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Sample records for bilateral cochlear implant

  1. Effect of pediatric bilateral cochlear implantation on language development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boons, Tinne; Brokx, Jan; Frijns, Johan; Peeraer, Louis; Philips, Birgit; Vermeulen,; Wouters,; Wieringen, van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine spoken language outcomes in children undergoing bilateral cochlear implantation compared with matched peers undergoing unilateral implantation. Design: Case-control, frequency-matched, retrospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Setting: Two Belgian and 3 Dutch cochlear im

  2. Localization ability with bimodal hearing aids and bilateral cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Bernhard U.; Baumann, Uwe; Fastl, Hugo

    2004-09-01

    After successful cochlear implantation in one ear, some patients continue to use a hearing aid at the contralateral ear. They report an improved reception of speech, especially in noise, as well as a better perception of music when the hearing aid and cochlear implant are used in this bimodal combination. Some individuals in this bimodal patient group also report the impression of an improved localization ability. Similar experiences are reported by the group of bilateral cochlear implantees. In this study, a survey of 11 bimodally and 4 bilaterally equipped cochlear implant users was carried out to assess localization ability. Individuals in the bimodal implant group were all provided with the same type of hearing aid in the opposite ear, and subjects in the bilateral implant group used cochlear implants of the same manufacturer on each ear. Subjects adjusted the spot of a computer-controlled laser-pointer to the perceived direction of sound incidence in the frontal horizontal plane by rotating a trackball. Two subjects of the bimodal group who had substantial residual hearing showed localization ability in the bimodal configuration, whereas using each single device only the subject with better residual hearing was able to discriminate the side of sound origin. Five other subjects with more pronounced hearing loss displayed an ability for side discrimination through the use of bimodal aids, while four of them were already able to discriminate the side with a single device. Of the bilateral cochlear implant group one subject showed localization accuracy close to that of normal hearing subjects. This subject was also able to discriminate the side of sound origin using the first implanted device alone. The other three bilaterally equipped subjects showed limited localization ability using both devices. Among them one subject demonstrated a side-discrimination ability using only the first implanted device.

  3. Effect of unilateral and simultaneous bilateral cochlear implantation on tinnitus : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zon, Alice; Smulders, Yvette E; Ramakers, Geerte G J; Stegeman, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To determine the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus perception in patients with severe bilateral postlingual sensorineural hearing loss and to demonstrate possible differences between unilateral and bilateral cochlear implantation. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study. MET

  4. Comparison of Bilateral and Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Adults : A Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, Yvette E; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Rinia, Albert B; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Stokroos, Robert J; Hendrice, Nadia; Free, Rolien H; Maat, Bert; Frijns, Johan H M; Briaire, Jeroen J; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Huinck, Wendy J; Smit, Adriana L; Topsakal, Vedat; Tange, Rinze A; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Importance: The cost of bilateral cochlear implantation (BCI) is usually not reimbursed by insurance companies because of a lack of well-designed studies reporting the benefits of a second cochlear implant. Objective: To determine the benefits of simultaneous BCI compared with unilateral cochlear im

  5. Binaural integration abilities in bilateral cochlear implant user

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chie Obuchi; Masae Shiroma; Sayaka Ogane; Kimitaka Kaga

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral Cochlear implants (CIs) improved speech intelligibility, speech perception in background noise, and sound localization in quiet and noisy situations. However, it is unclear whether these advantages essentially result in binaural integration of acoustic stimuli from each ear. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of binaural integration by bilateral CIs placement using binaural hearing tests and subjective auditory perceptual assessment. A 61-year-old bilateral CIs subject underwent the following four tests:the Japanese Hearing in Noise Test (HINT-J), the dichotic listening test (DLT), the Rapidly Alternating Speech Perception (RASP) test, and subjective auditory perceptual assessment. The HINT-J score was significantly higher for bilateral CIs than for a unilateral CI. However, DLT and the RASP test revealed contradictory results. Subjective auditory perceptual assessment revealed active and bright impressions for bilateral hearing, which were also noisy and strong compared with those for unilateral hearing. The results of this study revealed that bilateral CIs improved speech perception in background noise and an improved auditory impression, although the bilateral integration abilities were not improved. This was probably because the patient was required to combine information from the two ears into a single perception in DLT and the RASP test. More longitudinal data should be collected and analyzed in future studies to evaluate the long-term effects of bilateral CIs. Copyright © 2016, PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. Production and hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  6. A Longitudinal Study in Adults with Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants: Time Course for Individual Ear and Bilateral Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Ruth M.; Firszt, Jill B.; Holden, Laura K.; Strube, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the rate of progress in the 2nd implanted ear as it relates to the 1st implanted ear and to bilateral performance in adult sequential cochlear implant recipients. In addition, this study aimed to identify factors that contribute to patient outcomes. Method: The authors performed a prospective…

  7. Speech recognition by bilateral cochlear implant users in a cocktail-party setting

    OpenAIRE

    Loizou, Philipos C.; Hu, Yi; Litovsky, Ruth; Yu, Gongqiang; PETERS, Robert; Lake, Jennifer; Roland, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Unlike prior studies with bilateral cochlear implant users which considered only one interferer, the present study considered realistic listening situations wherein multiple interferers were present and in some cases originating from both hemifields. Speech reception thresholds were measured in bilateral users unilaterally and bilaterally in four different spatial configurations, with one and three interferers consisting of modulated noise or competing talkers. The data were analyzed in terms...

  8. Long-Term Predictors of Narrative Skill in Children with Early Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Kelsey E.; Wie, Ona Bø

    2015-01-01

    Narratives require the integration of many different linguistic skills and can be used as an ecologically valid measure of child language development. This study investigated the narrative skills of 18 six- to seven-year-old prelingually deaf children who received simultaneous bilateral cochlear implants (CI) between 5 and 18 months of age. No…

  9. The effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus in patients with bilateral hearing loss : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramakers, Geerte G J; van Zon, Alice; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present an overview of the effect of cochlear implantation on tinnitus in adults with bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Embase databases were searched for articles from database inception up to January 13, 2015. METHODS: A system

  10. Song Recognition by Young Children with Cochlear Implants: Comparison between Unilateral, Bilateral, and Bimodal Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartov, Tamar; Most, Tova

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine song identification by preschoolers with normal hearing (NH) versus preschoolers with cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Participants included 45 children ages 3;8-7;3 (years;months): 12 with NH and 33 with CIs, including 10 with unilateral CI, 14 with bilateral CIs, and 9 bimodal users (CI-HA) with unilateral CI and…

  11. Bilateral Versus Unilateral Cochlear Implants in Children: A Study of Spoken Language Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sarant, Julia; Harris, David; Bennet, Lisa; Bant, Sharyn

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although it has been established that bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) offer additional speech perception and localization benefits to many children with severe to profound hearing loss, whether these improved perceptual abilities facilitate significantly better language development has not yet been clearly established. The aims of this study were to compare language abilities of children having unilateral and bilateral CIs to quantify the rate of any improvement in language attr...

  12. Cochlear implantation in bilateral Ménière’s disease. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa MORENO-BRAVO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Ménière’s disease (MD is an episodic vestibular syndrome associated with sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. It may be unilateral or bilateral. Cochlear implantation (CI could be considered in MD patients if a profound hearing loss is showed in both ears. As alternative, it should be valued if profound hearing loss affects only one ear but the contralateral is affected too. When a MD patient suffers from vertigo spells or otolitic crisis of Tumarkin appart from the profound hearing loss, a simultaneous surgical labyrinthectomy and CI procedure could be considered. Description: Bilateral MD patient with right profound hearing loss and left fluctuating moderate hearing loss. No response was observed after oral and intratympanic steroids and intratympatic gentamicin in the treatment of right ear. A cochlear implantation and classic labyrinthectomy were performed at the same time in the right ear. No new vertigo spells or otolitic crisis of Tumarkin appeared after three months of follow up. Discussion: The objective in the treatment of MD is to get the control of vertigo spells and a hearing preservation. When conservative treatment is not useful, the gold standard is the labyrinthectomy (gentamicin or classic labyrinthectomy. The surgical labyrinthectomy could be accompanied by cochlear implantation to restore hearing in this ear. To perform both surgical labyrinthectomy and cochlear implantation simultaneously should be considered in order to reduce anesthesic ricks and cochlear histological changes after labyrinthectomy.

  13. The effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implants for severe-to-profound deafness in adults : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoonhoven, Jelmer; Sparreboom, Marloes; van Zanten, Bert G. A.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Dreschler, Wouter A.; Grolman, Wilko; Maat, Bert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of the clinical effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implantation compared with unilateral cochlear implantation or bimodal stimulation, in adults with severe-to-profound hearing loss. In 2007, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the U. K. conduct

  14. The Effectiveness of Bilateral Cochlear Implants for Severe-to-Profound Deafness in Children : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparreboom, Marloes; van Schoonhoven, Jelmer; van Zanten, Bert G. A.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Grolman, Wilko; Maat, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implantation compared with unilateral cochlear implantation alone or with a contralateral hearing aid (bimodal stimulation), in children with severe-to-profound hearing loss. Recently, the National Institute for Health and Clinica

  15. Speech-perception-in-noise and bilateral spatial abilities in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Oosthuizen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine speech-perception-in-noise (with speech and noise spatially distinct and coincident and bilateral spatial benefits of head-shadow effect, summation, squelch and spatial release of masking in adults with delayed sequential cochlear implants. Study design: A cross-sectional one group post-test-only exploratory design was employed. Eleven adults (mean age 47 years; range 21 – 69 years of the Pretoria Cochlear Implant Programme (PCIP in South Africa with a bilateral severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Prerecorded Everyday Speech Sentences of The Central Institute for the Deaf (CID were used to evaluate participants’ speech-in-noise perception at sentence level. An adaptive procedure was used to determine the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, in dB at which the participant’s speech reception threshold (SRT was achieved. Specific calculations were used to estimate bilateral spatial benefit effects. Results: A minimal bilateral benefit for speech-in-noise perception was observed with noise directed to the first implant (CI 1 (1.69 dB and in the speech and noise spatial listening condition (0.78 dB, but was not statistically significant. The head-shadow effect at 180° was the most robust bilateral spatial benefit. An improvement in speech perception in spatially distinct speech and noise indicates the contribution of the second implant (CI 2 is greater than that of the first implant (CI 1 for bilateral spatial benefit. Conclusion: Bilateral benefit for delayed sequentially implanted adults is less than previously reported for simultaneous and sequentially implanted adults. Delayed sequential implantation benefit seems to relate to the availability of the ear with the most favourable SNR.

  16. Different Perception of Musical Stimuli in Patients with Monolateral and Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Giulio Maglione

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to measure the perceived pleasantness during the observation of a musical video clip in a group of cochlear implanted adult patients when compared to a group of normal hearing subjects. This comparison was performed by using the imbalance of the EEG power spectra in alpha band over frontal areas as a metric for the perceived pleasantness. Subjects were asked to watch a musical video clip in three different experimental conditions: with the original audio included (Norm, with a distorted version of the audio (Dist, and without the audio (Mute. The frontal EEG imbalance between the estimated power spectra for the left and right prefrontal areas has been calculated to investigate the differences among the two populations. Results suggested that the perceived pleasantness of the musical video clip in the normal hearing population and in the bilateral cochlear implanted populations has similar range of variation across the different stimulations (Norm, Dist, and Mute, when compared to the range of variation of video clip’s pleasantness for the monolateral cochlear implanted population. A similarity exists in the trends of the perceived pleasantness across the different experimental conditions in the mono- and bilaterally cochlear implanted patients.

  17. Binaural Unmasking of Multi-channel Stimuli in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Van Deun, Lieselot; Van Wieringen, Astrid; Francart, Tom; Büchner, Andreas; Lenarz, Thomas; Wouters, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Previous work suggests that bilateral cochlear implant users are sensitive to interaural cues if experimental speech processors are used to preserve accurate interaural information in the electrical stimulation pattern. Binaural unmasking occurs in adults and children when an interaural delay is applied to the envelope of a high-rate pulse train. Nevertheless, for speech perception, binaural unmasking benefits have not been demonstrated consistently, even with coordinated stimulation at both ...

  18. Multi-microphone adaptive noise reduction strategies for coordinated stimulation in bilateral cochlear implant devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (BI-CI) recipients achieve high word recognition scores in quiet listening conditions. Still, there is a substantial drop in speech recognition performance when there is reverberation and more than one interferers. BI-CI users utilize information from just two directional microphones placed on opposite sides of the head in a so-called independent stimulation mode. To enhance the ability of BI-CI users to communicate in noise, the use of two computationally inexpensi...

  19. Audio-Visual Speech Intelligibility Benefits with Bilateral Cochlear Implants when Talker Location Varies

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoesel, Richard J. M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key benefits of using cochlear implants (CIs) in both ears rather than just one is improved localization. It is likely that in complex listening scenes, improved localization allows bilateral CI users to orient toward talkers to improve signal-to-noise ratios and gain access to visual cues, but to date, that conjecture has not been tested. To obtain an objective measure of that benefit, seven bilateral CI users were assessed for both auditory-only and audio-visual speech intelligib...

  20. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this topic can be found in our Audiology Information Series [PDF]. How does a cochlear implant ... speech-language pathologists; speech, language, and hearing scientists; audiology and speech-language pathology support personnel; and students. ...

  1. Environment-adaptive speech enhancement for bilateral cochlear implants using a single processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher S; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser; Gopalakrishna, Vanishree; Loizou, Philipos C

    2013-05-01

    A computationally efficient speech enhancement pipeline in noisy environments based on a single-processor implementation is developed for utilization in bilateral cochlear implant systems. A two-channel joint objective function is defined and a closed form solution is obtained based on the weighted-Euclidean distortion measure. The computational efficiency and no need for synchronization aspects of this pipeline make it a suitable solution for real-time deployment. A speech quality measure is used to show its effectiveness in six different noisy environments as compared to a similar one-channel enhancement pipeline when using two separate processors or when using independent sequential processing.

  2. Binaural Fusion and Listening Effort in Children Who Use Bilateral Cochlear Implants: A Psychoacoustic and Pupillometric Study

    OpenAIRE

    Steel, Morrison M.; Papsin, Blake C.; Karen A Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants aim to provide hearing to both ears for children who are deaf and promote binaural/spatial hearing. Benefits are limited by mismatched devices and unilaterally-driven development which could compromise the normal integration of left and right ear input. We thus asked whether children hear a fused image (ie. 1 vs 2 sounds) from their bilateral implants and if this "binaural fusion" reduces listening effort. Binaural fusion was assessed by asking 25 deaf children wit...

  3. Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an optimal period to develop speech and language skills. Research has shown that when these children receive a cochlear implant followed by intensive therapy before they are 18 months ... age develop language skills at a rate comparable to children with normal ...

  4. Cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  5. Binaural fusion and listening effort in children who use bilateral cochlear implants: a psychoacoustic and pupillometric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison M Steel

    Full Text Available Bilateral cochlear implants aim to provide hearing to both ears for children who are deaf and promote binaural/spatial hearing. Benefits are limited by mismatched devices and unilaterally-driven development which could compromise the normal integration of left and right ear input. We thus asked whether children hear a fused image (ie. 1 vs 2 sounds from their bilateral implants and if this "binaural fusion" reduces listening effort. Binaural fusion was assessed by asking 25 deaf children with cochlear implants and 24 peers with normal hearing whether they heard one or two sounds when listening to bilaterally presented acoustic click-trains/electric pulses (250 Hz trains of 36 ms presented at 1 Hz. Reaction times and pupillary changes were recorded simultaneously to measure listening effort. Bilaterally implanted children heard one image of bilateral input less frequently than normal hearing peers, particularly when intensity levels on each side were balanced. Binaural fusion declined as brainstem asymmetries increased and age at implantation decreased. Children implanted later had access to acoustic input prior to implantation due to progressive deterioration of hearing. Increases in both pupil diameter and reaction time occurred as perception of binaural fusion decreased. Results indicate that, without binaural level cues, children have difficulty fusing input from their bilateral implants to perceive one sound which costs them increased listening effort. Brainstem asymmetries exacerbate this issue. By contrast, later implantation, reflecting longer access to bilateral acoustic hearing, may have supported development of auditory pathways underlying binaural fusion. Improved integration of bilateral cochlear implant signals for children is required to improve their binaural hearing.

  6. Academic Outcomes for School-Aged Children with Severe-Profound Hearing Loss and Early Unilateral and Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarant, Julia Z.; Harris, David C.; Bennet, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to (a) determine whether academic outcomes for children who received early cochlear implants (CIs) are age appropriate, (b) determine whether bilateral CI use significantly improves academic outcomes, and (c) identify other factors that are predictive of these outcomes. Method: Forty-four 8-year-old children with…

  7. Cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Despotović, Adrijana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to analyze the performance of the child with cochlear implant (CI) at language, math and movement activities. For the purpose of research exercises from all three above mentioned activities are prepared. Results of the exercises constitute the ground for the comparison of a child with CI and children with no hearing disability. Testing language skills was performed with exercises that included understanding, diction and identifying syllables. Mathematic skills...

  8. Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this text, the authors recall the main principles and data ruling cochlear implants. Then, a first circle of technical equipment for assistance is presented. This circle includes: device setting (DS), Electrically evoked Auditory Brainstem Responses (EABR), Neural Response Telemetry (NRT), Stapedial Reflex (SR) and Electrodogram Acquisition (EA). This first cycle becomes more and more important as children are implanted younger and younger; the amount of data available with this assistance makes necessary the use of models (implicit or explicit) to handle this information. Consequently, this field is more open than ever.

  9. Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Karimi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available People with profound hearing loss are not able to use some kinds of conventional amplifiers due to the nature of their loss . In these people, hearing sense is stimulated only when the auditory nerve is activated via electrical stimulation. This stimulation is possible through cochlear implant. In fact, for the deaf people who have good mental health and can not use surgical and medical treatment and also can not benefit from air and bone conduction hearing aids, this device is used if they have normal central auditory system. The basic parts of the device included: Microphone, speech processor, transmitter, stimulator and receiver, and electrode array.

  10. Spatial hearing benefits demonstrated with presentation of acoustic temporal fine structure cues in bilateral cochlear implant listenersa)

    OpenAIRE

    Churchill, Tyler H.; Kan, Alan; Goupell, Matthew J.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2014-01-01

    Most contemporary cochlear implant (CI) processing strategies discard acoustic temporal fine structure (TFS) information, and this may contribute to the observed deficits in bilateral CI listeners' ability to localize sounds when compared to normal hearing listeners. Additionally, for best speech envelope representation, most contemporary speech processing strategies use high-rate carriers (≥900 Hz) that exceed the limit for interaural pulse timing to provide useful binaural information. Many...

  11. Studies on Bilateral Cochlear Implants at the University of Wisconsin’s Binaural Hearing and Speech Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Litovsky, Ruth Y.; Goupell, Matthew J.; Godar, Shelly; Grieco-Calub, Tina; Jones, Gary L.; Garadat, Soha N.; Agrawal, Smita; Kan, Alan; Todd, Ann; Hess, Christi; Misurelli, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This report highlights research projects relevant to binaural and spatial hearing in adults and children. In the past decade we have made progress in understanding the impact of bilateral cochlear implants (BiCIs) on performance in adults and children. However, BiCI users typically do not perform as well as normal hearing (NH) listeners. In this paper we describe the benefits from BiCIs compared with a single CI, focusing on measures of spatial hearing and speech understanding in noise. We hi...

  12. Experiences with bimodal hearing and bilateral cochlear implantation in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Schedlbauer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the geriatric population being the fastest growing segment of our society the number of elderly people with different levels of hearing impairments is increasing. According to the German Society of Hearing Impaired there are concerned 37% of the 60-69-year-old and 54% of the over 70-year-old. Furthermore the needs of the elderly are changing with augmented social activity and agility compared to former times: 80 is the new 70. After initial concerns about poor audiologic performance and added peri- and postoperative risks because of comorbidities, cochlear implantation is becoming more and more the method of choice also for postlingually deaf people of higher age. With the demographic shift there can be observed a trend reversal: the proportion of implantees is sliding from the young to the senior and duration of deafness at the time of implantation is declining (Battmer 2010. It is therefore necessary to investigate the impact of cochlear implantation on audiologic performance and quality of life in this growing age group.

  13. Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin ... the Use of Cochlear Implants What are the Benefits of Cochlear Implants? For people with implants: Hearing ...

  14. MUSIC AND COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao Yitao; Xu Li

    2013-01-01

    Currently, most people with modern multichannel cochlear implant systems can understand speech in qui-et environment very well. However, studies in recent decades reported a lack of satisfaction in music percep-tion with cochlear implants. This article reviews the literature on music ability of cochlear implant users by presenting a systematic outline of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients with regard to their music perception as well as production. The review also evaluates the similarities and differences be-tween electric hearing and acoustic hearing regarding music perception. We summarize the research results in terms of the individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, pitch, and timbre). Finally, we briefly intro-duce the vocal singing of prelingually-deafened children with cochlear implants as evaluated by acoustic measures.

  15. Experience Changes How Emotion in Music Is Judged: Evidence from Children Listening with Bilateral Cochlear Implants, Bimodal Devices, and Normal Hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Giannantonio

    Full Text Available Children using unilateral cochlear implants abnormally rely on tempo rather than mode cues to distinguish whether a musical piece is happy or sad. This led us to question how this judgment is affected by the type of experience in early auditory development. We hypothesized that judgments of the emotional content of music would vary by the type and duration of access to sound in early life due to deafness, altered perception of musical cues through new ways of using auditory prostheses bilaterally, and formal music training during childhood. Seventy-five participants completed the Montreal Emotion Identification Test. Thirty-three had normal hearing (aged 6.6 to 40.0 years and 42 children had hearing loss and used bilateral auditory prostheses (31 bilaterally implanted and 11 unilaterally implanted with contralateral hearing aid use. Reaction time and accuracy were measured. Accurate judgment of emotion in music was achieved across ages and musical experience. Musical training accentuated the reliance on mode cues which developed with age in the normal hearing group. Degrading pitch cues through cochlear implant-mediated hearing induced greater reliance on tempo cues, but mode cues grew in salience when at least partial acoustic information was available through some residual hearing in the contralateral ear. Finally, when pitch cues were experimentally distorted to represent cochlear implant hearing, individuals with normal hearing (including those with musical training switched to an abnormal dependence on tempo cues. The data indicate that, in a western culture, access to acoustic hearing in early life promotes a preference for mode rather than tempo cues which is enhanced by musical training. The challenge to these preferred strategies during cochlear implant hearing (simulated and real, regardless of musical training, suggests that access to pitch cues for children with hearing loss must be improved by preservation of residual hearing and

  16. Experience Changes How Emotion in Music Is Judged: Evidence from Children Listening with Bilateral Cochlear Implants, Bimodal Devices, and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannantonio, Sara; Polonenko, Melissa J; Papsin, Blake C; Paludetti, Gaetano; Gordon, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Children using unilateral cochlear implants abnormally rely on tempo rather than mode cues to distinguish whether a musical piece is happy or sad. This led us to question how this judgment is affected by the type of experience in early auditory development. We hypothesized that judgments of the emotional content of music would vary by the type and duration of access to sound in early life due to deafness, altered perception of musical cues through new ways of using auditory prostheses bilaterally, and formal music training during childhood. Seventy-five participants completed the Montreal Emotion Identification Test. Thirty-three had normal hearing (aged 6.6 to 40.0 years) and 42 children had hearing loss and used bilateral auditory prostheses (31 bilaterally implanted and 11 unilaterally implanted with contralateral hearing aid use). Reaction time and accuracy were measured. Accurate judgment of emotion in music was achieved across ages and musical experience. Musical training accentuated the reliance on mode cues which developed with age in the normal hearing group. Degrading pitch cues through cochlear implant-mediated hearing induced greater reliance on tempo cues, but mode cues grew in salience when at least partial acoustic information was available through some residual hearing in the contralateral ear. Finally, when pitch cues were experimentally distorted to represent cochlear implant hearing, individuals with normal hearing (including those with musical training) switched to an abnormal dependence on tempo cues. The data indicate that, in a western culture, access to acoustic hearing in early life promotes a preference for mode rather than tempo cues which is enhanced by musical training. The challenge to these preferred strategies during cochlear implant hearing (simulated and real), regardless of musical training, suggests that access to pitch cues for children with hearing loss must be improved by preservation of residual hearing and improvements in

  17. Experience Changes How Emotion in Music Is Judged: Evidence from Children Listening with Bilateral Cochlear Implants, Bimodal Devices, and Normal Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannantonio, Sara; Polonenko, Melissa J; Papsin, Blake C; Paludetti, Gaetano; Gordon, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    Children using unilateral cochlear implants abnormally rely on tempo rather than mode cues to distinguish whether a musical piece is happy or sad. This led us to question how this judgment is affected by the type of experience in early auditory development. We hypothesized that judgments of the emotional content of music would vary by the type and duration of access to sound in early life due to deafness, altered perception of musical cues through new ways of using auditory prostheses bilaterally, and formal music training during childhood. Seventy-five participants completed the Montreal Emotion Identification Test. Thirty-three had normal hearing (aged 6.6 to 40.0 years) and 42 children had hearing loss and used bilateral auditory prostheses (31 bilaterally implanted and 11 unilaterally implanted with contralateral hearing aid use). Reaction time and accuracy were measured. Accurate judgment of emotion in music was achieved across ages and musical experience. Musical training accentuated the reliance on mode cues which developed with age in the normal hearing group. Degrading pitch cues through cochlear implant-mediated hearing induced greater reliance on tempo cues, but mode cues grew in salience when at least partial acoustic information was available through some residual hearing in the contralateral ear. Finally, when pitch cues were experimentally distorted to represent cochlear implant hearing, individuals with normal hearing (including those with musical training) switched to an abnormal dependence on tempo cues. The data indicate that, in a western culture, access to acoustic hearing in early life promotes a preference for mode rather than tempo cues which is enhanced by musical training. The challenge to these preferred strategies during cochlear implant hearing (simulated and real), regardless of musical training, suggests that access to pitch cues for children with hearing loss must be improved by preservation of residual hearing and improvements in

  18. Pediatric cochlear implantation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Bacciu, Andrea; Guida, Maurizio; Marra, Francesca; Bertoldi, Barbara; Bacciu, Salvatore; Pasanisi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Deafness in pediatric age can adversely impact language acquisition as well as educational and social-emotional development. Once diagnosed, hearing loss should be rehabilitated early; the goal is to provide the child with maximum access to the acoustic features of speech within a listening range that is safe and comfortable. In presence of severe to profound deafness, benefit from auditory amplification cannot be enough to allow a proper language development. Cochlear implants are partially implantable electronic devices designed to provide profoundly deafened patients with hearing sensitivity within the speech range. Since their introduction more than 30 years ago, cochlear implants have improved their performance to the extent that are now considered to be standard of care in the treatment of children with severe to profound deafness. Over the years patient candidacy has been expanded and the criteria for implantation continue to evolve within the paediatric population. The minimum age for implantation has progressively reduced; it has been recognized that implantation at a very early age (12-18 months) provides children with the best outcomes, taking advantage of sensitive periods of auditory development. Bilateral implantation offers a better sound localization, as well as a superior ability to understand speech in noisy environments than unilateral cochlear implant. Deafened children with special clinical situations, including inner ear malformation, cochlear nerve deficiency, cochlear ossification, and additional disabilities can be successfully treated, even thogh they require an individualized candidacy evaluation and a complex post-implantation rehabilitation. Benefits from cochlear implantation include not only better abilities to hear and to develop speech and language skills, but also improved academic attainment, improved quality of life, and better employment status. Cochlear implants permit deaf people to hear, but they have a long way to go before

  19. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION: MY EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is a small, surgically implanted complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This type of hearing loss, typically involves damage to hair cells in the cochlea, as a result sound cannot reach the auditory nerve which usually receives information from hair cells. A cochlear implant skips the damaged hair cells and to stimulate the auditory nerve directly. An implant does not restore normal hearing, instead it can give a deaf person a useful representation of sounds in the environment and help him or her to understand speech. I am here presenting this article in relation to the indications, intraoperative and postoperative complications of cochlear implantation in our institute since January 2013. Children who receive implants at earlier age, outperform their peers who are implanted at a later age. This is reflected in all the areas of speech and language development.

  20. Cochlear Implant in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Samadi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the result of a great combination and collaboration of engineering and medicine. It is mainly because it has the most conflict with the human nervous system among all prosthesis. Cochlear implant helps a child with profound hearing loss to understand and articulate speech and let an adult person with hearing loss communicate with people by phone. Although these wonderful results could not be seen in all patients, will let us know about the great scientific findings.

  1. Simultaneous Assessment of Speech Identification and Spatial Discrimination: A Potential Testing Approach for Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizley, Jennifer K; Elliott, Naomi; Wood, Katherine C; Vickers, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    With increasing numbers of children and adults receiving bilateral cochlear implants, there is an urgent need for assessment tools that enable testing of binaural hearing abilities. Current test batteries are either limited in scope or are of an impractical duration for routine testing. Here, we report a behavioral test that enables combined testing of speech identification and spatial discrimination in noise. In this task, multitalker babble was presented from all speakers, and pairs of speech tokens were sequentially presented from two adjacent speakers. Listeners were required to identify both words from a closed set of four possibilities and to determine whether the second token was presented to the left or right of the first. In Experiment 1, normal-hearing adult listeners were tested at 15° intervals throughout the frontal hemifield. Listeners showed highest spatial discrimination performance in and around the frontal midline, with a decline at more eccentric locations. In contrast, speech identification abilities were least accurate near the midline and showed an improvement in performance at more lateral locations. In Experiment 2, normal-hearing listeners were assessed using a restricted range of speaker locations designed to match those found in clinical testing environments. Here, speakers were separated by 15° around the midline and 30° at more lateral locations. This resulted in a similar pattern of behavioral results as in Experiment 1. We conclude, this test offers the potential to assess both spatial discrimination and the ability to use spatial information for unmasking in clinical populations. PMID:26721927

  2. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  3. Benefits and detriments of unilateral cochlear implant use on bilateral auditory development in children who are deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Gordon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We have explored both the benefits and detriments of providing electrical input through a cochlear implant in one ear to the auditory system of young children. A cochlear implant delivers electrical pulses to stimulate the auditory nerve, providing children who are deaf with access to sound. The goals of implantation are to restrict reorganization of the deprived immature auditory brain and promote development of hearing and spoken language. It is clear that limiting the duration of deprivation is a key factor. Additional considerations are the onset, etiology, and use of residual hearing as each of these can have unique effects on auditory development in the pre-implant period. New findings show that many children receiving unilateral cochlear implants are developing mature-like brainstem and thalamo-cortical responses to sound with long term use despite these sources of variability; however, there remain considerable abnormalities in cortical function. The most apparent, determined by implanting the other ear and measuring responses to acute stimulation, is a loss of normal cortical response from the deprived ear. Recent data reveal that this can be avoided in children by early implantation of both ears simultaneously or with limited delay. We conclude that auditory development requires input early in development and from both ears.

  4. Binaural advantages in users of bimodal and bilateral cochlear implant devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Pak, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates to what extent users of bilateral and bimodal fittings should expect to benefit from all three different binaural advantages found to be present in normal-hearing listeners. Head-shadow and binaural squelch are advantages occurring under spatially separated speech and noise, while summation emerges when speech and noise coincide in space. For 14 bilateral or bimodal listeners, speech reception thresholds in the presence of four-talker babble were measured in sound-fiel...

  5. Effects of Delayed Second Cochlear Implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Rui-ming; WU Xi-hong; JANG Zi-gang; JING Yuan-yuan; LIN Yun-juan; YU Li-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective Since Helms' successful bilateral cochlear implantation with good results in 1996, there have been increasing number of reports on bilateral cochlear implantation. Most second device have been implantated within one year after the first. Considering effects of long time auditory deprivation, it is not clear whether a delayed second cochlear implant serves to add additional benefits and how it may interact with central nervous system plasticity. Methods Three cases who received delayed second cochlear implants at People's Hospital of Peking University from 2002 to 2005 were reviewed. The interval between the first and second implants was longer than 2 years in all three patients. Sound perception, and unilateral/bilateral speech discrimination in quiet and noise were evaluated. In addition, GAP detection test was conducted in one patient. Results In one case,having both implants on provided improved performance compared to using only one implant both in quiet and noise. Presumably due to visual interference from lip-reading or short interval between second implant and testing,one patient showed no improvement from using the second implant either in quiet or noise, while the last case demonstrated additional benefits from the second implant only in quiet. In all three patients, performance in recognizing the four tones in Mandarin was superior over word recognition. Conclusions Considerable plasticity in the cerebral auditory center is preserved, despite long acoustic deprivation in some children who have received unilateral cochlear implant. Delayed second implants can result in significant improvements in some of these children. Visual interference from lip-reading may be an obstacle during retraining. The better recognition of tones in the Mandarin language may represent a different sound discrimination mechanism in the auditory system,although it may also be related to the signal processing mechanisms of the implant used (MED-EL COMBI 40+).

  6. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2 - 46 years and 2 - 18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear.

  7. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    2007-01-01

      Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  8. Efter cochlear implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders

    Dit barn har netop fået et cochlear implant. Hvad nu? Skal barnet fokusere udelukkende på at lære talt sprog, eller skal det også lære/fortsætte med tegnsprog eller støttetegn? Det er et vanskeligt spørgsmål, og før valget foretages, er det vigtigt at vurdere hvilke konsekvenser valget har, dels...... for den sproglige udvikling isoleret set, og dels for barnets udvikling ud fra en helhedsbetragtning. Dette indlæg fokuserer på, hvilke forventninger man kan have til cochlear implant-brugeres sproglige udvikling med talt sprog alene, hhv. med to sprog (tale og tegn). Disse forventninger er baseret på...

  9. Cochlear implants in genetic deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuezhong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic defects are one of the most important etiologies of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss and play an important role in determining cochlear implantation outcomes. While the pathogenic mutation types of a number of deafness genes have been cloned, the pathogenesis mechanisms and their relationship to the outcomes of cochlear implantation remain a hot research area. The auditory performance is considered to be affected by the etiology of hearing loss and the number of surviving spiral ganglion cells, as well as others. Current research advances in cochlear implantation for hereditary deafness, especially the relationship among clinic-types, genotypes and outcomes of cochlear implantation, will be discussed in this review.

