and can be further manipulated by electrical gating. This allows for an unprecedented control over electronic properties and opens up the possibility of flexible band structure engineering. Here we present novel magnetotransport data in a twisted bilayer, crossing the energetic border between decoupled monolayers and coupled bilayer. In addition a transition in Berry phase between π and 2π is observed at intermediate magnetic fields. Analysis of Fermi velocities and gate induced charge carrier densities suggests an important role of strong layer asymmetry for the observed phenomena.

  1. Surface modification of polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via selective laser sintering for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih-Hao [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishann, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Ming-Yih [Graduate Institute of Medical Mechatronics, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Tzung [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung University, Kweishann, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Jyh-Ping, E-mail: jpchen@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China); Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-07-01

    Surface modified porous polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via rapid prototyping techniques were evaluated for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Polycaprolactone scaffolds manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) were surface modified through immersion coating with either gelatin or collagen. Three groups of scaffolds were created and compared for both mechanical and biological properties. Surface modification with collagen or gelatin improved the hydrophilicity, water uptake and mechanical strength of the pristine scaffold. From microscopic observations and biochemical analysis, collagen-modified scaffold was the best for cartilage tissue engineering in terms of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production. Chondrocytes/collagen-modified scaffold constructs were implanted subdermally in the dorsal spaces of female nude mice. Histological and immunohistochemical staining of the retrieved implants after 8 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue formation. We conclude that collagen surface modification through immersion coating on SLS-manufactured scaffolds is a feasible scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in craniofacial reconstruction. - Highlights: • Selective laser sintered polycaprolactone scaffolds are prepared. • Scaffolds are surface modified through immersion coating with gelatin or collagen. • Collagen-scaffold is the best for cartilage tissue engineering in vitro. • Chondrocytes/collagen-scaffold reveals enhanced cartilage tissue formation in vivo.

  2. A DIC Based Technique to Measure the Contraction of a Skeletal Muscle Engineered Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carosio, Silvia; Faraldi, Martina; Pisu, Simona; Musarò, Antonio; Del Prete, Zaccaria

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary science based on the application of engineering approaches to biologic tissue formation. Engineered tissue internal organization represents a key aspect to increase biofunctionality before transplant and, as regarding skeletal muscles, the potential of generating contractile forces is dependent on the internal fiber organization and is reflected by some macroscopic parameters, such as the spontaneous contraction. Here we propose the application of digital image correlation (DIC) as an independent tool for an accurate and noninvasive measurement of engineered muscle tissue spontaneous contraction. To validate the proposed technique we referred to the X-MET, a promising 3-dimensional model of skeletal muscle. The images acquired through a high speed camera were correlated with a custom-made algorithm and the longitudinal strain predictions were employed for measuring the spontaneous contraction. The spontaneous contraction reference values were obtained by studying the force response. The relative error between the spontaneous contraction frequencies computed in both ways was always lower than 0.15%. In conclusion, the use of a DIC based system allows for an accurate and noninvasive measurement of biological tissues' spontaneous contraction, in addition to the measurement of tissue strain field on any desired region of interest during electrical stimulation. PMID:27034612

  3. Chitosan and Its Potential Use as a Scaffold for Tissue Engineering in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an important therapeutic strategy to be used in regenerative medicine in the present and in the future. Functional biomaterials research is focused on the development and improvement of scaffolding, which can be used to repair or regenerate an organ or tissue. Scaffolds are one of the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Scaffolds consisting of natural polymers have recently been developed more quickly and have gained more popularity. These include chitosan, a copolymer derived from the alkaline deacetylation of chitin. Expectations for use of these scaffolds are increasing as the knowledge regarding their chemical and biological properties expands, and new biomedical applications are investigated. Due to their different biological properties such as being biocompatible, biodegradable, and bioactive, they have given the pattern for use in tissue engineering for repair and/or regeneration of different tissues including skin, bone, cartilage, nerves, liver, and muscle. In this review, we focus on the intrinsic properties offered by chitosan and its use in tissue engineering, considering it as a promising alternative for regenerative medicine as a bioactive polymer.

