WorldWideScience

Sample records for bilayer membrane fusion

  1. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  2. The computational route from bilayer membranes to vesicle fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shillcock, Julian C; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Biological membranes are examples of 'smart' materials whose properties and behaviour emerge from the propagation across many scales of the molecular characteristics of their constituents. Artificial smart materials, such as drug delivery vehicles and biosensors, often rely on modifying naturally occurring soft matter, such as polymers and lipid vesicles, so that they possess useful behaviour. However, the complexity of natural membranes, both in their static properties, exemplified in their phase behaviour, and in their dynamic properties, as in the kinetics of their formation and interactions, hinders their rational modification. Mesoscopic simulations, such as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), allow in silico experiments to be easily and cheaply performed on complex, soft materials requiring as input only the molecular structure of the constituents at a coarse-grained level. They can therefore act as a guide to experimenters prior to performing costly assays. Additionally, mesoscopic simulations provide the only currently feasible window on the length- and timescales relevant to important biophysical processes such as vesicle fusion. We review here the development of computational models of bilayer membranes, and in particular the use of mesoscopic simulations to follow the molecular rearrangements that occur during membrane fusion

  3. Membrane fusion-competent virus-like proteoliposomes and proteinaceous supported bilayers made directly from cell plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Deirdre A; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Millet, Jean K; Porri, Teresa; Daniel, Susan

    2013-05-28

    Virus-like particles are useful materials for studying virus-host interactions in a safe manner. However, the standard production of pseudovirus based on the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) backbone is an intricate procedure that requires trained laboratory personnel. In this work, a new strategy for creating virus-like proteoliposomes (VLPLs) and virus-like supported bilayers (VLSBs) is presented. This strategy uses a cell blebbing technique to induce the formation of nanoscale vesicles from the plasma membrane of BHK cells expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) fusion protein of influenza X-31. These vesicles and supported bilayers contain HA and are used to carry out single particle membrane fusion events, monitored using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The results of these studies show that the VLPLs and VLSBs contain HA proteins that are fully competent to carry out membrane fusion, including the formation of a fusion pore and the release of fluorophores loaded into vesicles. This new strategy for creating spherical and planar geometry virus-like membranes has many potential applications. VLPLs could be used to study fusion proteins of virulent viruses in a safe manner, or they could be used as therapeutic delivery particles to transport beneficial proteins coexpressed in the cells to a target cell. VLSBs could facilitate high throughput screening of antiviral drugs or pathogen-host cell interactions.

  4. Membranes linked by trans-SNARE complexes require lipids prone to non-bilayer structure for progression to fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Michael; Stroupe, Christopher; Orr, Amy; Douville, Deborah; Wickner, William T

    2014-01-01

    Like other intracellular fusion events, the homotypic fusion of yeast vacuoles requires a Rab GTPase, a large Rab effector complex, SNARE proteins which can form a 4-helical bundle, and the SNARE disassembly chaperones Sec17p and Sec18p. In addition to these proteins, specific vacuole lipids are required for efficient fusion in vivo and with the purified organelle. Reconstitution of vacuole fusion with all purified components reveals that high SNARE levels can mask the requirement for a complex mixture of vacuole lipids. At lower, more physiological SNARE levels, neutral lipids with small headgroups that tend to form non-bilayer structures (phosphatidylethanolamine, diacylglycerol, and ergosterol) are essential. Membranes without these three lipids can dock and complete trans-SNARE pairing but cannot rearrange their lipids for fusion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01879.001.

  5. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  6. Membrane fusion and exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, R; Südhof, T C

    1999-01-01

    Membrane fusion involves the merger of two phospholipid bilayers in an aqueous environment. In artificial lipid bilayers, fusion proceeds by means of defined transition states, including hourglass-shaped intermediates in which the proximal leaflets of the fusing membranes are merged whereas the distal leaflets are separate (fusion stalk), followed by the reversible opening of small aqueous fusion pores. Fusion of biological membranes requires the action of specific fusion proteins. Best understood are the viral fusion proteins that are responsible for merging the viral with the host cell membrane during infection. These proteins undergo spontaneous and dramatic conformational changes upon activation. In the case of the paradigmatic fusion proteins of the influenza virus and of the human immunodeficiency virus, an amphiphilic fusion peptide is inserted into the target membrane. The protein then reorients itself, thus forcing the fusing membranes together and inducing lipid mixing. Fusion of intracellular membranes in eukaryotic cells involves several protein families including SNAREs, Rab proteins, and Sec1/Munc-18 related proteins (SM-proteins). SNAREs form a novel superfamily of small and mostly membrane-anchored proteins that share a common motif of about 60 amino acids (SNARE motif). SNAREs reversibly assemble into tightly packed helical bundles, the core complexes. Assembly is thought to pull the fusing membranes closely together, thus inducing fusion. SM-proteins comprise a family of soluble proteins that bind to certain types of SNAREs and prevent the formation of core complexes. Rab proteins are GTPases that undergo highly regulated GTP-GDP cycles. In their GTP form, they interact with specific proteins, the effector proteins. Recent evidence suggests that Rab proteins function in the initial membrane contact connecting the fusing membranes but are not involved in the fusion reaction itself.

  7. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  8. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  9. Mechanics of Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Thomas R.

    All cells have membranes. The plasma membrane encapsulates the cell's interior, acting as a barrier against the outside world. In cells with nuclei (eukaryotic cells), membranes also form internal compartments (organelles) which carry out specialized tasks, such as protein modification and sorting in the case of the Golgi apparatus, and ATP production in the case of mitochondria. The main components of membranes are lipids and proteins. The proteins can be channels, carriers, receptors, catalysts, signaling molecules, or structural elements, and typically contribute a substantial fraction of the total membrane dry weight. The equilibrium properties of pure lipid membranes are relatively well-understood, and will be the main focus of this article. The framework of elasticity theory and statistical mechanics that we will develop will serve as the foundation for understanding biological phenomena such as the nonequilibrium behavior of membranes laden with ion pumps, the role of membrane elasticity in ion channel gating, and the dynamics of vesicle fission and fusion. Understanding the mechanics of lipid membranes is also important for drug encapsulation and delivery.

  10. Interaction of elaiophylin with model bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, J.; Dencheva-Zarkova, M.

    2017-01-01

    Elaiophylin is a new macrodiolide antibiotic, which is produced by the Streptomyces strains [1]. It displays biological activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi. The mode of action of this antibiotic has been attributed to an alteration of the membrane permeability. When this antibiotic is inserted into the bilayer membranes destabilization of the membrane and formation of ion-penetrable channels is observed. The macrodiolide antibiotic forms stable cation selective ion channels in synthetic lipid bilayer membranes. The aim of this work was to study the interactions of Elaiophylin with model bilayer membranes and to get information on the mechanical properties of lipid bilayers in presence of this antibiotic. Patch-clamp technique [2] were used in the study

  11. Engineering plant membranes using droplet interface bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, N E; Smpokou, E; Friddin, M S; Macey, R; Gould, I R; Turnbull, C; Flemming, A J; Brooks, N J; Ces, O; Barter, L M C

    2017-03-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) have become widely recognised as a robust platform for constructing model membranes and are emerging as a key technology for the bottom-up assembly of synthetic cell-like and tissue-like structures. DIBs are formed when lipid-monolayer coated water droplets are brought together inside a well of oil, which is excluded from the interface as the DIB forms. The unique features of the system, compared to traditional approaches (e.g., supported lipid bilayers, black lipid membranes, and liposomes), is the ability to engineer multi-layered bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together in 3D, and the capability to impart bilayer asymmetry freely within these droplet architectures by supplying droplets with different lipids. Yet despite these achievements, one potential limitation of the technology is that DIBs formed from biologically relevant components have not been well studied. This could limit the reach of the platform to biological systems where bilayer composition and asymmetry are understood to play a key role. Herein, we address this issue by reporting the assembly of asymmetric DIBs designed to replicate the plasma membrane compositions of three different plant species; Arabidopsis thaliana , tobacco, and oats, by engineering vesicles with different amounts of plant phospholipids, sterols and cerebrosides for the first time. We show that vesicles made from our plant lipid formulations are stable and can be used to assemble asymmetric plant DIBs. We verify this using a bilayer permeation assay, from which we extract values for absolute effective bilayer permeation and bilayer stability. Our results confirm that stable DIBs can be assembled from our plant membrane mimics and could lead to new approaches for assembling model systems to study membrane translocation and to screen new agrochemicals in plants.

  12. Effect of phospholipid metabolites on model membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shragin, A.S.; Vasilenko, I.A.; Selishcheva, A.A.; Shvets, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    /sup 31/P-NMR spectroscopy and formation of fluorescent complexes between Tb/sup 3 +/ and dipicolinic acid were used to monitor liposome fusion and the effects of phospholipases C and D on the process. Phospholipase C was found highly efficient in initiating liposomal fusion, regardless of the phospholipid composition of the bilayer membranes. However, phospholipase D promoted liposomal fusion only in cases in which the membranes contained high concentrations of phospholipids incapable of forming bilayer membranes, such as phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin. The mechanism of action of both enzymes in promoting liposomal fusion was ascribed to the generation of a metastable state in the membranes as a result of enzymatic formation of lipophilic metabolites 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. The perturbation, or fluidity, of the liposomal membranes favored fusion on contact. 21 references, 4 figures.

  13. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 64; Issue 6. Fusion of biological membranes. K Katsov M Müller M Schick. Invited Talks:- Topic 11. Biologically motivated problems (protein-folding models, dynamics at the scale of the cell; biological networks, evolution models, etc.) Volume 64 Issue 6 June 2005 pp ...

  14. Vesicle fusion observed by content transfer across a tethered lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawle, Robert J; van Lengerich, Bettina; Chung, Minsub; Bendix, Poul Martin; Boxer, Steven G

    2011-10-19

    Synaptic transmission is achieved by exocytosis of small, synaptic vesicles containing neurotransmitters across the plasma membrane. Here, we use a DNA-tethered freestanding bilayer as a target architecture that allows observation of content transfer of individual vesicles across the tethered planar bilayer. Tethering and fusion are mediated by hybridization of complementary DNA-lipid conjugates inserted into the two membranes, and content transfer is monitored by the dequenching of an aqueous content dye. By analyzing the diffusion profile of the aqueous dye after vesicle fusion, we are able to distinguish content transfer across the tethered bilayer patch from vesicle leakage above the patch. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  16. Effect of Membrane Tension on the Electric Field and Dipole Potential of Lipid Bilayer Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaviak, Dora Toledo; Muellner, Michael J.; Chachisvilis, Mirianas

    2011-01-01

    The dipole potential of lipid bilayer membrane controls the difference in permeability of the membrane to oppositely charged ions. We have combined molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies to determine changes in electric field and electrostatic potential of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer in response to applied membrane tension. MD simulations based on CHARMM36 force field showed that electrostatic potential of DOPC bilayer decreases by ~45 mV in the physiologically relevant range of membrane tension values (0 to 15 dyn/cm). The electrostatic field exhibits a peak (~0.8×109 V/m) near the water/lipid interface which shifts by 0.9 Å towards the bilayer center at 15 dyn/cm. Maximum membrane tension of 15 dyn/cm caused 6.4% increase in area per lipid, 4.7% decrease in bilayer thickness and 1.4% increase in the volume of the bilayer. Dipole-potential sensitive fluorescent probes were used to detect membrane tension induced changes in DOPC vesicles exposed to osmotic stress. Experiments confirmed that dipole potential of DOPC bilayer decreases at higher membrane tensions. These results are suggestive of a potentially new mechanosensing mechanism by which mechanically induced structural changes in the lipid bilayer membrane could modulate the function of membrane proteins by altering electrostatic interactions and energetics of protein conformational states. PMID:21722624

  17. Fusion of Sendai virus with vesicles of oligomerizable lipids: a microcalorimetric analysis of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoo, B J; Weringa, W D; Engberts, J B

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4- (beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head groups of DHPBNS in the bilayer vesicles. The enthalpy associated with fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles was measured by isothermal titration microcalorimetry, comparing titrations of Sendai virus into (i) solutions of DHPBNS vesicles (which fuse with the virus) and (ii) oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles (which do not fuse with the virus), respectively. The observed heat effect of fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is strongly dependent on the buffer medium, reflecting a partial charge neutralization of the Sendai F and HN proteins upon insertion into the negatively-charged vesicle membrane. No buffer effect was observed for the titration of Sendai virus into oligomerized DHPBNS vesicles, indicating that inhibition of fusion is a result of inhibition of insertion of the fusion protein into the target membrane. Fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles is endothermic and entropy-driven. The positive enthalpy term is dominated by heat effects resulting from merging of the protein-rich viral envelope with the lipid vesicle bilayers rather than by the fusion of the viral with the vesicle bilayers per se. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  18. Formation of supported lipid bilayers of charged E. coli lipids on modified gold by vesicle fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana F. Márquez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple way of fusing E. coli lipid vesicles onto a gold surface. Supported lipid bilayers on metal surfaces are interesting for several reasons: transducing a biological signal to an electric readout, using surface analytical tools such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR, Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy, Neutron Reflectivity or Electrochemistry. The most widely used method to prepare supported lipid membranes is fusion of preexisting liposomes. It is quite efficient on hydrophilic surfaces such as glass, mica or SiO2, but vesicle fusion on metals and metal oxide surfaces (as gold, titanium oxide or indium tin oxide, remains a challenge, particularly for vesicles containing charged lipids, as is the case of bacterial lipids. We describe a simple method based on modifying the gold surface with a charged mercaptopropionic acid self-assembled monolayer and liposomes partially solubilized with detergent. The formed bilayers were characterized using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Some advantages of this protocol are that the stability of the self-assembled monolayer allows for repeated use of the substrate after detergent removal of the bilayer and that the amount of detergent required for optimal fusion can be determined previously using the lipid-detergent solubility curve.

  19. Gas Separation through Bilayer Silica, the Thinnest Possible Silica Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bowen; Mandrà, Salvatore; Curry, John O; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim; Schrier, Joshua

    2017-12-13

    Membrane-based gas separation processes can address key challenges in energy and environment, but for many applications the permeance and selectivity of bulk membranes is insufficient for economical use. Theory and experiment indicate that permeance and selectivity can be increased by using two-dimensional materials with subnanometer pores as membranes. Motivated by experiments showing selective permeation of H 2 /CO mixtures through amorphous silica bilayers, here we perform a theoretical study of gas separation through silica bilayers. Using density functional theory calculations, we obtain geometries of crystalline free-standing silica bilayers (comprised of six-membered rings), as well as the seven-, eight-, and nine-membered rings that are observed in glassy silica bilayers, which arise due to Stone-Wales defects and vacancies. We then compute the potential energy barriers for gas passage through these various pore types for He, Ne, Ar, Kr, H 2 , N 2 , CO, and CO 2 gases, and use the data to assess their capability for selective gas separation. Our calculations indicate that crystalline bilayer silica, which is less than a nanometer thick, can be a high-selectivity and high-permeance membrane material for 3 He/ 4 He, He/natural gas, and H 2 /CO separations.

  20. Shallow Boomerang-shaped Influenza Hemagglutinin G13A Mutant Structure Promotes Leaky Membrane Fusion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alex L.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that an angled boomerang-shaped structure of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) fusion domain is critical for virus entry into host cells by membrane fusion. Because the acute angle of ∼105° of the wild-type fusion domain promotes efficient non-leaky membrane fusion, we asked whether different angles would still support fusion and thus facilitate virus entry. Here, we show that the G13A fusion domain mutant produces a new leaky fusion phenotype. The mutant fusion domain structure was solved by NMR spectroscopy in a lipid environment at fusion pH. The mutant adopted a boomerang structure similar to that of wild type but with a shallower kink angle of ∼150°. G13A perturbed the structure of model membranes to a lesser degree than wild type but to a greater degree than non-fusogenic fusion domain mutants. The strength of G13A binding to lipid bilayers was also intermediate between that of wild type and non-fusogenic mutants. These membrane interactions provide a clear link between structure and function of influenza fusion domains: an acute angle is required to promote clean non-leaky fusion suitable for virus entry presumably by interaction of the fusion domain with the transmembrane domain deep in the lipid bilayer. A shallower angle perturbs the bilayer of the target membrane so that it becomes leaky and unable to form a clean fusion pore. Mutants with no fixed boomerang angle interacted with bilayers weakly and did not promote any fusion or membrane perturbation. PMID:20826788

  1. Post-Fusion Membrane Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-27

    diphosphoglycerate , and NEM (a crosslinking agent), and ethanol treatments all had reproducible and very specific effects on the kinetic phases and the fusion product...actually, at the ultrastructure level , a double membrane multiply perforated with fusion sites (or pores). Also, because the heat treatment was within...relationships. Moreover. 2.3- Diphosphoglycerate (2-3-DPG). a naturally occuring metabolite which is known to have a regulatory role in spectrin-cytoskeletal

  2. Semiconductor particle mediated photoelectron transfers in bilayer lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendler, J.H.; Baral, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor particles in situ generated on the cis surface of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs), that have been used to mediate photoelectric effects. The presence of semiconductors on the BLM surface is addressed. The observed photoelectric effects are rationalized and presented

  3. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion: Post-Palade Era Researchers Win the Nobel Prize. Riddhi Atul Jani Subba Rao Gangi Setty. General Article Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 421-445 ...

  4. Inducing morphological changes in lipid bilayer membranes with microfabricated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangjie; Collins, Liam F.; Ashkar, Rana; Heberle, Frederick A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Lateral organization of lipids and proteins into distinct domains and anchoring to a cytoskeleton are two important strategies employed by biological membranes to carry out many cellular functions. However, these interactions are difficult to emulate with model systems. Here we use the physical architecture of substrates consisting of arrays of micropillars to systematically control the behavior of supported lipid bilayers - an important step in engineering model lipid membrane systems with well-defined functionalities. Competition between attractive interactions of supported lipid bilayers with the underlying substrate versus the energy cost associated with membrane bending at pillar edges can be systematically investigated as functions of pillar height and pitch, chemical functionalization of the microstructured substrate, and the type of unilamellar vesicles used for assembling the supported bilayer. Confocal fluorescent imaging and AFM measurements highlight correlations that exist between topological and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and lateral lipid mobility in these confined environments. This study provides a baseline for future investigations into lipid domain reorganization on structured solid surfaces and scaffolds for cell growth.

  5. Structure and organization of nanosized-inclusion-containing bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chun-Lai; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2009-07-01

    Based on a considerable amount of experimental evidence for lateral organization of lipid membranes which share astonishingly similar features in the presence of different inclusions, we use a hybrid self-consistent field theory (SCFT)/density-functional theory (DFT) approach to deal with bilayer membranes embedded by nanosized inclusions and explain experimental findings. Here, the hydrophobic inclusions are simple models of hydrophobic drugs or other nanoparticles for biomedical applications. It is found that lipid/inclusion-rich domains are formed at moderate inclusion concentrations and disappear with the increase in the concentration of inclusions. At high inclusion content, chaining of inclusions occurs due to the effective depletion attraction between inclusions mediated by lipids. Meanwhile, the increase in the concentration of inclusions can also cause thickening of the membrane and the distribution of inclusions undergoes a layering transition from one-layer structure located in the bilayer midplane to two-layer structure arranged into the two leaflets of a bilayer. Our theoretical predictions address the complex interactions between membranes and inclusions suggesting a unifying mechanism which reflects the competition between the conformational entropy of lipids favoring the formation of lipid- and inclusion-rich domains in lipids and the steric repulsion of inclusions leading to the uniform dispersion.

  6. Mitochondrial fusion through membrane automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Konstantinos; Andronikos, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that malfunctions in mitochondrial processes can be blamed for diseases. However, the mechanism behind these operations is yet not sufficiently clear. In this work we present a novel approach to describe a biomolecular model for mitochondrial fusion using notions from the membrane computing. We use a case study defined in BioAmbient calculus and we show how to translate it in terms of a P automata variant. We combine brane calculi with (mem)brane automata to produce a new scheme capable of describing simple, realistic models. We propose the further use of similar methods and the test of other biomolecular models with the same behaviour.

  7. Membrane fusion and inverted phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, H.; Siegel, D.P.; Alford, D.; Yeagle, P.L.; Boni, L.; Lis, L.J.; Quinn, P.J.; Bentz, J.

    1989-01-01

    We have found a correlation between liposome fusion kinetics and lipid phase behavior for several inverted phase forming lipids. N-Methylated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE-Me), or mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), will form an inverted hexagonal phase (HII) at high temperatures (above TH), a lamellar phase (L alpha) at low temperatures, and an isotropic/inverted cubic phase at intermediate temperatures, which is defined by the appearance of narrow isotropic 31 P NMR resonances. The phase behavior has been verified by using high-sensitivity DSC, 31 P NMR, freeze-fracture electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature range over which the narrow isotropic resonances occur is defined as delta TI, and the range ends at TH. Extruded liposomes (approximately 0.2 microns in diameter) composed of these lipids show fusion and leakage kinetics which are strongly correlated with the temperatures of these phase transitions. At temperatures below delta TI, where the lipid phase is L alpha, there is little or no fusion, i.e., mixing of aqueous contents, or leakage. However, as the temperature reaches delta TI, there is a rapid increase in both fusion and leakage rates. At temperatures above TH, the liposomes show aggregation-dependent lysis, as the rapid formation of HII phase precursors disrupts the membranes. We show that the correspondence between the fusion and leakage kinetics and the observed phase behavior is easily rationalized in terms of a recent kinetic theory of L alpha/inverted phase transitions. In particular, it is likely that membrane fusion and the L alpha/inverted cubic phase transition proceed via a common set of intermembrane intermediates

  8. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-01-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements. (paper)

  9. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  10. Multicomponent ion transport in a mono and bilayer cation-exchange membrane at high current density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshtari Khah, S.; Oppers, N.A.W.; de Groot, M.T.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Schouten, J.C.; van der Schaaf, J.

    2017-01-01

    This work describes a model for bilayer cation-exchange membranes used in the chlor-alkali process. The ion transport inside the membrane is modeled with the Nernst–Planck equation. A logistic function is used at the boundary between the two layers of the bilayer membrane to describe the change in

  11. Lipid intermediates in membrane fusion: formation, structure, and decay of hemifusion diaphragm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-11-01

    Lipid bilayer fusion is thought to involve formation of a local hemifusion connection, referred to as a fusion stalk. The subsequent fusion stages leading to the opening of a fusion pore remain unknown. The earliest fusion pore could represent a bilayer connection between the membranes and could be formed directly from the stalk. Alternatively, fusion pore can form in a single bilayer, referred to as hemifusion diaphragm (HD), generated by stalk expansion. To analyze the plausibility of stalk expansion, we studied the pathway of hemifusion theoretically, using a recently developed elastic model. We show that the stalk has a tendency to expand into an HD for lipids with sufficiently negative spontaneous splay, (~)J(s)action of an external force pulling the diaphragm rim apart. We calculate the dependence of the HD radius on this force. To address the mechanism of fusion pore formation, we analyze the distribution of the lateral tension emerging in the HD due to the establishment of lateral equilibrium between the deformed and relaxed portions of lipid monolayers. We show that this tension concentrates along the HD rim and reaches high values sufficient to rupture the bilayer and form the fusion pore. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that transition from a hemifusion to a fusion pore involves radial expansion of the stalk.

  12. Steady-state oxidation of cholesterol catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase in lipid bilayer membranes on platinum electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Devadoss, Anando; Palencsar, Mariela S.; Burgess, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol oxidase is immobilized in electrode-supported lipid bilayer membranes. Platinum electrodes are initially modified with a self-assembled monolayer of thiolipid. A vesicle fusion method is used to deposit an outer leaflet of phospholipids onto the thiolipid monolayer forming a thiolipid/lipid bilayer membrane on the electrode surface. Cholesterol oxidase spontaneously inserts into the electrode-supported lipid bilayer membrane from solution and is consequently immobilized to the electrode surface. Cholesterol partitions into the membrane from buffer solutions containing cyclodextrin. Cholesterol oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of cholesterol by molecular oxygen, forming hydrogen peroxide as a product. Amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide for continuous solution flow experiments are presented, where flow was alternated between cholesterol solution and buffer containing no cholesterol. Steady-state anodic currents were observed during exposures of cholesterol solutions ranging in concentration from 10 to 1000 μM. These data are consistent with the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for oxidation of cholesterol as catalyzed by cholesterol oxidase immobilized in the lipid bilayer membrane. The cholesterol detection limit is below 1 μM for cholesterol solution prepared in buffered cyclodextrin. The response of the electrodes to low density lipoprotein solutions is increased upon addition of cyclodextrin. Evidence for adsorption of low density lipoprotein to the electrode surface is presented

  13. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. PMID:26269359

  14. Membrane-spanning lipids for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmann, Günter; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2015-10-01

    A Förster resonance energy transfer-based fusion and transfer assay was developed to study, in model membranes, protein-mediated membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer of fluorescent sphingolipid analogs. For this assay, it became necessary to apply labeled reporter molecules that are resistant to spontaneous as well as protein-mediated intermembrane transfer. The novelty of this assay is the use of nonextractable fluorescent membrane-spanning bipolar lipids. Starting from the tetraether lipid caldarchaeol, we synthesized fluorescent analogs with fluorophores at both polar ends. In addition, we synthesized radioactive glycosylated caldarchaeols. These labeled lipids were shown to stretch through bilayer membranes rather than to loop within a single lipid layer of liposomes. More important, the membrane-spanning lipids (MSLs) in contrast to phosphoglycerides proved to be nonextractable by proteins. We could show that the GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is promiscuous with respect to glycero- and sphingolipid transfer. Saposin (Sap) B also transferred sphingolipids albeit with kinetics different from GM2AP. In addition, we could unambiguously show that the recombinant activator protein Sap C x His6 induced membrane fusion rather than intermembrane lipid transfer. These findings showed that these novel MSLs, in contrast with fluorescent phosphoglycerolipids, are well suited for an uncompromised monitoring of membrane fusion and intermembrane lipid transfer. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Emneus, Jenny; Geschke, Oliver; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). → Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. → Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10 5 FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm 2 within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  16. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    . The simulations suggest that this attraction mainly relies on electrostatic interactions of the amino group of the neurotransmitter and the lipid phosphate. We conclude that moderate attraction to lipid membranes occurs for some polar neurotransmitters and hence that one premise for a theory of bilayer-mediated......Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...

  17. Lipid Acrobatics in the Membrane Fusion Arena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markvoort, Albert J.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we describe the recent contribution of computer simulation approaches to unravel the molecular details of membrane fusion. Over the past decade, fusion between apposed membranes and vesicles has been studied using a large variety of simulation methods and systems. Despite the variety

  18. Biophysical characterization and membrane interaction of the two fusion loops of glycoprotein B from herpes simplex type I virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Falanga

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of entry of herpesviruses requires a multicomponent fusion system. Cell invasion by Herpes simplex virus (HSV requires four virally encoded glycoproteins: namely gD, gB and gH/gL. The role of gB has remained elusive until recently when the crystal structure of HSV-1 gB became available and the fusion potential of gB was clearly demonstrated. Although much information on gB structure/function relationship has been gathered in recent years, the elucidation of the nature of the fine interactions between gB fusion loops and the membrane bilayer may help to understand the precise molecular mechanism behind herpesvirus-host cell membrane fusion. Here, we report the first biophysical study on the two fusion peptides of gB, with a particular focus on the effects determined by both peptides on lipid bilayers of various compositions. The two fusion loops constitute a structural subdomain wherein key hydrophobic amino acids form a ridge that is supported on both sides by charged residues. When used together the two fusion loops have the ability to significantly destabilize the target membrane bilayer, notwithstanding their low bilayer penetration when used separately. These data support the model of gB fusion loops insertion into cholesterol enriched membranes.

  19. Shear-Induced Membrane Fusion in Viscous Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Kogan, Maxim

    2014-05-06

    Large unilamellar lipid vesicles do not normally fuse under fluid shear stress. They might deform and open pores to relax the tension to which they are exposed, but membrane fusion occurring solely due to shear stress has not yet been reported. We present evidence that shear forces in a viscous solution can induce lipid bilayer fusion. The fusion of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes is observed in Couette flow with shear rates above 3000 s-1 provided that the medium is viscous enough. Liposome samples, prepared at different viscosities using a 0-50 wt % range of sucrose concentration, were studied by dynamic light scattering, lipid fusion assays using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Liposomes in solutions with 40 wt % (or more) sucrose showed lipid fusion under shear forces. These results support the hypothesis that under suitable conditions lipid membranes may fuse in response to mechanical-force- induced stress. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Enhanced sensitivity of a microfabricated resonator using a graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Eunho; Cho, Kilwon; Jeon, Sangmin, E-mail: jeons@postech.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    A graphene layer was synthesized using chemical vapor deposition methods and a polystyrene solution was spin-cast onto the graphene film. The graphene-polystyrene bilayer membrane was attached between the two tines of a microfabricated quartz tuning fork (QTF). The modulus of the graphene-polystyrene bilayer was measured to be twice that of a pristine polystyrene membrane. Exposure of the membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor decreased the resonance frequency of the microresonator. The bilayer membrane-coated QTF produced a frequency change that was three times the change obtained using a polystyrene membrane-coated QTF, with a lower degree of degradation in the Q factor. The limit of detection of the bilayer membrane-coated QTF to ethanol vapor was determined to be 20 ppm.

  1. Effects of Fatty Acid Inclusion in a DMPC Bilayer Membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Møller, Martin S.

    2009-01-01

    Free fatty acids in biomembranes have been proposed to be a central component in several cellular control and regulatory mechanisms. To elucidate some fundamental elements underlying this, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations and experimental density measurements to study the molecular...... packing and structure of oleic acid (HOA) and stearic acid (HSA) in fluid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). The experimental data show a small but consistent positive excess volume for fatty acid concentrations below 10 mol %. At higher concentrations the fatty acids mix ideally...... with fluid DMPC. The simulations, which were benchmarked against the densitometric data, revealed interesting differences in the structure and location of the fatty acids depending on their protonation status. Thus, the protonated (uncharged) acid is located rather deeply in the membrane with an average...

  2. Mechanical properties of electrospun bilayer fibrous membranes as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Juan; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-06-01

    Bilayer fibrous membranes of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) were fabricated by electrospinning, using a parallel-disk mandrel configuration that resulted in the sequential deposition of a layer with fibers aligned across the two parallel disks and a layer with randomly oriented fibers, both layers deposited in a single process step. Membrane structure and fiber alignment were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and two-dimensional fast Fourier transform. Because of the intricacies of the generated electric field, bilayer membranes exhibited higher porosity than single-layer membranes consisting of randomly oriented fibers fabricated with a solid-drum collector. However, despite their higher porosity, bilayer membranes demonstrated generally higher elastic modulus, yield strength and toughness than single-layer membranes with random fibers. Bilayer membrane deformation at relatively high strain rates comprised multiple abrupt microfracture events characterized by discontinuous fiber breakage. Bilayer membrane elongation yielded excessive necking of the layer with random fibers and remarkable fiber stretching (on the order of 400%) in the layer with fibers aligned in the stress direction. In addition, fibers in both layers exhibited multiple localized necking, attributed to the nonuniform distribution of crystalline phases in the fibrillar structure. The high membrane porosity, good mechanical properties, and good biocompatibility and biodegradability of PLLA (demonstrated in previous studies) make the present bilayer membranes good scaffold candidates for a wide range of tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevention of intra-abdominal adhesion by bi-layer electrospun membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shichao; Wang, Wei; Yan, Hede; Fan, Cunyi

    2013-06-04

    The aim of this study was to compare the anti-adhesion efficacy of a bi-layer electrospun fibrous membrane consisting of hyaluronic acid-loaded poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fibrous membrane as the inner layer and PCL fibrous membrane as the outer layer with a single-layer PCL electrospun fibrous membrane in a rat cecum abrasion model. The rat model utilized a cecal abrasion and abdominal wall insult surgical protocol. The bi-layer and PCL membranes were applied between the cecum and the abdominal wall, respectively. Control animals did not receive any treatment. After postoperative day 14, a visual semiquantitative grading scale was used to grade the extent of adhesion. Histological analysis was performed to reveal the features of adhesion tissues. Bi-layer membrane treated animals showed significantly lower adhesion scores than control animals (p compared with the PCL membrane. Histological analysis of the bi-layer membrane treated rat rarely demonstrated tissue adhesion while that of the PCL membrane treated rat and control rat showed loose and dense adhesion tissues, respectively. Bi-layer membrane can efficiently prevent adhesion formation in abdominal cavity and showed a significantly decreased adhesion tissue formation compared with the control.

  4. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...... channels as molecular force probes for studying this mechanism, with a unique ability to discriminate between consequences of changes in monolayer curvature and bilayer elastic moduli....

  5. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S A; Gov, Nir S

    2007-01-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton

  6. Two-Phase Contiguous Supported Lipid Bilayer Model for Membrane Rafts via Polymer Blotting and Stenciling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Daniel, Susan

    2017-02-07

    The supported lipid bilayer has been portrayed as a useful model of the cell membrane compatible with many biophysical tools and techniques that demonstrate its appeal in learning about the basic features of the plasma membrane. However, some of its potential has yet to be realized, particularly in the area of bilayer patterning and phase/composition heterogeneity. In this work, we generate contiguous bilayer patterns as a model system that captures the general features of membrane domains and lipid rafts. Micropatterned polymer templates of two types are investigated for generating patterned bilayer formation: polymer blotting and polymer lift-off stenciling. While these approaches have been used previously to create bilayer arrays by corralling bilayers patches with various types of boundaries impenetrable to bilayer diffusion, unique to the methods presented here, there are no physical barriers to diffusion. In this work, interfaces between contiguous lipid phases define the pattern shapes, with continuity between them allowing transfer of membrane-bound biomolecules between the phases. We examine effectors of membrane domain stability including temperature and cholesterol content to investigate domain dynamics. Contiguous patterning of supported bilayers as a model of lipid rafts expands the application of the SLB to an area with current appeal and brings with it a useful toolset for characterization and analysis. These combined tools should be helpful to researchers investigating lipid raft dynamics and function and biomolecule partitioning studies. Additionally, this patterning technique may be useful for applications such as bioseparations that exploit differences in lipid phase partitioning or creation of membranes that bind species like viruses preferentially at lipid phase boundaries, to name a few.

  7. Computational Design of Multi-component Bio-Inspired Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Koufos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation is motivated by the need to design bilayer membranes with tunable interfacial and mechanical properties for use in a range of applications, such as targeted drug delivery, sensing and imaging. We draw inspiration from biological cell membranes and focus on their principal constituents. In this paper, we present our results on the role of molecular architecture on the interfacial, structural and dynamical properties of bio-inspired membranes. We focus on four lipid architectures with variations in the head group shape and the hydrocarbon tail length. Each lipid species is composed of a hydrophilic head group and two hydrophobic tails. In addition, we study a model of the Cholesterol molecule to understand the interfacial properties of a bilayer membrane composed of rigid, single-tail molecular species. We demonstrate the properties of the bilayer membranes to be determined by the molecular architecture and rigidity of the constituent species. Finally, we demonstrate the formation of a stable mixed bilayer membrane composed of Cholesterol and one of the phospholipid species. Our approach can be adopted to design multi-component bilayer membranes with tunable interfacial and mechanical properties. We use a Molecular Dynamics-based mesoscopic simulation technique called Dissipative Particle Dynamics that resolves the molecular details of the components through soft-sphere coarse-grained models and reproduces the hydrodynamic behavior of the system over extended time scales.

  8. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.

    2011-01-01

    Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We...... establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein...... reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR)=50 more than 105 FomA proteins could be incorporated...

  9. Membrane Trafficking and Vesicle Fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    protein and the data can be cor- related with cellular .... these mutant cells under the electron microscope and found a large number of ... trans-Golgi network and early ..... Arrows represent the flow of membrane traffic: black arrows – antero-.

  10. Aromatic amino acids and ultraviolet induced photoelectric effects in bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebner, J S; Arrieta, R T [University of North Florida, Jacksonville (USA); Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1982-04-01

    Ultraviolet light flashes induced voltage transients across bilayer lipid membranes when aromatic amino acids were adsorbed to one side of the membrane. These photo-effects varied with the chromophore structure, the aqueous solution salt concentration, pH and oxygen partial pressure. These photo-effects are attributed to the migration of electrically charged photochemical intermediates in the membrane, and provide a new method for studying the effects of UV light on membranes.

  11. Statistical thermodynamics of association colloids : the equilibrium structure of micelles, vesicles, and bilayer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to unravel the general equilibrium physical properties of lipid bilayer membranes. We consider four major questions:
    1. What determines the morphology of the association colloids (micelles, membranes, vesicles) in general?
    2. Do the

  12. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    to study composition-structure-property materials relationships of free-standing lipid bilayer membranes. Because their size (~5 to 100 m diameter) that is well above the resolution limit of regular light microscopes, GUVs are suitable membrane models for optical microscopy and micromanipulation...

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Telenius, Jelena; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many such molecu......Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many...

  14. Low frequency acoustic properties of bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial with magnetic oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nansha Gao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial was proposed to overcome the influence of the mass law on traditional acoustic materials and obtain a lightweight thin-layer structure that can effectively isolate low frequency noise. The finite element analysis (FEA results agree well with the experimental results. It is proved that the sound transmission losses (STLs of the proposed structures are higher than those of same surface density acoustic materials. The introduction of the magnetic mass block is different from the traditional design method, in which only a passive mass block is fixed on the membrane. The magnetic force will cause tension in the membrane, increase membrane prestress, and improve overall structural stiffness. The effects of the geometry size on the STLs are discussed in detail. The kind of method presented in this paper can provide a new means for engineering noise control. Keywords: Bilayer membrane acoustic metamaterial, Low frequency sound insulation, Sound transmission loss, Magnet oscillator

  15. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camley, Brian A. [Center for Theoretical Biological Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Lerner, Michael G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana 47374 (United States); Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Pastor, Richard W. [Laboratory of Computational Biology, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Brown, Frank L. H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model.

  16. Strong influence of periodic boundary conditions on lateral diffusion in lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camley, Brian A.; Lerner, Michael G.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-01-01

    The Saffman-Delbrück hydrodynamic model for lipid-bilayer membranes is modified to account for the periodic boundary conditions commonly imposed in molecular simulations. Predicted lateral diffusion coefficients for membrane-embedded solid bodies are sensitive to box shape and converge slowly to the limit of infinite box size, raising serious doubts for the prospects of using detailed simulations to accurately predict membrane-protein diffusivities and related transport properties. Estimates for the relative error associated with periodic boundary artifacts are 50% and higher for fully atomistic models in currently feasible simulation boxes. MARTINI simulations of LacY membrane protein diffusion and LacY dimer diffusion in DPPC membranes and lipid diffusion in pure DPPC bilayers support the underlying hydrodynamic model

  17. Lipid Bilayer Membrane in a Silicon Based Micron Sized Cavity Accessed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Patel, Darayas; Weimer, Jeffrey; Williams, John Dalton

    2017-07-05

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are widely used in biophysical research to probe the functionality of biological membranes and to provide diagnoses in high throughput drug screening. Formation of SLBs at below phase transition temperature ( Tm ) has applications in nano-medicine research where low temperature profiles are required. Herein, we report the successful production of SLBs at above-as well as below-the Tm of the lipids in an anisotropically etched, silicon-based micro-cavity. The Si-based cavity walls exhibit controlled temperature which assist in the quick and stable formation of lipid bilayer membranes. Fusion of large unilamellar vesicles was monitored in real time in an aqueous environment inside the Si cavity using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the lateral organization of the lipid molecules was characterized until the formation of the SLBs. The stability of SLBs produced was also characterized by recording the electrical resistance and the capacitance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Analysis was done in the frequency regime of 10 -2 -10⁵ Hz at a signal voltage of 100 mV and giga-ohm sealed impedance was obtained continuously over four days. Finally, the cantilever tip in AFM was utilized to estimate the bilayer thickness and to calculate the rupture force at the interface of the tip and the SLB. We anticipate that a silicon-based, micron-sized cavity has the potential to produce highly-stable SLBs below their Tm . The membranes inside the Si cavity could last for several days and allow robust characterization using AFM or EIS. This could be an excellent platform for nanomedicine experiments that require low operating temperatures.

  18. Regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity-a single molecule technology to measure the bilayer properties experienced by an embedded protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundbaek, Jens August

    2006-01-01

    Membrane protein function is generally regulated by the molecular composition of the host lipid bilayer. The underlying mechanisms have long remained enigmatic. Some cases involve specific molecular interactions, but very often lipids and other amphiphiles, which are adsorbed to lipid bilayers, regulate a number of structurally unrelated proteins in an apparently non-specific manner. It is well known that changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer (e.g., thickness or monolayer spontaneous curvature) can affect the function of an embedded protein. However, the role of such changes, in the general regulation of membrane protein function, is unclear. This is to a large extent due to lack of a generally accepted framework in which to understand the many observations. The present review summarizes studies which have demonstrated that the hydrophobic interactions between a membrane protein and the host lipid bilayer provide an energetic coupling, whereby protein function can be regulated by the bilayer elasticity. The feasibility of this 'hydrophobic coupling mechanism' has been demonstrated using the gramicidin channel, a model membrane protein, in planar lipid bilayers. Using voltage-dependent sodium channels, N-type calcium channels and GABA A receptors, it has been shown that membrane protein function in living cells can be regulated by amphiphile induced changes in bilayer elasticity. Using the gramicidin channel as a molecular force transducer, a nanotechnology to measure the elastic properties experienced by an embedded protein has been developed. A theoretical and technological framework, to study the regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity, has been established

  19. Lipid clustering correlates with membrane curvature as revealed by molecular simulations of complex lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Koldsø

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are complex multicomponent systems, which are highly heterogeneous in the lipid distribution and composition. To date, most molecular simulations have focussed on relatively simple lipid compositions, helping to inform our understanding of in vitro experimental studies. Here we describe on simulations of complex asymmetric plasma membrane model, which contains seven different lipids species including the glycolipid GM3 in the outer leaflet and the anionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphophate (PIP2, in the inner leaflet. Plasma membrane models consisting of 1500 lipids and resembling the in vivo composition were constructed and simulations were run for 5 µs. In these simulations the most striking feature was the formation of nano-clusters of GM3 within the outer leaflet. In simulations of protein interactions within a plasma membrane model, GM3, PIP2, and cholesterol all formed favorable interactions with the model α-helical protein. A larger scale simulation of a model plasma membrane containing 6000 lipid molecules revealed correlations between curvature of the bilayer surface and clustering of lipid molecules. In particular, the concave (when viewed from the extracellular side regions of the bilayer surface were locally enriched in GM3. In summary, these simulations explore the nanoscale dynamics of model bilayers which mimic the in vivo lipid composition of mammalian plasma membranes, revealing emergent nanoscale membrane organization which may be coupled both to fluctuations in local membrane geometry and to interactions with proteins.

  20. Calcium-dependent regulation of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-07-30

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca(2+) sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca(2+)-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca(2+)/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (K(D) = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (K(D) = 2 microm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca(2+) sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion.

  1. Electric field-induced reorganization of two-component supported bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, J T; Boxer, S G; McConnell, H M

    1997-12-09

    Application of electric fields tangent to the plane of a confined patch of fluid bilayer membrane can create lateral concentration gradients of the lipids. A thermodynamic model of this steady-state behavior is developed for binary systems and tested with experiments in supported lipid bilayers. The model uses Flory's approximation for the entropy of mixing and allows for effects arising when the components have different molecular areas. In the special case of equal area molecules the concentration gradient reduces to a Fermi-Dirac distribution. The theory is extended to include effects from charged molecules in the membrane. Calculations show that surface charge on the supporting substrate substantially screens electrostatic interactions within the membrane. It also is shown that concentration profiles can be affected by other intermolecular interactions such as clustering. Qualitative agreement with this prediction is provided by comparing phosphatidylserine- and cardiolipin-containing membranes.

  2. Fusion of raft-like lipid bilayers operated by a membranotropic domain of the HSV-type I glycoprotein gH occurs through a cholesterol-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Falanga, Annarita; Petruk, Ariel Alcides; Merlino, Antonello; Fragneto, Giovanna; Paduano, Luigi; Galdiero, Stefania; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2015-04-21

    A wealth of evidence indicates that lipid rafts are involved in the fusion of the viral lipid envelope with the target cell membrane. However, the interplay between these sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched ordered domains and viral fusion glycoproteins has not yet been clarified. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanism by which a membranotropic fragment of the glycoprotein gH of the Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type I (gH625) drives fusion of lipid bilayers formed by palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC)-sphingomyelin (SM)-cholesterol (CHOL) (1 : 1 : 1 wt/wt/wt), focusing on the role played by each component. The comparative analysis of the liposome fusion assays, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), spectrofluorimetry, Neutron Reflectivity (NR) and Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) experiments, and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations shows that CHOL is fundamental for liposome fusion to occur. In detail, CHOL stabilizes the gH625-bilayer association by specific interactions with the peptide Trp residue. The interaction with gH625 causes an increased order of the lipid acyl chains, whose local rotational motion is significantly hampered. SM plays only a minor role in the process, favoring the propagation of lipid perturbation to the bilayer inner core. The stiffening of the peptide-interacting bilayer leaflet results in an asymmetric perturbation of the membrane, which is locally destabilized thus favoring fusion events. Our results show that viral fusion glycoproteins are optimally suited to exert a high fusogenic activity on lipid rafts and support the relevance of cholesterol as a key player of membrane-related processes.

  3. Porous Materials to Support Bilayer Lipid Membranes for Ion Channel Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Phung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify materials suitable as membrane supports for ion channel biosensors, six filter materials of varying hydrophobicity, tortuosity, and thickness were examined for their ability to support bilayer lipid membranes as determined by electrical impedance spectroscopy. Bilayers supported by hydrophobic materials (PTFE, polycarbonate, nylon, and silanised silver had optimal resistance (14–19 GΩ and capacitance (0.8–1.6 μF values whereas those with low hydrophobicity did not form BLMs (PVDF or were short-lived (unsilanised silver. The ability of ion channels to function in BLMs was assessed using a method recently reported to improve the efficiency of proteoliposome incorporation into PTFE-supported bilayers. Voltage-gated sodium channel activation by veratridine and inhibition by saxitoxin showed activity for PTFE, nylon, and silanised silver, but not polycarbonate. Bilayers on thicker, more tortuous, and hydrophobic materials produced higher current levels. Bilayers that self-assembled on PTFE filters were the longest lived and produced the most channel activity using this method.