  10. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding. PMID:11766315

  11. [Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyfter, W; Colletti, V; Pruszewicz, A; Kopeć, T; Szymiec, E; Kawczyński, M; Karlik, M

    2001-01-01

    The inner part of cochlear implant is inserted into inner ear during surgery through mastoid and middle ear. It is a classical method, used in the majority cochlear centers in the world. This is not a suitable method in case of chronic otitis media and middle ear malformation. In these cases Colletti proposed the middle fossa approach and cochlear implant insertion omitting middle ear structures. In patient with bilateral chronic otitis media underwent a few ears operations without obtaining dry postoperative cavity. Cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach was performed in this patient. The bone fenster was cut, temporal lobe was bent and petrosus pyramid upper surface was exposed. When the superficial petrosal greater nerve, facial nerve and arcuate eminence were localised, the cochlear was open in the basal turn and electrode were inserted. The patient achieves good results in the postoperative speech rehabilitation. It confirmed Colletti tesis that deeper electrode insertion in the cochlear implantation through the middle fossa approach enable use of low and middle frequencies, which are very important in speech understanding.

  12. Intracochlear misdirected implantation of a cochlear implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tange, R A; Grolman, W; Maat, A

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a rare complication of an intracochlear misdirection of the electrode of a cochlear implant in a 55-year-old male. The patient received a cochlear implant using the mastoid-saving surgical approach. Intraoperative measurements showed impedance and NRT reactions suggesting a reas

  13. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear implant (CI represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development.

  14. COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION PREVALENCE IN ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Starokha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current paper describes an experience of cochlear implantation in elderly. Cochlear implantation has become a widely accepted intervention in the treatment of individuals with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss. Cochlear implants are now accepted as a standard of care to optimize hearing and subsequent speech development in children and adults with deafness. But cochlear implantation affects not only hearing abilities, speech perception and speech production; it also has an outstanding impact on the social life, activities and self-esteem of each patient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cochlear implantation efficacy in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. There were 5 patients under our observation. Surgery was performed according to traditional posterior tympanotomy and cochleostomy for cochlear implant electrode insertion for all observed patients. The study was conducted in two stages: before speech processor’s activation and 3 months later. Pure tone free field audiometry was performed to each patient to assess the efficiency of cochlear implantation in dynamics. The aim of the study was also to evaluate quality of life in elderly with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss after unilateral cochlear implantation. Each patient underwent questioning with 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. SF-36 is a set of generic, coherent, and easily administered quality-of-life measures. The SF-36 consists of eight scaled scores, which are the weighted sums of the questions in their section. Each scale is directly transformed into a 0-100 scale on the assumption that each question carries equal weight. The eight sections are: physical functioning; physical role functioning; emotional role functioning; vitality; emotional well-being; social role functioning; bodily pain; general health perceptions. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in elderly consistently improved quality of life

  15. New Criteria of Indication and Selection of Patients to Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L. L. Sampaio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous changes continue to occur in cochlear implant candidacy. In general, these have been accompanied by concomitant and satisfactory changes in surgical techniques. Together, this has advanced the utility and safety of cochlear implantation. Most devices are now approved for use in patients with severe to profound unilateral hearing loss rather then the prior requirement of a bilateral profound loss. Furthermore, studies have begun utilizing short electrode arrays for shallow insertion in patients with considerable low-frequency residual hearing. This technique will allow the recipient to continue to use acoustically amplified hearing for the low frequencies simultaneously with a cochlear implant for the high frequencies. The advances in design of, and indications for, cochlear implants have been matched by improvements in surgical techniques and decrease in complications. The resulting improvements in safety and efficacy have further encouraged the use of these devices. This paper will review the new concepts in the candidacy of cochlear implant. Medline data base was used to search articles dealing with the following topics: cochlear implant in younger children, cochlear implant and hearing preservation, cochlear implant for unilateral deafness and tinnitus, genetic hearing loss and cochlear implant, bilateral cochlear implant, neuropathy and cochlear implant and neural plasticity, and the selection of patients for cochlear implant.

  16. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos; Samuel, Paola Angélica; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valeria Schimdt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July...

  17. Developmental Neuroplasticity After Cochlear Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kral, Andrej; Sharma, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system—resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receiv...

  18. Influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiulan; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Zhaobing

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion Vestibular function in patients can be damaged following cochlear implantation. Therefore, assessing the pre-operative vestibular status, carefully choosing the side of implantation, and preserving function by using minimally invasive surgical techniques are important. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cochlear implantation on vestibular function in patients with severe and profound sensorineural hearing loss, and to analyze a possible correlation between the changes in vestibular testing and post-operative vestibular symptoms. Methods Thirty-four patients were evaluated for vestibular function using the cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP, respectively), and 29 patients underwent caloric tests pre-operatively and 4 weeks post-operatively. Results Before surgery, the cVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 22 patients, unilaterally in eight patients, and absent bilaterally in four patients. The oVEMPs were recorded bilaterally in 19 patients, unilaterally in six patients, and absent bilaterally in nine patients. After implantation, the cVEMPs were absent in 10 patients and the oVEMPs were absent in seven patients on the implanted side. Caloric tests demonstrated canal paresis in 17 patients, and normal responses were recorded in 12 of the 29 patients pre-operatively. There was a significant decrease post-implantation in the ear implanted, with the exception of two patients. Two patients presented with vertigo and another two patients reported slight unsteadiness post-operatively, but all symptoms resolved within 7 days. The impaired vestibular function did not correlate with vestibular symptoms, age, or gender. Function on the contralateral side remained unaffected. PMID:27008103

  19. Developmental neuroplasticity after cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Andrej; Sharma, Anu

    2012-02-01

    Cortical development is dependent on stimulus-driven learning. The absence of sensory input from birth, as occurs in congenital deafness, affects normal growth and connectivity needed to form a functional sensory system, resulting in deficits in oral language learning. Cochlear implants bypass cochlear damage by directly stimulating the auditory nerve and brain, making it possible to avoid many of the deleterious effects of sensory deprivation. Congenitally deaf animals and children who receive implants provide a platform to examine the characteristics of cortical plasticity in the auditory system. In this review, we discuss the existence of time limits for, and mechanistic constraints on, sensitive periods for cochlear implantation and describe the effects of multimodal and cognitive reorganization that result from long-term auditory deprivation. PMID:22104561

  20. Enduring Advantages of Early Cochlear Implantation for Spoken Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Anne E.; Nicholas, Johanna G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, the authors sought to determine whether the precise age of implantation (AOI) remains an important predictor of spoken language outcomes in later childhood for those who received a cochlear implant (CI) between 12 and 38 months of age. Relative advantages of receiving a bilateral CI after age 4.5 years, better…

  1. Cochlear implantation: a biomechanical prosthesis for hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Robert; Hunter, Jacob B; Sweeney, Alex D; Bennett, Marc L

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a medical prosthesis used to treat sensorineural deafness, and one of the greatest advances in modern medicine. The following article is an overview of cochlear implant technology. The history of cochlear implantation and the development of modern implant technology will be discussed, as well as current surgical techniques. Research regarding expansion of candidacy, hearing preservation cochlear implantation, and implantation for unilateral deafness are described. Lastly, innovative technology is discussed, including the hybrid cochlear implant and the totally implantable cochlear implant.

  2. Dealing with moral dilemma raised by adaptive preferences in health technology assessment: the example of growth hormones and bilateral cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébaut, Clémence

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this article is to assess dilemma raised by adaptive preferences in the economic evaluation of growth hormone (GH) treatment for non-GH-deficient short children, and of bilateral cochlear implants for deaf children. Early implementation of both technologies and their irreversible consequences increase the potential conflicts faced by the assessors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) states (on behalf of patients) who could be interviewed (parents, individuals with an experience of the same disability, or representative samples of the general public). Indeed, assessors' preferences may be influenced by their own situation and they are likely to vary according to age and the experience of disability. Three options are put forward which aim to resolve these moral dilemma and help economists make methodological choices that cannot be avoided in order to carry out this assessment. They are grounded on three specific egalitarian theories of social justice. The main contribution of this article is to show that a dialogue between ethics and economics, prior to an assessment, makes it possible to redefine the choice of effectiveness criteria (subjective well-being, capabilities or social outcomes), the choice of perspective (patients or the able-bodied), as well as the scope of assessment (medical and non-medical care). PMID:24355476

  3. Cortical plasticity after cochlear implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B; Gjedde, A; Wallentin, M;

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen...

  4. Reading skills after cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Agnes Maria

    2007-01-01

    It has frequently been found that profoundly deaf children with conventional hearing aids have difficulties with the comprehension of written text. Cochlear Implants (CIs) were expected to enhance the reading comprehension of these profoundly deaf children because they provide auditory access to spo

  5. Cochlear Implants and Brain Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    Cochlear implants have been implanted in over 110,000 deaf adults and children worldwide and provide these patients with important auditory cues necessary for auditory awareness and speech perception via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (AN). In 1942 Woolsey & Walzl presented the first report of cortical responses to localised electrical stimulation of different sectors of the AN in normal hearing cats, and established the cochleotopic organization of the projections to primary au...

  6. Significant regional differences in Denmark in outcome after cochlear implants in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Busch, Georg Walter; Sandahl, Minna;

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to study regional differences in outcome for a paediatric cochlear implant (CI) population after the introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) and bilateral implantation in Denmark.......The objectives of the present study were to study regional differences in outcome for a paediatric cochlear implant (CI) population after the introduction of universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) and bilateral implantation in Denmark....

  7. Surgical Complications of Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basir Hashemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implantation is a method used for the treatment ofpatients with profound hearing loss. This procedure may theaccompanied by some major or minor complications. Weevaluated the surgical complications of cochlear implantationin Fars province (south of Iran. A total of 150 patients withcochlear implantation were enrolled in the present study. Mostof the patients were pre-lingual children and most of our deviceswere nucleus prosthesis. We had three device failuresand four major complications, including one misplaced electrode,one case of meningitis, one case of foreign body reactionto suture and one case with extensive hematoma. Thesecomplications were managed successfully by surgical interventionor re-implantation. Facial nerve damage or woundbreakdown was not seen. Minor complications including smallhematoma, edema, stitch infection and dizziness were found in15 cases, which were managed medically. In our center, therate of minor complications was comparable to other centersin the world. But the rate of major surgical complications waslower than other centers.

  8. The development of the Nucleus Freedom Cochlear implant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, James F; Busby, Peter A; Gibson, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus Freedom, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour Advance electrode, the modular Freedom processor, the available speech coding strategies, the input processing options of Smart Sound to improve the signal before coding as electrical signals, and the programming software. Preliminary results from multicenter studies with the Freedom system are reported, demonstrating better levels of performance compared with the previous systems. The final section presents the most recent implant reliability data, with the early findings at 18 months showing improved reliability of the Freedom implant compared with the earlier Nucleus 3 System. Also reported are some of the findings of Cochlear's collaborative research programs to improve recipient outcomes. Included are studies showing the benefits from bilateral implants, electroacoustic stimulation using an ipsilateral and/or contralateral hearing aid, advanced speech coding, and streamlined speech processor programming. PMID:17172547

  9. Growing up with a Cochlear Implant: Education, Vocation, and Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Linda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Gantz, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term educational/vocational, affiliation, and quality-of-life outcomes of the first and second cohorts of children with bilateral, profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants under a large National Institutes of Health-funded study was investigated in 41 of 61 eligible participants. Educational and vocational outcomes were…

  10. Speech and Literacy Development in a Child with a Cochlear Implant: Application of a Psycholinguistic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Michelle; Randall-Pieterse, Candice; Geiger, Martha

    2013-01-01

    This single case study describes the speech, phonological awareness and literacy of a 6;0-year-old girl with a cochlear implant. NG, a child with a congenital bilateral severe/profound hearing loss, received a monaural cochlear implant at the age of 3;0, three years prior to the study. Using a psycholinguistic framework to investigate her single…

  11. Imaging for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, P D; Annis, J A; Robinson, P J

    1990-07-01

    Insertion of a sound amplification device into the round window niche (extracochlear implant) or into the coils of the cochlea (intracochlear implant) can give significant benefits to some carefully selected, severely deaf patients. Imaging has an essential role in selective and pre-operative assessment. Severe otosclerosis and post-meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans are common causes of deafness in these patients and can be demonstrated by computed tomography (CT). The most suitable side for operation can be assessed. We describe our experiences with 165 patients, 69 of whom were found suitable for implants. Thin (1 mm) section CT in axial and coronal planes is the best imaging investigation of the petrous temporal bones but the place of magnetic resonance scanning to confirm that the inner ear is fluid-filled and polytomography to show a multichannel implant in the cochlea is discussed. No implants were used for congenital deformities, but some observations are made of this type of structural deformity of the inner ear. PMID:2390686

  12. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, B.; Gjedde, A.; Wallentin, M.; Vuust, P.

    2013-01-01

    The most dramatic progress in the restoration of hearing takes place in the first months after cochlear implantation. To map the brain activity underlying this process, we used positron emission tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca's area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca's area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca's area has been active prior to the loss of hearing. PMID:24377050

  13. Congenitally Deafblind Children and Cochlear Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2008-01-01

    There has been much research conducted demonstrating the positive benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in children who are deaf. Research on cochlear implantation in children who are both deaf and blind, however, is lacking. The purpose of this article is to present a study of 5 congenitally...

  14. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    this advantage persists in the subsequent years. With regard to cochlear implantation in children older than 12 months the studies show better hearing and linguistic results in children implanted at earlier ages. A sensitive period under 24-36 months has been identified over which cochlear implantation is reported to be less effective in terms of improvement in speech and hearing results. With regard to clinical effectiveness of bilateral cochlear implantation, greater benefits from bilateral implants compared to monolateral ones when assessing hearing in quiet and in noise and in sound localization abilities are reported to be present in both case of simultaneous or sequential bilateral implantation. However, with regard to the delay between the surgeries in sequential bilateral implantation, although benefit is reported to be present even after very long delays, on average long delays between surgeries seems to negatively affect the outcome with the second implant. With regard to benefits after cochlear implantation in children with multiple disabilities, benefits in terms of speech perception and communication as well as in quality of the daily life are reported even if benefits are slower and lower in comparison to those generally attained by implanted children without additional disabilities. Regarding the costs/efficacy ratio, the CI is expensive, in particular because of the cost of the high technological device, long life support, but even if healthcare costs are high, the savings in terms of indirect costs and quality of life are important. The CI, in fact, has a positive impact in terms of quality of life. PMID:23685383

  15. Retrolabyrinthine approach for cochlear nerve preservation in neurofibromatosis type 2 and simultaneous cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few cases of cochlear implantation (CI in neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 patients had been reported in the literature. The approaches described were translabyrinthine, retrosigmoid or middle cranial fossa. Objectives: To describe a case of a NF2- deafened-patient who underwent to vestibular schwannoma resection via RLA with cochlear nerve preservation and CI through the round window, at the same surgical time. Resumed Report: A 36-year-old woman with severe bilateral hearing loss due to NF2 was submitted to vestibular schwannoma resection and simultaneous CI. Functional assessment of cochlear nerve was performed by electrical promontory stimulation. Complete tumor removal was accomplishment via RLA with anatomic and functional cochlear and facial nerve preservation. Cochlear electrode array was partially inserted via round window. Sound field hearing threshold improvement was achieved. Mean tonal threshold was 46.2 dB HL. The patient could only detect environmental sounds and human voice but cannot discriminate vowels, words nor do sentences at 2 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Cochlear implantation is a feasible auditory restoration option in NF2 when cochlear anatomic and functional nerve preservation is achieved. The RLA is adequate for this purpose and features as an option for hearing preservation in NF2 patients.

  16. Focused tight dressing does not prevent cochlear implant magnet migration under 1.5 Tesla MRI

    OpenAIRE

    CUDA, D.; A. MURRI; Succo, G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We report a retrospective case of inner magnet migration, which occurred after 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning in an adult recipient of a bilateral cochlear implant (CI) despite a focused head dressing. The patient, bilaterally implanted with Nucleus 5 CIs (Cochlear LTD, Sydney, Australia), underwent a 1.5 Tesla cholangio-MRI scan for biliary duct pathology. In subsequent days, a focal skin alteration appeared over the left inner coil. Plain skull radiographs showed partial magnet migration on...

  17. Informed Consent, Deaf Culture, and Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Lauren; Graber, Abraham D

    2015-01-01

    While cochlear implantation is now considered routine in many parts of the world, the debate over how to ethically implement this technology continues. One's stance on implantation often hinges on one's understanding of deafness. On one end of the spectrum are those who see cochlear implants as a much needed cure for an otherwise intractable disability. On the other end of the spectrum are those who view the Deaf as members of a thriving culture and see the cochlear implant as an attempt to eliminate this culture. Rather than take a stance in this debate, we will argue that the informed consent process for cochlear implantation must include access to Deaf perspectives. Deaf individuals know best what it is like to be a member of the Deaf community; the reasonable person would put significant weight on the testimony of Deaf individuals when considering whether to undergo cochlear implantation. The reasonable person standard determines what information careproviders must present as part of the informed consent process; thus, informed consent for cochlear implantation requires access to the testimony of Deaf individuals. PMID:26399672

  18. Successful outcomes of cochlear implantation in long-term unilateral deafness: brain plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora-Vieira, Dayse; Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M; Maric, Vesna; Rajan, Gunesh P

    2013-09-11

    To investigate the implications of duration of deafness in the rehabilitation of unilateral deafness utilizing cochlear implantation. From the ongoing prospective cochlear implantation in unilateral deafness study, we looked at five adults who received a cochlear implant for long-term unilateral deafness. Speech perception in noise and subjective evaluation of the benefits of cochlear implantation were measured at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation. The results were analyzed and compared with published data from normal hearing individuals and adults using cochlear implants bilaterally. Analysis of speech perception in noise showed significant improvement for three spatial configurations: speech and noise from the front (S0/N0; P=0.003), speech from the front and noise from the normal hearing ear (S0/NHE; P=0.001), speech from the implanted ear, and noise from the normal hearing ear (SCI/NHE; Pdeafness obtained scores in speech perception testing and in subjective evaluation that are similar to those attained by individuals with normal hearing and/or those with bilateral cochlear implants. Therefore, patients with postlingual unilateral deafness should not be excluded as cochlear implant candidates on the basis of a long duration of deafness.

  19. Cochlear implant in an ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Aimee M; Lassen, L Frederick

    2013-02-01

    Presbycusis, or sensorineural hearing loss in the elderly population, affects approximately 40% to 50% of people over the age of 75. A variety of devices are available to those with hearing loss. Cochlear implants, for example, are especially useful for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss. The population is aging, so the demand for cochlear implantation in ambulatory surgery centers will likely increase. Ambulatory surgery centers (ASC) can provide a more convenient and less expensive location for cochlear implant surgery than hospital-based operating facilities. Patient selection using standard ASC criteria, coupled with an understanding of the unique surgical and anesthetic needs of cochlear implant patients, are key to bringing this once exotic inpatient procedure into the ASC.

  20. Cortical Plasticity after Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Petersen

    2013-01-01

    tomography at three time points: within 14 days, three months, and six months after switch-on. Fifteen recently implanted adult implant recipients listened to running speech or speech-like noise in four sequential PET sessions at each milestone. CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss showed differential activation of left superior temporal gyrus during speech and speech-like stimuli, unlike CI listeners with prelingual hearing loss. Furthermore, Broca’s area was activated as an effect of time, but only in CI listeners with postlingual hearing loss. The study demonstrates that adaptation to the cochlear implant is highly related to the history of hearing loss. Speech processing in patients whose hearing loss occurred after the acquisition of language involves brain areas associated with speech comprehension, which is not the case for patients whose hearing loss occurred before the acquisition of language. Finally, the findings confirm the key role of Broca’s area in restoration of speech perception, but only in individuals in whom Broca’s area has been active prior to the loss of hearing.

  1. Audiological outcomes of cochlear implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalhães, Ana Tereza de Matos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most relevant clinical symptom in Waardenburg syndrome is profound bilateral sensorioneural hearing loss. Aim: To characterize and describe hearing outcomes after cochlear implantation in patients with Waardenburg syndrome to improve preoperative expectations. Method: This was an observational and retrospective study of a series of cases. Children who were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome and who received a multichannel cochlear implant between March 1999 and July 2012 were included in the study. Intraoperative neural response telemetry, hearing evaluation, speech perception, and speech production data before and after surgery were assessed. Results: During this period, 806 patients received a cochlear implant and 10 of these (1.2% were diagnosed with Waardenburg syndrome. Eight of the children received a Nucleus 24® implant and 1 child and 1 adult received a DigiSonic SP implant. The mean age at implantation was 44 months among the children. The average duration of use of a cochlear implant at the time of the study was 43 months. Intraoperative neural responses were present in all cases. Patients who could use the speech processor effectively had a pure tone average of 31 dB in free-field conditions. In addition, the MUSS and MAIS questionnaires revealed improvements in speech perception and production. Four patients did not have a good outcome, which might have been associated with ineffective use of the speech processor. Conclusion: Despite the heterogeneity of the group, patients with Waardenburg syndrome who received cochlear implants were found to have hearing thresholds that allowed access to speech sounds. However, patients who received early intervention and rehabilitation showed better evolution of auditory perception.

  2. Music Therapy for Preschool Cochlear Implant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia; Kenworthy, Maura; Van Voorst, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually-deaf children (~age 2-5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) research regarding music perception of children with CIs. This information serves as a foundation for the final portion of the article, which describe...

  3. Emotional Perception of Music in Children with Unilateral Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sareh Shirvani; Zahra Jafari; Abdolreza Sheibanizadeh; Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy; Shohre Jalaie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cochlear implantation (CI) improves language skills among children with hearing loss. However, children with CIs still fall short of fulfilling some other needs, including musical perception. This is often attributed to the biological, technological, and acoustic limitations of CIs. Emotions play a key role in the understanding and enjoyment of music. The present study aimed to investigate the emotional perception of music in children with bilaterally severe-to-profound hearing ...

  4. Profile of cochlear implant users of the city of Manaus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrett, Mariana dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The cochlear implant is a device that is intended to substitute for the function of cochlear hair cells, electrically stimulate auditory nerve fibers, and contribute to the perception of speech sounds. However, the surgical procedure alone is not enough for the user to achieve favorable results in habilitation/rehabilitation. Objective: To characterize the patients from Manaus who have received cochlear implants based on the criteria for surgery. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of 15 cases and recorded etiological aspects of deafness, age, gender, duration of implant use, use of hearing aids, and participation in individual therapy. Data were recorded in a protocol designed specifically for this purpose. All patients were natives of Manaus. Results: The leading etiological aspect was ototoxicity associated with prematurity in newborns undergoing treatment in the neonatal intensive care unit. The age at surgery is carefully observed in the evaluation of implant centers, as well as if the candidate is pre-or post-lingual. In this study, 73% of patients were pre-lingual and did not benefit from hearing aids. As to the degree and type of hearing loss, 93% had audiological reports indicating profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and 7% had severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. This latter finding confirmed one of the basic principles of implant placement. Conclusion: This study allowed us to verify that there are reduced number of cochlear implant recipients in Manaus, but they have met the criteria required by implant centers located in other states of Brazil.

  5. Understanding music with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  6. Understanding music with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Lisa; Mürbe, Dirk; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Direct stimulation of the auditory nerve via a Cochlear Implant (CI) enables profoundly hearing-impaired people to perceive sounds. Many CI users find language comprehension satisfactory, but music perception is generally considered difficult. However, music contains different dimensions which might be accessible in different ways. We aimed to highlight three main dimensions of music processing in CI users which rely on different processing mechanisms: (1) musical discrimination abilities, (2) access to meaning in music, and (3) subjective music appreciation. All three dimensions were investigated in two CI user groups (post- and prelingually deafened CI users, all implanted as adults) and a matched normal hearing control group. The meaning of music was studied by using event-related potentials (with the N400 component as marker) during a music-word priming task while music appreciation was gathered by a questionnaire. The results reveal a double dissociation between the three dimensions of music processing. Despite impaired discrimination abilities of both CI user groups compared to the control group, appreciation was reduced only in postlingual CI users. While musical meaning processing was restorable in postlingual CI users, as shown by a N400 effect, data of prelingual CI users lack the N400 effect and indicate previous dysfunctional concept building. PMID:27558546

  7. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  8. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  9. Cochlear Implants Keep Twin Sisters Learning, Discovering Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Cochlear Implants Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... Mia, right, and Isabelle Jeppsen meet with Mia's cochlear implant surgeon, John Niparko, M.D., of Johns ...

  10. Simplifying cochlear implant speech processor fitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willeboer, C.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional fittings of the speech processor of a cochlear implant (CI) rely to a large extent on the implant recipient's subjective responses. For each of the 22 intracochlear electrodes the recipient has to indicate the threshold level (T-level) and comfortable loudness level (C-level) while stim

  11. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Delage Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition.

  12. Cochlear implantation and change in quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of cochlear implantation (CI) in adults and to evaluate the average implant usage per day. Ten profoundly deaf adults were implanted during the period April 1994 to September 1997. The patients answered questionnaires 1 year or more after receiving...... their cochlear implants. All of the patients used their implant daily. The average implant usage per day was 16 h. The patients stated that, given the choice, they would again opt for a cochlear implant and would recommend a cochlear implant for a deaf friend. A paired comparison showed that the implants led...

  13. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than conventional hearing aids in prelingually deaf patients. Summary of the findings: The study was a systematic review of scientific papers selected by a search of the SciELO, Cochrane, MEDLINE, and LILACS-BIREME databases. Among the 2169 articles found, 12 studies proved relevant to the issue and presented an evidence strength rating of B. No publications rated evidence strength A. Seven of the studies analyzed were prospective cohorts and 5 were cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Based on several studies, cochlear implants were demonstrated to be the best current alternative for bilateral severe or profound hearing loss, achieving better results in speech perception and development in prelingual children when compared to conventional hearing aids.

  14. EEG frontal asymmetry related to pleasantness of music perception in healthy children and cochlear implanted users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, G; Maglione, A G; Scorpecci, A; Malerba, P; Marsella, P; Di Francesco, G; Vitiello, S; Colosimo, A; Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Interestingly, the international debate about the quality of music fruition for cochlear implanted users does not take into account the hypothesis that bilateral users could perceive music in a more pleasant way with respect to monolateral users. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate if cerebral signs of pleasantness during music perception in healthy child are similar to those observed in monolateral and in bilateral cochlear implanted users. In fact, previous observations in literature on healthy subjects have indicated that variations of the frontal EEG alpha activity are correlated with the perceived pleasantness of the sensory stimulation received (approach-withdrawal theory). In particular, here we described differences between cortical activities estimated in the alpha frequency band for a healthy child and in patients having a monolateral or a bilateral cochlear implant during the fruition of a musical cartoon. The results of the present analysis showed that the alpha EEG asymmetry patterns observed in a healthy child and that of a bilateral cochlear implanted patient are congruent with the approach-withdrawal theory. Conversely, the scalp topographic distribution of EEG power spectra in the alpha band resulting from the monolateral cochlear user presents a different EEG pattern from the normal and bilateral implanted patients. Such differences could be explained at the light of the approach-withdrawal theory. In fact, the present findings support the hypothesis that a monolateral cochlear implanted user could perceive the music in a less pleasant way when compared to a healthy subject or to a bilateral cochlear user.

  15. EEG frontal asymmetry related to pleasantness of music perception in healthy children and cochlear implanted users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiato, G; Maglione, A G; Scorpecci, A; Malerba, P; Marsella, P; Di Francesco, G; Vitiello, S; Colosimo, A; Babiloni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Interestingly, the international debate about the quality of music fruition for cochlear implanted users does not take into account the hypothesis that bilateral users could perceive music in a more pleasant way with respect to monolateral users. In this scenario, the aim of the present study was to investigate if cerebral signs of pleasantness during music perception in healthy child are similar to those observed in monolateral and in bilateral cochlear implanted users. In fact, previous observations in literature on healthy subjects have indicated that variations of the frontal EEG alpha activity are correlated with the perceived pleasantness of the sensory stimulation received (approach-withdrawal theory). In particular, here we described differences between cortical activities estimated in the alpha frequency band for a healthy child and in patients having a monolateral or a bilateral cochlear implant during the fruition of a musical cartoon. The results of the present analysis showed that the alpha EEG asymmetry patterns observed in a healthy child and that of a bilateral cochlear implanted patient are congruent with the approach-withdrawal theory. Conversely, the scalp topographic distribution of EEG power spectra in the alpha band resulting from the monolateral cochlear user presents a different EEG pattern from the normal and bilateral implanted patients. Such differences could be explained at the light of the approach-withdrawal theory. In fact, the present findings support the hypothesis that a monolateral cochlear implanted user could perceive the music in a less pleasant way when compared to a healthy subject or to a bilateral cochlear user. PMID:23366987

  16. Anatomic considerations of cochlear morphology and its implications for insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, B.M.; Ferrarini, L.; Briaire, J.J.; Zarowski, A.; Admiraal-Behloul, F.; Olofsen, H.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Frijns, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The goal of this study is to analyze the 3-dimensional anatomy of the cochlear spiral and to investigate the consequences of its course to insertion trauma during cochlear implantation. BACKGROUND: Insertion trauma in cochlear implant surgery is a feared surgical risk, potentially causin

  17. [Extruded cochlear implant magnet covered with a temporoparietal fascial flap. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Sánchez, J; Berenguer, B; Aránguez, G; González Meli, B; Marín Molina, C; de Tomás Palacios, E

    2013-01-01

    Complications are infrequent after cochlear implant surgery but they might occur despite careful preoperative planning and meticulous surgical technique. Among the most commonly encountered problems are those associated with the postauricular flap. An exposed, and therefore contaminated, device requires immediate attention and intervention. Cochlear implantation revision surgery is justified by two main reasons, the high price of these devices and the difficulty of reimplantation, due to cochlear fibrosis and ossification after its removal. There are multiple options in cochlear implantation revision surgery with infected device. However, the temporoparietal fascia flap is highly vascularized and provides some advantages over other alternatives. We report a case of a 5 year old boy with bilateral sensor neural hearing loss, who suffered a device extrusion three years after its implantation. PMID:23833928

  18. Listening Effort with Cochlear Implant Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Baskent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing participants listened to CI simulations with varying…

  19. Accurate Guitar Tuning by Cochlear Implant Musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Lu; Juan Huang; Fan-Gang Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to

  20. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  1. The inferior cochlear vein: surgical aspects in cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, HongLei; Chen, Wei; Zhu, XiaoQuan; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-02-01

    The patency of the inferior cochlear vein (ICV) may be challenged in cochlear implantation (CI) due to its location near the round window (RW). This may be essential to consider during selection of different trajectories for electrode insertion aiming at preserving residual hearing. Venous blood from the human cochlea is drained through the ICV. The vein also drains blood from the modiolus containing the spiral ganglion neurons. Surgical interference with this vein could cause neural damage influencing CI outcome. We analyzed the topographical relationship between the RW and ICV bony channel and cochlear aqueduct (CA) from a surgical standpoint. Archival human temporal bones were further microdissected to visualize the CA and its accessory canals (AC1 and AC2). This was combined with examinations of plastic and silicone molds of the human labyrinth. Metric analyses were made using photo stereomicroscopy documenting the proximal portion of the AC1, the internal aperture of the CA and the RW. The mean distance between the AC1 and the anterior rim of the RW was 0.81 mm in bone specimens and 0.67 mm assessed in corrosion casts. The AC1 runs from the floor of the scala tympani through the otic capsule passing parallel to the CA to the posterior cranial fossa. The mean distance between the CA and AC1 canal was 0.31 and 0.25 mm, respectively. PMID:25700831

  2. Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conjugate vaccine=MenACWY Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants Recommend on Facebook ... cochlear implants are more likely to get bacterial meningitis than children without cochlear implants. In addition, some ...

  3. Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searls, J. Matt, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of individuals with significant permanent hearing loss. Cochlear implants may not be suitable for everyone. They are designed to provide…

  4. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children

    OpenAIRE

    Ostojić Sanja; Đoković Sanja; Radić-Šestić Marina; Nikolić Mina; Mikić Branka; Mirić Danica

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim. Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP) of cochlear implanted (CI) children. Special attention was focuse...

  5. Investigations of prosody perception by adult cochlear implant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson

    -synthesized speech to investigate the perceptual abilities of adult cochlear implant listeners in Danish and Swedish language settings. These studies examine performance relationships between prosody and other indexes of speech perception, including common clinical measurements.Results shed light on inherent device...... limitations and speech perception via an electrical-neural interface. This thesis is relevant to auditory rehabilitation, cochlear implant candidacy issues and sound processing in cochlear implants....

  6. Single and Multiple Microphone Noise Reduction Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R.

    2012-01-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noi...

  7. Diversity in cochlear morphology and its influence on cochlear implant electrode position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, K.S. van der; Briaire, J.J.; Wolterbeek, R..; Snel-Bongers, J.; Verbist, B.M.; Frijns, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    To define a minimal set of descriptive parameters for cochlear morphology and study its influence on the cochlear implant electrode position in relation to surgical insertion distance.Cochlear morphology and electrode position were analyzed using multiplanar reconstructions of the pre- and postopera

  8. Hearing Preservation in Cochlear Implant Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Carvalho Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past, it was thought that hearing loss patients with residual low-frequency hearing would not be good candidates for cochlear implantation since insertion was expected to induce inner ear trauma. Recent advances in electrode design and surgical techniques have made the preservation of residual low-frequency hearing achievable and desirable. The importance of preserving residual low-frequency hearing cannot be underestimated in light of the added benefit of hearing in noisy atmospheres and in music quality. The concept of electrical and acoustic stimulation involves electrically stimulating the nonfunctional, high-frequency region of the cochlea with a cochlear implant and applying a hearing aid in the low-frequency range. The principle of preserving low-frequency hearing by a “soft surgery” cochlear implantation could also be useful to the population of children who might profit from regenerative hair cell therapy in the future. Main aspects of low-frequency hearing preservation surgery are discussed in this review: its brief history, electrode design, principles and advantages of electric-acoustic stimulation, surgical technique, and further implications of this new treatment possibility for hearing impaired patients.