  4. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  5. Surface modification of polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via selective laser sintering for cartilage tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface modified porous polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated via rapid prototyping techniques were evaluated for cartilage tissue engineering purposes. Polycaprolactone scaffolds manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) were surface modified through immersion coating with either gelatin or collagen. Three groups of scaffolds were created and compared for both mechanical and biological properties. Surface modification with collagen or gelatin improved the hydrophilicity, water uptake and mechanical strength of the pristine scaffold. From microscopic observations and biochemical analysis, collagen-modified scaffold was the best for cartilage tissue engineering in terms of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix production. Chondrocytes/collagen-modified scaffold constructs were implanted subdermally in the dorsal spaces of female nude mice. Histological and immunohistochemical staining of the retrieved implants after 8 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue formation. We conclude that collagen surface modification through immersion coating on SLS-manufactured scaffolds is a feasible scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering in craniofacial reconstruction. - Highlights: • Selective laser sintered polycaprolactone scaffolds are prepared. • Scaffolds are surface modified through immersion coating with gelatin or collagen. • Collagen-scaffold is the best for cartilage tissue engineering in vitro. • Chondrocytes/collagen-scaffold reveals enhanced cartilage tissue formation in vivo

  6. Bone Regeneration Based on Tissue Engineering Conceptions-A 21st Century Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jan Henkel; Maria A. Woodruff; Devakara R. Epari; Roland Steck; Vaida Glatt; Ian C. Dickinson; Peter FM Choong; Michael A. Schuetz; Dietmar W. Hutmacher

    2013-01-01

    The role of Bone Tissue Engineering in the field of Regenerative Medicine has been the topic of substantial research over the past two decades. Technological advances have improved orthopaedic implants and surgical techniques for bone reconstruction. However, improvements in surgical techniques to reconstruct bone have been limited by the paucity of autologous materials available and donor site morbidity. Recent advances in the development of biomaterials have provided attractive alternatives to bone grafting expanding the surgical options for restoring the form and function of injured bone. Specifically, novel bioactive (second generation) biomaterials have been developed that are characterised by controlled action and reaction to the host tissue environment, whilst exhibiting controlled chemical breakdown and resorption with an ultimate replacement by regenerating tissue. Future generations of biomaterials (third generation) are designed to be not only osteo-conductive but also osteoinductive, i.e. to stimulate regeneration of host tissues by combining tissue engineer-ing and in situ tissue regeneration methods with a focus on novel applications. These techniques will lead to novel possibilities for tissue regeneration and repair. At present, tissue engineered constructs that may find future use as bone grafts for complex skeletal defects, whether from post-traumatic, degenerative, neoplastic or congenital/developmental“origin”require osseous reconstruction to ensure structural and functional integrity. Engineering functional bone using combinations of cells, scaffolds and bioactive factors is a promising strategy and a particular feature for future development in the area of hybrid materials which are able to exhibit suitable biomimetic and mechanical properties. This review will discuss the state of the art in this field and what we can expect from future generations of bone regeneration concepts.

  7. New roles of artificial materials in tissue engineering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Filová, Elena; Grausová, Ľubica; Chlupáč, Jaroslav; Pařízek, Martin; Blazewicz, S.; Brynda, Eduard; Biederman, H.; Kromka, Alexander; Rypáček, František; Švorčík, V.; Vacík, Jiří

    Liberec : Technická univerzita, 2007 - (Tůmová, Š.). s. 66-67 ISBN 978-80-7372-266-1. [Vacuum and Plasma Surface Engineering. 24.10.2007-26.10.2007, Liberec-Hejnice] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/0225; GA ČR(CZ) GA101/06/0226; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011301; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400480701; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN101120701; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500110564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : spr2 * synthetic polymers * carbon * metals Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  8. Invasive cervical root resorption: Engineering the lost tissue by regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexton Antony Johns

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption (ICR is a localized resorptive process that commences on the surface of the root below the epithelial attachment and the coronal aspect of the supporting alveolar process, namely the zone of the connective tissue attachment′ early diagnosis, elimination of the resorption and restorative management are the keys to a successful outcome. Treatment done was a combined non-surgical root canal therapy, surgical treatment to expose the resorptive defect and the resorptive defect was filled up with reverse sandwich technique and finally the bony defect filled with platelet rich fibrin (PRF, hydroxylapatite and PRF membrane. Significant bone fill was obtained in our case after a 2 year follow-up period. This case report presents a treatment strategy that might improve the healing outcomes for patients with ICR.