  4. Non-bilayer structures in mitochondrial membranes regulate ATP synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, Sardar E; Kim, Aleksandr A; Yaguzhinsky, Lev S; Dagda, Ruben K

    2018-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid at the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) that facilitates the formation of transient non-bilayer (non-lamellar) structures to maintain mitochondrial integrity. CL modulates mitochondrial functions including ATP synthesis. However, the biophysical mechanisms by which CL generates non-lamellar structures and the extent to which these structures contribute to ATP synthesis remain unknown. We hypothesized that CL and ATP synthase facilitate the formation of non-bilayer structures at the IMM to stimulate ATP synthesis. By using 1 H NMR and 31 P NMR techniques, we observed that increasing the temperature (8°C to 37°C), lowering the pH (3.0), or incubating intact mitochondria with CTII - an IMM-targeted toxin that increases the formation of immobilized non-bilayer structures - elevated the formation of non-bilayer structures to stimulate ATP synthesis. The F 0 sector of the ATP synthase complex can facilitate the formation of non-bilayer structures as incubating model membranes enriched with IMM-specific phospholipids with exogenous DCCD-binding protein of the F 0 sector (DCCD-BPF) elevated the formation of immobilized non-bilayer structures to a similar manner as CTII. Native PAGE assays revealed that CL, but not other anionic phospholipids, specifically binds to DCCD-BPF to promote the formation of stable lipid-protein complexes. Mechanistically, molecular docking studies identified two lipid binding sites for CL in DCCD-BPF. We propose a new model of ATP synthase regulation in which CL mediates the formation of non-bilayer structures that serve to cluster protons and ATP synthase complexes as a mechanism to enhance proton translocation to the F 0 sector, and thereby increase ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface functionalization of a polymeric lipid bilayer for coupling a model biological membrane with molecules, cells, and microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morigaki, Kenichi; Mizutani, Kazuyuki; Saito, Makoto; Okazaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Tatsu, Yoshiro; Imaishi, Hiromasa

    2013-02-26

    We describe a stable and functional model biological membrane based on a polymerized lipid bilayer with a chemically modified surface. A polymerized lipid bilayer was formed from a mixture of two diacetylene-containing phospholipids, 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DiynePC) and 1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DiynePE). DiynePC formed a stable bilayer structure, whereas the ethanolamine headgroup of DiynePE enabled functional molecules to be grafted onto the membrane surface. Copolymerization of DiynePC and DiynePE resulted in a robust bilayer. Functionalization of the polymeric bilayer provided a route to a robust and biomimetic surface that can be linked with biomolecules, cells, and three-dimensional (3D) microstructures. Biotin and peptides were grafted onto the polymeric bilayer for attaching streptavidin and cultured mammalian cells by molecular recognition, respectively. Nonspecific adsorption of proteins and cells on polymeric bilayers was minimum. DiynePE was also used to attach a microstructure made of an elastomer (polydimethylsiloxan: PDMS) onto the membrane, forming a confined aqueous solution between the two surfaces. The microcompartment enabled us to assay the activity of a membrane-bound enzyme (cyochrome P450). Natural (fluid) lipid bilayers were incorporated together with membrane-bound proteins by lithographically polymerizing DiynePC/DiynePE bilayers. The hybrid membrane of functionalized polymeric bilayers and fluid bilayers offers a novel platform for a wide range of biomedical applications including biosensor, bioassay, cell culture, and cell-based assay.

  6. Spatial orientation and electric-field-driven transport of hypericin inside of bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strejčková, Alena; Staničová, Jana; Jancura, Daniel; Miškovský, Pavol; Bánó, Gregor

    2013-02-07

    Fluorescence experiments were carried out to investigate the interaction of hypericin (Hyp), a natural hydrophobic photosensitizer, with artificial bilayer lipid membranes. The spatial orientation of Hyp monomers incorporated in diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) membranes was determined by measuring the dependence of the Hyp fluorescence intensity on the angle of incidence of p- and s-polarized excitation laser beams. Inside of the membrane, Hyp monomers are preferentially located in the layers near the membrane/water interface and are oriented with the S(1) ← S(0) transition dipole moments perpendicular to the membrane surface. Transport of Hyp anions between the two opposite sides of the lipid bilayer was induced by applying rectangular electric field pulses to the membrane. The characteristic time for Hyp transport through the membrane center was evaluated by the analysis of the Hyp fluorescence signal during the voltage pulses. In the zero-voltage limit, the transport time approached 70 ms and gradually decreased with higher voltage applied to the membrane. In addition, our measurements indicated an apparent pK(a) constant of 8 for Hyp deprotonation in the membrane.

  7. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  8. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10 8 –10 9 V m −1 , which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10 8 V m −1 ) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3

  9. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, G. H.; Hansen, F. Y., E-mail: flemming@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Denmark, IK 207 DTU, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Taub, H.; Miskowiec, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the University of Missouri Research Reactor,University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic potential within phospholipid membranes imply an enormous electric field of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} V m{sup −1}, which is likely to have great significance in controlling the conformation of translocating membrane proteins and in the transfer of ions and molecules across the membrane. We have calculated the membrane potential for DMPG bilayers and found ∼1 V (∼2 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the fluid phase with a monovalent counter-ion and ∼1.4 V (∼2.8 ⋅ 10{sup 8} V m{sup −1}) when in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The number of water molecules for a fully hydrated DMPG membrane has been estimated to be 9.7 molecules per lipid in the gel phase and 17.5 molecules in the fluid phase, considerably smaller than inferred experimentally for 1

  10. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  11. Characterization of a structural intermediate of flavivirus membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stiasny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral membrane fusion proceeds through a sequence of steps that are driven by triggered conformational changes of viral envelope glycoproteins, so-called fusion proteins. Although high-resolution structural snapshots of viral fusion proteins in their prefusion and postfusion conformations are available, it has been difficult to define intermediate structures of the fusion pathway because of their transient nature. Flaviviruses possess a class II viral fusion protein (E mediating fusion at acidic pH that is converted from a dimer to a trimer with a hairpin-like structure during the fusion process. Here we show for tick-borne encephalitis virus that exposure of virions to alkaline instead of acidic pH traps the particles in an intermediate conformation in which the E dimers dissociate and interact with target membranes via the fusion peptide without proceeding to the merger of the membranes. Further treatment to low pH, however, leads to fusion, suggesting that these monomers correspond to an as-yet-elusive intermediate required to convert the prefusion dimer into the postfusion trimer. Thus, the use of nonphysiological conditions allows a dissection of the flavivirus fusion process and the identification of two separate steps, in which membrane insertion of multiple copies of E monomers precedes the formation of hairpin-like trimers. This sequence of events provides important new insights for understanding the dynamic process of viral membrane fusion.

  12. Single-particle fusion of influenza viruses reveals complex interactions with target membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Borg, Guus; Braddock, Scarlett; Blijleven, Jelle S.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2018-05-01

    The first step in infection of influenza A virus is contact with the host cell membrane, with which it later fuses. The composition of the target bilayer exerts a complex influence on both fusion efficiency and time. Here, an in vitro, single-particle approach is used to study this effect. Using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a microfluidic flow cell, the hemifusion of single virions is visualized. Hemifusion efficiency and kinetics are studied while altering target bilayer cholesterol content and sialic-acid donor. Cholesterol ratios tested were 0%, 10%, 20%, and 40%. Sialic-acid donors GD1a and GYPA were used. Both cholesterol ratio and sialic-acid donors proved to have a significant effect on hemifusion efficiency. Furthermore, comparison between GD1a and GYPA conditions shows that the cholesterol dependence of the hemifusion time is severely affected by the sialic-acid donor. Only GD1a shows a clear increasing trend in hemifusion efficiency and time with increasing cholesterol concentration of the target bilayer with maximum rates for GD1A and 40% cholesterol. Overall our results show that sialic acid donor and target bilayer composition should be carefully chosen, depending on the desired hemifusion time and efficiency in the experiment.

  13. Regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity—a single molecule technology to measure the bilayer properties experienced by an embedded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    , regulate a number of structurally unrelated proteins in an apparently non-specific manner. It is well known that changes in the physical properties of a lipid bilayer (e.g., thickness or monolayer spontaneous curvature) can affect the function of an embedded protein. However, the role of such changes......-dependent sodium channels, N-type calcium channels and GABAA receptors, it has been shown that membrane protein function in living cells can be regulated by amphiphile induced changes in bilayer elasticity. Using the gramicidin channel as a molecular force transducer, a nanotechnology to measure the elastic...... properties experienced by an embedded protein has been developed. A theoretical and technological framework, to study the regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity, has been established....

  14. Temperature dependence of positronium reactivities with charge transfer molecules in bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, Y.C.; Yu, C.; Wang, Y.Y.; Yeh, Y.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Rate constants for positronium atoms reacting chemically with charge-transfer molecules such as p-benzoquinone, nitrobenzene, and coenzyme Q-10 in a model bilayer membrane, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), have been measured at temperatures between 23 and 65 0 C. A strong variation of the positronium chemical reactivities, k/sub Ps/ was observed in these systems: k/sub Ps/ increases with increasing temperature until the pretransition temperature of the membrane reaches a maximum value near the main transition temperature and decreases at temperatures higher than the main transition temperature. This variation is interpreted in terms of fluidity and permeability changes associated with the phase transitions of membranes and in terms of charge-transfer-complex formation between the solubilized molecules and the polar head of the membrane. These results demonstrate that positronium and its annihilation characteristics can be employed to investigate charge transport phenomena and microstructural changes of real biological membranes

  15. Lipid bilayer-bound conformation of an integral membrane beta barrel protein by multidimensional MAS NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, Matthew T.; Su, Yongchao; Silvers, Robert; Andreas, Loren; Clark, Lindsay; Wagner, Gerhard; Pintacuda, Guido; Emsley, Lyndon; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The human voltage dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC) is a 32 kDa β-barrel integral membrane protein that controls the transport of ions across the outer mitochondrial membrane. Despite the determination of VDAC solution and diffraction structures, a structural basis for the mechanism of its function is not yet fully understood. Biophysical studies suggest VDAC requires a lipid bilayer to achieve full function, motivating the need for atomic resolution structural information of VDAC in a membrane environment. Here we report an essential step toward that goal: extensive assignments of backbone and side chain resonances for VDAC in DMPC lipid bilayers via magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR). VDAC reconstituted into DMPC lipid bilayers spontaneously forms two-dimensional lipid crystals, showing remarkable spectral resolution (0.5–0.3 ppm for 13 C line widths and <0.5 ppm 15 N line widths at 750 MHz). In addition to the benefits of working in a lipid bilayer, several distinct advantages are observed with the lipid crystalline preparation. First, the strong signals and sharp line widths facilitated extensive NMR resonance assignments for an integral membrane β-barrel protein in lipid bilayers by MAS NMR. Second, a large number of residues in loop regions were readily observed and assigned, which can be challenging in detergent-solubilized membrane proteins where loop regions are often not detected due to line broadening from conformational exchange. Third, complete backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments could be obtained for the first 25 residues, which comprise the functionally important N-terminus. The reported assignments allow us to compare predicted torsion angles for VDAC prepared in DMPC 2D lipid crystals, DMPC liposomes, and LDAO-solubilized samples to address the possible effects of the membrane mimetic environment on the conformation of the protein. Concluding, we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the reported

  16. Microchemical device based on microscopic bilayer lipid membranes; Bisho 2 bunshimaku wo mochiiita maikuro kagaku debaisu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, H. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-04-01

    If an organism is regarded as a macromolecular system, the element device to construct the same is the molecular structure of nano meter scale formed by the functional protein existing in biomembranes. A lot of essential functions of organism such as the sense reception including vision, gustation, etc., photosynthesis, energy-substance production and so on are performed therein. In this paper, the structure, preparing process and the functions of the microchemical device using micro-bilipid membranes are described. The simulation of the sense receiving functions of organisms is tried by said microchemical device wherein, same as biomembranes, the base is bilayer lipid molecular membrane and the receptive protein for receiving signals from exterior and output molecules such as ion channels connected to said receptive protein and the like are incorporated in the membranes. Recently, it becomes possible to make a partial imaging of the bilayer lipid membranes fixed on porous membrane by the observation with scanning Maxwell-stress microscope. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. The Multifaceted Role of SNARE Proteins in Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key process in all living organisms that contributes to a variety of biological processes including viral infection, cell fertilization, as well as intracellular transport, and neurotransmitter release. In particular, the various membrane-enclosed compartments in eukaryotic cells need to exchange their contents and communicate across membranes. Efficient and controllable fusion of biological membranes is known to be driven by cooperative action of SNARE proteins, which constitute the central components of the eukaryotic fusion machinery responsible for fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane. During exocytosis, vesicle-associated v-SNARE (synaptobrevin) and target cell-associated t-SNAREs (syntaxin and SNAP-25) assemble into a core trans-SNARE complex. This complex plays a versatile role at various stages of exocytosis ranging from the priming to fusion pore formation and expansion, finally resulting in the release or exchange of the vesicle content. This review summarizes current knowledge on the intricate molecular mechanisms underlying exocytosis triggered and catalyzed by SNARE proteins. Particular attention is given to the function of the peptidic SNARE membrane anchors and the role of SNARE-lipid interactions in fusion. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms by synaptic auxiliary proteins in SNARE-driven membrane fusion are briefly outlined.

  18. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  19. Insertion of Neurotransmitters into a Lipid Bilayer Membrane and Its Implication on Membrane Stability: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun; Xue, Minmin; Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2017-03-17

    The signaling molecules in neurons, called neurotransmitters, play an essential role in the transportation of neural signals, during which the neurotransmitters interact with not only specific receptors, but also cytomembranes, such as synaptic vesicle membranes and postsynaptic membranes. Through extensive molecular dynamics simulations, the atomic-scale insertion dynamics of typical neurotransmitters, including methionine enkephalin (ME), leucine enkephalin (LE), dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), and aspartic acid (ASP), into lipid bilayers is investigated. The results show that the first three neurotransmitters (ME, LE, and DA) are able to diffuse freely into both 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) membranes, and are guided by the aromatic residues Tyr and Phe. Only a limited number of these neurotransmitters are allowed to penetrate into the membrane, which suggests an intrinsic mechanism by which the membrane is protected from being destroyed by excessive inserted neurotransmitters. After spontaneous insertion, the neurotransmitters disturb the surrounding phospholipids in the membrane, as indicated by the altered distribution of components in lipid leaflets and the disordered lipid tails. In contrast, the last two neurotransmitters (ACh and ASP) cannot enter the membrane, but instead always diffuse freely in solution. These findings provide an understanding at the atomic level of how neurotransmitters interact with the surrounding cytomembrane, as well as their impact on membrane behavior. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Membrane fusion by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Chuan; Hardee, Deborah; Minnear, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Pairing of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins on vesicles (v-SNAREs) and SNARE proteins on target membranes (t-SNAREs) mediates intracellular membrane fusion. VAMP3/cellubrevin is a v-SNARE that resides in recycling endosomes and endosome-derived transport vesicles. VAMP3 has been implicated in recycling of transferrin receptors, secretion of α-granules in platelets, and membrane trafficking during cell migration. Using a cell fusion assay, we examined membrane fusion capacity of the ternary complexes formed by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25. VAMP3 forms fusogenic pairing with t-SNARE complexes syntaxin1/SNAP-25, syntaxin1/SNAP-23 and syntaxin4/SNAP-25, but not with syntaxin4/SNAP-23. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of syntaxin4 enhanced membrane fusion more than two fold, indicating that the N-terminal domain negatively regulates membrane fusion. Differential membrane fusion capacities of the ternary v-/t-SNARE complexes suggest that transport vesicles containing VAMP3 have distinct membrane fusion kinetics with domains of the plasma membrane that present different t-SNARE proteins

  1. Genomic analysis indicates the presence of an asymmetric bilayer outer membrane in Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daan R Speth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the phylum Planctomycetes are of special interest for the study of compartmental cellular organization. Members of this phylum share a very unusual prokaryotic cell plan, featuring several membrane-bound compartments. Recently, it was shown that this cellular organization might extend to certain members of the phylum Verrucomicrobia. The Planctomycete cell plan has been defined as featuring a proteinaceous cell wall, a cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the paryphoplasm and an intracytoplasmic membrane defining the riboplasm. So far it was presumed that Planctomycetes did not have an asymmetric bilayer outer membrane as observed in Gram-negative bacteria. However, recent work on outer membrane biogenesis has provided several marker genes in the outer membrane protein (OMP assembly and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS insertion complexes. Additionally, advances in computational prediction of OMPs provided new tools to perform more accurate genomic screening for such proteins.Here we searched all 22 Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia genomes available in Genbank, plus the recently published genome of ‘Candidatus Scalindua profunda’, for markers of outer membrane biogenesis and OMPs. We were able to identify the key components of LPS insertion, OMP assembly and at least eight OMPs in all genomes tested. Additionally, we have analyzed the transcriptome and proteome data of the Planctomycetes ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’ and ‘Ca. S. profunda’ and could confirm high expression of several predicted OMPs, including the biomarkers of outer membrane biogenesis.

  2. Exploring the Local Elastic Properties of Bilayer Membranes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pieffet, Gilles; Botero, Alonso; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane mechanical elastic properties regulate a variety of cellular processes involving local membrane deformation, such as ion channel function and vesicle fusion. In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to estimate the local elastic properties of a membrane. For this, we calculated...... the stretching process in molecular detail, allowing us to fit this profile to a previously proposed continuum elastic model. Through this approach, we calculated an effective membrane spring constant of 42 kJ-2.mol-1, which is in good agreement with the PMF calculation. Furthermore, the solvation energy we...

  3. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... a system that can be considered a paradigm for interactions of soluble proteins with membrane receptors. In this work, we have investigated different technologies for capturing nanodiscs containing the glycolipid receptor G(M1) in lipid bilayers, enabling measurements of binding of its soluble interaction...

  4. On the freezing behavior and diffusion of water in proximity to single-supported zwitterionic and anionic bilayer lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiec, A.; Buck, Z. N.; Brown, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the freezing/melting behavior of water hydrating single-supported bilayers of a zwitterionic lipid DMPC with that of an anionic lipid DMPG. For both membranes, the temperature dependence of the elastically scattered neutron intensity indicates distinct water types undergoing...... translational diffusion: bulk-like water probably located above the membrane and two types of confined water closer to the lipid head groups. The membranes differ in the greater width of the water freezing transition near the anionic DMPG bilayer compared to zwitterionic DMPC as well as in the abruptness...

  5. Chitosan derivatives targeting lipid bilayers: Synthesis, biological activity and interaction with model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Danubia Batista; Nasário, Fábio Domingues; Silva-Gonçalves, Laiz Costa; de Oliveira Tiera, Vera Aparecida; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Tiera, Marcio José; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez

    2018-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan and derivatives to human and plant pathogens represents a high-valued prospective market. Presently, two low molecular weight derivatives, endowed with hydrophobic and cationic character at different ratios were synthesized and characterized. They exhibit antimicrobial activity and increased performance in relation to the intermediate and starting compounds. However, just the derivative with higher cationic character showed cytotoxicity towards human cervical carcinoma cells. Considering cell membranes as targets, the mode of action was investigated through the interaction with model lipid vesicles mimicking bacterial, tumoral and erythrocyte membranes. Intense lytic activity and binding are demonstrated for both derivatives in anionic bilayers. The less charged compound exhibits slightly improved selectivity towards bacterial model membranes, suggesting that balancing its hydrophobic/hydrophilic character may improve efficiency. Observing the aggregation of vesicles, we hypothesize that the "charge cluster mechanism", ascribed to some antimicrobial peptides, could be applied to these chitosan derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. El Tor hemolysin of Vibrio cholerae O1 forms channels in planar lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, H; Ono, T; Iwata, M; Nakae, T; Shimamura, T

    1997-05-15

    We investigated the channel formation by El Tor hemolysin (molecular mass, 65 kDa) of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in planar lipid bilayers. The El Tor hemolysin channel exhibited asymmetric and hyperbolic membrane current with increasing membrane potential, meaning that the channel is voltage dependent. The zero-current membrane potential measured in KCI solution showed that permeability ratio PK+/PCl- was 0.16, indicating that the channel is 6-fold more anion selective over cation. The hemolysin channel frequently flickered in the presence of divalent cations, suggesting that the channel spontaneously opens and closes. These data imply that the El Tor hemolysin damages target cells by the formation of transmembrane channels and, consequently, is the cause of osmotic cytolysis.

  7. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid...... compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have...... the sensitivity to confirm the diffusion of a small component of water bound to the lipids as found in the simulations. In addition, the orientation of the dipole moment of the water molecules has been determined as a function of their depth in the membrane. Previous indirect estimates of the electrostatic...

  8. An Investigation on bilayer structures of electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous membrane and cellulose membrane used as filtration media for apple juice clarification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawitri, Asti; Miftahul Munir, Muhammad; Edikresnha, Dhewa; Sandi, Ahzab; Fauzi, Ahmad; Rajak, Abdul; Natalia, Dessy; Khairurrijal, Khairurrijal

    2018-05-01

    Nanofibrous membrane has a potential to use in filtration technology with electrospinning as one of the techniques used in synthesizing nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibrous membranes with various fibers diameters were electrospun by varying its precursor solution concentration. The average fibers diameters of the PAN nanofibrous membranes obtained from the precursor solution concentrations of 6, 9, 12, and 14 wt% were 341, 534, 1274, and 2107 nm, respectively. Filtration media for apple juice clarification were bilayer-structured membranes made of PAN nanofibrous membranes on commercial cellulose microfibrous membranes. It has been shown that the reduction of apple juice color or turbidity performed by the cellulose microfibrous membrane was well enhanced by the presence of the PAN nanofibrous membrane in the bilayer-structured membrane. In addition, the apple-juice color and turbidity reductions increased with decreasing the average fibers diameter of the PAN nanofibrous membrane. Furthermore, the PAN nanofibrous membrane also helped the cellulose microfibrous membrane in the bilayer-structured membrane enhance the reductions of total phenols, protein, and glucose of the apple juice.

  9. Fusion of Sendai Virus with Vesicles of Oligomerizable Lipids: A Micro Calorimetric Analysis of Membrane Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ravoo, Bart Jan; Weringa, Wilke D.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4-(beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head groups of DHPBNS in the bilayer vesicles. The enthalpy associated with fusion of Sendai virus with DHPBNS vesicles was measured by isothermal titration microcalorimetry, comparing titrations of Sen...

  10. Impact of monoolein on aquaporin1-based supported lipid bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Ding, Wande; Wang, Miaoqi; Gao, Congjie; Qi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) based biomimetic membranes have attracted considerable attention for their potential water purification applications. In this paper, AQP1 incorporated biomimetic membranes were prepared and characterized. The morphology and structure of the biomimetic membranes were characterized by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The nanofiltration performance of the AQP1 incorporated membranes was investigated at 4 bar by using 2 g l −1 NaCl as feed solution. Lipid mobility plays an important role in the performance of the AQP1 incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) membranes. We demonstrated that the lipid mobility is successfully tuned by the addition of monoolein (MO). Through in situ AFM and fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) measurements, the membrane morphology and the molecular mobility were studied. The lipid mobility increased in the sequence DPPC < DPPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC/MO (R MO = 5/5) < DOPC, which is consistent with the flux increment and salt rejection. This study may provide some useful insights for improving the water purification performance of biomimetic membranes. (paper)

  11. A comparison of sulfur mustard and heptane penetrating a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Thomas J., E-mail: t.mueller@theo.chemie.tu-darmstadt.de [Theoretische Physikalische Chemie, Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 20, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Mueller-Plathe, Florian [Theoretische Physikalische Chemie, Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 20, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-08-30

    In the present molecular dynamics simulations we study the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) and the alkane heptane inserted into a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer, a generic model for a biological membrane. We investigate the diffusion, the orientation, the preferred positioning, and the end-to-end distance of the solutes within the membrane as well as the corresponding coupling times. We compare results of equilibrium simulations and simulation at different external forces, which drag the solutes through the membrane. These properties lead to a general comparison of the rotational and translational behaviors of the two solutes during the penetration of the membrane. We show that sulfur mustard, due to its atomic charge polarization, its bigger flexibility and its smaller molecular volume, is the faster moving molecule within the membrane. In last consequence, we show that this leads to different limits for the transport mechanism as observed in these simulations. For heptane the hindrance to penetrate into the membrane is significantly higher than for sulfur mustard. In contrast to heptane molecules, which spend the most of the time penetrating the tail groups, sulfur mustard needs more time to escape the tail group-head group interface of the membrane.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  13. Membrane-on-a-Chip : Microstructured Silicon/Silicon-Dioxide Chips for High-Throughput Screening of Membrane Transport and Viral Membrane Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusters, Ilja; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    Screening of transport processes across biological membranes is hindered by the challenge to establish fragile supported lipid bilayers and the difficulty to determine at which side of the membrane reactants reside. Here, we present a method for the generation of suspended lipid bilayers with

  14. Blocking of valinomycin-mediated bilayer membrane conductance by substituted benzimidazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K H; Fukuto, T R; Miller, T A; Bruner, L J

    1976-01-01

    Valinomycin selectively transports alkali cations, e.g. potassium ions, across lipid bilayer membranes. The blocking of this carrier-mediated transport by four substituted benzimidazoles has been investigated. The compounds are 4,5,6,7-tetrachloro-2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole, (TTFB); 4,5,6,7,-tetrachloro-2-methylbenzimidazole, (TMB); 2-trifluoromethylbenzimidazole, (TFB); and 2-methylbenzimidazole, (MBM). Because of its low acidic dissociation constant (pKa = 5.04), the blocking efficiency of TTFB in both neutral and anionic forms in the aqueous phase could be studied. The compounds exhibit the blocking efficiency sequence, TTFB- greater than TTFB0 greater than TMB0 greater than TFB0 greater than MBM0. The corresponding scale of decreasing lipophilicity, as determined by octanol/water partitioning, is TTFB0 greater than TMB0 greater than TTFB- greater than TFB0 greater than MBM0. Comparison of neutral species establishes a positive correlation of blocking efficiency with lipophilicity, with the latter being conferred primarily by chlorination of the benzenoid nucleus. Anionic TTFB, on the other hand, is the most effective blocking agent studied in spite of the fact that its dissociation in the aqueous phase markedly impedes its entry (presumably as a neutral species) into a bulk hydrocarbon phase. This observation suggests that the blocking of valinomycin-mediated bilayer membrane conductance takes place at the membrane/solution interface. PMID:1247644

  15. Bilayer porous scaffold based on poly-(ε-caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane and gelatin sponge for favoring cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Zhihua; Zhou Yang; Chen Yiwang; Nie Huarong; Wang Yang; Li Fan; Zheng Yan

    2011-01-01

    Electrospun poly-(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers has been widely used in the medical prosthesis. However, poor hydrophilicity and the lack of natural recognition sites for covalent cell-recognition signal molecules to promote cell attachment have limited its utility as tissue scaffolds. In this study, Bilayer porous scaffolds based on PCL electrospun membranes and gelatin (GE) sponges were fabricated through soft hydrolysis of PCL electrospun followed by grafting gelatin onto the fiber surface, through crosslinking and freeze drying treatment of additional gelatin coat and grafted gelatin surface. GE sponges were stably anchored on PCL membrane surface with the aid of grafted GE molecules. The morphologies of bilayer porous scaffolds were observed through SEM. The contact angle of the scaffolds was 0°, the mechanical properties of scaffolds were measured by tensile test, Young's moduli of PCL scaffolds before and after hydrolysis are 66-77.3 MPa and 62.3-75.4 MPa, respectively. Thus, the bilayer porous scaffolds showed excellent hydrophilic surface and desirable mechanical strength due to the soft hydrolysis and GE coat. The cell culture results showed that the adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells did more favor to adhere and grow on the bilayer porous scaffolds than on PCL electrospun membranes. The better cell affinity of the final bilayer scaffolds not only attributed to the surface chemistry but also the introduction of bilayer porous structure.

  16. Bilayer porous scaffold based on poly-({epsilon}-caprolactone) nanofibrous membrane and gelatin sponge for favoring cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Zhihua; Zhou Yang [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Chen Yiwang, E-mail: ywchen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Institute of Polymers, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Nie Huarong, E-mail: niehr@iccas.ac.cn [Institute of Polymers, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang Yang [First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, 17 Yongwaizheng Road, Nanchang 330006 (China); Li Fan; Zheng Yan [Institute of Polymers, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Electrospun poly-({epsilon}-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers has been widely used in the medical prosthesis. However, poor hydrophilicity and the lack of natural recognition sites for covalent cell-recognition signal molecules to promote cell attachment have limited its utility as tissue scaffolds. In this study, Bilayer porous scaffolds based on PCL electrospun membranes and gelatin (GE) sponges were fabricated through soft hydrolysis of PCL electrospun followed by grafting gelatin onto the fiber surface, through crosslinking and freeze drying treatment of additional gelatin coat and grafted gelatin surface. GE sponges were stably anchored on PCL membrane surface with the aid of grafted GE molecules. The morphologies of bilayer porous scaffolds were observed through SEM. The contact angle of the scaffolds was 0 Degree-Sign , the mechanical properties of scaffolds were measured by tensile test, Young's moduli of PCL scaffolds before and after hydrolysis are 66-77.3 MPa and 62.3-75.4 MPa, respectively. Thus, the bilayer porous scaffolds showed excellent hydrophilic surface and desirable mechanical strength due to the soft hydrolysis and GE coat. The cell culture results showed that the adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells did more favor to adhere and grow on the bilayer porous scaffolds than on PCL electrospun membranes. The better cell affinity of the final bilayer scaffolds not only attributed to the surface chemistry but also the introduction of bilayer porous structure.

  17. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...... of diffusive water motion: bulk-like, confined, and bound. The motion of bulk-like and confined water molecules is fast compared to those bound to the lipid head groups (7-10 H2O molecules per lipid), which move on the same nanosecond time scale as H atoms within the lipid molecules. Copyright (C) EPLA, 2012...

  18. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Peter G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swingle, Kirstie L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paxton, Walter F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nogan, John J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stromberg, Loreen R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Firestone, Millicent A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Montaño, Gabriel A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.

  19. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  20. Single Lipid Molecule Dynamics on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Membrane Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip P. Cheney

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane is a highly compartmentalized, dynamic material and this organization is essential for a wide variety of cellular processes. Nanoscale domains allow proteins to organize for cell signaling, endo- and exocytosis, and other essential processes. Even in the absence of proteins, lipids have the ability to organize into domains as a result of a variety of chemical and physical interactions. One feature of membranes that affects lipid domain formation is membrane curvature. To directly test the role of curvature in lipid sorting, we measured the accumulation of two similar lipids, 1,2-Dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DHPE and hexadecanoic acid (HDA, using a supported lipid bilayer that was assembled over a nanopatterned surface to obtain regions of membrane curvature. Both lipids studied contain 16 carbon, saturated tails and a head group tag for fluorescence microscopy measurements. The accumulation of lipids at curvatures ranging from 28 nm to 55 nm radii was measured and fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulated more than fluorescein labeled HDA at regions of membrane curvature. We then tested whether single biotinylated DHPE molecules sense curvature using single particle tracking methods. Similar to groups of fluorescein labeled DHPE accumulating at curvature, the dynamics of single molecules of biotinylated DHPE was also affected by membrane curvature and highly confined motion was observed.

  1. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  2. MEMBRANE-FUSION OF SEMLIKI FOREST VIRUS INVOLVES HOMOTRIMERS OF THE FUSION PROTEIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAHLBERG, JM; WILSCHUT, J; GAROFF, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion Processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated

  3. DSC and EPR investigations on effects of cholesterol component on molecular interactions between paclitaxel and phospholipid within lipid bilayer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingyun; Feng, Si-Shen; Kocherginsky, Nikolai; Kostetski, Iouri

    2007-06-29

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) were applied to investigate effects of cholesterol component on molecular interactions between paclitaxel, which is one of the best antineoplastic agents found from nature, and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) within lipid bilayer vesicles (liposomes), which could also be used as a model cell membrane. DSC analysis showed that incorporation of paclitaxel into the DPPC bilayer causes a reduction in the cooperativity of bilayer phase transition, leading to a looser and more flexible bilayer structure. Including cholesterol component in the DPPC/paclitaxel mixed bilayer can facilitate the molecular interaction between paclitaxel and lipid and make the tertiary system more stable. EPR analysis demonstrated that both of paclitaxel and cholesterol have fluidization effect on the DPPC bilayer membranes although cholesterol has more significant effect than paclitaxel does. The reduction kinetics of nitroxides by ascorbic acid showed that paclitaxel can inhibit the reaction by blocking the diffusion of either the ascorbic acid or nitroxide molecules since the reaction is tested to be a first order one. Cholesterol can remarkably increase the reduction reaction speed. This research may provide useful information for optimizing liposomal formulation of the drug as well as for understanding the pharmacology of paclitaxel.

  4. Paramyxovirus F1 protein has two fusion peptides: implications for the mechanism of membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisajovich, S G; Samuel, O; Shai, Y

    2000-03-10

    Viral fusion proteins contain a highly hydrophobic segment, named the fusion peptide, which is thought to be responsible for the merging of the cellular and viral membranes. Paramyxoviruses are believed to contain a single fusion peptide at the N terminus of the F1 protein. However, here we identified an additional internal segment in the Sendai virus F1 protein (amino acids 214-226) highly homologous to the fusion peptides of HIV-1 and RSV. A synthetic peptide, which includes this region, was found to induce membrane fusion of large unilamellar vesicles, at concentrations where the known N-terminal fusion peptide is not effective. A scrambled peptide as well as several peptides from other regions of the F1 protein, which strongly bind to membranes, are not fusogenic. The functional and structural characterization of this active segment suggest that the F1 protein has an additional internal fusion peptide that could participate in the actual fusion event. The presence of homologous regions in other members of the same family suggests that the concerted action of two fusion peptides, one N-terminal and the other internal, is a general feature of paramyxoviruses. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Pair interaction of bilayer-coated nanoscopic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi-Yi

    2009-02-01

    The pair interaction between bilayer membrane-coated nanosized particles has been explored by using the self-consistent field (SCF) theory. The bilayer membranes are composed of amphiphilic polymers. For different system parameters, the pair-interaction free energies are obtained. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of a sequence of structural transformations of bilayers on spherical particles, which occur during their approaching processes. For different head fractions of amphiphiles, the asymmetrical morphologies between bilayers on two particles and the inverted micellar intermediates have been found in the membrane fusion pathway. These results can benefit the fabrication of vesicles as encapsulation vectors for drug and gene delivery.

  6. Low-pH-induced transformation of bilayer membrane into bicontinuous cubic phase in dioleoylphosphatidylserine/monoolein membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshihide; Masum, Shah Md; Miyazawa, Haruna; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2008-04-01

    Cubic biomembranes, nonbilayer membranes with connections in three-dimensional space that have a cubic symmetry, have been observed in various cells. Interconversion between the bilayer liquid-crystalline (L(alpha)) phase and cubic phases attracted much attention in terms of both biological and physicochemical aspects. Herein we report the pH effect on the phase and structure of dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS)/monoolein (MO) membranes under a physiological ion concentration condition, which was revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurement. At neutral pH, DOPS/MO membranes containing high concentrations of DOPS were in the L(alpha) phase. First, the pH effect on the phase and structure of the multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) of the DOPS/MO membranes preformed at neutral pH was investigated by adding various low-pH buffers into the MLV suspension. For 20%-DOPS/80%-MO MLVs, at and below pH 2.9, a transition from the L(alpha) to cubic (Q(224)) phase occurred within 1 h. This phase transition was reversible; a subsequent increase in pH to a neutral one in the membrane suspension transformed the cubic phase into the original L(alpha) phase. Second, we found that a decrease in pH transformed large unilamellar vesicles of DOPS/MO membranes into the cubic phase under similar conditions. We have proposed the mechanism of the low-pH-induced phase transition and also made a quantitative analysis on the critical pH of the phase transition. This finding is the first demonstration that a change in pH can induce a reversible phase transition between the L(alpha) and cubic phases of lipid membranes within 1 h.

  7. The yeast cell fusion protein Prm1p requires covalent dimerization to promote membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Engel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion.

  8. Electrodeformation of multi-bilayer spherical concentric membranes by AC electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Escobedo, J.; Arauz-Lara, J.; Aranda-Espinoza, H.; Adlerz, K.; Viveros-Mendez, P. X.; Aranda-Espinoza, S.

    2017-09-01

    It is now well established that external stresses alter the behaviour of cells, where such alterations can be as profound as changes in gene expression. A type of stresses of particular interest are those due to alternating-current (AC) electric fields. The effect of AC fields on cells is still not well understood, in particular it is not clear how these fields affect the cell nucleus and other organelles. Here, we propose that one possible mechanism is through the deformation of the membranes. In order to investigate the effect of AC fields on the morphological changes of the cell organelles, we modelled the cell as two concentric bilayer membranes. This model allows us to obtain the deformations induced by the AC field by balancing the elastic energy and the work done by the Maxwell stresses. Morphological phase diagrams are obtained as a function of the frequency and the electrical properties of the media and membranes. We demonstrate that the organelle shapes can be changed without modifying the shape of the external cell membrane and that the organelle deformation transitions can be used to measure, for example, the conductivity of the nucleus.

  9. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin, E-mail: huangwm@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes.

  10. Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of planar phosphatidylethanolamine hybrid bilayer membranes under water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kett, Peter J N; Casford, Michael T L; Davies, Paul B

    2010-06-15

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy has been used to study the structure of phosphatidylethanolamine hybrid bilayer membranes (HBMs) under water at ambient temperatures. The HBMs were formed using a modified Langmuir-Schaefer technique and consisted of a layer of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) physisorbed onto an octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) at a series of surface pressures from 1 to 40 mN m(-1). The DPPE and ODT were selectively deuterated so that the contributions to the SFG spectra from the two layers could be determined separately. SFG spectra in both the C-H and C-D stretching regions confirmed that a monolayer of DPPE had been adsorbed to the ODT SAM and that there were gauche defects within the alkyl chains of the phospholipid. On adsorption of a layer of DPPE, methylene modes from the ODT SAM were detected, indicating that the phospholipid had partially disordered the alkanethiol monolayer. SFG spectra recorded in air indicated that removal of water from the surface of the HBM resulted in disruption of the DPPE layer and the formation of phospholipid bilayers.

  11. Thermodynamic free energy methods to investigate shape transitions in bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N; Tourdot, Richard W; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    The conformational free energy landscape of a system is a fundamental thermodynamic quantity of importance particularly in the study of soft matter and biological systems, in which the entropic contributions play a dominant role. While computational methods to delineate the free energy landscape are routinely used to analyze the relative stability of conformational states, to determine phase boundaries, and to compute ligand-receptor binding energies its use in problems involving the cell membrane is limited. Here, we present an overview of four different free energy methods to study morphological transitions in bilayer membranes, induced either by the action of curvature remodeling proteins or due to the application of external forces. Using a triangulated surface as a model for the cell membrane and using the framework of dynamical triangulation Monte Carlo, we have focused on the methods of Widom insertion, thermodynamic integration, Bennett acceptance scheme, and umbrella sampling and weighted histogram analysis. We have demonstrated how these methods can be employed in a variety of problems involving the cell membrane. Specifically, we have shown that the chemical potential, computed using Widom insertion, and the relative free energies, computed using thermodynamic integration and Bennett acceptance method, are excellent measures to study the transition from curvature sensing to curvature inducing behavior of membrane associated proteins. The umbrella sampling and WHAM analysis has been used to study the thermodynamics of tether formation in cell membranes and the quantitative predictions of the computational model are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. Furthermore, we also present a method based on WHAM and thermodynamic integration to handle problems related to end-point-catastrophe that are common in most free energy methods.

  12. Monitoring the Orientational Changes of Alamethicin during Incorporation into Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrig, Enrico; Staffa, Jana K; Salewski, Johannes; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Hildebrandt, Peter; Kozuch, Jacek

    2018-02-13

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are the first line of defense after contact of an infectious invader, for example, bacterium or virus, with a host and an integral part of the innate immune system of humans. Their broad spectrum of biological functions ranges from cell membrane disruption over facilitation of chemotaxis to interaction with membrane-bound or intracellular receptors, thus providing novel strategies to overcome bacterial resistances. Especially, the clarification of the mechanisms and dynamics of AMP incorporation into bacterial membranes is of high interest, and different mechanistic models are still under discussion. In this work, we studied the incorporation of the peptaibol alamethicin (ALM) into tethered bilayer lipid membranes on electrodes in combination with surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. This approach allows monitoring the spontaneous and potential-induced ion channel formation of ALM in situ. The complex incorporation kinetics revealed a multistep mechanism that points to peptide-peptide interactions prior to penetrating the membrane and adopting the transmembrane configuration. On the basis of the anisotropy of the backbone amide I and II infrared absorptions determined by density functional theory calculations, we employed a mathematical model to evaluate ALM reorientations monitored by SEIRA spectroscopy. Accordingly, ALM was found to adopt inclination angles of ca. 69°-78° and 21° in its interfacially adsorbed and transmembrane incorporated states, respectively. These orientations can be stabilized efficiently by the dipolar interaction with lipid head groups or by the application of a potential gradient. The presented potential-controlled mechanistic study suggests an N-terminal integration of ALM into membranes as monomers or parallel oligomers to form ion channels composed of parallel-oriented helices, whereas antiparallel oligomers are barred from intrusion.

  13. Dynamics of a bilayer membrane coupled to a two-dimensional cytoskeleton: Scale transfers of membrane deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the dynamics of a floating lipid bilayer membrane coupled with a two-dimensional cytoskeleton network, taking into account explicitly the intermonolayer friction, the discrete lattice structure of the cytoskeleton, and its prestress. The lattice structure breaks lateral continuous translational symmetry and couples Fourier modes with different wave vectors. It is shown that within a short time interval a long-wavelength deformation excites a collection of modes with wavelengths shorter than the lattice spacing. These modes relax slowly with a common renormalized rate originating from the long-wavelength mode. As a result, and because of the prestress, the slowest relaxation is governed by the intermonolayer friction. Conversely, and most interestingly, forces applied at the scale of the cytoskeleton for a sufficiently long time can cooperatively excite large-scale modes.

  14. Simulation of polyethylene glycol and calcium-mediated membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannuzzo, Martina; De Jong, Djurre H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Raudino, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    We report on the mechanism of membrane fusion mediated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Ca 2+ by means of a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation approach. Our data provide a detailed view on the role of cations and polymer in modulating the interaction between negatively charged apposed membranes. The PEG chains cause a reduction of the inter-lamellar distance and cause an increase in concentration of divalent cations. When thermally driven fluctuations bring the membranes at close contact, a switch from cis to trans Ca 2+ -lipid complexes stabilizes a focal contact acting as a nucleation site for further expansion of the adhesion region. Flipping of lipid tails induces subsequent stalk formation. Together, our results provide a molecular explanation for the synergistic effect of Ca 2+ and PEG on membrane fusion

  15. Flavivirus cell entry and membrane fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Jolanda M.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Wilschut, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue virus and West Nile virus, are enveloped viruses that infect cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and fusion from within acidic endosomes. The cell entry process of flaviviruses is mediated by the viral E glycoprotein. This short review will address recent

  16. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid...... aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model...

  17. Shear-Induced Membrane Fusion in Viscous Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Kogan, Maxim; Feng, Bobo; Nordé n, Bengt; Rocha, Sandra; Beke-Somfai, Tamá s

    2014-01-01

    Large unilamellar lipid vesicles do not normally fuse under fluid shear stress. They might deform and open pores to relax the tension to which they are exposed, but membrane fusion occurring solely due to shear stress has not yet been reported. We

  18. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  19. Absorption and folding of melittin onto lipid bilayer membranes via unbiased atomic detail microsecond molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles H; Wiedman, Gregory; Khan, Ayesha; Ulmschneider, Martin B

    2014-09-01

    Unbiased molecular simulation is a powerful tool to study the atomic details driving functional structural changes or folding pathways of highly fluid systems, which present great challenges experimentally. Here we apply unbiased long-timescale molecular dynamics simulation to study the ab initio folding and partitioning of melittin, a template amphiphilic membrane active peptide. The simulations reveal that the peptide binds strongly to the lipid bilayer in an unstructured configuration. Interfacial folding results in a localized bilayer deformation. Akin to purely hydrophobic transmembrane segments the surface bound native helical conformer is highly resistant against thermal denaturation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments confirm the strong binding and thermostability of the peptide. The study highlights the utility of molecular dynamics simulations for studying transient mechanisms in fluid lipid bilayer systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Formation of 3D cholesterol crystals from 2D nucleation sites in lipid bilayer membranes: implications for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsano, Neta; Fargion, Iael; Wolf, Sharon G; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2015-02-04

    Atherosclerosis is the major precursor of cardiovascular disease. The formation of cholesterol crystals in atherosclerotic plaques is associated with the onset of acute pathology. The cholesterol crystals induce physical injury in the plaque core, promoting cell apoptosis and triggering an increased inflammatory response. Herein we address the question of how cholesterol crystal formation occurs in atherosclerosis. We demonstrate that three-dimensional (3D) cholesterol crystals can undergo directed nucleation from bilayer membranes containing two-dimensional (2D) cholesterol crystalline domains. We studied crystal formation on supported lipid bilayers loaded with exogenous cholesterol and labeled using a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes ordered cholesterol arrays. Our findings show that 3D crystals are formed exclusively on the bilayer regions where there are segregated 2D cholesterol crystalline domains and that they form on the domains. This study has potentially significant implications for our understanding of the crucial step in the mechanism by which atherosclerotic lesions form.

  1. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM 14 N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments

  2. Micro- and nanofabrication methods for ion channel reconstitution in bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Daisuke; Yamaura, Daichi; Arata, Kohei; Ohori, Takeshi; Ma, Teng; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2018-03-01

    The self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) forms the basic structure of the cell membrane and serves as a major barrier against ion movement. Ion channel proteins function as gated pores that permit ion permeation across the BLM. The reconstitution of ion channel proteins in artificially formed BLMs represents a well-defined system for investigating channel functions and screening drug effects on ion channels. In this review, we will discuss our recent microfabrication approaches to the formation of stable BLMs containing ion channel proteins as a potential platform for next-generation drug screening systems. BLMs formed in a microaperture having a tapered edge exhibited highly stable properties, such as a lifetime of ∼65 h and tolerance to solution changes even after the incorporation of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. We also explore a new method of efficiently incorporating human ion channels into BLMs by centrifugation. Our approaches to the formation of stable BLMs and efficient channel incorporation markedly improve the experimental efficiency of BLM reconstitution systems, leading to the realization of a BLM-based high-throughput platform for functional assays of various ion channels.