  9. A Retrospective Multicenter Study Comparing Speech Perception Outcomes for Bilateral Implantation and Bimodal Rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blamey, Peter J.; Maat, Bert; Başkent, Deniz; Mawman, Deborah; Burke, Elaine; Dillier, Norbert; Beynon, Andy; Kleine-Punte, Andrea; Govaerts, Paul J.; Skarzynski, Piotr H.; Huber, Alexander M.; Sterkers-Artieres, Francoise; Van de Heyning, Paul; O'Leary, Stephen; Fraysse, Bernard; Green, Kevin; Sterkers, Olivier; Venail, Frederic; Skarzynski, Henryk; Vincent, Christophe; Truy, Eric; Dowell, Richard; Bergeron, Francois; Lazard, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare speech perception outcomes between bilateral implantation (cochlear implants [CIs]) and bimodal rehabilitation (one CI on one side plus one hearing aid [HA] on the other side) and to explore the clinical factors that may cause asymmetric performances in speech intelligibility

  10. Neuroradiological imaging in patients with sensorineural hearing loss prior to cochlear implantation; Neuroradiologische Diagnostik bei Patienten mit sensorineuralem Hoerverlust vor Cochlea-Implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biller, A.; Bartsch, A.; Solymosi, L.; Bendszus, M. [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany); Knaus, C.; Mueller, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenkranke, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is an established technique for enabling speech perception in patients suffering from severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Thorough preoperative radiological assessment is essential for correctly evaluating the indication for surgery and safely performing cochlear implantation. CT and conventional and functional MRI are available for radiological assessment. Therefore, knowledge of the most frequent congenital syndromal, non-syndromal, and acquired malformations of inner ear structures is fundamental. This article provides information about imaging techniques prior to CI and relevant malformations of the inner ear. Safety aspects for patients with a cochlear implant undergoing MR imaging are also discussed. (orig.)

  11. Hearing Preservation after Cochlear Implantation: UNICAMP Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS is an excellent choice for people with residual hearing in low frequencies but not high frequencies and who derive insufficient benefit from hearing aids. For EAS to be effective, subjects' residual hearing must be preserved during cochlear implant (CI surgery. Methods. We implanted 6 subjects with a CI. We used a special surgical technique and an electrode designed to be atraumatic. Subjects' rates of residual hearing preservation were measured 3 times postoperatively, lastly after at least a year of implant experience. Subjects' aided speech perception was tested pre- and postoperatively with a sentence test in quiet. Subjects' subjective responses assessed after a year of EAS or CI experience. Results. 4 subjects had total or partial residual hearing preservation; 2 subjects had total residual hearing loss. All subjects' hearing and speech perception benefited from cochlear implantation. CI diminished or eliminated tinnitus in all 4 subjects who had it preoperatively. 5 subjects reported great satisfaction with their new device. Conclusions. When we have more experience with our surgical technique we are confident we will be able to report increased rates of residual hearing preservation. Hopefully, our study will raise the profile of EAS in Brazil and Latin/South America.

  12. Prelingual deafness: Benefits from cochlear implants versus conventional hearing aids

    OpenAIRE

    Bittencourt, Aline Gomes; Torre, Ana Adelina Giantomassi Della; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Brito, Rubens de

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: The majority of patients with hearing loss, including those with severe hearing loss, benefits from the use of hearing aids. The cochlear implant is believed to achieve better results in a child with hearing loss in cases where the severity of disability renders hearing aids incapable of providing adequate sound information, as they require sufficient cochlear reserve so that acoustic detention occurs. Objective: To assess if cochlear implants provide more benefit than c...

  13. A Literature Analysis of Themes in Paediatric Cochlear Implant Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2015-01-01

    Research on children with cochlear implants (CI) has documented positive outcomes, but also that many still experience language delays. The aim of this article is to explore how research on children with cochlear implants cover topics of early language development compared to research on children...

  14. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  15. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  16. Speech Intelligibility and Prosody Production in Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Steven B.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Phan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between speech intelligibility and prosody production in children who use cochlear implants. Methods: The Beginner's Intelligibility Test (BIT) and Prosodic Utterance Production (PUP) task were administered to 15 children who use cochlear implants and 10 children with normal…

  17. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  18. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  19. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Koyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months. Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome.

  20. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. Five children with Waardenburg syndrome underwent cochlear implantation. The average age at implantation was 2 years 11 months (ranging from 1 year 9 months to 6 years 3 months). Four patients had congenital profound hearing loss and one patient had progressive hearing loss. Two patients had an inner ear malformation of cochlear incomplete partition type 2. No surgical complication or difficulty was seen in any patient. All patients showed good hearing outcome postoperatively. Conclusion. Cochlear implantation could be a good treatment option for Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:27376080

  1. Exploring Perspectives on Cochlear Implants and Language Acquisition within the Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants generated intense debate almost immediately following their introduction in the 1980s. Today, with a vast number of deaf individuals with cochlear implants, the debate about the cochlear implant device and mode of communication continues. Q-methodology was used in this study to explore cochlear implants and language acquisition…

  2. Cochlear implantation at the ear, nose and throat clinic of the Clinical center of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. Cochlear implants bypass the damaged hearing systems and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant differs from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. Cochlear implantations have been performed at the ENT Clinic in Novi Sad since 2002. The aim of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate performance of cochlear implanted patients in regard to the age of hearing loss identification, age at implantation, as well as complications. Material and Methods. During a 5-year period (2002-2007, 45 patients underwent cochlear implantation (46 implants at the ENT Clinic in Novi Sad. Only four patients were postlingually deaf adults. Forty-one implanted patients were children with a mean age at implantation of 42.2 months (range: 2 to 8 years. Out of these patients, 28 (68.2% had congenital deafness of unknown cause. The commonest known cause was meningitis, found in 4 (9.7% patients, followed by use of ototoxic drugs and hereditary deafness. Etiological factors included: postnatal hypoxia, intracranial hemorrhage, pre term birth, cytomegalovirus infection during pregnancy, middle ear cholesteatoma, as well as sudden bilateral deafness. The time span between diagnosis of hearing loss and implantation was 34.6 months in 2002 and only 10 months in 2007. Results. 6 (13% patients presented with complications. There were 4 major, and two minor complications. The following complications were noted: ossified cochlea which required reoperation, unsuccessful operation in a patient with Down syndrome, facial tics, temporary facial weakness and ataxia. Five out of six complications were successfully resolved. Conclusion. New, more

  3. Cochlear re-implantation: lessons learnt and the way ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Uma; Sikka, Kapil; Agarwal, Shivani; Kumar, Rakesh; Thakar, Alok; Sharma, Suresh C

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion A cochlear re-implantation procedure is undesirable; however, the cochlear implant surgeon may have to perform a re-implantation procedure occasionally for various reasons. Following standard techniques, implant performance comparable with primary implantation may be achieved. Objective To study the causes and outcomes of cochlear re-implantation in an Asian Indian population. Study design Retrospective analysis of clinical charts over an 18-year period with prospective follow-up of patients. Methods The charts of 534 patients, who underwent cochlear implant, at an Otorhinolaryngology institutional Centre, from January 1997 to January 2015 were studied. Of these, the charts of 18 patients who underwent cochlear re-implantation were studied. The causes and audiological and speech outcomes were analysed. Results Eighteen patients (3.4%) underwent cochlear re-implantation for various reasons. The commonest indication was device failure in seven patients (39%), followed by electrode extrusion in five (28%), trauma in three (11%), electrode migration in two (11%) and improper electrode placement in one (6%) patient. The audiological performance tests and speech tests either remained the same or improved from those achieved for patients undergoing primary implantation, in 87% patients. PMID:26898701

  4. MR imaging of cochlear implant candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the value of diagnostic imaging in the workup of patients for possible placement of a multichannel intracochlear hearing device. Forty-five candidates for cochlear implantation were examined with both CT and MR imaging. In 32 adult patients coronal and axial T2-weighted spin-echo sequences were performed. In 10 patients, we used a T2*-weighted gradient-echo three-dimensional sequence with axial presaturation instead. Three children were examined with an ultrafast snapshot sequence for scout viewing, followed by a T2-weighted axial half-Fourier spin-echo sequence. In 36 patients we found the cochlea to be patent. Thirty-three of these patients successfully received an implant device. Three patients still await surgery. Six patients showed pathologic conditions in at least one ear at CT and MR alone. In 3 patients there was evidence of bony occulsion of the cochlear duct at CT; MR revealed a reduced signal intensity in the cochlea as well. Two patients with normal CT results showed abnormal conditions at MR imaging (reduced signal on T2-weighted images) and were not operated on

  5. Current status and correlated issues on cochlear implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ke-li; WANG Lin-e

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cochlear implant is a biomedical device, which can directly stimulate the auditory nerve pass-by the damaged hair cell to recover and rebuild the hearing of deaf people. The implant can also stimulate the auditory brainstem and cortex in patients whose auditory nerve is not accessible because of acoustic tumors. Cochlear implantation can make the patients generate electrical hearing (artificial hearing).The artificial hearing can recover,improve or rebuild the hearing of deaf people through electrical stimulus.

  6. Maximizing Cochlear Implant Patients’ Performance with Advanced Speech Training Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Qian-Jie; Galvin, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in implant technology and speech processing have provided great benefit to many cochlear implant patients. However, some patients receive little benefit from the latest technology, even after many years’ experience with the device. Moreover, even the best cochlear implant performers have great difficulty understanding speech in background noise, and music perception and appreciation remain major challenges. Recent studies have shown that targeted auditory training can significantly i...

  7. CT and MR imaging for pediatric cochlear implantation: emphasis on the relationship between the cochlear nerve canal and the cochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Mikiko; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Morimoto, Noriko; Taiji, Hidenobu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Cochlear implantation has become an accepted treatment for deafness. As the frequency of cochlear implantation has increased, requests for images have also increased in the work-up for candidates. An absent cochlear nerve (CN) is a contraindication to cochlear implantation. Therefore, MRI is performed to evaluate the CN in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Recently, some authors have reported the relationship between cochlear nerve canal (CNC) stenosis and CN hypoplasia. To review the relationship between CNC and CN. During a period of 78 months, 21 children (42 ears) with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss underwent both HRCT and MRI of the cochlear nerve. We retrospectively reviewed two factors: the evaluation of inner ear malformations and the relationship between CNC stenosis and CN hypoplasia. Inner ear malformations were recognized in ten ears. The mean CNC diameter was approximately 2 mm (ranging from 0.6 to 2.7 mm). CN hypoplasia was seen in eight of the 42 ears; all eight were associated with CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm). Of the 34 ears with normal CN, 32 had CNC >1.5 mm in diameter and the remaining two ears, with incomplete partition type I, had CNC stenosis. Children with CNC stenosis had a high incidence of CN hypoplasia. CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm) suggests CN hypoplasia. On the other hand, CN hypoplasia was not seen in children with CNC diameter >1.5 mm. Therefore, we conclude that children with CNC stenosis or malformations on HRCT should receive MR imaging of the CN. (orig.)

  8. Studying the Language Development in Children with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Sabri leghaie

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implant surgery is aimed at making a comprehensive packet of information for the deaf by mixing the data acquired by implanted device and the communicational grammar. Although language production and ability of communication are not main factors in determining the candidacy for cochlear implant surgery, they play crucial role in determining cochlear implant success. we should study the communication skills much deeper than a simple perception and production of speech to have a reasonable evaluation of development of Auditory integration and grammatical language structure. Hence in the current article we will first discuss the grammatical structure in language and then have a look at the pragmatics , semantics and phonological aspects in children with cochlear implant in Virginia college in USA.

  9. Evaluation of vestibular function following cochlear implant surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motesaddi Zandi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are contradictory reports regarding vestibular function after cochlear implant surgery. In this study, we evaluated the influence of cochlear implant surgery on vestibular function by comparing the results of caloric test in both ears of patients who received implants. Materials and Methods: 24 adult patients who had undergone cochlear implant surgery at least 6 months earlier, were participated in this study. Caloric test with the stimulus of cold and warm water was performed on both ears of each patient and results were compared with each other regarding unilateral weakness, directional preponderance and areflexia. Results: The differences between two ears regarding directional preponderance, unilateral weakness and areflexia were not statistically significant. Conclusion: It seems the pathological cause of deafness is a more influential factor on vestibular dysfunction than the damage following cochlear implant surgery.

  10. Aspects of Music with Cochlear Implants – Music Listening Habits and Appreciation in Danish Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau; Ovesen, Therese; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implant users differ significantly from their normal hearing peerswhen it comes to perception of music. Several studies have shown thatstructural features – such as rhythm, timbre, and pitch – are transmitted lessaccurately through an implant. However, we cannot predict personalenjoyment of music solely as a function of accuracy of perception. But canmusic be pleasant with a cochlear implant at all? Our aim here was to gatherinformation of both music enjoyment and listening habits be...

  11. Long-term asymmetric hearing affects cochlear implantation outcomes differently in adults with pre- and postlingual hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M; Dowell, Richard C; Lyxell, Björn

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with postlingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears.

  12. Simultaneous Translabyrinthine Tumor Removal and Cochlear Implantation in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Won; Han, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Jin Woong; Moon, In Seok

    2016-11-01

    Refinement of surgical techniques has allowed hearing preservation after tumor resection to be prioritized. Moreover, restoration of hearing after tumor removal can be attempted in patients with bilateral vestibular schwannomas or those with a schwannoma in the only-hearing ear. Cochlear implantation (CI) has emerged as a proper method of acoustic rehabilitation, provided that the cochlear nerve remains intact. Studies of electrical promontory stimulation in patients after vestibular schwannoma resection have demonstrated favorable results. We describe herein two cases of hearing rehabilitation via CI implemented at the time of vestibular schwannoma resection. Tumors were totally removed, and cochlear implant electrodes were successfully inserted in both cases. Also, post operative CI-aided hearing showed improved results. PMID:27593888

  13. Frequency-place compression and expansion in cochlear implant listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, D; Shannon, RV

    2004-01-01

    In multichannel cochlear implants, low frequency information is delivered to apical cochlear locations while high frequency information is delivered to more basal locations, mimicking the normal acoustic tonotopic organization of the auditory nerves. In clinical practice; little attention has been p

  14. Language understanding and vocabulary of early cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, L; Busch, GW; Sandahl, M;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of language understanding, the level of receptive and active vocabulary, and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for cochlear implanted children's language level....

  15. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lu

    Full Text Available Modern cochlear implant (CI users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to <0.5 Hz. One subject had normal contralateral hearing and produced more accurate tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task.

  16. Accurate guitar tuning by cochlear implant musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Huang, Juan; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Modern cochlear implant (CI) users understand speech but find difficulty in music appreciation due to poor pitch perception. Still, some deaf musicians continue to perform with their CI. Here we show unexpected results that CI musicians can reliably tune a guitar by CI alone and, under controlled conditions, match simultaneously presented tones to tuning with CI than his normal ear. To understand these counterintuitive findings, we presented tones sequentially and found that tuning error was larger at ∼ 30 Hz for both subjects. A third subject, a non-musician CI user with normal contralateral hearing, showed similar trends in performance between CI and normal hearing ears but with less precision. This difference, along with electric analysis, showed that accurate tuning was achieved by listening to beats rather than discriminating pitch, effectively turning a spectral task into a temporal discrimination task. PMID:24651081

  17. Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials in Unsuccessful Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munivrana, Boska; Mildner, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    In some cochlear implant users, success is not achieved in spite of optimal clinical factors (including age at implantation, duration of rehabilitation and post-implant hearing level), which may be attributed to disorders at higher levels of the auditory pathway. We used cortical auditory evoked potentials to investigate the ability to perceive…

  18. The Hearing Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation in Waardenburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Koyama, Hajime; Kashio, Akinori; Sakata, Aki; Tsutsumiuchi, Katsuhiro; Matsumoto, Yu; Karino, Shotaro; Kakigi, Akinobu; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of cochlear implantation for sensorineural hearing loss in patients with Waardenburg syndrome. Method. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients who underwent cochlear implantation at the University of Tokyo Hospital. Clinical classification, genetic mutation, clinical course, preoperative hearing threshold, high-resolution computed tomography of the temporal bone, and postoperative hearing outcome were assessed. Result. F...

  19. Bilingualism: A Pearl to Overcome Certain Perils of Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Humphries, Tom; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Napoli, Donna Jo; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian; Smith, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated success in improving young deaf children’s speech and low-level speech awareness across a range of auditory functions, but this success is highly variable, and how this success correlates to high-level language development is even more variable. Prevalence on the success rate of CI as an outcome for language development is difficult to obtain because studies vary widely in methodology and variables of interest, and because not all cochlear implant tech...

  20. Tinnitus before and 6 Months after Cochlear Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kompis, M; Pelizzone, M.; Dillier, N; J. Allum; Demin, N; Senn, P.

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress were investigated in 174 cochlear implant (CI) candidates who underwent CI surgery at a Swiss cochlear implant center. All subjects participated in two session, one preoperatively and one 6 months after device activation. In both sessions, tinnitus loudness was assessed using a visual analogue scale and tinnitus distress using a standardized tinnitus questionnaire. The data were compared with unaided pre- a...

  1. The Effect of Age of Cochlear Implantation on the Improvement of the Auditory Performance in the Children Undergoing Cochlear Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Monshizadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing is one of the premier human senses. Being deprived from hearing is not only being unable to hear the sounds, but it is also the disability to gain a lot of helpful experiences. Cochlear implantation is introduced worldwide in order to treat the severe to profound hearing loss. Therefore, the present study aims to determine the effect of age of cochlear implantation on improvement of the auditory performance. Methods: The present follow-up study was conducted on 96 children who had referred to Fars Cochlear Implantation Center. The patients’ information was gathered from their profiles both before and after the operation. In addition, the auditory performance score was obtained in 3 stages – 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation – through the Cap test. Also, non-parametric tests of Fridman, Willcoxon, and Mann-Withney U were utilized in order to analyze the data of the study. Results: The mean of the children’s auditory performance 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation was measured as 2.8+1.03, 4.36+1.04, and 5.34+1.02, respectively. Besides, the median of their auditory performance 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation was calculated as 3, 5, and 5, respectively. Also, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the independent variable of age of cochlear implantation and the auditory performance score 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the implantation. Conclusion: In line with other studies conducted on the issue, the present study showed the improvement of the auditory performance in the children who benefited from cochlear implantation. Moreover, the results of the present study revealed that the age of cochlear implantation can be of great help in determining the candidates of cochlear implantation. In other words, it can be a major prognostic factor of the response to the treatment

  2. Cochlear implant benefits in deafness rehabilitation: PET study of temporal voice Activations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coez, A.; Zilbovicius, M. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, INSERM, Res Unit Neuroimaging and Psychiat, U797, IFR49, F-91406 Orsay (France); Zilbovicius, M.; Syrota, A.; Samson, Y. [CEA, DSV, DRM, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, F-91406 Orsay (France); Bizaguet, E. [Lab Correct Audit, Paris (France); Coez, A. [Univ Paris Sud 11, Paris (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [INSERM, Unit M 867, Paris (France); Ambert-Dahan, E. [Hop Beaujon, Serv ORL Chirurg Cervicofaciale, AP-HP, Clichy (France); Ferrary, E.; Bouccara, D.; Mosnier, I.; Sterkers, O. [Inst Fed Rech Claude Bernard Physiol et Pathol, IFR02, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Serv Urgences Cerebro-vasc, AP-HP, Paris (France); Samson, Y. [Univ Paris 06, Paris (France); Sterkers, O. [Univ Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cochlear implants may improve the medical and social prognosis of profound deafness. Nevertheless, some patients have experienced poor results without any clear explanations. One correlate may be an alteration in cortical voice processing. To test this hypothesis, we studied the activation of human temporal voice areas (TVA) using a well-standardized PET paradigm adapted from previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies. Methods: A PET H{sub 2}{sup 15}O activation study was performed on 3 groups of adult volunteers: normal-hearing control subjects (n 6) and cochlear-implanted post-lingually deaf patients with {>=}2 y of cochlear implant experience, with intelligibility scores in the 'Lafon monosyllabic task' {>=}80% (Good group; n 6) or {<=}20% (Poor group; n 6). Relative cerebral blood flow was measured in 3 conditions: rest, passive listening to human voice, and non-voice stimuli. Results: Compared with silence, the activations induced by non-voice stimuli were bilaterally located in the superior temporal regions in all groups. However these activations were significantly and similarly reduced in both cochlear implant groups, whereas control subjects showed supplementary activations. Compared with non-voice, the voice stimuli induced bilateral activation of the TVA along the superior temporal sulcus (STS) in both the control and the Good groups. In contrast, these activations were not detected in the Poor group, which showed only left unilateral middle STS activation. Conclusion: These results suggest that PET is an adequate method to explore cochlear implant benefits and that this benefit could be linked to the activation of the TVA. (authors)

  3. Cochlear implant candidates: assessment with CT and MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnsberger, H R; Dart, D J; Parkin, J L; Smoker, W R; Osborn, A G

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-seven patients with severe to profound hearing loss were evaluated for possible placement of a multichannel cochlear implant hearing device. After initial clinical screening, 42 patients underwent computed tomographic (CT) examination. Five of these patients were also examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Twenty-two patients received implants. CT of the middle and inner ear was normal in 24 patients (57.1%) and showed labyrinthine ossification in 12 (28.6%), cochlear or fenestral otosclerosis (or both) in four (9.5%), and congenital cochlear malformation in two (4.8%). The information provided by CT was used to (a) exclude patients in whom multichannel cochlear implantation would most likely be unsuccessful (owing to obliterative labyrinthine ossification, or congenital cochlear malformation, severe cochlear, or fenestral otosclerosis), (b) help select the best ear for implantation, and (c) provide a preoperative picture of normal variants and avoidable surgical pitfalls. MR experience is limited but assessment of the size of the cochlear nerve and the membranous labyrinth is possible with this modality and may provide additional information in the evaluation of these patients. PMID:3108956

  4. Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients with Implications for Music Instruction: A Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Feilin; Gfeller, Kate

    2012-03-23

    This review of literature presents a systematic analysis of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients regarding music perception. Specifically, it a) analyzes individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, timbre, and pitch) as they interface with the technical characteristics of cochlear implants and the perceptual abilities of cochlear implant recipients; and b) describes accommodations for music instruction that support successful participation of children with cochlear implants. This article consolidates research studies from various disciplines (audiology, hearing science, speech-language pathology, cochlear implants, and music therapy) to provide practical recommendations for educators in fostering the musical growth of children with cochlear implants. PMID:23469365

  5. Abnormal pitch perception produced by cochlear implant stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Gang Zeng

    Full Text Available Contemporary cochlear implants with multiple electrode stimulation can produce good speech perception but poor music perception. Hindered by the lack of a gold standard to quantify electric pitch, relatively little is known about the nature and extent of the electric pitch abnormalities and their impact on cochlear implant performance. Here we overcame this obstacle by comparing acoustic and electric pitch perception in 3 unilateral cochlear-implant subjects who had functionally usable acoustic hearing throughout the audiometric frequency range in the non-implant ear. First, to establish a baseline, we measured and found slightly impaired pure tone frequency discrimination and nearly perfect melody recognition in all 3 subjects' acoustic ear. Second, using pure tones in the acoustic ear to match electric pitch induced by an intra-cochlear electrode, we found that the frequency-electrode function was not only 1-2 octaves lower, but also 2 times more compressed in frequency range than the normal cochlear frequency-place function. Third, we derived frequency difference limens in electric pitch and found that the equivalent electric frequency discrimination was 24 times worse than normal-hearing controls. These 3 abnormalities are likely a result of a combination of broad electric field, distant intra-cochlear electrode placement, and non-uniform spiral ganglion cell distribution and survival, all of which are inherent to the electrode-nerve interface in contemporary cochlear implants. Previous studies emphasized on the "mean" shape of the frequency-electrode function, but the present study indicates that the large "variance" of this function, reflecting poor electric pitch discriminability, is the main factor limiting contemporary cochlear implant performance.

  6. Cochlear imaging in the era of cochlear implantation : from silence to sound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbist, Berit Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are a well accepted treatment for hearing impaired people. In pre- and postoperative assessment of CI-candidates imaging plays an important role to analyze anatomy, rule out pathology and determine intracochlear positioning and integrity of the implant. Developments in CI-des

  7. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis. PMID:25962718

  8. Cochlear Implantation, Enhancements, Transhumanism and Posthumanism: Some Human Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    Biomedical engineering technologies such as brain-machine interfaces and neuroprosthetics are advancements which assist human beings in varied ways. There are exciting yet speculative visions of how the neurosciences and bioengineering may influence human nature. However, these could be preparing a possible pathway towards an enhanced and even posthuman future. This article seeks to investigate several ethical themes and wider questions of enhancement, transhumanism and posthumanism. Four themes of interest are: autonomy, identity, futures, and community. Three larger questions can be asked: will everyone be enhanced? Will we be "human" if we are not, one day, transhuman? Should we be enhanced or not? The article proceeds by concentrating on a widespread and sometimes controversial application: the cochlear implant, an auditory prosthesis implanted into Deaf patients. Cochlear implantation and its reception in both the deaf and hearing communities have a distinctive moral discourse, which can offer surprising insights. The paper begins with several points about the enhancement of human beings, transhumanism's reach beyond the human, and posthuman aspirations. Next it focuses on cochlear implants on two sides. Firstly, a shorter consideration of what technologies may do to humans in a transhumanist world. Secondly, a deeper analysis of cochlear implantation's unique socio-political movement, its ethical explanations and cultural experiences linked with pediatric cochlear implantation-and how those wary of being thrust towards posthumanism could marshal such ideas by analogy. As transhumanism approaches, the issues and questions merit continuing intense analysis.

  9. SUPPRESSION OF TINNITUS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Khorsandi

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available 7 'innitus is a frequent complaint in patients with sensorineural deafness. Different reports suggest that electrical stimulation caused by cochlear implant devices "upn"ises tinnitus to a considerable degree. In a longitudinal -.mdv we have evaluated the severity and duration of tinnitus in both ears of J 7 cochlear implant patients before and after operation. Severity of tinnitus was reduced in both implanted and not implanted ears after the implantation (P=0.003 and p - 0.00-1 respectively. Duration of tinnitus, however, was not affected significantly. No significant difference in tinnitus suppression was observed between the implanted and not implanted ears. This might be attributed to both the electrical stimulation caused by the device and the psychogenic stability provided by return to the world of sound.

  10. Cochlear implant challenges encountered in tuberculous otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Fang Chen; Zhao-Hui Liu; Jing Xie; Xiao-Bo Ma; Yi Li; Shu-Sheng Gong

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is rare inENT department, and is frequently misdiagnosed as otitis media. Thus early systemic treatment is very important forTOM. We reported a case report withTOM to highlight development of the disease and difficulties in clinical treatment in late stage ofTOM. Implantation of ossified and eroded cochlea poses many unique challenges to both the surgeon and programming team. With thorough preparation and complete knowledge about characters of specific issues, implantation would be performed successfully, and patients with ossified cochlear could benefit from cochlear implantation.

  11. Cochlear implants and the deaf child: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, K E; Coffin, C; Kenna, M

    1999-01-01

    Cochlear implants are no longer considered new or experimental technology and are available for children with profound sensorineural hearing loss. Pediatric cochlear implantation requires a multidisciplinary team approach with contributions from surgeons, audiologists, speech-language pathologists, psychologists, nurses, special educators, and parents. The decision to perform cochlear implantation in children must be seriously considered. Some in the deaf community voice strong objections to the procedure. Additionally, it requires an enormous commitment on the part of the family and the health care system in both personal and financial terms. The surgery has some risks, and the rehabilitation period is lengthy. Outcomes are variable, and many factors play a role in a child's successful use of implants. Nonetheless, gradual, steady improvement in speech perception, speech production, and language typically occurs. The approach of Children's Hospital in Boston to the assessment, the surgical procedure, and follow-up is detailed here.

  12. Profiles of Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.; Young, Nancy M.; Nathani, Suneeti

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of cochlear implant experience on prelinguistic vocal development in young deaf children. Procedure: A prospective longitudinal research design was used to document the sequence and time course of vocal development in 7 children who were implanted between 10 and 36 months…

  13. Motor Development of Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysen, Freja; Loots, Gerrit; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a cochlear implant (CI) on the motor development of deaf children. The study involved 36 mainstreamed deaf children (15 boys, 21 girls; 4- to 12-years old) without any developmental problems. Of these children, 20 had been implanted. Forty-three hearing children constituted a comparison…

  14. Simultaneous communication and cochlear implants in the classroom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.C.; Marschark, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the potential of simultaneous communication (sign and speech together) to support classroom learning by college students who use cochlear implants (CIs). Metacognitive awareness of learning also was evaluated. A within-subjects design involving 40 implant users in

  15. Cochlear implantation at the ear, nose and throat clinic of the Clinical center of Vojvodina

    OpenAIRE

    Komazec Zoran; Dankuc Dragan; Vlaški Ljiljana; Lemajić-Komazec Slobodanka; Nedeljkov Spomenka; Sokolovac Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. A cochlear implant is a small electronic device that can provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. Cochlear implants bypass the damaged hearing systems and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Signals generated by the implant are sent by way of the auditory nerve to the brain, which recognizes the signals as sound. Hearing through a cochlear implant differs from normal hearing and takes time to learn or relearn. Cochlear implantat...

  16. The Development of the Nucleus® Freedom™ Cochlear Implant System

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick, James F.; Busby, Peter A.; Gibson, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear Limited (Cochlear™) released the fourth-generation cochlear implant system, Nucleus® Freedom™, in 2005. Freedom is based on 25 years of experience in cochlear implant research and development and incorporates advances in medicine, implantable materials, electronic technology, and sound coding. This article presents the development of Cochlear's implant systems, with an overview of the first 3 generations, and details of the Freedom system: the CI24RE receiver-stimulator, the Contour ...

  17. A speech processing study using an acoustic model of a multiple-channel cochlear implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying

    1998-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an electronic device designed to provide sound information for adults and children who have bilateral profound hearing loss. The task of representing speech signals as electrical stimuli is central to the design and performance of cochlear implants. Studies have shown that the current speech- processing strategies provide significant benefits to cochlear implant users. However, the evaluation and development of speech-processing strategies have been complicated by hardware limitations and large variability in user performance. To alleviate these problems, an acoustic model of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy is implemented in this study, in which a set of acoustic stimuli whose psychophysical characteristics are as close as possible to those produced by a cochlear implant are presented on normal-hearing subjects. To test the effectiveness and feasibility of this acoustic model, a psychophysical experiment was conducted to match the performance of a normal-hearing listener using model- processed signals to that of a cochlear implant user. Good agreement was found between an implanted patient and an age-matched normal-hearing subject in a dynamic signal discrimination experiment, indicating that this acoustic model is a reasonably good approximation of a cochlear implant with the SPEAK strategy. The acoustic model was then used to examine the potential of the SPEAK strategy in terms of its temporal and frequency encoding of speech. It was hypothesized that better temporal and frequency encoding of speech can be accomplished by higher stimulation rates and a larger number of activated channels. Vowel and consonant recognition tests were conducted on normal-hearing subjects using speech tokens processed by the acoustic model, with different combinations of stimulation rate and number of activated channels. The results showed that vowel recognition was best at 600 pps and 8 activated channels, but further increases in stimulation rate and

  18. Minimal incision access for pediatric and adult cochlear implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Danmo; Shi Ying; Su Qiaotong; Liu Ting; Han Demin; Li Yongxin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cochlear implant surgery is widely practiced.Minimal incision cochlear implant surgery has been developed with the aims of reducing the impact of surgery on the patient and improving cosmesis while maintaining the low morbidity of conventional wider access approaches.This study aimed to assess the surgical technique and complication rate of minimal incision cochlear implantation (MICI) for children and adults.Methods Data for this study were obtained via a retrospective analysis.Totally 378 patients were included in the study.All patients received minimal incision cochlear implantation,using the skin protector during the process of the operation.The surgical complications of MICI were recorded in a spreadsheet format.The incidence of major and minor complication were analyzed,and appropriate treatment was provided.Results A total of 40 (10.5%) complications were noted in the study.There were 0 life-threatening,9 major,and 31 minor complications.Of the nine major complications,five were device failures,one developed infection and extrusion,and three required receiver-stimulator repositioning.Conclusions MICI is as safe as standard cochlear implantation (SCI) and affords with it other benefits.Eliminating the scalp flap avoids devascularization and minimizes the opportunity of flap infection or necrosis.Complications not related to the flap are similar to SCI.

  19. Changes in Pitch with a Cochlear Implant Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Lina A.J.; Turner, Christopher W.; Erenberg, Sheryl R.; Gantz, Bruce J

    2007-01-01

    In the normal auditory system, the perceived pitch of a tone is closely linked to the cochlear place of vibration. It has generally been assumed that high-rate electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant electrode also evokes a pitch sensation corresponding to the electrode’s cochlear place (“place” code) and stimulation rate (“temporal” code). However, other factors may affect electric pitch sensation, such as a substantial loss of nearby nerve fibers or even higher-level perceptual changes...

  20. Future technology in cochlear implants: assessing the benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Robert J S

    2011-05-01

    It has been over 50 years since Djourno and Eyries first attempted electric stimulation in a patient with deafness. Over this time, the Cochlear Implant (CI) has become not only remarkably successful, but increasingly complex. Although the basic components of the system still comprise an implanted receiver stimulator and electrode, externally worn speech processor, microphone, control system, and power source, there are now several alternative designs of these components with different attributes that can be variably combined to meet the needs of specific patient groups. Development by the manufacturers has been driven both by these various patient needs, and also by the desire to achieve technological superiority, or at least differentiation, ultimately in pursuit of market share. Assessment of benefit is the responsibility of clinicians. It is incumbent on both industry and clinicians to ensure appropriate, safe, and affordable introduction of new technology. For example, experience with the totally implanted cochlear implant (TIKI) has demonstrated that quality of hearing is the over-riding consideration for CI users. To date, improved hearing outcomes have been achieved by improvements in: speech processing strategies; microphone technology; pre-processing strategies; electrode placement; bilateral implantation; use of a hearing aid in the opposite ear (bimodal stimulation); and the combination of electric and acoustic stimulation in the same ear. The resulting expansion of CI candidacy, with more residual hearing, further improves the outcomes achieved. Largely facilitated by advances in electronic capability and computerization, it can be expected that these improvements will continue. However, marked variability of results still occurs and we cannot assure any individual patient of their outcome. Realistic goals for implementation of new technology include: improved hearing in noise and music perception; effective invisible hearing (no external apparatus

  1. Aspects of Music with Cochlear Implants – Music Listening Habits and Appreciation in Danish Cochlear Implant Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hansen, Mads; Sørensen, Stine Derdau;

    Cochlear implant users differ significantly from their normal hearing peers when it comes to perception of music. Several studies have shown that structural features – such as rhythm, timbre, and pitch – are transmitted less accurately through an implant. However, we cannot predict personal...... enjoyment of music solely as a function of accuracy of perception. But can music be pleasant with a cochlear implant at all? Our aim here was to gather information of both music enjoyment and listening habits before the onset of hearing loss and post-operation from a large, representative sample of Danish...... recipients. A hundred and sixty three adult cochlear implant users (101 females, 62 males) completed a survey containing questions about musical background, listening habits, and music enjoyment. The results indicate a wide range of success with music, but in general, the results show that the CI users enjoy...