  9. Challenges in tissue engineering - towards cell control inside artificial scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, M; Witzel, P; Heinrich, D

    2016-05-11

    Control of living cells is vital for the survival of organisms. Each cell inside an organism is exposed to diverse external mechano-chemical cues, all coordinated in a spatio-temporal pattern triggering individual cell functions. This complex interplay between external chemical cues and mechanical 3D environments is translated into intracellular signaling loops. Here, we describe how external mechano-chemical cues control cell functions, especially cell migration, and influence intracellular information transport. In particular, this work focuses on the quantitative analysis of (1) intracellular vesicle transport to understand intracellular state changes in response to external cues, (2) cellular sensing of external chemotactic cues, and (3) the cells' ability to migrate in 3D structured environments, artificially fabricated to mimic the 3D environment of tissue in the human body. PMID:27139622

  10. Mid-term clinical results of tissue-engineered vascular autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosthetic and bioprosthetic materials currently in use lack growth potential and therefore must be repeatedly replaced in pediatric patients as they grow. Tissue engineering is a new discipline that offers the potential for creating replacement structures from autologous cells and biodegradable polymer scaffolds. In May 2000, we initiated clinical application of tissue-engineered vascular grafts seeded with cultured cells. However, cell culturing is time-consuming, and xenoserum must be used. To overcome these disadvantages, we began to use bone marrow cells, readily available on the day of surgery, as a cell source. Since September 2001, tissue-engineered grafts seeded with autologous bone marrow cells have been implanted in 44 patients. The patients or their parents were fully informed and had given consent to the procedure. A 3 to 10 ml/kg specimen of bone marrow was aspirated with the patient under general anesthesia before the skin incision. The polymer tube serving as a scaffold for the cells was composed of a copolymer of lactide and ε-caprolactone (50:50) which degrades by hydrolysis. Polyglycolic or poly-l-lactic acid woven fabric was used for reinforcement. Twenty-six tissue-engineered conduits and 19 tissue-engineered patches were used for the repair of congenital heart defects. The patients' ages ranged from 1 to 24 years (median 7.4 years). All patients underwent a catheterization study, CT scan, or both, for evaluation after the operation. There were 4 late deaths due to heart failure with or without multiple organ failure or brain bleeding in this series; these were unrelated to the tissue-engineered graft function. One patient required percutaneous balloon angioplasty for tubular graft-stenosis and 4 patients for the stenosis of the patch-shaped tissue engineered material. Two patients required re-do operation; one for recurrent pulmonary stenosis and another for a resulting R-L shunt after the lateral tunnel method. Kaplan-Meier analysis in

  11. Myocardial matrix–polyethylene glycol hybrid hydrogels for tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar to other protein-based hydrogels, extracellular matrix (ECM) based hydrogels, derived from decellularized tissues, have a narrow range of mechanical properties and are rapidly degraded. These hydrogels contain natural cellular adhesion sites, form nanofibrous networks similar to native ECM, and are biodegradable. In this study, we expand the properties of these types of materials by incorporating poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) into the ECM network. We use decellularized myocardial matrix as an example of a tissue specific ECM derived hydrogel. Myocardial matrix–PEG hybrids were synthesized by two different methods, cross-linking the proteins with an amine-reactive PEG-star and photo-induced radical polymerization of two different multi-armed PEG-acrylates. We show that both methods allow for conjugation of PEG to the myocardial matrix by gel electrophoresis and infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the hybrid materials still contain a nanofibrous network similar to unmodified myocardial matrix and that the fiber diameter is changed by the method of PEG incorporation and PEG molecular weight. PEG conjugation also decreased the rate of enzymatic degradation in vitro, and increased material stiffness. Hybrids synthesized with amine-reactive PEG had gelation rates of 30 min, similar to the unmodified myocardial matrix, and incorporation of PEG did not prevent cell adhesion and migration through the hydrogels, thus offering the possibility to have an injectable ECM hydrogel that degrades more slowly in vivo. The photo-polymerized radical systems gelled in 4 min upon irradiation, allowing 3D encapsulation and culture of cells, unlike the soft unmodified myocardial matrix. This work demonstrates that PEG incorporation into ECM-based hydrogels can expand material properties, thereby opening up new possibilities for in vitro and in vivo applications. (paper)

  12. [Research Progress of Collagen-based Three-dimensional Porous Scaffolds Used in Skin Tissue Engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Tang, Qiwei; Zhou, Aimei; Yang, Shulin