  3. Effect of vesicle size on the prodan fluorescence in diheptadecanoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membrane under atmospheric and high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masaki; Sawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tamai, Nobutake; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2010-08-17

    The bilayer phase behavior of diheptadecanoylphosphatidylcholine (C17PC) with different vesicle sizes (large multilamellar vesicle (LMV) and giant multilamellar vesicle (GMV)) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy using a polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe Prodan under atmospheric and high pressures. The difference in phase transitions and thermodynamic quantities of the transition was hardly observed between LMV and GMV used here. On the contrary, the Prodan fluorescence in the bilayer membranes changed depending on the size of vesicles as well as on the phase states. From the second derivative of fluorescence spectra, the three-dimensional image plots in which we can see the location of Prodan in the bilayer membrane as blue valleys were constructed for LMV and GMV under atmospheric pressure. The following characteristic behavior was found: (1) the Prodan molecules in GMV can be distributed to not only adjacent glycerol backbone region, but also near bulk-water region in the lamellar gel or ripple gel phase; (2) the blue valleys of GMV became deeper than those of LMV because of the greater surface density of the Prodan molecules per unit area of GMV than LMV; (3) the liquid crystalline phase of the bilayer excludes the Prodan molecules to a more hydrophilic region at the membrane surface with an increase in vesicle size; (4) the accurate information as to the phase transitions is gradually lost with increasing vesicle size. Under the high-pressure condition, the difference in Prodan fluorescence between LMV and GMV was essentially the same as the difference under atmospheric pressure except for the existence of the pressure-induced interdigitated gel phase. Further, we found that Prodan fluorescence spectra in the interdigitated gel phase were especially affected by the size of vesicles. This study revealed that the Prodan molecules can move around the headgroup region by responding not only to the phase state but also to the vesicle size, and they

  4. Conflicting views on the membrane fusion machinery and the fusion pore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jakob B

    2009-01-01

    of the assembly of the fusogenic SNARE-complex. Here, I review conflicting views on the function of the core fusion machinery consisting of the SNAREs, Munc18, complexin, and synaptotagmin. Munc18 controls docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane and initial SNARE-complex assembly, whereas complexin...

  5. Characterization of the functional requirements of West Nile virus membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Smit, Jolanda M

    2010-02-01

    Flaviviruses infect their host cells by a membrane fusion reaction. In this study, we performed a functional analysis of the membrane fusion properties of West Nile virus (WNV) with liposomal target membranes. Membrane fusion was monitored continuously using a lipid mixing assay involving the fluorophore, pyrene. Fusion of WNV with liposomes occurred on the timescale of seconds and was strictly dependent on mildly acidic pH. Optimal fusion kinetics were observed at pH 6.3, the threshold for fusion being pH 6.9. Preincubation of the virus alone at pH 6.3 resulted in a rapid loss of fusion capacity. WNV fusion activity is strongly promoted by the presence of cholesterol in the target membrane. Furthermore, we provide direct evidence that cleavage of prM to M is a requirement for fusion activity of WNV.

  6. Lipid Bilayer Formation on Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-23

    The lipid bilayer is the elemental structure of cell membrane, forming a stable barrier between the interior and exterior of the cell while hosting membrane proteins that enable selective transport of biologically important compounds and cellular recognition. Monitoring the quality and function of lipid bilayers is thus essential and can be performed using electrically active substrates that allow for transduction of signals. Such a promising electronic transducer material is the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) which has provided a plethora of novel bio transducing architectures. The challenge is however in assembling a bilayer on the conducting polymer surface, which is defect-free and has high mobility. Herein, we investigate the fusion of zwitterionic vesicles on a variety of PEDOT:PSS films, but also on an electron transporting, negatively charged organic semiconductor, in order to understand the surface properties that trigger vesicle fusion. The PEDOT:PSS films are prepared from dispersions containing different concentrations of ethylene glycol included as a formulation additive, which gives a handle to modulate surface physicochemical properties without a compromise on the chemical composition. The strong correlation between the polarity of the surface, the fusion of vesicles and the mobility of the resulting bilayer aides extracting design principles for the development of future conducting polymers that will enable the formation of lipid bilayers.

  7. All electrochemical fabrication of a bilayer membrane composed of nanotubular photocatalyst and palladium toward high-purity hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Masashi [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Noda, Kei, E-mail: nodakei@elec.keio.ac.jp [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A bilayer membrane composed of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array and palladium was fabricated. • The TiO{sub 2}/Pd bilayer membrane was prepared with an all-electrochemical process. • The membrane consists of pure Pd and anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with no alloy formation. • Photocatalytic H{sub 2} production and concomitant separation were demonstrated. • High-purity H{sub 2} production rate and apparent quantum yield were evaluated. - Abstract: We developed an all-electrochemical technique for fabricating a bilayer structure of a titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube array (TNA) and a palladium film (TNA/Pd membrane), which works for photocatalytic high-purity hydrogen production. Electroless plating was used for depositing the Pd film on the TNA surface prepared by anodizing a titanium foil. A 3-μm-thick TNA/Pd membrane without any pinholes in a 1.5-cm-diameter area was fabricated by transferring a 1-μm-thick TNA onto an electroless-plated 2-μm-thick Pd film with a mechanical peel-off process. This ultrathin membrane with sufficient mechanical robustness showed photocatalytic H{sub 2} production via methanol reforming under ultraviolet illumination on the TNA side, immediately followed by the purification of the generated H{sub 2} gas through the Pd layer. The hydrogen production rate and the apparent quantum yield for high-purity H{sub 2} production from methanol/water mixture with the TNA/Pd membrane were also examined. This work suggests that palladium electroless plating is more suitable and practical for preparing a well-organized TNA/Pd heterointerface than palladium sputter deposition.

  8. Decoupling of bilayer leaflets under gas supersaturation: nitrogen nanobubbles in a membrane and their implication in decompression sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xianren; Cao, Dapeng

    2018-05-01

    Decompression sickness (also known as diver’s sickness) is a disease that arises from the formation of a bubble inside the body caused by rapid decompression from high atmospheric pressures. However, the nature of pre-existing micronuclei that are proposed for interpreting the formation and growth of the bubble, as well as their very existence, is still highly controversial. In this work, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the nucleation of gas bubbles under the condition of nitrogen supersaturation, in the presence of a lipid bilayer and lipid micelle representing other macromolecules with a smaller hydrophobic region. Our simulation results demonstrate that by crossing a small energy barrier, excess nitrogen molecules can enter the lipid bilayer nearly spontaneously, for which the hydrophobic core serves as a potential well for gas enrichment. At a rather low nitrogen supersaturation, gas molecules in the membrane are dispersed in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer, with a slight increase in membrane thickness. But as the level of gas supersaturation reaches a threshold, the accumulation of N2 molecules in the bilayer center causes the two leaflets to be decoupled and the formation of nanobubbles. Therefore, we propose a nucleation mechanism for bubble formation in a supersaturated solution of inert gas: a cell membrane acts as a potential well for gas enrichment, being an ideal location for forming nanobubbles that induce membrane damage at a high level of gas supersaturation. As opposed to previous models, the new mechanism involves forming gas nuclei in a very low-tension hydrophobic environment, and thus a rather low energy barrier is required and pre-existing bubble micronuclei are not needed.

  9. Channels formed by botulinum, tetanus, and diphtheria toxins in planar lipid bilayers: relevance to translocation of proteins across membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoch, D H; Romero-Mira, M; Ehrlich, B E; Finkelstein, A; DasGupta, B R; Simpson, L L

    1985-01-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as "tunnel proteins" for translocation of active peptide fragments. These f...

  10. Transport Asymmetry of Novel Bi-Layer Hybrid Perfluorinated Membranes on the Base of MF-4SC Modified by Halloysite Nanotubes with Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Filippov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Three types of bi-layer hybrid nanocomposites on the base of perfluorinated cation-exchange membrane MF-4SC (Russian analogue of Nafion®-117 were synthesized and characterized. It was found that two membranes possess the noticeable asymmetry of the current–voltage curve (CVC under changing their orientation towards the applied electric field, despite the absence of asymmetry of diffusion permeability. These phenomena were explained in the frame of the “fine-porous model” expanded for bi-layer membranes. A special procedure to calculate the real values of the diffusion layers thickness and the limiting current density was proposed. Due to asymmetry effects of the current voltage curves of bi-layer hybrid membranes on the base of MF-4SC, halloysite nanotubes and platinum nanoparticles, it is prospective to assemble membrane switches (membrane relays or diodes with predictable transport properties, founded upon the theory developed here.

  11. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J.; Calero, C.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10 −5 cm 2 /s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10 −8 cm 2 /s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of its interaction

  12. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J., E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Calero, C. [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Center for Polymer Studies, Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  13. Channels Formed by Botulinum, Tetanus, and Diphtheria Toxins in Planar Lipid Bilayers: Relevance to Translocation of Proteins across Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, David H.; Romero-Mira, Miryam; Ehrlich, Barbara E.; Finkelstein, Alan; Dasgupta, Bibhuti R.; Simpson, Lance L.

    1985-03-01

    The heavy chains of both botulinum neurotoxin type B and tetanus toxin form channels in planar bilayer membranes. These channels have pH-dependent and voltage-dependent properties that are remarkably similar to those previously described for diphtheria toxin. Selectivity experiments with anions and cations show that the channels formed by the heavy chains of all three toxins are large; thus, these channels could serve as ``tunnel proteins'' for translocation of active peptide fragments. These findings support the hypothesis that the active fragments of botulinum neurotoxin and tetanus toxin, like that of diphtheria toxin, are translocated across the membranes of acidic vesicles.

  14. Membrane Fusion Involved in Neurotransmission: Glimpse from Electron Microscope and Molecular Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion is one of the most fundamental physiological processes in eukaryotes for triggering the fusion of lipid and content, as well as the neurotransmission. However, the architecture features of neurotransmitter release machinery and interdependent mechanism of synaptic membrane fusion have not been extensively studied. This review article expounds the neuronal membrane fusion processes, discusses the fundamental steps in all fusion reactions (membrane aggregation, membrane association, lipid rearrangement and lipid and content mixing and the probable mechanism coupling to the delivery of neurotransmitters. Subsequently, this work summarizes the research on the fusion process in synaptic transmission, using electron microscopy (EM and molecular simulation approaches. Finally, we propose the future outlook for more exciting applications of membrane fusion involved in synaptic transmission, with the aid of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM, cryo-EM (cryo-EM, and molecular simulations.

  15. Membrane Fusion Involved in Neurotransmission: Glimpse from Electron Microscope and Molecular Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiwei; Gou, Lu; Chen, Shuyu; Li, Na; Zhang, Shengli; Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Membrane fusion is one of the most fundamental physiological processes in eukaryotes for triggering the fusion of lipid and content, as well as the neurotransmission. However, the architecture features of neurotransmitter release machinery and interdependent mechanism of synaptic membrane fusion have not been extensively studied. This review article expounds the neuronal membrane fusion processes, discusses the fundamental steps in all fusion reactions (membrane aggregation, membrane association, lipid rearrangement and lipid and content mixing) and the probable mechanism coupling to the delivery of neurotransmitters. Subsequently, this work summarizes the research on the fusion process in synaptic transmission, using electron microscopy (EM) and molecular simulation approaches. Finally, we propose the future outlook for more exciting applications of membrane fusion involved in synaptic transmission, with the aid of stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), cryo-EM (cryo-EM), and molecular simulations. PMID:28638320

  16. Membrane fusion between baculovirus budded virus-enveloped particles and giant liposomes generated using a droplet-transfer method for the incorporation of recombinant membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigami, Misako; Mori, Takaaki; Tomita, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Kingo; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2017-07-01

    Giant proteoliposomes are generally useful as artificial cell membranes in biochemical and biophysical studies, and various procedures for their preparation have been reported. We present here a novel preparation technique that involves the combination of i) cell-sized lipid vesicles (giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs) that are generated using the droplet-transfer method, where lipid monolayer-coated water-in-oil microemulsion droplets interact with oil/water interfaces to form enclosed bilayer vesicles, and ii) budded viruses (BVs) of baculovirus (Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus) that express recombinant transmembrane proteins on their envelopes. GP64, a fusogenic glycoprotein on viral envelopes, is activated by weak acids and is thought to cause membrane fusion with liposomes. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), we observed that the single giant liposomes fused with octadecyl rhodamine B chloride (R18)-labeled wild-type BV envelopes with moderate leakage of entrapped soluble compounds (calcein), and the fusion profile depended on the pH of the exterior solution: membrane fusion occurred at pH ∼4-5. We further demonstrated that recombinant transmembrane proteins, a red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tagged GPCR (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1, CRHR1) and envelope protein GP64 could be partly incorporated into membranes of the individual giant liposomes with a reduction of the pH value, though there were also some immobile fluorescent spots observed on their circumferences. This combination may be useful for preparing giant proteoliposomes containing the desired membranes and inner phases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pair interaction of bilayer-coated nanoscopic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi-Yi, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The pair interaction between bilayer membrane-coated nanosized particles has been explored by using the self-consistent field (SCF) theory. The bilayer membranes are composed of amphiphilic polymers. For different system parameters, the pair-interaction free energies are obtained. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of a sequence of structural transformations of bilayers on spherical particles, which occur during their approaching processes. For different head fractions of amphiphiles, the asymmetrical morphologies between bilayers on two particles and the inverted micellar intermediates have been found in the membrane fusion pathway. These results can benefit the fabrication of vesicles as encapsulation vectors for drug and gene delivery. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  18. Viral membrane fusion: is glycoprotein G of rhabdoviruses a representative of a new class of viral fusion proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Da Poian

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses always gain entry into the cytoplasm by fusion of their lipid envelope with a cell membrane. Some enveloped viruses fuse directly with the host cell plasma membrane after virus binding to the cell receptor. Other enveloped viruses enter the cells by the endocytic pathway, and fusion depends on the acidification of the endosomal compartment. In both cases, virus-induced membrane fusion is triggered by conformational changes in viral envelope glycoproteins. Two different classes of viral fusion proteins have been described on the basis of their molecular architecture. Several structural data permitted the elucidation of the mechanisms of membrane fusion mediated by class I and class II fusion proteins. In this article, we review a number of results obtained by our laboratory and by others that suggest that the mechanisms involved in rhabdovirus fusion are different from those used by the two well-studied classes of viral glycoproteins. We focus our discussion on the electrostatic nature of virus binding and interaction with membranes, especially through phosphatidylserine, and on the reversibility of the conformational changes of the rhabdovirus glycoprotein involved in fusion. Taken together, these data suggest the existence of a third class of fusion proteins and support the idea that new insights should emerge from studies of membrane fusion mediated by the G protein of rhabdoviruses. In particular, the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the G protein or even of the fusion peptide at different pH's might provide valuable information for understanding the fusion mechanism of this new class of fusion proteins.

  19. Experimental Investigations of Direct and Converse Flexoelectric Effect in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Angelio Todorov

    Flexoelectric coefficients (direct and converse), electric properties (capacitance and resistivity) and mechanical properties (thickness and elastic coefficients) have been determined for bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL), glycerol monoleate (GMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidyl serine (PS) as a function of frequency, pH and surface charge modifiers. Direct flexoelectric effect manifested itself in the development of microvolt range a.c. potential (U_{f}) upon subjecting one side of a BLM to an oscillating hydrostatic pressure, in the 100-1000 Hz range. Operationally, the flexoelectric coefficient (f) is expressed by the ratio between U_{f} and the change of curvature (c) which accompanied the flexing of the membrane. Membrane curvature was determined by means of either the electric method (capacitance microphone effect) or by the newly developed method of stroboscopic interferometry. Real-time stroboscopic interferometry coupled with simultaneous electric measurements, provided a direct method for the determination of f. Two different frequency regimes of f were recognized. At low frequencies (300 Hz), associated with free mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 24.1 times 10^{-19} and 0.87 times 10^ {-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. At high frequencies (>300 Hz), associated with blocked mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 16.5 times 10^ {-19} and 0.30 times 10^{-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. The theoretically calculated value for the GMO BLM oscillating at high frequency (0.12 times 10^{-19 } Coulombs) agreed well with that determined experimentally (0.3 times 10 ^{-19} Coulombs). For charged bovine brain PS BLM the observed flexocoefficient was f = 4.0 times 10^{ -18} Coulombs. Converse flexoelectric effect manifested itself in voltage-induced BLM curvature. Observations were carried out on uranyl acetate (UA) stabilized PS BLM under a.c. excitation. Frequency dependence of f

  20. The coronavirus spike protein : mechanisms of membrane fusion and virion incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The coronavirus spike protein is a membrane-anchored glycoprotein responsible for virus-cell attachment and membrane fusion, prerequisites for a successful virus infection. In this thesis, two aspects are described regarding the molecular biology of the coronavirus spike protein: its membrane fusion

  1. Hypothesis: spring-loaded boomerang mechanism of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2003-07-11

    Substantial progress has been made in recent years to augment the current understanding of structures and interactions that promote viral membrane fusion. This progress is reviewed with a particular emphasis on recently determined structures of viral fusion domains and their interactions with lipid membranes. The results from the different structural and thermodynamic experimental approaches are synthesized into a new proposed mechanism, termed the "spring-loaded boomerang" mechanism of membrane fusion, which is presented here as a hypothesis.

  2. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  3. Study of pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIPs) interaction with lipid bilayer of membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika

    The pH-dependent interactions of pHLIPsRTM (pH (Low) Insertion Peptides) with lipid bilayer of membrane provides an opportunity to study and address fundamental questions of protein folding/insertion into membrane and unfolding/exit, as well as develop novel approach to target acidic diseased tissue such as cancer, ischemic myocardium, infection and others. The main goal of the work presented here is to answer the following questions: - What is the molecular mechanism of spontaneous insertion and folding of a peptide in a lipid bilayer of membrane; - What is the molecular mechanism of unfolding and exit of a peptide from a lipid bilayer of membrane; - How polar cargo attached to a peptide's inserting end might affect the process of insertion into a lipid bilayer of membrane; How sequence variation will affect a peptide's interactions with a lipid bilayer of membrane (partitioning into bilayer at neutral and low pH; apparent pK of insertion) with the main goal to identify the best pHLIP variants for imaging and therapy of pathological states such as cancer and others. It has been demonstrated that pHLIP insertion into a membrane is associated with the protonation of Asp/Glu residues, which leads to an increase of hydrophobicity that triggers the folding and insertion of the peptide across a lipid bilayer. The insertion of the pHLIP is unidirectional and it is accompanied by the release of energy. Therefore, the energy of membrane associated-folding can be used to favor the movement of cell-impermeable polar cargo molecules across the hydrophobic membrane bilayer when they are attached to the inserting end of pHLIP. Both pH-targeting behavior and molecular translocation have been demonstrated in cultured cells and in vivo. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop a novel concept in drug delivery, which is based on the use of a monomeric, pH-sensitive peptide molecular transporter, to deliver agents that are significantly more polar than conventional drugs

  4. Effect of intra-membrane C60 fullerenes on the modulus of elasticity and the mechanical resistance of gel and fluid lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Contera, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    Penetration and partition of C60 to the lipid bilayer core are both relevant to C60 toxicity, and useful to realise C60 biomedical potential. A key aspect is the effect of C60 on bilayer mechanical properties. Here, we present an experimental study on the mechanical effect of the incorporation of C60 into the hydrophobic core of fluid and gel phase zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers. We demonstrate its incorporation inside the hydrophobic lipid core and the effect on the packing of the lipids and the vesicle size using a combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser light scattering. Using AFM we measured the Young's modulus of elasticity (E) of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) in the absence (presence) of intra-membranous C60 at 24.5 °C. E of fluid phase supported bilayers is not altered by C60, but E increases with incorporation of C60 in gel phase bilayers. The increase is higher for longer hydrocarbon chains: 1.6 times for DPPC and 2 times for DSPC. However the mechanical resistance of gel phase bilayers of curved bilayered structures decreases with the incorporation of C60. Our combined results indicate that C60 causes a decrease in gel phase lipid mobility, i.e. an increase in membrane viscosity.

  5. Plasmonic nanoantenna arrays for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of lipid molecules embedded in a bilayer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühler, Paul; Weber, Max; Lohmüller, Theobald

    2014-06-25

    We demonstrate a strategy for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of supported lipid membranes with arrays of plasmonic nanoantennas. Colloidal lithography refined with plasma etching is used to synthesize arrays of triangular shaped gold nanoparticles. Reducing the separation distance between the triangle tips leads to plasmonic coupling and to a strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field in the nanotriangle gap. As a result, the Raman scattering intensity of molecules that are located at this plasmonic "hot-spot" can be increased by several orders of magnitude. The nanoantenna array is then embedded with a supported phospholipid membrane which is fluid at room temperature and spans the antenna gap. This configuration offers the advantage that molecules that are mobile within the bilayer membrane can enter the "hot-spot" region via diffusion and can therefore be measured by SERS without static entrapment or adsorption of the molecules to the antenna itself.

  6. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  7. Lipid diffusion in the distal and proximal leaflets of supported lipid bilayer membranes studied by single particle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, Rafael L.; Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Haran, Gilad

    2018-03-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been studied extensively as simple but powerful models for cellular membranes. Yet, potential differences in the dynamics of the two leaflets of a SLB remain poorly understood. Here, using single particle tracking, we obtain a detailed picture of bilayer dynamics. We observe two clearly separate diffusing populations, fast and slow, that we associate with motion in the distal and proximal leaflets of the SLB, respectively, based on fluorescence quenching experiments. We estimate diffusion coefficients using standard techniques as well as a new method based on the blur of images due to motion. Fitting the observed diffusion coefficients to a two-leaflet membrane hydrodynamic model allows for the simultaneous determination of the intermonolayer friction coefficient and the substrate-membrane friction coefficient, without any prior assumptions on the strengths of the relevant interactions. Remarkably, our calculations suggest that the viscosity of the interfacial water confined between the membrane and the substrate is elevated by ˜104 as compared to bulk water. Using hidden Markov model analysis, we then obtain insight into the transbilayer movement of lipids. We find that lipid flip-flop dynamics are very fast, with half times in the range of seconds. Importantly, we find little evidence for membrane defect mediated lipid flip-flop for SLBs at temperatures well above the solid-to-liquid transition, though defects seem to be involved when the SLBs are cooled down. Our work thus shows that the combination of single particle tracking and advanced hydrodynamic modeling provides a powerful means to obtain insight into membrane dynamics.

  8. Cholesterol Induced Changes in the Characteristics of the Time Series From Planar Lipid Bilayer Membrane during Electroporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulska, M.; Koronkiewicz, S.; Kalinowski, S.

    2002-01-01

    The electroporation can be used as a non-toxic method for introducing exogenous macromolecules, especially DNA and drugs, into various types of cells. Research in to new therapeutic methods based on Long Duration Electroporation (LDE) is of special interest. A new current-clamp method makes possible the electroporation of very long duration with no damage to bio-membranes. In this paper we compare responses of lipid planar bilayer membranes at physiological concentration of KCl, with lipid membranes formed at higher ionic strength, and membranes containing cholesterol. A longer lifespan of the membranes with cholesterol and membranes with increased ionic strength could be observed. Sensitivity of the power spectrum response to the presence of cholesterol, ionic strength, current intensity, and membrane ageing was examined. The membrane memory was analyzed by means of autocorrelation function and rescaled range analysis. We showed that the memory of the system decreases for higher current intensities and this relation is pronounced better at higher ionic strength. At low current intensities all membranes showed slightly persistent type of noise behavior with crossover to Brownian type of noise for higher current value. The transition w as much faster for higher ionic strength, where the next transition to anti-persistent response was observed for relatively low currents. Very interesting results were obtained from power spectrum analysis. At low current intensity, all membranes exhibited 1/f noise, which disappeared for higher currents, maintaining f β type with rising value of β. Membranes formed at lower ionic strength and with cholesterol showed a pronounced tendency to lose flicker noise while ageing, also with rising β value. (author)

  9. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar B. Nikolov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G and class I fusion (F envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins.

  10. Physiological levels of diacylglycerols in phospholipid membranes induce membrane fusion and stabilize inverted phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, D.P.; Banschbach, J.; Alford, D.; Ellens, H.; Lis, L.J.; Quinn, P.J.; Yeagle, P.L.; Bentz, J.

    1989-01-01

    In a previous paper, it was shown that liposome fusion rates are substantially enhanced under the same conditions which induce isotropic 31 P NMR resonances in multilamellar dispersions of the same lipid. Both of these phenomena occur within the same temperature interval, ΔT I , below the L α /H II phase transition temperature, T H . T H and ΔT I can be extremely sensitive to the lipid composition. The present work shows that 2 mol % of diacylglycerols like those produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle in vivo can lower T H , ΔT I , and the temperature for fast membrane fusion by 15-20 degree C. N-Monomethylated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine is used as a model system. These results show that physiological levels of diacylglycerols can substantially increase the susceptibility of phospholipid membranes to fusion. This suggests that, in addition to their role in protein kinase C activation, diacylglycerols could play a more direct role in the fusion event during stimulus-exocytosis coupling in vivo

  11. Asymmetric bi-layer PFSA membranes as model systems for the study of water management in the PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Z; Peng, A Z; Morin, A; Huguet, P; Lanteri, Y; Deabate, S

    2014-10-14

    New bi-layer PFSA membranes made of Nafion® NRE212 and Aquivion™ E79-05s with different equivalent weights are prepared with the aim of managing water repartition in the PEMFC. The membrane water transport properties, i.e. back-diffusion and electroosmosis, as well as the electrochemical performances, are compared to those of state-of-art materials. The actual water content (the inner water concentration profile across the membrane thickness) is measured under operation in the fuel cell by in situ Raman microspectroscopy. The orientation of the equivalent weight gradient with respect to the water external gradient and to the proton flow direction affects the membrane water content, the water transport ability and, thus, the fuel cell performances. Higher power outputs, related to lower ohmic losses, are observed when the membrane is assembled with the lower equivalent weight layer (Aquivion™) at the anode side. This orientation, corresponding to enhanced water transport by back-flow while electroosmosis remains unaffected, results in the higher hydration of the membrane and of the anode active layer during operation. Also, polarization data suggest a different water repartition in the fuel cell along the on-plane direction. Even if the interest in multi-layer PFSA membranes as perspective electrolytes for PEMFCs is not definitively attested, these materials appear to be excellent model systems to establish relationships between the membrane transport properties, the water distribution in the fuel cell and the electrochemical performances. Thanks to the micrometric resolution, in situ Raman microspectroscopy proves to be a unique tool to measure the actual hydration of the membrane at the surface swept by the hydrated feed gases during operation, so that it can be used as a local probe of the water concentration evolution along the gas distribution channels according to changing working conditions.

  12. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales

  13. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  14. Paramyxovirus membrane fusion: Lessons from the F and HN atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, Robert A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2006-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses enter cells by fusion of their lipid envelope with the target cell plasma membrane. Fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane allows entry of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion occurs at neutral pH, but the trigger mechanism that controls the viral entry machinery such that it occurs at the right time and in the right place remains to be elucidated. Two viral glycoproteins are key to the infection process-an attachment protein that varies among different paramyxoviruses and the fusion (F) protein, which is found in all paramyxoviruses. For many of the paramyxoviruses (parainfluenza viruses 1-5, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus and others), the attachment protein is the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) protein. In the last 5 years, atomic structures of paramyxovirus F and HN proteins have been reported. The knowledge gained from these structures towards understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion is described

  15. On-Chip Electrophoresis in Supported Lipid Bilayer Membranes Achieved Using Low Potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weerd, Jasper; Krabbenborg, Sven; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes; Huskens, Jurriaan; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    A micro supported lipid bilayer (SLB) electrophoresis method was developed, which functions at low potentials and appreciable operating times. To this end, (hydroxymethyl)-ferrocene (FcCH2OH) was employed to provide an electrochemical reaction at the anode and cathode at low applied potential to

  16. Supported lipid bilayer on nanocrystalline diamond: dual optical and field-effect sensor for membrane disruption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ang, P.K.; Loh, K.P.; Wohland, T.; Nesládek, Miloš; Van Hove, E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2009), s. 109-116 ISSN 1616-301X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * biocompatibility * supported lipid bilayers * biosensors * solution gate field effect transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 6.990, year: 2009

  17. Bilayer Localization of Membrane-Active Peptides Studied in Biomimetic Vesicles by Visible and Fluorescence Spectroscopies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sheynis, T.; Sýkora, Jan; Benda, Aleš; Kolusheva, S.; Hof, Martin; Jelinek, R.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 270, č. 22 (2003), s. 4478-4487 ISSN 0014-2956 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : solvent relaxation * fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * lipid bilayers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.001, year: 2003

  18. Inhibition of HIV-1 endocytosis allows lipid mixing at the plasma membrane, but not complete fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de la Vega Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently provided evidence that HIV-1 enters HeLa-derived TZM-bl and lymphoid CEMss cells by fusing with endosomes, whereas its fusion with the plasma membrane does not proceed beyond the lipid mixing step. The mechanism of restriction of HIV-1 fusion at the cell surface and/or the factors that aid the virus entry from endosomes remain unclear. Results We examined HIV-1 fusion with a panel of target cells lines and with primary CD4+ T cells. Kinetic measurements of fusion combined with time-resolved imaging of single viruses further reinforced the notion that HIV-1 enters the cells via endocytosis and fusion with endosomes. Furthermore, we attempted to deliberately redirect virus fusion to the plasma membrane, using two experimental strategies. First, the fusion reaction was synchronized by pre-incubating the viruses with cells at reduced temperature to allow CD4 and coreceptors engagement, but not the virus uptake or fusion. Subsequent shift to a physiological temperature triggered accelerated virus uptake followed by entry from endosomes, but did not permit fusion at the cell surface. Second, blocking HIV-1 endocytosis by a small-molecule dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, resulted in transfer of viral lipids to the plasma membrane without any detectable release of the viral content into the cytosol. We also found that a higher concentration of dynasore is required to block the HIV-endosome fusion compared to virus internalization. Conclusions Our results further support the notion that HIV-1 enters disparate cell types through fusion with endosomes. The block of HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane at a post-lipid mixing stage shows that this membrane is not conducive to fusion pore formation and/or enlargement. The ability of dynasore to interfere with the virus-endosome fusion suggests that dynamin could be involved in two distinct steps of HIV-1 entry - endocytosis and fusion within intracellular compartments.

  19. pH-Dependent Formation and Disintegration of the Influenza A Virus Protein Scaffold To Provide Tension for Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, O V; Shilova, L A; Kachala, M V; Tashkin, V Y; Sokolov, V S; Fedorova, N V; Baratova, L A; Knyazev, D G; Zimmerberg, J; Chizmadzhev, Y A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is taken up from a pH-neutral extracellular milieu into an endosome, whose contents then acidify, causing changes in the viral matrix protein (M1) that coats the inner monolayer of the viral lipid envelope. At a pH of ~6, M1 interacts with the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) in a putative priming stage; at this stage, the interactions of the M1 scaffold coating the lipid envelope are intact. The M1 coat disintegrates as acidification continues to a pH of ~5 to clear a physical path for the viral genome to transit from the viral interior to the cytoplasm. Here we investigated the physicochemical mechanism of M1's pH-dependent disintegration. In neutral media, the adsorption of M1 protein on the lipid bilayer was electrostatic in nature and reversible. The energy of the interaction of M1 molecules with each other in M1 dimers was about 10 times as weak as that of the interaction of M1 molecules with the lipid bilayer. Acidification drives conformational changes in M1 molecules due to changes in the M1 charge, leading to alterations in their electrostatic interactions. Dropping the pH from 7.1 to 6.0 did not disturb the M1 layer; dropping it lower partially desorbed M1 because of increased repulsion between M1 monomers still stuck to the membrane. Lipid vesicles coated with M1 demonstrated pH-dependent rupture of the vesicle membrane, presumably because of the tension generated by this repulsive force. Thus, the disruption of the vesicles coincident with M1 protein scaffold disintegration at pH 5 likely stretches the lipid membrane to the point of rupture, promoting fusion pore widening for RNP release. Influenza remains a top killer of human beings throughout the world, in part because of the influenza virus's rapid binding to cells and its uptake into compartments hidden from the immune system. To attack the influenza virus during this time of hiding, we need to understand the physical forces that allow the internalized virus to infect the cell. In

  20. The influence of oscillating electromagnetic fields on membrane structure and function: Synthetic liposome and natural membrane bilayer systems with direct application to the controlled delivery of chemical agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liburdy, R.P.; de Manincor, D.; Fingado, B.

    1989-09-01

    Investigations have been conducted to determine if an imposed electromagnetic field can influence membrane transport, and ion and drug permeability in both synthetic and natural cell membrane systems. Microwave fields enhance accumulation of sodium in the lymphocyte and induce protein shedding at Tc. Microwaves also trigger membrane permeability of liposome systems under specific field exposure conditions. Sensitivity varies in a defined way in bilayers displaying a membrane structural phase transition temperature, Tc; maximal release was observed at or near Tc. Significantly, liposome systems without a membrane phase transition were also found to experience permeability increases but, in contrast, this response was temperature independent. The above results indicate that field-enhanced drug release occurs in liposome vesicles that possess a Tc as well as non-Tc liposomes. Additional studies extend non-Tc liposome responses to the in vivo case in which microwaves trigger Gentamicin release from a liposome ''depot'' placed subcutaneously in the rat hind leg. In addition, evidence is provided that cell surface sequestered liposomes can be triggered by microwave fields to release drugs directly into target cells. 24 refs., 6 figs

  1. A tethering complex drives the terminal stage of SNARE-dependent membrane fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Massimo; Risselada, Herre Jelger; Lürick, Anna; Ungermann, Christian; Mayer, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Membrane fusion in eukaryotic cells mediates the biogenesis of organelles, vesicular traffic between them, and exo- and endocytosis of important signalling molecules, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. Distinct tasks in intracellular membrane fusion have been assigned to conserved protein systems. Tethering proteins mediate the initial recognition and attachment of membranes, whereas SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein complexes are considered as the core fusion engine. SNARE complexes provide mechanical energy to distort membranes and drive them through a hemifusion intermediate towards the formation of a fusion pore. This last step is highly energy-demanding. Here we combine the in vivo and in vitro fusion of yeast vacuoles with molecular simulations to show that tethering proteins are critical for overcoming the final energy barrier to fusion pore formation. SNAREs alone drive vacuoles only into the hemifused state. Tethering proteins greatly increase the volume of SNARE complexes and deform the site of hemifusion, which lowers the energy barrier for pore opening and provides the driving force. Thereby, tethering proteins assume a crucial mechanical role in the terminal stage of membrane fusion that is likely to be conserved at multiple steps of vesicular traffic. We therefore propose that SNAREs and tethering proteins should be considered as a single, non-dissociable device that drives fusion. The core fusion machinery may then be larger and more complex than previously thought.

  2. Early and late HIV-1 membrane fusion events are impaired by sphinganine lipidated peptides that target the fusion site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Yoel A; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Viard, Mathias; Porat, Ziv; Blumenthal, Robert; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-07-15

    Lipid-conjugated peptides have advanced the understanding of membrane protein functions and the roles of lipids in the membrane milieu. These lipopeptides modulate various biological systems such as viral fusion. A single function has been suggested for the lipid, binding to the membrane and thus elevating the local concentration of the peptide at the target site. In the present paper, we challenged this argument by exploring in-depth the antiviral mechanism of lipopeptides, which comprise sphinganine, the lipid backbone of DHSM (dihydrosphingomyelin), and an HIV-1 envelope-derived peptide. Surprisingly, we discovered a partnership between the lipid and the peptide that impaired early membrane fusion events by reducing CD4 receptor lateral diffusion and HIV-1 fusion peptide-mediated lipid mixing. Moreover, only the joint function of sphinganine and its conjugate peptide disrupted HIV-1 fusion protein assembly and folding at the later fusion steps. Via imaging techniques we revealed for the first time the direct localization of these lipopeptides to the virus-cell and cell-cell contact sites. Overall, the findings of the present study may suggest lipid-protein interactions in various biological systems and may help uncover a role for elevated DHSM in HIV-1 and its target cell membranes.

  3. The TIP30 protein complex, arachidonic acid and coenzyme A are required for vesicle membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengliang Zhang

    Full Text Available Efficient membrane fusion has been successfully mimicked in vitro using artificial membranes and a number of cellular proteins that are currently known to participate in membrane fusion. However, these proteins are not sufficient to promote efficient fusion between biological membranes, indicating that critical fusogenic factors remain unidentified. We have recently identified a TIP30 protein complex containing TIP30, acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 4 (ACSL4 and Endophilin B1 (Endo B1 that promotes the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles, which transport endosomal acidification enzymes vacuolar (H⁺-ATPases (V-ATPases to the early endosomes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that the TIP30 protein complex facilitates the fusion of endocytic vesicles with Rab5a vesicles in vitro. Fusion of the two vesicles also depends on arachidonic acid, coenzyme A and the synthesis of arachidonyl-CoA by ACSL4. Moreover, the TIP30 complex is able to transfer arachidonyl groups onto phosphatidic acid (PA, producing a new lipid species that is capable of inducing close contact between membranes. Together, our data suggest that the TIP30 complex facilitates biological membrane fusion through modification of PA on membranes.

  4. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-08-09

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated.

  5. Protein-induced fusion can be modulated by target membrane lipids through a structural switch at the level of the fusion peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pecheur, EI; Martin, [No Value; Bienvenue, A; Ruysschaert, JM; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Regulatory features of protein-induced membrane fusion are largely unclear, particularly at the level of the fusion peptide. Fusion peptides being part of larger protein complexes, such investigations are met with technical limitations. Here, we show that the fusion activity of influenza virus or

  6. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  7. Multi-layered nanoparticles for penetrating the endosome and nuclear membrane via a step-wise membrane fusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Hidetaka; Kudo, Asako; Minoura, Arisa; Yamaguti, Masaya; Khalil, Ikramy A; Moriguchi, Rumiko; Masuda, Tomoya; Danev, Radostin; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Efficient targeting of DNA to the nucleus is a prerequisite for effective gene therapy. The gene-delivery vehicle must penetrate through the plasma membrane, and the DNA-impermeable double-membraned nuclear envelope, and deposit its DNA cargo in a form ready for transcription. Here we introduce a concept for overcoming intracellular membrane barriers that involves step-wise membrane fusion. To achieve this, a nanotechnology was developed that creates a multi-layered nanoparticle, which we refer to as a Tetra-lamellar Multi-functional Envelope-type Nano Device (T-MEND). The critical structural elements of the T-MEND are a DNA-polycation condensed core coated with two nuclear membrane-fusogenic inner envelopes and two endosome-fusogenic outer envelopes, which are shed in stepwise fashion. A double-lamellar membrane structure is required for nuclear delivery via the stepwise fusion of double layered nuclear membrane structure. Intracellular membrane fusions to endosomes and nuclear membranes were verified by spectral imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between donor and acceptor fluorophores that had been dually labeled on the liposome surface. Coating the core with the minimum number of nucleus-fusogenic lipid envelopes (i.e., 2) is essential to facilitate transcription. As a result, the T-MEND achieves dramatic levels of transgene expression in non-dividing cells.

  8. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, Kaustubh R.; Gopinath, T.; Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Kitchen, Jason; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Brey, William W.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring 1 H- 15 N dipolar couplings (DC) and 15 N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles’ heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([ 1 H, 15 N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D 15 N/ 15 N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the 15 N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers.

  9. Multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR experiments enable the sequential assignment of uniformly 15N labeled integral membrane proteins in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Kaustubh R; Gopinath, T; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Kitchen, Jason; Gor'kov, Peter L; Brey, William W; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-11-01

    Oriented solid-state NMR is the most direct methodology to obtain the orientation of membrane proteins with respect to the lipid bilayer. The method consists of measuring (1)H-(15)N dipolar couplings (DC) and (15)N anisotropic chemical shifts (CSA) for membrane proteins that are uniformly aligned with respect to the membrane bilayer. A significant advantage of this approach is that tilt and azimuthal (rotational) angles of the protein domains can be directly derived from analytical expression of DC and CSA values, or, alternatively, obtained by refining protein structures using these values as harmonic restraints in simulated annealing calculations. The Achilles' heel of this approach is the lack of suitable experiments for sequential assignment of the amide resonances. In this Article, we present a new pulse sequence that integrates proton driven spin diffusion (PDSD) with sensitivity-enhanced PISEMA in a 3D experiment ([(1)H,(15)N]-SE-PISEMA-PDSD). The incorporation of 2D (15)N/(15)N spin diffusion experiments into this new 3D experiment leads to the complete and unambiguous assignment of the (15)N resonances. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated for the membrane protein sarcolipin reconstituted in magnetically aligned lipid bicelles. Taken with low electric field probe technology, this approach will propel the determination of sequential assignment as well as structure and topology of larger integral membrane proteins in aligned lipid bilayers. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  10. Adsorption and Orientation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP Monomer at Anionic Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Membrane-Mediated Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghong Wei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding and aggregation cause serious degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and type II diabetes. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP is the major component of amyloid deposits found in the pancreas of type II diabetic patients. Increasing evidence suggests that β-cell death is related to the interaction of hIAPP with the cellular membrane, which accelerates peptide aggregation. In this study, as a first step towards understanding the membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation, we investigate the atomic details of the initial step of hIAPP-membrane interaction, including the adsorption orientation and conformation of hIAPP monomer at an anionic POPG lipid bilayer by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We found that hIAPP monomer is quickly adsorbed to bilayer surface, and the adsorption is initiated from the N-terminal residues driven by strong electrostatic interactions of the positively-charged residues K1 and R11 with negatively-charged lipid headgroups. hIAPP binds parallel to the lipid bilayer surface as a stable helix through residues 7–22, consistent with previous experimental study. Remarkably, different simulations lead to the same binding orientation stabilized by electrostatic and H-bonding interactions, with residues R11, F15 and S19 oriented towards membrane and hydrophobic residues L12, A13, L16 and V17 exposed to solvent. Implications for membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation are discussed.

  11. The cytosolic domain of T-cell receptor ζ associates with membranes in a dynamic equilibrium and deeply penetrates the bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kerstin; Eells, Rebecca; Heinrich, Frank; Rintoul, Stefanie; Josey, Brian; Shekhar, Prabhanshu; Lösche, Mathias; Stern, Lawrence J

    2017-10-27

    Interactions between lipid bilayers and the membrane-proximal regions of membrane-associated proteins play important roles in regulating membrane protein structure and function. The T-cell antigen receptor is an assembly of eight single-pass membrane-spanning subunits on the surface of T lymphocytes that initiates cytosolic signaling cascades upon binding antigens presented by MHC-family proteins on antigen-presenting cells. Its ζ-subunit contains multiple cytosolic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs involved in signal transduction, and this subunit by itself is sufficient to couple extracellular stimuli to intracellular signaling events. Interactions of the cytosolic domain of ζ (ζ cyt ) with acidic lipids have been implicated in the initiation and regulation of transmembrane signaling. ζ cyt is unstructured in solution. Interaction with acidic phospholipids induces structure, but its disposition when bound to lipid bilayers is controversial. Here, using surface plasmon resonance and neutron reflection, we characterized the interaction of ζ cyt with planar lipid bilayers containing mixtures of acidic and neutral lipids. We observed two binding modes of ζ cyt to the bilayers in dynamic equilibrium: one in which ζ cyt is peripherally associated with lipid headgroups and one in which it penetrates deeply into the bilayer. Such an equilibrium between the peripherally bound and embedded forms of ζ cyt apparently controls accessibility of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation signal transduction pathway. Our results reconcile conflicting findings of the ζ structure reported in previous studies and provide a framework for understanding how lipid interactions regulate motifs to tyrosine kinases and may regulate the T-cell antigen receptor biological activities for this cell-surface receptor system.

  12. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao, E-mail: hk228@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  13. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  14. Measuring the strength of interaction between the Ebola fusion peptide and lipid rafts: implications for membrane fusion and virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica S Freitas

    Full Text Available The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO₁₆ is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO₁₆ and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM, a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO₁₆ to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO₁₆ was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs, but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO₁₆. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO₁₆ and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases.

  15. Measuring the strength of interaction between the Ebola fusion peptide and lipid rafts: implications for membrane fusion and virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mônica S; Follmer, Cristian; Costa, Lilian T; Vilani, Cecília; Bianconi, M Lucia; Achete, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Jerson L

    2011-01-13

    The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO₁₆) is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO₁₆ and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM), a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO₁₆ to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO₁₆ was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs), but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO₁₆. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO₁₆ and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases.

  16. Characterization of HCoV-229E fusion core: Implications for structure basis of coronavirus membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cheng; Feng Youjun; Gao Feng; Zhang Qiangmin; Wang Ming

    2006-01-01

    Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E), a member of group I coronaviruses, has been identified as one of the major viral agents causing respiratory tract diseases in humans for nearly 40 years. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of the membrane fusion mediated by the spike (S) protein of HCoV-229E remains elusive. Here, we report, for the first time, a rationally designed fusion core of HCoV-229E (HR1-SGGRGG-HR2), which was in vitro produced in GST prokaryotic expression system. Multiple lines of experimental data including gel-filtration, chemical cross-linking, and circular diagram (CD) demonstrated that the HCoV-229E fusion core possesses the typical properties of the trimer of coiled-coil heterodimer (six α-helix bundle). 3D structure modeling presents its most-likely structure, similar to those of coronaviruses that have been well-documented. Collectively, HCoV-229E S protein belongs to the type I fusion protein, which is characterized by the existence of two heptad-repeat regions (HR1 and HR2), furthermore, the available knowledge concerning HCoV-229E fusion core may make it possible to design small molecule or polypeptide drugs targeting the membrane fusion, a crucial step of HCoV-229E infection

  17. Stress analysis and fail-safe design of bilayered tubular supported ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Søgaard, Martin

    2014-01-01

    . Stress distributions in two membrane systems have been analyzed and routes to minimize stress are proposed. For a Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δBa0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3−δ membrane supported on a porous substrate of the same material under pressure-vacuum operation, the optimal configuration in terms...... for both membrane systems at operating conditions in the range of practical interest....

  18. Sphingolipids activate membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus in a stereospecific manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Lise; Corver, J; Erukulla, R K

    1995-01-01

    The alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) enters cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Subsequently, triggered by the acid pH in endosomes, the viral envelope fuses with the endosomal membrane. Membrane fusion of SFV has been shown previously to be dependent on the presence of cholesterol ...