  2. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez; Sergio Bonafonte Royo

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL) implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for i...

  3. Cochlear implant electrode array misplaced in Hyrtl's fissure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzali, Amina; Ouennoughi, Kheiredidine; Haraoubia, Mohamed-Salah; Zemirli, Omar; Triglia, Jean Michel

    2011-11-01

    Hyrtl's fissure is a cleft that is present in the developing fetal petrous temporal bone and extends from the area inferior to the round window to the meninges of the posterior fossa. Persistent Hyrtl's fissure, due to incomplete ossification, is considered a rare temporal bone malformation, and is a known cause of perilabyrinthine cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Very few cases are reported as being at risk of complication of cochlear implant surgery. Here we report the case of an 8-year-old boy with misplacement of an electrode array in Hyrtl's fissure. The diagnosis was made postoperatively, since cochlear implant failure was suspected from non-auditory responses. Computed tomography (CT) revealed the extracochlear location of the electrode array. We emphasize the role of presurgical imaging CT and magnetic resonance imaging in detecting temporal bone abnormalities, and we discuss the value of intraoperative auditory nerve response telemetry and postoperative radiological evaluation in diagnosing cochlear implant misplacement.

  4. Cochlear Implantation in a Patient with Kabuki Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesseur, Annemarie; Cillessen, Eva; Mylanus, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Criteria for cochlear implants are expanding and now include children with disabilities in addition to hearing loss, such as those with Kabuki syndrome (KS). This case report describes language outcomes and changes in the quality of life of a female child with KS after cochlear implantation. The subject had a profound progressive sensorineural hearing loss, cognitive impairments, and other disabilities and communicated using vocalized sounds and the Dutch Sign Language. After cochlear implantation at an age of nine years and three months, the patient displayed no progress in speech production and minimal progress in receptive language development, but she had an increased awareness of the world and an increase in the quality of life. PMID:27341000

  5. Automatic Model Generation Framework for Computational Simulation of Cochlear Implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangado Lopez, Nerea; Ceresa, Mario; Duchateau, Nicolas;

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging. To addr......Recent developments in computational modeling of cochlear implantation are promising to study in silico the performance of the implant before surgery. However, creating a complete computational model of the patient's anatomy while including an external device geometry remains challenging......'s CT image, an accurate model of the patient-specific cochlea anatomy is obtained. An algorithm based on the parallel transport frame is employed to perform the virtual insertion of the cochlear implant. Our automatic framework also incorporates the surrounding bone and nerve fibers and assigns...... constitutive parameters to all components of the finite element model. This model can then be used to study in silico the effects of the electrical stimulation of the cochlear implant. Results are shown on a total of 25 models of patients. In all cases, a final mesh suitable for finite element simulations...

  6. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP of cochlear implanted (CI children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. Methods. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/ caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Results. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F (1, 28 = 2.909; p = 0.099 and age aberration in CP score (F (1, 28 = 0.114, p = 0.738. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Conclusion. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear

  7. Analysis of Speech Processing Strategies in Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouachi Rouiha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants can restore partial hearing to profoundly deaf people; the main function of these prostheses is to electrically stimulate the auditory nerve using an electrode array inserted in the cochlea. The acoustic signal is picked up by a microphone and analyzed. Then the extracted parameters of the signal are coded to generate electrical signals reconstituting the original signal. Currently all commercialized implants are multichannel they allow to stimulate the auditory nerve at different place of the cochlea, exploiting the tonotopic coding of the frequencies. This research will present an overview of various signal processing techniques that have been used for cochlear prosthesis over the years.

  8. Staphylococcus lugdunensis: novel organism causing cochlear implant infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Bhumbra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A majority of cochlear implant infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Reported here is a pediatric patient with a cochlear implant infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus that has only recently been determined to be clinically relevant (1988. Unlike other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, it is more aggressive, carrying a greater potential for tissue destruction. In pediatrics, the organism is uncommon, poorly described, and generally pan-susceptible. Described herein is the presentation and management of this unusual organism in a pediatric setting.

  9. Are routine preoperative CT scans necessary in adult cochlear implantation? Implications for the allocation of resources in cochlear implant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenway, Bruno; Vlastarakos, Petros V; Kasbekar, Anand V; Axon, Patrick R; Donnelly, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Our aim was to critically assess the influence of preoperative computed tomography (CT) scans on implantation decisions for adult cochlear implant candidates. The working hypothesis was that these routine scans might not provide critical additional information in most adult cochlear implant candidates. The charts of 175 adults with unilateral cochlear implantation were reviewed. Preoperative CT scan reports were audited, and scans with reported pathology were examined by an Otologist/ENT Surgeon. Clinic notes and multidisciplinary team meeting summaries were also analyzed to assess whether the results of the radiology report had influenced the decision to implant or the laterality of implantation. Twenty-five of the 175 scans (14.3%) showed an abnormality. Five of those 25 scans showed evidence of previous surgeries already known to the clinicians. Of the remaining 20 scans, 17 showed abnormalities, including wide vestibular aqueducts, Mondini deformities, and varying degrees of otospongiosis, the identification of which can be considered preoperatively helpful. Of the 175 scans, 3 (1.7%) demonstrated abnormalities that influenced the side of implantation or the decision to implant and, therefore, had an impact on treatment. We conclude that a preoperative CT scan seems to have an impact on treatment in only a small percentage of adult cochlear implantees. Hence, it may only need to be performed in patients with a history or clinical suspicion of meningitis or otosclerosis, if the individual was born deaf or became deaf before the age of 16, or if there are other clinical reasons to scan (e.g., otoscopic appearance). The related resources can be allocated to other facets of cochlear implant programs. PMID:27551842

  10. Emotional Perception of Music in Children with Unilateral Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Shirvani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cochlear implantation (CI improves language skills among children with hearing loss. However, children with CIs still fall short of fulfilling some other needs, including musical perception. This is often attributed to the biological, technological, and acoustic limitations of CIs. Emotions play a key role in the understanding and enjoyment of music. The present study aimed to investigate the emotional perception of music in children with bilaterally severe-to-profound hearing loss and unilateral CIs.   Materials and Methods: Twenty-five children with congenital severe-to-profound hearing loss and unilateral CIs and 30 children with normal hearing participated in the study. The children’s emotional perceptions of music, as defined by Peretz (1998, were measured. Children were instructed to indicate happy or sad feelings fostered in them by the music by pointing to pictures of faces showing these emotions.   Results: Children with CI obtained significantly lower scores than children with normal hearing, for both happy and sad items of music as well as in overall test scores (P

  11. Experiences of adult patients hearing loss postlingually with Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa María Lizcano Tejado

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is a significant public health problem. The incidence is difficult to establish because of the lack of data in people under age three, but is estimated about 1 per thousand for severe and profound hearing loss.A cochlear implant (CI is a device that converts sounds into electrical energy that triggers a sensation of hearing. The IC is indicated in patients with severe bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with null or poor benefit use of hearing aids.The general objective of this project is to understand the experiences of adult patients with severe-profound sensorineural hearing loss with IC postlingually throughout the implementation process.A personal vision of those implemented will allow us to learn how to face the possibility to hear and interact with their environment, applying this information to improve health care provided to them and identifying those areas where such assistance should be improved. Also allow us to compare the initial expectations and have been achieved, creating realistic expectations for future candidates.For its development we have designed a qualitative study, based on the principles and procedures of grounded theory, semistructured interviews, participant observation and discussion groups.The data will be analyzed using the software Nudist ViVo 9.

  12. Delayed loss of hearing after hearing preservation cochlear implantation: Human temporal bone pathology and implications for etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Alicia M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Rosowski, John J; Hansen, Marlan R; Gantz, Bruce J; Nadol, Joseph B

    2016-03-01

    After initially successful preservation of residual hearing with cochlear implantation, some patients experience subsequent delayed hearing loss. The etiology of such delayed hearing loss is unknown. Human temporal bone pathology is critically important in investigating the etiology, and directing future efforts to maximize long term hearing preservation in cochlear implant patients. Here we present the temporal bone pathology from a patient implanted during life with an Iowa/Nucleus Hybrid S8 implant, with initially preserved residual hearing and subsequent hearing loss. Both temporal bones were removed for histologic processing and evaluated. Complete clinical and audiologic records were available. He had bilateral symmetric high frequency severe to profound hearing loss prior to implantation. Since he was implanted unilaterally, the unimplanted ear was presumed to be representative of the pre-implantation pathology related to his hearing loss. The implanted and contralateral unimplanted temporal bones both showed complete degeneration of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the basal half of the cochleae, and only mild patchy loss of inner hair cells and outer hair cells in the apical half. The total spiral ganglion neuron counts were similar in both ears: 15,138 (56% of normal for age) in the unimplanted right ear and 13,722 (51% of normal for age) in the implanted left ear. In the basal turn of the implanted left cochlea, loose fibrous tissue and new bone formation filled the scala tympani, and part of the scala vestibuli. Delayed loss of initially preserved hearing after cochlear implantation was not explained by additional post-implantation degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons in this patient. Decreased compliance at the round window and increased damping in the scala tympani due to intracochlear fibrosis and new bone formation might explain part of the post-implantation hearing loss. Reduction of the inflammatory and immune response to

  13. The Effect of Cochlear Implantation on Education of Children with Hearing Disabilities in South Bohemia Region

    OpenAIRE

    MLÁDKOVÁ, Lucie

    2008-01-01

    The procedure of this qualitative research describes case studies of children with cochlear implants in the South Bohemia Region. It is a collection of information about their disabilities, families, social interactions and whole processes of rehabilitation before and after cochlear implantation. Its aim is to show how children with cochlear implants are successful and to facilitate the decision of each of their parents about the appropriate way of education for their own child with cochlear ...

  14. Cochlear implantation in the ossified cochlear%耳蜗骨化与人工耳蜗植入

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永新; 张华; 韩德民; 梁爽; 赵啸天; 郑军; 陈雪清; 孔颖; 刘博; 刘莎; 莫玲燕

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨耳蜗骨化状态下人工耳蜗植入手术的经验及分析术后效果.方法 北京同仁医院自1996年开展多道人工耳蜗植入手术以来,截止到2006年12月已开展手术600余例,遇到双侧耳蜗骨化患者7例.其中4例有明确的脑膜炎病史,3例耳蜗骨化原因不明.3例为耳蜗完全骨化;1例鼓阶完全骨化,前庭阶未受累;1例耳蜗部分骨化;2例耳蜗部分纤维化.总结术前、术中及术后的处理原则、方法及术后康复效果.结果 1例术中出现镫井喷,但比其他内耳畸形术中出现镫井喷的程度轻微;4例电极完全插入耳蜗内,2例植入部分电极,1例家属放弃植入;术后无面神经麻痹、脑脊液瘘等并发症;术后开机调试发现部分患者T值、C值比正常形态耳蜗植入偏高(因病例数量少未做统计学分析),但听阈无明显区别.术后语训听力及言语能力均有不同程度的提高.结论 对于耳蜗部分骨化患者,术中只要将其骨化成分自鼓阶内清除后可顺利植入电极;对于完全骨化患者可以将围绕蜗轴的鼓阶顶壁钻开,将电极嵌入骨槽内即可.脑膜炎后出现重度感音性聋应考虑耳蜗骨化的可能,常规颞骨CT及MRI检查,一旦确诊应尽快手术,以免耳蜗完全骨化.人工耳蜗植入术可以作为伴有耳蜗骨化的深度感音性聋患者的治疗和康复手段.%Objective To explore the problems and describe clinical experiences associated with multichannel cochlear implantation in patients with cochlear ossification.Methods Seven cochlear implant cases with bilateral cochlear ossification from 1996 to 2006 in Beijing Tongren Hospital were retrospectivly reviewed,4 of which were the consequence of meningitis.Three patients'cochlear were completely ossified,1 patient's tympanic scala was completely ossified,1 patient's cochlear was partially ossified,and 2 patients'cochlear were partially fibrotic.This article addressed the components of the

  15. Pre-, intra- and post-operative imaging of cochlear implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, T.J.; Naguib, N.N.N.; Burck, I. [University Hospital Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tawfik, A. [Mansoura Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Emam, A. [University Hospital Alexandria (Egypt). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Nour-Eldin, A. [University Hospital Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Radiology; Stoever, T. [University Hospital of Frankfurt (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to present essential imaging aspects in patients who are candidates for a possible cochlear implant as well as in postsurgical follow-up. Imaging plays a major role in providing information on preinterventional topography, variations and possible infections. Preoperative imaging using DVT, CT, MRI or CT and MRI together is essential for candidate selection, planning of surgical approach and exclusion of contraindications like the complete absence of the cochlea or cochlear nerve, or infection. Relative contraindications are variations of the cochlea and vestibulum. Intraoperative imaging can be performed by fluoroscopy, mobile radiography or DVT. Postoperative imaging is regularly performed by conventional X-ray, DVT, or CT. In summary, radiological imaging has its essential role in the pre- and post-interventional period for patients who are candidates for cochlear implants.

  16. Theory of mind and language in children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmel, Ethan; Peters, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Thirty children with cochlear implants (CI children), age range 3-12 years, and 30 children with normal hearing (NH children), age range 4-6 years, were tested on theory of mind and language measures. The CI children showed little to no delay on either theory of mind, relative to the NH children, or spoken language, relative to hearing norms. The CI children showed a slightly atypical sequence of acquisition of theory of mind concepts. The CI children's theory of mind performance was associated with general syntactic proficiency more than measures of complement syntax, and with time since implantation more than age at implantation. Results suggest that cochlear implantation can benefit spoken language ability, which may then benefit theory of mind, perhaps by increasing access to mental state language.

  17. Predictors of Spoken Language Development Following Pediatric Cochlear Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boons, Tinne; Brokx, Jan; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Frijns, Johan; Peeraer, Louis; Vermeulen,; Wouters,; Wieringen, van

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Although deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) are able to develop good language skills, the large variability in outcomes remains a significant concern. The first aim of this study was to evaluate language skills in children with CIs to establish benchmarks. The second aim was to m

  18. Multicenter study with a direct acoustic cochlear implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenarz, T.; Zwartenkot, J.W.; Stieger, C.; Schwab, B.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Caversaccio, M.; Kompis, M.; Snik, A.F.M.; D'Hondt, C.; Mojallal, H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To confirm the clinical efficacy and safety of a direct acoustic cochlear implant. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective multicenter study. SETTING: The study was performed at 3 university hospitals in Europe (Germany, The Netherlands, and Switzerland). PATIENTS: Fifteen patients with severe-to-profo

  19. Communication Intervention for Children with Cochlear Implants: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.; Leonard, Jeannette S.; Pachuilo, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the intervention programs attended and progress made by two children (ages 3 and 7) who exhibited considerable differences in benefit from their cochlear implants. Their intervention programs employed both analytical and synthetic auditory training and emphasized the development of speech production and language skills.…

  20. Counselling Challenges and Strategies for Cochlear Implant Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implant specialists daily observe patients and families grapple with a wide range of emotions. As nonprofessional counsellors, we can help patients address those emotions by providing more opportunities to talk about their thoughts and feelings. This paper will review some familiar counselling challenges, such as the disappointment that…

  1. Speech and sign perception in deaf children with cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Giezen

    2011-01-01

    Although a cochlear implant (CI) restores access to sound and speech for profoundly deaf children, there is substantial inter-individual variation in outcomes and many children with a CI continue to be delayed in their spoken language development. This suggests that they may benefit from alternative

  2. Patient Specific Simulation for Planning of Cochlear Implantation Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vera, Sergio; Perez, Frederic; Balust, Clara;

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is a surgical procedure that can restore the hearing capabilities to patients with severe or complete functional loss. However, the level of restoration varies highly between subjects and depends on patient-specific factors. This paper presents a software application for pla...

  3. Acoustic and Semantic Enhancements for Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, Rajka; Sladen, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined how signal clarity interacts with the use of sentence context information in determining speech-in-noise recognition for children with cochlear implants and children with normal hearing. Method: One hundred and twenty sentences in which the final word varied in predictability (high vs. low semantic…

  4. Two new directions in speech processor design for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Blake S; Schatzer, Reinhold; Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A; Sun, Xiaoan; Lawson, Dewey T; Wolford, Robert D

    2005-08-01

    Two new approaches to the design of speech processors for cochlear implants are described. The first aims to represent "fine structure" or "fine frequency" information in a way that it can be perceived and used by patients, and the second aims to provide a closer mimicking than was previously possible of the signal processing that occurs in the normal cochlea.

  5. Mismatch Negativity Based Neurofeedback for Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luckmann, Annika; Başkent, Deniz; Jolij, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users experience great difficulty when it comes to pitch discrimination. This leads to problems during daily interactions, due to poor speech perception, but also a very low pleasure ratings for music. Improving pitch perception and discrimination in CI users would improve thei

  6. Signal Processing Strategies for Cochlear Implants Using Current Steering

    OpenAIRE

    Waldo Nogueira; Leonid Litvak; Bernd Edler; Jörn Ostermann; Andreas Büchner

    2009-01-01

    In contemporary cochlear implant systems, the audio signal is decomposed into different frequency bands, each assigned to one electrode. Thus, pitch perception is limited by the number of physical electrodes implanted into the cochlea and by the wide bandwidth assigned to each electrode. The Harmony HiResolution bionic ear (Advanced Bionics LLC, Valencia, CA, USA) has the capability of creating virtual spectral channels through simultaneous delivery of current to pairs of adjacent electrodes....

  7. Bilateral Pseudoexfoliation Deposits on Intraocular Lens Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bonafonte Marquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of bilateral pseudoexfoliative deposits on both intraocular lens (IOL implants in an 83-year-old woman with no other associated pathology, 5 years after cataract surgery. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome is the most common cause of secondary open-angle glaucoma worldwide and these deposits are usually found on the natural lens. The fact that pseudoexfoliative deposits have been found on IOL implants implies the need for a thorough examination in pseudophakic patients, for it could be the only sign of secondary glaucoma.

  8. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Aparecida Fagundes Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP; speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP; Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS; and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS. The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms. In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms. The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI.

  9. Auditory Cortical Maturation in a Child with Cochlear Implant: Analysis of Electrophysiological and Behavioral Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Liliane Aparecida Fagundes; Couto, Maria Inês Vieira; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Carvalho, Ana Claudia Martinho; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to longitudinally assess the behavioral and electrophysiological hearing changes of a girl inserted in a CI program, who had bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss and underwent surgery of cochlear implantation with electrode activation at 21 months of age. She was evaluated using the P1 component of Long Latency Auditory Evoked Potential (LLAEP); speech perception tests of the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure (GASP); Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS); and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS). The study was conducted prior to activation and after three, nine, and 18 months of cochlear implant activation. The results of the LLAEP were compared with data from a hearing child matched by gender and chronological age. The results of the LLAEP of the child with cochlear implant showed gradual decrease in latency of the P1 component after auditory stimulation (172 ms–134 ms). In the GASP, IT-MAIS, and MUSS, gradual development of listening skills and oral language was observed. The values of the LLAEP of the hearing child were expected for chronological age (132 ms–128 ms). The use of different clinical instruments allow a better understanding of the auditory habilitation and rehabilitation process via CI. PMID:26881163

  10. An Undecimated Wavelet-based Method for Cochlear Implant Speech Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiaghababa, Fatemeh; Kermani, Saeed; Marateb, Hamid R.

    2014-01-01

    A cochlear implant is an implanted electronic device used to provide a sensation of hearing to a person who is hard of hearing. The cochlear implant is often referred to as a bionic ear. This paper presents an undecimated wavelet-based speech coding strategy for cochlear implants, which gives a novel speech processing strategy. The undecimated wavelet packet transform (UWPT) is computed like the wavelet packet transform except that it does not down-sample the output at each level. The speech ...

  11. Binaural release from masking with single- and multi-electrode stimulation in children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Ann E; Goupell, Matthew J; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2016-07-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) provide children with access to speech information from a young age. Despite bilateral cochlear implantation becoming common, use of spatial cues in free field is smaller than in normal-hearing children. Clinically fit CIs are not synchronized across the ears; thus binaural experiments must utilize research processors that can control binaural cues with precision. Research to date has used single pairs of electrodes, which is insufficient for representing speech. Little is known about how children with bilateral CIs process binaural information with multi-electrode stimulation. Toward the goal of improving binaural unmasking of speech, this study evaluated binaural unmasking with multi- and single-electrode stimulation. Results showed that performance with multi-electrode stimulation was similar to the best performance with single-electrode stimulation. This was similar to the pattern of performance shown by normal-hearing adults when presented an acoustic CI simulation. Diotic and dichotic signal detection thresholds of the children with CIs were similar to those of normal-hearing children listening to a CI simulation. The magnitude of binaural unmasking was not related to whether the children with CIs had good interaural time difference sensitivity. Results support the potential for benefits from binaural hearing and speech unmasking in children with bilateral CIs. PMID:27475132

  12. Mandarin melody recognition by pediatric cochlear implant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Feilin

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of children with implants who speak Mandarin Chinese, a tonal language, to recognize familiar melodies. It further examined the relative contributions of pitch, rhythm, and lyrics to melody recognition. Two groups of participants (ages 7-15; n = 20 for each group), those with cochlear implants and those with typical hearing, listened to 2 sets (traditional Mandarin children's songs and children's songs from Western cultures translated into Mandarin) of three melodies. These melodies were presented in 3 conditions: (a) melodic contour only (pitches in equal durations); (b) melodic contour with rhythmic patterns; and (c) melodic contour with rhythmic patterns and lyrics. The results indicated that pediatric cochlear implant recipients performed with greater accuracy in melody recognition when lyrics were available. Their scores were significantly lower when melodies containing only pitch features. Providing the rhythmic patterns aided participants' identification of the target melodies, but less so than the lyrics. Applications of findings to aural rehabilitation are discussed.

  13. [Long-latency auditory evoked potentials in cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, J J; Jiménez, J M; Pérez, J; Postigo, A; Roldán, B

    1999-01-01

    Cortical evoked potentials were evaluated in patients with cochlear implants. In a group of 8 adults of different ages, the lingual state before implantation and during rehabilitation were evaluated. Using cortical evoked potentials, the results of the P300 wave in response to two tones, one frequent (1,000 Hz) and the other infrequent (2,000 Hz), presented at 70 and 80 dB HL were studied. Results were analyzed and compared in relation to locutive state, rehabilitation stage, and intensity of stimulus. Absolute latencies did not differ significantly. However, latency values in relation to reaction time were significantly longer in prelingual than in postlingual patients (p test). The results confirmed the normality of central cognitive processes in patients with cochlear implants in objective assessment of P300 latency. The results suggest differences between prelingual and postlingual patients in relation to central signal processing.

  14. Brazilian adaptation of the Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI: comparison between normal hearing and cochlear implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trissia M.F. Vassoler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Enabling development of the ability to communicate effectively is the principal objective of cochlear implantation (CI in children. However, objective and effective metrics of communication for cochlear-implanted Brazilian children are lacking . The Functioning after Pediatric Cochlear Implantation (FAPCI, a parent/caregiver reporting instrument developed in the United States, is the first communicative performance scale for evaluation of real-world verbal communicative performance of 2-5-year-old children with cochlear implants. The primary aim was to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the FAPCI. The secondary aim was to conduct a trial of the adapted Brazilian-Portuguese FAPCI (FAPCI-BP in normal hearing (NH and CI children. METHODS: The American-English FAPCI was translated by a rigorous forward-backward process. The FAPCI-BP was then applied to the parents of children with NH (n = 131 and CI (n = 13, 2-9 years of age. Test-retest reliability was verified. RESULTS: The FAPCI-BP was confirmed to have excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.90. The CI group had lower FAPCI scores (58.38 ± 22.6 than the NH group (100.38 ± 15.2; p < 0.001, Wilcoxon test. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that the FAPCI-BP is a reliable instrument. It can be used to evaluate verbal communicative performance in children with and without CI. The FAPCI is currently the only psychometrically-validated instrument that allows such measures in cochlear-implanted children.

  15. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Assen Koitschev; Katarina Stingl; Karl Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt; Angelika Braun; Florian Gekeler; Udo Greppmaier; Helmut Sachs; Tobias Peters; Barbara Wilhelm; Eberhart Zrenner; Dorothea Besch

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and ...

  16. Modeling of Auditory Neuron Response Thresholds with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Venail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the prosthetic-neural interface is a critical point for cochlear implant efficiency. It depends not only on technical and anatomical factors such as electrode position into the cochlea (depth and scalar placement, electrode impedance, and distance between the electrode and the stimulated auditory neurons, but also on the number of functional auditory neurons. The efficiency of electrical stimulation can be assessed by the measurement of e-CAP in cochlear implant users. In the present study, we modeled the activation of auditory neurons in cochlear implant recipients (nucleus device. The electrical response, measured using auto-NRT (neural responses telemetry algorithm, has been analyzed using multivariate regression with cubic splines in order to take into account the variations of insertion depth of electrodes amongst subjects as well as the other technical and anatomical factors listed above. NRT thresholds depend on the electrode squared impedance (β = −0.11 ± 0.02, P<0.01, the scalar placement of the electrodes (β = −8.50 ± 1.97, P<0.01, and the depth of insertion calculated as the characteristic frequency of auditory neurons (CNF. Distribution of NRT residues according to CNF could provide a proxy of auditory neurons functioning in implanted cochleas.

  17. Speaker normalization for chinese vowel recognition in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2005-07-01

    Because of the limited spectra-temporal resolution associated with cochlear implants, implant patients often have greater difficulty with multitalker speech recognition. The present study investigated whether multitalker speech recognition can be improved by applying speaker normalization techniques to cochlear implant speech processing. Multitalker Chinese vowel recognition was tested with normal-hearing Chinese-speaking subjects listening to a 4-channel cochlear implant simulation, with and without speaker normalization. For each subject, speaker normalization was referenced to the speaker that produced the best recognition performance under conditions without speaker normalization. To match the remaining speakers to this "optimal" output pattern, the overall frequency range of the analysis filter bank was adjusted for each speaker according to the ratio of the mean third formant frequency values between the specific speaker and the reference speaker. Results showed that speaker normalization provided a small but significant improvement in subjects' overall recognition performance. After speaker normalization, subjects' patterns of recognition performance across speakers changed, demonstrating the potential for speaker-dependent effects with the proposed normalization technique. PMID:16042003

  18. Complications in cochlear implantation at the Clinical Center of Vojvodina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dankuc Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The first modern cochlear implantation in Serbia was performed on November 26, 2002 at the Center for Cochlear Implantation of the Clinic for Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Clinical Center of Vojvodina. Objective. The aim of the paper is the analysis of intraoperative and postoperative complications. Major complications include those resulting in the necessity for revision surgery, explantation, reimplantation, severe disease or even lethal outcomes. Minor complications resolve spontaneously or can be managed by conservative therapy and do not require any prolonged hospitalization of the patient. Methods. In the 2002-2013 period, 99 patients underwent surgical procedures and 100 cochlear implants were placed. Both intraoperative and postoperative complications were analyzed in the investigated patient population. Results. The analysis encompassed 99 patients, the youngest and the oldest ones being one year old and 61 years old, respectively. The complications were noticed in 11 patients, i.e. in 10.5% of 105 surgical procedures. The majority of procedures (89.5% were not accompanied by any post-surgical complications. Unsuccessful implantation in a single-step procedure (4.04% and transient facial nerve paralysis can be considered most frequent among our patients, whereas cochlear ossification (1.01% and transient ataxia (2.02% occurred rarely. Stimulation of the facial nerve (1.01%, intraoperative perilymph liquid gusher (1.01%, device failure and late infections (1.01% were recorded extremely rarely. Conclusion. Complications such as electrode extrusion, skin necrosis over the implant or meningitis, which is considered the most severe postoperative complication, have not been recorded at our Center since the very beginning. Absence of postoperative meningitis in patients treated at the Center can be attributed to timely pneumococcal vaccination of children.

  19. Cochlear implantation in late-implanted prelingually deafened adults: changes in quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straatman, L.V.; Huinck, W.J.; Langereis, M.C.; Snik, A.F.M.; Mulder, J.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With expanding inclusion criteria for cochlear implantation, the number of prelingually deafened persons who are implanted as adults increases. Compared with postlingually deafened adults, this group shows limited improvement in speech recognition. In this study, the changes in health-re

  20. Cochlear implant: what the radiologist should know; Implante coclear: o que o radiologista precisa saber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Natalia Delage; Couto, Caroline Laurita Batista; Gaiotti, Juliana Oggioni; Costa, Ana Maria Doffemond; Ribeiro, Marcelo Almeida; Diniz, Renata Lopes Furletti Caldeira, E-mail: nataliadelagegomes@gmail.com [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-05-15

    Cochlear implant is the method of choice in the treatment of deep sensorineural hypoacusis, particularly in patients where conventional amplification devices do not imply noticeable clinical improvement. Imaging findings are crucial in the indication or contraindication for such surgical procedure. In the assessment of the temporal bone, radiologists should be familiar with relative or absolute contraindication factors, as well as with factors that might significantly complicate the implantation. Some criteria such as cochlear nerve aplasia, labyrinthine and/or cochlear aplasia are still considered as absolute contraindications, in spite of studies bringing such criteria into question. Cochlear dysplasias constitute relative contraindications, among them labyrinthitis ossificans is highlighted. Other alterations may be mentioned as complicating agents in the temporal bone assessment, namely, hypoplasia of the mastoid process, aberrant facial nerve, otomastoiditis, otosclerosis, dehiscent jugular bulb, enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac. The experienced radiologist assumes an important role in the evaluation of this condition. (author)

  1. The influence of newborn hearing screening on the age at cochlear implantation in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, Marc J W; Jansen, Thijs T G; Grolman, Wilko; Lenarz, Thomas; Versnel, Huib; Van Zanten, Gijsbert A.; Topsakal, Vedat; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis To evaluate the influence of the introduction of newborn hearing screening programs on the age at cochlear implantation in children. Study Design Retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Methods All 1,299 pediatric cochlear implant users who received their implants before the a

  2. Educational Interpreters: Meeting the Communication Needs of Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Julie; Higbee, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved cochlear implants for deaf and hard of hearing children, the number of children who have cochlear implants has increased in mainstream settings. Recent research suggests that these students, like their deaf and hard of hearing peers without implants who use sign language,…

  3. Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients with Implications for Music Instruction: A Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Feilin; Gfeller, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review of literature presents a systematic analysis of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant recipients regarding music perception. Specifically, it a) analyzes individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, timbre, and pitch) as they interface with the technical characteristics of cochlear implants and the perceptual abilities of cochlear implant recipients; and b) describes accommodations for music instruction that support successful participation of children with cochlea...

  4. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  5. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  6. Music recognition by Japanese children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Takayuki; Trehub, Sandra E; Mitani, Chisato; Kanda, Yukihiko; Shibasaki, Atsuko; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Congenitally deaf Japanese children with cochlear implants were tested on their recognition of theme songs from television programs that they watched regularly. The children, who were 4-9 years of age, attempted to identify each song from a closed set of alternatives. Their song identification ability was examined in the context of the original commercial recordings (vocal plus instrumental), the original versions without the words (i.e., karaoke versions), and flute versions of the melody. The children succeeded in identifying the music only from the original versions, and their performance was related to their music listening habits. Children gave favorable appraisals of the music even when they were unable to recognize it. Further research is needed to find means of enhancing cochlear implants users' perception and appreciation of music. PMID:15684539

  7. Variability of the mental representation of the cochlear anatomy during cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Renato; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Bernardeschi, Daniele; De Seta, Daniele; Bensimon, Jean Loup; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Nguyen, Yann

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mental representation of the insertion axis of surgeons with different degrees of experience, and reproducibility of the insertion axis in repeated measures. A mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy were prepared in five different artificial temporal bones. A cone-beam CT was performed for each temporal bone and the data were registered on a magnetic navigation system. In these five temporal bones, 16 surgeons (3 experts; >50 cochlear implant surgery/year; 7 fellows with few cochlear implant experience, and 6 residents) were asked to determine the optimal insertion axis according to their mental representation. Compared to a planned ideal axis, the insertion axis was better determined by the experts with higher accuracy (axial: 7° ± 1.5°, coronal: 6° ± 1.5°) than fellows (axial: 14° ± 1.7°, coronal: 13° ± 1.7°; p scala tympani can be observed due to the complexity of the temporal bone anatomy and lack of landmarks to determine scala tympani orientation. Navigation systems can be used to evaluate and improve mental representation of the insertion axis to the scala tympani for cochlear implant surgery. PMID:26324880

  8. Comparison of intonation production in cochlear-implanted children and normal hearing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Nourbakhsh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Due to defects of auditory feedback, children with hearing loss have inappropriate speech intonation. Consistently, results of previous studies have shown that cochlear-implanted children have some difficulties in their intonation. Intonation shows the type of the sentence which can be statement or question sentences. The purpose of this study was comparison of speech intonation in cochlear-implanted children and normal hearing children.Methods: The present study was performed on 25 cochlear-implanted children and 50 normal hearing children. Different pictures were shown to the subjects and they said statement and question sentences. All sentences were heard by eight speech therapists and perceptually judged. Using praat software mean base frequency and pitch alterations were measured.Results: In cochlear-implanted group, mean speech base frequency was higher and mean pitch alteration was lower than the control group. Mean experts' scores in cochlear-implanted group were lower than the control group. Differences in all three variables were statistically significant (p<0.05. There was a significant direct correlation between duration of time that the children had cochlear implant and perceptual judgment scores (p<0.05.Conclusion: According to the results, cochlear implant prosthesis has limited efficacy in improving speech intonation; although their ability to produce speech intonation improves by increasing duration of the time that children have cochlear implant. Thus speech therapists should consider intervening on speech intonation in treatment program of cochlear-implanted children.

  9. Training to improve language outcomes in cochlear implant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    ErinM.Ingvalson; PatrickC. M.Wong

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have brought with them hearing ability for many prelingually deafened children. Advances in CI technology have brought not only hearing ability but speech perception to these same children. Concurrent with the development of speech perception has come spoken language development, bringing with it the hopes that prelingually deafened CI recipient children will develop spoken language capabilities on par with those of normal hearing (NH) children. Unfortunately, this has ...

  10. MUSIC APPRECIATION AND TRAINING FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANT RECIPIENTS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Looi, Valerie; Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in music perception of cochlear implant (CI) recipients, and a growing body of research conducted in this area. The majority of these studies have examined perceptual accuracy for pitch, rhythm, and timbre. Another important, but less commonly studied aspect of music listening is appreciation, or appraisal. Despite the ongoing research into potential technological improvements that may improve music perception for recipients, both perceptual...