    2015-08-01

    Collagen is a kind of natural biomedical material and collagen based three-dimensional porous scaffolds have been widely used in skin tissue engineering. However, these scaffolds do not meet the requirements for artificial skin substitutes in terms of their poor mechanical properties, short supply, and rejection in the bodies. All of these factors limit their further application in skin tissue engineering. A variety of methods have been chosen to meliorate the situation, such as cross linking and blending other substance for improving mechanical properties. The highly biomimetic scaffolds either in structure or in function can be prepared through culturing cells and loading growth factors. To avoid the drawbacks of unsafety attributing to animals, investigators have fixed their eyes on the recombinant collagen. This paper reviews the the progress of research and application of collagen-based 3-dimensional porous scaffolds in skin tissue engineering. PMID:26710471

  13. Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hanke

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechanical properties of such scaffolds and in cell culture experiments we showed that flock scaffolds allow attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and support their osteogenic differentiation. These matrices represent promising scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  14. Bioactive Glass and Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo R. Boccaccini

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, bioactive glasses have been used to fill and restore bone defects. More recently, this category of biomaterials has become an emerging research field for bone tissue engineering applications. Here, we review and discuss current knowledge on porous bone tissue engineering scaffolds on the basis of melt-derived bioactive silicate glass compositions and relevant composite structures. Starting with an excerpt on the history of bioactive glasses, as well as on fundamental requirements for bone tissue engineering scaffolds, a detailed overview on recent developments of bioactive glass and glass-ceramic scaffolds will be given, including a summary of common fabrication methods and a discussion on the microstructural-mechanical properties of scaffolds in relation to human bone (structure-property and structure-function relationship. In addition, ion release effects of bioactive glasses concerning osteogenic and angiogenic responses are addressed. Finally, areas of future research are highlighted in this review.

  15. Modified chitosan hydrogels as drug delivery and tissue engineering systems: present status and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Giri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan, a natural cationic polysaccharide, is prepared industrially by the hydrolysis of the aminoacetyl groups of chitin, a naturally available marine polymer. Chitosan is a non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable polymer and has attracted considerable interest in a wide range of biomedical and pharmaceutical applications including drug delivery, cosmetics, and tissue engineering. The primary hydroxyl and amine groups located on the backbone of chitosan are responsible for the reactivity of the polymer and also act as sites for chemical modification. However, chitosan has certain limitations for use in controlled drug delivery and tissue engineering. These limitations can be overcome by chemical modification. Thus, modified chitosan hydrogels have gained importance in current research on drug delivery and tissue engineering systems. This paper reviews the general properties of chitosan, various methods of modification, and applications of modified chitosan hydrogels.

  16. Use of magnetic particles to apply mechanical forces for bone tissue engineering purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartmell, S H; Keramane, A; Kirkham, G R; Verschueren, S B; Magnay, J L; El Haj, A J; Dobson, J [Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, University of Keele, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 7QB (United Kingdom)

    2005-01-01

    It is possible to influence osteoblast activity by the application of mechanical forces. There is potential in using these forces for tissue engineering applications in that cell matrix production may be upregulated, resulting in a functional tissue engineered construct created in a shorter culture time. We have been developing a novel technique for applying mechanical forces directly to the cell with the use of magnetic particles. Particles attached to the cell membrane can be manipulated using an external magnetic field thus applying forces in the piconewton range. We have previously demonstrated that primary human osteoblasts respond to this type of stimulus by upregulating bone related gene expression and producing mineralized matrix at early time points. In this paper we discuss the optimization of this technique by presenting data on the effects of this type of force on osteoblast proliferation, phagocytosis and also the potential use of this technique in developing 3D tissue engineered constructs.

  17. Emerging nanotechnology approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim ES

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eung-Sam Kim,1,2 Eun Hyun Ahn,3,4 Tal Dvir,5,6 Deok-Ho Kim1,4,71Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea; 3Department of Pathology, 4Institute of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, 6Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; 7Center for Cardiovascular Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USAThe history of human kind suggests that there has been a correlation between global population growth and major events in science and technology over the last three centuries. Sharp increases in the world’s population have been triggered by the industrial revolution and scientific and technological breakthroughs including: the advent of the railways, discovery of penicillin and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, and the invention of the computer.1 Since the 20th century, interdisciplinary areas in the physical and biological sciences have accelerated the progress of biomedical applications. The recent integration of emerging nanotechnology into biology and biomedicine has resulted in a range of innovative nanoengineering efforts for the repair and regeneration of tissues and organs.2 Thus, it is expected that nanoengineering approaches to biomedical applications can contribute to addressing the present issue of personal and global health care and its economic burden for more than 7 billion people.Why are we paying attention to nanoengineering for biomedical applications? The size of most biomolecules ranges from 0.2 nm to 200 nm (Figure 1. Research has focused on control of the interaction and localization of biomolecules even at the single-molecule level using ever-evolving nanotechnology.3 The evidence indicates that cells can respond to nanoscale changes in the dynamic