  19. Translocation of cell penetrating peptides and calcium-induced membrane fusion share same mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Magarkar, Aniket; Allolio, Christoph; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Baxová, Katarína; Šachl, Radek; Horinek, D.; Heinz, V.; Rachel, R.; Ziegler, C.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, Suppl 1 (2017), S386 ISSN 0175-7571. [IUPAB congress /19./ and EBSA congress /11./. 16.07.2017-20.07.2017, Edinburgh] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : membrane interactions * membrane fusion * cell penetration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  20. Solute transport on the sub 100 ms scale across the lipid bilayer membrane of individual proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, Gabriel; Tabaei, Seyed R; Beech, Jason; Kvassman, Jan; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-11-21

    Screening assays designed to probe ligand and drug-candidate regulation of membrane proteins responsible for ion-translocation across the cell membrane are wide spread, while efficient means to screen membrane-protein facilitated transport of uncharged solutes are sparse. We report on a microfluidic-based system to monitor transport of uncharged solutes across the membrane of multiple (>100) individually resolved surface-immobilized liposomes. This was accomplished by rapidly switching (solution above dye-containing liposomes immobilized on the floor of a microfluidic channel. With liposomes encapsulating the pH-sensitive dye carboxyfluorescein (CF), internal changes in pH induced by transport of a weak acid (acetic acid) could be measured at time scales down to 25 ms. The applicability of the set up to study biological transport reactions was demonstrated by examining the osmotic water permeability of human aquaporin (AQP5) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. In this case, the rate of osmotic-induced volume changes of individual proteoliposomes was time resolved by imaging the self quenching of encapsulated calcein in response to an osmotic gradient. Single-liposome analysis of both pure and AQP5-containing liposomes revealed a relatively large heterogeneity in osmotic permeability. Still, in the case of AQP5-containing liposomes, the single liposome data suggest that the membrane-protein incorporation efficiency depends on liposome size, with higher incorporation efficiency for larger liposomes. The benefit of low sample consumption and automated liquid handling is discussed in terms of pharmaceutical screening applications.

  1. Design, construction, and characterization of high-performance membrane fusion devices with target-selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamane, Iori; Tsuboi, Mana; Ando, Shun; Matsuda, Kiyomi

    2012-01-31

    Membrane fusion proteins such as the hemagglutinin glycoprotein have target recognition and fusion accelerative domains, where some synergistically working elements are essential for target-selective and highly effective native membrane fusion systems. In this work, novel membrane fusion devices bearing such domains were designed and constructed. We selected a phenylboronic acid derivative as a recognition domain for a sugar-like target and a transmembrane-peptide (Leu-Ala sequence) domain interacting with the target membrane, forming a stable hydrophobic α-helix and accelerating the fusion process. Artificial membrane fusion behavior between the synthetic devices in which pilot and target liposomes were incorporated was characterized by lipid-mixing and inner-leaflet lipid-mixing assays. Consequently, the devices bearing both the recognition and transmembrane domains brought about a remarkable increase in the initial rate for the membrane fusion compared with the devices containing the recognition domain alone. In addition, a weakly acidic pH-responsive device was also constructed by replacing three Leu residues in the transmembrane-peptide domain by Glu residues. The presence of Glu residues made the acidic pH-dependent hydrophobic α-helix formation possible as expected. The target-selective liposome-liposome fusion was accelerated in a weakly acidic pH range when the Glu-substituted device was incorporated in pilot liposomes. The use of this pH-responsive device seems to be a potential strategy for novel applications in a liposome-based delivery system. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Cytosol-dependent membrane fusion in ER, nuclear envelope and nuclear pore assembly: biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikova, Elvira R; Melikov, Kamran; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope rearrangements after mitosis are often studied in the reconstitution system based on Xenopus egg extract. In our recent work we partially replaced the membrane vesicles in the reconstitution mix with protein-free liposomes to explore the relative contributions of cytosolic and transmembrane proteins. Here we discuss our finding that cytosolic proteins mediate fusion between membranes lacking functional transmembrane proteins and the role of membrane fusion in endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope reorganization. Cytosol-dependent liposome fusion has allowed us to restore, without adding transmembrane nucleoporins, functionality of nuclear pores, their spatial distribution and chromatin decondensation in nuclei formed at insufficient amounts of membrane material and characterized by only partial decondensation of chromatin and lack of nuclear transport. Both the mechanisms and the biological implications of the discovered coupling between spatial distribution of nuclear pores, chromatin decondensation and nuclear transport are discussed.

  3. Conformational Plasticity of the Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Helix in Lipid Bilayers Under Varying pH, Drug Binding and Membrane Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Luo, Wenbin; Cady, Sarah D.; Hong, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Membrane proteins change their conformations to respond to environmental cues, thus conformational plasticity is important for function. The influenza A M2 protein forms an acid-activated proton channel important for the virus lifecycle. Here we have used solid-state NMR spectroscopy to examine the conformational plasticity of membrane-bound transmembrane domain of M2 (M2TM). 13C and 15N chemical shifts indicate coupled conformational changes of several pore-facing residues due to changes in bilayer thickness, drug binding and pH. The structural changes are attributed to the formation of a well-defined helical kink at G34 in the drug-bound state and in thick lipid bilayers, non-ideal backbone conformation of the secondary-gate residue V27 in the presence of drug, and non-ideal conformation of the proton-sensing residue H37 at high pH. The chemical shifts constrained the (ϕ, ψ) torsion angles for three basis states, the equilibrium among which explains the multiple resonances per site in the NMR spectra under different combinations of bilayer thickness, drug binding and pH conditions. Thus, conformational plasticity is important for the proton conduction and inhibition of M2TM. The study illustrates the utility of NMR chemical shifts for probing the structural plasticity and folding of membrane proteins. PMID:20883664

  4. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P. B.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across the various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham - Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this

  5. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, N., E-mail: ramn@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Sunil Kumar, P.B., E-mail: sunil@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, 600036 (India); Radhakrishnan, Ravi, E-mail: rradhak@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA-19104 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein–lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham–Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this description

  6. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, N.; Sunil Kumar, P.B.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein–lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham–Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this description

  7. Mesoscale computational studies of membrane bilayer remodeling by curvature-inducing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, N; Sunil Kumar, P B; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Biological membranes constitute boundaries of cells and cell organelles. These membranes are soft fluid interfaces whose thermodynamic states are dictated by bending moduli, induced curvature fields, and thermal fluctuations. Recently, there has been a flood of experimental evidence highlighting active roles for these structures in many cellular processes ranging from trafficking of cargo to cell motility. It is believed that the local membrane curvature, which is continuously altered due to its interactions with myriad proteins and other macromolecules attached to its surface, holds the key to the emergent functionality in these cellular processes. Mechanisms at the atomic scale are dictated by protein-lipid interaction strength, lipid composition, lipid distribution in the vicinity of the protein, shape and amino acid composition of the protein, and its amino acid contents. The specificity of molecular interactions together with the cooperativity of multiple proteins induce and stabilize complex membrane shapes at the mesoscale. These shapes span a wide spectrum ranging from the spherical plasma membrane to the complex cisternae of the Golgi apparatus. Mapping the relation between the protein-induced deformations at the molecular scale and the resulting mesoscale morphologies is key to bridging cellular experiments across the various length scales. In this review, we focus on the theoretical and computational methods used to understand the phenomenology underlying protein-driven membrane remodeling. Interactions at the molecular scale can be computationally probed by all atom and coarse grained molecular dynamics (MD, CGMD), as well as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations, which we only describe in passing. We choose to focus on several continuum approaches extending the Canham - Helfrich elastic energy model for membranes to include the effect of curvature-inducing proteins and explore the conformational phase space of such systems. In this

  8. Conformational changes in Sindbis virions resulting from exposure to low pH and interactions with cells suggest that cell penetration may occur at the cell surface in the absence of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Angel M.; Ferreira, Davis; Horton, Michelle; Saad, Ali; Tsuruta, Hiro; Johnston, Robert; Klimstra, William; Ryman, Kate; Hernandez, Raquel; Chiu Wah; Brown, Dennis T.

    2004-01-01

    Alphaviruses have the ability to induce cell-cell fusion after exposure to acid pH. This observation has served as an article of proof that these membrane-containing viruses infect cells by fusion of the virus membrane with a host cell membrane upon exposure to acid pH after incorporation into a cell endosome. We have investigated the requirements for the induction of virus-mediated, low pH-induced cell-cell fusion and cell-virus fusion. We have correlated the pH requirements for this process to structural changes they produce in the virus by electron cryo-microscopy. We found that exposure to acid pH was required to establish conditions for membrane fusion but that membrane fusion did not occur until return to neutral pH. Electron cryo-microscopy revealed dramatic changes in the structure of the virion as it was moved to acid pH and then returned to neutral pH. None of these treatments resulted in the disassembly of the virus protein icosahedral shell that is a requisite for the process of virus membrane-cell membrane fusion. The appearance of a prominent protruding structure upon exposure to acid pH and its disappearance upon return to neutral pH suggested that the production of a 'pore'-like structure at the fivefold axis may facilitate cell penetration as has been proposed for polio (J. Virol. 74 (2000) 1342) and human rhino virus (Mol. Cell 10 (2002) 317). This transient structural change also provided an explanation for how membrane fusion occurs after return to neutral pH. Examination of virus-cell complexes at neutral pH supported the contention that infection occurs at the cell surface at neutral pH by the production of a virus structure that breaches the plasma membrane bilayer. These data suggest an alternative route of infection for Sindbis virus that occurs by a process that does not involve membrane fusion and does not require disassembly of the virus protein shell

  9. Systematic implicit solvent coarse-graining of bilayer membranes: lipid and phase transferability of the force field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zunjing; Deserno, Markus, E-mail: zwang@cmu.ed, E-mail: deserno@andrew.cmu.ed [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    We study the lipid and phase transferability of our recently developed systematically coarse-grained solvent-free membrane model. The force field was explicitly parameterized to describe a fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer at 310 K with correct structure and area per lipid, while gaining at least three orders of magnitude in computational efficiency (see Wang and Deserno 2010 J. Phys. Chem. B 114 11207-20). Here, we show that exchanging CG tails, without any subsequent re-parameterization, creates reliable models of 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids in terms of structure and area per lipid. Furthermore, all CG lipids undergo a liquid-gel transition upon cooling, with characteristics like those observed in experiments and all-atom simulations during phase transformation. These studies suggest a promising transferability of our force field parameters to different lipid species and thermodynamic state points, properties that are a prerequisite for even more complex systems, such as mixtures.

  10. Systematic implicit solvent coarse-graining of bilayer membranes: lipid and phase transferability of the force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zunjing; Deserno, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We study the lipid and phase transferability of our recently developed systematically coarse-grained solvent-free membrane model. The force field was explicitly parameterized to describe a fluid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayer at 310 K with correct structure and area per lipid, while gaining at least three orders of magnitude in computational efficiency (see Wang and Deserno 2010 J. Phys. Chem. B 114 11207-20). Here, we show that exchanging CG tails, without any subsequent re-parameterization, creates reliable models of 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids in terms of structure and area per lipid. Furthermore, all CG lipids undergo a liquid-gel transition upon cooling, with characteristics like those observed in experiments and all-atom simulations during phase transformation. These studies suggest a promising transferability of our force field parameters to different lipid species and thermodynamic state points, properties that are a prerequisite for even more complex systems, such as mixtures.

  11. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  12. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  13. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2 on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26 abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9 loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly.

  14. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, K.S.; Silva, A.H.M.; Mendanha, S.A.; Rezende, K.R.; Alonso, A.

    2013-01-01

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2′-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO4/H2O2, in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO4/H2O2, whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO4/H2O2. The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation. PMID:24068194

  15. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, K.S.; Silva, A.H.M.; Mendanha, S.A.; Rezende, K.R.; Alonso, A.

    2013-01-01

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2′-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO 4 /H 2 O 2 , in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO 4 /H 2 O 2 , whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO 4 /H 2 O 2 . The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation

  16. Antioxidant effect of 4-nerolidylcatechol and α-tocopherol in erythrocyte ghost membranes and phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, K. S.; Silva, A. H.M.; Mendanha, S. A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Rezende, K. R. [Laboratório de Biofarmácia e Farmacocinética de Substâncias Bioativas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Alonso, A. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2013-09-06

    4-Nerolidylcatechol (4-NC) is found in Pothomorphe umbellata root extracts and is reported to have a topical protective effect against UVB radiation-induced skin damage, toxicity in melanoma cell lines, and antimalarial activity. We report a comparative study of the antioxidant activity of 4-NC and α-tocopherol against lipid peroxidation initiated by two free radical-generating systems: 2,2′-azobis(2-aminopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in red blood cell ghost membranes and in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Lipid peroxidation was monitored by membrane fluidity changes assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of a spin-labeled lipid and by the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. When lipoperoxidation was initiated by the hydroxyl radical in erythrocyte ghost membranes, both 4-NC and α-tocopherol acted in a very efficient manner. However, lower activities were observed when lipoperoxidation was initiated by the peroxyl radical; and, in this case, the protective effect of α-tocopherol was lower than that of 4-NC. In egg PC vesicles, malondialdehyde formation indicated that 4-NC was effective against lipoperoxidation initiated by both AAPH and FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, whereas α-tocopherol was less efficient in protecting against lipoperoxidation by AAPH, and behaved as a pro-oxidant for FeSO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free-radical assay indicated that two free radicals were scavenged per 4-NC molecule, and one free radical was scavenged per α-tocopherol molecule. These data provide new insights into the antioxidant capacity of 4-NC, which may have therapeutic applications for formulations designed to protect the skin from sunlight irradiation.

  17. The Fusion Loops of the Initial Prefusion Conformation of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Fusion Protein Point Toward the Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fontana

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available All enveloped viruses, including herpesviruses, must fuse their envelope with the host membrane to deliver their genomes into target cells, making this essential step subject to interference by antibodies and drugs. Viral fusion is mediated by a viral surface protein that transits from an initial prefusion conformation to a final postfusion conformation. Strikingly, the prefusion conformation of the herpesvirus fusion protein, gB, is poorly understood. Herpes simplex virus (HSV, a model system for herpesviruses, causes diseases ranging from mild skin lesions to serious encephalitis and neonatal infections. Using cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging, we have characterized the structure of the prefusion conformation and fusion intermediates of HSV-1 gB. To this end, we have set up a system that generates microvesicles displaying full-length gB on their envelope. We confirmed proper folding of gB by nondenaturing electrophoresis-Western blotting with a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs covering all gB domains. To elucidate the arrangement of gB domains, we labeled them by using (i mutagenesis to insert fluorescent proteins at specific positions, (ii coexpression of gB with Fabs for a neutralizing MAb with known binding sites, and (iii incubation of gB with an antibody directed against the fusion loops. Our results show that gB starts in a compact prefusion conformation with the fusion loops pointing toward the viral membrane and suggest, for the first time, a model for gB’s conformational rearrangements during fusion. These experiments further illustrate how neutralizing antibodies can interfere with the essential gB structural transitions that mediate viral entry and therefore infectivity.

  18. Atomic force microscopy: Unraveling the fundamental principles governing secretion and membrane fusion in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jena, Bhanu P.

    2009-01-01

    The story of cell secretion and membrane fusion is as old as life itself. Without these fundamental cellular processes known to occur in yeast to humans, life would cease to exist. In the last 15 years, primarily using the atomic force microscope, a detailed understanding of the molecular process and of the molecular machinery and mechanism of secretion and membrane fusion in cells has come to light. This has led to a paradigm shift in our understanding of the underlying mechanism of cell secretion. The journey leading to the discovery of a new cellular structure the 'porosome',-the universal secretory machinery in cells, and the contributions of the AFM in our understanding of the general molecular machinery and mechanism of cell secretion and membrane fusion, is briefly discussed in this article.

  19. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  20. Probe transfer with and without membrane fusion in a fluorescence fusion assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohki, S; Flanagan, TD; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the R(18) fusion assay was made during the fusion of the Sendai virus with erythrocyte ghosts. The increase in R(18) fluorescence, reflecting the interaction process, was evaluated in terms of the different processes that in principle may contribute to this increase, that is,

  1. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy to probe single membrane proteins in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, K Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has opened vast avenues hitherto inaccessible to the biological scientist. The high temporal (millisecond) and spatial (nanometer) resolutions of the AFM are suited for studying many biological processes in their native conditions. The AFM cantilever stylus is aptly termed as a "lab on a tip" owing to its versatility as an imaging tool as well as a handle to manipulate single bonds and proteins. Recent examples assert that the AFM can be used to study the mechanical properties and monitor processes of single proteins and single cells, thus affording insight into important mechanistic details. This chapter specifically focuses on practical and analytical protocols of single-molecule AFM methodologies related to high-resolution imaging and single-molecule force spectroscopy of membrane proteins. Both these techniques are operator oriented, and require specialized working knowledge of the instrument, theoretical, and practical skills.

  2. Analysis of the synaptotagmin family during reconstituted membrane fusion. Uncovering a class of inhibitory isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Akhil; Chicka, Michael C; Chapman, Edwin R

    2008-08-01

    Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis in neurons and neuroendocrine cells is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein synaptotagmin (syt) I. Sixteen additional isoforms of syt have been identified, but little is known concerning their biochemical or functional properties. Here, we assessed the abilities of fourteen syt isoforms to directly regulate SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor)-catalyzed membrane fusion. One group of isoforms stimulated neuronal SNARE-mediated fusion in response to Ca(2+), while another set inhibited SNARE catalyzed fusion in both the absence and presence of Ca(2+). Biochemical analysis revealed a strong correlation between the ability of syt isoforms to bind 1,2-dioleoyl phosphatidylserine (PS) and t-SNAREs in a Ca(2+)-promoted manner with their abilities to enhance fusion, further establishing PS and SNAREs as critical effectors for syt action. The ability of syt I to efficiently stimulate fusion was specific for certain SNARE pairs, suggesting that syts might contribute to the specificity of intracellular membrane fusion reactions. Finally, a subset of inhibitory syts down-regulated the ability of syt I to activate fusion, demonstrating that syt isoforms can modulate the function of each other.

  3. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  4. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Ronzone

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  5. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V.; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori; Jawahar, A.

    2014-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM 14 N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments

  6. Incorporation of adenylate cyclase into membranes of giant liposomes using membrane fusion with recombinant baculovirus-budded virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takaaki; Kamiya, Koki; Tomita, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Tetsuro; Tsumoto, Kanta

    2014-06-01

    Recombinant transmembrane adenylate cyclase (AC) was incorporated into membranes of giant liposomes using membrane fusion between liposomes and baculovirus-budded virus (BV). AC genes were constructed into transfer vectors in a form fused with fluorescent protein or polyhistidine at the C-terminus. The recombinant BVs were collected by ultracentrifugation and AC expression was verified using western blotting. The BVs and giant liposomes generated using gentle hydration were fused under acidic conditions; the incorporation of AC into giant liposomes was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy through the emission of fluorescence from their membranes. The AC-expressing BVs were also fused with liposomes containing the substrate (ATP) with/without a specific inhibitor (SQ 22536). An enzyme immunoassay on extracts of the sample demonstrated that cAMP was produced inside the liposomes. This procedure facilitates direct introduction of large transmembrane proteins into artificial membranes without solubilization.

  7. Membrane fusion is induced by a distinct peptide sequence of the sea urchin fertilization protein bindin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulrich, AS; Glabe, CG; Hoekstra, D

    1998-01-01

    Fertilization in the sea urchin is mediated by the membrane-associated acrosomal protein bindin, which plays a key role in the adhesion and fusion between sperm and egg. We have investigated the structure/function relationship of an 18-amino acid peptide fragment "B18," which represents the minimal

  8. Membrane support of accelerated fuel capsules for inertial fusion energy reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petzoldt, R.W.; Moir, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a thin membrane to suspend an (inertial fusion energy) fuel capsule in a holder for injection into a reactor chamber is investigated. Capsule displacement and membrane deformation angle are calculated for an axisymmetric geometry for a range of membrane strain and capsule size. This information is used to calculate maximum target accelerations. Membranes must be thin (perhaps of order one micron) to minimize their effect on capsule implosion symmetry. For example, a 5 μm thick cryogenic mylar membrane is calculated to allow 1,000 m/s 2 acceleration of a 3 mm radius, 100 mg capsule. Vibration analysis (for a single membrane support) shows that if membrane vibration is not deliberately minimized, allowed acceleration may be reduced by a factor of four. A two membrane alternative geometry would allow several times greater acceleration. Therefore, alternative membrane geometry's should be used to provide greater target acceleration potential and reduce capsule displacement within the holder (for a given membrane thickness)

  9. Study on a multi-component palladium alloy membrane for the fusion fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Okuno, Kenji; Nagasaki, Takanori; Noda, Kenji; Ishii, Yoshinobu; Takeshita, Hidefumi.

    1985-11-01

    A feasibility study on the material integrity with respect to the hydride formation and helium damage of the palladium alloy membrane was performed for an application of the palladium diffuser to a fusion fuel cleanup process. This study was conducted under the Japan/US Fusion Cooperation Program. Experimental works on the crystallography, hydrogen solubility and 3 He release characteristics were carried out with a multi-component palladium alloy(Pd-25Ag.Au.Ru). The excellent hydrogen permeability and mechanical properties of the membrane made of this alloy had been confirmed by authors' previous study. Based on the present study, this alloy membrane has high resistivity to the hydrogen embrittlement, and swelling and fracture due to the helium bubble formation under the practical operating conditions of the diffuser. (author)

  10. The pH sensor for flavivirus membrane fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses that infect cells by uptake through endosomes have generally evolved to ?sense? the local pH as part of the mechanism by which they penetrate into the cytosol. Even for the very well studied fusion proteins of enveloped viruses, identification of the specific pH sensor has been a challenge, one that has now been met successfully, for flaviviruses, by Fritz et al. (Fritz, R., K. Stiasny, and F.X. Heinz. 2008. J. Cell Biol. 183:353?361) in this issue. Thorough mutational analysis of con...

  11. Biochemistry and biophysics of HIV-1 gp41 - membrane interactions and implications for HIV-1 envelope protein mediated viral-cell fusion and fusion inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lifeng; Gochin, Miriam; Liu, Keliang

    2011-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes ~2 millions death every year and still defies an effective vaccine. HIV-1 infects host cells through envelope protein - mediated virus-cell fusion. The transmembrane subunit of envelope protein, gp41, is the molecular machinery which facilitates fusion. Its ectodomain contains several distinguishing functional domains, fusion peptide (FP), Nterminal heptad repeat (NHR), C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) and membrane proximal extracellular region (MPER). During the fusion process, FP inserts into the host cell membrane, and an extended gp41 prehairpin conformation bridges the viral and cell membranes through MPER and FP respectively. Subsequent conformational change of the unstable prehairpin results in a coiled-coil 6-helix bundle (6HB) structure formed between NHR and CHR. The energetics of 6HB formation drives membrane apposition and fusion. Drugs targeting gp41 functional domains to prevent 6HB formation inhibit HIV-1 infection. T20 (enfuvirtide, Fuzeon) was approved by the US FDA in 2003 as the first fusion inhibitor. It is a 36-residue peptide from the gp41 CHR, and it inhibits 6HB formation by targeting NHR and lipids. Development of new fusion inhibitors, especially small molecule drugs, is encouraged to overcome the shortcomings of T20 as a peptide drug. Hydrophobic characteristics and membrane association are critical for gp41 function and mechanism of action. Research in gp41-membrane interactions, using peptides corresponding to specific functional domains, or constructs including several interactive domains, are reviewed here to get a better understanding of gp41 mediated virus-cell fusion that can inform or guide the design of new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

  12. Fusion of Sendai Virus with Vesicles of Oligomerizable Lipids : A Micro Calorimetric Analysis of Membrane Fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravoo, Bart Jan; Weringa, Wilke D.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.

    2000-01-01

    Sendai virus fuses efficiently with small and large unilamellar vesicles of the lipid 1,2-di-n-hexadecyloxypropyl-4-(beta-nitrostyryl) phosphate (DHPBNS) at pH 7.4 and 37°C, as shown by lipid mixing assays and electron microscopy. However, fusion is strongly inhibited by oligomerization of the head

  13. Tri-membrane nanoparticles produced by combining liposome fusion and a novel patchwork of bicelles to overcome endosomal and nuclear membrane barriers to cargo delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Asako; Mitsueda, Asako; Hasan, Mahadi; Ueda, Miho; Hama, Susumu; Warashina, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-03-01

    Membrane fusion is a rational strategy for crossing intracellular membranes that present barriers to liposomal nanocarrier-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA into the nucleus of non-dividing cells, such as dendritic cells. Based on this strategy, we previously developed nanocarriers consisting of a nucleic acid core particle coated with four lipid membranes [Akita, et al., Biomaterials, 2009, 30, 2940-2949]. However, including the endosomal membrane and two nuclear membranes, cells possess three intracellular membranous barriers. Thus, after entering the nucleus, nanoparticles coated with four membranes would still have one lipid membrane remaining, and could impede cargo delivery. Until now, coating a core particle with an odd number of lipid membranes was challenging. To produce nanocarriers with an odd number of lipid membranes, we developed a novel coating method involving lipid nano-discs, also known as bicelles, as a material for packaging DNA in a carrier with an odd number of lipid membranes. In this procedure, bicelles fuse to form an outer coating that resembles a patchwork quilt, which allows the preparation of nanoparticles coated with only three lipid membranes. Moreover, the transfection activity of dendritic cells with these three-membrane nanoparticles was higher than that for nanoparticles coated with four lipid membranes. In summary, we developed novel nanoparticles coated with an odd number of lipid membranes using the novel "patchwork-packaging method" to deliver plasmid DNA into the nucleus via membrane fusion.

  14. Sequential analysis of trans-SNARE formation in intracellular membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Alpadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SNARE complexes are required for membrane fusion in the endomembrane system. They contain coiled-coil bundles of four helices, three (Q(a, Q(b, and Q(c from target (t-SNAREs and one (R from the vesicular (v-SNARE. NSF/Sec18 disrupts these cis-SNARE complexes, allowing reassembly of their subunits into trans-SNARE complexes and subsequent fusion. Studying these reactions in native yeast vacuoles, we found that NSF/Sec18 activates the vacuolar cis-SNARE complex by selectively displacing the vacuolar Q(a SNARE, leaving behind a Q(bcR subcomplex. This subcomplex serves as an acceptor for a Q(a SNARE from the opposite membrane, leading to Q(a-Q(bcR trans-complexes. Activity tests of vacuoles with diagnostic distributions of inactivating mutations over the two fusion partners confirm that this distribution accounts for a major share of the fusion activity. The persistence of the Q(bcR cis-complex and the formation of the Q(a-Q(bcR trans-complex are both sensitive to the Rab-GTPase inhibitor, GDI, and to mutations in the vacuolar tether complex, HOPS (HOmotypic fusion and vacuolar Protein Sorting complex. This suggests that the vacuolar Rab-GTPase, Ypt7, and HOPS restrict cis-SNARE disassembly and thereby bias trans-SNARE assembly into a preferred topology.

  15. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roe, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures 125 I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins

  16. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Qianlong [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Blissard, Gary W. [Boyce Thompson Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United State (United States); Liu, Tong-Xian [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Li, Zhaofei, E-mail: zhaofeili73@outlook.com [State Key Laboratory of Crop Stress Biology for Arid Areas, Key Laboratory of Northwest Loess Plateau Crop Pest Management of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A& F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. - Highlights: • The baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. • The detailed mechanism of conformational change of GP64 is unknown. • We analyzed 24 positions that might stabilize the post-fusion structure of GP64. • We identified 4 residues in domain V that were critical for membrane fusion. • Two residues are critical for formation of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64.

  17. The action of polyene antibiotics on lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of several cations and anions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zutphen, H. van; Demel, R.A.; Norman, A.W.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1971-01-01

    1. 1. Filipin complex, filipin II, filipin III, nystatin, etruscomycin, and pimaricin at concentrations of 10−5 M were able to disrupt bimolecular lipid films containing lecithin and cholesterol in a 1:1 molar ratio. 2. 2. The above antibiotics were not able to disrupt lecithin bilayer

  18. Pt and PtRu catalyst bilayers increase efficiencies for ethanol oxidation in proton exchange membrane electrolysis and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    Polarization curves, product distributions, and reaction stoichiometries have been measured for the oxidation of ethanol at anodes consisting of Pt and PtRu bilayers and a homogeneous mixture of the two catalysts. These anode structures all show synergies between the two catalysts that can be attributed to the oxidation of acetaldehyde produced at the PtRu catalyst by the Pt catalyst. The use of a PtRu layer over a Pt layer produces the strongest effect, with higher currents than a Pt on PtRu bilayer, mixed layer, or either catalyst alone, except for Pt at high potentials. Reaction stoichiometries (average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule) were closer to the values for Pt alone for both of the bilayer configurations but much lower for PtRu and mixed anodes. Although Pt alone would provide the highest overall fuel cell efficiency at low power densities, the PtRu on Pt bilayer would provide higher power densities without a significant loss of efficiency. The origin of the synergy between the Pt and PtRu catalysts was elucidated by separation of the total current into the individual components for generation of carbon dioxide and the acetaldehyde and acetic acid byproducts.

  19. Analysis of membrane fusion as a two-state sequential process: evaluation of the stalk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreb, Gabriel; Lentz, Barry R

    2007-06-01

    We propose a model that accounts for the time courses of PEG-induced fusion of membrane vesicles of varying lipid compositions and sizes. The model assumes that fusion proceeds from an initial, aggregated vesicle state ((A) membrane contact) through two sequential intermediate states (I(1) and I(2)) and then on to a fusion pore state (FP). Using this model, we interpreted data on the fusion of seven different vesicle systems. We found that the initial aggregated state involved no lipid or content mixing but did produce leakage. The final state (FP) was not leaky. Lipid mixing normally dominated the first intermediate state (I(1)), but content mixing signal was also observed in this state for most systems. The second intermediate state (I(2)) exhibited both lipid and content mixing signals and leakage, and was sometimes the only leaky state. In some systems, the first and second intermediates were indistinguishable and converted directly to the FP state. Having also tested a parallel, two-intermediate model subject to different assumptions about the nature of the intermediates, we conclude that a sequential, two-intermediate model is the simplest model sufficient to describe PEG-mediated fusion in all vesicle systems studied. We conclude as well that a fusion intermediate "state" should not be thought of as a fixed structure (e.g., "stalk" or "transmembrane contact") of uniform properties. Rather, a fusion "state" describes an ensemble of similar structures that can have different mechanical properties. Thus, a "state" can have varying probabilities of having a given functional property such as content mixing, lipid mixing, or leakage. Our data show that the content mixing signal may occur through two processes, one correlated and one not correlated with leakage. Finally, we consider the implications of our results in terms of the "modified stalk" hypothesis for the mechanism of lipid pore formation. We conclude that our results not only support this hypothesis but

  20. Accelerating Convergence in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutes in Lipid Membranes by Conducting a Random Walk along the Bilayer Normal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Chris; Madill, Chris; Rauscher, Sarah; Pomès, Régis

    2013-08-13

    All molecular dynamics simulations are susceptible to sampling errors, which degrade the accuracy and precision of observed values. The statistical convergence of simulations containing atomistic lipid bilayers is limited by the slow relaxation of the lipid phase, which can exceed hundreds of nanoseconds. These long conformational autocorrelation times are exacerbated in the presence of charged solutes, which can induce significant distortions of the bilayer structure. Such long relaxation times represent hidden barriers that induce systematic sampling errors in simulations of solute insertion. To identify optimal methods for enhancing sampling efficiency, we quantitatively evaluate convergence rates using generalized ensemble sampling algorithms in calculations of the potential of mean force for the insertion of the ionic side chain analog of arginine in a lipid bilayer. Umbrella sampling (US) is used to restrain solute insertion depth along the bilayer normal, the order parameter commonly used in simulations of molecular solutes in lipid bilayers. When US simulations are modified to conduct random walks along the bilayer normal using a Hamiltonian exchange algorithm, systematic sampling errors are eliminated more rapidly and the rate of statistical convergence of the standard free energy of binding of the solute to the lipid bilayer is increased 3-fold. We compute the ratio of the replica flux transmitted across a defined region of the order parameter to the replica flux that entered that region in Hamiltonian exchange simulations. We show that this quantity, the transmission factor, identifies sampling barriers in degrees of freedom orthogonal to the order parameter. The transmission factor is used to estimate the depth-dependent conformational autocorrelation times of the simulation system, some of which exceed the simulation time, and thereby identify solute insertion depths that are prone to systematic sampling errors and estimate the lower bound of the

  1. Nuclear inner membrane fusion facilitated by yeast Jem1p is required for spindle pole body fusion but not for the first mitotic nuclear division during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Hirata, Aiko; Endo, Toshiya

    2008-11-01

    During mating of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two haploid nuclei fuse to produce a diploid nucleus. The process of nuclear fusion requires two J proteins, Jem1p in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and Sec63p, which forms a complex with Sec71p and Sec72p, in the ER membrane. Zygotes of mutants defective in the functions of Jem1p or Sec63p contain two haploid nuclei that were closely apposed but failed to fuse. Here we analyzed the ultrastructure of nuclei in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes using electron microscope with the freeze-substituted fixation method. Three-dimensional reconstitution of nuclear structures from electron microscope serial sections revealed that Jem1p facilitates nuclear inner-membrane fusion and spindle pole body (SPB) fusion while Sec71p facilitates nuclear outer-membrane fusion. Two haploid SPBs that failed to fuse could duplicate, and mitotic nuclear division of the unfused haploid nuclei started in jem1 Delta and sec71 Delta mutant zygotes. This observation suggests that nuclear inner-membrane fusion is required for SPB fusion, but not for SPB duplication in the first mitotic cell division.

  2. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A new combination of membranes and membrane reactors for improved tritium management in breeder blanket of fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demange, D.; Staemmler, S.; Kind, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tritium used as fuel in future fusion machines will be produced within the breeder blanket. The tritium extraction system recovers the tritium to be routed into the inner-fuel cycle of the machine. Accurate and precise tritium accountancy between both systems is mandatory to ensure a reliable operation. Handling in the blanket huge helium flow rates containing tritium as traces in molecular and oxide forms is challenging both for the process and the accountancy. Alternative tritium processes based on combinations of membranes and membrane reactors are proposed to facilitate the tritium management. The PERMCAT process is based on counter-current isotope swamping in a palladium membrane reactor. It allows recovering tritium efficiently from any chemical species. It produces a pure hydrogen stream enriched in tritium of advantage for integration upstream of the accountancy stage. A pre-separation and pre-concentration stage using new zeolite membranes has been studied to optimize the whole process. Such a combination could improve the tritium processes and facilitate accountancy in DEMO.

  4. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  5. Lipid Bilayer Formation on Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yi; Wustoni, Shofarul; Savva, Achilleas; Giovannitti, Alexander; McCulloch, Iain; Inal, Sahika

    2018-01-01

    The lipid bilayer is the elemental structure of cell membrane, forming a stable barrier between the interior and exterior of the cell while hosting membrane proteins that enable selective transport of biologically important compounds and cellular

  6. Nanoporous microbead supported bilayers: stability, physical characterization, and incorporation of functional transmembrane proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Ryan W. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, James A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Brozik, Susan Marie; Cox, Jason M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Lopez, Gabriel P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Barrick, Todd A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Flores, Adrean (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of functional transmembrane proteins into supported bilayer-based biomimetic systems presents a significant challenge for biophysics. Among the various methods for producing supported bilayers, liposomal fusion offers a versatile method for the introduction of membrane proteins into supported bilayers on a variety of substrates. In this study, the properties of protein containing unilamellar phosphocholine lipid bilayers on nanoporous silica microspheres are investigated. The effects of the silica substrate, pore structure, and the substrate curvature on the stability of the membrane and the functionality of the membrane protein are determined. Supported bilayers on porous silica microspheres show a significant increase in surface area on surfaces with structures in excess of 10 nm as well as an overall decrease in stability resulting from increasing pore size and curvature. Comparison of the liposomal and detergent-mediated introduction of purified bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and the human type 3 serotonin receptor (5HT3R) are investigated focusing on the resulting protein function, diffusion, orientation, and incorporation efficiency. In both cases, functional proteins are observed; however, the reconstitution efficiency and orientation selectivity are significantly enhanced through detergent-mediated protein reconstitution. The results of these experiments provide a basis for bulk ionic and fluorescent dye-based compartmentalization assays as well as single-molecule optical and single-channel electrochemical interrogation of transmembrane proteins in a biomimetic platform.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  8. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  9. Spatiotemporal dynamics of membrane remodeling and fusion proteins during endocytic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Henning; Auffarth, Kathrin; Kurre, Rainer; Lisse, Dominik; Piehler, Jacob; Ungermann, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Organelles of the endolysosomal system undergo multiple fission and fusion events to combine sorting of selected proteins to the vacuole with endosomal recycling. This sorting requires a consecutive remodeling of the organelle surface in the course of endosomal maturation. Here we dissect the remodeling and fusion machinery on endosomes during the process of endocytosis. We traced selected GFP-tagged endosomal proteins relative to exogenously added fluorescently labeled α-factor on its way from the plasma membrane to the vacuole. Our data reveal that the machinery of endosomal fusion and ESCRT proteins has similar temporal localization on endosomes, whereas they precede the retromer cargo recognition complex. Neither deletion of retromer nor the fusion machinery with the vacuole affects this maturation process, although the kinetics seems to be delayed due to ESCRT deletion. Of importance, in strains lacking the active Rab7-like Ypt7 or the vacuolar SNARE fusion machinery, α-factor still proceeds to late endosomes with the same kinetics. This indicates that endosomal maturation is mainly controlled by the early endosomal fusion and remodeling machinery but not the downstream Rab Ypt7 or the SNARE machinery. Our data thus provide important further understanding of endosomal biogenesis in the context of cargo sorting. © 2015 Arlt et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. A GALA lipopeptide mediates pH- and membrane charge dependent fusion with stable giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Thomas P.; Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas R.

    2012-01-01

    sporadic and there is a strong need to characterize and increase our understanding of the membrane fusion properties of these peptides. Many fusion studies have focused on the ability of free peptides in solution that mediate fusion between liposomes. For drug delivery purposes it is a necessity to attach......,2-diamino propanoic acid (Dap) moiety, yielding the lipopeptide dimyristoyl-Dap-GALA (DMDGALA). We have investigated DMDGALA as a component in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and demonstrate pH-triggered fusion of peptide containing LUVs with stable target giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), which were...

  11. pH sensing by lipids in membranes: The fundamentals of pH-driven migration, polarization and deformations of lipid bilayer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Miglena I; Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Seigneuret, Michel; Staneva, Galya; Kodama, Atsuji; Sakuma, Yuka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro; Imai, Masayuki; Puff, Nicolas

    2018-03-06

    Most biological molecules contain acido-basic groups that modulate their structure and interactions. A consequence is that pH gradients, local heterogeneities and dynamic variations are used by cells and organisms to drive or regulate specific biological functions including energetic metabolism, vesicular traffic, migration and spatial patterning of tissues in development. While the direct or regulatory role of pH in protein function is well documented, the role of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions in modulating the properties of lipid assemblies such as bilayer membranes is only beginning to be understood. Here, we review approaches using artificial lipid vesicles that have been instrumental in providing an understanding of the influence of pH gradients and local variations on membrane vectorial motional processes: migration, membrane curvature effects promoting global or local deformations, crowding generation by segregative polarization processes. In the case of pH induced local deformations, an extensive theoretical framework is given and an application to a specific biological issue, namely the structure and stability of mitochondrial cristae, is described. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emergence of Complex Behavior in Biomembranes edited by Marjorie Longo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of structural topology of a membrane protein in lipid bilayers using polarization optimized experiments (POE) for static and MAS solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mote, Kaustubh R. [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gopinath, T. [University of Minnesota, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics (United States); Veglia, Gianluigi, E-mail: vegli001@umn.edu [University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The low sensitivity inherent to both the static and magic angle spinning techniques of solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has thus far limited the routine application of multidimensional experiments to determine the structure of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers. Here, we demonstrate the advantage of using a recently developed class of experiments, polarization optimized experiments, for both static and MAS spectroscopy to achieve higher sensitivity and substantial time-savings for 2D and 3D experiments. We used sarcolipin, a single pass membrane protein, reconstituted in oriented bicelles (for oriented ssNMR) and multilamellar vesicles (for MAS ssNMR) as a benchmark. The restraints derived by these experiments are then combined into a hybrid energy function to allow simultaneous determination of structure and topology. The resulting structural ensemble converged to a helical conformation with a backbone RMSD {approx}0.44 A, a tilt angle of 24 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign , and an azimuthal angle of 55 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign . This work represents a crucial first step toward obtaining high-resolution structures of large membrane proteins using combined multidimensional oriented solid-state NMR and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR.

  13. Evaluation of Cytochalasin B-Induced Membrane Vesicles Fusion Specificity with Target Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gomzikova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV represent a promising vector system for biomolecules and drug delivery due to their natural origin and participation in intercellular communication. As the quantity of EVs is limited, it was proposed to induce the release of membrane vesicles from the surface of human cells by treatment with cytochalasin B. Cytochalasin B-induced membrane vesicles (CIMVs were successfully tested as a vector for delivery of dye, nanoparticles, and a chemotherapeutic. However, it remained unclear whether CIMVs possess fusion specificity with target cells and thus might be used for more targeted delivery of therapeutics. To answer this question, CIMVs were obtained from human prostate cancer PC3 cells. The diameter of obtained CIMVs was 962,13 ± 140,6 nm. We found that there is no statistically significant preference in PC3 CIMVs fusion with target cells of the same type. According to our observations, the greatest impact on CIMVs entry into target cells is by the heterophilic interaction of CIMV membrane receptors with the surface proteins of target cells.

  14. Inhibition of EBV-mediated membrane fusion by anti-gHgL antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, Karthik; Jiang, Jiansen; Möhl, Britta S.; Chen, Jia; Zhou, Z. Hong; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (UCLA); (Stanford-MED); (NWU)

    2017-09-22

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires the coordinated action of multiple virus envelope glycoproteins, including gH, gL, and gB. For EBV, the gp42 protein assembles into complexes with gHgL heterodimers and binds HLA class II to activate gB-mediated membrane fusion with B cells. EBV tropism is dictated by gp42 levels in the virion, as it inhibits entry into epithelial cells while promoting entry into B cells. The gHgL and gB proteins are targets of neutralizing antibodies and potential candidates for subunit vaccine development, but our understanding of their neutralizing epitopes and the mechanisms of inhibition remain relatively unexplored. Here we studied the structures and mechanisms of two anti-gHgL antibodies, CL40 and CL59, that block membrane fusion with both B cells and epithelial cells. We determined the structures of the CL40 and CL59 complexes with gHgL using X-ray crystallography and EM to identify their epitope locations. CL59 binds to the C-terminal domain IV of gH, while CL40 binds to a site occupied by the gp42 receptor binding domain. CL40 binding to gHgL/gp42 complexes is not blocked by gp42 and does not interfere with gp42 binding to HLA class II, indicating that its ability to block membrane fusion with B cells represents a defect in gB activation. These data indicate that anti-gHgL neutralizing antibodies can block gHgL-mediated activation of gB through different surface epitopes and mechanisms.

  15. Preliminary design of fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by palladium alloy membrane method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-10-01

    A design of palladium diffuser and Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for D-T fusion reactor is proposed. Feasibility of palladium alloy membrane method is discussed based on the early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. FCU system is designed under the feed conditions of Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The system is composed of Pd-diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer and zink beds, and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases. (author)

  16. Automatically Identifying Fusion Events between GLUT4 Storage Vesicles and the Plasma Membrane in TIRF Microscopy Image Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior about membrane-bound secretory vesicles has proven to be important in biological research. This paper proposes a novel approach to automatically identify the elusive fusion events between VAMP2-pHluorin labeled GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs and the plasma membrane. The differentiation is implemented to detect the initiation of fusion events by modified forward subtraction of consecutive frames in the TIRFM image sequence. Spatially connected pixels in difference images brighter than a specified adaptive threshold are grouped into a distinct fusion spot. The vesicles are located at the intensity-weighted centroid of their fusion spots. To reveal the true in vivo nature of a fusion event, 2D Gaussian fitting for the fusion spot is used to derive the intensity-weighted centroid and the spot size during the fusion process. The fusion event and its termination can be determined according to the change of spot size. The method is evaluated on real experiment data with ground truth annotated by expert cell biologists. The evaluation results show that it can achieve relatively high accuracy comparing favorably to the manual analysis, yet at a small fraction of time.

  17. Can macular xanthophylls replace cholesterol in formation of the liquid-ordered phase in lipid-bilayer membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subczynski, Witold K; Wisniewska-Becker, Anna; Widomska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Lateral organization of membranes made from binary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and macular xanthophylls (lutein or zeaxanthin) was investigated using the saturation-recovery (SR) EPR spin-labeling discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method in which the bimolecular collision rate of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label is measured. This work was undertaken to examine whether or not lutein and zeaxanthin, macular xanthophylls that parallel cholesterol in its function as a regulator of both membrane fluidity and hydrophobicity, can parallel other structural functions of cholesterol, including formation of the liquid-ordered phase in membranes. The DOT method permits discrimination of different membrane phases when the collision rates (oxygen transport parameter) differ in these phases. Additionally, membrane phases can be characterized by the oxygen transport parameter in situ without the need for separation, which provides information about the dynamics of each phase. In gel-phase membranes, two coexisting phases were discriminated in the presence of macular xanthophylls - namely, the liquid-ordered-like and solid-ordered-like phases. However, in fluid-phase membranes, xanthophylls only induce the solitary liquid-ordered-like phase, while at similar concentrations, cholesterol induces coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. No significant differences between the effects of lutein and zeaxanthin were found.

  18. Performance of a palladium membrane reactor using a Ni catalyst for fusion fuel impurities processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Wilhelm, R.; Okuno, K.

    1994-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PNM) provides a means to recover hydrogen isotopes from impurities expected to be present in fusion reactor exhaust. This recovery is based on reactions such as water-gas shift and steam reforming for which conversion is equilibrium limited. By including a selectively permeable membrane such as Pd/Ag in the catalyst bed, hydrogen isotopes can be removed from the reacting environment, thus promoting the reaction to complete conversion. Such a device has been built and operated at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For the reactions listed above, earlier study with this unit has shown that hydrogen single-pass recoveries approaching 100% can be achieved. It was also determined that a nickel catalyst is a feasible choice for use with a PMR appropriate for fusion fuel impurities processing. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the performance of the PMR using a nickel catalyst over a range of temperatures, feed compositions and flowrates. Reactions which were studied are the water-gas shift reaction and steam reforming

  19. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Guardado-Calvo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS, depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single "fusion loop". We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal "tail" that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens.