  11. The Cost of Cochlear Implantation: A Review of Methodological Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Costa Nadège; Garnault Valérie; Ferlicoq Laura; Derumeaux-Burel Hélène; Bongard Vanina; Deguine Olivier; Fraysse Bernard; Molinier Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. Cost studies can provide useful guidance, so long as they adhere to accepted methodology. Cochlear implants (CIs) are electronic devices introduced surgically into the inner ear. It is a relevant example to review cost study analyses because of its costliness. The aim of this study was to review relevant published cost studies of CI to analyze the method used. Methods. First, we described the key points of cost study methodology. Cost studies relating to CI were systematically rev...

  12. Cochlear implantation in India: A public health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneela Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Around 7% of the population of India suffers from profound deafness. More than a million children needs either hearing aid or cochlear implant surgery to restore their hearing power. Many of them had never heard a single word since their birth. Still only 5000 cochlear implant surgery has been conducted in the country, the first being nearly 20 years ago, and most of them in private health facilities where the patient paid out of their pocket. The main reason of such poor penetration of the surgery in masses is the inhibitory cost associated with cochlear implant surgery and the lack of trained man-power to conduct such surgeries. The other reason is being the government engagement with other pressing health needs of the society resulting in the shout of ear care falling on deaf ears. With the advent of National Program for Prevention and Control of Deafness (NPPCD in 2006, there is renewed interest in tackling this public health disaster.

  13. "COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH INNER EAR MALFORMATIONS"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Borghei S. Abdi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Performing cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformation has always been a matter of dispute. This study was designed to analyze the operative findings,complications, and postoperative performance of patients with inner ear anomalies who underwent cochlear implantation. Six patients with inner ear malformations underwent implantation in our academic tertiary referral center from 1997 to 2002. The average follow-up period was 27 months. Malformations included one incomplete partition, one common cavity, one narrow internal acoustic canal (IAC in a patient with Riley-Day syndrome and 3 cases of large vestibular aqueduct. All received multi-channel implants either Nucleus 22 or Clarion device. Facial nerve was anomalous in 2 cases. CSF gusher occurred in 4 patients, which was controlled with packing the cochleostomy site. In all cases, the full length of electrode array was inserted, except one with Mondini's dysplasia where insertion failed in the first operation and was referred to another center for a successful surgery on the opposite ear. No other surgical complications were encountered. In 4 cases, all the 22 electrodes could be activated. All patients showed improved hearing performance after implantation. Four showed open-set speech recognition. The one with narrow IAC showed improved awareness to environmental sounds. In the other case (common cavity, the perception tests could not be performed because of very young age. Cochlear implantation in patients with inner ear malformations is a successful way of rehabilitation, although complications should be expected and auditory responses may be highly variable and relatively moderate.

  14. Implante coclear Digisonic SP® Binaural: acesso coronal tunelizado Digisonic SP® Binaural cochlear implant: the coronal tunneled approach

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    Guilherme Machado de Carvalho

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O implante coclear é um grande avanço no tratamento da surdez. Há grandes evidências que a audição bilateral traz diversas vantagens ao ser humano e muito mais quando se trata de audição binaural. OBJETIVO: Este artigo tem por objetivo descrever o primeiro caso operado no Brasil, sendo o terceiro país das Américas (México e Colômbia a realizar, com implante binaural Neurelec Digisonic SP® demonstrando a técnica cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Descrição da técnica cirúrgica. RESULTADOS: Ver técnica cirúrgica. Procedimento ocorreu sem intercorrências. DISCUSSÃO: O efeito "squelch", a somação binaural, a localização da fonte sonora e o efeito sombra da cabeça são umas das principais razões que justificam a superioridade da reabilitação binaural. O custo do tratamento deve ser levado em conta em políticas de saúde pública. CONCLUSÃO: Custo do implante coclear é um dos grandes limitadores da bilateralidade na reabilitação desse grupo de pacientes, porém, com essa tecnologia, é possível solucionar esse problema, expondo o paciente a poucos riscos, com o uso de uma técnica cirúrgica pouco invasiva.Cochlear implants represent a significant breakthrough in the treatment of hearing loss. Evidence indicates bilateral hearing brings significant benefits to patients, particularly when binaural hearing is offered. OBJECTIVE: To describe the first case of implantation of a Digisonic SP® Binaural Neurelec device in Brazil (the third implant placed in the Americas, after Mexico and Colombia and the chosen surgical approach. METHOD: Description of a surgical approach. RESULTS: The procedure was successfully completed. DISCUSSION: The squelch effect, binaural summation, location of the sound source, and the shadow effect of the head are listed among the reasons to explain the superiority of binaural rehabilitation. Cost of treatment must be considered in the development of public health policies. CONCLUSION: The cost of cochlear

  15. Optical coherence tomography as a guide for cochlear implant surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, T.; Lankenau, E.; Hüttmann, G.; Pau, H. W.

    2008-02-01

    To assess the potential use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in cochlear implant surgery, OCT was applied in human temporal bones before cochleostomy. The question was whether OCT might provide information about the cochlear topography, especially about the site of the scala tympani. OCT was carried out on human temporal bone preparations, in which the cochleostomy was performed leaving the membranous labyrinth and the fluid-filled inner ear intact. A specially equipped operating microscope with integrated OCT prototype was used. Spectral-domain (SD)-OCT was used for all investigations. On all scans, OCT supplied information about inner ear structures, such as scala tympani, scala vestibuli while the membranous labyrinth was still intact. In the fresh temporal bone the scala media, basilar membrane and the Reissner's membrane were identified. This OCT study clearly documents the possibility to identify inner ear structures, especially the scala tympani without opening its enveloping membranes. These findings may have an impact on cochlear implant surgery, especially as an orientation guide to localize the scala tympani precisely before opening the fluid filled inner ear.

  16. Design of a new electrode array for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This study aims to design a new electrode array which can be precisely located beneath the basilar membrane within the cochlear scala tympani. This placement of the electrode array is beneficial for increasing the effectiveness of the electrical stimulation of the audi tory nerves and maximising the growth factors delivered into the cochlea for regenerating the progressively lost auditory neurons, thereby significantly improving performance of the cochlear implant systems. Methods The design process involved two steps. First, the biocom patible nitinol-based shape memory alloy, of which mechanical deformation can be controlled using electrical cUTents/fields act vated by body temperature, was selected. Second, five different designs of the electrode array with embedded nitinol actuators were studied (Table I). The finite element method was employed to predict final positions of these electrode arrays. Results The electrode array with three 6 mm actuators at 2-8, 8-J4 and 14-20 mm from the tip (Fig. I) was found to be located most closely to the basilar membrane, compared with those in the other four cases. Conclusions A new nitinol cochlear implant electrode array with three embedded nitinol actuators has been designed. This electrode array is expected to be located beneath the basilar membrane for maximising the delivery of growth factors. Future research will involve the manufacturing of a prototype of this electrode array for use in insertion experiments and neurotrophin release tests.

  17. Achieving early functional auditory access in paediatric cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzan, E; Muzzi, E; Marchi, R; Falzone, C; Battelino, S; Ciciriello, E

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) is a viable option for providing access to auditory stimulation in severe-to-profound hearing loss/impairment of cochlear origin. It has been demonstrated that CI is safe and effective for deaf children. Younger age at activation after CI is linked with better outcomes. It is important to study variables and issues that can interfere with an early fitting and access to sound after CI. They range from patient characteristics, family compliance and support, to technical, medical or organisational problems. A SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix was conducted to discuss issues and propose recommendations to be considered when operating an early switch on of the CI. PMID:27054390

  18. Should a hearing aid in the contralateral ear be recommended for children with a unilateral cochlear implant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijen, J.W.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Leeuw, A.R.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To predict bimodal benefit before cochlear implantation, we compared the performances of participants with bimodal fitting and with a cochlear implant alone on speech perception tests. METHODS: Twenty-two children with a cochlear implant in one ear and a hearing aid in the other (bimodal

  19. Persistent Language Delay versus Late Language Emergence in Children with Early Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann E.; Nicholas, Johanna; Tobey, Emily; Davidson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation is to differentiate children using cochlear implants (CIs) who did or did not achieve age-appropriate language scores by mid-elementary grades and to identify risk factors for persistent language delay following early cochlear implantation. Materials and Method: Children receiving unilateral CIs at…

  20. Parental mode of communication is essential for speech and language outcomes in cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Breinegaard, Nina;

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a very strong effect of the parental communication mode on the auditory capabilities and speech/language outcome for cochlear implanted children. The children exposed to spoken language had higher odds of scoring high in all tests applied and the findings suggest...... a very clear benefit of spoken language communication with a cochlear implanted child....

  1. Contribution of Family Environment to Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users' Speech and Language Outcomes: Some Preliminary Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Rachael Frush; Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.; Lalonde, Kaylah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the family environments of children with cochlear implants and to examine relationships between family environment and postimplant language development and executive function. Method: Forty-five families of children with cochlear implants completed a self-report family environment questionnaire (Family Environment Scale-Fourth…

  2. Cochlear Implantation among Deaf Children with Additional Disabilities: Parental Perceptions of Benefits, Challenges, and Service Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet R.; Chia, Ruth; Kozak, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Although increasing numbers of children with additional disabilities are receiving cochlear implants (CIs), little is known about family perspectives of the benefits and the challenges of cochlear implantation in this pediatric population. This study examines perceptions among parents of deaf children with additional disabilities regarding…

  3. Comparison of Auditory Perception in Cochlear Implanted Children with and without Additional Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Basir Hashemi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of children with cochlear implants who have other difficulties such as attention deficiency and cerebral palsy has increased dramatically. Despite the need for information on the results of cochlear implantation in this group, the available literature is extremely limited. We, therefore, sought to compare the levels of auditory perception in children with cochlear implants with and without additional disabilities. Methods: A spondee test comprising 20 two-syllable words was performed. The data analysis was done using SPSS, version 19. Results: Thirty-one children who had received cochlear implants 2 years previously and were at an average age of 7.5 years were compared via the spondee test. From the 31 children,15 had one or more additional disabilities. The data analysis indicated that the mean score of auditory perception in this group was approximately 30 scores below that of the children with cochlear implants who had no additional disabilities. Conclusion: Although there was an improvement in the auditory perception of all the children with cochlear implants, there was a noticeable difference in the level of auditory perception between those with and without additional disabilities. Deafness and additional disabilities depended the children on lip reading alongside the auditory ways of communication. In addition, the level of auditory perception in the children with cochlear implants who had more than one additional disability was significantly less than that of the other children with cochlear implants who had one additional disability.

  4. Long-Term Evolution of the Electrical Stimulation Levels for Cochlear Implant Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Jose Luis; Sainz, Manuel; Roldan, Cristina; Alvarez, Isaac; de la Torre, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The stimulation levels programmed in cochlear implant systems are affected by an evolution since the first switch-on of the processor. This study was designed to evaluate the changes in stimulation levels over time and the relationship between post-implantation physiological changes and with the hearing experience provided by the continuous use of the cochlear implant. Methods Sixty-two patients, ranging in age from 4 to 68 years at the moment of implantation participated in this s...

  5. The identification of musical instruments through nucleus cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasmeder, M L; Lutman, M E

    2006-09-01

    In this study, self-reported ability to recognize musical instruments was investigated by means of a questionnaire, which was sent to a group of adult Nucleus cochlear implant users and a group of normally hearing subjects. In addition, spectrograms and electrodograms were produced and analysed for samples of music played on 10 different musical instruments. Self-reported ability to recognize some instruments was poor in the group of implant users, particularly for the saxophone, tuba and clarinet. Electrodograms showed that these instruments could only be identified using distorted spectral information or reduced temporal information. Other instruments, such as the drum and piano, could be identified using temporal information. Limited spectral resolution makes the recognition of musical instruments difficult for Nucleus implant users.

  6. School failure in students who are normal-hearing or deaf: with or without cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ivone; Santos, Cristina Costa; Rego, Guilhermina; Nunes, Rui

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of cochlear implants on the school failure of deaf who attend mainstream classes by comparing them to their normal-hearing peers as well as deaf without cochlear implants. This case-control study included participants aged 8-18 years. The number of school years failed was obtained from school records. The greatest differences in achievement levels were found between hearing students and those who were deaf without cochlear implants. Cochlear implants provide educational opportunities for hearing-impaired students, yet those without cochlear implants remain at a great disadvantage. These findings suggest that measures promoting greater equity and quality for all deaf students allow achievement levels closer to those of the not impaired. PMID:27026931

  7. Mitochondrial Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Retrospective Study and a Description of Cochlear Implantation in a MELAS Patient

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    Mauro Scarpelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment is common in patients with mitochondrial disorders, affecting over half of all cases at some time in the course of the disease. In some patients, deafness is only part of a multisystem disorder. By contrast, there are also a number of “pure” mitochondrial deafness disorders, the most common probably being maternally inherited. We retrospectively analyzed the last 60 genetically confirmed mitochondrial disorders diagnosed in our Department: 28 had bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, whereas 32 didn't present ear's abnormalities, without difference about sex and age of onset between each single group of diseases. We reported also a case of MELAS patient with sensorineural hearing loss, in which cochlear implantation greatly contributed to the patient's quality of life. Our study suggests that sensorineural hearing loss is an important feature in mitochondrial disorders and indicated that cochlear implantation can be recommended for patients with MELAS syndrome and others mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Bilingualism: A Pearl to Overcome Certain Perils of Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Tom; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Mathur, Gaurav; Napoli, Donna Jo; Padden, Carol; Rathmann, Christian; Smith, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) have demonstrated success in improving young deaf children's speech and low-level speech awareness across a range of auditory functions, but this success is highly variable, and how this success correlates to high-level language development is even more variable. Prevalence on the success rate of CI as an outcome for language development is difficult to obtain because studies vary widely in methodology and variables of interest, and because not all cochlear implant technology (which continues to evolve) is the same. Still, even if the notion of treatment failure is limited narrowly to those who gain no auditory benefit from CI in that they cannot discriminate among ambient noises, the reported treatment failure rate is high enough to call into question the current lack of consideration of alternative approaches to ensure young deaf children's language development. Recent research has highlighted the risks of delaying language input during critical periods of brain development with concomitant consequences for cognitive and social skills. As a result, we propose that before, during, and after implantation deaf children learn a sign language along with a spoken language to ensure their maximal language development and optimal long-term developmental outcomes. PMID:25419095

  9. Speech recognition for 40 patients receiving multichannel cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, R C; Mecklenburg, D J; Clark, G M

    1986-10-01

    We collected data on 40 patients who received the Nucleus multichannel cochlear implant. Results were reviewed to determine if the coding strategy is effective in transmitting the intended speech features and to assess patient benefit in terms of communication skills. All patients demonstrated significant improvement over preoperative results with a hearing aid for both lipreading enhancement and speech recognition without lipreading. Of the patients, 50% demonstrated ability to understand connected discourse with auditory input only. For the 23 patients who were tested 12 months postoperatively, there was substantial improvement in open-set speech recognition. PMID:3755975

  10. Perceptual fusion of polyphonic pitch in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Patrick J; Guo, Benjamin Z; Limb, Charles J

    2009-11-01

    In music, multiple pitches often occur simultaneously, an essential feature of harmony. In the present study, the authors assessed the ability of cochlear implant (CI) users to perceive polyphonic pitch. Acoustically presented stimuli consisted of one, two, or three superposed tones with different fundamental frequencies (f(0)). The normal hearing control group obtained significantly higher mean scores than the CI group. CI users performed near chance levels in recognizing two- and three-pitch stimuli, and demonstrated perceptual fusion of multiple pitches as single-pitch units. These results suggest that limitations in polyphonic pitch perception may significantly impair music perception in CI users.

  11. [A review of research on music perception ability for adult cochlear implant users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziye; Liu, Bo; Wang, Shuo

    2012-11-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a kind of surgically implanted electronic device that provides a sense of sound to a person who has severe to profound sensorineural hearing impairment. However, studies have shown that the performance in music perception for CI users has not been achieved to an ideal level. It is important to evaluate the ability to perceive music using well designed music perception test materials, in order to improve the quality of life for cochlear implant users. This paper reviewed the studies on assessing music perception ability for adult cochlear implant users from the existing literature. PMID:23379124

  12. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assen Koitschev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply.

  13. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  14. Extraocular Surgical Approach for Placement of Subretinal Implants in Blind Patients: Lessons from Cochlear-Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, Assen; Stingl, Katarina; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Braun, Angelika; Gekeler, Florian; Greppmaier, Udo; Sachs, Helmut; Peters, Tobias; Wilhelm, Barbara; Zrenner, Eberhart; Besch, Dorothea

    2015-01-01

    In hereditary retinal diseases photoreceptors progressively degenerate, often causing blindness without therapy being available. Newly developed subretinal implants can substitute functions of photoreceptors. Retina implant extraocular surgical technique relies strongly on cochlear-implant know-how. However, a completely new surgical approach providing safe handling of the photosensor array had to be developed. The Retina Implant Alpha IMS consisting of a subretinal microphotodiode array and cable linked to a cochlear-implant-like ceramic housing was introduced via a retroauricular incision through a subperiosteal tunnel above the zygoma into the orbit using a specially designed trocar. Implant housing was fixed in a bony bed within a tight subperiosteal pocket in all patients. Primary outcomes were patient short term safety as well as effectiveness. Nine patients participated in the first part of the multicenter trial and received the subretinal visual implant in one eye. In all cases microphotodiode array pull-through procedure and stable positioning were possible without affecting the device function. No intraoperative complications were encountered. The minimally invasive suprazygomatic tunneling technique for the sensor unit as well as a subperiosteal pocket fixation of the implant housing provides a safe extraocular implantation approach of a subretinal device with a transcutaneous extracorporeal power supply. PMID:26783453

  15. The Effects of Training on Recognition of Musical Instruments by Adults with Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Virginia D

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the efficiency and effectiveness of three types of training on recognition of musical instruments by adults with cochlear implants (CI). Seventy-one adults with CIs were randomly assigned to one of three training conditions: feedback on response accuracy, feedback-plus (response accuracy plus correct answer), and direct instruction. Each participant completed three training sessions per week over a five-week time period in which they listened to recorded excerpts of eight different musical instruments. Results showed significant pre-to-posttest improvement in music instrument recognition accuracy for all three training conditions (22.9-25.7%, p< 0.0001). Time when tested (week), bilateral CI use, and age were significant predictors of performance. Participants who wore bilateral implants scored significantly higher than participants with unilateral implants at all three time points; hearing aid use was not a significant predictor. These results may have practical implications for numerous types of auditory rehabilitation for persons who use CIs.

  16. Role of bimodal stimulation for auditory-perceptual skills development in children with a unilateral cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, P; Giannantonio, S; Scorpecci, A; Pianesi, F; Micardi, M; Resca, A

    2015-12-01

    This is a prospective randomised study that evaluated the differences arising from a bimodal stimulation compared to a monaural electrical stimulation in deaf children, particularly in terms of auditory-perceptual skills development. We enrolled 39 children aged 12 to 36 months, suffering from severe-to-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with residual hearing on at least one side. All were unilaterally implanted: 21 wore only the cochlear implant (CI) (unilateral CI group), while the other 18 used the CI and a contralateral hearing aid at the same time (bimodal group). They were assessed with a test battery designed to appraise preverbal and verbal auditory-perceptual skills immediately before and 6 and 12 months after implantation. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups at time 0, while at 6 and 12 months children in the bimodal group had better scores in each test than peers in the unilateral CI group. Therefore, although unilateral deafness/hearing does not undermine hearing acuity in normal listening, the simultaneous use of a CI and a contralateral hearing aid (binaural hearing through a bimodal stimulation) provides an advantage in terms of acquisition of auditory-perceptual skills, allowing children to achieve the basic milestones of auditory perception faster and in greater number than children with only one CI. Thus, "keeping awake" the contralateral auditory pathway, albeit not crucial in determining auditory acuity, guarantees benefits compared with the use of the implant alone. These findings provide initial evidence to establish shared guidelines for better rehabilitation of patients undergoing unilateral cochlear implantation, and add more evidence regarding the correct indications for bilateral cochlear implantation. PMID:26900251

  17. Role of bimodal stimulation for auditory-perceptual skills development in children with a unilateral cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, P; Giannantonio, S; Scorpecci, A; Pianesi, F; Micardi, M; Resca, A

    2015-12-01

    This is a prospective randomised study that evaluated the differences arising from a bimodal stimulation compared to a monaural electrical stimulation in deaf children, particularly in terms of auditory-perceptual skills development. We enrolled 39 children aged 12 to 36 months, suffering from severe-to-profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with residual hearing on at least one side. All were unilaterally implanted: 21 wore only the cochlear implant (CI) (unilateral CI group), while the other 18 used the CI and a contralateral hearing aid at the same time (bimodal group). They were assessed with a test battery designed to appraise preverbal and verbal auditory-perceptual skills immediately before and 6 and 12 months after implantation. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups at time 0, while at 6 and 12 months children in the bimodal group had better scores in each test than peers in the unilateral CI group. Therefore, although unilateral deafness/hearing does not undermine hearing acuity in normal listening, the simultaneous use of a CI and a contralateral hearing aid (binaural hearing through a bimodal stimulation) provides an advantage in terms of acquisition of auditory-perceptual skills, allowing children to achieve the basic milestones of auditory perception faster and in greater number than children with only one CI. Thus, "keeping awake" the contralateral auditory pathway, albeit not crucial in determining auditory acuity, guarantees benefits compared with the use of the implant alone. These findings provide initial evidence to establish shared guidelines for better rehabilitation of patients undergoing unilateral cochlear implantation, and add more evidence regarding the correct indications for bilateral cochlear implantation.

  18. A retrospective study of cochlear implant outcomes in children with residual hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; McCrae, Rosemary; Schramm, David

    2006-01-01

    Background There has been increasing demand for the cochlear implantation of children who demonstrate some auditory capacity with conventional hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine speech recognition outcomes in a group of children who were regarded as borderline candidates for cochlear implantation as their residual hearing and/or auditory functioning levels exceeded typical audiologic candidacy criteria. Methods A retrospective chart review was undertaken at one Canadian cochlear implant centre to identify children implanted at age 4 or older with a pure-tone-average of 90 dB or better and speech recognition of 30% or greater. Pre-implant and post-implant open-set word and sentence test scores were analyzed. Results Eleven children of 195 paediatric cochlear implant recipients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Speech recognition results for the10 English-speaking children indicated significant gains in both open-set word and sentence understanding within the first 6 to 12 months of implant use. Seven of 9 children achieved 80% open-set sentence recognition within 12 months post-surgery. Conclusion Children with several years of experience using conventional amplification demonstrated rapid progress in auditory skills following cochlear implantation. These findings suggest that cochlear implantation may be an appropriate intervention for selected children with severe hearing losses and/or auditory capacity outside current candidacy criteria. PMID:16623948

  19. A retrospective study of cochlear implant outcomes in children with residual hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCrae Rosemary

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been increasing demand for the cochlear implantation of children who demonstrate some auditory capacity with conventional hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine speech recognition outcomes in a group of children who were regarded as borderline candidates for cochlear implantation as their residual hearing and/or auditory functioning levels exceeded typical audiologic candidacy criteria. Methods A retrospective chart review was undertaken at one Canadian cochlear implant centre to identify children implanted at age 4 or older with a pure-tone-average of 90 dB or better and speech recognition of 30% or greater. Pre-implant and post-implant open-set word and sentence test scores were analyzed. Results Eleven children of 195 paediatric cochlear implant recipients met the inclusion criteria for this study. Speech recognition results for the10 English-speaking children indicated significant gains in both open-set word and sentence understanding within the first 6 to 12 months of implant use. Seven of 9 children achieved 80% open-set sentence recognition within 12 months post-surgery. Conclusion Children with several years of experience using conventional amplification demonstrated rapid progress in auditory skills following cochlear implantation. These findings suggest that cochlear implantation may be an appropriate intervention for selected children with severe hearing losses and/or auditory capacity outside current candidacy criteria.

  20. Signal Processing Strategies for Cochlear Implants Using Current Steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Nogueira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary cochlear implant systems, the audio signal is decomposed into different frequency bands, each assigned to one electrode. Thus, pitch perception is limited by the number of physical electrodes implanted into the cochlea and by the wide bandwidth assigned to each electrode. The Harmony HiResolution bionic ear (Advanced Bionics LLC, Valencia, CA, USA has the capability of creating virtual spectral channels through simultaneous delivery of current to pairs of adjacent electrodes. By steering the locus of stimulation to sites between the electrodes, additional pitch percepts can be generated. Two new sound processing strategies based on current steering have been designed, SpecRes and SineEx. In a chronic trial, speech intelligibility, pitch perception, and subjective appreciation of sound were compared between the two current steering strategies and standard HiRes strategy in 9 adult Harmony users. There was considerable variability in benefit, and the mean results show similar performance with all three strategies.

  1. Changes in Tinnitus after Cochlear Implantation and Its Relation with Psychological Functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloostra, Francka J. J.; Arnold, Rosemarie; Hofman, Rutger; Van Dijk, Pim

    2015-01-01

    This study retrospectively assessed the prevalence of tinnitus in cochlear implant patients and the changes after implantation in 212 patients implanted between 2000 and 2009. Patients were included at least 6 months after implantation and received 2 sets of questionnaires, one about the situation b

  2. Surgical complications following cochlear implantation in adults based on a proposed reporting consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jonas; Faber, Christian Emil

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Conclusion: The rate of severe complications was low and cochlear implantation is a relatively safe procedure. Standardization is crucial when reporting on cochlear implant complications to ensure comparability between studies. A consensus on the reporting of complications proposed by a ...... occurred following one implantation (0.3%). Transient chorda tympani syndrome (30.8%), vertigo/dizziness (29.5%) and tinnitus (4.9%) were the most frequent minor complications....

  3. Advances in Cochlear Implant Telemetry: Evoked Neural Responses, Electrical Field Imaging, and Technical Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mens, Lucas H. M.

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, cochlear implantation has evolved into a well-established treatment of deafness, predominantly because of many improvements in speech processing and the controlled excitation of the auditory nerve. Cochlear implants now also feature telemetry, which is highly useful to monitor the proper functioning of the implanted electronics and electrode contacts. Telemetry can also support the clinical management in young children and difficult cases where neural unresponsiveness ...

  4. Electric auditory brainstem response (E-ABR in cochlear implant children: Effect of age at implantation and duration of implant use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithreen Mohammed Said Abdelsalam

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: A well-established EABR was obtained in cochlear implant children with proper parameters. The characterizations of the EABR waves including wave latencies and threshold were extracted at different electrodes. The EABR test proves to be an effective method to evaluate the functions of the auditory pathway in children after cochlear implantation.

  5. A Binaural Cochlear Implant Sound Coding Strategy Inspired by the Contralateral Medial Olivocochlear Reflex

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique A Lopez-Poveda; Eustaquio-Martín, Almudena; Stohl, Joshua S.; Wolford, Robert D.; Schatzer, Reinhold; Wilson, Blake S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In natural hearing, cochlear mechanical compression is dynamically adjusted via the efferent medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR). These adjustments probably help understanding speech in noisy environments and are not available to the users of current cochlear implants (CIs). The aims of the present study are to: (1) present a binaural CI sound processing strategy inspired by the control of cochlear compression provided by the contralateral MOCR in natural hearing; and (2) assess th...

  6. Cochlear implantation in children with "CHARGE syndrome": surgical options and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Giampietro; Trabalzini, Franco; Faralli, Mario; D'Ascanio, Luca; Cristi, Cristina; Molini, Egisto

    2014-03-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a rare, polymalformative disease, representing one of the major causes of associated blindness and deafness. Bilateral, severe-profound, sensorineural hearing loss is common in CHARGE children. Aim of this study is to present our results in children with "CHARGE syndrome" submitted to cochlear implantation (CI). The frequency of anatomic anomalies, possible variations in the surgical technique of CI, and the audiological/rehabilitative benefits attained in our patients are reported. we submitted 5 children affected by CHARGE syndrome with profound, bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss to CI. Otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response, acoustic impedance testing, cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance were carried out preoperatively in all children. CI was performed using the mastoidotomy-posterior tympanotomy approach in two cases, and the suprameatal approach in three children. Infant toddler-meaningful auditory integration scale was used to evaluate kid's audiological performance before and after CI. Intra-operatory findings and postsurgical complications were evaluated. Among our patients, intraoperative anatomical malformations were cochlear hypoplasia (100 %), ossicles malformations (100 %), semicircular canals aplasia (100 %), oval window atresia (60 %), round window atresia (40 %), widening of the aqueduct of the vestibule (20 %), and aberrant course of the facial nerve (20 %). No intra- or postoperative complication was recorded in relation to implant positioning. After a follow-up ranging from 1 to 4.5 years, only 2/5 patients used oral language as the sole mean of communication, 1 started utilizing oral language as the main mean of communication, while 2 patients did not develop any linguistic ability. In conclusion, CI in patients with CHARGE association is feasible and, despite results variability, it should be carried out in CHARGE children with severe hearing loss as soon as possible. Although the selection of a

  7. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf - Cochlear Implants: A Technical and Personal Account

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue University)

    2003-12-17

    Cochlear implants are the first device to successfully restore neural function. They have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. In this talk the physiology of natural hearing will be reviewed from the perspective of a physicist, and the function of cochlear implants will be described in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. The social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses will also be discussed.

  8. Parental mode of communication is essential for speech and language outcomes in cochlear implanted children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Breinegaard, Nina;

    2010-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a very strong effect of the parental communication mode on the auditory capabilities and speech/language outcome for cochlear implanted children. The children exposed to spoken language had higher odds of scoring high in all tests applied and the findings suggest a ...... a very clear benefit of spoken language communication with a cochlear implanted child.......The present study demonstrates a very strong effect of the parental communication mode on the auditory capabilities and speech/language outcome for cochlear implanted children. The children exposed to spoken language had higher odds of scoring high in all tests applied and the findings suggest...

  9. The multi-channel cochlear implant: past, present and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Initial research demonstrated that only low frequencies could be mimicked with rate of electrical stimulation, and thus multi-channel rather than single-channel stimulation was required for the place coding of the mid-high speech frequencies. Place coding of mid-high frequencies was best achieved with electrodes inside the cochlea. Furthermore, correct biomechanical properties of a multiple electrode bundle were required for it to pass around the cochlear spiral to the speech frequency region. Biological studies showed too that intra-cochlear electrodes could be used with minimal trauma, safe electrical stimulus parameters, and methods to prevent inner ear infection and meningitis. The crucial discoveries for coding speech with electrical stimulation have been based on the discovery of: 1) the fact the brain processes frequency information along spatial and temporal channels, and 2) that the first patient experienced vowels when stimulating different electrodes that corresponded to the place of excitation for single formant vowels in people with normal hearing. The inaugural and subsequent speech processing strategies extracted frequencies of special importance for speech intelligibility, and transmitted the information along place coding channels. The voicing frequency and/or amplitude, was coded as temporal information across these spatial channels. As a result a great majority of severely-to-profoundly deaf people with previous hearing can not only communicate when electrical stimulation is combined with lipreading, but with electrical stimulation alone. In addition, the benefits of binaural hearing with bilateral cochlear implants or an implant in one ear and hearing aid in the other ear have been realized. Related psychophysical research has discovered the basic perceptual skills that process the complex patterns of brain excitation that underlie speech recognition both in the one ear as well as bilateral implants.In addition the development of the perceptual

  10. Vestibular Dysfunctions in Cochlear Implant Patients; A Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in response to click or short tone burst stimuli have been used as a clinical test for distinguish saccule and inferior vestibular nerve diseases. Different studies show that cochlear implant could have inverse effects on vestibular structures. We aimed to investigate vestibular evoked myogenic potential in unilateral cochlear implanted individuals in compare to normal individuals.Methods: Thirty-three unilateral cochlear implanted patients (mean age 19.96 years and 30 normal hearing individuals (mean age 24-27 years as control group were enrolled in this cross- sectional study. Absolute latencies and amplitudes of myogenic potential responses were measured and compared in both groups.Results: Myogenic potential recorded in both ears of all controls were normal. No response could be recorded in 16 patients (48.48% from both ears. In three patients, responses were recorded in both ears though the amplitude of waves was reduced in implanted ear. Unilateral response could be recorded in 14 patients only in their non-implanted ear.Conclusion: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential test is a useful tool for assessing saccular function in cochlear implant patients. Damages of osseous spiral lamina and basilar membrane after cochlear implantation could result in dysfunctions of vestibular organs specially saccule. It seems that saccule could be easily damaged after cochlear implantation. This would cause absence or reduced amplitudes in myogenic potential.

  11. Coding strategies for cochlear implants under adverse environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmina, Qudsia

    Cochlear implants are electronic prosthetic devices that restores partial hearing in patients with severe to profound hearing loss. Although most coding strategies have significantly improved the perception of speech in quite listening conditions, there remains limitations on speech perception under adverse environments such as in background noise, reverberation and band-limited channels, and we propose strategies that improve the intelligibility of speech transmitted over the telephone networks, reverberated speech and speech in the presence of background noise. For telephone processed speech, we propose to examine the effects of adding low-frequency and high- frequency information to the band-limited telephone speech. Four listening conditions were designed to simulate the receiving frequency characteristics of telephone handsets. Results indicated improvement in cochlear implant and bimodal listening when telephone speech was augmented with high frequency information and therefore this study provides support for design of algorithms to extend the bandwidth towards higher frequencies. The results also indicated added benefit from hearing aids for bimodal listeners in all four types of listening conditions. Speech understanding in acoustically reverberant environments is always a difficult task for hearing impaired listeners. Reverberated sounds consists of direct sound, early reflections and late reflections. Late reflections are known to be detrimental to speech intelligibility. In this study, we propose a reverberation suppression strategy based on spectral subtraction to suppress the reverberant energies from late reflections. Results from listening tests for two reverberant conditions (RT60 = 0.3s and 1.0s) indicated significant improvement when stimuli was processed with SS strategy. The proposed strategy operates with little to no prior information on the signal and the room characteristics and therefore, can potentially be implemented in real-time CI

  12. Toward automated cochlear implant insertion using tubular manipulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granna, Josephine; Rau, Thomas S.; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    During manual cochlear implant electrode insertion the surgeon is at risk to damage the intracochlear fine-structure, as the electrode array is inserted through a small opening in the cochlea blindly with little force-feedback. This paper addresses a novel concept for cochlear electrode insertion using tubular manipulators to reduce risks of causing trauma during insertion and to automate the insertion process. We propose a tubular manipulator incorporated into the electrode array composed of an inner wire within a tube, both elastic and helically shaped. It is our vision to use this manipulator to actuate the initially straight electrode array during insertion into the cochlea by actuation of the wire and tube, i.e. translation and slight axial rotation. In this paper, we evaluate the geometry of the human cochlea in 22 patient datasets in order to derive design requirements for the manipulator. We propose an optimization algorithm to automatically determine the tube set parameters (curvature, torsion, diameter, length) for an ideal final position within the cochlea. To prove our concept, we demonstrate that insertion can be realized in a follow-the-leader fashion for 19 out of 22 cochleas. This is possible with only 4 different tube/wire sets.