  18. Engineered skeletal muscle tissue for soft robotics: fabrication strategies, current applications, and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Rebecca M; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a scalable actuator system used throughout nature from the millimeter to meter length scales and over a wide range of frequencies and force regimes. This adaptability has spurred interest in using engineered skeletal muscle to power soft robotics devices and in biotechnology and medical applications. However, the challenges to doing this are similar to those facing the tissue engineering and regenerative medicine fields; specifically, how do we translate our understanding of myogenesis in vivo to the engineering of muscle constructs in vitro to achieve functional integration with devices. To do this researchers are developing a number of ways to engineer the cellular microenvironment to guide skeletal muscle tissue formation. This includes understanding the role of substrate stiffness and the mechanical environment, engineering the spatial organization of biochemical and physical cues to guide muscle alignment, and developing bioreactors for mechanical and electrical conditioning. Examples of engineered skeletal muscle that can potentially be used in soft robotics include 2D cantilever-based skeletal muscle actuators and 3D skeletal muscle tissues engineered using scaffolds or directed self-organization. Integration into devices has led to basic muscle-powered devices such as grippers and pumps as well as more sophisticated muscle-powered soft robots that walk and swim. Looking forward, current, and future challenges include identifying the best source of muscle precursor cells to expand and differentiate into myotubes, replacing cardiomyocytes with skeletal muscle tissue as the bio-actuator of choice for soft robots, and vascularization and innervation to enable control and nourishment of larger muscle tissue constructs. PMID:24319010

  19. Human dental pulp stem cell is a promising autologous seed cell for bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-hui; LIU Da-yong; ZHANG Fang-ming; WANG Fan; ZHANG Wen-kui; ZHANG Zhen-ting

    2011-01-01

    Background The seed cell is a core problem in bone tissue engineering research.Recent research indicates that human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) can differentiate into osteoblasts in vitro,which suggests that they may become a new kind of seed cells for bone tissue engineering.The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs in vitro and bone-like tissue formation when transplanted with three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds in vivo,and hDPSCs may become appropriate seed cells for bone tissue engineering.Methods We have utilized enzymatic digestion to obtain hDPSCs from dental pulp tissue extracted during orthodontic treatment.After culturing and expansion to three passages,the cells were seeded in 6-well plates or on three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds and cultured in osteogenic medium.After 14 days in culture,the three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 4 weeks.In 6-well plate culture,osteogenesis was assessed by alkaline phosphatase staining,Von Kossa staining,and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the osteogenesis-specific genes type I collagen (COL l),bone sialoprotein (BSP),osteocalcin (OCN),RUNX2,and osterix (OSX).In three-dimensional gelatin scaffold culture,X-rays,hematoxylin/eosin staining,and immunohistochemical staining were used to examine bone formation.Results In vitro studies revealed that hDPSCs do possess osteogenic differentiation potential.In vivo studies revealed that hDPSCs seeded on gelatin scaffolds can form bone structures in heterotopic sites of nude mice.Conclusions These findings suggested that hDPSCs may be valuable as seed cells for bone tissue engineering.As a special stem cell source,hDPSCs may blaze a new path for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Environmental cues to guide stem cell fate decision for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsberg, Eben; von Recum, Horst A; Mahoney, Melissa J

    2006-09-01

    The human body contains a variety of stem cells capable of both repeated self-renewal and production of specialised, differentiated progeny. Critical to the implementation of these cells in tissue engineering strategies is a thorough understanding of which external signals in the stem cell microenvironment provide cues to control their fate decision in terms of proliferation or differentiation into a desired, specific phenotype. These signals must then be incorporated into tissue regeneration approaches for regulated exposure to stem cells. The precise spatial and temporal presentation of factors directing stem cell behaviour is extremely important during embryogenesis, development and natural healing events, and it is possible that this level of control will be vital to the success of many regenerative therapies. This review covers existing tissue engineering approaches to guide the differentiation of three disparate stem cell populations: mesenchymal, neural and endothelial. These progenitor cells will be of central importance in many future connective, neural and vascular tissue regeneration technologies. PMID:16918253