  20. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  1. Mutations that promote furin-independent growth of Semliki Forest virus affect p62-E1 interactions and membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinyong; Kielian, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The enveloped alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) infects cells via a low pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the E1 protein. E1's fusion activity is regulated by its heterodimeric interaction with a companion membrane protein E2. Mature E2 protein is generated by furin processing of the precursor p62. Processing destabilizes the heterodimer, allowing dissociation at acidic pH, E1 conformational changes, and membrane fusion. We used a furin-deficient cell line, FD11, to select for SFV mutants that show increased growth in the absence of p62 processing. We isolated and characterized 7 such pci mutants (p62 cleavage independent), which retained the parental furin cleavage site but showed significant increases in their ability to carry out membrane fusion in the p62 form. Sequence analysis of the pci mutants identified mutations primarily on the E2 protein, and suggested sites important in the interaction of p62 with E1 and the regulation of fusion

  2. Membrane-lipid therapy: A historical perspective of membrane-targeted therapies - From lipid bilayer structure to the pathophysiological regulation of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-09-01

    Our current understanding of membrane lipid composition, structure and functions has led to the investigation of their role in cell signaling, both in healthy and pathological cells. As a consequence, therapies based on the regulation of membrane lipid composition and structure have been recently developed. This novel field, known as Membrane Lipid Therapy, is growing and evolving rapidly, providing treatments that are now in use or that are being studied for their application to oncological disorders, Alzheimer's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, obesity, and neuropathic pain. This field has arisen from relevant discoveries on the behavior of membranes in recent decades, and it paves the way to adopt new approaches in modern pharmacology and nutrition. This innovative area will promote further investigation into membranes and the development of new therapies with molecules that target the cell membrane. Due to the prominent roles of membranes in the cells' physiology and the paucity of therapeutic approaches based on the regulation of the lipids they contain, it is expected that membrane lipid therapy will provide new treatments for numerous pathologies. The first on-purpose rationally designed molecule in this field, minerval, is currently being tested in clinical trials and it is expected to enter the market around 2020. However, it seems feasible that during the next few decades other membrane regulators will also be marketed for the treatment of human pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo V. Escribá. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Coiled-coil formation of the membrane-fusion K/E peptides viewed by electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin Kumar

    Full Text Available The interaction of the complementary K (Ac-(KIAALKE3-GW-NH2 and E (Ac-(EIAALEK3-GY-NH2 peptides, components of the zipper of an artificial membrane fusion system (Robson Marsden H. et al. Angew Chemie Int Ed. 2009 is investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR. By frozen solution continuous-wave EPR and double electron-electron resonance (DEER, the distance between spin labels attached to the K- and to the E-peptide is measured. Three constructs of spin-labelled K- and E-peptides are used in five combinations for low temperature investigations. The K/E heterodimers are found to be parallel, in agreement with previous studies. Also, K homodimers in parallel orientation were observed, a finding that was not reported before. Comparison to room-temperature, solution EPR shows that the latter method is less specific to detect this peptide-peptide interaction. Combining frozen solution cw-EPR for short distances (1.8 nm to 2.0 nm and DEER for longer distances thus proves versatile to detect the zipper interaction in membrane fusion. As the methodology can be applied to membrane samples, the approach presented suggests itself for in-situ studies of the complete membrane fusion process, opening up new avenues for the study of membrane fusion.

  4. Slaved diffusion in phospholipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangfang; Granick, Steve

    2005-01-01

    The translational diffusion of phospholipids in supported fluid bilayers splits into two populations when polyelectrolytes adsorb at incomplete surface coverage. Spatially resolved measurements using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that a slow mode, whose magnitude scales inversely with the degree of polymerization of the adsorbate, coexists with a fast mode characteristic of naked lipid diffusion. Inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer are affected nearly equally. Mobility may vary from spot to spot on the membrane surface, despite the lipid composition being the same. This work offers a mechanism to explain how nanosized domains with reduced mobility arise in lipid membranes. PMID:15967988

  5. Lipid domain formation and ligand-receptor distribution in lipid bilayer membranes investigated by atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Mouritsen, O.G.; Jørgensen, K.

    2002-01-01

    A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid-supported l......A novel experimental technique, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), is proposed to visualize the lateral organization of membrane systems in the nanometer range. The technique involves the use of a ligand-receptor pair, biotin-avidin, which introduces a height variation on a solid...

  6. Acid-induced movements in the glycoprotein shell of an alphavirus turn the spikes into membrane fusion mode

    OpenAIRE

    Haag, Lars; Garoff, Henrik; Xing, Li; Hammar, Lena; Kan, Sin-Tau; Cheng, R.Holland

    2002-01-01

    In the icosahedral (T = 4) Semliki Forest virus, the envelope protomers, i.e. E1–E2 heterodimers, make one-to-one interactions with capsid proteins below the viral lipid bilayer, transverse the membrane and form an external glycoprotein shell with projections. The shell is organized by protomer domains interacting as hexamers and pentamers around shell openings at icosahedral 2- and 5-fold axes, respectively, and the projections by other domains associating as trimers at 3- and quasi 3-fold a...

  7. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...

  8. Effects of Lateral and Terminal Chains of X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene Cores on Self-Assembly Behavior. Part 2: Domain Formation by Self-Assembly in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Werner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly of membrane constituents within a phospholipid bilayer creates complex functional platforms in biological cells that operate in intracellular signaling, trafficking and membrane remodeling. Synthetic polyphilic compounds of macromolecular or small size can be incorporated into artificial phospholipid bilayers. Featuring three or four moieties of different philicities, they reach beyond ordinary amphiphilicity and open up avenues to new functions and interaction concepts. Here, we have incorporated a series of X-shaped bolapolyphiles into DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bolapolyphiles consist of a rod-like oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE core, hydrophilic glycerol-based headgroups with or without oligo(ethylene oxide expansions at both ends and two lateral alkyl chains attached near the center of the OPE core. In the absence of DPPC and water, the compounds showed thermotropic liquid-crystalline behavior with a transition between polyphilic and amphiphilic assembly (see part 1 in this issue. In DPPC membranes, various trends in the domain morphologies were observed upon structure variations, which entailed branched alkyl chains of various sizes, alkyl chain semiperfluorination and size expansion of the headgroups. Observed effects on domain morphology are interpreted in the context of the bulk behavior (part 1 and of a model that was previously developed based on spectroscopic and physicochemical data.

  9. Model of SNARE-mediated membrane adhesion kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Warner

    Full Text Available SNARE proteins are conserved components of the core fusion machinery driving diverse membrane adhesion and fusion processes in the cell. In many cases micron-sized membranes adhere over large areas before fusion. Reconstituted in vitro assays have helped isolate SNARE mechanisms in small membrane adhesion-fusion and are emerging as powerful tools to study large membrane systems by use of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs. Here we model SNARE-mediated adhesion kinetics in SNARE-reconstituted GUV-GUV or GUV-supported bilayer experiments. Adhesion involves many SNAREs whose complexation pulls apposing membranes into contact. The contact region is a tightly bound rapidly expanding patch whose growth velocity v(patch increases with SNARE density Gamma(snare. We find three patch expansion regimes: slow, intermediate, fast. Typical experiments belong to the fast regime where v(patch ~ (Gamma(snare(2/3 depends on SNARE diffusivities and complexation binding constant. The model predicts growth velocities ~10 - 300 microm/s. The patch may provide a close contact region where SNAREs can trigger fusion. Extending the model to a simple description of fusion, a broad distribution of fusion times is predicted. Increasing SNARE density accelerates fusion by boosting the patch growth velocity, thereby providing more complexes to participate in fusion. This quantifies the notion of SNAREs as dual adhesion-fusion agents.

  10. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel; Montanez, Cecilia; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  11. Probing plasma membrane microdomains in cowpea protoplasts using lipidated GFP-fusion proteins and multimode FRET microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, J.E.M.; van Munster, E.B.; Vischer, N.O.; Gadella, T.

    2004-01-01

    Multimode fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was applied to study the plasma membrane organization using different lipidated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins co-expressed in cowpea protoplasts. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to the hyper variable region

  12. Can macular xanthophylls replace cholesterol in formation of the liquid-ordered phase in lipid-bilayer membranes?

    OpenAIRE

    Subczynski, Witold K.; Wisniewska, Anna; Widomska, Justyna

    2012-01-01

    Lateral organization of membranes made from binary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and macular xanthophylls (lutein or zeaxanthin) was investigated using the saturation-recovery (SR) EPR spin-labeling discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method in which the bimolecular collision rate of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label is measured. This work was undertaken to examine whether or not lutein and zeaxanthin, macular xant...

  13. Flunarizine Prevents Hepatitis C Virus Membrane Fusion in a Genotype-dependent Manner by Targeting the Potential Fusion Peptide within E1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Paula M.; Haid, Sibylle; Brown, Richard J. P.; Doerrbecker, Juliane; Schulze, Kai; Zeilinger, Carsten; von Schaewen, Markus; Heller, Brigitte; Vercauteren, Koen; Luxenburger, Eva; Baktash, Yasmine M.; Vondran, Florian W. R.; Speerstra, Sietkse; Awadh, Abdullah; Mukhtarov, Furkat; Schang, Luis M; Kirschning, Andreas; Müller, Rolf; Guzman, Carlos A.; Kaderali, Lars; Randall, Glenn; Meuleman, Philip; Ploss, Alexander; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To explore mechanisms of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication we screened a compound library including licensed drugs. Flunarizine, a diphenylmethylpiperazine used to treat migraine, inhibited HCV cell entry in vitro and in vivo in a genotype-dependent fashion. Analysis of mosaic viruses between susceptible and resistant strains revealed that E1 and E2 glycoproteins confer susceptibility to flunarizine. Time of addition experiments and single particle tracking of HCV demonstrated that flunarizine specifically prevents membrane fusion. Related phenothiazines and pimozide also inhibited HCV infection and preferentially targeted HCV genotype 2 viruses. However, phenothiazines and pimozide exhibited improved genotype coverage including the difficult to treat genotype 3. Flunarizine-resistant HCV carried mutations within the alleged fusion peptide and displayed cross-resistance to these compounds, indicating that these drugs have a common mode of action. Conclusion: These observations reveal novel details about HCV membrane fusion. Moreover, flunarizine and related compounds represent first-in-class HCV fusion inhibitors that merit consideration for repurposing as cost-effective component of HCV combination therapies. PMID:26248546

  14. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Fusion between perinuclear virions and the outer nuclear membrane requires the fusogenic activity of herpes simplex virus gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Catherine C; Wisner, Todd W; Hannah, Brian P; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Johnson, David C

    2009-11-01

    Herpesviruses cross nuclear membranes (NMs) in two steps, as follows: (i) capsids assemble and bud through the inner NM into the perinuclear space, producing enveloped virus particles, and (ii) the envelopes of these virus particles fuse with the outer NM. Two herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins, gB and gH (the latter, likely complexed as a heterodimer with gL), are necessary for the second step of this process. Mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate in the perinuclear space or in herniations (membrane vesicles derived from the inner NM). Both gB and gH/gL are also known to act directly in fusing the virion envelope with host cell membranes during HSV entry into cells, i.e., both glycoproteins appear to function directly in different aspects of the membrane fusion process. We hypothesized that HSV gB and gH/gL also act directly in the membrane fusion that occurs during virus egress from the nucleus. Previous studies of the role of gB and gH/gL in nuclear egress involved HSV gB and gH null mutants that could potentially also possess gross defects in the virion envelope. Here, we produced recombinant HSV-expressing mutant forms of gB with single amino acid substitutions in the hydrophobic "fusion loops." These fusion loops are thought to play a direct role in membrane fusion by insertion into cellular membranes. HSV recombinants expressing gB with any one of four fusion loop mutations (W174R, W174Y, Y179K, and A261D) were unable to enter cells. Moreover, two of the mutants, W174Y and Y179K, displayed reduced abilities to mediate HSV cell-to-cell spread, and W174R and A261D exhibited no spread. All mutant viruses exhibited defects in nuclear egress, enveloped virions accumulated in herniations and in the perinuclear space, and fewer enveloped virions were detected on cell surfaces. These results support the hypothesis that gB functions directly to mediate the fusion between perinuclear virus particles and the outer NM.

  16. Lactoferricin B causes depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and fusion of negatively charged liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvatne, H; Haukland, H H; Olsvik, O; Vorland, L H

    2001-03-09

    Antimicrobial peptides have been extensively studied in order to elucidate their mode of action. Most of these peptides have been shown to exert a bactericidal effect on the cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Lactoferricin is an antimicrobial peptide with a net positive charge and an amphipatic structure. In this study we examine the effect of bovine lactoferricin (lactoferricin B; Lfcin B) on bacterial membranes. We show that Lfcin B neither lyses bacteria, nor causes a major leakage from liposomes. Lfcin B depolarizes the membrane of susceptible bacteria, and induces fusion of negatively charged liposomes. Hence, Lfcin B may have additional targets responsible for the antibacterial effect.

  17. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, H.

    1989-01-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-([ 125 I]iodophenyl)diazirine ([ 125 I]TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent [ 125 I]TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion

  18. Penetration and fusion of phospholipid vesicles by lysozyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Kim, H. (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul)

    1989-10-01

    The lysozyme-induced fusion of phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylethanolamine vesicles as studied at a wide range of pH is found to correlate well with the binding of this protein to the vesicles. An identical 6000 molecular weight segment of lysozyme at the N-terminal region is found to be protected from tryptic digestion when initially incubated with vesicles at several pH values. Only this segment is labeled by dansyl chloride, which is partitioned into the bilayer. These results suggest the penetration of one segment of lysozyme into the bilayer. Photoactivated labeling of the membrane-penetrating segment of lysozyme with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)diazirine (({sup 125}I)TID) and subsequent identification of the labeled residues by Edman degradation and gamma-ray counting indicate that four amino acids from the N-terminal are located outside the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. Although treatment of the membrane-embedded segment with aminopeptidase failed to cleave any amino acids from the N-terminal, it appears that a loop of lysozyme segment near the N-terminal penetrates into the bilayer at acidic pH. A helical wheel diagram shows that the labeling is done mainly on one surface of the alpha-helix. The penetration kinetics as studied by time-dependent ({sup 125}I)TID labeling coincide with the fusion kinetics, strongly suggesting that the penetration of the lysozyme segment into the vesicles is the cause of the fusion.

  19. DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids: correlation with lipid mesomorphism, interfacial curvature, and membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C. (Northwestern)

    2010-01-18

    DNA release from lipoplexes is an essential step during lipofection and is probably a result of charge neutralization by cellular anionic lipids. As a model system to test this possibility, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between DNA and lipid covalently labeled with Cy3 and BODIPY, respectively, was used to monitor the release of DNA from lipid surfaces induced by anionic liposomes. The separation of DNA from lipid measured this way was considerably slower and less complete than that estimated with noncovalently labeled DNA, and depends on the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and anionic liposomes. This result was confirmed by centrifugal separation of released DNA and lipid. X-ray diffraction revealed a clear correlation of the DNA release capacity of the anionic lipids with the interfacial curvature of the mesomorphic structures developed when the anionic and cationic liposomes were mixed. DNA release also correlated with the rate of fusion of anionic liposomes with lipoplexes. It is concluded that the tendency to fuse and the phase preference of the mixed lipid membranes are key factors for the rate and extent of DNA release. The approach presented emphasizes the importance of the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and target membranes and suggests optimal transfection may be obtained by tailoring lipoplex composition to the lipid composition of target cells.

  20. On-demand liquid-in-liquid droplet metering and fusion utilizing pneumatically actuated membrane valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bo-Chih; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an active emulsification scheme that is capable of producing micro-droplets with desired volumes and compositions on demand. Devices with pneumatically actuated membranes constructed on top of specially designed microfluidic channels are utilized to meter and fuse liquid-in-liquid droplets. By steadily pressurizing a fluid and intermittently blocking its flow, droplets with desired volumes are dispersed into another fluid. Furthermore, droplets from multiple sources are fused together to produce combined droplets with desired compositions. In the prototype demonstration, a three-layer PDMS molding and irreversible bonding process was employed to fabricate the proposed microfluidic devices. For a dispersed-phase flow that is normally blocked by a membrane valve, the relationship between the volume (V) of a metered droplet and the corresponding valve open time (T) is found to be approximately V = kT a , in which k and a are constants determined mainly by the fluid-driving pressures. In addition to the metering device, functional droplet entrapment, fusion and flow-switching devices were also integrated in the system to produce desired combined droplets and deliver them to intended destinations upon request. As such, the demonstrated microfluidic system could potentially realize the controllability on droplet volume, composition and motion, which is desired for a variety of chemical and biological applications

  1. The influence of non polar and polar molecules in mouse motile cells membranes and pure lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sierra-Valdez

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA. Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered.

  2. Simulations of skin barrier function: free energies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic transmembrane pores in ceramide bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W J; Noro, Massimo G; den Otter, Wouter K

    2008-11-15

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel phase and in the DMSO-induced fluidized state. Our simulations show that the fluid phase bilayers form archetypal water-filled hydrophilic pores similar to those observed in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the rigid gel-phase bilayers develop hydrophobic pores. At the relatively small pore diameters studied here, the hydrophobic pores are empty rather than filled with bulk water, suggesting that they do not compromise the barrier function of ceramide membranes. A phenomenological analysis suggests that these vapor pores are stable, below a critical radius, because the penalty of creating water-vapor and tail-vapor interfaces is lower than that of directly exposing the strongly hydrophobic tails to water. The PMCF free energy profile of the vapor pore supports this analysis. The simulations indicate that high DMSO concentrations drastically impair the barrier function of the skin by strongly reducing the free energy required for pore opening.

  3. Cholesterol Protects the Oxidized Lipid Bilayer from Water Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owen, Michael C; Kulig, Waldemar; Rog, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how cholesterol protects membrane structure under oxidative stress conditions, we monitored the changes to the structure of lipid bilayers comprising 30 mol% cholesterol and an increasing concentration of Class B oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC...... in a characteristic reduction in bilayer thickness and increase in area per lipid, thereby increasing the exposure of the membrane hydrophobic region to water. However, cholesterol was observed to help reduce water injury by moving into the bilayer core and forming more hydrogen bonds with the oxPLs. Cholesterol also...... resists altering its tilt angle, helping to maintain membrane integrity. Water that enters the 1-nm-thick core region remains part of the bulk water on either side of the bilayer, with relatively few water molecules able to traverse through the bilayer. In cholesterol-rich membranes, the bilayer does...

  4. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. → Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. → This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  5. The Highly Conserved Proline at Position 438 in Pseudorabies Virus gH Is Important for Regulation of Membrane Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Schröter, Christina; Klupp, Barbara G.; Fuchs, Walter; Gerhard, Marika; Backovic, Marija; Rey, Felix A.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion in herpesviruses requires viral glycoproteins (g) gB and gH/gL. While gB is considered the actual fusion protein but is nonfusogenic per se, the function of gH/gL remains enigmatic. Crystal structures for different gH homologs are strikingly similar despite only moderate amino acid sequence conservation. A highly conserved sequence motif comprises the residues serine-proline-cysteine corresponding to positions 437 to 439 in pseudorabies virus (PrV) gH. The PrV-gH structure sho...

  6. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxΦ domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1 NL4.3 compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  7. Hemi-fused structure mediates and controls fusion and fission in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Dong; Hamid, Edaeni; Shin, Wonchul; Wen, Peter J; Krystofiak, Evan S; Villarreal, Seth A; Chiang, Hsueh-Cheng; Kachar, Bechara; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2016-06-23

    Membrane fusion and fission are vital for eukaryotic life. For three decades, it has been proposed that fusion is mediated by fusion between the proximal leaflets of two bilayers (hemi-fusion) to produce a hemi-fused structure, followed by fusion between the distal leaflets, whereas fission is via hemi-fission, which also produces a hemi-fused structure, followed by full fission. This hypothesis remained unsupported owing to the lack of observation of hemi-fusion or hemi-fission in live cells. A competing fusion hypothesis involving protein-lined pore formation has also been proposed. Here we report the observation of a hemi-fused Ω-shaped structure in live neuroendocrine chromaffin cells and pancreatic β-cells, visualized using confocal and super-resolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This structure is generated from fusion pore opening or closure (fission) at the plasma membrane. Unexpectedly, the transition to full fusion or fission is determined by competition between fusion and calcium/dynamin-dependent fission mechanisms, and is notably slow (seconds to tens of seconds) in a substantial fraction of the events. These results provide key missing evidence in support of the hemi-fusion and hemi-fission hypothesis in live cells, and reveal the hemi-fused intermediate as a key structure controlling fusion and fission, as fusion and fission mechanisms compete to determine the transition to fusion or fission.

  8. Possible mechanism of adhesion in a mica supported phospholipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertsin, Alexander; Grunze, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers supported on hydrophilic solids like silica and mica play a substantial role in fundamental studies and technological applications of phospholipid membranes. In both cases the molecular mechanism of adhesion between the bilayer and the support is of primary interest. Since the possibilities of experimental methods in this specific area are rather limited, the methods of computer simulation acquire great importance. In this paper we use the grand canonical Monte Carlo technique and an atomistic force field to simulate the behavior of a mica supported phospholipid bilayer in pure water as a function of the distance between the bilayer and the support. The simulation reveals a possible adhesion mechanism, where the adhesion is due to individual lipid molecules that protrude from the bilayer and form widely spaced links with the support. Simultaneously, the bilayer remains separated from the bilayer by a thin water interlayer which maintains the bilayer fluidity

  9. MITO-Porter: A liposome-based carrier system for delivery of macromolecules into mitochondria via membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuma; Akita, Hidetaka; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Kogure, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takenori; Shinohara, Yasuo; Yamashita, Kikuji; Kobayashi, Hideo; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in higher cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Effective medical therapies for such diseases will ultimately require targeted delivery of therapeutic proteins or nucleic acids to the mitochondria, which will be achieved through innovations in the nanotechnology of intracellular trafficking. Here we describe a liposome-based carrier that delivers its macromolecular cargo to the mitochondrial interior via membrane fusion. These liposome particles, which we call MITO-Porters, carry octaarginine surface modifications to stimulate their entry into cells as intact vesicles (via macropinocytosis). We identified lipid compositions for the MITO-Porter which promote both its fusion with the mitochondrial membrane and the release of its cargo to the intra-mitochondrial compartment in living cells. Thus, the MITO-Porter holds promise as an efficacious system for the delivery of both large and small therapeutic molecules into mitochondria.

  10. Fusion peptide of influenza hemagglutinin requires a fixed angle boomerang structure for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alex L; Park, Heather; White, Judith M; Tamm, Lukas K

    2006-03-03

    The fusion peptide of influenza hemagglutinin is crucial for cell entry of this virus. Previous studies showed that this peptide adopts a boomerang-shaped structure in lipid model membranes at the pH of membrane fusion. To examine the role of the boomerang in fusion, we changed several residues proposed to stabilize the kink in this structure and measured fusion. Among these, mutants E11A and W14A expressed hemagglutinins with hemifusion and no fusion activities, and F9A and N12A had no effect on fusion, respectively. Binding enthalpies and free energies of mutant peptides to model membranes and their ability to perturb lipid bilayer structures correlated well with the fusion activities of the parent full-length molecules. The structure of W14A determined by NMR and site-directed spin labeling features a flexible kink that points out of the membrane, in sharp contrast to the more ordered boomerang of the wild-type, which points into the membrane. A specific fixed angle boomerang structure is thus required to support membrane fusion.

  11. Reactions of radicals with lecithin bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.J.W.; Thomas, J.K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of reaction of .OH and e/sub aq/ - with lecithin bilayers have been measured. The rate for .OH + lecithin is 5.1 +- 0.9 x 10 8 M -1 sec -1 while the e/sub aq/ - + lecithin rate is very slow. When a solute such as pyrene is solubilized in the bilayer, .OH and e/sub aq/ - may react with the solute; rates of 1.65 +- 0.12 x 10 9 M -1 sec -1 and 7 x 10 7 M -1 sec -1 have been measured for reaction of .OH and e/sub aq/ - , respectively, with pyrene in lecithin. These rates are lower than those observed for similar reactions in homogeneous systems. This is explained in terms of (a) the protective effect of the bilayer, this being especially true for e/sub aq/ - which does not readily leave the aqueous phase, and (b) in terms of the restricted diffusion imposed on the reactive species by the bilayer. The kinetics in these model systems are relevant to reactions of radicals with membranes. Long-term alteration in the model membrane following .OH attack is manifested in terms of damage to the head group, increasing water penetration of the bilayer, and of cross-linking with the membrane, thereby restricting motion in the interior of the bilayer. Increased rigidity and leakiness of membranes is an expected consequence of radiation damage

  12. Vesicular PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 and Rab7 are key effectors of sea urchin zygote nuclear membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lete, Marta G; Byrne, Richard D; Alonso, Alicia; Poccia, Dominic; Larijani, Banafshé

    2017-01-15

    Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics is an important example of the universal phenomena of membrane fusion. The signalling molecules involved in nuclear membrane fusion might also be conserved during the formation of both pronuclear and zygote nuclear envelopes in the fertilised egg. Here, we determine that class-I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are needed for in vitro nuclear envelope formation. We show that, in vivo, PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 is transiently located in vesicles around the male pronucleus at the time of nuclear envelope formation, and around male and female pronuclei before membrane fusion. We illustrate that class-I PI3K activity is also necessary for fusion of the female and male pronuclear membranes. We demonstrate, using coincidence amplified Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) monitored using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), a protein-lipid interaction of Rab7 GTPase and PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 that occurs during pronuclear membrane fusion to create the zygote nuclear envelope. We present a working model, which includes several molecular steps in the pathways controlling fusion of nuclear envelope membranes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Membrane fusion activity of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G is induced by low pH but not by heat or denaturant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yi; Ghosh, Kakoli; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.; Ghosh, Hara P.

    2003-01-01

    The fusogenic envelope glycoprotein G of the rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) induces membrane fusion at acidic pH. At acidic pH the G protein undergoes a major structural reorganization leading to the fusogenic conformation. However, unlike other viral fusion proteins, the low-pH-induced conformational change of VSV G is completely reversible. As well, the presence of an α-helical coiled-coil motif required for fusion by a number of viral and cellular fusion proteins was not predicted in VSV G protein by using a number of algorithms. Results of pH dependence of the thermal stability of G protein as determined by intrinsic Trp fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy show that the G protein is equally stable at neutral or acidic pH. Destabilization of G structure at neutral pH with either heat or urea did not induce membrane fusion or conformational change(s) leading to membrane fusion. Taken together, these data suggest that the mechanism of VSV G-induced fusion is distinct from the fusion mechanism of fusion proteins that involve a coiled-coil motif

  14. Chloroquine Increases Glucose Uptake via Enhancing GLUT4 Translocation and Fusion with the Plasma Membrane in L6 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chloroquine can induce an increase in the cellular uptake of glucose; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Methods: In this study, translocation of GLUT4 and intracellular Ca2+ changes were simultaneously observed by confocal microscope in L6 cells stably over-expressing IRAP-mOrange. The GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane (PM was traced using HA-GLUT4-GFP. Glucose uptake was measured using a cell-based glucose uptake assay. GLUT4 protein was detected by Western blotting and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. Results: We found that chloroquine induced significant increases in glucose uptake, glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane (GTPM, GLUT4 fusion with the PM, and intracellular Ca2+ in L6 muscle cells. Chloroquine-induced increases of GTPM and intracellular Ca2+ were inhibited by Gallein (Gβγ inhibitor and U73122 (PLC inhibitor. However, 2-APB (IP3R blocker only blocked the increase in intracellular Ca2+ but did not inhibit GTPM increase. These results indicate that chloroquine, via the Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R pathway, induces elevation of Ca2+, and this Ca2+ increase does not play a role in chloroqui-ne-evoked GTPM increase. However, GLUT4 fusion with the PM and glucose uptake were significantly inhibited with BAPTA-AM. This suggests that Ca2+ enhances GLUT4 fusion with the PM resulting in glucose uptake increase. Conclusion: Our data indicate that chloroquine via Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R induces Ca2+ elevation, which in turn promotes GLUT4 fusion with the PM. Moreover, chloroquine can enhance GLUT4 trafficking to the PM. These mechanisms eventually result in glucose uptake increase in control and insulin-resistant L6 cells. These findings suggest that chloroquine might be a potential drug for improving insulin tolerance in diabetic patients.

  15. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  17. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-García, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús Ignacio; Mendieta, Jesús; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. ► HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. ► HRS domains of F protein form three single α-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from β-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an α-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  18. Exploring the membrane fusion mechanism through force-induced disassembly of HIV-1 six-helix bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Kai [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Yong [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Lou, Jizhong, E-mail: jlou@ibp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of RNA Biology, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Noncoding RNA, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Enveloped virus, such as HIV-1, employs membrane fusion mechanism to invade into host cell. HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain uses six-helix bundle configuration to accomplish this process. Using molecular dynamic simulations, we confirmed the stability of this six-helix bundle by showing high occupancy of hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Key residues and interactions important for the bundle integration were characterized by force-induced unfolding simulations of six-helix bundle, exhibiting the collapse order of these groups of interactions. Moreover, our results in some way concerted with a previous theory that the formation of coiled-coil choose a route which involved cooperative interactions between the N-terminal and C-terminal helix. -- Highlights: •Unfolding of HIV-1 gp41 six-helix bundle is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. •Specific interactions responsible for the stability of HIV-1 envelope post-fusion conformation were identified. •The gp41 six-helix bundle transition inducing membrane fusion might be a cooperative process of the three subunits.

  19. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Wrenn, Stephen M. Dicker, Eleanor F. Small, Nily R. Dan, Michał Mleczko, Georg Schmitz, Peter A. Lewin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol (PEG - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented

  20. Involvement of human endogenous retroviral syncytin-1 in human osteoclast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Hobolt-Pedersen, Anne-Sofie

    2011-01-01

    fusion of the lipid bilayers of their cell membranes are still unknown. Syncytin-1 is a protein encoded by a human endogenous retroviral gene which was stably integrated into the human ancestor genome more than 24 million years ago. Upon activation, syncytin-1 is able to destabilize the lipid bilayer....... This was documented through Q-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. These in vitro findings were confirmed by immunohistochemical stainings in human iliac crest biopsies. A syncytin-1 inhibitory peptide reduced the number of nuclei per osteoclast by 30%, as well as TRACP activity. From a mechanistic...

  1. Conservation of proteo-lipid nuclear membrane fusion machinery during early embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Richard D; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Applebee, Christopher J; Larijani, Banafshé

    2014-01-01

    The fusogenic lipid diacylglycerol is essential for remodeling gamete and zygote nuclear envelopes (NE) during early embryogenesis. It is unclear whether upstream signaling molecules are likewise conserved. Here we demonstrate PLCγ and its activator SFK1, which co-operate during male pronuclear envelope formation, also promote the subsequent male and female pronuclear fusion. PLCγ and SFK1 interact directly at the fusion site leading to PLCγ activation. This is accompanied by a spatially restricted reduction of PtdIns(4,5)P2. Consequently, pronuclear fusion is blocked by PLCγ or SFK1 inhibition. These findings identify new regulators of events in the early embryo and suggest a conserved "toolkit" of fusion machinery drives successive NE fusion events during embryogenesis.

  2. Targeting of a chimeric human histone fusion mRNA to membrane-bound polysomes in HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular location of histone mRNA-containing polysomes may play a key role in the posttranscriptional events that mediate histone mRNA turnover following inhibition of DNA synthesis. Previously, it has been shown that histone mRNA is found primarily on free polysomes that are associated with the cytoskeleton. The authors report here the construction of an Escherichia coli pBR322 β-lactamase signal peptide-human H3 histone fusion gene. The fusion transcript is targeted to membrane-bound polysomes and remains stable following interruption of DNA replication. Relocating mRNA within the cell may provide a procedure for studying the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression

  3. High yield, reproducible and quasi-automated bilayer formation in a microfluidic format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; van Uitert, I.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic platform is reported for various experimentation schemes on cell membrane models and membrane proteins using a combination of electrical and optical measurements, including confocal microscopy. Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) are prepared in the device upon spontaneous and

  4. Proton permeation of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, D W

    1987-10-01

    Proton permeation of the lipid bilayer barrier has two unique features. First, permeability coefficients measured at neutral pH ranges are six to seven orders of magnitude greater than expected from knowledge of other monovalent cations. Second, proton conductance across planar lipid bilayers varies at most by a factor of 10 when pH is varied from near 1 to near 11. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this anomalous behavior: proton conductance related to contaminants of lipid bilayers, and proton translocation along transient hydrogen-bonded chains (tHBC) of associated water molecules in the membrane. The weight of evidence suggests that trace contaminants may contribute to proton conductance across planar lipid membranes at certain pH ranges, but cannot account for the anomalous proton flux in liposome systems. Two new results will be reported here which were designed to test the tHBC model. These include measurements of relative proton/potassium permeability in the gramicidin channel, and plots of proton flux against the magnitude of pH gradients. (1) The relative permeabilities of protons and potassium through the gramicidin channel, which contains a single strand of hydrogen-bonded water molecules, were found to differ by at least four orders of magnitude when measured at neutral pH ranges. This result demonstrates that a hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules can provide substantial discrimination between protons and other cations. It was also possible to calculate that if approximately 7% of bilayer water was present in a transient configuration similar to that of the gramicidin channel, it could account for the measured proton flux. (2) The plot of proton conductance against pH gradient across liposome membranes was superlinear, a result that is consistent with one of three alternative tHBC models for proton conductance described by Nagle elsewhere in this volume.

  5. Thermotropic and Barotropic Phase Behavior of Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutake Tamai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilayers formed by phospholipids are frequently used as model biological membranes in various life science studies. A characteristic feature of phospholipid bilayers is to undergo a structural change called a phase transition in response to environmental changes of their surroundings. In this review, we focus our attention on phase transitions of some major phospholipids contained in biological membranes, phosphatidylcholines (PCs, depending on temperature and pressure. Bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, which is the most representative lipid in model membrane studies, will first be explained. Then, the bilayer phase behavior of various kinds of PCs with different molecular structures is revealed from the temperature–pressure phase diagrams, and the difference in phase stability among these PC bilayers is discussed in connection with the molecular structure of the PC molecules. Furthermore, the solvent effect on the phase behavior is also described briefly.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Marshall C; Cambrea, Lee R; Hovis, Jennifer S

    2005-09-15

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for examining lipid bilayers; however, it says little about the fluidity of the bilayer-a key physical aspect. It is shown here that it is possible to both acquire spectroscopic data of supported lipid bilayer samples and make measurements of the membrane fluidity. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) is used to obtain the spectroscopic information and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to determine the fluidity of the samples. In the infrared spectra of lipid bilayers composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the following major peaks were observed; nu(as)(CH3) 2954 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH3) 2870 cm(-1), nu(as)(CH2) 2924 cm(-1), nu(s)(CH2) 2852 cm(-1), nu(C=O) 1734 cm(-1), delta(CH2) 1463-1473 cm(-1), nu(as)(PO2-) 1226 cm(-1), nu(s)(PO2-) 1084 cm(-1), and nu(as)(N+(CH3)3) 973 cm(-1). The diffusion coefficient of the same lipid bilayer was measured to be 3.5 +/- 0.5 micom(2)/s with visual recovery also noted through use of epifluorescence microscopy. FRAP and visual data confirm the formation of a uniform, mobile supported lipid bilayer. The combination of ATR-FT-IR and FRAP provides complementary data giving a more complete picture of fully hydrated model membrane systems.

  7. Recruitment and SNARE-mediated fusion of vesicles in furrow membrane remodeling during cytokinesis in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Liwai; Webb, Sarah E.; Lee, Karen W.; Miller, Andrew L.

    2006-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the final stage in cell division that serves to partition cytoplasm and daughter nuclei into separate cells. Membrane remodeling at the cleavage plane is a required feature of cytokinesis in many species. In animal cells, however, the precise mechanisms and molecular interactions that mediate this process are not yet fully understood. Using real-time imaging in live, early stage zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that vesicles labeled with the v-SNARE, VAMP-2, are recruited to the cleavage furrow during deepening in a microtubule-dependent manner. These vesicles then fuse with, and transfer their VAMP-2 fluorescent label to, the plasma membrane during both furrow deepening and subsequent apposition. This observation indicates that new membrane is being inserted during these stages of cytokinesis. Inhibition of SNAP-25 (a cognate t-SNARE of VAMP-2), using a monoclonal antibody, blocked VAMP-2 vesicle fusion and furrow apposition. Transient expression of mutant forms of SNAP-25 also produced defects in furrow apposition. SNAP-25 inhibition by either method, however, did not have any significant effect on furrow deepening. Thus, our data clearly indicate that VAMP-2 and SNAP-25 play an essential role in daughter blastomere apposition, possibly via the delivery of components that promote the cell-to-cell adhesion required for the successful completion of cytokinesis. Our results also support the idea that new membrane addition, which occurs during late stage cytokinesis, is not required for furrow deepening that results from contractile band constriction

  8. Alpha-tocopherol inhibits pore formation in oxidized bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonnoy, P.; Karttunen, M.; Wong-Ekkabut, J.

    2017-01-01

    In biological membranes, alpha-tocopherols (α-toc; vitamin E) protect polyunsaturated lipids from free radicals. Although the interactions of α-toc with non-oxidized lipid bilayers have been studied, their effects on oxidized bilayers remain unknown. In this study, atomistic molecular dynamics (MD)

  9. Computer Simulations of Lipid Bilayers and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The importance of computer simulations in lipid bilayer research has become more prominent for the last couple of decades and as computers get even faster, simulations will play an increasingly important part of understanding the processes that take place in and across cell membranes. This thesis...... entitled Computer simulations of lipid bilayers and proteins describes two molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of pure lipid bilayers as well as a study of a transmembrane protein embedded in a lipid bilayer matrix. Below follows a brief overview of the thesis. Chapter 1. This chapter is a short...... in the succeeding chapters is presented. Details on system setups, simulation parameters and other technicalities can be found in the relevant chapters. Chapter 3, DPPC lipid parameters: The quality of MD simulations is intimately dependent on the empirical potential energy function and its parameters, i...

  10. Lipid bilayers and interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems lipid bilayers are subject to many different interactions with other entities. These can range from proteins that are attached to the hydrophilic region of the bilayer or transmembrane proteins that interact with the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer. Interaction between

  11. Osteoclast Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Julie Møller, Anaïs; Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Søe, Kent

    2017-01-01

    on the nuclearity of fusion partners. While CD47 promotes cell fusions involving mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts, syncytin-1 promotes fusion of two multi-nucleated osteoclasts, but also reduces the number of fusions between mono-nucleated pre-osteoclasts. Furthermore, CD47 seems to mediate fusion mostly through...... individual fusion events using time-lapse and antagonists of CD47 and syncytin-1. All time-lapse recordings have been studied by two independent observers. A total of 1808 fusion events were analyzed. The present study shows that CD47 and syncytin-1 have different roles in osteoclast fusion depending...... broad contact surfaces between the partners' cell membrane while syncytin-1 mediate fusion through phagocytic-cup like structure. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 1-8, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  12. cGAS-Mediated Innate Immunity Spreads Intercellularly through HIV-1 Env-Induced Membrane Fusion Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuting; Ducroux, Aurélie; Ponnurangam, Aparna; Vieyres, Gabrielle; Franz, Sergej; Müsken, Mathias; Zillinger, Thomas; Malassa, Angelina; Ewald, Ellen; Hornung, Veit; Barchet, Winfried; Häussler, Susanne; Pietschmann, Thomas; Goffinet, Christine

    2016-10-12

    Upon sensing cytoplasmic retroviral DNA in infected cells, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) produces the cyclic dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates STING to trigger a type I interferon (IFN) response. We find that membrane fusion-inducing contact between donor cells expressing the HIV envelope (Env) and primary macrophages endogenously expressing the HIV receptor CD4 and coreceptor enable intercellular transfer of cGAMP. This cGAMP exchange results in STING-dependent antiviral IFN responses in target macrophages and protection from HIV infection. Furthermore, under conditions allowing cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1, infected primary T cells, but not cell-free virions, deliver cGAMP to autologous macrophages through HIV-1 Env and CD4/coreceptor-mediated membrane fusion sites and induce a STING-dependent, but cGAS-independent, IFN response in target cells. Collectively, these findings identify an infection-specific mode of horizontal transfer of cGAMP between primary immune cells that may boost antiviral responses, particularly in infected tissues in which cell-to-cell transmission of virions exceeds cell-free infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptide-Based Membrane Fusion Inhibitors Targeting HCoV-229E Spike Protein HR1 and HR2 Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Xia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E infection in infants, elderly people, and immunocompromised patients can cause severe disease, thus calling for the development of effective and safe therapeutics to treat it. Here we reported the design, synthesis and characterization of two peptide-based membrane fusion inhibitors targeting HCoV-229E spike protein heptad repeat 1 (HR1 and heptad repeat 2 (HR2 domains, 229E-HR1P and 229E-HR2P, respectively. We found that 229E-HR1P and 229E-HR2P could interact to form a stable six-helix bundle and inhibit HCoV-229E spike protein-mediated cell-cell fusion with IC50 of 5.7 and 0.3 µM, respectively. 229E-HR2P effectively inhibited pseudotyped and live HCoV-229E infection with IC50 of 0.5 and 1.7 µM, respectively. In a mouse model, 229E-HR2P administered intranasally could widely distribute in the upper and lower respiratory tracts and maintain its fusion-inhibitory activity. Therefore, 229E-HR2P is a promising candidate for further development as an antiviral agent for the treatment and prevention of HCoV-229E infection.

  14. Interactive transport of guanidinylated poly(propylene imine)-based dendrimers through liposomal and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsogas, Ioannis; Sideratou, Zili; Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Theodossiou, Theodossis A; Paleos, Constantinos M

    2007-10-15

    The ability of guanidinylated poly(propylene imine) dendrimers to translocate across lipid bilayers was assessed by employing either a model phosphate-bearing liposomal membrane system or A549 human lung carcinoma cells. Two dendrimer generations, differing in the number of surface guanidinium groups, were employed, while surface acetylation or the use of spacers affected the binding of the guanidinium group to the phosphate moiety and finally the transport efficiency. Following adhesion of dendrimers with liposomes, fusion or transport occurred. Transport through the liposomal bilayer was observed at low guanidinium/phosphate molar ratios, and was enhanced when the bilayer was in the liquid-crystalline phase. For effective transport through the liposomal membrane, an optimum balance between the binding strength and the degree of hydrophobicity of the guanidinylated dendrimer is required. In experiments performed in vitro with cells, efficient penetration and internalization in subcellular organelles and cytosol was observed.

  15. Structure and distribution of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba toxin in lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Stroh, Cordula; Zhu Rong; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry δ-endotoxins cause death of susceptible insect larvae by forming lytic pores in the midgut epithelial cell membranes. The 65 kDa trypsin activated Cry4Ba toxin was previously shown to be capable of permeabilizing liposomes and forming ionic channels in receptor-free planar lipid bilayers. Here, magnetic ACmode (MACmode) atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the lateral distribution and the native molecular structure of the Cry4Ba toxin in the membrane. Liposome fusion and the Langmuir-Blodgett technique were employed for supported lipid bilayer preparations. The toxin preferentially inserted in a self-assembled structure, rather than as a single monomeric molecule. In addition, the spontaneous insertion into receptor-free lipid bilayers lead to formation of characteristic pore-like structures with four-fold symmetry, suggesting that tetramers are the preferred oligomerization state of this toxin

  16. Effects of carotenoids on lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Quentin R; Mostofian, Barmak; Fuente Gomez, Gabriel; Smith, Jeremy C; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2018-01-31

    Carotenoids have been found to be important in improving the integrity of biomembranes in eukaryotes. However, the molecular details of how carotenoids modulate the physical properties of biomembranes are unknown. To this end, we have conducted a series of molecular dynamics simulations of different biologically-relevant membranes in the presence of carotenoids. The carotenoid effect on the membrane was found to be specific to the identity of the carotenoid and the composition of the membrane itself. Therefore, different classes of carotenoids produce a different effect on the membrane, and different membrane phases are affected differently by carotenoids. It is apparent from our data that carotenoids do trigger the bilayer to become thinner. The mechanism by which this occurs depends on two competing factors, the ability of the lipid tails of opposing monolayers to either (1) compress or (2) interdigitate as the bilayer condenses. Indeed, carotenoids directly influence the physical properties via these two mechanisms, thus compacting the bilayer. However, the degree to which these competing mechanisms are utilized depends on the bilayer phase and the carotenoid identity.

  17. Observation of undulation motion of lipid bilayers by neutron spin echo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Norifumi L.; Seto, Hideki; Hishida, Mafumi

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of synthesized phospholipids have been well investigated as model biomembranes. These lipids usually self-assemble into regular stacks of bilayers with a characteristic repeat distance on the order of nm, whereas real biomembrane exist as single bilayers. The key phenomenon in understanding the formation of single isolated bilayers in 'unbinding' of lipid bilayers, in which the inter-bilayer distance of lipid bilayers diverges by the steric interaction due to the membrane undulation. In this paper, we show some results of neutron spin-echo (NSE) experiments to investigate the effect of the steric interaction on unbinding and related phenomena. (author)

  18. Characterization of the transverse relaxation rates in lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watnick, P.I.; Dea, P.; Chan, S.I.

    1990-01-01

    The 2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of a deuterated phospholipid bilayer reflect slow motions in the bilayer membrane. A study of dimyristoyl lecithin specifically deuterated at several positions of the hydrocarbon chains indicates that these motions are cooperative and are confined to the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayer. However, lipid head group interactions do play an important role in modulating the properties of the cooperative fluctuations of the hydrocarbon chains (director fluctuations), as evidenced by the effects of various lipid additives on the 2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of the dimyristoyl lecithin bilayer

  19. Dispersion of fullerenes in phospholipid bilayers and the subsequent phase changes in the host bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeng, U-S. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: usjeng@nsrrc.org.tw; Hsu, C.-H. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China); Lin, T.-L. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Wu, C.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tai, L.-A. [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Hwang, K.-C. [Department of Chemistry, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2005-02-28

    We have studied the structure and phase transition characteristics of the fullerenes (C{sub 60})-embedded lipid bilayers. With small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we have observed a degradation of bilayer ordering and a suppression effect on the phase transitions of the host vesicle bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), due to the embedment of fullerenes. The fullerene-embedded lipid system with substrate-oriented bilayers is also investigated using X-ray reflectivity and grazing incident small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). In the depth direction, the multilamellar peaks observed in the X-ray reflectivity profile for the oriented DPPC/C{sub 60} bilayers reveal a larger head-to-head distance D{sub HH} of 50.6 A and a bilayer spacing D of 59.8 A, compared to the D{sub HH}=47.7 A and D=59.5 A for a pure DPPC membrane measured at the same conditions. Furthermore, the lipid head layers and water layers in the extracted electron density profile for the complex system are highly smeared, implying a fluctuating or corrugated structure in this zone. Correspondingly, GISAXS for the oriented DPPC/C{sub 60} membrane reveals stronger diffuse scatterings along the membrane plane than that for the pure DPPC system, indicating a higher in-plane correlation associated with the embedded fullerenes.