  13. Links Between Surgical Landmarks of the Temporal Bone and Cochlear Implant Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Lostun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to underline the surgical importance of the distances between the landmarks of the temporal bone, important for quantifying the benefits and disadvantages of two different cochlear implant techniques.

  14. Single- and Multi-Channel Modulation Detection in Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galvin, John J.; Oba, Sandy; Fu, Qian-Jie; Başkent, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    Single-channel modulation detection thresholds (MDTs) have been shown to predict cochlear implant (CI) users' speech performance. However, little is known about multi-channel modulation sensitivity. Two factors likely contribute to multichannel modulation sensitivity: multichannel loudness summation

  15. The cochlear implantation surgery: A review of anesthetic considerations and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancement in the technology of the cochlear implants has resulted in increasing trend of cochlear implantation in both the children and elderly population. The anesthesiologist is faced with the task of smoothly conducting the surgery without any interference in the stimulation techniques used. The preoperative evaluation is mainly focused on the presence of any congenital anomalies in these patients which may affect anesthetic technique. The reduction of anxiety of the patient as well as the parents of small children is an important aspect of the preoperative visit. Intraoperatively the anesthetic technique chosen should not interfere with the stimulation of the cochlear implant electrode assembly. The postoperative management is mainly focused at prevention of agitation and good analgesia. A close cooperation between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist is essential for a positive outcome in this surgery. The current review focuses on the important anesthesia aspects related to cochlear implant surgery.

  16. Impact of a moving noise masker on speech perception in cochlear implant users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Weissgerber

    Full Text Available Previous studies investigating speech perception in noise have typically been conducted with static masker positions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of spatial separation of source and masker (spatial release from masking, SRM in a moving masker setup and to evaluate the impact of adaptive beamforming in comparison with fixed directional microphones in cochlear implant (CI users.Speech reception thresholds (SRT were measured in S0N0 and in a moving masker setup (S0Nmove in 12 normal hearing participants and 14 CI users (7 subjects bilateral, 7 bimodal with a hearing aid in the contralateral ear. Speech processor settings were a moderately directional microphone, a fixed beamformer, or an adaptive beamformer. The moving noise source was generated by means of wave field synthesis and was smoothly moved in a shape of a half-circle from one ear to the contralateral ear. Noise was presented in either of two conditions: continuous or modulated.SRTs in the S0Nmove setup were significantly improved compared to the S0N0 setup for both the normal hearing control group and the bilateral group in continuous noise, and for the control group in modulated noise. There was no effect of subject group. A significant effect of directional sensitivity was found in the S0Nmove setup. In the bilateral group, the adaptive beamformer achieved lower SRTs than the fixed beamformer setting. Adaptive beamforming improved SRT in both CI user groups substantially by about 3 dB (bimodal group and 8 dB (bilateral group depending on masker type.CI users showed SRM that was comparable to normal hearing subjects. In listening situations of everyday life with spatial separation of source and masker, directional microphones significantly improved speech perception with individual improvements of up to 15 dB SNR. Users of bilateral speech processors with both directional microphones obtained the highest benefit.

  17. Two Portuguese Cochlear Implanted Dizygotic Twins: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Rita Chora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual’s hearing performance after cochlear implant (CI is variable and depends on different factors such as etiology of deafness, age at implantation, and social/family hearing environment. Here we report the case of dizygotic twins, boy and girl, presenting with neurosensorial profound deafness prior CI (age of implantation = 3.5 years old. Both parents have severe/profound deafness, since childhood, and use sign language as primary mode of communication. Clinical and genetic characterization was performed, as well as the assessment of the auditory and oral (rehabilitation after CI, applying a battery of audiological, speech, and language tests. The twin girl and the father were homozygous for the c.35delG mutation in the GJB2 gene, while the twin boy and the mother were compound heterozygotes, both monoallelic for c.35delG and for the deletion del(GJB6-D13S1830 in the GJB6 gene. The remaining hearing impaired relatives were c.35delG homozygotes. The genetic cause of deafness was thus identified in this family. Some noteworthy differences were observed regarding twins’ auditory and oral performance after CI. Subsequent follow-up of these children allowed us to conclude that those differences were most likely due to the different environment in which the twins have been living than to their different GJB2/GJB6 genotypes.

  18. Communication, Psychosocial, and Educational Outcomes of Children with Cochlear Implants and Challenges Remaining for Professionals and Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Punch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview and a synthesis of the findings of a large, multifaceted study investigating outcomes from paediatric cochlear implantation. The study included children implanted at several Australian implant clinics and attending a variety of early intervention and educational settings across a range of locations in eastern Australia. It investigated three major aspects of childhood cochlear implantation: (1 parental expectations of their children's implantation, (2 families' decision-making processes, and (3 the communication, social, and educational outcomes of cochlear implantation for deaf children. It employed a mixed-methods approach in which quantitative survey data were gathered from 247 parents and 151 teachers, and qualitative data from semistructured interviews with 27 parents, 15 teachers, and 11 children and adolescents with cochlear implants. The summarised findings highlight several areas where challenges remain for implant clinics, parents, and educators if children with cochlear implants are to reach their full potential personally, educationally, and socially.

  19. Neurotrophic treatment of the degenerating auditory nerve; cochlear implants in deafened guinea pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterberg, M.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    To date, the cochlear implant is the most successful sensorineural prosthesis. The device consists of a small array with a number of electrodes implanted in the cochlea of profoundly hearing impaired people. Some people with an implant are able to use the telephone. Unfortunately, others hardly bene

  20. A Case Study Assessing the Auditory and Speech Development of Four Children Implanted with Cochlear Implants by the Chronological Age of 12 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit May-Mederake

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with severe hearing loss most likely receive the greatest benefit from a cochlear implant (CI when implanted at less than 2 years of age. Children with a hearing loss may also benefit greater from binaural sensory stimulation. Four children who received their first CI under 12 months of age were included in this study. Effects on auditory development were determined using the German LittlEARS Auditory Questionnaire, closed- and open-set monosyllabic word tests, aided free-field, the Mainzer and Göttinger speech discrimination tests, Monosyllabic-Trochee-Polysyllabic (MTP, and Listening Progress Profile (LiP. Speech production and grammar development were evaluated using a German language speech development test (SETK, reception of grammar test (TROG-D and active vocabulary test (AWST-R. The data showed that children implanted under 12 months of age reached open-set monosyllabic word discrimination at an age of 24 months. LiP results improved over time, and children recognized 100% of words in the MTP test after 12 months. All children performed as well as or better than their hearing peers in speech production and grammar development. SETK showed that the speech development of these children was in general age appropriate. The data suggests that early hearing loss intervention benefits speech and language development and supports the trend towards early cochlear implantation. Furthermore, the data emphasizes the potential benefits associated with bilateral implantation.

  1. Speech Recognition Performance in Children with Cochlear Implants Using Bimodal Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Rathna Kumar, S. B.; Mohanty, P.; Prakash, S. G. R.

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implantees have considerably good speech understanding abilities in quiet surroundings. But, ambient noise poses significant difficulties in understanding speech for these individuals. Bimodal stimulation is still not used by many Indian implantees in spite of reports that bimodal stimulation is beneficial for speech understanding in noise as compared to cochlear implant alone and also prevents auditory deprivation in the un-implanted ear. The aim of the study is to evaluate the bene...

  2. Auditory Speech Perception Tests in Relation to the Coding Strategy in Cochlear Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Bazon, Aline Cristine; Mantello, Erika Barioni; Gonçales, Alina Sanches; Isaac, Myriam de Lima; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  The objective of the evaluation of auditory perception of cochlear implant users is to determine how the acoustic signal is processed, leading to the recognition and understanding of sound. Objective  To investigate the differences in the process of auditory speech perception in individuals with postlingual hearing loss wearing a cochlear implant, using two different speech coding strategies, and to analyze speech perception and handicap perception in relation to the strategy us...

  3. Neuropsychological Correlates of Vocabulary, Reading, and Working Memory in Deaf Children With Cochlear Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Fagan, Mary K.; Pisoni, David B.; Horn, David L.; DILLON, CAITLIN M.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of deaf children with cochlear implants was assessed using measures standardized on hearing children. To investigate nonverbal cognitive and sensorimotor processes associated with postimplant variability, five selected sensorimotor and visuospatial subtests from A Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (NEPSY) were compared with standardized vocabulary, reading, and digit span measures. Participants were 26 deaf children, ages 6−14 years, who received a cochlear implant b...

  4. Using hearing aid directional microphones and noise reduction algorithms to enhance cochlear implant performance

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, K; Zeng, F G; Waltzman, S

    2004-01-01

    Hearing aids and cochlear implants are two major hearing enhancement technologies but yet share little in research and development. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hearing aid directional microphones and noise reduction technologies could enhance cochlear implant users' speech understanding and ease of listening. Digital hearing aids serving as preprocessors were programmed to omni-directional microphone, directional microphone, and directional microphone plus noise reducti...

  5. Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Kohlberg, Gavriel D.; Mancuso, Dean M.; Divya A. Chari; Lalwani, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI) listener. Methods. Normal hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9) evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less comple...

  6. A retrospective study of cochlear implant outcomes in children with residual hearing

    OpenAIRE

    McCrae Rosemary; Fitzpatrick Elizabeth; Schramm David

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There has been increasing demand for the cochlear implantation of children who demonstrate some auditory capacity with conventional hearing aids. The purpose of this study was to examine speech recognition outcomes in a group of children who were regarded as borderline candidates for cochlear implantation as their residual hearing and/or auditory functioning levels exceeded typical audiologic candidacy criteria. Methods A retrospective chart review was undertaken at one Ca...

  7. A Binaural Cochlear Implant Sound Coding Strategy Inspired by the Contralateral Medial Olivocochlear Reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustaquio-Martín, Almudena; Stohl, Joshua S.; Wolford, Robert D.; Schatzer, Reinhold; Wilson, Blake S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In natural hearing, cochlear mechanical compression is dynamically adjusted via the efferent medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR). These adjustments probably help understanding speech in noisy environments and are not available to the users of current cochlear implants (CIs). The aims of the present study are to: (1) present a binaural CI sound processing strategy inspired by the control of cochlear compression provided by the contralateral MOCR in natural hearing; and (2) assess the benefits of the new strategy for understanding speech presented in competition with steady noise with a speech-like spectrum in various spatial configurations of the speech and noise sources. Design: Pairs of CI sound processors (one per ear) were constructed to mimic or not mimic the effects of the contralateral MOCR on compression. For the nonmimicking condition (standard strategy or STD), the two processors in a pair functioned similarly to standard clinical processors (i.e., with fixed back-end compression and independently of each other). When configured to mimic the effects of the MOCR (MOC strategy), the two processors communicated with each other and the amount of back-end compression in a given frequency channel of each processor in the pair decreased/increased dynamically (so that output levels dropped/increased) with increases/decreases in the output energy from the corresponding frequency channel in the contralateral processor. Speech reception thresholds in speech-shaped noise were measured for 3 bilateral CI users and 2 single-sided deaf unilateral CI users. Thresholds were compared for the STD and MOC strategies in unilateral and bilateral listening conditions and for three spatial configurations of the speech and noise sources in simulated free-field conditions: speech and noise sources colocated in front of the listener, speech on the left ear with noise in front of the listener, and speech on the left ear with noise on the right ear. In both bilateral and

  8. Hair Barrette Induced Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulator Site Infection with Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung N. Le

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cochlear implant infections and extrusion are uncommon but potentially devastating complications. Recent literature suggests conservative management can be employed. Local measures inclusive of aggressive surgical debridement with vascularized flaps and parenteral antibiotics represent a viable option and often permit device salvage. However, explantation should be considered if there is evidence of systemic, intracranial, or intractable infection. Method. A Case report and literature review. Case Report. This case illustrates a complicated local wound infection associated with cochlear implantation due to transcutaneous adherence of a ferrous hair barrette to a cochlear implant magnet. Reconstruction of computed tomography (CT data with 3D volume rendering significantly improved the value of the images and facilitated patient counseling as well as operative planning. Conclusion. Cochlear implant infections can be associated with foreign bodies. CT images are beneficial in the evaluation of cochlear implant complications. 3D CT images provide a comprehensive view of the site of interest, displaying the relationship of the hardware to the skull and soft tissues, while minimizing associated artifacts. Cochlear implant patients should consider use of nonmetallic hair devices.

  9. Learning and Memory Processes Following Cochlear Implantation:The Missing Piece of the Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Pisoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, there is no question that cochlear implants work and often work very well in quiet listening conditions for many profoundly deaf children and adults. The speech and language outcomes data published over the last two decades document quite extensively the clinically significant benefits of cochlear implants. Although there now is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of cochlear implants as a medical intervention for profound hearing loss in both children and adults, there still remain a number of challenging unresolved clinical and theoretical issues that deal with the effectiveness of cochlear implants in individual patients that have not yet been successfully resolved. In this paper, we review recent findings on learning and memory, two central topics in the field of cognition that have been seriously neglected in research on cochlear implants. Our research findings on sequence learning, memory and organization processes, and retrieval strategies used in verbal learning and memory of categorized word lists suggests that basic domain-general learning abilities may be the missing piece of the puzzle in terms of understanding the cognitive factors that underlie the enormous individual differences and variability routinely observed in speech and language outcomes following cochlear implantation.

  10. Individual Differences in Effectiveness of Cochlear Implants in Children Who Are Prelingually Deaf: New Process Measures of Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Pisoni, David B.; Cleary, Miranda; Geers, Ann E.; Tobey, Emily A.

    1999-01-01

    The efficacy of cochlear implants in children who are deaf has been firmly established in the literature. However, the effectiveness of cochlear implants varies widely and is influenced by demographic and experiential factors. Several key findings suggest new directions for research on central auditory factors that underlie the effectiveness of cochlear implants. First, enormous individual differences have been observed in both adults and children on a wide range of audiological outcome measu...

  11. [Improving speech comprehension using a new cochlear implant speech processor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Deile, J; Kortmann, T; Hoppe, U; Hessel, H; Morsnowski, A

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this multicenter clinical field study was to assess the benefits of the new Freedom 24 sound processor for cochlear implant (CI) users implanted with the Nucleus 24 cochlear implant system. The study included 48 postlingually profoundly deaf experienced CI users who demonstrated speech comprehension performance with their current speech processor on the Oldenburg sentence test (OLSA) in quiet conditions of at least 80% correct scores and who were able to perform adaptive speech threshold testing using the OLSA in noisy conditions. Following baseline measures of speech comprehension performance with their current speech processor, subjects were upgraded to the Freedom 24 speech processor. After a take-home trial period of at least 2 weeks, subject performance was evaluated by measuring the speech reception threshold with the Freiburg multisyllabic word test and speech intelligibility with the Freiburg monosyllabic word test at 50 dB and 70 dB in the sound field. The results demonstrated highly significant benefits for speech comprehension with the new speech processor. Significant benefits for speech comprehension were also demonstrated with the new speech processor when tested in competing background noise.In contrast, use of the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit (APHAB) did not prove to be a suitably sensitive assessment tool for comparative subjective self-assessment of hearing benefits with each processor. Use of the preprocessing algorithm known as adaptive dynamic range optimization (ADRO) in the Freedom 24 led to additional improvements over the standard upgrade map for speech comprehension in quiet and showed equivalent performance in noise. Through use of the preprocessing beam-forming algorithm BEAM, subjects demonstrated a highly significant improved signal-to-noise ratio for speech comprehension thresholds (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio for 50% speech comprehension scores) when tested with an adaptive procedure using the Oldenburg

  12. Music Perception Ability of Korean Adult Cochlear Implant Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunoak; Lee, Hyo-Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Although the cochlear implant (CI) is successful for understanding speech in patients with severe to profound hearing loss, listening to music is a challenging task to most CI listeners. The purpose of this study was to assess music perception ability and to provide clinically useful information regarding CI rehabilitation. Methods Ten normal hearing and ten CI listeners with implant experience, ranging 2 to 6 years, participated in the subtests of pitch, rhythm, melody, and instrument. A synthesized piano tone was used as musical stimuli. Participants were asked to discriminate two different tones during the pitch subtest. The rhythm subtest was constructed with sets of five, six, and seven intervals. The melody & instrument subtests assessed recognition of eight familiar melodies and five musical instruments from a closed set, respectively. Results CI listeners performed significantly poorer than normal hearing listeners in pitch, melody, and instrument identification tasks. No significant differences were observed in rhythm recognition between groups. Correlations were not found between music perception ability and word recognition scores. Conclusion The results are consistent with previous studies that have shown that pitch, melody, and instrument identifications are difficult to identify for CI users. Our results can provide fundamental information concerning the development of CI rehabilitation tools. PMID:22701773

  13. Sirviendo a los estudiantes sordos que tienen Los implantes cocleares. Hoja de consejos de PEPNet (Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    This version of "Serving Deaf Students Who Have Cochlear Implants. PEPNet Tipsheet," written in Spanish, describes how cochlear implants (CIs) work. CIs are complex electronic devices surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear. These devices utilize electrodes placed in the inner ear (the cochlea) to stimulate the auditory nerve of…

  14. Cochlear Implantation in Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 2 and Patients with Vestibular Schwannoma in the Only Hearing Ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Celis-Aguilar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants are a new surgical option in the hearing rehabilitation of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 and patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS in the only hearing ear. Auditory brainstem implant (ABI has been the standard surgical treatment for these patients. We performed a literature review of patients with NF2 and patients with VS in the only hearing ear. Cochlear implantation (CI provided some auditory benefit in all patients. Preservation of cochlear nerve integrity is crucial after VS resection. Results ranged from environmental sound awareness to excellent benefit with telephone use. Promontory stimulation is recommended although not crucial. MRI can be performed safely in cochlear implanted patients.

  15. Reliability of Med-El Cochlear Implants in children. The Romania Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Horatiu Stefanescu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Early detection of hearing loss significantly lowered the age of cochlear implantation. A failed CI is a very problematic issue for the child and family and seems to be, for the moment, inevitable. This is a retrospective review aimed to evaluate the reliability of Med-El devices implanted in children in Romania. Materials and Methods: We designed a questionnaire to assess the incidence, the time elapsed and the reason of total device failure. Medical-surgical data were collected from children who received Med-El cochlear implants since the start of the National Cochlear Implant Program in 2001. Results: There were 256 patients included. Failure Rate (6,64% and Cumulative Survival Rate (95,31% at 5 years were calculated. The majority of the hard and soft failures were encountered in Pulsar devices. Flap necrosis was the most frequent medical/surgical reason for re-plantation. There was only one case of posttraumatic device failure. Time elapsed to device failure was short – 22 months on average. Conclusion: Cochlear implant reliability data should be considered during the choice of an implant for each individual patient. This study confirms the safety and efficacy of Med-El cochlear implants in children for both ceramic and non-ceramic devices.

  16. Change in Speech Perception and Auditory Evoked Potentials over Time after Unilateral Cochlear Implantation in Postlingually Deaf Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Suzanne C; Kelly, Andrea S

    2016-02-01

    Speech perception varies widely across cochlear implant (CI) users and typically improves over time after implantation. There is also some evidence for improved auditory evoked potentials (shorter latencies, larger amplitudes) after implantation but few longitudinal studies have examined the relationship between behavioral and evoked potential measures after implantation in postlingually deaf adults. The relationship between speech perception and auditory evoked potentials was investigated in newly implanted cochlear implant users from the day of implant activation to 9 months postimplantation, on five occasions, in 10 adults age 27 to 57 years who had been bilaterally profoundly deaf for 1 to 30 years prior to receiving a unilateral CI24 cochlear implant. Changes over time in middle latency response (MLR), mismatch negativity, and obligatory cortical auditory evoked potentials and word and sentence speech perception scores were examined. Speech perception improved significantly over the 9-month period. MLRs varied and showed no consistent change over time. Three participants aged in their 50s had absent MLRs. The pattern of change in N1 amplitudes over the five visits varied across participants. P2 area increased significantly for 1,000- and 4,000-Hz tones but not for 250 Hz. The greatest change in P2 area occurred after 6 months of implant experience. Although there was a trend for mismatch negativity peak latency to reduce and width to increase after 3 months of implant experience, there was considerable variability and these changes were not significant. Only 60% of participants had a detectable mismatch initially; this increased to 100% at 9 months. The continued change in P2 area over the period evaluated, with a trend for greater change for right hemisphere recordings, is consistent with the pattern of incremental change in speech perception scores over time. MLR, N1, and mismatch negativity changes were inconsistent and hence P2 may be a more robust measure

  17. Electrophysiological channel interactions using focused multipolar stimulation for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Shefin S.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Wise, Andrew K.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Fallon, James B.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Speech intelligibility with existing multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) is thought to be limited by poor spatial selectivity and interactions between CI channels caused by overlapping activation with monopolar (MP) stimulation. Our previous studies have shown that focused multipolar (FMP) and tripolar (TP) stimulation produce more restricted neural activation in the inferior colliculus (IC), compared to MP stimulation. Approach. This study explored interactions in the IC produced by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels. We recorded multi-unit neural activity in the IC of anaesthetized cats with normal and severely degenerated spiral ganglion neuron populations in response to FMP, TP and MP stimulation from a 14 channel CI. Stimuli were applied to a ‘fixed’ CI channel, chosen toward the middle of the cochlear electrode array, and the effects of simultaneously stimulating a more apical ‘test’ CI channel were measured as a function of spatial separation between the two stimulation channels and stimulus level of the fixed channel. Channel interactions were quantified by changes in neural responses and IC threshold (i.e., threshold shift) elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two CI channels, compared to stimulation of the test channel alone. Main results. Channel interactions were significantly lower for FMP and TP than for MP stimulation (p < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was observed between FMP and TP stimulation. With MP stimulation, threshold shifts increased with decreased inter-electrode spacing and increased stimulus levels of the fixed channel. For FMP and TP stimulation, channel interactions were found to be similar for different inter-electrode spacing and stimulus levels of the fixed channel. Significance. The present study demonstrates how the degree of channel interactions in a CI can be controlled using stimulation configurations such as FMP and TP; such knowledge is essential in enhancing CI function in complex

  18. Visual Cross-Modal Re-Organization in Children with Cochlear Implants.

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    Julia Campbell

    Full Text Available Visual cross-modal re-organization is a neurophysiological process that occurs in deafness. The intact sensory modality of vision recruits cortical areas from the deprived sensory modality of audition. Such compensatory plasticity is documented in deaf adults and animals, and is related to deficits in speech perception performance in cochlear-implanted adults. However, it is unclear whether visual cross-modal re-organization takes place in cochlear-implanted children and whether it may be a source of variability contributing to speech and language outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine if visual cross-modal re-organization occurs in cochlear-implanted children, and whether it is related to deficits in speech perception performance.Visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded via high-density EEG in 41 normal hearing children and 14 cochlear-implanted children, aged 5-15 years, in response to apparent motion and form change. Comparisons of VEP amplitude and latency, as well as source localization results, were conducted between the groups in order to view evidence of visual cross-modal re-organization. Finally, speech perception in background noise performance was correlated to the visual response in the implanted children.Distinct VEP morphological patterns were observed in both the normal hearing and cochlear-implanted children. However, the cochlear-implanted children demonstrated larger VEP amplitudes and earlier latency, concurrent with activation of right temporal cortex including auditory regions, suggestive of visual cross-modal re-organization. The VEP N1 latency was negatively related to speech perception in background noise for children with cochlear implants.Our results are among the first to describe cross modal re-organization of auditory cortex by the visual modality in deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. Our findings suggest that, as a group, children with cochlear implants show evidence of visual cross

  19. Is cochlear implantation a good treatment method for profoundly deafened elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachowska M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Magdalena Lachowska, Agnieszka Pastuszka, Paulina Glinka, Kazimierz Niemczyk Department of Otolaryngology, Hearing Implant Center, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Purpose: To assess the benefits of cochlear implantation in the elderly. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of 31 postlingually deafened elderly (≥60 years of age with unilateral cochlear implants was conducted. Audiological testing included preoperative and postoperative pure-tone audiometry and a monosyllabic word recognition test presented from recorded material in free field. Speech perception tests included Ling's six sound test (sound detection, discrimination, and identification, syllable discrimination, and monosyllabic and multisyllabic word recognition (open set without lip-reading. Everyday life benefits from cochlear implantation were also evaluated. Results: The mean age at the time of cochlear implantation was 72.4 years old. The mean post-implantation follow-up time was 2.34 years. All patients significantly improved their audiological and speech understanding performances. The preoperative mean pure-tone average threshold for 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz was 110.17 dB HL. Before cochlear implantation, all patients scored 0% on the monosyllabic word recognition test in free field at 70 dB SPL intensity level. The postoperative pure-tone average was 37.14 dB HL (the best mean threshold was 17.50 dB HL, the worst was 58.75 dB HL. After the surgery, mean monosyllabic word recognition reached 47.25%. Speech perception tests showed statistically significant improvement in speech recognition. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that cochlear implantation is indeed a successful treatment for improving speech recognition and offers a great help in everyday life to deafened elderly patients. Therefore, they can be good candidates for cochlear implantation and their age alone should not be a relevant or excluding factor when choosing

  20. Reading and Spelling Abilities of Deaf Adolescents with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Terlektsi, Emmanouela

    2011-01-01

    A total of 86 deaf children aged between 12 and 16 years were recruited from schools for the deaf, specialist units attached to a school, and mainstream schools. Approximately one-third used hearing aids, one-third had received a cochlear implant before 42 months, and one-third had been implanted later. The 3 subgroups were matched for age and…

  1. Expected Test Scores for Preschoolers with a Cochlear Implant Who Use Spoken Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Johanna G.; Geers, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The major purpose of this study was to provide information about expected spoken language skills of preschool-age children who are deaf and who use a cochlear implant. A goal was to provide "benchmarks" against which those skills could be compared, for a given age at implantation. We also examined whether parent-completed checklists of…

  2. The Responses of Preschoolers with Cochlear Implants to Musical Activities: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraer-Joiner, Lyn E.; Chen-Hafteck, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the musical experiences of preschool cochlear implant users. Research objectives were to examine: (1) musical, social and emotional responses to activities; and (2) whether length of experience with the implant influenced responses. Participants were three prelingually deafened children, age 4,…

  3. Great Expectations: Perspectives on Cochlear Implantation of Deaf Children in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Eva; Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Hyde, Mervyn B.; Hjulstad, Oddvar

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the use of cochlear implants with deaf children in Norway and examine how this intervention has raised new expectations and some tensions concerning the future of education for deaf students. They report on two studies of communication within school learning environments of young children with implants in Norwegian preschools…

  4. Modelling of the Human Inner Ear Anatomy and Variability for Cochlear Implant Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin

    This thesis takes the biomedical engineering approach to working with and understanding the anatomy and physiology of the inner ear. The purpose is to apply the acquired knowledge in the development of implantable hearing aids. The so-called Cochlear Implant (CI) is a fascinating technology...

  5. The Development of Falling Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of intonation in 12 cochlear implant (CI) recipients. In a previously reported study of the first year of CI use, children who were implanted late (after 24 months) acquired intonation more rapidly than the younger participants. The older children's advantage is plausibly owing to their greater maturity.…

  6. Children's Development of Intonation during the First Year of Cochlear Implant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David P.; Ertmer, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the longitudinal development of intonation in 18 deaf children who received cochlear implants (CIs) before the age of 3 years and 12 infants with typical development (TD) who served as controls. At the time their implants were activated, the children with CIs ranged in age from 9 to 36 months. Cross-group comparisons were…

  7. MRI of the labyrinth with volume rendering for cochlear implants candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated three-dimensional models of the labyrinth by volume rendering (VR) in preoperative assessment for cochlear implantation. MRI data sets were acquired in selected subjects using three-dimensional-fast spin echo sequences (3D-FSE). We produced the three-dimensional models of the labyrinth from axial heavily T2-weighted images. The three-dimensional models distinguished the scala tympani and scala vestibuli and provided multidirectional images. The optimal threshold three-dimensional models clearly showed the focal region of signal loss in the cochlear turns (47.1%) and the presence of inner ear anomalies (17.3%) in our series of patients. This study was concluded that these three-dimensional models by VR provide the oto-surgeon with precise, detailed, and easily interpreted information about the cochlear turns for cochlear implants candidates. (author)

  8. Phonetic context effects in adult listeners with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudhan, Radhika; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2005-09-01

    From previous studies it is known that normal-hearing (NH) listeners have the ability to compensate for the acoustic variability present in speech through context-dependent perception of speech sounds. One question of practical and theoretical interest is whether listeners with cochlear implants (CI) also show context-dependent speech perception. Because of the lack of spectral resolution in the input, the representation of speech for CI listeners may differ from NH listeners, which may interfere with perceptual compensation. In a test of this prediction, adult postlingually deafened CI listeners did not demonstrate the contrastive context effects elicited from NH listeners for either /da/-/ga/ targets and /al/-/ar/ contexts or V targets and /b-b/-/d-d/ contexts. In contrast, as predicted by the good temporal resolution of the CI signal, CI listeners showed normal effects of vowel length on preceding glide-stop categorization. CI simulations with NH listeners were also performed for some of these context effects. The results support the view that spectral content of contexts largely determines their effect on target sounds, and that phonetic content does not play an essential role. In addition, the findings predict that CI listeners will have particular difficulty with heavily coarticulated speech. [Work sponsored by NIH and NSF.

  9. Musical training software for children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nardo, W; Schinaia, L; Anzivino, R; De Corso, E; Ciacciarelli, A; Paludetti, G

    2015-10-01

    Although the voice in a free field has an excellent recruitment by a cochlear implant (CI), the situation is different for music because it is a much more complex process, where perceiving the pitch discrimination becomes important to appreciate it. The aim of this study is to determine the music perception abilities among children with Cis and to verify the benefit of a training period for specific musical frequency discrimination. Our main goals were to prepare a computer tool for pitch discrimination training and to assess musical improvements. Ten children, aged between 5 and 12 years, with optimal phoneme recognition in quiet and with no disabilities associated with deafness, were selected to join the training. Each patient received, before training period, two types of exams: a pitch discrimination test, consisting of discovering if two notes were different or not; and a music test consisting of two identification tasks (melodic and full version) of one music-item among 5 popular childhood songs. After assessment, a music training software was designed and utilised individually at home for a period of six months. The results following complete training showed significantly higher performance in the task of frequency discrimination. After a proper musical training identification, frequency discrimination performance was significantly higher (p musical enhancement and to achieve improvements in frequency discrimination, following pitch discrimination training. PMID:26824211

  10. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed.

  11. Sparse Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Strategy for Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Hu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Current cochlear implant (CI strategies carry speech information via the waveform envelope in frequency subbands. CIs require efficient speech processing to maximize information transfer to the brain, especially in background noise, where the speech envelope is not robust to noise interference. In such conditions, the envelope, after decomposition into frequency bands, may be enhanced by sparse transformations, such as nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF. Here, a novel CI processing algorithm is described, which works by applying NMF to the envelope matrix (envelopogram of 22 frequency channels in order to improve performance in noisy environments. It is evaluated for speech in eight-talker babble noise. The critical sparsity constraint parameter was first tuned using objective measures and then evaluated with subjective speech perception experiments for both normal hearing and CI subjects. Results from vocoder simulations with 10 normal hearing subjects showed that the algorithm significantly enhances speech intelligibility with the selected sparsity constraints. Results from eight CI subjects showed no significant overall improvement compared with the standard advanced combination encoder algorithm, but a trend toward improvement of word identification of about 10 percentage points at +15 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR was observed in the eight CI subjects. Additionally, a considerable reduction of the spread of speech perception performance from 40% to 93% for advanced combination encoder to 80% to 100% for the suggested NMF coding strategy was observed.

  12. Frequency-dependent loudness balancing in bimodal cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion In users of a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, frequency-dependent loudness balancing between devices did, on average, not lead to improved speech understanding as compared to broadband balancing. However, nine out of 15 bimodal subjects showed significantly better speech understanding with either one of the fittings. Objectives Sub-optimal fittings and mismatches in loudness are possible explanations for the large individual differences seen in listeners using bimodal stimulation. Methods HA gain was adjusted for soft and loud input sounds in three frequency bands (0-548, 548-1000, and >1000 Hz) to match loudness with the CI. This procedure was compared to a simple broadband balancing procedure that reflected current clinical practice. In a three-visit cross-over design with 4 weeks between sessions, speech understanding was tested in quiet and in noise and questionnaires were administered to assess benefit in real world. Results Both procedures resulted in comparable HA gains. For speech in noise, a marginal bimodal benefit of 0.3 ± 4 dB was found, with large differences between subjects and spatial configurations. Speech understanding in quiet and in noise did not differ between the two loudness balancing procedures. PMID:26986743

  13. Sparse Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Strategy for Cochlear Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongmei; Lutman, Mark E; Ewert, Stephan D; Li, Guoping; Bleeck, Stefan

    2015-12-30

    Current cochlear implant (CI) strategies carry speech information via the waveform envelope in frequency subbands. CIs require efficient speech processing to maximize information transfer to the brain, especially in background noise, where the speech envelope is not robust to noise interference. In such conditions, the envelope, after decomposition into frequency bands, may be enhanced by sparse transformations, such as nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF). Here, a novel CI processing algorithm is described, which works by applying NMF to the envelope matrix (envelopogram) of 22 frequency channels in order to improve performance in noisy environments. It is evaluated for speech in eight-talker babble noise. The critical sparsity constraint parameter was first tuned using objective measures and then evaluated with subjective speech perception experiments for both normal hearing and CI subjects. Results from vocoder simulations with 10 normal hearing subjects showed that the algorithm significantly enhances speech intelligibility with the selected sparsity constraints. Results from eight CI subjects showed no significant overall improvement compared with the standard advanced combination encoder algorithm, but a trend toward improvement of word identification of about 10 percentage points at +15 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was observed in the eight CI subjects. Additionally, a considerable reduction of the spread of speech perception performance from 40% to 93% for advanced combination encoder to 80% to 100% for the suggested NMF coding strategy was observed.