  20. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  1. Membrane pumping technology, helium and hydrogen isotopes separation in the fusion hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, A.Yu.; Pistunovich, V.I.; Busnyuk, A.O.

    1994-01-01

    A gas pumping system for the ITER, improved by implementation of superpermeable membranes for selective hydrogen isotope exhaust, is considered. The study of the pumping capability of a niobium membrane for a hydrogen-helium mixture has been fulfilled. The membrane superpermeability can be only realized for atomic hydrogen. Helium does not pass through the membrane, and its presence does not affect the hydrogen pumping. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of gas behavior for the experimental facility has been done. The probability of permeation for a hydrogen atom for one collision with the membrane is ∼0.1; the same probability of molecule permeation is ∼10 -5 . The probability for atomization, i.e. re-emission of an atomizer is ∼0.2; the probability of recombination of an atom is ∼0.2

  2. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  3. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S

    2001-01-01

    -complex formation occurs downstream from trans-SNARE pairing, and depends on both the Rab-GTPase Ypt7 and calmodulin. The maintenance of existing complexes and completion of fusion are independent of trans-SNARE pairs. Reconstituted proteolipids form sealed channels, which can expand to form aqueous pores in a Ca2...

  4. Probing Lipid Bilayers under Ionic Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-12-06

    Biological membranes are normally under a resting transmembrane potential (TMP), which originates from the ionic imbalance between extracellular fluids and cytosols, and serves as electric power storage for cells. In cell electroporation, the ionic imbalance builds up a high TMP, resulting in the poration of cell membranes. However, the relationship between ionic imbalance and TMP is not clearly understood, and little is known about the effect of ionic imbalance on the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. In this study, we used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to characterize a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer system under ionic imbalances ranging from 0 to ∼0.06 e charges per lipid (e/Lip). We found that the TMP displayed three distinct regimes: 1) a linear regime between 0 and 0.045 e/Lip, where the TMP increased linearly with ionic imbalance; 2) a yielding regime between ∼0.045 and 0.060 e/Lip, where the TMP displayed a plateau; and 3) a poration regime above ∼0.060 e/Lip, where we observed pore formation within the sampling time (80 ns). We found no structural changes in the linear regime, apart from a nonlinear increase in the area per lipid, whereas in the yielding regime the bilayer exhibited substantial thinning, leading to an excess of water and Na + within the bilayer, as well as significant misalignment of the lipid tails. In the poration regime, lipid molecules diffused slightly faster. We also found that the fluid-to-gel phase transition temperature of the bilayer dropped below the normal value with increased ionic imbalances. Our results show that a high ionic imbalance can substantially alter the essential properties of the bilayer, making the bilayer more fluid like, or conversely, depolarization of a cell could in principle lead to membrane stiffening. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...... are well studied, the possibility of texture in gel domains has so far not been examined. When using polarized light for two-photon excitation of the fluorescent lipid probe Laurdan, the emission intensity is highly sensitive to the angle between the polarization and the tilt orientation of lipid acyl...... chains. By imaging the intensity variations as a function of the polarization angle, we map the lateral variations of the lipid tilt within domains. Results reveal that gel domains are composed of subdomains with different lipid tilt directions. We have applied a Fourier decomposition method...

  6. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    to the hydroperoxide groups to interact with the nitroxide at the methyl-terminal, confirming that the H-bonds experimentally observed are due to increased water penetration in the bilayer. The EPR and MD data on model membranes demonstrate that cell membrane damage by oxidative stress cause alteration of water......(zz) parameters revealed that OHPLPC, but mostly HpPLPC, induced a measurable increase in polarity and H-bonding propensity in the central region of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulation performed on 16-DSA in the PLPC-HpPLPC bilayer revealed that water molecules are statistically favored with respect...

  7. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic. PMID:26268612

  8. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-10-07

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic.

  9. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  10. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Anthony M.; Cheung, Pamela; Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru; Tsibane, Tshidi; Durham, Natasha D.; Basler, Christopher F.; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Chen, Benjamin K.

    2016-01-01

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  11. In Vivo Efficacy of Measles Virus Fusion Protein-Derived Peptides Is Modulated by the Properties of Self-Assembly and Membrane Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, T. N.; Palermo, L. M.; Veiga, A. S.; Huey, D.; Alabi, C. A.; Santos, N. C.; Welsch, J. C.; Mathieu, C.; Niewiesk, S.; Moscona, A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) infection is undergoing resurgence and remains one of the leading causes of death among young children worldwide despite the availability of an effective measles vaccine. MV infects its target cells by coordinated action of the MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins; upon receptor engagement by H, the prefusion F undergoes a structural transition, extending and inserting into the target cell membrane and then refolding into a postfusion structure that fuses the viral and cell membranes. By interfering with this structural transition of F, peptides derived from the heptad repeat (HR) regions of F can inhibit MV infection at the entry stage. In previous work, we have generated potent MV fusion inhibitors by dimerizing the F-derived peptides and conjugating them to cholesterol. We have shown that prophylactic intranasal administration of our lead fusion inhibitor efficiently protects from MV infection in vivo. We show here that peptides tagged with lipophilic moieties self-assemble into nanoparticles until they reach the target cells, where they are integrated into cell membranes. The self-assembly feature enhances biodistribution and the half-life of the peptides, while integration into the target cell membrane increases fusion inhibitor potency. These factors together modulate in vivo efficacy. The results suggest a new framework for developing effective fusion inhibitory peptides. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV) infection causes an acute illness that may be associated with infection of the central nervous system (CNS) and severe neurological disease. No specific treatment is available. We have shown that fusion-inhibitory peptides delivered intranasally provide effective prophylaxis against MV infection. We show here that specific biophysical properties regulate the in vivo efficacy of MV F-derived peptides. PMID:27733647

  12. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement...

  13. Reversible acid-induced inactivation of the membrane fusion protein of Semliki Forest virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, BL; Smit, JM; Aneke, OJC; McInerney, GM; Liljestrom, P; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    Previously, it has been shown that the exposure of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) to a mildly acidic environment induces a rapid and complete loss of the ability of the virus to bind and fuse to target membranes added subsequently. In the present study, incubation of SFV at low pH followed by a specific

  14. pH-induced conformational changes of AcrA, the membrane fusion protein of Escherichia coli multidrug efflux system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Hermia; Stratton, Kelly; Zgurskaya, Helen; Liu, Jun

    2003-12-12

    The multidrug efflux system AcrA-AcrB-TolC of Escherichia coli expels a wide range of drugs directly into the external medium from the bacterial cell. The mechanism of the efflux process is not fully understood. Of an elongated shape, AcrA is thought to span the periplasmic space coordinating the concerted operation of the inner and outer membrane proteins AcrB and TolC. In this study, we used site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) spectroscopy to investigate the molecular conformations of AcrA in solution. Ten AcrA mutants, each with an alanine to cysteine substitution, were engineered, purified, and labeled with a nitroxide spin label. EPR analysis of spin-labeled AcrA variants indicates that the side chain mobilities are consistent with the predicted secondary structure of AcrA. We further demonstrated that acidic pH induces oligomerization and conformational change of AcrA, and that the structural changes are reversible. These results suggest that the mechanism of action of AcrA in drug efflux is similar to the viral membrane fusion proteins, and that AcrA actively mediates the efflux of substrates.

  15. Lipid bilayers suspended on microfabricated supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogier, Simon D.; Bushby, Richard J.; Cheng, Yaling; Cox, Tim I.; Evans, Stephen D.; Knowles, Peter F.; Miles, Robert E.; Pattison, Ian

    2001-03-01

    The plasma membrane, that exists as part of many animal and plant cells, is a regulator for the transport of ions and small molecules across cell boundaries. Two main components involved are the phospholipid bilayer and the transport proteins. This paper details the construction of a micromachined support for bilayers (MSB) as a first step towards the development of highly selective and highly sensitive ion-channel based biosensors. The device consists of a ~100 micrometer hole in a polymeric support above a cavity that can hold ~25 nL of electrolyte. Electrodes attached to the structure allow the resistance of the membranes to be measured using d.c. conductivity. The MSB is made in two halves, using SU8 ultra-thick resist, which are subsequently bonded together to make the final structure. A layer of gold, surrounding the aperture, enables self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols to be used to make the polymeric structure biocompatible. Lipid membranes have been formed over these holes with resistances comparable with those of natural membranes >10 MOhmcm^2. The ion-channel gramicidin has successfully been incorporated into the bilayer and its activity monitored. It is proposed that this type of device could be used not only for studying membrane transport phenomena but also as part of an ion-channel based biosensor.

  16. The Integrin Receptor in Biologically Relevant Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalli, Antreas C.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2017-01-01

    /talin complex was inserted in biologically relevant bilayers that resemble the cell plasma membrane containing zwitterionic and charged phospholipids, cholesterol and sphingolipids to study the dynamics of the integrin receptor and its effect on bilayer structure and dynamics. The results of this study...... demonstrate the dynamic nature of the integrin receptor and suggest that the presence of the integrin receptor alters the lipid organization between the two leaflets of the bilayer. In particular, our results suggest elevated density of cholesterol and of phosphatidylserine lipids around the integrin....../talin complex and a slowing down of lipids in an annulus of ~30 Å around the protein due to interactions between the lipids and the integrin/talin F2–F3 complex. This may in part regulate the interactions of integrins with other related proteins or integrin clustering thus facilitating signal transduction...

  17. A single amino acid substitution modulates low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of GP64 protein in Autographa californica and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedroviruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katou, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Hayato; Ikeda, Motoko; Kobayashi, Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that budded viruses of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) enter the cell cytoplasm but do not migrate into the nuclei of non-permissive Sf9 cells that support a high titer of Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) multiplication. Here we show, using the syncytium formation assay, that low-pH-triggered membrane fusion of BmNPV GP64 protein (Bm-GP64) is significantly lower than that of AcMNPV GP64 protein (Ac-GP64). Mutational analyses of GP64 proteins revealed that a single amino acid substitution between Ac-GP64 H155 and Bm-GP64 Y153 can have significant positive or negative effects on membrane fusion activity. Studies using bacmid-based GP64 recombinant AcMNPV harboring point-mutated ac-gp64 and bm-gp64 genes showed that Ac-GP64 H155Y and Bm-GP64 Y153H substitutions decreased and increased, respectively, the multiplication and cell-to-cell spread of progeny viruses. These results indicate that Ac-GP64 H155 facilitates the low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction between virus envelopes and endosomal membranes.

  18. Determination of the electroporation onset of bilayer lipid membranes as a novel approach to establish ternary phase diagrams: example of the L-α-PC/SM/cholesterol system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uitert, I.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The lipid matrix of cell membranes contains phospholipids belonging to two main classes, glycero- and sphingolipids, as well as cholesterol. This matrix can exist in different phases, liquid disordered (l(d)), liquid ordered (l(o)) and possibly solid (s(o)), or even a combination of these. The

  19. Studies with GFP-Vpr fusion proteins: induction of apoptosis but ablation of cell-cycle arrest despite nuclear membrane or nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldhuber, Megan G.; Bateson, Michael; Tan, Judith; Greenway, Alison L.; McPhee, Dale A.

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein is known to arrest the cell cycle in G 2 /M and induce apoptosis following arrest. The functions of Vpr relative to its location in the cell remain unresolved. We now demonstrate that the location and function of Vpr are dependent on the makeup of fusion proteins and that the functions of G 2 /M arrest and apoptosis are separable. Using green fluorescence protein mutants (EGFP or EYFP), we found that fusion at either the N- or C-terminus compromised the ability of Vpr to arrest cell cycling, relative to that of His-Vpr or wild-type protein. Additionally, utilizing the ability to specifically identify cells expressing the fusion proteins, we confirm that Vpr can induce apoptosis, but appears to be independent of cell-cycle arrest in G 2 /M. Both N- and C-terminal Vpr/EYFP fusion proteins induced apoptosis but caused minimal G 2 /M arrest. These studies with Vpr fusion proteins indicate that the functions of Vpr leading to G 2 /M arrest and apoptosis are separable and that fusion of Vpr to EGFP or EYFP affected the localization of the protein. Our findings suggest that nuclear membrane localization and nuclear import and export are strongly governed by modification of the N-terminus of Vpr

  20. Constitutive dimerization of the G-protein coupled receptor, neurotensin receptor 1, reconstituted into phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Peter J; Attrill, Helen; Boehringer, Jonas; Ross, Simon; Wadhams, George H; Smith, Eleanor; Armitage, Judith P; Watts, Anthony

    2009-02-01

    Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTS1), a Family A G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the fluorescent proteins eCFP or eYFP. A fluorophore-tagged receptor was used to study the multimerization of NTS1 in detergent solution and in brain polar lipid bilayers, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A detergent-solubilized receptor was unable to form FRET-competent complexes at concentrations of up to 200 nM, suggesting that the receptor is monomeric in this environment. When reconstituted into a model membrane system at low receptor density, the observed FRET was independent of agonist binding, suggesting constitutive multimer formation. In competition studies, decreased FRET in the presence of untagged NTS1 excludes the possibility of fluorescent protein-induced interactions. A simulation of the experimental data indicates that NTS1 exists predominantly as a homodimer, rather than as higher-order multimers. These observations suggest that, in common with several other Family A GPCRs, NTS1 forms a constitutive dimer in lipid bilayers, stabilized through receptor-receptor interactions in the absence of other cellular signaling components. Therefore, this work demonstrates that well-characterized model membrane systems are useful tools for the study of GPCR multimerization, allowing fine control over system composition and complexity, provided that rigorous control experiments are performed.

  1. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  2. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  3. Mitochondrial matrix delivery using MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that specifies fusion with mitochondrial membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuzaki, Yukari; Yamada, Yuma; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are the principal producers of energy in cells of higher organisms. It was recently reported that mutations and defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with various mitochondrial diseases including a variety of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases. Therefore, an effective mitochondrial gene therapy and diagnosis would be expected to have great medical benefits. To achieve this, therapeutic agents need to be delivered into the innermost mitochondrial space (mitochondrial matrix), which contains the mtDNA pool. We previously reported on the development of MITO-Porter, a liposome-based carrier that introduces macromolecular cargos into mitochondria via membrane fusion. In this study, we provide a demonstration of mitochondrial matrix delivery and the visualization of mitochondrial genes (mtDNA) in living cells using the MITO-Porter. We first prepared MITO-Porter containing encapsulated propidium iodide (PI), a fluorescent dye used to stain nucleic acids to detect mtDNA. We then confirmed the emission of red-fluorescence from PI by conjugation with mtDNA, when the carriers were incubated in the presence of isolated rat liver mitochondria. Finally, intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy clearly verified that the MITO-Porter delivered PI to the mitochondrial matrix.

  4. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Cynthia L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Connolly, Sarah A. [Department of Health Sciences, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States); Chen, Jia [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States); Jardetzky, Theodore S. [Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 371 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Longnecker, Richard, E-mail: r-longnecker@northwestern.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60611 (United States)

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  5. ER-associated SNAREs and Sey1p mediate nuclear fusion at two distinct steps during yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jason V; Arlow, Tim; Inkellis, Elizabeth R; Koo, Timothy S; Rose, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    During yeast mating, two haploid nuclei fuse membranes to form a single diploid nucleus. However, the known proteins required for nuclear fusion are unlikely to function as direct fusogens (i.e., they are unlikely to directly catalyze lipid bilayer fusion) based on their predicted structure and localization. Therefore we screened known fusogens from vesicle trafficking (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors [SNAREs]) and homotypic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fusion (Sey1p) for additional roles in nuclear fusion. Here we demonstrate that the ER-localized SNAREs Sec20p, Ufe1p, Use1p, and Bos1p are required for efficient nuclear fusion. In contrast, Sey1p is required indirectly for nuclear fusion; sey1Δ zygotes accumulate ER at the zone of cell fusion, causing a block in nuclear congression. However, double mutants of Sey1p and Sec20p, Ufe1p, or Use1p, but not Bos1p, display extreme ER morphology defects, worse than either single mutant, suggesting that retrograde SNAREs fuse ER in the absence of Sey1p. Together these data demonstrate that SNAREs mediate nuclear fusion, ER fusion after cell fusion is necessary to complete nuclear congression, and there exists a SNARE-mediated, Sey1p-independent ER fusion pathway.

  6. Ion dynamics in cationic lipid bilayer systems in saline solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Positively charged lipid bilayer systems are a promising class of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene and drug delivery. Detailed understanding of these systems is therefore not only of fundamental but also of practical biomedical interest. Here, we study bilayers comprising a binary...... are concluded to be interesting for the physics of the whole membrane, especially considering its interaction dynamics with charged macromolecular surfaces....

  7. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madu, Ikenna G.; Belouzard, Sandrine; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  8. Herpes simplex virus glycoproteins gB and gH function in fusion between the virion envelope and the outer nuclear membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Aaron; Wisner, Todd W; Webb, Michael; Roller, Richard; Cohen, Gary; Eisenberg, Roselyn; Johnson, David C

    2007-06-12

    Herpesviruses must traverse the nuclear envelope to gain access to the cytoplasm and, ultimately, to exit cells. It is believed that herpesvirus nucleocapsids enter the perinuclear space by budding through the inner nuclear membrane (NM). To reach the cytoplasm these enveloped particles must fuse with the outer NM and the unenveloped capsids then acquire a second envelope in the trans-Golgi network. Little is known about the process by which herpesviruses virions fuse with the outer NM. Here we show that a herpes simplex virus (HSV) mutant lacking both the two putative fusion glycoproteins gB and gH failed to cross the nuclear envelope. Enveloped virions accumulated in the perinuclear space or in membrane vesicles that bulged into the nucleoplasm (herniations). By contrast, mutants lacking just gB or gH showed only minor or no defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that either HSV gB or gH can promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. It is noteworthy that fusion associated with HSV entry requires the cooperative action of both gB and gH, suggesting that the two types of fusion (egress versus entry) are dissimilar processes.

  9. A new automated technique for the reconstitution of hydrophobic proteins into planar bilayer membranes. Studies of human recombinant uncoupling protein 1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, V.; Jabůrek, Martin; Breen, E. P.; Porter, R. K.; Ježek, Petr; Pohl, E. E.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1757, č. 5-6 (2006), s. 474-479 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011106; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME794 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) Po-524/2-2; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) 436 TSE 113/44/0-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : artificial membranes * uncoupling protein-1 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.237, year: 2006

  10. TRAIL death receptor 4 signaling via lysosome fusion and membrane raft clustering in coronary arterial endothelial cells: evidence from ASM knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Han, Wei-Qing; Boini, Krishna M; Xia, Min; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor, death receptor 4 (DR4), have been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. However, the signaling mechanism mediating DR4 activation leading to endothelial injury remains unclear. We recently demonstrated that ceramide production via hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) results in membrane raft (MR) clustering and the formation of important redox signaling platforms, which play a crucial role in amplifying redox signaling in endothelial cells leading to endothelial dysfunction. The present study aims to investigate whether TRAIL triggers MR clustering via lysosome fusion and ASM activation, thereby conducting transmembrane redox signaling and changing endothelial function. Using confocal microscopy, we found that TRAIL induced MR clustering and co-localized with DR4 in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) isolated from wild-type (Smpd1 (+/+)) mice. Furthermore, TRAIL triggered ASM translocation, ceramide production, and NADPH oxidase aggregation in MR clusters in Smpd1 ( +/+ ) CAECs, whereas these observations were not found in Smpd1 (-/-) CAECs. Moreover, ASM deficiency reduced TRAIL-induced O(2) (-[Symbol: see text]) production in CAECs and abolished TRAIL-induced impairment on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in small resistance arteries. By measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we found that Lamp-1 (lysosome membrane marker protein) and ganglioside G(M1) (MR marker) were trafficking together in Smpd1 (+/+) CAECs, which was absent in Smpd1 (-/-) CAECs. Consistently, fluorescence imaging of living cells with specific lysosome probes demonstrated that TRAIL-induced lysosome fusion with membrane was also absent in Smpd1 (-/-) CAECs. Taken together, these results suggest that ASM is essential for TRAIL-induced lysosomal trafficking, membrane fusion and formation of MR redox signaling platforms

  11. Meet me on the other side: trans-bilayer modulation of a model voltage-gated ion channel activity by membrane electrostatics asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Mereuta

    Full Text Available While it is accepted that biomembrane asymmetry is generated by proteins and phospholipids distribution, little is known about how electric changes manifested in a monolayer influence functional properties of proteins localized on the opposite leaflet. Herein we used single-molecule electrophysiology and investigated how asymmetric changes in the electrostatics of an artificial lipid membrane monolayer, generated oppositely from where alamethicin--a model voltage-gated ion channel--was added, altered peptide activity. We found that phlorizin, a membrane dipole potential lowering amphiphile, augmented alamethicin activity and transport features, whereas the opposite occurred with RH-421, which enhances the monolayer dipole potential. Further, the monolayer surface potential was decreased via adsorption of sodium dodecyl sulfate, and demonstrated that vectorial modification of it also affected the alamethicin activity in a predictive manner. A new paradigm is suggested according to which asymmetric changes in the monolayer dipole and surface potential extend their effects spatially by altering the intramembrane potential, whose gradient is sensed by distantly located peptides.

  12. H1N1 Swine Influenza Viruses Differ from Avian Precursors by a Higher pH Optimum of Membrane Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Jan; Kouassi, Nancy Mounogou; Foni, Emanuela; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2016-02-01

    The H1N1 Eurasian avian-like swine (EAsw) influenza viruses originated from an avian H1N1 virus. To characterize potential changes in the membrane fusion activity of the hemagglutinin (HA) during avian-to-swine adaptation of the virus, we studied EAsw viruses isolated in the first years of their circulation in pigs and closely related contemporary H1N1 viruses of wild aquatic birds. Compared to the avian viruses, the swine viruses were less sensitive to neutralization by lysosomotropic agent NH4Cl in MDCK cells, had a higher pH optimum of hemolytic activity, and were less stable at acidic pH. Eight amino acid substitutions in the HA were found to separate the EAsw viruses from their putative avian precursor; four substitutions-T492S, N722D, R752K, and S1132F-were located in the structural regions of the HA2 subunit known to play a role in acid-induced conformational transition of the HA. We also studied low-pH-induced syncytium formation by cell-expressed HA proteins and found that the HAs of the 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009 pandemic viruses required a lower pH for fusion induction than did the HA of a representative EAsw virus. Our data show that transmission of an avian H1N1 virus to pigs was accompanied by changes in conformational stability and fusion promotion activity of the HA. We conclude that distinctive host-determined fusion characteristics of the HA may represent a barrier for avian-to-swine and swine-to-human transmission of influenza viruses. Continuing cases of human infections with zoonotic influenza viruses highlight the necessity to understand which viral properties contribute to interspecies transmission. Efficient binding of the HA to cellular receptors in a new host species is known to be essential for the transmission. Less is known about required adaptive changes in the membrane fusion activity of the HA. Here we show that adaptation of an avian influenza virus to pigs in Europe in 1980s was accompanied by mutations in the HA, which decreased

  13. The radiation effects on lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Matsuura, Tomio; Narita, Noboru; Ozawa, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation effects on lipid bilayers are studied by the electron spin resonance. Egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes are labeled with spin probes (5 SAL, 12 SAL). Effects of membrane fluidity by X-Ray (or ultraviolet) irradiation are measured by change of the order parameter S. The results obtained are as follows: 1) A similar tendency is observed on the order parameter S between X-Ray irradiated egg lecithin liposomes and human erythrocytes. 2) The rapid changes of the membrane fluidity are observed below 1 krad. The fluctuation of membrane fluidity decreases above 1 krad, consequently the membrane has a tendency changing to a rigid state at low dose area. 3) It is suggested that the more effective radicals are hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals. 4) The effects of ultraviolet irradiation with hydrogen peroxide show that hydroxyl radicals lead to changes of membrane fluidity. (author)

  14. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bax, Ad

    2015-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41’s ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion

  15. Complete dissociation of the HIV-1 gp41 ectodomain and membrane proximal regions upon phospholipid binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States); Ghirlando, Rodolfo [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Bax, Ad, E-mail: bax@nih.gov [National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Laboratory of Chemical Physics (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The envelope glycoprotein gp41 mediates the process of membrane fusion that enables entry of the HIV-1 virus into the host cell. Strong lipid affinity of the ectodomain suggests that its heptad repeat regions play an active role in destabilizing membranes by directly binding to the lipid bilayers and thereby lowering the free-energy barrier for membrane fusion. In such a model, immediately following the shedding of gp120, the N-heptad and C-heptad helices dissociate and melt into the host cell and viral membranes, respectively, pulling the destabilized membranes into juxtaposition, ready for fusion. Post-fusion, reaching the final 6-helix bundle (6HB) conformation then involves competition between intermolecular interactions needed for formation of the symmetric 6HB trimer and the membrane affinity of gp41’s ectodomain, including its membrane-proximal regions. Our solution NMR study of the structural and dynamic properties of three constructs containing the ectodomain of gp41 with and without its membrane-proximal regions suggests that these segments do not form inter-helical interactions until the very late steps of the fusion process. Interactions between the polar termini of the heptad regions, which are not associating with the lipid surface, therefore may constitute the main driving force initiating formation of the final post-fusion states. The absence of significant intermolecular ectodomain interactions in the presence of dodecyl phosphocholine highlights the importance of trimerization of gp41’s transmembrane helix to prevent complete dissociation of the trimer during the course of fusion.

  16. Quantifying the Relationship Between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dennis Skjøth; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecular...... dynamics simulations, we show that head group dipole moments, the lateral pressure profile across the bilayer and spontaneous curvature all systematically change with increasing membrane potentials. In particu- lar, there is a linear dependence between the bending moment (the product of bending rigidity...

  17. pH Optimum of Hemagglutinin-Mediated Membrane Fusion Determines Sensitivity of Influenza A Viruses to the Interferon-Induced Antiviral State and IFITMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Thomas; Hensen, Luca; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Bergmann, Janina; Winkler, Michael; Peteranderl, Christin; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Weber, Friedemann; Herold, Susanne; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2017-06-01

    The replication and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses (IAVs) critically depend on their ability to tolerate the antiviral interferon (IFN) response. To determine a potential role for the IAV hemagglutinin (HA) in viral sensitivity to IFN, we studied the restriction of IAV infection in IFN-β-treated human epithelial cells by using 2:6 recombinant IAVs that shared six gene segments of A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 virus (PR8) and contained HAs and neuraminidases of representative avian, human, and zoonotic H5N1 and H7N9 viruses. In A549 and Calu-3 cells, viruses displaying a higher pH optimum of HA-mediated membrane fusion, H5N1-PR8 and H7N9-PR8, were less sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state than their counterparts with HAs from duck and human viruses, which fused at a lower pH. The association between a high pH optimum of fusion and reduced IFN sensitivity was confirmed by using HA point mutants of A/Hong Kong/1/1968-PR8 that differed solely by their fusion properties. Furthermore, similar effects of the viral fusion pH on IFN sensitivity were observed in experiments with (i) primary human type II alveolar epithelial cells and differentiated cultures of human airway epithelial cells, (ii) nonrecombinant zoonotic and pandemic IAVs, and (iii) preparations of IFN-α and IFN-λ1. A higher pH of membrane fusion and reduced sensitivity to IFN correlated with lower restriction of the viruses in MDCK cells stably expressing the IFN-inducible transmembrane proteins IFITM2 and IFITM3, which are known to inhibit viral fusion. Our results reveal that the pH optimum of HA-driven membrane fusion of IAVs is a determinant of their sensitivity to IFN and IFITM proteins. IMPORTANCE The IFN system constitutes an important innate defense against viral infection. Substantial information is available on how IAVs avoid detection by sensors of the IFN system and disable IFN signaling pathways. Much less is known about the ability of IAVs to tolerate the antiviral activity of IFN

  18. Fluorescent Lipids: Functional Parts of Fusogenic Liposomes and Tools for Cell Membrane Labeling and Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kleusch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a rapid and highly efficient method for controlled incorporation of fluorescent lipids into living mammalian cells is introduced. Here, the fluorescent molecules have two consecutive functions: First, they trigger rapid membrane fusion between cellular plasma membranes and the lipid bilayers of their carrier particles, so called fusogenic liposomes, and second, after insertion into cellular membranes these molecules enable fluorescence imaging of cell membranes and membrane traffic processes. We tested the fluorescent derivatives of the following essential membrane lipids for membrane fusion: Ceramide, sphingomyelin, phosphocholine, phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate, ganglioside, cholesterol, and cholesteryl ester. Our results show that all probed lipids could more efficiently be incorporated into the plasma membrane of living cells than by using other methods. Moreover, labeling occurred in a gentle manner under classical cell culture conditions reducing cellular stress responses. Staining procedures were monitored by fluorescence microscopy and it was observed that sphingolipids and cholesterol containing free hydroxyl groups exhibit a decreased distribution velocity as well as a longer persistence in the plasma membrane compared to lipids without hydroxyl groups like phospholipids or other artificial lipid analogs. After membrane staining, the fluorescent molecules were sorted into membranes of cell organelles according to their chemical properties and biological functions without any influence of the delivery system.

  19. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Imhof

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature.

  20. Poly(aniline) nanowires in sol-gel coated ITO: A pH-responsive substrate for planar supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chenhao; Orosz, Kristina S.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Facilitated ion transport across an artificial lipid bilayer coupled to a solid substrate is a function common to several types of bioelectronic devices based on supported membranes, including biomimetic fuel cells and ion channel biosensors. Described here is fabrication of a pH-sensitive transducer composed of a porous sol-gel layer derivatized with poly(aniline) (PANI) nanowires grown from an underlying planar indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode. The upper sol-gel surface is hydrophilic, smooth, and compatible with deposition of a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB) formed via vesicle fusion. Conducting tip AFM was used to show that the PANI wires are connected to the ITO, which convert this electrode into a potentiometric pH sensor. The response to changes in the pH of the buffer contacting the PANI nanowire/sol-gel/ITO electrode is blocked by the very low ion permeability of the overlying, fluid PSLB. The feasibility of using this assembly to monitor facilitated proton transport across the PSLB was demonstrated by doping the membrane with lipophilic ionophores that respond to a transmembrane pH gradient, which produced an apparent proton permeability several orders of magnitude greater than values measured for undoped lipid bilayers. PMID:21707069

  1. Detection of closed influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide structures in membranes by backbone {sup 13}CO-{sup 15}N rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ujjayini; Xie Li; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-02-15

    The influenza virus fusion peptide is the N-terminal {approx}20 residues of the HA2 subunit of the hemagglutinin protein and this peptide plays a key role in the fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes during initial infection of a cell. The fusion peptide adopts N-helix/turn/C-helix structure in both detergent and membranes with reports of both open and closed interhelical topologies. In the present study, backbone {sup 13}CO-{sup 15}N REDOR solid-state NMR was applied to the membrane-associated fusion peptide to detect the distribution of interhelical distances. The data clearly showed a large fraction of closed and semi-closed topologies and were best-fitted to a mixture of two structures that do not exchange. One of the earlier open structural models may have incorrect G13 dihedral angles derived from TALOS analysis of experimentally correct {sup 13}C shifts.

  2. Inner-membrane proteins PMI/TMEM11 regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis independently of the DRP1/MFN fission/fusion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Thomas; Macchi, Marc; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Poidevin, Mickael; Maillet, Frédéric; Richard, Fabrice; Fatmi, Ahmed; Belenguer, Pascale; Royet, Julien

    2011-03-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that can change in number and morphology during cell cycle, development or in response to extracellular stimuli. These morphological dynamics are controlled by a tight balance between two antagonistic pathways that promote fusion and fission. Genetic approaches have identified a cohort of conserved proteins that form the core of mitochondrial remodelling machineries. Mitofusins (MFNs) and OPA1 proteins are dynamin-related GTPases that are required for outer- and inner-mitochondrial membrane fusion respectively whereas dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) is the master regulator of mitochondrial fission. We demonstrate here that the Drosophila PMI gene and its human orthologue TMEM11 encode mitochondrial inner-membrane proteins that regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis. PMI-mutant cells contain a highly condensed mitochondrial network, suggesting that PMI has either a pro-fission or an anti-fusion function. Surprisingly, however, epistatic experiments indicate that PMI shapes the mitochondria through a mechanism that is independent of drp1 and mfn. This shows that mitochondrial networks can be shaped in higher eukaryotes by at least two separate pathways: one PMI-dependent and one DRP1/MFN-dependent.

  3. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  4. Single-molecule study of full-length NaChBac by planar lipid bilayer recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jo

    Full Text Available Planar lipid bilayer device, alternatively known as BLM, is a powerful tool to study functional properties of conducting membrane proteins such as ion channels and porins. In this work, we used BLM to study the prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav NaChBac in a well-defined membrane environment. Navs are an essential component for the generation and propagation of electric signals in excitable cells. The successes in the biochemical, biophysical and crystallographic studies on prokaryotic Navs in recent years has greatly promoted the understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlies these proteins and their eukaryotic counterparts. In this work, we investigated the single-molecule conductance and ionic selectivity behavior of NaChBac. Purified NaChBac protein was first reconstituted into lipid vesicles, which is subsequently incorporated into planar lipid bilayer by fusion. At single-molecule level, we were able to observe three distinct long-lived conductance sub-states of NaChBac. Change in the membrane potential switches on the channel mainly by increasing its opening probability. In addition, we found that individual NaChBac has similar permeability for Na+, K+, and Ca2+. The single-molecule behavior of the full-length protein is essentially highly stochastic. Our results show that planar lipid bilayer device can be used to study purified ion channels at single-molecule level in an artificial environment, and such studies can reveal new protein properties that are otherwise not observable in in vivo ensemble studies.

  5. Interaction of saponin 1688 with phase separated lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maohui; Balhara, Vinod; Jaimes Castillo, Ana Maria; Balsevich, John; Johnston, Linda J

    2017-07-01

    Saponins are a diverse family of naturally occurring plant triterpene or steroid glycosides that have a wide range of biological activities. They have been shown to permeabilize membranes and in some cases membrane disruption has been hypothesized to involve saponin/cholesterol complexes. We have examined the interaction of steroidal saponin 1688-1 with lipid membranes that contain cholesterol and have a mixture of liquid-ordered (L o ) and liquid-disordered (L d ) phases as a model for lipid rafts in cellular membranes. A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence was used to probe the effect of saponin on the bilayer. The results demonstrate that saponin forms defects in the membrane and also leads to formation of small aggregates on the membrane surface. Although most of the membrane damage occurs in the liquid-disordered phase, fluorescence results demonstrate that saponin localizes in both ordered and disordered membrane phases, with a modest preference for the disordered regions. Similar effects are observed for both direct incorporation of saponin in the lipid mixture used to make vesicles/bilayers and for incubation of saponin with preformed bilayers. The results suggest that the initial sites of interaction are at the interface between the domains and surrounding disordered phase. The preference for saponin localization in the disordered phase may reflect the ease of penetration of saponin into a less ordered membrane, rather than the actual cholesterol concentration in the membrane. Dye leakage assays indicate that a high concentration of saponin is required for membrane permeabilization consistent with the supported lipid bilayer experiments. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phase behavior of supported lipid bilayers: A systematic study by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poursoroush, Asma; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Laradji, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Solid-supported lipid bilayers are utilized by experimental scientists as models for biological membranes because of their stability. However, compared to free standing bilayers, their close proximity to the substrate may affect their phase behavior. As this is still poorly understood, and few co...

  7. Potential and limitations of S-layers as support for planar lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiene, E.

    2011-01-01

    then after chemical modification and no additional activation step was necessary. The lipid bilayer was fabricated by binding and fusion of discoidal lipid structures, so-called bicelles, while monitoring the process in AFM and QCM-D. As an exemplary transmembrane protein, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor nAChR was isolated from T. californica and purified using magnetic beads coated with an nAChR specific antibody. An S-layer supported membrane could be fabricated by chemical adsorption and fusion of bicelles, but no bicelles could be bound using the Ni-HIS-interaction on the recombinant S-layer. Further crystallisation and Ni-HIS-tag binding studies, including TEM analysis, as well as near surface charge (zeta-potential) measurements of the inner and outer surface of SbpA lattices, gave interesting insights into the folding and crystallisation ability and the accessibility of the C-terminal HIS-tag of the recombinant protein. In conclusion, S-layer lattices were found to be a potentially powerful tool for nanobiotechnologic applications including the build-up of supported planar lipid membranes. However, great effort needs to be put into the thorough analysis of 3D structural models and subsequently into the optimisation of S-layer crystallisation processes and the accessibility of functional moieties. (author) [de

  8. Reconstitution of a Kv channel into lipid membranes for structural and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungsoo; Zheng, Hui; Shi, Liang; Jiang, Qiu-Xing

    2013-07-13

    To study the lipid-protein interaction in a reductionistic fashion, it is necessary to incorporate the membrane proteins into membranes of well-defined lipid composition. We are studying the lipid-dependent gating effects in a prototype voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, and have worked out detailed procedures to reconstitute the channels into different membrane systems. Our reconstitution procedures take consideration of both detergent-induced fusion of vesicles and the fusion of protein/detergent micelles with the lipid/detergent mixed micelles as well as the importance of reaching an equilibrium distribution of lipids among the protein/detergent/lipid and the detergent/lipid mixed micelles. Our data suggested that the insertion of the channels in the lipid vesicles is relatively random in orientations, and the reconstitution efficiency is so high that no detectable protein aggregates were seen in fractionation experiments. We have utilized the reconstituted channels to determine the conformational states of the channels in different lipids, record electrical activities of a small number of channels incorporated in planar lipid bilayers, screen for conformation-specific ligands from a phage-displayed peptide library, and support the growth of 2D crystals of the channels in membranes. The reconstitution procedures described here may be adapted for studying other membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, especially for the investigation of the lipid effects on the eukaryotic voltage-gated ion channels.

  9. A fluorogenic probe for SNAP-tagged plasma membrane proteins based on the solvatochromic molecule Nile Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Efthymia; Reymond, Luc; Umebayashi, Miwa; Hovius, Ruud; Riezman, Howard; Johnsson, Kai

    2014-03-21

    A fluorogenic probe for plasma membrane proteins based on the dye Nile Red and SNAP-tag is introduced. It takes advantage of Nile Red, a solvatochromic molecule highly fluorescent in an apolar environment, such as cellular membranes, but almost dark in a polar aqueous environment. The probe possesses a tuned affinity for membranes allowing its Nile Red moiety to insert into the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, becoming fluorescent, only after its conjugation to a SNAP-tagged plasma membrane protein. The fluorogenic character of the probe was demonstrated for different SNAP-tag fusion proteins, including the human insulin receptor. This work introduces a new approach for generating a powerful turn-on probe for "no-wash" labeling of plasma membrane proteins with numerous applications in bioimaging.

  10. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  11. Cholesterol Bilayer Domains in the Eye Lens Health: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    The most unique biochemical characteristic of the eye lens fiber cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content, the need for which is still unclear. It is evident, however, that the disturbance of Chol homeostasis may result in damages associated with cataracts. Electron paramagnetic resonance methods allow discrimination of two types of lipid domains in model membranes overloaded with Chol, namely, phospholipid-cholesterol domains and pure Chol bilayer domains. These domains are also detected in human lens lipid membranes prepared from the total lipids extracted from lens cortices and nuclei of donors from different age groups. Independent of the age-related changes in phospholipid composition, the physical properties of phospholipid-Chol domains remain the same for all age groups and are practically identical for cortical and nuclear membranes. The presence of Chol bilayer domains in these membranes provides a buffering capacity for cholesterol concentration in the surrounding phospholipid-Chol domains, keeping it at a constant saturating level and thus keeping the physical properties of the membrane consistent with and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. It seems that the presence of Chol bilayer domains plays an integral role in the regulation of cholesterol-dependent processes in fiber cell plasm membranes and in the maintenance of fiber cell membrane homeostasis.

  12. Fusion of biological membranes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of. California ... applied to examine the free energy barriers in the different scenarios. ... of cylindrical coordinates as obtained in self-consistent field theory.

  13. GABA_A receptor function is regulated by lipid bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Werge, Thomas; Berthelsen, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    ( s) underlying these effects are poorly understood. DHA and Triton X-100, at concentrations that affect GABAA receptor function, increase the elasticity of lipid bilayers measured as decreased bilayer stiffness using gramicidin channels as molecular force transducers. We have previously shown...... reduced the peak amplitude of the GABA-induced currents and increased the rate of receptor desensitization. The effects of the amphiphiles did not correlate with the expected changes in monolayer spontaneous curvature. We conclude that GABAA receptor function is regulated by lipid bilayer elasticity....... PUFAs may generally regulate membrane protein function by affecting the elasticity of the host lipid bilayer....

  14. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; de Ghellinck, Alexis; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of red grape and accordingly in their wines, is hold liable for health impacts such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidative effect. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. However, basic...... knowledge on its probable working mechanism is rare. In this biophysical study, neutron reflectometry was used to investigate the direct impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes with solid supported bilayers. When interacting with di- palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers, resveratrol accumulates...... in between the headgroups but is absent in the hydrophobic core. Without a biogenic removal mechanism, the headgroup region may host up to ~25 mol% of resveratrol. The average thickness and the interfacial roughness of the headgroup layer are increased. From the structural results, the average tilting...

  15. Cholesterol effect on water permeability through DPPC and PSM lipid bilayers: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Wataru

    2011-12-29

    Water permeability of two different lipid bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM) in the absence and presence of cholesterol (0-50 mol %) have been studied by molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the reduction in water leakage across the membranes by the addition of cholesterol. An enhanced free energy barrier was observed in these membranes with increased cholesterol concentration, and this was explained by the reduced cavity density around the cholesterol in the hydrophobic membrane core. There was an increase of trans conformers in the hydrophobic lipid chains adjacent to the cholesterol, which reduced the cavity density. The enhanced free energy barrier was found to be the main reason to reduce the water permeability with increased cholesterol concentration. At low cholesterol concentrations the PSM bilayer exhibited a higher free energy barrier than the DPPC bilayer for water permeation, while at greater than 30 mol % of cholesterol the difference became minor. This tendency for the PSM and DPPC bilayers to resemble each other at higher cholesterol concentrations was similar to commonly observed trends in several structural properties, such as order parameters, cross-sectional area per molecule, and cavity density profiles in the hydrophobic regions of bilayer membranes. These results demonstrate that DPPC and PSM bilayers with high cholesterol contents possess similar physical properties, which suggests that the solubility of cholesterol in these lipid bilayers has importance for an understanding of multicomponent lipid membranes with cholesterol. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duff, K.C. [Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (United Kingdom); Saxena, A.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  17. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J.; Duff, K.C.; Saxena, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein

  18. Cell fusion and nuclear fusion in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Ohtsu, Mina; Higashiyama, Tetsuya

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic cells are surrounded by a plasma membrane and have a large nucleus containing the genomic DNA, which is enclosed by a nuclear envelope consisting of the outer and inner nuclear membranes. Although these membranes maintain the identity of cells, they sometimes fuse to each other, such as to produce a zygote during sexual reproduction or to give rise to other characteristically polyploid tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that the mechanisms of plasma membrane or nuclear membrane fusion in plants are shared to some extent with those of yeasts and animals, despite the unique features of plant cells including thick cell walls and intercellular connections. Here, we summarize the key factors in the fusion of these membranes during plant reproduction, and also focus on "non-gametic cell fusion," which was thought to be rare in plant tissue, in which each cell is separated by a cell wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structural and Dynamical Properties of Putative Arsenic Substituted Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Juwita

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are composed mainly of phospholipids which are in turn, composed of five major chemical elements: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of sustaining life if the phosphorus is substituted by arsenic. Although this issue is still controversial, it is of interest to investigate the properties of arsenated-lipid bilayers to evaluate this possibility. In this study, we simulated arsenated-lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-arsenocholine (POAC, lipid bilayers using all-atom molecular dynamics to understand basic structural and dynamical properties, in particular, the differences from analogous 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (POPC lipid bilayers. Our simulations showed that POAC lipid bilayers have distinct structural and dynamical properties from those of native POPC lipid bilayers. Relative to POPC lipid bilayers, POAC lipid bilayers have a more compact structure with smaller lateral areas and greater order. The compact structure of POAC lipid bilayers is due to the fact that more inter-lipid salt bridges are formed with arsenate-choline compared to the phosphate-choline of POPC lipid bilayers. These inter-lipid salt bridges bind POAC lipids together and also slow down the head group rotation and lateral diffusion of POAC lipids. Thus, it would be anticipated that POAC and POPC lipid bilayers would have different biological implications.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand

  1. Supported lipid bilayers with controlled curvature via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Maria; Manandhar, Michal; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) at surfaces provide a route to quantitatively study molecular interactions with and at lipid membranes via different surface-based analytical techniques. Here, a method to fabricate SLBs with controlled curvatures, in the nanometer regime over large areas, is prese...

  2. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  3. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquette, Stéphane G.; Banner, David; Chi, Le Thi Bao; Leon, Alberto J.; Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi; Huang, Stephen S.H.; Farooqui, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development

  4. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J.; Largo, E.; Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P.; O’Donnell, V.; Holinka, L.G.; Carey, L.B.; Lu, X.; Nieva, J.L.; Borca, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    E2, along with E rns and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, 818 CPIGWTGVIEC 828 , containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP 818 CPIGWTGVIEC 828 indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion

  5. Effect of specific amino acid substitutions in the putative fusion peptide of structural glycoprotein E2 on Classical Swine Fever Virus replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernández-Sainz, I.J. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA (United States); Largo, E. [Biophysics Unit (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Gladue, D.P.; Fletcher, P. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA (United States); O’Donnell, V. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA (United States); Plum Island Animal Disease Center, DHS, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Holinka, L.G. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA (United States); Carey, L.B. [Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), E-08003 Barcelona (Spain); Lu, X. [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, DHS, Greenport, NY 11944 (United States); Nieva, J.L. [Biophysics Unit (CSIC-UPV/EHU), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Borca, M.V., E-mail: manuel.borca@ars.usda.gov [Plum Island Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    E2, along with E{sup rns} and E1, is an envelope glycoprotein of Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV). E2 is involved in several virus functions: cell attachment, host range susceptibility and virulence in natural hosts. Here we evaluate the role of a specific E2 region, {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828}, containing a putative fusion peptide (FP) sequence. Reverse genetics utilizing a full-length infectious clone of the highly virulent CSFV strain Brescia (BICv) was used to evaluate how individual amino acid substitutions within this region of E2 may affect replication of BICv. A synthetic peptide representing the complete E2 FP amino acid sequence adopted a β-type extended conformation in membrane mimetics, penetrated into model membranes, and perturbed lipid bilayer integrity in vitro. Similar peptides harboring amino acid substitutions adopted comparable conformations but exhibited different membrane activities. Therefore, a preliminary characterization of the putative FP {sup 818}CPIGWTGVIEC{sup 828} indicates a membrane fusion activity and a critical role in virus replication. - Highlights: • A putative fusion peptide (FP) region in CSFV E2 protein was shown to be critical for virus growth. • Synthetic FPs were shown to efficiently penetrate into lipid membranes using an in vitro model. • Individual residues in the FP affecting virus replication were identified by reverse genetics. • The same FP residues are also responsible for mediating membrane fusion.

  6. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation

  7. Coexistence of a two-states organization for a cell-penetrating peptide in lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plénat, Thomas; Boichot, Sylvie; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2005-12-01

    Primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides transport cargoes across cell membranes with high efficiency and low lytic activity. These primary amphipathic peptides were previously shown to form aggregates or supramolecular structures in mixed lipid-peptide monolayers, but their behavior in lipid bilayers remains to be characterized. Using atomic force microscopy, we have examined the interactions of P(alpha), a primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide which remains alpha-helical whatever the environment, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Addition of P(alpha) at concentrations up to 5 mol % markedly modified the supported bilayers topography. Long and thin filaments lying flat at the membrane surface coexisted with deeply embedded peptides which induced a local thinning of the bilayer. On the other hand, addition of P(alpha) only exerted very limited effects on the corresponding liposome's bilayer physical state, as estimated from differential scanning calorimetry and diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The use of a gel-fluid phase separated supported bilayers made of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixture confirmed both the existence of long filaments, which at low peptide concentration were preferentially localized in the fluid phase domains and the membrane disorganizing effects of 5 mol % P(alpha). The simultaneous two-states organization of P(alpha), at the membrane surface and deeply embedded in the bilayer, may be involved in the transmembrane carrier function of this primary amphipathic peptide.

  8. Influence of ester-modified lipids on bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Diana Y; Lim, Joseph B; Klauda, Jeffery B

    2013-11-19

    Lipid membranes function as barriers for cells to prevent unwanted chemicals from entering the cell and wanted chemicals from leaving. Because of their hydrophobic interior, membranes do not allow water to penetrate beyond the headgroup region. We performed molecular simulations to examine the effects of ester-modified lipids, which contain ester groups along their hydrocarbon chains, on bilayer structure. We chose two lipids from those presented in Menger et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 14034] with ester groups in (1) the upper half of the lipid chain (MEPC) and (2) the middle and end of the lipid chain (MGPC). MGPC (30%)/POPC bilayers formed stable water pores of diameter 5-7 Å, but MGPC (22%)/POPC and MEPC (30%)/POPC bilayers did not form these defects. These pores were similar to those formed during electroporation; i.e., the head groups lined the pore and allowed water and ions to transport across the bilayer. However, we found that lateral organization of the MGPC lipids into clusters, instead of an electric field or charge disparity as in electroporation, was essential for pore formation. On the basis of this, we propose an overall mechanism for pore formation. The similarities between the ester-modified lipids and byproducts of lipid peroxidation with multiple hydrophilic groups in the middle of the chain suggest that free radical reactions with unsaturated lipids and sterols result in fundamental changes that may be similar to what is seen in bilayers with ester-modified lipids.

  9. Structure and physical properties of bio membranes and model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tibor Hianik

    2006-01-01

    Bio membranes belong to the most important structures of the cell and the cell organelles. They play not only structural role of the barrier separating the external and internal part of the membrane but contain also various functional molecules, like receptors, ionic channels, carriers and enzymes. The cell membrane also preserves non-equilibrium state in a cell which is crucial for maintaining its excitability and other signaling functions. The growing interest to the bio membranes is also due to their unique physical properties. From physical point of view the bio membranes, that are composed of lipid bilayer into which are incorporated integral proteins and on their surface are anchored peripheral proteins and polysaccharides, represent liquid s crystal of smectic type. The bio membranes are characterized by anisotropy of structural and physical properties. The complex structure of bio membranes makes the study of their physical properties rather difficult. Therefore several model systems that mimic the structure of bio membranes were developed. Among them the lipid monolayers at an air-water interphase, bilayer lipid membranes, supported bilayer lipid membranes and liposomes are most known. This work is focused on the introduction into the physical word of the bio membranes and their models. After introduction to the membrane structure and the history of its establishment, the physical properties of the bio membranes and their models are stepwise presented. The most focus is on the properties of lipid monolayers, bilayer lipid membranes, supported bilayer lipid membranes and liposomes that were most detailed studied. This lecture has tutorial character that may be useful for undergraduate and graduate students in the area of biophysics, biochemistry, molecular biology and bioengineering, however it contains also original work of the author and his co-worker and PhD students, that may be useful also for specialists working in the field of bio membranes and model

  10. Influence of membrane composition on its flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbelli, B.B.; Teixeira da Silva, E.R.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Oliveira, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Lamellar phases and vesicles composed of lipids have been used as model systems to investigate biological process related to cell membrane as well as promising carriers for drugs and gene therapy. The composition of the membrane determines its three dimensional shape and its properties such as rigidity and compressibility which play an important role on membrane fusion, protein adhesion, interactions between proteins, etc. We present systematic study of a lamellar system composed mainly of lecithin which is a biocompatible phospholipid and simusol, which is a mixture of fatty acids that acts as a cosurfactant introducing flexibility to the membrane. Using X ray scattering we determine the lamellar periodicity as a function of the hydration for different formulations of the membrane; ranging from 100 % to 50 % mass fraction of lecithin. The X-ray spectra are fitted using a 4 Gaussian model [1]that allows us to determine the lamellar periodicity and the Caille parameter [2]. The ideal swelling law relating the membrane volume fraction (φ m ) to the lamellar periodicity (D) is given by φ m =δ m /D, where δ m is the thickness membrane, however, when steric interactions are dominant with respect to electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, deviations from this behavior are expected [3]. We present experimental data illustrating the swelling behavior for the membrane compositions and the respective behavior of the hydration limit, membrane Luzzati [4], of the Caille parameter and qualitative interpretation of the interaction forces the systems studying the parameter membrane square amplitude fluctuation[5]. [1] Private communication with Prof. Dr. Cristiano Luis Pinto de Oliveira. [2] Caille A. et all, Acad. Sci. Paris B274 (1972) 891. [3] E. Kurtisovski et all, PRL 98, 258103 (2007). [4] Nagle et all, Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2000 Aug;10(4):474-80. [5] H. I. Petrache. Structure and interactions of fluid phospholipids bilayers measured by high resolution

  11. The fusion loops and membrane proximal region of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B (gB) can function in the context of herpes simplex virus 1 gB when substituted individually but not in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Anna; Connolly, Sarah A; Spear, Patricia G; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Among the herpesvirus glycoprotein B (gB) fusion proteins, the hydrophobic content of fusion loops and membrane proximal regions (MPRs) are inversely correlated with each other. We examined the functional importance of the hydrophobicity of these regions by replacing them in herpes simplex virus type 1 gB with corresponding regions from Epstein-Barr virus gB. We show that fusion activity is dependent on the structural context in which the specific loops and MPR sequences exist, rather than a simple hydrophobic relationship. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Neutron View of Proteins in Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Despite the growing number of atomic-resolution membrane protein structures, direct structural information about proteins in their native membrane environment is scarce. This problem is particularly relevant in the case of the highly-charged S1-S4 voltage- sensing domains responsible for nerve impulses, where interactions with the lipid bilayer are critical for the function of voltage-activated potassium channels. We have used neutron diffraction, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structure and hydration of bilayer membranes containing S1-S4 voltage-sensing domains. Our results show that voltage sensors adopt transmembrane orientations, cause a modest reshaping of the surrounding lipid bilayer, and that water molecules intimately interact with the protein within the membrane. These structural findings reveal that voltage sensors have evolved to interact with the lipid membrane while keeping the energetic and structural perturbations to a minimum, and that water penetrates into the membrane to hydrate charged residues and shape the transmembrane electric field.

  13. Simulation studies of protein-induced bilayer deformations, and lipid-induced protein tilting, on a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Smit, B.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena

    2005-01-01

    membranes. Here we present a mesoscopic model for lipid bilayers with embedded proteins, which we have studied with the help of the dissipative particle dynamics simulation technique. Because hydrophobic matching is believed to be one of the main physical mechanisms regulating lipid-protein interactions......-induced protein tilt, with the hydrophobic mismatch ( positive and negative) between the protein hydrophobic length and the pure lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness. The protein-induced bilayer perturbation was quantified in terms of a coherence length, xi(P), of the lipid bilayer hydrophobic thickness pro. le...... for positive values of mismatch; a dependence on the protein size appears as well. In the case of large model proteins experiencing extreme mismatch conditions, in the region next to the so-called lipid annulus, there appears an undershooting ( or overshooting) region where the bilayer hydrophobic thickness...

  14. Simulations of Skin Barrier Function: Free Energies of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Transmembrane Pores in Ceramide Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W. J.; Noro, Massimo G.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2008-01-01

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel pha...

  15. Manipulating lipid membrane architecture by liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Doo

    2015-10-01

    Soft matters such as liquid crystals and biological molecules exhibit a variety of interesting physical phenomena as well as new applications. Recently, in mimicking biological systems that have the ability to sense, regulate, grow, react, and regenerate in a highly responsive and self-adaptive manner, the significance of the liquid crystal order in living organisms, for example, a biological membrane possessing the lamellar order, is widely recognized from the viewpoints of physics and chemistry of interfaces and membrane biophysics. Lipid bilayers, resembling cell membranes, provide primary functions for the transport of biological components of ions and molecules in various cellular activities, including vesicle budding and membrane fusion, through lateral organization of the membrane components such as proteins. In this lecture, I will describe how the liquid crystal-analog curvature elasticity of a lipid bilayer plays a critical role in developing a new platform for understanding diverse biological functions at a cellular level. The key concept is to manipulate the local curvature at an interface between a solid substrate and a model membrane. Two representative examples will be demonstrated: one of them is the topographic control of lipid rafts in a combinatorial array where the ligand-receptor binding event occurs and the other concerns the reconstitution of a ring-type lipid raft in bud-mimicking architecture within the framework of the curvature elasticity.

  16. Unusual Self-Assembly of the Recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein-Based Fusion Antigen CTH522 Into Protein Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Fabrice; Karlsen, Kasper; Jensen, Pernille

    2018-01-01

    Sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infects more than 100 million people annually, and untreated chlamydia infections can cause severe complications. Therefore, there is an urgent need for a chlamydia vaccine. The Ct major outer membrane protein (MOMP) is highly immunogenic but is a c......Sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infects more than 100 million people annually, and untreated chlamydia infections can cause severe complications. Therefore, there is an urgent need for a chlamydia vaccine. The Ct major outer membrane protein (MOMP) is highly immunogenic...... but is a challenging vaccine candidate by being an integral membrane protein, and the immunogenicity depends on a correctly folded structure. We investigated the biophysical properties of the recombinant MOMP-based fusion antigen CTH522, which is tested in early human clinical trials. It consists of a truncated......-defined secondary structural elements, and no thermal transitions were measurable. Chemical unfolding resulted monomers that upon removal of the denaturant self-assembled into higher order structures, comparable to the structure of the native protein. The conformation of CTH522 in nanoparticles is thus not entirely...

  17. Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Walter F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Biological organisms are potentially the most sensitive and selective biological detection systems known, yet we are currently severely limited in our ability to exploit biological interactions in sensory devices, due in part to the limited stability of biological systems and derived materials. This proposal addresses an important aspect of integrating biological sensory materials in a solid state device. If successful, such technology could enable entirely new classes of robust biosensors that could be miniaturized and deployed in the field. The critical aims of the proposed work were 1) the calibration of a more versatile approach to measuring pH, 2) the use of this method to monitor pH changes caused by the light-induced pumping of protons across vesicles with bacteriorhodopsin integrated into the membranes (either polymer or lipid); 3) the preparation of bilayer assemblies on platinum surfaces; 4) the enhanced detection of lightinduced pH changes driven by bR-loaded supported bilayers. I have developed a methodology that may enable that at interfaces and developed a methodology to characterize the functionality of bilayer membranes with reconstituted membrane proteins. The integrity of the supported bilayer films however must be optimized prior to the full realization of the work originally envisioned in the original proposal. Nevertheless, the work performed on this project and the encouraging results it has produced has demonstrated that these goals are challenging yet within reach.

  18. Stability of asymmetric lipid bilayers assessed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteban-Martin, Santi; Risselada, H. Jelger; Salgado, Jesus; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    The asymmetric insertion of amphiphiles into biological membranes compromises the balance between the inner and outer monolayers. As a result, area expansion of the receiving leaflet and curvature strain may lead to membrane permeation, shape changes, or membrane fusion events. We have conducted

  19. Direct Visualization of Ebola Virus Fusion Triggering in the Endocytic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Spence

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV makes extensive and intricate use of host factors in the cellular endosomal/lysosomal pathway to release its genome into the cytoplasm and initiate infection. Following viral internalization into endosomes, host cysteine proteases cleave the EBOV fusion glycoprotein (GP to unmask the binding site for its intracellular receptor, the cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1. GP-NPC1 interaction is required for viral entry. Despite these and other recent discoveries, late events in EBOV entry following GP-NPC1 binding and culminating in GP-catalyzed fusion between viral and cellular lipid bilayers remain enigmatic. A mechanistic understanding of EBOV membrane fusion has been hampered by the failure of previous efforts to reconstitute fusion in vitro or at the cell surface. This report describes an assay to monitor initial steps directly in EBOV membrane fusion—triggering of GP and virus-cell lipid mixing—by single virions in live cells. Fusogenic triggering of GP occurs predominantly in Rab7-positive (Rab7+ endosomes, absolutely requires interaction between proteolytically primed GP and NPC1, and is blocked by key GP-specific neutralizing antibodies with therapeutic potential. Unexpectedly, cysteine protease inhibitors do not inhibit lipid mixing by virions bearing precleaved GP, even though they completely block cytoplasmic entry by these viruses, as shown previously. These results point to distinct cellular requirements for different steps in EBOV membrane fusion and suggest a model in which host cysteine proteases are dispensable for GP fusion triggering after NPC1 binding but are required for the formation of fusion pores that permit genome delivery.

  20. The hemifusion structure induced by influenza virus haemagglutinin is determined by physical properties of the target membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlanda, Petr; Mekhedov, Elena; Waters, Hang; Schwartz, Cindi L; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Ryham, Rolf J; Cohen, Fredric S; Blank, Paul S; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2016-04-18

    Influenza A virus haemagglutinin conformational change drives the membrane fusion of viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. Membrane fusion proceeds through an intermediate called hemifusion(1,2). For viral fusion, the hemifusion structures are not determined(3). Here, influenza virus-like particles(4) carrying wild-type haemagglutinin or haemagglutinin hemifusion mutant G1S(5) and liposome mixtures were studied at low pH by Volta phase plate cryo-electron tomography, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio close to focus. We determined two distinct hemifusion structures: a hemifusion diaphragm and a novel structure termed a 'lipidic junction'. Liposomes with lipidic junctions were ruptured with membrane edges stabilized by haemagglutinin. The rupture frequency and hemifusion diaphragm diameter were not affected by G1S mutation, but decreased when the cholesterol level in the liposomes was close to physiological concentrations. We propose that haemagglutinin induces a merger between the viral and target membranes by one of two independent pathways: a rupture-insertion pathway leading to the lipidic junction and a hemifusion-stalk pathway leading to a fusion pore. The latter is relevant under the conditions of influenza virus infection of cells. Cholesterol concentration functions as a pathway switch because of its negative spontaneous curvature in the target bilayer, as determined by continuum analysis.

  1. Water distribution function across the curved lipid bilayer: SANS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, M.A.; Zemlyanaya, E.V.; Ryabova, N.Y.; Hauss, T.; Dante, S.; Lombardo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron scattering length density across the membrane is simulated on the basis of fluctuated model of lipid bilayer. The use of a separated form factors method has been applied for the identification of the structural features of the polydispersed unilamellar DMPC vesicle system. The hydration of vesicle is described by sigmoid distribution function of the water molecules. The application of the model to the obtained SANS spectra allow the determination of the main parameters of the system, such as the average vesicle radius (and its polydispersity), the membrane thickness, the thickness of hydrocarbon chain region, the number of water molecules located per lipid molecule, and the phospholipid surface area. Moreover the approach allow the calculation of some relevant parameters connected with the water distribution function across the bilayer system. The main features of the obtained results furnish an explanation of why lipid membrane is easily penetrated by the water molecules of the solution

  2. Tribology of implantation bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of implantation films must be analysed in terms of bilayer rheology (laws of mechanical behaviour). Tribology takes into account thermodynamical, chemical and metallurgical parameters to interpret the friction properties of a system as a whole. One can distinguish between alloying effects of ion implantation and structural modifications. Alloying affects the basic properties of the crystal: elasticity, cohesion, mobility of planar defects, and its surface electronic structure, which determines the reactivity with the atmosphere or the friction counterpart (adhesion). Radiation damage and phase changes act more particularly on the modes of gliding and climbing of dislocations, and fracture mechanisms. 105 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 table

  3. Revisiting interaction specificity reveals neuronal and adipocyte Munc18 membrane fusion regulatory proteins differ in their binding interactions with partner SNARE Syntaxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P Christie

    Full Text Available The efficient delivery of cellular cargo relies on the fusion of cargo-carrying vesicles with the correct membrane at the correct time. These spatiotemporal fusion events occur when SNARE proteins on the vesicle interact with cognate SNARE proteins on the target membrane. Regulatory Munc18 proteins are thought to contribute to SNARE interaction specificity through interaction with the SNARE protein Syntaxin. Neuronal Munc18a interacts with Syntaxin1 but not Syntaxin4, and adipocyte Munc18c interacts with Syntaxin4 but not Syntaxin1. Here we show that this accepted view of specificity needs revision. We find that Munc18c interacts with both Syntaxin4 and Syntaxin1, and appears to bind "non-cognate" Syntaxin1 a little more tightly than Syntaxin4. Munc18a binds Syntaxin1 and Syntaxin4, though it interacts with its cognate Syntaxin1 much more tightly. We also observed that when bound to non-cognate Munc18c, Syntaxin1 captures its neuronal SNARE partners SNAP25 and VAMP2, and Munc18c can bind to pre-formed neuronal SNARE ternary complex. These findings reveal that Munc18a and Munc18c bind Syntaxins differently. Munc18c relies principally on the Syntaxin N-peptide interaction for binding Syntaxin4 or Syntaxin1, whereas Munc18a can bind Syntaxin1 tightly whether or not the Syntaxin1 N-peptide is present. We conclude that Munc18a and Munc18c differ in their binding interactions with Syntaxins: Munc18a has two tight binding modes/sites for Syntaxins as defined previously but Munc18c has just one that requires the N-peptide. These results indicate that the interactions between Munc18 and Syntaxin proteins, and the consequences for in vivo function, are more complex than can be accounted for by binding specificity alone.

  4. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of HIV fusion peptide 13CO to lipid 31P proximities support similar partially inserted membrane locations of the α helical and β sheet peptide structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrys, Charles M; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D; Weliky, David P

    2013-10-03

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the ∼25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of "HFP", i.e., a ∼25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was (13)CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly (13)CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric β sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP (13)CO nuclei and (31)P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct (13)CO shifts for the α helical and β sheet structures so that the proximities to (31)P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the (13)CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. "HFPmn" was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. "HFPmn_V2E" contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and

  5. Neutron scattering investigations of the lipid bilayer structure pressure dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Soloviov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bilayer structure investigation results obtained with small angle neutron scattering method at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research IBR-2M nuclear reactor (Dubna, Russia are presented. Experiment has been per-formed with small angle neutron scattering spectrometer YuMO, upgraded with the apparatus for performing P-V-T measurements on the substance under investigation. D2O-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC liquid system, presenting the model of natural live membrane, has been taken as the sample for investiga-tions. The lipid bilayer spatial period was measured in experiment along with isothermal compressibility simulta-neously at different pressures. It has been shown, that the bilayer structural transition from ripple (wavelike gel-phase phase to liquid-crystal phase is accompanied with anomalous rise of isothermal compressibility, indicat-ing occurrence of the phase transition.

  6. Model for the structure of the lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, R.W.; Venable, R.M.; Karplus, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed model for the structure and dynamics of the interior of the lipid bilayer in the liquid crystal phase is presented. The model includes two classes of motion: (i) the internal dynamics of the chains, determined from Brownian dynamics simulations with a continuous version of the Marcelja mean-field potential, and (ii) noncollective reorientation (axial rotation and wobble) of the entire molecule, introduced by a cone model. The basic unit of the model is a single lipid chain with field parameters adjusted to fit the 2H order parameters and the frequency-dependent 13C NMR T1 relaxation times of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The chain configurations obtained from the trajectory are used to construct a representation of the bilayer. The resulting lipid assembly is consistent with NMR, neutron diffraction, surface area, and density data. It indicates that a high degree of chain disorder and entanglement exists in biological membranes

  7. Neutron scattering investigations of the lipid bilayer structure pressure dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovjov, D.V.; Gordelyij, V.Yi.; Gorshkova, Yu.Je.; Yivan'kov, O.Yi.; Koval'ov, Yu.S.; Kuklyin, A.Yi.; Solovjov, D.V.; Bulavyin, L.A.; Yivan'kov, O.Yi.; Nyikolajenko, T.Yu.; Kuklyin, A.Yi.; Gordelyij, V.Yi.; Gordelyij, V.Yi.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid bilayer structure investigation results obtained with small angle neutron scattering method at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research IBR-2M nuclear reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented. Experiment has been performed with small angle neutron scattering spectrometer YuMO, upgraded with the apparatus for performing PV-T measurements on the substance under investigation. D 2 O-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) liquid system, presenting the model of natural live membrane, has been taken as the sample for investigations. The lipid bilayer spatial period was measured in experiment along with isothermal compressibility simultaneously at different pressures. It has been shown, that the bilayer structural transition from ripple (wavelike gel-phase) phase to liquid-crystal phase is accompanied with anomalous rise of isothermal compressibility, indicating occurrence of the phase transition.

  8. Tunneling Plasmonics in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Z; Iwinski, E G; Ni, G X; Zhang, L M; Bao, W; Rodin, A S; Lee, Y; Wagner, M; Liu, M K; Dai, S; Goldflam, M D; Thiemens, M; Keilmann, F; Lau, C N; Castro-Neto, A H; Fogler, M M; Basov, D N

    2015-08-12

    We report experimental signatures of plasmonic effects due to electron tunneling between adjacent graphene layers. At subnanometer separation, such layers can form either a strongly coupled bilayer graphene with a Bernal stacking or a weakly coupled double-layer graphene with a random stacking order. Effects due to interlayer tunneling dominate in the former case but are negligible in the latter. We found through infrared nanoimaging that bilayer graphene supports plasmons with a higher degree of confinement compared to single- and double-layer graphene, a direct consequence of interlayer tunneling. Moreover, we were able to shut off plasmons in bilayer graphene through gating within a wide voltage range. Theoretical modeling indicates that such a plasmon-off region is directly linked to a gapped insulating state of bilayer graphene, yet another implication of interlayer tunneling. Our work uncovers essential plasmonic properties in bilayer graphene and suggests a possibility to achieve novel plasmonic functionalities in graphene few-layers.

  9. Herpesvirus gB-induced fusion between the virion envelope and outer nuclear membrane during virus egress is regulated by the viral US3 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisner, Todd W; Wright, Catherine C; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D; Roller, Richard J; Johnson, David C

    2009-04-01

    Herpesvirus capsids collect along the inner surface of the nuclear envelope and bud into the perinuclear space. Enveloped virions then fuse with the outer nuclear membrane (NM). We previously showed that herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins gB and gH act in a redundant fashion to promote fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM. HSV mutants lacking both gB and gH accumulate enveloped virions in herniations, vesicles that bulge into the nucleoplasm. Earlier studies had shown that HSV mutants lacking the viral serine/threonine kinase US3 also accumulate herniations. Here, we demonstrate that HSV gB is phosphorylated in a US3-dependent manner in HSV-infected cells, especially in a crude nuclear fraction. Moreover, US3 directly phosphorylated the gB cytoplasmic (CT) domain in in vitro assays. Deletion of gB in the context of a US3-null virus did not add substantially to defects in nuclear egress. The majority of the US3-dependent phosphorylation of gB involved the CT domain and amino acid T887, a residue present in a motif similar to that recognized by US3 in other proteins. HSV recombinants lacking gH and expressing either gB substitution mutation T887A or a gB truncated at residue 886 displayed substantial defects in nuclear egress. We concluded that phosphorylation of the gB CT domain is important for gB-mediated fusion with the outer NM. This suggested a model in which the US3 kinase is incorporated into the tegument layer (between the capsid and envelope) in HSV virions present in the perinuclear space. By this packaging, US3 might be brought close to the gB CT tail, leading to phosphorylation and triggering fusion between the virion envelope and the outer NM.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of tethered lipid assemblies for membrane protein reconstitution (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziano, Rémi; Rossi, Claire; Chenal, Alexandre; Brenner, Catherine; Ladant, Daniel; Chopineau, Joël

    2017-09-28

    Biological membranes and their related molecular mechanisms are essential for all living organisms. Membranes host numerous proteins and are responsible for the exchange of molecules and ions, cell signaling, and cell compartmentation. Indeed, the plasma membrane delimits the intracellular compartment from the extracellular environment and intracellular membranes. Biological membranes also play a major role in metabolism regulation and cellular physiology (e.g., mitochondrial membranes). The elaboration of membrane based biomimetic systems allows us to reconstitute and investigate, in controlled conditions, biological events occurring at the membrane interface. A whole variety of model membrane systems have been developed in the last few decades. Among these models, supported membranes were developed on various hydrophilic supports. The use of solid supports enables the direct use of surface sensitive techniques (e.g., surface plasmon resonance, quartz crystal microbalance, and atomic force microscopy) to monitor and quantify events occurring at the membrane surface. Tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) could be considered as an achievement of the first solid supported membranes described by the McConnell group. Tethered bilayers on solid supports were designed to delimit an inside compartment from an outside one. They were used for measuring interactions with ligands or incorporating large membrane proteins or complexes without interference with the support. In this context, the authors developed an easy concept of versatile tBLMs assembled on amino coated substrates that are formed upon the vesicle fusion rupture process applicable to protein-free vesicles as well as proteoliposomes. The phospholipid bilayer (natural or synthetic lipids) incorporated 5% of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-poly ethylene glycol-N-hydroxy succinimide to ensure the anchorage of the bilayer to the amino coated surface. The conditions for the formation of tBLMs on amino

  11. Interaction of Cecropin B with Zwitterionic and Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers Immobilized at Gold Electrode Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhaniewicz, Joanna; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Warszyński, Piotr; Sęk, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Membranolytic properties of cationic antimicrobial peptide cecropin B were investigated using electrochemical techniques, atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Two types of artificial lipid bilayers supported on gold electrode were used as model systems composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and cholesterol (Chol) at 7:3 molar ratio and L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (E. coli) (PE), L-α-phosphatidylglycerol sodium salt (E. coli) (PG) at 8:2 molar ratio. Thus the lipid content was intended to represent either mammalian or bacterial membrane respectively. Model bilayers were exposed to cecropin B at 1 μM concentration and the changes in bilayer structure, permeability and morphology were monitored as a function of time. We have found that cecropin B does not show any pronounced effect on POPC/Chol bilayer, while PE/PG system was strongly affected in the presence of the peptide. This observation suggests that cecropin B shows some selectivity with respect to lipid composition of the membrane. In case of PE/PG membrane, we have observed that peptide action involves electrostatically driven adsorption of the cecropin B at the top of the bilayer with simultaneous fluidization and swelling of the membrane. The latter may facilitate the rearrangement and insertion of the molecules into the core of the lipid bilayer, which leads to further rupture and degradation of the film through formation of mixed peptide-lipid aggregates.

  12. Convenient synthesis and application of versatile nucleic acid lipid membrane anchors in the assembly and fusion of liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ries, Oliver; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    or the construction of DNA origami structures. We herein present the synthesis and applications of versatile lipid membrane anchor building blocks suitable for solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis. These are readily synthesized in bulk in five to seven steps from commercially available precursors and can...

  13. Membrane fusion activity of Semliki forest virus in a liposomal model system : Specific inhibition by Zn2+ ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corver, J; Snippe, H; Kraaijeveld, C; Wilschut, J

    1997-01-01

    Semliki Forest virus (SFV) has been shown previously to fuse efficiently with cholesterol-and sphingolipid-containing liposomal model membranes in a low-pH-dependent manner. Several steps can be distinguished in this process, including low-pH-induced irreversible binding of the virus to the

  14. Functional fluorescent protein insertions in herpes simplex virus gB report on gB conformation before and after execution of membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gallagher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV into a target cell requires complex interactions and conformational changes by viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. During viral entry, gB transitions from a prefusion to a postfusion conformation, driving fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. While the structure of postfusion gB is known, the prefusion conformation of gB remains elusive. As the prefusion conformation of gB is a critical target for neutralizing antibodies, we set out to describe its structure by making genetic insertions of fluorescent proteins (FP throughout the gB ectodomain. We created gB constructs with FP insertions in each of the three globular domains of gB. Among 21 FP insertion constructs, we found 8 that allowed gB to remain membrane fusion competent. Due to the size of an FP, regions in gB that tolerate FP insertion must be solvent exposed. Two FP insertion mutants were cell-surface expressed but non-functional, while FP insertions located in the crown were not surface expressed. This is the first report of placing a fluorescent protein insertion within a structural domain of a functional viral fusion protein, and our results are consistent with a model of prefusion HSV gB constructed from the prefusion VSV G crystal structure. Additionally, we found that functional FP insertions from two different structural domains could be combined to create a functional form of gB labeled with both CFP and YFP. FRET was measured with this construct, and we found that when co-expressed with gH/gL, the FRET signal from gB was significantly different from the construct containing CFP alone, as well as gB found in syncytia, indicating that this construct and others of similar design are likely to be powerful tools to monitor the conformation of gB in any model system accessible to light microscopy.

  15. Dynamic patterns in a supported lipid bilayer driven by standing surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Martin; Neumann, Jürgen; Wixforth, Achim; Rädler, Joachim O; Schneider, Matthias F

    2009-11-07

    In the past decades supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) have been an important tool in order to study the physical properties of biological membranes and cells. So far, controlled manipulation of SLBs is very limited. Here we present a new technology to create lateral patterns in lipid membranes controllable in both space and time. Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are used to generate lateral standing waves on a piezoelectric substrate which create local "traps" in the lipid bilayer and lead to a lateral modulation in lipid concentration. We demonstrate that pattern formation is reversible and does not affect the integrity of the lipid bilayer as shown by extracting the diffusion constant of fluid membranes. The described method could possibly be used to design switchable interfaces for the lateral transport and organization of membrane bound macromolecules to create dynamic bioarrays and control biofilm formation.

  16. Phase separation in lipid bilayers triggered by low pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, Swetha; Edwardson, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Lipid bilayers have been imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM). → At pH 5 phase separation occurs in lipid bilayers containing mixed acyl chains. → Phase separation does not occur when lipids have only unsaturated chains. → Phase separation might drive protein clustering during endocytosis. -- Abstract: Endocytosis involves the capture of membrane from the cell surface in the form of vesicles, which become rapidly acidified to about pH 5. Here we show using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging that this degree of acidification triggers phase separation in lipid bilayers containing mixed acyl chains (e.g. palmitoyl/oleoyl) or complex mixtures (e.g. total brain extract) but not in bilayers containing only lipids with unsaturated chains (e.g. dioleoyl). Since mixed-chain lipids are major constituents of the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, the type of phase separation reported here might support protein clustering and signaling during endocytosis.

  17. Poly(amidoamine) dendrimers on lipid bilayers II: Effects of bilayer phase and dendrimer termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher V; Leroueil, Pascale R; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2008-08-07

    The molecular structures and enthalpy release of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers binding to 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers were explored through atomistic molecular dynamics. Three PAMAM dendrimer terminations were examined: protonated primary amine, neutral acetamide, and deprotonated carboxylic acid. Fluid and gel lipid phases were examined to extract the effects of lipid tail mobility on the binding of generation-3 dendrimers, which are directly relevant to the nanoparticle interactions involving lipid rafts, endocytosis, lipid removal, and/or membrane pores. Upon binding to gel phase lipids, dendrimers remained spherical, had a constant radius of gyration, and approximately one-quarter of the terminal groups were in close proximity to the lipids. In contrast, upon binding to fluid phase bilayers, dendrimers flattened out with a large increase in their asphericity and radii of gyration. Although over twice as many dendrimer-lipid contacts were formed on fluid versus gel phase lipids, the dendrimer-lipid interaction energy was only 20% stronger. The greatest enthalpy release upon binding was between the charged dendrimers and the lipid bilayer. However, the stronger binding to fluid versus gel phase lipids was driven by the hydrophobic interactions between the inner dendrimer and lipid tails.

  18. Development of an automation technique for the establishment of functional lipid bilayer arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J S; Vogel, J; Geschke, O; Emnéus, J; Nielsen, C H; Perry, M; Vissing, T; Hansen, C R

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a technique for establishing multiple black lipid membranes (BLMs) in arrays of micro structured ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) films, and supported by a micro porous material was developed. Rectangular 8 × 8 arrays with apertures having diameters of 301 ± 5 µm were fabricated in ETFE Teflon film by laser ablation using a carbon dioxide laser. Multiple lipid membranes could be formed across the micro structured 8 × 8 array ETFE partitions. Success rates for the establishment of cellulose-supported BLMs across the multiple aperture arrays were above 95%. However, the time course of the membrane thinning process was found to vary considerably between multiple aperture bilayer experiments. An airbrush partition pretreatment technique was developed to increase the reproducibility of the multiple lipid bilayers formation during the time course from the establishment of the lipid membranes to the formation of bilayers. The results showed that multiple lipid bilayers could be reproducible formed across the airbrush-pretreated 8 × 8 rectangular arrays. The ionophoric peptide valinomycin was incorporated into established membrane arrays, resulting in ionic currents that could be effectively blocked by tetraethylammonium. This shows that functional bimolecular lipid membranes were established, and furthermore outlines that the established lipid membrane arrays could host functional membrane-spanning molecules

  19. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Michael T.; Wilcox, Kyle C.; Klein, William L.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membr...

  20. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  1. SFG studies on interactions between antimicrobial peptides and supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Chen, Zhan

    2006-09-01

    The mode of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in disrupting cell membrane bilayers is of fundamental importance in understanding the efficiency of different AMPs, which is crucial to design antibiotics with improved properties. Recent developments in the field of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy have made it a powerful and unique biophysical technique in investigating the interactions between AMPs and a single substrate supported planar lipid bilayer. We will review some of the recent progress in applying SFG to study membrane lipid bilayers and discuss how SFG can provide novel information such as real-time bilayer structure change and AMP orientation during AMP-lipid bilayer interactions in a very biologically relevant manner. Several examples of applying SFG to monitor such interactions between AMPs and a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) bilayer are presented. Different modes of actions are observed for melittin, tachyplesin I, d-magainin 2, MSI-843, and a synthetic antibacterial oligomer, demonstrating that SFG is very effective in the study of AMPs and AMP-lipid bilayer interactions.

  2. Subterahertz Longitudinal Phonon Modes Propagating in a Lipid Bilayer Immersed in an Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhvataev, V. E.

    2018-04-01

    The properties of subterahertz longitudinal acoustic phonon modes in the hydrophobic region of a lipid bilayer immersed in a compressible viscous aqueous medium are investigated theoretically. An approximate expression is obtained for the Mandelstam-Brillouin components of the dynamic structure factor of a bilayer. The analysis is based on a generalized hydrodynamic model of the "two-dimensional lipid bilayer + three-dimensional fluid medium" system, as well as on known sharp estimates for the frequencies and lifetimes of long-wavelength longitudinal acoustic phonons in a free hydrated lipid bilayer and in water, obtained from inelastic X-ray scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that, for characteristic values of the parameters of the membrane system, subterahertz longitudinal phonon-like excitations in the hydrophobic part of the bilayer are underdamped. In this case, the contribution of the viscous flow of the aqueous medium to the damping of a longitudinal membrane mode is small compared with the contribution of the lipid bilayer. Quantitative estimates of the damping ratio agree well with the experimental results for the vibration mode of the enzyme lysozyme in aqueous solution [1]. It is also shown that a coupling between longitudinal phonon modes of the bilayer and relaxation processes in its fluid environment gives rise to an additional peak in the scattering spectrum, which corresponds to a non-propagating mode.

  3. Nonpolar interactions between trans-membrane helical EGF peptide and phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and cholesterol. Molecular dynamics simulation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Róg, T.; Murzyn, K.; Karttunen, M.E.J.; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M.

    2008-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation study of four lipid bilayers with inserted trans-membrane helical fragment of epithelial growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGF peptide) was performed. The lipid bilayers differ in their lipid composition and consist of (i) unsaturated phosphatidylcholine

  4. Residue-specific membrane location of peptides and proteins using specifically and extensively deuterated lipids and {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H rotational-echo double-resonance solid-state NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Li; Ghosh, Ujjayini; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P., E-mail: weliky@chemistry.msu.edu [Michigan State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Residue-specific location of peptides in the hydrophobic core of membranes was examined using {sup 13}C-{sup 2}H REDOR and samples in which the lipids were selectively deuterated. The transmembrane topology of the KALP peptide was validated with this approach with substantial dephasing observed for deuteration in the bilayer center and reduced or no dephasing for deuteration closer to the headgroups. Insertion of {beta} sheet HIV and helical and {beta} sheet influenza virus fusion peptides into the hydrophobic core of the membrane was validated in samples with extensively deuterated lipids.

  5. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Poła, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers.

  6. Calculation of the electrostatic potential of lipid bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations: methodological issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    of the electrostatic potential from atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers. We discuss two slightly different forms of Poisson equation that are normally used to calculate the membrane potential: (i) a classical form when the potential and the electric field are chosen to be zero on one...... systems). For symmetric bilayers we demonstrate that both approaches give essentially the same potential profiles, provided that simulations are long enough (a production run of at least 100 ns is required) and that fluctuations of the center of mass of a bilayer are properly accounted for. In contrast...

  7. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  8. Overcoming bottlenecks in the membrane protein structural biology pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, David; Bill, Roslyn M; Jawhari, Anass; Rothnie, Alice J

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins account for a third of the eukaryotic proteome, but are greatly under-represented in the Protein Data Bank. Unfortunately, recent technological advances in X-ray crystallography and EM cannot account for the poor solubility and stability of membrane protein samples. A limitation of conventional detergent-based methods is that detergent molecules destabilize membrane proteins, leading to their aggregation. The use of orthologues, mutants and fusion tags has helped improve protein stability, but at the expense of not working with the sequence of interest. Novel detergents such as glucose neopentyl glycol (GNG), maltose neopentyl glycol (MNG) and calixarene-based detergents can improve protein stability without compromising their solubilizing properties. Styrene maleic acid lipid particles (SMALPs) focus on retaining the native lipid bilayer of a membrane protein during purification and biophysical analysis. Overcoming bottlenecks in the membrane protein structural biology pipeline, primarily by maintaining protein stability, will facilitate the elucidation of many more membrane protein structures in the near future. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants

  10. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrig, John T., E-mail: jtr1@cdc.gov [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Bennett, Susan L. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  11. Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-receptor interactions: From classical genetics to novel insights into virus-cell membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.J.O.; Elleder, D.; Young, J.A.T.

    2006-01-01

    For over 40 years, avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV)-receptor interactions have been employed as a useful model system to study the mechanism of retroviral entry into cells. Pioneering studies on this system focused upon the genetic basis of the differential susceptibilities of different lines of chickens to infection by distinct subgroups of ASLV. These studies led to the definition of three distinct autosomal recessive genes that were predicted to encode cellular receptors for different viral subgroups. They also led to the concept of viral interference, i.e. the mechanism by which infection by one virus can render cells resistant to reinfection by other viruses that use the same cellular receptor. Here, we review the contributions that analyses of the ASLV-receptor system have made in unraveling the mechanisms of retroviral entry into cells and focus on key findings such as identification and characterization of the ASLV receptor genes and the subsequent elucidation of an unprecedented mechanism of virus-cell fusion. Since many of the initial findings on this system were published in the early volumes of Virology, this subject is especially well suited to this special anniversary issue of the journal

  12. [3H]PN200-110 and [3H]ryanodine binding and reconstitution of ion channel activity with skeletal muscle membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.L.; Alvarez, R.M.; Fill, M.; Hawkes, M.J.; Brush, K.L.; Schilling, W.P.; Stefani, E.

    1989-01-01

    Skeletal muscle membranes derived either from the tubular (T) network or from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were characterized with respect to the binding of the dihydropyridine, [ 3 H]PN200-110, and the alkaloid, [ 3 H]ryanodine; polypeptide composition; and ion channel activity. Conditions for optimizing the binding of these radioligands are discussed. A bilayer pulsing technique is described and is used to examine the channels present in these membranes. Fusion of T-tubule membranes into bilayers revealed the presence of chloride channels and dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels with three distinct conductances. The dihydropyridine-sensitive channels were further characterized with respect to their voltage dependence. Pulsing experiments indicated that two different populations of dihydropyridine-sensitive channels existed. Fusion of heavy SR vesicles revealed three different ion channels; the putative calcium release channel, a potassium channel, and a chloride channel. Thus, this fractionation procedure provides T-tubules and SR membranes which, with radioligand binding and single channel recording techniques, provide a useful tool to study the characteristics of skeletal muscle ion channels and their possible role in excitation-contraction coupling

  13. Simulations of Skin Barrier Function: Free Energies of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Transmembrane Pores in Ceramide Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, Willem J.; Noro, Massimo G.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2008-01-01

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)

  14. Atomic force microscopy on domains in biological model membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinia, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation and imaging of supported lipid bilayers, which can be regarded as biological modelmembranes, in the light of the formation of domains. The bilayers were prepared with either the Langmuir-Blodgett method, or with vesicle fusion. They were imaged with Atomic Force

  15. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of grape and accordingly in red wine, has significant health effects such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidation. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. Most probably, the working...... mechanism is unspecific. However, there are only few biophysical studies regarding the impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes. Here, results from a neutron reflectometry investigation on solid supported di-palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers with incorporated resveratrol are presented. The data...... show an accumulation of resveratrol in between the headgroups and evidence its absence in the hydrophobic core. Without a removal mechanism, the headgroup region hosts up to ~25 mol% of resveratrol. The presence of resveratrol induces a change of the tilt angle of the PC headgroups to a more upright...

  16. Lipid Bilayer – mediated Regulation of Ion Channel Function by Amphiphilic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    that are transforming it into a subject of quantitative science. It is described how the hydrophobic interactions between a membrane protein and the host lipid bilayer provide the basis for a mechanism, whereby protein function is regulated by the bilayer physical properties. The use of gramicidin channels as single-molecule......Drugs that at pico- to nanomolar concentration regulate ion channel function by high-affi nity binding to their cognate receptor often have a “ secondary pharmacology, ” in which the same molecule at low micromolar concentrations regulates a diversity of membrane proteins in an apparently...... nonspecifi c manner. It has long been suspected that this promiscuous regulation of membrane protein function could be due to changes in the physical properties of the host lipid bilayer, but the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Given that pharmacological research often involves drug...

  17. Dependency of {gamma}-secretase complex activity on the structural integrity of the bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hua, E-mail: hzhou2@lbl.gov [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zhou, Shuxia; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K. [Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Partial solubilization of membranes with CHAPSO can increase {gamma}-secretase activity. {yields} Completely solubilized {gamma}-secretase is inactive. {yields} Purified {gamma}-secretase regains activity after reconstitution into lipid bilayers. {yields} A broad range of detergents can be used to successfully reconstitute {gamma}-secretase. -- Abstract: {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex associated with the production of A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease. We have characterized the activity of {gamma}-secretase complexes under a variety of detergent solubilization and reconstitution conditions, and the structural state of proteoliposomes by electron microscopy. We found that {gamma}-secretase activity is highly dependent on the physical state or integrity of the membrane bilayer - partial solubilization may increase activity while complete solubilization will abolish it. The activity of well-solubilized {gamma}-secretase can be restored to near native levels when properly reconstituted into a lipid bilayer environment.

  18. MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein of the macrolide transporter MacAB-TolC, binds lipopolysaccharide core specifically and with high affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shuo; Zgurskaya, Helen I

    2013-11-01

    The Escherichia coli MacAB-TolC transporter has been implicated in efflux of macrolide antibiotics and secretion of enterotoxin STII. In this study, we found that purified MacA, a periplasmic membrane fusion protein, contains one tightly bound rough core lipopolysaccharide (R-LPS) molecule per MacA molecule. R-LPS was bound specifically to MacA protein with affinity exceeding that of polymyxin B. Sequence analyses showed that MacA contains two high-density clusters of positively charged amino acid residues located in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain and the periplasmic C-terminal domain. Substitutions in the C-terminal cluster reducing the positive-charge density completely abolished binding of R-LPS. At the same time, these substitutions significantly reduced the functionality of MacA in the protection of E. coli against macrolides in vivo and in the in vitro MacB ATPase stimulation assays. Taken together, our results suggest that R-LPS or a similar glycolipid is a physiological substrate of MacAB-TolC.