  14. MUSIC APPRECIATION AND TRAINING FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANT RECIPIENTS: A REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Valerie; Gfeller, Kate; Driscoll, Virginia

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in music perception of cochlear implant (CI) recipients, and a growing body of research conducted in this area. The majority of these studies have examined perceptual accuracy for pitch, rhythm, and timbre. Another important, but less commonly studied aspect of music listening is appreciation, or appraisal. Despite the ongoing research into potential technological improvements that may improve music perception for recipients, both perceptual accuracy and appreciation generally remain poor for most recipients. Whilst perceptual accuracy for music is important, appreciation and enjoyment also warrants research as it also contributes to clinical outcomes and perceived benefits. Music training is being shown to offer excellent potential for improving music perception and appreciation for recipients.Therefore, the primary topics of this review are music appreciation and training. However, a brief overview of the psychoacoustic, technical, and physiological factors associated with a recipient's perception of music is provided, as these are important factors in understanding the listening experience for CI recipients. The purpose of this review is to summarize key papers that have investigated these issues, in order to demonstrate that i) music enjoyment and appraisal is an important and valid consideration in evaluating music outcomes for recipients, and ii) that music training can improve music listening for many recipients, and is something that can be offered to persons using current technology. PMID:23459244

  15. Phonological systems of pediatric cochlear implant users: The acquisition of voicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Steven B.; Oglesbee, Eric N.; Kirk, Andrew K.; Krug, Joseph E.

    2005-04-01

    Although cochlear implants are primarily auditory prostheses, they have also demonstrated their usefulness as aids to speech production and the acquisition of spoken language in children. This presentation reports on research currently being conducted at the Indiana University Medical Center on the development of phonological systems by children with five or more years of cochlear implant use in English-speaking environments. Characteristics of the feature [voice] will be examined in children with cochlear implants and in two comparison groups: adults with normal hearing and children with normal hearing. Specific aspects of voicing to be discussed include characteristic error patterns, phonetic implementation of the voicing contrast, and phonetic implementation of neutralization of the voicing contrast. Much of the evidence obtained thus far indicates that voicing acquisition in children with cochlear implants is not radically different from that of children with normal hearing. Many differences between the systems of children with cochlear implants and the ambient system thus appear to reflect the children's age as much as their hearing status. [Work supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health to Indiana University: R01DC005594 and R03DC003852.

  16. [The experience of the work of a regional cochlear implantation center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashchenko, A I; Eretnova, N M; Bakhshinian, V V; Petrova, I P; Tavartkiladze, G A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the main lines of the development of a regional cochlear implantation centre and to estimate the effectiveness of rehabilitation of the children treated with the use of cochlear implantation. Analysis of the results of the work of the branch of the Russian Research and Practical Centre of Audiology and Hearing Rehabilitation based at Voronezh Regional Children's Clinical Hospital No 1 provided materials for the establishment of the principle directions of activities of the regional cochlear implantation centre where a total of 161 children have been kept under observation during the last years. Fifty six of the 138 children at the age varying from 1 to 12 years were given the surgical treatment. The patients were followed up within two and more years after connection of the speech processor. The study group was comprised only of the pre-lingually deaf children. It is concluded that the performance of most cochlear implantation procedures based at local centres allows to reduce the cost of rehabilitation and makes the high-tech medical aid more readily available to the patients; moreover, the practical introduction of remote speech processor programming software into the work of regional cochlear implantation centres enhances the effectiveness of the rehabilitative measures based at local medical facilities. PMID:24781168

  17. Exploring the Discourse on Communication Modality after Cochlear Implantation: A Foucauldian Analysis of Parents' Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruin, Marieke; Nevøy, Anne

    2014-01-01

    After pediatric cochlear implantation, parents have to make decisions concerning which communication modality the child and the child's family will use. The choice has to be made against a background of opposing views on communication modality in follow-up after pediatric cochlear implantation. The opposing views form a discourse that has…

  18. Musical Methods for Little Digital Ears — Musical Learning with Preschool Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hardgrove Hansen, Roberta; Beyer, Karen; Mortensen, Malene Vejby; Vuust, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prelingually deaf children who receive cochlear implants (CI) earlycan successfully develop age-appropriate language skills providedsufficient intervention measures are initiated. However, little isknown about the music perception and enjoyment of these children,though the enhanced development in the central auditory systemin early-implanted children may benefit music processing. Wehypothesized that early-implanted, prelingually deaf children withCI’s, who were exposed to group-oriented music...

  19. Cochlear Implants in Children Diagnosed with CHARGE Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso, Carolina Costa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The CHARGE association (coloboma of the eyes; heart disease; atresia of the choanae; retarded growth and development; genital hypoplasia/genitourinary anomalies; ear anomalies and/or hearing loss was first described in 1979 by Hall, and among its main features is hearing loss. This study presents a case aiming to establish relationships between performance on Infant Toddler Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (IT-MAIS and Meaningful Use of Speech Scales (MUSS tests and the analysis of hearing and language categories of a patient diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome, before and after cochlear implant (CI surgery. Case Report: A 7-year-old girl was diagnosed with CHARGE. She had severe sensorineural hearing loss and was a prelingual unilateral CI user. We analyzed data from the patient's medical records regarding therapies and video recordings. Results: The patient showed positive results in all evaluations after CI. IT-MAIS rose from 5 to 90% following the use of CI. MUSS also rose, from 75 to 72.5%, after use of CI. Classification of Auditory Skills changed from category 1 before use of CI to category 6 after use of CI. Classification of Language Skills changed from category 1 before use of CI to category 3 after use of CI. The CI is an aid but there are many factors in the therapeutic process, and great heterogeneity in individuals diagnosed with CHARGE should be investigated. Conclusion: The development of listening and language skills after CI use was demonstrated by IT-MAIS and MUSS tests, and categorization of speech and hearing in this child with a diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome shows that CI can be an effective technological resource to provide information on hearing as one source for language construction.

  20. Effective use of the spectral information in speech processing of cochlear implant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Tian; GONG Qin; YE Datian

    2007-01-01

    Based on the results of the acoustic research on Mandarin, two novel algorithms using the spectral information in speech processing of cochlear implants are purposed and certified effectively by the spectral information of tonal language in acoustic simulation experiments. We bring forward novel algorithms conveying the spectral information based on the choices of the frequency bands. These new algorithms can not only improve the speech recognition ability of cochlear implant users in the noisy environments but also reduce the complexity of computing and the memory occupied, and make it more suitable to be carried out in clinical practice.

  1. Factors influencing spoken language outcomes in children following early cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Ann E

    2006-01-01

    Development of spoken language is an objective of virtually all English-based educational programs for children who are deaf or hard of hearing. The primary goal of pediatric cochlear implantation is to provide critical speech information to the child's auditory system and brain to maximize the chances of developing spoken language. Cochlear implants have the potential to accomplish for profoundly deaf children what the electronic hearing aid made possible for hard of hearing children more than 50 years ago. Though the cochlear implant does not allow for hearing of the same quality as that experienced by persons without a hearing loss, it nonetheless has revolutionized the experience of spoken language acquisition for deaf children. However, the variability in performance remains quite high, with limited explanation as to the reasons for good and poor outcomes. Evaluating the success of cochlear implantation requires careful consideration of intervening variables, the characteristics of which are changing with advances in technology and clinical practice. Improvement in speech coding strategies, implantation at younger ages and in children with greater preimplant residual hearing, and rehabilitation focused on speech and auditory skill development are leading to a larger proportion of children approaching spoken language levels of hearing age-mates. PMID:16891836

  2. The Development of Intonation in Young Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Study of the Influence of Age at Implantation and Length of Implant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, David; Ertmer, David

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the development of emerging intonation in six children who had received a cochlear implant (CI) before the age of 3 years. At the time their implant was activated, the children ranged in age from 11-37 months. Spontaneous longitudinal speech samples were recorded from 30-minute sessions in which the child interacted with his…

  3. Assessment of SAR in the tissues near a cochlear implant exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibella, F; Parazzini, M; Paglialonga, A; Ravazzani, P [Istituto di Ingegneria Biomedica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: federica.sibella@polimi.it, E-mail: marta.parazzini@polimi.it, E-mail: alessia.paglialonga@polimi.it, E-mail: paolo.ravazzani@polimi.it

    2009-04-21

    Cochlear implants (CI) are electronic devices used to restore partial hearing to people with severe hearing impairment. This paper aims to investigate if the introduction of a CI has an effect on SAR distribution in a head model exposed to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) at mobile communication frequencies. The head model was obtained by image segmentation, the implant was modelled as a geometric structure and the exposure source was modelled as a uniform plane wave at 900 MHz, 1750 MHz and 1950 MHz, incident on the side of the head with the CI. Vertical and horizontal polarizations were simulated. Results show that the presence of a CI inside the cochlea produces negligible variations in the averaged SAR values, both in the head and in the cochlear tissues, although very localized differences in point SAR were found in the cochlea. Globally, these results suggest that finding harmful effects in the cochlear tissues will be unlikely. (note)

  4. Dichotic Listening Can Improve Perceived Clarity of Music in Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannson, Nicolas; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Musical enjoyment for cochlear implant (CI) recipients is often reported to be unsatisfactory. Our goal was to determine whether the musical experience of postlingually deafened adult CI recipients could be enriched by presenting the bass and treble clef parts of short polyphonic piano pieces separately to each ear (dichotic). Dichotic presentation should artificially enhance the lateralization cues of each part and help the listeners to better segregate them and thus provide greater clarity. We also hypothesized that perception of the intended emotion of the pieces and their overall enjoyment would be enhanced in the dichotic mode compared with the monophonic (both parts in the same ear) and the diotic mode (both parts in both ears). Twenty-eight piano pieces specifically composed to induce sad or happy emotions were selected. The tempo of the pieces, which ranged from lento to presto covaried with the intended emotion (from sad to happy). Thirty participants (11 normal-hearing listeners, 11 bimodal CI and hearing-aid users, and 8 bilaterally implanted CI users) participated in this study. Participants were asked to rate the perceived clarity, the intended emotion, and their preference of each piece in different listening modes. Results indicated that dichotic presentation produced small significant improvements in subjective ratings based on perceived clarity and preference. We also found that preference and clarity ratings were significantly higher for pieces with fast tempi compared with slow tempi. However, no significant differences between diotic and dichotic presentation were found for the participants' preference ratings, or their judgments of intended emotion. PMID:26316123

  5. Dichotic Listening Can Improve Perceived Clarity of Music in Cochlear Implant Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Vannson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Musical enjoyment for cochlear implant (CI recipients is often reported to be unsatisfactory. Our goal was to determine whether the musical experience of postlingually deafened adult CI recipients could be enriched by presenting the bass and treble clef parts of short polyphonic piano pieces separately to each ear (dichotic. Dichotic presentation should artificially enhance the lateralization cues of each part and help the listeners to better segregate them and thus provide greater clarity. We also hypothesized that perception of the intended emotion of the pieces and their overall enjoyment would be enhanced in the dichotic mode compared with the monophonic (both parts in the same ear and the diotic mode (both parts in both ears. Twenty-eight piano pieces specifically composed to induce sad or happy emotions were selected. The tempo of the pieces, which ranged from lento to presto covaried with the intended emotion (from sad to happy. Thirty participants (11 normal-hearing listeners, 11 bimodal CI and hearing-aid users, and 8 bilaterally implanted CI users participated in this study. Participants were asked to rate the perceived clarity, the intended emotion, and their preference of each piece in different listening modes. Results indicated that dichotic presentation produced small significant improvements in subjective ratings based on perceived clarity. We also found that preference and clarity ratings were significantly higher for pieces with fast tempi compared with slow tempi. However, no significant differences between diotic and dichotic presentation were found for the participants’ preference ratings, or their judgments of intended emotion.

  6. [Postoperative complications of cochlear implant: eight years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yépez-Pabón, Daniela; Guevara-Sánchez, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el implante coclear es una cirugía con poca morbimortalidad. Las complicaciones posquirúrgicas pueden ser menores y mayores. Las menores requieren manejo conservador; las mayores, reintervención o retiro del implante. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar nuestras complicaciones y cotejarlas con series internacionales y latinoamericanas. Métodos: se analizan retrospectivamente 275 casos intervenidos entre diciembre 2005 y diciembre 2013. Se incluyen niños y adultos entre 11 meses hasta 82 años de edad. Se evalúan datos demográficos, colocación uni o bilateral, tipo de cirugía y las complicaciones posquirúrgicas. El seguimiento fue por 20 meses. Resultados: el 57.46 % son niños y adolescentes; el 33.81 % jóvenes y adultos, y el 8.73 % adultos mayores. El índice de complicaciones es del 12 % (n = 33), 6.91 % en mujeres y 5.09 % en hombres. Entre los 19 a 60 años hay más complicaciones. Las complicaciones menores representan el 7.64 %: infección local (n = 9), parálisis facial transitoria tardía (n = 7), vértigo (n = 3) y tinnitus (n = 2). Prevalecen en niños y adultos. Las complicaciones mayores son el 4.36 %: hematomas postquirúrgicos (n = 8), extrusiones (n = 2) e inadecuada colocación de electrodos (n = 2). Predominan en los adultos entre 19 a 60 años. No se presentan casos de meningitis ni decesos. Conclusiones: la implantación coclear tiene baja incidencia de complicaciones. Nuestros resultados, los únicos reportados a nivel nacional, son similares a los que menciona la literatura.

  7. Cochlear Implant: the complexity involved in the decision making process by the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila de Souza Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to understand the meanings the family attributes to the phases of the decision-making process on a cochlear implant for their child.METHOD: qualitative research, using Symbolic Interactionism and Grounded Theory as the theoretical and methodological frameworks, respectively. Data collection instrument: semistructured interview. Nine families participated in the study (32 participants.RESULTS: knowledge deficit, difficulties to contextualize benefits and risks and fear are some factors that make this process difficult. Experiences deriving from interactions with health professionals, other cochlear implant users and their relatives strengthen decision making in favor of the implant.CONCLUSION: deciding on whether or not to have the implant involves a complex process, in which the family needs to weigh gains and losses, experience feelings of accountability and guilt, besides overcoming the risk aversion. Hence, this demands cautious preparation and knowledge from the professionals involved in this intervention.

  8. Residual neural processng of musical sound features in adult cochlear implant users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira;

    2014-01-01

    neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. HIGHLIGHTS: -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes reflect the limitations of central auditory processing in adult Cochlear Implant users.-The brains of adult CI users automatically...... process sound features changes even when inserted in a musical context.-CI users show disrupted automatic discriminatory abilities for rhythm in the brain.-Our fast paradigm demonstrate residual musical abilities in the brains of adult CI users giving hope for their future rehabilitation. KEYWORDS......Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological...

  9. The effect of emphasis and position on word identification by adult cochlear implant listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson; Magnusson, Lennart; Jönsson, Radoslava

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of emphasis and word position on word identification by postlingually deafened adult cochlear implant (CI) listeners (n = 20). These participants performed an identification task where Swedish (quasi-) minimal pairs were drawn from sentences and presented in a carri...

  10. Design and fabrication of stiff silicon probes: A step towards sophisticated cochlear implant electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawand, N.S.; French, P.J.; Briare, J.J.; Frijns, J.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants work on the principle of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. It has advantages to replace their traditional wired electrodes by a high-density thin-film multielectrode stimulation array which is relatively small in dimensions, stable, resistant to electrolysis, and

  11. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children with Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The…

  12. Electrochemical study of potential materials for cochlear implant electrode array (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawand, N.S.; Lopez, V.; French, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are commonly accepted therapeutic devices for clinical use and have restored hearing to more than 230,000 profoundly deaf people. CI devices consists of an external part comprising a speech processor (DSP) a microphone which together receive and convert the sound into a digit

  13. Theory-of-Mind Development in Oral Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants or Conventional Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Candida C.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In the context of the established finding that theory-of-mind (ToM) growth is seriously delayed in late-signing deaf children, and some evidence of equivalent delays in those learning speech with conventional hearing aids, this study's novel contribution was to explore ToM development in deaf children with cochlear implants. Implants…

  14. Sequential Bimodal Bilingual Acquisition: Mediation Using a Cochlear Implant as a Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramér-Wolrath, Emelie

    2013-01-01

    Most deaf children are born to hearing families. During the last twenty years deaf children, in increasing numbers and at an early age, receive a cochlear implant, a highly technological hearing device. The aim of this qualitative, longitudinal, single-case study was to explore and describe critical changes in naturalistic, video-observed…

  15. Negative Intraoral Air Pressures of Deaf Children with Cochlear Implants: Physiology, Phonology, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Maureen B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of four children with deafness who had cochlear implants investigated the use of negative intraoral air pressure in articulation, from both the physiological and phonological perspectives. The study showed that the children used speech-production strategies that were different from hearing children and that deviant speech behaviors should…

  16. Profound mixed hearing loss: bone-anchored hearing aid system or cochlear implant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaegen, V.J.O.; Mulder, J.J.S.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We evaluated 5 patients who were changed over from a Baha Cordelle to a cochlear implant (CI). Moreover, the level of phoneme score was determined at which a Baha Cordelle user was better helped with a CI. METHODS: We offer descriptive case reports and a retrospective evaluation of speec

  17. Long-Term Trajectories of the Development of Speech Sound Production in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin, J. Bruce; Peng, Shu-Chen; Spencer, Linda J.; Lu, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study characterized the development of speech sound production in prelingually deaf children with a minimum of 8 years of cochlear implant (CI) experience. Method: Twenty-seven pediatric CI recipients' spontaneous speech samples from annual evaluation sessions were phonemically transcribed. Accuracy for these speech samples was…

  18. The Emergence of Productive Speech and Language in Spanish-Learning Paediatric Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Torres, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that cochlear implant users may develop robust categorical perception skills, but that they show limited precision in perception. This article explores if a parallel contrast is observable in production, and if, despite acquiring typical linguistic representations, their early words are inconsistent. The participants were…

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Pragmatic Language Development in Three Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown how cochlear implants (CIs), in children with hearing impairments, have improved speech perception and production, but very little is known about the children's pragmatic language development. During a 4-year longitudinal study of three children with CIs, certain aspects of pragmatic language development were observed in free…

  20. Changing Realities in the Classroom for Hearing-Impaired Children with Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Anneke; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Snik, Ad

    2012-01-01

    Auditory perception with cochlear implants (CIs) enables the majority of deaf children with normal learning potential to develop (near) age-appropriate spoken language. As a consequence, a large proportion of children now attend mainstream education from an early stage. The acoustical environment in kindergartens and schools, however, might be…

  1. Feasibility of a Recasting and Auditory Bombardment Treatment with Young Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encinas, Danielle; Plante, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is little to guide clinicians in terms of evidence-based interventions for children with cochlear implants who demonstrate morpheme errors. This feasibility study tested the utility of a treatment targeting grammatical morpheme errors. Method: Three children (ages 4-5 years) received Enhanced Conversational Recast treatment, a…

  2. Efficacy of Multiple-Talker Phonetic Identification Training in Postlingually Deafened Cochlear Implant Listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon E.; Zhang, Yang; Nelson, Peggy B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study implemented a pretest-intervention-posttest design to examine whether multiple-talker identification training enhanced phonetic perception of the /ba/-/da/ and /wa/-/ja/ contrasts in adult listeners who were deafened postlingually and have cochlear implants (CIs). Method: Nine CI recipients completed 8 hours of identification…

  3. A Cochlear Implant Signal Processing Lab: Exploration of a Problem-Based Learning Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, P. T.; McClellan, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an introductory signal processing laboratory and examines this laboratory exercise in the context of problem-based learning (PBL). Centered in a real-world application, a cochlear implant, the exercise challenged students to demonstrate a working software-based signal processor. Partnering in groups of two or three, second-year…

  4. The musician effect : does it persist under degraded pitch conditions of cochlear implant simulations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, Christina D; Galvin, John J; Maat, Bert; Free, Rolien H; Başkent, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses that restore hearing via electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. Compared to normal acoustic hearing, sounds transmitted through the CI are spectro-temporally degraded, causing difficulties in challenging listening tasks such as speech intelligib

  5. Validation of the Common Objects Token (COT) Test for Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ilona; Martin, Jane; Costa, Anne; Jamieson, Lyn; Bailey, Elspeth; Plant, Geoff; Pitterl, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Changes in selection criteria have meant that children are being provided with cochlear implants (CI) at increasingly younger ages. However, there is a paucity of measures that are appropriate for testing complex listening skills--most tests are too cognitively complex for such young children. The Common Objects Token (COT) Test was developed as a…

  6. Executive Functioning and Speech-Language Skills Following Long-Term Use of Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberger, William G.; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocognitive processes such as executive functioning (EF) may influence the development of speech-language skills in deaf children after cochlear implantation in ways that differ from normal-hearing, typically developing children. Conversely, spoken language abilities and experiences may also exert reciprocal effects on the development of EF.…

  7. Genetic Predisposition and Sensory Experience in Language Development: Evidence from Cochlear-Implanted Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coene, Martine; Schauwers, Karen; Gillis, Steven; Rooryck, Johan; Govaerts, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent neurobiological studies have advanced the hypothesis that language development is not continuously plastic but is governed by biological constraints that may be modified by experience within a particular time window. This hypothesis is tested based on spontaneous speech data from deaf cochlear-implanted (CI) children with access to…

  8. Deaf Parents of Cochlear-Implanted Children: Beliefs on Bimodal Bilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchiner, Julie Cantrell

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated 17 Deaf families in North America with cochlear-implanted children about their attitudes, beliefs, and practices on bimodal bilingualism (defined as using both a visual/manual language and an aural/oral language) in American Sign Language (ASL) and English. A survey and follow-up interviews with 8 families were conducted.…

  9. Music Perception of Cochlear Implant Recipients with Implications for Music Instruction: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Feilin; Gfeller, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This review of the literature presents a systematic analysis of the capabilities and limitations of cochlear implant (CI) recipients with regard to music perception. Specifically, it (a) analyzes individual components of music (e.g., rhythm, timbre, and pitch) as they interface with the technical characteristics of CIs and the perceptual abilities…

  10. Perceptual Spaces Induced by Cochlear Implant All-Polar Stimulation Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; McKay, Colette M

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. To reduce this spread, an alternative stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with five participants...

  11. Vocabulary Knowledge of Children with Cochlear Implants: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily

    2016-01-01

    This article employs meta-analysis procedures to evaluate whether children with cochlear implants demonstrate lower spoken-language vocabulary knowledge than peers with normal hearing. Of the 754 articles screened and 52 articles coded, 12 articles met predetermined inclusion criteria (with an additional 5 included for one analysis). Effect sizes…

  12. Expressive Vocabulary, Morphology, Syntax and Narrative Skills in Profoundly Deaf Children after Early Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience and research reveal generic spoken language benefits after cochlear implantation. However, systematic research on specific language domains and error analyses are required to probe sub-skills. Moreover, the effect of predictive factors on distinct language domains is unknown. In this study, outcomes of 70 school-aged children…

  13. Prosody perception in simulated cochlear implant listening in modulated and stationary noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear Implant (CI) listeners can do well when attending to speech in quiet, yet challenging listening situations are more problematic. Previous studies have shown that fluctuations in the noise do not yield better speech recognition scores for CI listeners as they can do for normal hearing (NH...

  14. Unexpected findings and surgical complications in 505 consecutive cochlear implantations: a proposal for reporting consensus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Anthonsen, Kristian; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is a safe procedure in experienced hands, as the rate of severe complications is below 2%. Complications differ between children and adults, and transient disequilibrium/vertigo is the most common complication, followed by wound infection, haematoma/oedema and transient chorda...

  15. Cross-Modal Reorganization and Speech Perception in Cochlear Implant Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, M. E.; Bergeron, F.; Lassonde, M.; Ferron, P.; Lepore, F.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work suggests that once the auditory cortex of deaf persons has been reorganized by cross-modal plasticity, it can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant (CI) installed subsequently. To further examine this issue, we compared the evoked potentials involved in the processing of visual stimuli between CI users and hearing…

  16. Matching Automatic Gain Control Across Devices in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, L.C.E.; Chalupper, J.; Snik, A.F.M; Opstal, A.J. van; Mens, L.H.M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to improve bimodal benefit in listeners using a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, by matching the time constants and the number of compression channels of the automatic gain control (AGC) of the HA to the CI. Equivalent AGC

  17. Cochlear implant electrode array insertion monitoring with intra-operative 3D rotational X-ray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carelsen, B; Grolman, W; Tange, R; Streekstra, G J; van Kemenade, P; Jansen, R J; Freling, N J M; White, M; Maat, B; Fokkens, W J

    2007-01-01

    During cochlear implantation surgery, we use a mobile C-arm with 3D functionality to acquire per-operative 3D X-ray images. Scanning the multielectrode array is performed once before removal of the stylet and once after full insertion. When dissatisfied with the position of the multielectrode a repo

  18. Analog Integrated Circuit and System Design for a Compact, Low-Power Cochlear Implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ngamkham, W.

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear Implants (CIs) are prosthetic devices that restore hearing in profoundly deaf patients by bypassing the damaged parts of the inner ear and directly stimulating the remaining auditory nerve fibers in the cochlea with electrical pulses. This thesis describs the electronic circuit design of va

  19. Cochlear implants and the claims of culture? A response to Lane and Grodin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dena S

    1997-09-01

    Because I reject the notion that physical characteristics constitute cultural membership, I argue that, even if the claim were persuasive that deafness is a culture rather than a disability, there is no reason to fault hearing parents who choose cochlear implants for their deaf children.

  20. Expressive vocabulary, morphology, syntax and narrative skills in profoundly deaf children after early cochlear implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; Wieringen, van

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience and research reveal generic spoken language benefits after cochlear implantation. However, systematic research on specific language domains and error analyses are required to probe sub-skills. Moreover, the effect of predictive factors on distinct language domains is unknown. In

  1. Factors that affect the social well-being of children with cochlear implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, L.; Jensen, J.H.; Caye-Thomasen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with the level of social well-being for cochlear implanted children and to estimate effect-related odds ratios for the children's well-being. Another aim was to analyse associations between speech and language level and the level of social w...

  2. Imitative Production of Rising Speech Intonation in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shu-Chen; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Spencer, Linda J.; Hurtig, Richard R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients' imitative production of rising speech intonation, in relation to the perceptual judgments by listeners with normal hearing (NH). Method: Recordings of a yes-no interrogative utterance imitated by 24 prelingually deafened children with a CI…

  3. Beyond hearing : social-emotional outcomes following cochlear implantation in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, Lizet

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to hearing children, children with hearing loss more often experience social-emotional problems. This thesis aimed to assess whether this was also true for 1-to-5-year-old children who had received a cochlear implant (CI) to remediate their hearing loss. In comparison to hearing peers,

  4. Executive Functioning Skills in Preschool-Age Children with Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Jessica; Kronenberger, William G.; Castellanos, Irina; Colson, Bethany G.; Henning, Shirley C.; Pisoni, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether deficits in executive functioning (EF) in children with cochlear implants (CIs) emerge as early as the preschool years. Method: Two groups of children ages 3 to 6 years participated in this cross-sectional study: 24 preschoolers who had CIs prior to 36 months of age and 21 preschoolers…

  5. Cochlear implants in children : development in interaction with the social context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiefferink, K.C.

    2012-01-01

    Between 150 and 200 deaf children are born in the Netherlands each year. Deafness has major consequences for these children’s development, as it deprives them of access to spoken language. Since the 1990s, deaf children have been able to have a cochlear implant (CI), which enables them to experience

  6. Perceptual space induced by cochlear implant all-polar stimulation mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marozeau, Jeremy; Mckay, Colette M.

    2015-01-01

    It has often been argued that a main limitation of the cochlear implant is the spread of current induced by each electrode, which activates an inappropriately large range of sensory neurons. In order to reduce this spread, a new stimulation mode, the all-polar mode, was tested with 5 participants...

  7. Interaural Place-Mismatch Estimation With Two-Formant Vowels in Unilateral Cochlear- Implant Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guérit, François; Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef;

    Background: For patients with one cochlear implant (CI) and residual hearing in the opposite ear, a default frequency-to-electrode map is typically used despite large individual differences in electrode-array insertion depth. This non-individualized fitting rationale might partly explain the vari...

  8. Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant Rupture: An Uncommon Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mallon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant rupture developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant rupture only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be ruptured. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation.

  9. Semantic organization in children with cochlear implants: computational analysis of verbal fluency

    OpenAIRE

    YoedNissanKenett; DeenaWechsler-Kashi; DrorYKenett; RichardG.Schwartz; MiriamFaust

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cochlear implants (CIs) enable children with severe and profound hearing impairments to perceive the sensation of sound sufficiently to permit oral language acquisition. So far, studies have focused mainly on technological improvements and general outcomes of implantation for speech perception and spoken language development. This study quantitatively explored the organization of the semantic networks of children with CIs in comparison to those of age-matched normal hearing (NH) peer...

  10. The relative phonetic contributions of a cochlear implant and residual acoustic hearing to bimodal speech perceptiona

    OpenAIRE

    Sheffield, Benjamin M.; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    The addition of low-passed (LP) speech or even a tone following the fundamental frequency (F0) of speech has been shown to benefit speech recognition for cochlear implant (CI) users with residual acoustic hearing. The mechanisms underlying this benefit are still unclear. In this study, eight bimodal subjects (CI users with acoustic hearing in the non-implanted ear) and eight simulated bimodal subjects (using vocoded and LP speech) were tested on vowel and consonant recognition to determine th...

  11. Multivariate Predictors of Music Perception and Appraisal by Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Gfeller, Kate; Oleson, Jacob; Knutson, John F.; Breheny, Patrick; Driscoll, Virginia; Olszewski, Carol

    2008-01-01

    The research examined whether performance by adult cochlear implant recipients on a variety of recognition and appraisal tests derived from real-world music could be predicted from technological, demographic, and life experience variables, as well as speech recognition scores. A representative sample of 209 adults implanted between 1985 and 2006 participated. Using multiple linear regression models and generalized linear mixed models, sets of optimal predictor variables were selected that eff...

  12. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result

    OpenAIRE

    Mina Park; Jae-Jin Song; Seo Jin Oh; Min-Sup Shin; Jun Ho Lee; Seung Ha Oh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3–14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5–16) years) who were tested using ...

  13. Evolution of non-speech sound memory in postlingual deafness: implications for cochlear implant rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Lazard, D S; Giraud Mamessier, Anne-Lise; Truy, E; Lee, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Neurofunctional patterns assessed before or after cochlear implantation (CI) are informative markers of implantation outcome. Because phonological memory reorganization in post-lingual deafness is predictive of the outcome, we investigated, using a cross-sectional approach, whether memory of non-speech sounds (NSS) produced by animals or objects (i.e. non-human sounds) is also reorganized, and how this relates to speech perception after CI. We used an fMRI auditory imagery task in which sound...

  14. Perception of polyphony with cochlear implants for 2 and 3 simultaneous pitches

    OpenAIRE

    Penninger, Richard; Kludt, Eugen; Limb, Charles J.; Leman, Marc; Dhooge, Ingeborg; Buechner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis: It was hypothesized that cochlear implant (CI) subjects would be able to correctly identify one, two and three simultaneous pitches through direct electrical stimulation. We further hypothesized that the location on the implant array and the fundamental frequency of the pitches would have an impact on the performance. Background: "They gave me back speech but not music." is a sentence commonly heard by CI subjects. One of the reasons is that in music, multiple streams are frequ...

  15. Information-processing skills of deaf children with cochlear implants: some new process measures of performance

    OpenAIRE

    Pisoni, David B.

    2004-01-01

    Recent findings on learning, memory and cognitive processes in deaf children following cochlear implantation are reviewed. The contribution of demographic factors is discussed and the results of several studies using “process” measures of performance are presented. In the first study, results from an investigation of the “Stars” showed that the exceptionally good implant users differed from the low performers in several important ways reflecting their ability to rapidly encode sound patterns ...

  16. The use of subtotal petrosectomy in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Marcin; Ataide, Andre; Linder, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) candidates with chronic otitis media require special attention and management. The need of opening of the inner ear creates potential routes of spread of infection to subarachnoid spaces and lead to meningitis. The aim of the study was to analyse the technique and complications of subtotal petrosectomy (SP) in cochlear implant candidates with chronic otitis media at three different CI centres. A retrospective study was carried out in three Territory Referral Hospitals. The centres follow Fisch's philosophy and surgical techniques of SP. The study group consisted of 19 patients, 4 men and 15 women, aged 12-82 years. All patients underwent SP with either primary or staged CI implantation. Indications for single or a staged management, difficulties during surgery and complications were analysed. Skin and muscle flap design in primary and revision cases as well as imaging follow-up strategy are discussed. In 14 patients implantation was performed in a single stage and in 5 cases in two stages. Follow-up ranged from 8 months to 10 years. All the patients use their implants and there were no major nor minor complications. The use of subtotal petrosectomy with cochlear implants is a safe and efficient technique when strict surgical steps and rules are applied. Closure of the external ear canal after previous meatoplasty can be challenging and extreme care dissecting the skin flaps is required. In patients with extensive cholesteatoma, active discharge from the ear with resistant bacteria or an "unstable" situation, the procedure can be staged.

  17. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room. PMID:27546081

  18. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room.