  19. SV40 late protein VP4 forms toroidal pores to disrupt membranes for viral release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghava, Smita; Giorda, Kristina M; Romano, Fabian B; Heuck, Alejandro P; Hebert, Daniel N

    2013-06-04

    Nonenveloped viruses are generally released from the cell by the timely lysis of host cell membranes. SV40 has been used as a model virus for the study of the lytic nonenveloped virus life cycle. The expression of SV40 VP4 at later times during infection is concomitant with cell lysis. To investigate the role of VP4 in viral release and its mechanism of action, VP4 was expressed and purified from bacteria as a fusion protein for use in membrane disruption assays. Purified VP4 perforated membranes as demonstrated by the release of fluorescent markers encapsulated within large unilamellar vesicles or liposomes. Dynamic light scattering results revealed that VP4 treatment did not cause membrane lysis or change the size of the liposomes. Liposomes encapsulated with 4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-3-indacene-labeled streptavidin were used to show that VP4 formed stable pores in membranes. These VP4 pores had an inner diameter of 1-5 nm. Asymmetrical liposomes containing pyrene-labeled lipids in the outer monolayer were employed to monitor transbilayer lipid diffusion. Consistent with VP4 forming toroidal pore structures in membranes, VP4 induced transbilayer lipid diffusion or lipid flip-flop. Altogether, these studies support a central role for VP4 acting as a viroporin in the disruption of cellular membranes to trigger SV40 viral release by forming toroidal pores that unite the outer and inner leaflets of membrane bilayers.

  20. A new look at lipid-membrane structure in relation to drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    1998-01-01

    Lipid-bilayer membranes are key objects in drug research in relation to (i) interaction of drugs with membrane-bound receptors, (ii) drug targeting, penetration, and permeation of cell membranes, and (iii) use of liposomes in micro-encapsulation technologies for drug delivery. Rational design...... of new drugs and drug-delivery systems therefore requries insight into the physical properties of lipid-bilayer membranes. This mini-review provides a perspective on the current view of lipid-bilayer structure and dynamics based on information obtained from a variety of recent experimental...... and theoretical studies. Special attention is paid to trans-bilayer structure, lateral molecular organization of the lipid bilayer, lipid-mediated protein assembly, and lipid-bilayer permeability. It is argued that lipids play a major role in lipid membrane-organization and functionality....

  1. The Influence of Cholesterol on Fast Dynamics Inside of Vesicle and Planar Phospholipid Bilayers Measured with 2D IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kel, Oksana; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2015-07-23

    Phospholipid bilayers are frequently used as models for cell membranes. Here the influence of cholesterol on the structural dynamics in the interior of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (dilauroylphosphatidylcholine, DLPC) vesicles and DLPC planar bilayers are investigated as a function of cholesterol concentration. 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy was performed on the antisymmetric CO stretch of the vibrational probe molecule tungsten hexacarbonyl, which is located in the interior alkyl regions of the bilayers. The 2D IR experiments measure spectral diffusion, which is caused by the structural fluctuations of the bilayers. The 2D IR measurements show that the bilayer interior alkyl region dynamics occur on time scales ranging from a few picoseconds to many tens of picoseconds. These are the time scales of the bilayers' structural dynamics, which act as the dynamic solvent bath for chemical processes of membrane biomolecules. The results suggest that at least a significant fraction of the dynamics arise from density fluctuations. Samples are studied in which the cholesterol concentration is varied from 0% to 40% in both the vesicles (72 nm diameter) and fully hydrated planar bilayers in the form of aligned multibilayers. At all cholesterol concentrations, the structural dynamics are faster in the curved vesicle bilayers than in the planar bilayers. As the cholesterol concentration is increased, at a certain concentration there is a sudden change in the dynamics, that is, the dynamics abruptly slow down. However, this change occurs at a lower concentration in the vesicles (between 10% and 15% cholesterol) than in the planar bilayers (between 25% and 30% cholesterol). The sudden change in the dynamics, in addition to other IR observables, indicates a structural transition. However, the results show that the cholesterol concentration at which the transition occurs is influenced by the curvature of the bilayers.

  2. Modulated phases of phospholipid bilayers induced by tocopherols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Md Arif; Raghunathan, V A

    2012-11-01

    The influence of α-, γ- and δ-tocopherols on the structure and phase behavior of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers has been determined from X-ray diffraction studies on oriented multilayers. In all the three cases the main-transition temperature (T(m)) of DPPC was found to decrease with increasing tocopherol concentration up to around 25 mol%. Beyond this the main transition is suppressed in the case of γ-tocopherol, whereas T(m) becomes insensitive to composition in the other two cases. The pre-transition is found to be suppressed over a narrow tocopherol concentration range between 7.5 and 10 mol% in DPPC-γ-tocopherol and DPPC-δ-tocopherol bilayers, and the ripple phase occurs down to the lowest temperature studied. In all the three cases a modulated phase is observed above a tocopherol concentration of about 10 mol%, which is similar to the P(β) phase reported in DPPC-cholesterol bilayers. This phase is found to occur even in excess water conditions at lower tocopherol concentrations, and consists of bilayers with periodic height modulation. These results indicate the ability of tocopherols to induce local curvature in membranes, which could be important for some of their biological functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. NMR study of the interactions of polymyxin B, gramicidin S, and valinomycin with dimyristoyllecithin bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidovetzki, R.; Banerjee, U.; Harrington, D.W.; Chan, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions of three polypeptide antibiotics (polymyxin B, gramicidin S, and valinomycin) with artificial lecithin membranes were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Combination of 31 P and 2 H NMR allowed observation of perturbations of the bilayer membrane structure induced by each of the antibiotics in the regions of the polar headgroups and acyl side chains of the phospholipids. The comparative study of the effects of these membrane-active antibiotics and the lipid bilayer structure demonstrated distinct types of antibiotic-membrane interactions in each case. Thus, the results showed the absence of interaction of polymyxin B with the dimyristoyllecithin membranes. In contrast, gramicidin S exhibited strong interaction with the lipid above the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature: disordering of the acyl side chains was evident. Increasing the concentration of gramicidin S led to disintegration of the bilayer membrane structure. At a molar ratio of 1:16 of gramicidin S to lecithin, the results are consistent with coexistence of gel and liquid-crystalline phases of the phospholipids near the phase transition temperature. Valinomycin decreased the phase transition temperature of the lipids and increased the order parameters of the lipid side chains. Such behavior is consistent with penetration of the valinomycin molecule into the interior of the lipid bilayers

  4. ITO/Poly(Aniline/Sol-Gel Glass: An Optically Transparent, pH-Responsive Substrate for Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Obeidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Described here is fabrication of a pH-sensitive, optically transparent transducer composed of a planar indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode overcoated with a poly(aniline (PANI thin film and a porous sol-gel layer. Adsorption of the PANI film renders the ITO electrode sensitive to pH, whereas the sol-gel spin-coated layer makes the upper surface compatible with fusion of phospholipid vesicles to form a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB. The response to changes in the pH of the buffer contacting the sol-gel/PANI/ITO electrode is pseudo-Nernstian with a slope of 52 mV/pH over a pH range of 4–9. Vesicle fusion forms a laterally continuous PSLB on the upper sol-gel surface that is fluid with a lateral lipid diffusion coefficient of 2.2 μm2/s measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Due to its lateral continuity and lack of defects, the PSLB blocks the pH response of the underlying electrode to changes in the pH of the overlying buffer. This architecture is simpler to fabricate than previously reported ITO electrodes derivatized for PSLB formation and should be useful for optical monitoring of proton transport across supported membranes derivatized with ionophores and ion channels.

  5. Multi-Stacked Supported Lipid Bilayer Micropatterning through Polymer Stencil Lift-Off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex multi-lamellar structures play a critical role in biological systems, where they are present as lamellar bodies, and as part of biological assemblies that control energy transduction processes. Multi-lamellar lipid layers not only provide interesting systems for fundamental research on membrane structure and bilayer-associated polypeptides, but can also serve as components in bioinspired materials or devices. Although the ability to pattern stacked lipid bilayers at the micron scale is of importance for these purposes, limited work has been done in developing such patterning techniques. Here, we present a simple and direct approach to pattern stacked supported lipid bilayers (SLBs using polymer stencil lift-off and the electrostatic interactions between cationic and anionic lipids. Both homogeneous and phase-segregated stacked SLB patterns were produced, demonstrating that the stacked lipid bilayers retain lateral diffusivity. We demonstrate patterned SLB stacks of up to four bilayers, where fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and quenching was used to probe the interactions between lipid bilayers. Furthermore, the study of lipid phase behaviour showed that gel phase domains align between adjacent layers. The proposed stacked SLB pattern platform provides a robust model for studying lipid behaviour with a controlled number of bilayers, and an attractive means towards building functional bioinspired materials or devices.

  6. Model Biological Membranes and Possibilities of Application of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy for Their Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalová, Štěpánka; Vyskočil, V.; Barek, J.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 2 (2018), s. 207-219 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-05387S; GA ČR GA17-03868S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) * Liposomes * Model membrane * Phospholipid bilayer * Planar lipid bilayer * Supported lipid bilayers * Tethered lipid bilayers Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Electrochemistry (dry cells, batteries, fuel cells, corrosion metals, electrolysis) Impact factor: 2.851, year: 2016

  7. SymB and SymC, two membrane associated proteins, are required for Epichloë festucae hyphal cell-cell fusion and maintenance of a mutualistic interaction with Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kimberly A; Becker, Yvonne; Tanaka, Aiko; Takemoto, Daigo; Fitzsimons, Helen L; Seiler, Stephan; Lalucque, Hervé; Silar, Philippe; Scott, Barry

    2017-02-01

    Cell-cell fusion in fungi is required for colony formation, nutrient transfer and signal transduction. Disruption of genes required for hyphal fusion in Epichloë festucae, a mutualistic symbiont of Lolium grasses, severely disrupts the host interaction phenotype. They examined whether symB and symC, the E. festucae homologs of Podospora anserina self-signaling genes IDC2 and IDC3, are required for E. festucae hyphal fusion and host symbiosis. Deletion mutants of these genes were defective in hyphal cell fusion, formed intra-hyphal hyphae, and had enhanced conidiation. SymB-GFP and SymC-mRFP1 localize to plasma membrane, septa and points of hyphal cell fusion. Plants infected with ΔsymB and ΔsymC strains were severely stunted. Hyphae of the mutants colonized vascular bundles, were more abundant than wild type in the intercellular spaces and formed intra-hyphal hyphae. Although these phenotypes are identical to those previously observed for cell wall integrity MAP kinase mutants no difference was observed in the basal level of MpkA phosphorylation or its cellular localization in the mutant backgrounds. Both genes contain binding sites for the transcription factor ProA. Collectively these results show that SymB and SymC are key components of a conserved signaling network for E. festucae to maintain a mutualistic symbiotic interaction within L. perenne. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  9. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro......-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 mu m. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  10. Human serum albumin supported lipid patterns for the targeted recognition of microspheres coated by membrane based on ss-DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaoming; He Qiang; Cui Yue; Duan Li; Li Junbai

    2006-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) patterns have been successfully fabricated for the deposition of lipid bilayer, 1,2-dimyristoyl-sglycerophosphate (DMPA), by making use of the micro-contact printing (μCP) technique and liposome fusion. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results indicate that lipid bilayer has been assembled in HSA patterns with a good stability. Such well-defined lipid patterns formed on HSA surface create possibility to incorporate specific components like channels or receptors for specific recognition. In view of this, microspheres coated with lipid membranes were immobilized in HSA-supported lipid patterns via the hybridization of complementary ss-DNAs. This procedure enables to transfer solid materials to a soft surface through a specific recognition

  11. Cell fusions in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge; Bjerregaard, Bolette; Talts, Jan Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    Cell fusions are important to fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone, calcium homeostasis and the immune defense system. Additionally, cell fusions participate in tissue repair and may be important to cancer development and progression. A large number of factors appear...... to regulate cell fusions, including receptors and ligands, membrane domain organizing proteins, proteases, signaling molecules and fusogenic proteins forming alpha-helical bundles that bring membranes close together. The syncytin family of proteins represent true fusogens and the founding member, syncytin-1......, has been documented to be involved in fusions between placental trophoblasts, between cancer cells and between cancer cells and host ells. We review the literature with emphasis on the syncytin family and propose that syncytins may represent universal fusogens in primates and rodents, which work...

  12. Confocal Raman Microscopy for in Situ Measurement of Phospholipid-Water Partitioning into Model Phospholipid Bilayers within Individual Chromatographic Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitt, Jay P; Bryce, David A; Minteer, Shelley D; Harris, Joel M

    2018-06-05

    The phospholipid-water partition coefficient is a commonly measured parameter that correlates with drug efficacy, small-molecule toxicity, and accumulation of molecules in biological systems in the environment. Despite the utility of this parameter, methods for measuring phospholipid-water partition coefficients are limited. This is due to the difficulty of making quantitative measurements in vesicle membranes or supported phospholipid bilayers, both of which are small-volume phases that challenge the sensitivity of many analytical techniques. In this work, we employ in situ confocal Raman microscopy to probe the partitioning of a model membrane-active compound, 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid or ibuprofen, into both hybrid- and supported-phospholipid bilayers deposited on the pore walls of individual chromatographic particles. The large surface-area-to-volume ratio of chromatographic silica allows interrogation of a significant lipid bilayer area within a very small volume. The local phospholipid concentration within a confocal probe volume inside the particle can be as high as 0.5 M, which overcomes the sensitivity limitations of making measurements in the limited membrane areas of single vesicles or planar supported bilayers. Quantitative determination of ibuprofen partitioning is achieved by using the phospholipid acyl-chains of the within-particle bilayer as an internal standard. This approach is tested for measurements of pH-dependent partitioning of ibuprofen into both hybrid-lipid and supported-lipid bilayers within silica particles, and the results are compared with octanol-water partitioning and with partitioning into individual optically trapped phospholipid vesicle membranes. Additionally, the impact of ibuprofen partitioning on bilayer structure is evaluated for both within-particle model membranes and compared with the structural impacts of partitioning into vesicle lipid bilayers.

  13. Influence of natural organic matter (NOM) coatings on nanoparticle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zhang; Avsar, Saziye Yorulmaz; Corliss, Michael K; Chung, Minsub; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-10-05

    As the worldwide usage of nanoparticles in commercial products continues to increase, there is growing concern about the environmental risks that nanoparticles pose to biological systems, including potential damage to cellular membranes. A detailed understanding of how different types of nanoparticles behave in environmentally relevant conditions is imperative for predicting and mitigating potential membrane-associated toxicities. Herein, we investigated the adsorption of two popular nanoparticles (silver and buckminsterfullerene) onto biomimetic supported lipid bilayers of varying membrane charge (positive and negative). The quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) measurement technique was employed to track the adsorption kinetics. Particular attention was focused on understanding how natural organic matter (NOM) coatings affect nanoparticle-bilayer interactions. Both types of nanoparticles preferentially adsorbed onto the positively charged bilayers, although NOM coatings on the nanoparticle and lipid bilayer surfaces could either inhibit or promote adsorption in certain electrolyte conditions. While past findings showed that NOM coatings inhibit membrane adhesion, our findings demonstrate that the effects of NOM coatings are more nuanced depending on the type of nanoparticle and electrolyte condition. Taken together, the results demonstrate that NOM coatings can modulate the lipid membrane interactions of various nanoparticles, suggesting a possible way to improve the environmental safety of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  15. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Castorph, S; Salditt, T [Institute for X-ray Physics, University of Goettingen, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Konovalov, O [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Jahn, R; Holt, M, E-mail: sghosh1@gwdg.d, E-mail: mholt@gwdg.d, E-mail: tsaldit@gwdg.d [Department of Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). Although PIP{sub 2} is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP{sub 2} incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP{sub 2} incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca{sup 2+} ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  16. In vitro study of interaction of synaptic vesicles with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S K; Castorph, S; Salditt, T; Konovalov, O; Jahn, R; Holt, M

    2010-01-01

    The fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane in neurons is a crucial step in the release of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for carrying signals between nerve cells. While many of the molecular players involved in this fusion process have been identified, a precise molecular description of their roles in the process is still lacking. A case in point is the plasma membrane lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ). Although PIP 2 is known to be essential for vesicle fusion, its precise role in the process remains unclear. We have re-investigated the role of this lipid in membrane structure and function using the complementary experimental techniques of x-ray reflectivity, both on lipid monolayers at an air-water interface and bilayers on a solid support, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction on lipid monolayers. These techniques provide unprecedented access to structural information at the molecular level, and detail the profound structural changes that occur in a membrane following PIP 2 incorporation. Further, we also confirm and extend previous findings that the association of SVs with membranes is enhanced by PIP 2 incorporation, and reveal the structural changes that underpin this phenomenon. Further, the association is further intensified by a physiologically relevant amount of Ca 2+ ions in the subphase of the monolayer, as revealed by the increase in interfacial pressure seen with the lipid monolayer system. Finally, a theoretical calculation concerning the products arising from the fusion of these SVs with proteoliposomes is presented, with which we aim to illustrate the potential future uses of this system.

  17. Protein-induced bilayer Perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction...... between the model protein gramicidin and lipid bilayers of varying thickness. The free energy of the interaction is up to −6 kJ/mol; thus not strongly favored over lipid–lipid interactions. Incorporation of gramicidin results in increased order parameters with increased protein concentration...... and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid ↔ gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few Å results...

  18. Enhanced water desalination performance through hierarchically-structured ceramic membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Tong; Lei, Libin; Gu, Jianqiang; Wang, Yao; Winnubst, Louis; Chen, Chusheng; Ye, Chunsong; Chen, Fanglin

    2017-01-01

    Developments of membrane water desalination are impeded by low water vapor flux across the membrane. We present an innovative membrane design to significantly enhance the water vapor flux. A bilayer zirconia-based membrane with a thick hierarchically-structured support and a thin functional layer is

  19. Mesoscopic models of biological membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venturoli, M.; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Kranenburg, M.

    2006-01-01

    Phospholipids are the main components of biological membranes and dissolved in water these molecules self-assemble into closed structures, of which bilayers are the most relevant from a biological point of view. Lipid bilayers are often used, both in experimental and by theoretical investigations...... to coarse grain a biological membrane. The conclusion of this comparison is that there can be many valid different strategies, but that the results obtained by the various mesoscopic models are surprisingly consistent. A second objective of this review is to illustrate how mesoscopic models can be used...

  20. Cardiolipin effects on membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsay, Joseph D; Cosentino, Katia; Subburaj, Yamunadevi; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2013-12-23

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a lipid with unique properties solely found in membranes generating electrochemical potential. It contains four acyl chains and tends to form nonlamellar structures, which are believed to play a key role in membrane structure and function. Indeed, CL alterations have been linked to disorders such as Barth syndrome and Parkinson's disease. However, the molecular effects of CL on membrane organization remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated the structure and physical properties of CL-containing membranes using confocal microscopy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. We found that the fluidity of the lipid bilayer increased and its mechanical stability decreased with CL concentration, indicating that CL decreases the packing of the membrane. Although the presence of up to 20% CL gave rise to flat, stable bilayers, the inclusion of 5% CL promoted the formation of flowerlike domains that grew with time. Surprisingly, we often observed two membrane-piercing events in atomic force spectroscopy experiments with CL-containing membranes. Similar behavior was observed with a lipid mixture mimicking the mitochondrial outer membrane composition. This suggests that CL promotes the formation of membrane areas with apposed double bilayers or nonlamellar structures, similar to those proposed for mitochondrial contact sites. All together, we show that CL induces membrane alterations that support the role of CL in facilitating bilayer structure remodeling, deformation, and permeabilization.

  1. Rational design of a bi-layered reduced graphene oxide film on polystyrene foam for solar-driven interfacial water evaporation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Le; Wang, Yuchao; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Solar-driven water evaporation has been emerging as a highly efficient way for utilizing solar energy for clean water production and wastewater treatment. Here we rationally designed and fabricated a bi-layered photothermal membrane with a porous

  2. New optical method for measuring the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minetti, C; Dubois, F; Vitkova, V; Bivas, I

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the elasticity of lipid bilayer structures is fundamental for new developments in biophysics, pharmacology and biomedical research. Lipid vesicles are readily prepared in laboratory conditions and employed for studying the physical properties of lipid membranes. The thermal fluctuation analysis of the shape of lipid vesicles (or flicker spectroscopy) is one of the experimental methods widely used for the measurement of the bending modulus of lipid bilayers. We present direct phase measurements performed on dilute vesicular suspensions by means of a new optical method exploiting holographic microscopy. For the bending constant of phosphatidylcholine bilayers we report the value of 23k B T in agreement with values previously measured by micropipette aspiration, electrodeformation and flicker spectroscopy of giant lipid vesicles. The application of this novel approach for the evaluation of the bending elasticity of lipid membranes opens the way to future developments in the phase measurements on lipid vesicles for the evaluation of their mechanical constants. (paper)

  3. Influence of membrane composition on its flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerbelli, B.B.; Teixeira da Silva, E.R.; Oliveira, C.L.P.; Oliveira, E.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lamellar phases and vesicles composed of lipids have been used as model systems to investigate biological process related to cell membrane as well as promising carriers for drugs and gene therapy. The composition of the membrane determines its three dimensional shape and its properties such as rigidity and compressibility which play an important role on membrane fusion, protein adhesion, interactions between proteins, etc. We present systematic study of a lamellar system composed mainly of lecithin which is a biocompatible phospholipid and simusol, which is a mixture of fatty acids that acts as a cosurfactant introducing flexibility to the membrane. Using X ray scattering we determine the lamellar periodicity as a function of the hydration for different formulations of the membrane; ranging from 100 % to 50 % mass fraction of lecithin. The X-ray spectra are fitted using a 4 Gaussian model [1]that allows us to determine the lamellar periodicity and the Caille parameter [2]. The ideal swelling law relating the membrane volume fraction ({phi}{sub m}) to the lamellar periodicity (D) is given by {phi}{sub m} ={delta}{sub m}/D, where {delta}{sub m} is the thickness membrane, however, when steric interactions are dominant with respect to electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, deviations from this behavior are expected [3]. We present experimental data illustrating the swelling behavior for the membrane compositions and the respective behavior of the hydration limit, membrane Luzzati [4], of the Caille parameter and qualitative interpretation of the interaction forces the systems studying the parameter membrane square amplitude fluctuation[5]. [1] Private communication with Prof. Dr. Cristiano Luis Pinto de Oliveira. [2] Caille A. et all, Acad. Sci. Paris B274 (1972) 891. [3] E. Kurtisovski et all, PRL 98, 258103 (2007). [4] Nagle et all, Curr Opin Struct Biol. 2000 Aug;10(4):474-80. [5] H. I. Petrache. Structure and interactions of fluid phospholipids

  4. Probing lipid membrane electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi

    The electrostatic properties of lipid bilayer membranes play a significant role in many biological processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is highly sensitive to membrane surface potential in electrolyte solutions. With fully characterized probe tips, AFM can perform quantitative electrostatic analysis of lipid membranes. Electrostatic interactions between Silicon nitride probes and supported zwitterionic dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayer with a variable fraction of anionic dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) were measured by AFM. Classical Gouy-Chapman theory was used to model the membrane electrostatics. The nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation was numerically solved with finite element method to provide the potential distribution around the AFM tips. Theoretical tip-sample electrostatic interactions were calculated with the surface integral of both Maxwell and osmotic stress tensors on tip surface. The measured forces were interpreted with theoretical forces and the resulting surface charge densities of the membrane surfaces were in quantitative agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern model of membrane charge regulation. It was demonstrated that the AFM can quantitatively detect membrane surface potential at a separation of several screening lengths, and that the AFM probe only perturbs the membrane surface potential by external field created by the internai membrane dipole moment. The analysis yields a dipole moment of 1.5 Debye per lipid with a dipole potential of +275 mV for supported DOPC membranes. This new ability to quantitatively measure the membrane dipole density in a noninvasive manner will be useful in identifying the biological effects of the dipole potential. Finally, heterogeneous model membranes were studied with fluid electric force microscopy (FEFM). Electrostatic mapping was demonstrated with 50 nm resolution. The capabilities of quantitative electrostatic measurement and lateral charge density mapping make AFM a unique and powerful

  5. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  6. Effect of low levels of lipid oxidation on the curvature, dynamics, and permeability of lipid bilayers and their interactions with cationic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Malmstadt, Noah

    2018-04-01

    Lipid bilayers composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids, oxidized lipids, and cholesterol at concentrations of 0–18 mol% oxidized lipid were simulated, showing that the presence of oxidized lipid increases bilayer disorder, curvature, and lateral dynamics at low oxidized-lipid concentrations of 18 mol% or less. The aldehyde terminal of a shortened oxidized-lipid tail tends to interact with water and thus bends toward the bilayer-water interface, in agreement with previous experiments and simulations. In particular, water molecules pass through the oxidized bilayer without pore formation, implying passive permeability. A single nanoparticle, which consists of 300 polystyrene (PS) chains with cationic terminals, added to this bilayer simulation induces negative bilayer curvature and inserts to the bilayer, regardless of the oxidized-lipid concentration. Hydrophobic monomers and cationic terminals of the PS particle interact respectively with lipid tails and headgroups, leading to the wrapping of either lipid monolayer or bilayer along the particle surface. These results indicate that lipid oxidation increases membrane curvature and permeability even at such a low concentration of oxidized lipid, which supports the experimental observations regarding the passive permeability of oxidized bilayer, and also that oxidized lipids of low concentration do not significantly influence the insertion of a cationic PS particle to the bilayer.

  7. Membrane interaction of antimicrobial peptides using E. coli lipid extract as model bacterial cell membranes and SFG spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soblosky, Lauren; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are used as a convenient model cell membrane system to study biologically important molecule-lipid interactions in situ. However, the lipid bilayer models are often simple and the acquired results with these models may not provide all pertinent information related to a real cell membrane. In this work, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular-level interactions between the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) MSI-594, ovispirin-1 G18, magainin 2 and a simple 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (dDPPG)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) bilayer. We compared such interactions to those between the AMPs and a more complex dDPPG/Escherichia coli (E. coli) polar lipid extract bilayer. We show that to fully understand more complex aspects of peptide-bilayer interaction, such as interaction kinetics, a heterogeneous lipid composition is required, such as the E. coli polar lipid extract. The discrepancy in peptide-bilayer interaction is likely due in part to the difference in bilayer charge between the two systems since highly negative charged lipids can promote more favorable electrostatic interactions between the peptide and lipid bilayer. Results presented in this paper indicate that more complex model bilayers are needed to accurately analyze peptide-cell membrane interactions and demonstrates the importance of using an appropriate lipid composition to study AMP interaction properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding.

  9. Membrane bridging and hemifusion by denaturated Munc18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    Full Text Available Neuronal Munc18-1 and members of the Sec1/Munc18 (SM protein family play a critical function(s in intracellular membrane fusion together with SNARE proteins, but the mechanism of action of SM proteins remains highly enigmatic. During experiments designed to address this question employing a 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD fluorescence de-quenching assay that is widely used to study lipid mixing between reconstituted proteoliposomes, we observed that Munc18-1 from squid (sMunc18-1 was able to increase the apparent NBD fluorescence emission intensity even in the absence of SNARE proteins. Fluorescence emission scans and dynamic light scattering experiments show that this phenomenon arises at least in part from increased light scattering due to sMunc18-1-induced liposome clustering. Nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism data suggest that, although native sMunc18-1 does not bind significantly to lipids, sMunc18-1 denaturation at 37 °C leads to insertion into membranes. The liposome clustering activity of sMunc18-1 can thus be attributed to its ability to bridge two membranes upon (perhaps partial denaturation; correspondingly, this activity is hindered by addition of glycerol. Cryo-electron microscopy shows that liposome clusters induced by sMunc18-1 include extended interfaces where the bilayers of two liposomes come into very close proximity, and clear hemifusion diaphragms. Although the physiological relevance of our results is uncertain, they emphasize the necessity of complementing fluorescence de-quenching assays with alternative experiments in studies of membrane fusion, as well as the importance of considering the potential effects of protein denaturation. In addition, our data suggest a novel mechanism of membrane hemifusion induced by amphipathic macromolecules that does not involve formation of a stalk intermediate.

  10. Nanoscale cell membrane organization : a near-field optical view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Marjolein

    2006-01-01

    The cell plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is a lipid bi-layer that separates the cell cytosol from the extracellular environment. The composition and organization of proteins and lipids within this bi-layer have a direct impact on many cellular processes, since they form the senses of the cell.

  11. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  12. Lipid-bilayer-assisted two-dimensional self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuki; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Self-assembly is a ubiquitous approach to the design and fabrication of novel supermolecular architectures. Here we report a strategy termed `lipid-bilayer-assisted self-assembly' that is used to assemble DNA origami nanostructures into two-dimensional lattices. DNA origami structures are electrostatically adsorbed onto a mica-supported zwitterionic lipid bilayer in the presence of divalent cations. We demonstrate that the bilayer-adsorbed origami units are mobile on the surface and self-assembled into large micrometre-sized lattices in their lateral dimensions. Using high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, a variety of dynamic processes involved in the formation of the lattice, such as fusion, reorganization and defect filling, are successfully visualized. The surface modifiability of the assembled lattice is also demonstrated by in situ decoration with streptavidin molecules. Our approach provides a new strategy for preparing versatile scaffolds for nanofabrication and paves the way for organizing functional nanodevices in a micrometer space.

  13. Molecular Transport Studies Through Unsupported Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, William; Parekh, Sapun; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-03-01

    Dendrimers, spherical polymeric nanoparticles made from branched monomers around a central core, show great promise as drug delivery vehicles. Dendrimer size, core contents, and surface functionality can be synthetically tuned, providing unprecedented versatility. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers have been shown to enter cells; however, questions remain about their biophysical interactions with the cell membrane, specifically about the presence and size of transient pores. We monitor dendrimer-lipid bilayer interactions using unsupported black lipid membranes (BLMs) as model cell membranes. Custom bilayer slides contain two vertically stacked aqueous chambers separated by a 25 μm Teflon sheet with a 120 μm aperture where the bilayer is formed. We vary the composition of model membranes (cholesterol content and lipid phase) to create biomimetic systems and study the interaction of PAMAM G6 and G3 dendrimers with these bilayers. Dendrimers, dextran cargo, and bilayers are monitored and quantified using time-lapse fluorescence imaging. Electrical capacitance measurements are simultaneously recorded to determine if the membrane is porous, and the pore size is deduced by monitoring transport of fluorescent dextrans of increasing molecular weight. These experiments shed light on the importance of cholesterol content and lipid phase on the interaction of dendrimer nanoparticles with membranes.

  14. Electronic transport in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshino, Mikito

    2009-01-01

    We present theoretical studies on the transport properties and localization effects of bilayer graphene. We calculate the conductivity by using the effective mass model with the self-consistent Born approximation, in the presence and absence of an energy gap opened by the interlayer asymmetry. We find that, in the absence of the gap, the minimum conductivity approaches the universal value by increasing the disorder potential, and the value is robust in the strong disorder regime where mixing with high-energy states is considerable. The gap-opening suppresses the conductivity over a wide energy range, even in the region away from the gap.We also study the localization effects in the vicinity of zero energy in bilayer graphene. We find that the states are all localized in the absence of the gap, while the gap-opening causes a phase transition analogous to the quantum Hall transition, which is accompanied by electron delocalization.

  15. Cyclotron resonance in bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E A; Jiang, Z; Tung, L-C; Schwartz, M E; Takita, M; Wang, Y-J; Kim, P; Stormer, H L

    2008-02-29

    We present the first measurements of cyclotron resonance of electrons and holes in bilayer graphene. In magnetic fields up to B=18 T, we observe four distinct intraband transitions in both the conduction and valence bands. The transition energies are roughly linear in B between the lowest Landau levels, whereas they follow square root[B] for the higher transitions. This highly unusual behavior represents a change from a parabolic to a linear energy dispersion. The density of states derived from our data generally agrees with the existing lowest order tight binding calculation for bilayer graphene. However, in comparing data to theory, a single set of fitting parameters fails to describe the experimental results.

  16. Layer configurations comparison of bilayer-films for EGFET pH sensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, R. A.; Zulkefle, M. A.; Yusof, K. A.; Abdullah, W. F. H.; Rusop, M.; Herman, S. H.

    2018-05-01

    The comparison between bilayer configurations were presented in this paper. TiO2 and ZnO layer configurations were manipulated in order to investigate which configuration produce highest sensing performance to be applied as EGFET pH sensor. Both of the materials were deposited together as the bilayer film. The configurations were manipulated between TiO2/ZnO and ZnO/TiO2. ITO was used as the substrate in this study and both of the materials were deposited by using sol-gel spin coating technique. After deposition process, these bilayer film then undergone for EGFET pH sensor measurement and physical characterization. The EGFET pH sensor measurement was done by dipping the fabricated bilayer film into three different pH values, which is pH4, pH7 and pH10. Bilayer film act as the pH-sensitive membrane, which connected to the commercial metal-oxide semiconductor FET (MOSFET). This MOSFET was connected to the interfacing circuit. Voltage output obtained were recorded and the graph was plotted by using the data recorded. Based on the EGFET pH sensor measurement, TiO2/ZnO bilayer film exhibit higher sensing performance, compared with ZnO/TiO2. TiO2/ZnO bilayer film produced 53.10 mV/pH with the linearity value of 0.9913. Afterwards, fabricated bilayer films then were characterized with AFM to explore their surface roughness and surface topography behavior.

  17. Amphotericin B induced interdigitation of apolipoprotein stabilized nanodisk bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T; Weers, P M; Sulchek, T; Hoeprich, P D; Ryan, R O

    2006-12-07

    Amphotericin B nanodisks (AMB-ND) are ternary complexes of AMB, phospholipid (PL) and apolipoprotein organized as discrete nanometer scale disk-shaped bilayers. In gel filtration chromatography experiments, empty ND lacking AMB elute as a single population of particles with a molecular weight in the range of 200 kDa. AMB-ND formulated at a 4:1 PL:AMB weight ratio, separated into two peaks. Peak 1 eluted at the position of control ND lacking AMB while the second peak, containing all of the AMB present in the original sample, eluted in the void volume. When ND prepared with increased AMB (1:1 phospholipid:AMB molar ratio) were subjected to gel filtration chromatography, an increased proportion of phospholipid and apolipoprotein were recovered in the void volume with the AMB. Prior to gel filtration the AMB-ND sample could be passed through a 0.22 {micro}m filter without loss of AMB while the voided material was lost. Native gel electrophoresis studies corroborated the gel permeation chromatography data. Far UV circular dichroism analyses revealed that apoA-I associated with AMB-ND denatures at a lower guanidine HCl concentration than apoA-I associated with ND lacking AMB. Atomic force microscopy revealed that AMB induces compression of the ND bilayer thickness consistent with bilayer interdigitation, a phenomenon that is likely related to the ability of AMB to induce pore formation in susceptible membranes.

  18. A model of lipid rearrangements during pore formation in the DPPC lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrona, Artur; Kubica, Krystian

    2017-07-10

    The molecular bases of pore formation in the lipid bilayer remain unclear, as do the exact characteristics of their sizes and distributions. To understand this process, numerous studies have been performed on model lipid membranes including cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV). The effect of an electric field on DPPC GUV depends on the lipid membrane state: in the liquid crystalline phase the created pores have a cylinder-like shape, whereas in the gel phase a crack has been observed. The aim of the study was to investigate the geometry of pores created in a lipid bilayer in gel and liquid crystalline phases in reference to literature experimental data. A mathematical model of the pore in a DPPC lipid bilayer developed based on the law of conservation of mass and the assumption of constant volume of lipid molecules, independent of their conformation, allows for analysis of pore shape and accompanying molecular rearrangements. The membrane area occupied by the pore of a cylinder-like shape is greater than the membrane area occupied by lipid molecules creating the pore structure (before pore appearance). Creation of such pores requires more space, which can be achieved by conformational changes of lipid chains toward a more compact state. This process is impossible for a membrane in the most compact, gel phase. We show that the geometry of the pores formed in the lipid bilayer in the gel phase must be different from the cylinder shape formed in the lipid bilayer in a liquid crystalline state, confirming experimental studies. Furthermore, we characterize the occurrence of the 'buffer' zone surrounding pores in the liquid crystalline phase as a mechanism of separation of neighbouring pores.

  19. Efficient preparation and analysis of membrane and membrane protein systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1858, č. 10 (2016), s. 2468-2482 ISSN 0005-2736 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : tools and software * membrane building * protein insertion * molecular dynamics * lipid bilayer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.498, year: 2016

  20. Diffusion of Integral Membrane Proteins in Protein-Rich Membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Javanainen, M.; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Metzler, R.; Vattulainen, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 17 (2017), s. 4308-4313 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : giant unilamellar vesicles * single-molecule tracking * lipid bilayer membranes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 9.353, year: 2016

  1. Controlling the shape of membrane protein polyhedra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2017-03-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids can self-assemble into membrane protein polyhedral nanoparticles (MPPNs). MPPNs have a closed spherical surface and a polyhedral protein arrangement, and may offer a new route for structure determination of membrane proteins and targeted drug delivery. We develop here a general analytic model of how MPPN self-assembly depends on bilayer-protein interactions and lipid bilayer mechanical properties. We find that the bilayer-protein hydrophobic thickness mismatch is a key molecular control parameter for MPPN shape that can be used to bias MPPN self-assembly towards highly symmetric and uniform MPPN shapes. Our results suggest strategies for optimizing MPPN shape for structural studies of membrane proteins and targeted drug delivery.

  2. Cell fusion by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, M.B.

    1993-08-01

    The relevance and importance of cell fusion are illustrated by the notion that current interest in this phenomenon is shared by scientists in quite varied disciplines. The diversity of cellular membrane fusion phenomena could provoke one to think that there must be a multitude of mechanisms that can account for such diversity. But, in general, the mechanism for the fusion reaction itself could be very similar in many, or even all, cases. Cell fusion can be induced by several factors such as virus Sendai, polyethylene glycol, electric current and ionizing radiation. This article provides the reader with short view of recent progress in research on cell fusion and gives some explanations about fusion mechanisms. This study shows for the first time, the results of the cell fusion induced by ionizing radiations that we have obtained in our researches and the work performed by other groups. (author). 44 refs

  3. Origin of microbial life hypothesis: a gel cytoplasm lacking a bilayer membrane, with infrared radiation producing exclusion zone (EZ) water, hydrogen as an energy source and thermosynthesis for bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J T; Pollack, G H

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that pre-biotic bacterial cell(s) and the first cells capable of growth/division did not require a cytoplasmic membrane. A gel-like microscopic structure less than a cubic micrometer may have had a dual role as both an ancient pre-cytoplasm and a boundary layer to the higher-entropy external environment. The gel pre-cytoplasm exposed to radiant energy, especially in the infrared (IR) region of the EM spectrum resulted in the production of an exclusion zone (EZ) with a charge differential (-100 to -200 mV) and boundary that may have been a possible location for the latter organization of the first cytoplasmic membrane. Pre-biotic cells and then-living cells may have used hydrogen as the universal energy source, and thermosynthesis in their bioenergetic processes. These components will be discussed as to how they are interconnected, and their hypothesized roles in the origin of life. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-01-01

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1 QH1549.13 blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  5. Dynamics, Surface Electrostatics and Phase Properties of Nanoscale Curved Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolivand, Amir

    Surface electrostatic potential of a lipid bilayer governs many vital functions of living cells. Several classes of proteins are known of exhibiting strong binding preferences to curved lipid bilayer surfaces. In this project we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of a recently introduced phospholipid (IMTSL-PTE) bearing a pH-sensitive nitroxide covalently attached to the lipid head group to measure the surface electrostatics of the lipid membrane and nanopore-confined lipid bilayers as a function of the bilayer curvature. The pKa of the ionizable group of this lipid-based spin probe is reporting on the bilayer surface electrostatics potential by changes in the EPR spectra. Specifically, both rotational dynamics and magnetic parameters of the nitroxide are affected by the probe protonation. Effect of curvature on the surface electrostatic potential and dynamics of lipid bilayer was studied for POPG and DMPG unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). It was found that the magnitude of the negative surface electrostatic potential increased upon decrease in the vesicle diameter for the bilayers in the fluid phase; however, no significant changes were observed for DMPG ULVs in a gel phase. We speculate that biologically relevant fluid bilayer phase allows for a larger variability in the lipid packing density in the lipid polar head group region than a more ordered gel phase and it is likely that the lipid flip-flop is responsible for pH equilibration of IMTSL-PTE. The kinetic EPR study of nitroxide reduction showed that the rate of flip-flop is in the order of 10-5 s-1. The flip-flop rate constant increases when vesicle size deceases. Oxygen permeability measured by X-ban EPR decreases in higher curved vesicles---an observation that is consistent with a tighter packing in smaller vesicles. Partitioning of a small nitroxide molecule TEMPO into ULVs was measured by X-band (9 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) EPR spectroscopy. The partitioning coefficient of this probe in the lipid

  6. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R. T.; Victor, Bruno L.; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide’s free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  7. Molecular Structure of Membrane Tethers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Marrink, Siewert J.; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2012-01-01

    Membrane tethers are nanotubes formed by a lipid bilayer. They play important functional roles in cell biology and provide an experimental window on lipid properties. Tethers have been studied extensively in experiments and described by theoretical models, but their molecular structure remains

  8. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  9. A portable lipid bilayer system for environmental sensing with a transmembrane protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Kawano

    Full Text Available This paper describes a portable measurement system for current signals of an ion channel that is composed of a planar lipid bilayer. A stable and reproducible lipid bilayer is formed in outdoor environments by using a droplet contact method with a micropipette. Using this system, we demonstrated that the single-channel recording of a transmembrane protein (alpha-hemolysin was achieved in the field at a high-altitude (∼3623 m. This system would be broadly applicable for obtaining environmental measurements using membrane proteins as a highly sensitive sensor.

  10. Localization and Orientation of Xanthophylls in a Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grudzinski, Wojciech; Nierzwicki, Lukasz; Welc, Renata; Reszczynska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafal; Czub, Jacek; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2017-08-29

    Xanthophylls (polar carotenoids) play diverse biological roles, among which are modulation of the physical properties of lipid membranes and protection of biomembranes against oxidative damage. Molecular mechanisms underlying these functions are intimately related to the localization and orientation of xanthophyll molecules in lipid membranes. In the present work, we address the problem of localization and orientation of two xanthophylls present in the photosynthetic apparatus of plants and in the retina of the human eye, zeaxanthin and lutein, in a single lipid bilayer membrane formed with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. By using fluorescence microscopic analysis and Raman imaging of giant unilamellar vesicles, as well as molecular dynamics simulations, we show that lutein and zeaxanthin adopt a very similar transmembrane orientation within a lipid membrane. In experimental and computational approach, the average tilt angle of xanthophylls relative to the membrane normal is independently found to be ~40 deg, and results from hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane thickness and the distance between the terminal hydroxyl groups of the xanthophylls. Consequences of such a localization and orientation for biological activity of xanthophylls are discussed.

  11. Loss-of-function of the ciliopathy protein Cc2d2a disorganizes the vesicle fusion machinery at the periciliary membrane and indirectly affects Rab8-trafficking in zebrafish photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda Naharros, Irene; Gesemann, Matthias; Mateos, José M; Barmettler, Gery; Forbes, Austin; Ziegler, Urs; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Bachmann-Gagescu, Ruxandra

    2017-12-01

    Ciliopathies are human disorders caused by dysfunction of primary cilia, ubiquitous organelles involved in transduction of environmental signals such as light sensation in photoreceptors. Concentration of signal detection proteins such as opsins in the ciliary membrane is achieved by RabGTPase-regulated polarized vesicle trafficking and by a selective barrier at the ciliary base, the transition zone (TZ). Dysfunction of the TZ protein CC2D2A causes Joubert/Meckel syndromes in humans and loss of ciliary protein localization in animal models, including opsins in retinal photoreceptors. The link between the TZ and upstream vesicle trafficking has been little explored to date. Moreover, the role of the small GTPase Rab8 in opsin-carrier vesicle (OCV) trafficking has been recently questioned in a mouse model. Using correlative light and electron microscopy and live imaging in zebrafish photoreceptors, we provide the first live characterization of Rab8-mediated trafficking in photoreceptors in vivo. Our results support a possibly redundant role for both Rab8a/b paralogs in OCV trafficking, based on co-localization of Rab8 and opsins in vesicular structures, and joint movement of Rab8-tagged particles with opsin. We further investigate the role of the TZ protein Cc2d2a in Rab8-mediated trafficking using cc2d2a zebrafish mutants and identify a requirement for Cc2d2a in the latest step of OCV trafficking, namely vesicle fusion. Progressive accumulation of opsin-containing vesicles in the apical portion of photoreceptors lacking Cc2d2a is caused by disorganization of the vesicle fusion machinery at the periciliary membrane with mislocalization and loss of the t-SNAREs SNAP25 and Syntaxin3 and of the exocyst component Exoc4. We further observe secondary defects on upstream Rab8-trafficking with cytoplasmic accumulation of Rab8. Taken together, our results support participation of Rab8 in OCV trafficking and identify a novel role for the TZ protein Cc2d2a in fusion of incoming

  12. Self-assembled tethered bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Ritz, Sandra; Naumann, Renate; Schiller, Stefan; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the strategies developed in our group for designing, constructing and structurally and functionally characterizing tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLM). We introduce this platform as a novel model membrane system that complements the existing ones, for example, Langmuir monolayers, vesicular liposomal dispersions and bimolecular ("black") lipid membranes. Moreover, it offers the additional advantage of allowing for studies of the influence of membrane structure and order on the function of integral proteins, for example, on how the composition and organization of lipids in a mixed membrane influence the ion translocation activity of integral channel proteins. The first strategy that we introduce concerns the preparation of tethered monolayers by the self-assembly of telechelics. Their molecular architecture with a headgroup, a spacer unit (the "tether") and the amphiphile that mimics the lipid molecule allows them to bind specifically to the solid support thus forming the proximal layer of the final architecture. After fusion of vesicles that could contain reconstituted proteins from a liposomal dispersion in contact to this monolayer the tethered bimolecular lipid membrane is obtained. This can then be characterized by a broad range of surface analytical techniques, including surface plasmon spectroscopies, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques, to mention a few. It is shown that this concept allows for the construction of tethered lipid bilayers with outstanding electrical properties including resistivities in excess of 10 MOmega cm2. A modified strategy uses the assembly of peptides as spacers that couple covalently via their engineered sulfhydryl or lipoic acid groups at the N-terminus to the employed gold substrate, while their C-terminus is being activated afterward for the coupling of, for example, dimyristoylphosphatidylethanol amine (DMPE) lipid molecules

  13. Conformational study of the protegrin-1 (PG-1 dimer interaction with lipid bilayers and its effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protegrin-1 (PG-1 is known as a potent antibiotic peptide; it prevents infection via an attack on the membrane surface of invading microorganisms. In the membrane, the peptide forms a pore/channel through oligomerization of multiple subunits. Recent experimental and computational studies have increasingly unraveled the molecular-level mechanisms underlying the interactions of the PG-1 β