  19. The convergence of cochlear implantation with induced pluripotent stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A

    2012-09-01

    According to 2010 estimates from The National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, approximately 17% (36 million) American adults have reported some degree of hearing loss. Currently, the only clinical treatment available for those with severe-to-profound hearing loss is a cochlear implant, which is designed to electrically stimulate the auditory nerve in the absence of hair cells. Whilst the cochlear implant has been revolutionary in terms of providing hearing to the severe-to-profoundly deaf, there are variations in cochlear implant performance which may be related to the degree of degeneration of auditory neurons following hearing loss. Hence, numerous experimental studies have focused on enhancing the efficacy of cochlear implants by using neurotrophins to preserve the auditory neurons, and more recently, attempting to replace these dying cells with new neurons derived from stem cells. As a result, several groups are now investigating the potential for both embryonic and adult stem cells to replace the degenerating sensory elements in the deaf cochlea. Recent advances in our knowledge of stem cells and the development of induced pluripotency by Takahashi and Yamanaka in 2006, have opened a new realm of science focused on the use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for therapeutic purposes. This review will provide a broad overview of the potential benefits and challenges of using iPS cells in combination with a cochlear implant for the treatment of hearing loss, including differentiation of iPS cells into an auditory neural lineage and clinically relevant transplantation approaches. PMID:21956409

  20. [Preoperative imaging of the inner ear prior to the implantation of a multichannel cochlear implant using computed and MR technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerny, C; Gstoettner, W; Adunka, O; Hamzavi, J; Baumgartner, W D

    2000-06-01

    CT and MRT are now standard examinations prior to insertion of a cochlear implant. Both methods have advantages and disadvantages in terms of discovering potentially pathological structures in the inner ear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pros and cons of using CT and MRT before cochlear implantation. CT is usually performed using axial planigraphic planes. Like MRT, bone-specific CT is helpful in the diagnosis of congenital and acquired changes within the inner ear. Congenital defects in the meatus acusticus internus, the endolymphatic duct and sac, the cochlea and the vestibulum can be diagnosed and also quantified. Infectious morphologic changes can be seen on CT images in their terminal residual state (sclerotic tissue). However, acute inflammation and fibrotic tissue is not visible on CT. T2-specific MRT images are very fluid sensitive and play a major role in preoperative cochlear implant diagnosis. This examination demonstrates fluid within the peri- and enolymphatic cave and permits the diagnostician to determine whether congenital or acquired diseases have destroyed such fluid-filled cavities. In order to demonstrate pathological changes in the temporal bone and neural structures in the inner ear, MRT is the preferred method. Displaying the modiolus and the cochlear nerve is extremely important because, in their absence, a cochlear implantation may be contra-indicated. MRT also demonstrates other neural structures such as the facial nerve. This information may be important for the surgeon, e.g. the state of the pneumatic system in the mastoid cavity (which is best visualised by bone-specific CT). PMID:10890125

  1. Technology developments to initiate a next generation of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volckaerts, B; Corless, A R; Mercanzini, A; Silmon, A M; Bertsch, A; Van Himbeeck, C; Wasikiewicz, J; Vanden Bulcke, M; Vadgama, P; Renaud, P

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EU-supported research project Healthy Aims, we developed a range of novel electrode arrays and related technologies for use in hearing prosthesis. This paper summarizes our ongoing research activities on alternative electrode manufacturing routes, functional electrode interfaces and smart intra-cochlear and intra-modiolus electrode arrays.

  2. Communication outcomes following cochlear implantation in a child with cystic cochleovestibular anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Banumathy; Naresh K. Panda

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implantation is one of the best amongst the various management options available for children and adults with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Inner ear and internal auditory canal (IAC) malformations accounts to approximately 25%of congenital sensorineural hearing loss in children. The primary goal of this report was to evaluate the communication outcomes after cochlear implantation in a child with cystic cochleovestibular anomaly (CCVA). The child was evaluated through various standardized outcome measures at regular intervals to track the progress in terms of auditory and spoken language skills. The scores on Categories of Auditory Perception (CAP), Meaningful Auditory Integration Scale (MAIS), Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR), Meaningful Use of Speech Scale (MUSS), and listening and spoken language skills showed a significant leap in 12 months duration post implantation. The report thus highlights and correlates the significant progress in auditory and spoken language skills of the child with congenital malformations to appropriate auditory rehabilitation and intensive parental training.

  3. Spectral subtraction-based speech enhancement for cochlear implant patients in background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Fu, Qian-Jie

    2005-03-01

    A single-channel speech enhancement algorithm utilizing speech pause detection and nonlinear spectral subtraction is proposed for cochlear implant patients in the present study. The spectral subtraction algorithm estimates the short-time spectral magnitude of speech by subtracting the estimated noise spectral magnitude from the noisy speech spectral magnitude. The artifacts produced by spectral subtraction (such as ``musical noise'') were significantly reduced by combining variance-reduced gain function and spectral flooring. Sentence recognition by seven cochlear implant subjects was tested under different noisy listening conditions (speech-shaped noise and 6-talker speech babble at +9, +6, +3, and 0 dB SNR) with and without the speech enhancement algorithm. For speech-shaped noise, performance for all subjects at all SNRs was significantly improved by the speech enhancement algorithm; for speech babble, performance was only modestly improved. The results suggest that the proposed speech enhancement algorithm may be beneficial for implant users in noisy listening. .

  4. Children using Cochlear Implants Capitalize on Acoustical Hearing for Music Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talar eHopyan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cochlear implants (CIs electrically stimulate the auditory nerve providing children who are deaf with access to speech and music. Because of device limitations, it was hypothesized that children using CIs develop abnormal perception of musical cues. Perception of pitch and rhythm as well as memory for music was measured by the children’s version of the Montreal Battery of Amusia (MBEA in 23 unilateral CI users and 22 age-matched children with normal hearing. Children with CIs were less accurate than their normal hearing peers (p<0.05. CI users were best able to discern rhythm changes (p < .01 and to remember musical pieces (p < .01. Contrary to expectations, abilities to hear cues in music improved as the age at implantation increased (p < .01. Further analyses revealed that this was because the children implanted at older ages also had better low frequency hearing prior to cochlear implantation and were able to use this hearing prior to cochlear implantation by wearing hearing aids. Access to early acoustical hearing in the lower frequency ranges appears to establish a base for music perception, which can be accessed with later electrical CI hearing.

  5. Comparisons of Auditory Performance and Speech Intelligibility after Cochlear Implant Reimplantation in Mandarin-Speaking Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Feng Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We evaluated the causes, hearing, and speech performance before and after cochlear implant reimplantation in Mandarin-speaking users. Methods. In total, 589 patients who underwent cochlear implantation in our medical center between 1999 and 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Data related to demographics, etiologies, implant-related information, complications, and hearing and speech performance were collected. Results. In total, 22 (3.74% cases were found to have major complications. Infection (n=12 and hard failure of the device (n=8 were the most common major complications. Among them, 13 were reimplanted in our hospital. The mean scores of the Categorical Auditory Performance (CAP and the Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR obtained before and after reimplantation were 5.5 versus 5.8 and 3.7 versus 4.3, respectively. The SIR score after reimplantation was significantly better than preoperation. Conclusions. Cochlear implantation is a safe procedure with low rates of postsurgical revisions and device failures. The Mandarin-speaking patients in this study who received reimplantation had restored auditory performance and speech intelligibility after surgery. Device soft failure was rare in our series, calling attention to Mandarin-speaking CI users requiring revision of their implants due to undesirable symptoms or decreasing performance of uncertain cause.

  6. The effect of age of cochlear implantation on vocal characteristics in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Knight

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early cochlear implantation aids auditory feedback and supports better communication and self-monitoring of the voice. The objective of this study was to determine whether the age of cochlear implantation has an impact on vocal development in children implanted before age 4.Method and procedures: The study consisted of 19 participants in total. All implant recipients (experimental group were 3–5 years post-implantation, including four prelingual (0–2 years and five perilingual (2–4 years implant recipients. The control group consisted of 10 children whose hearing was within normal limits between the ages 3–6 years and 10 months, which was compared to the experimental group. Established paediatric norms were used for additional comparison. A questionnaire was used to gather information from each of the participant’s caregivers to determine whether other personal and contextual factors had an impact on voice production. An acoustic analysis was conducted for each participant using the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program of the Computerized Speech Lab.Results: When the experimental group and the control group were compared, similar results were yielded for fundamental frequency and short-term perturbation (jitter and shimmer. More variability was noted in long-term frequency and amplitude measures, with significantly higher differences, and therefore further outside the norms, in the prelingual group when compared to the perilingual and control groups.Conclusion: In this study, age of implantation did not impact vocal characteristics. Further research should include larger sample sizes, with participants that are age and gender matched.Keywords: cochlear implant; vocal development; age of implantation; prelingual; lingual

  7. In vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic study of a dexamethasone-releasing silicone for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya; Jolly, Claude; Braun, Susanne; Stark, Thomas; Scherer, Elias; Plontke, Stefan K; Kiefer, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Cochlear implants have been widely used for patients with profound hearing loss and partial deafness. Residual low-frequency hearing, however, may deteriorate due to insertion trauma and tissue response around the electrode array. The present study investigated in vitro and in vivo release of dexamethasone from silicone used for cochlear implant electrode carriers. The in vitro experiment involved an apparatus simulating the inner ear fluid environment in humans. Release from two sizes of silicone films (200 µm × 1 mm × 10 mm and 500 µm × 1 mm × 10 mm), each loaded with 2 % dexamethasone, and was measured for 24 weeks. In the in vivo experiment, silicone rods loaded with 2 or 10 % dexamethasone, respectively, were implanted into the scala tympani of guinea pigs. Perilymph concentrations were measured during the first week after implantation. The results showed that dexamethasone was released from the silicone in a sustained manner. After a burst release, perilymph concentration was similar for silicone incorporated with 2 and 10 % dexamethasone, respectively. The similar pharmacokinetic profile was found in the in vitro experiment. The period of sustained drug delivery was maintained for 20 weeks in vitro and for 1 week in vivo. The results of the present study suggest that drugs like dexamethasone are released in a controlled manner from silicon electrode carriers of cochlear implants. Further studies will identify optimal release profiles for the use with cochlear implants to improve their safety and long-term performance. PMID:26319276

  8. Ophthalmological screening of a paediatric cochlear implant population: a retrospective analysis and 12-year follow-up.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falzon, K

    2010-06-01

    To determine the nature and prevalence of ophthalmological findings for a cohort of children in a paediatric cochlear implant program and to assist the clinician in devising an investigative plan for this population.

  9. Self-esteem and social well-being of children with cochlear implant compared to normal-hearing children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Percy-Smith, L.; Caye-Thomasen, P.; Gudman, M.;

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to make a quantitative comparison of parameters of self-esteem and social well-being between children with cochlear implants and normal-hearing children. Material and methods: Data were obtained from 164 children with cochlear implant (CI) and 2169 normal......-hearing children (NH). Parental questionnaires, used in a national survey assessing the self-esteem and well-being of normal-hearing children, were applied to the cochlear implanted group, in order to allow direct comparisons. Results: The children in the CI group rated significantly higher on questions about well-being...... overall self-esteem or number of friends. The two groups of children scored similarly on being confident, independent, social, not worried and happy. Conclusion: Children with cochlear implant score equal to or better than their normal-hearing peers on matters of self-esteem and social well-being. (C...

  10. Aspects of temporal bone anatomy and pathology in conjunction with cochlear implant surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stjernholm, Christina [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Soedersjukhuset

    2003-07-01

    Cochlear implantation is a treatment for patients with severe sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, who get no help from ordinary hearing aids. The cochlear implant is surgically placed under the skin near the ear and a very thin electrode array is introduced into the cochlea of the inner ear, where it stimulates the remaining nerve fibers. The operation is complicated; it is performed with the aid of a microscope, and involves drilling very close to vital vessels and important nerves. High resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone is a part of the preoperative evaluation preceding cochlear implantation. It is a method for visualizing the bony structures of the middle and inner ear - to diagnose pathology and to describe the anatomy. The first work concerns CT of the temporal bone and cochlear implant surgery in children with CHARGE association. This is a rare condition with multiple congenital abnormalities, sometimes lethal. Children with CHARGE have different combinations of disabilities, of which impairments of vision and hearing, as well as balance problems and facial palsy can lead to developmental delay. There have been few reports of radiological temporal bone changes and none of cochlear implant surgery for this group. The work includes a report of the findings on preoperative CT and at surgery, as well as postimplant results in two children. A review of the latest diagnostic criteria of CHARGE and the temporal bone changes found in international literature is also included. The conclusion was that certain combinations of temporal bone changes in CHARGE are, if not specific, at least extremely rare in other materials. CT can visualize these changes and be used as a diagnostic tool. This is important, since some of the associated disabilities are not so obvious from the start. Early treatment is vital for the child's development. This work also shows that cochlear implantation may help some of these often very isolated children to

  11. Aspects of temporal bone anatomy and pathology in conjunction with cochlear implant surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochlear implantation is a treatment for patients with severe sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, who get no help from ordinary hearing aids. The cochlear implant is surgically placed under the skin near the ear and a very thin electrode array is introduced into the cochlea of the inner ear, where it stimulates the remaining nerve fibers. The operation is complicated; it is performed with the aid of a microscope, and involves drilling very close to vital vessels and important nerves. High resolution computed tomography (CT) of the temporal bone is a part of the preoperative evaluation preceding cochlear implantation. It is a method for visualizing the bony structures of the middle and inner ear - to diagnose pathology and to describe the anatomy. The first work concerns CT of the temporal bone and cochlear implant surgery in children with CHARGE association. This is a rare condition with multiple congenital abnormalities, sometimes lethal. Children with CHARGE have different combinations of disabilities, of which impairments of vision and hearing, as well as balance problems and facial palsy can lead to developmental delay. There have been few reports of radiological temporal bone changes and none of cochlear implant surgery for this group. The work includes a report of the findings on preoperative CT and at surgery, as well as postimplant results in two children. A review of the latest diagnostic criteria of CHARGE and the temporal bone changes found in international literature is also included. The conclusion was that certain combinations of temporal bone changes in CHARGE are, if not specific, at least extremely rare in other materials. CT can visualize these changes and be used as a diagnostic tool. This is important, since some of the associated disabilities are not so obvious from the start. Early treatment is vital for the child's development. This work also shows that cochlear implantation may help some of these often very isolated children to communicate

  12. Optimization of power supply by external field in a cochlear implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.BATEL,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In biomedical implant field, a transcutanious connection is often used by transferring the radio frequency (RF power between coupled coils. The DC supply systems without material connection and the data transmitters used in the case of implanted biomedical devices like a cochlear implant, can be well dimensioned by taking into account the power attenuation by both transfer coils misalignment and biological tissue absorption. In this context, we present an optimal study of a DC supply circuit which takes into account these different powerattenuation aspects. Practical measurements are done to confirm the theoretical calculations.

  13. Multicentre prospective evaluation of implant-assisted mandibular bilateral distal extension removable partial dentures: patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Wismeijer; A. Tawse-Smith; A.G.T. Payne

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the levels of patient satisfaction with either conventional mandibular bilateral distal extension partial dentures or those assisted by bilateral distal implants. Materials and methods Forty-eight participants who were dissatisfied with their existing conventional mandibular dis

  14. Preschool Speech Intelligibility and Vocabulary Skills Predict Long-Term Speech and Language Outcomes Following Cochlear Implantation in Early Childhood

    OpenAIRE

    Castellanos, Irina; Kronenberger, William G.; Beer, Jessica; Henning, Shirley C.; Colson, Bethany G.; Pisoni, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Speech and language measures during grade school predict adolescent speech-language outcomes in children who receive cochlear implants, but no research has examined whether speech and language functioning at even younger ages is predictive of long-term outcomes in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine if early preschool measures of speech and language performance predict speech-language functioning in long-term users of cochlear implants. Early measures of speech intelligi...

  15. Modeling the Electrode-Neuron Interface of Cochlear Implants: Effects of Neural Survival, Electrode Placement, and the Partial Tripolar Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Goldwyn, Joshua H.; Bierer, Steven M.; Bierer, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The partial tripolar electrode configuration is a relatively novel stimulation strategies that can generate more spatially focused electric fields than the commonly used monopolar configuration. Focused stimulation strategies should improve spectral resolution in cochlear implant users, but may also be more sensitive to local irregularities in the electrode-neuron interface. In this study, we develop a practical computer model of cochlear implant stimulation that can simulate neural activatio...

  16. Identification of vowel length, word stress and compound words and phrases by postlingually-deafened cochlear implant listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson; Magnusson, Lennart; Faulkner, Andrew;

    2013-01-01

    Background: The accurate perception of prosody assists a listener in deriving meaning from natural speech. Few studies have addressed the ability of cochlear implant (CI) listeners to perceive the brief duration prosodic cues involved in contrastive vowel length, word stress, and compound word...... recipients’ ability to perceive brief prosodic cues. This is of interest in the preparation of rehabilitation materials used in training and in developing realistic expectations for potential CI candidates. Key Words: Cochlear implants, speech acoustics, speech intelligibility...

  17. Singing in the key of life:A study on effects of musical ear training after cochlear implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Bjørn; Mortensen, Malene Vejby; Hansen, Mads; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a 6-month one-to-one musical ear-training program on the perception of music, speech, and emotional prosody of deaf patients receiving a cochlear implant (CI). Eighteen patients who recently underwent cochlear implantation were assigned to either a musical ear-training group or a control group. The participants in the music group significantly improved in their overall music perception compared with the control group. In particular, their discrimination o...

  18. The comparison of balance performance among children with cochlear implantation, post-aural aid and normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Ahmad pour

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This cross-sectional study was carried out to compare balance performance between children with cochlear implants and post-aural aid and normal children. Methods: The present study was done on 67 severe to profound hearing impaired children. Of these, 21 children with an average age of 7 years and 4 months (±1.7 wore cochlear implant, 46 children with an average age of 7 years and 7 months (±1.7 wore post-aural aid and 60 children with an average 8 years and one month (±11 months were considered as a control group. All of the children were tested with the 9-stage balance subtest of Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency2 (BOT2. Results: The mean total BOT2 score of hearing impaired children was significantly lower than the normal group (P≤0.001. The mean total BOT2 score among children with cochlear implant, post-aural aids and normal group showed that cochlear implant group significantly performed weaker than the other two groups (P≤0.001. Conclusion: Hearing impaired children particularly children with cochlear implant are exposed to the risk of balance deficit. Hearing impaired children specially those who wear cochlear implants must be screened for vestibular hypofunction.

  19. Qualitative case studies of five cochlear implant recipients' experience with music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Lee R; Greenberg, Simon; Friesen, Lendra M; Ostroff, Jodi; Bodmer, Daniel; Shipp, David; Chen, Joseph M

    2011-02-01

    Cochlear implantation has revolutionized the management of those who suffer from severe-to-profound hearing loss because many patients now achieve excellent speech understanding with objective testing. Nevertheless, speech understanding in noisy conditions and music appreciation remain significant challenges to cochlear implant (CI) users. Music appreciation is an extremely complex experience that is difficult to quantify through a conventional outcome study. This paper aims at documenting the experience of five CI patients with regard to music appreciation using qualitative techniques. This information was obtained through a semi-structured interview process. The interviews were then transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method of qualitative description. The results together with medical case records were used to identify emerging themes. The common themes that evolved were: musical background, the experience of receiving the implant, current experience with music, attention, musical prediction ability, internal hearing, hedonic vs. critical listening, determination, and timbre perception. By documenting their experiences in this manner, novel insights into the patient perspective are provided that are unique to the literature. These descriptions will aid clinicians and researchers who work in the area of cochlear implantation to better understand the needs of their patients. PMID:21756456

  20. Judgment of musical emotions after cochlear implantation in adults with progressive deafness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuèle eAmbert-Dahan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While cochlear implantation is rather successful in restoring speech comprehension in quiet environments (Nimmons et al., 2008, other auditory tasks, such as music perception, can remain challenging for implant users. Here, we tested how patients who had received a cochlear implant (CI after post-lingual progressive deafness perceive emotions in music. Thirteen adult CI recipients with good verbal comprehension (dissyllabic words ≥ 70% and 13 normal hearing participants matched for age, gender, and education listened to 40 short musical excerpts that selectively expressed fear, happiness, sadness, and peacefulness (Vieillard et al., 2008. The participants were asked to rate (on a 0 to 100 scale how much the musical stimuli expressed these four cardinal emotions, and to judge their emotional valence (unpleasant-pleasant and arousal (relaxing-stimulating. Although CI users performed above chance level, their emotional judgments (mean correctness scores were generally impaired for happy, scary, and sad, but not for peaceful excerpts. CI users also demonstrated deficits in perceiving arousal of musical excerpts, whereas rating of valence remained unaffected. The current findings indicate that judgments of emotional categories and dimensions of musical excerpts are not uniformly impaired after cochlear implantation. These results are discussed in relation to the relatively spared abilities of CI users in perceiving temporal (rhythm and metric as compared to spectral (pitch and timbre musical dimensions, which might benefit the processing of musical emotions (Cooper et al., 2008.

  1. An Undecimated Wavelet-based Method for Cochlear Implant Speech Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghababa, Fatemeh; Kermani, Saeed; Marateb, Hamid R

    2014-10-01

    A cochlear implant is an implanted electronic device used to provide a sensation of hearing to a person who is hard of hearing. The cochlear implant is often referred to as a bionic ear. This paper presents an undecimated wavelet-based speech coding strategy for cochlear implants, which gives a novel speech processing strategy. The undecimated wavelet packet transform (UWPT) is computed like the wavelet packet transform except that it does not down-sample the output at each level. The speech data used for the current study consists of 30 consonants, sampled at 16 kbps. The performance of our proposed UWPT method was compared to that of infinite impulse response (IIR) filter in terms of mean opinion score (MOS), short-time objective intelligibility (STOI) measure and segmental signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Undecimated wavelet had better segmental SNR in about 96% of the input speech data. The MOS of the proposed method was twice in comparison with that of the IIR filter-bank. The statistical analysis revealed that the UWT-based N-of-M strategy significantly improved the MOS, STOI and segmental SNR (P bank based strategies. The advantage of UWPT is that it is shift-invariant which gives a dense approximation to continuous wavelet transform. Thus, the information loss is minimal and that is why the UWPT performance was better than that of traditional filter-bank strategies in speech recognition tests. Results showed that the UWPT could be a promising method for speech coding in cochlear implants, although its computational complexity is higher than that of traditional filter-banks. PMID:25426428

  2. Segmental analysis of cochlea on three-dimensional MR imaging and high-resolution CT. Application to pre-operative assessment of cochlear implant candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiba, Hidenari; Himi, Tetsuo; Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-12-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently become standard pre-operative examinations for cochlear implant candidates. HRCT can demonstrate ossification and narrowing of the cochlea, but subtle calcification or soft tissue obstruction may not be detected by this method alone, and so conventional T2 weighted image (T2WI) on MRI has been recommended to disclose them. In this study, segmental analyses of the cochlea were made on three-dimensional MRI (3DMRI) and HRCT in order to predict cochlear implant difficulties. The study involved 59 consecutive patients with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss who underwent MRI and HRCT from November 1992 to February 1998. Etiologies of deafness were meningogenic labyrinthitis (n=9), tympanogenic labyrinthitis (n=12), and others (n=38). Pulse sequence of heavy T2WI was steady state free precession and 3DMRI was reconstructed by maximum intensity projection method. HRCT was reconstructed by bone algorithm focusing on the temporal bone. For alternative segmental analysis, cochleas were anatomically divided into five parts and each of them was classified by three ranks of score depending on 3DMRI or HRCT findings. There was a close correlation by ranks between the total score of the five parts on 3DMRI and HRCT (rs=0.86, P<0.001), and a statistically significant difference was identified between causes of deafness in the total score on 3DMRI or HRCT (P<0.001, respectively). There was a significant difference in the score among the five parts on each examination (P<0.001, respectively), and abnormal findings were more frequent in the inferior horizontal part (IHP) of the basal turn. Of the 35 patients who underwent cochlear implantation, no one had ossification in the IHP on HRCT and only one patient had an obstacle to implantation. When no signal void in the IHP on 3DMRI and no ossification in the IHP on HRCT were assumed to be the criteria for candidacy for cochlear

  3. Temporary deafness can impair multisensory integration: a study of cochlear-implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Simon P; Guillemot, Jean-Paul; Champoux, François

    2013-07-01

    Previous investigations suggest that temporary deafness can have a dramatic impact on audiovisual speech processing. The aim of this study was to test whether temporary deafness disturbs other multisensory processes in adults. A nonspeech task involving an audiotactile illusion was administered to a group of normally hearing individuals and a group of individuals who had been temporarily auditorily deprived. Members of this latter group had their auditory detection thresholds restored to normal levels through the use of a cochlear implant. Control conditions revealed that auditory and tactile discrimination capabilities were identical in the two groups. However, whereas normally hearing individuals integrated auditory and tactile information, so that they experienced the audiotactile illusion, individuals who had been temporarily deprived did not. Given the basic nature of the task, failure to integrate multisensory information could not be explained by the use of the cochlear implant. Thus, the results suggest that normally anticipated audiotactile interactions are disturbed following temporary deafness.

  4. Psychophysics, fitting, and signal processing for combined hearing aid and cochlear implant stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    The addition of acoustic stimulation to electric stimulation via a cochlear implant has been shown to be advantageous for speech perception in noise, sound quality, music perception, and sound source localization. However, the signal processing and fitting procedures of current cochlear implants and hearing aids were developed independently, precluding several potential advantages of bimodal stimulation, such as improved sound source localization and binaural unmasking of speech in noise. While there is a large and increasing population of implantees who use a hearing aid, there are currently no generally accepted fitting methods for this configuration. It is not practical to fit current commercial devices to achieve optimal binaural loudness balance or optimal binaural cue transmission for arbitrary signals and levels. There are several promising experimental signal processing systems specifically designed for bimodal stimulation. In this article, basic psychophysical studies with electric acoustic stimulation are reviewed, along with the current state of the art in fitting, and experimental signal processing techniques for electric acoustic stimulation.

  5. A PDA platform for offline processing and streaming of stimuli for cochlear implant research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussnain; Lobo, Arthur P; Loizou, Philipos C

    2011-01-01

    A PDA-based research platform has been developed for implementing novel speech processing strategies and conducting psychophysical experiments with cochlear implant (CI) research that do not necessarily require real-time processing. The developed interface streams stimuli pulses to a CI unit in an offline mode from a Personal Computer via PDA platform using Windows Sockets (WINSOCK). Front-end of the application is run in MATLAB where stimuli pulses are created. Winsock establishes a TCP/IP connection with the PDA and starts the transmission of stimuli data. Server application installed on the PDA reads the stimulation data and forwards it to the SDIO board in packets where it is forwarded to the cochlear implant unit and pulses are then played in realtime. Versatility and flexibility are the key characteristics of the platform for easy implementation and testing of a wide range of applications and experiments without advanced programming skills.

  6. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children With Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-10-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The extent of the children's word learning was assessed using three assessment tasks: receptive pointing, expressively labeling, and word defining. Children demonstrated greater immediate expressive labeling gains and definition generation gains for words taught in the treatment condition compared to those in the comparison condition. In addition, the children's performance on delayed posttest vocabulary assessments indicated better retention across the expressive vocabulary task for words taught within the treatment condition as compared to the comparison condition. Findings suggest that children with cochlear implants with functional speech perception can benefit from an oral-only multimedia-enhanced intensive vocabulary instruction. PMID:26251346

  7. Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Children With Cochlear Implants Using Electronic Storybooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Jane; Wood, Carla

    2015-10-01

    The present intervention study explored the word learning of 18 children with cochlear implants in response to E-book instruction. Capitalizing on the multimedia options available in electronic storybooks, the intervention incorporated videos and definitions to provide a vocabulary intervention that includes evidence-based teaching strategies. The extent of the children's word learning was assessed using three assessment tasks: receptive pointing, expressively labeling, and word defining. Children demonstrated greater immediate expressive labeling gains and definition generation gains for words taught in the treatment condition compared to those in the comparison condition. In addition, the children's performance on delayed posttest vocabulary assessments indicated better retention across the expressive vocabulary task for words taught within the treatment condition as compared to the comparison condition. Findings suggest that children with cochlear implants with functional speech perception can benefit from an oral-only multimedia-enhanced intensive vocabulary instruction.

  8. Speech perception of young children using nucleus 22-channel or CLARION cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N M; Grohne, K M; Carrasco, V N; Brown, C

    1999-04-01

    This study compares the auditory perceptual skill development of 23 congenitally deaf children who received the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant with the SPEAK speech coding strategy, and 20 children who received the CLARION Multi-Strategy Cochlear Implant with the Continuous Interleaved Sampler (CIS) speech coding strategy. All were under 5 years old at implantation. Preimplantation, there were no significant differences between the groups in age, length of hearing aid use, or communication mode. Auditory skills were assessed at 6 months and 12 months after implantation. Postimplantation, the mean scores on all speech perception tests were higher for the Clarion group. These differences were statistically significant for the pattern perception and monosyllable subtests of the Early Speech Perception battery at 6 months, and for the Glendonald Auditory Screening Procedure at 12 months. Multiple regression analysis revealed that device type accounted for the greatest variance in performance after 12 months of implant use. We conclude that children using the CIS strategy implemented in the Clarion implant may develop better auditory perceptual skills during the first year postimplantation than children using the SPEAK strategy with the Nucleus device. PMID:10214811

  9. A laboratory study on a capacitive displacement sensor as an implant microphone in totally implant cochlear hearing aid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ping; Guo, Jun; Megerian, Cliff A; Young, Darrin J; Ko, Wen H

    2007-01-01

    A totally implant cochlear hearing aids system, integrating an implant microphone, interface electronics, a speech processor, a stimulator, and cochlear electrodes, can overcome the uncomfortable, inconvenient, and stigma problems associated with the conventional and semi-implantable hearing aids. This paper presents a laboratory feasibility study on the use of an electret condenser microphone (ECM) displacement sensor, serving as an implant microphone, and combined with a spring coupler to directly sense the umbo acoustic vibration. The umbo vibration characteristics were extracted from literature to determine the coupler and sensor requirements. A laboratory model was built to simulate the vibration source and experimentally study the transmission coefficient. Experimental data demonstrate that by using a 5 N/m stiffness spring, the umbo vibration amplitude as high as 67% can be transmitted to the sensor. Measurement of the sensor system on the temporal bone was also made. The minimum detectable sound pressure level (SPL) at 1 kHz is 41 and 67 dB for laboratory and 38 and 64 dB for temporal bone measurement for 1 and 388 Hz bandwidth, respectively. Better performance was achieved in a higher frequency. Results and analysis of this study can be used as a guideline for the future design of displacement sensors as implant microphones. PMID:18003304

  10. Cochlear implantation effect on deaf children with gap junction protein beta 2 gene mutation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Ying; LIU Sha; WANG Su-ju; Li Shu-jing; LIANG Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Background The popularization and promotion of gene diagnosis technology makes it possible to detect deafness genes for children with congenital hearing impairment,and the proportion of gap junction protein beta 2 (GJB2) gene mutations in cochlear implant patients is 26.5% We did follow-up evaluation on auditory rehabilitation effect for all 31 deaf children with GJB2 gene mutation after cochlear implantation to provide a reference for such patients.Methods Application of “the genetic deafness gene chip detection kit” and “gene complete sequence analysis” were applied to conduct detection on common genetic deafness gene mutation hotspots of the hearing impaired children with cochlear implantation.To conduct auditory rehabilitation effect evaluation on all 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness after 3,6 and 12 months of the operation respectively.The single factor repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to analysis whether there were significant difference among the results of initial consonant of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,the results of vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation,and the results of two-syllable recognition at 3 different stages after the operation.Results The 235delC is the high-incidence mutational site in 31 cases of patients with GJB2 genetic deafness,and the total detection rate is up to 90.3% (28/31).There were significant differences in the initial consonant and the vowel of a Chinese syllable recognition rate,and the two-syllable recognition rates at 3,6,and 12 months after the operation (P<0.01).Conclusion Cochlear implantation is a safe and effective measure for auditory reconstruction,enabling patients with GJB2 hereditary severe sensorineural deafness to achieve auditory speech recognition effectively.

  11. Effects of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal response characteristics in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Nayagam, David A X; Wise, Andrew K; Heffer, Leon F; Landry, Thomas G; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal deafness of 7-13 months duration leads to loss of cochleotopy in the primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be reversed by cochlear implant use. Here we describe the effects of a similar duration of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal processing. Specifically, we compared the temporal resolution of neurons in AI of young adult normal-hearing cats that were acutely deafened and implanted immediately prior to recording with that in three groups of neonatally deafened cats. One group of neonatally deafened cats received no chronic stimulation. The other two groups received up to 8 months of either low- or high-rate (50 or 500 pulses per second per electrode, respectively) stimulation from a clinical cochlear implant, initiated at 10 weeks of age. Deafness of 7-13 months duration had no effect on the duration of post-onset response suppression, latency, latency jitter, or the stimulus repetition rate at which units responded maximally (best repetition rate), but resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of units to respond to every stimulus in a train (maximum following rate). None of the temporal response characteristics of the low-rate group differed from those in acutely deafened controls. In contrast, high-rate stimulation had diverse effects: it resulted in decreased suppression duration, longer latency and greater jitter relative to all other groups, and an increase in best repetition rate and cut-off rate relative to acutely deafened controls. The minimal effects of moderate-duration deafness on temporal processing in the present study are in contrast to its previously-reported pronounced effects on cochleotopy. Much longer periods of deafness have been reported to result in significant changes in temporal processing, in accord with the fact that duration of deafness is a major factor influencing outcome in human cochlear implantees.

  12. Bimodal Benefits on Objective and Subjective Outcomes for Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jae-Hee; Lee, Won-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Given that only a few studies have focused on the bimodal benefits on objective and subjective outcomes and emphasized the importance of individual data, the present study aimed to measure the bimodal benefits on the objective and subjective outcomes for adults with cochlear implant. Subjects and Methods Fourteen listeners with bimodal devices were tested on the localization and recognition abilities using environmental sounds, 1-talker, and 2-talker speech materials...

  13. Impact of a moving noise masker on speech perception in cochlear implant users

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias Weissgerber; Tobias Rader; Uwe Baumann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies investigating speech perception in noise have typically been conducted with static masker positions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of spatial separation of source and masker (spatial release from masking, SRM) in a moving masker setup and to evaluate the impact of adaptive beamforming in comparison with fixed directional microphones in cochlear implant (CI) users. Design: Speech reception thresholds (SRT) were measured in S0N0 and in a mov...

  14. Cognitive Factors and Cochlear Implants: Some Thoughts on Perception, Learning, and Memory in Speech Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Pisoni, David B.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has been increased interest in studying some of the cognitive factors that affect speech perception performance of cochlear implant patients. In this paper, I provide a brief theoretical overview of the fundamental assumptions of the information-processing approach to cognition and discuss the role of perception, learning, and memory in speech perception and spoken language processing. The information-processing framework provides researchers and clinicians with...

  15. Measures of Working Memory Span and Verbal Rehearsal Speed in Deaf Children after Cochlear Implantation

    OpenAIRE

    Pisoni, David B.; Cleary, Miranda

    2003-01-01

    Large individual differences in spoken word recognition performance have been found in deaf children after cochlear implantation. Recently, Pisoni and Geers (2000) reported that simple forward digit span measures of verbal working memory were significantly correlated with spoken word recognition scores even after potentially confounding variables were statistically controlled for. The present study replicates and extends these initial findings to the full set of 176 participants in the CID co...

  16. Visual attention, behavioral inhibition and speech/language outcomes in deaf children with cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, David L.; Davisa, Rebecca A.O.; Pisoni, David B.; Miyamoto, Richard T.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated relations between sustained visual attention, behavioral inhibition skills, and speech–language outcomes in prelingually deaf children who use cochlear implants (CIs) using two computerized continuous performance tasks (CPTs). One test measured their ability to sustain visual attention to a string of numbers and another test measured their ability to delay a behavioral response. Performance on latter task was related to postimplant scores on tests of vocabulary knowledge, lang...

  17. The effect of noise on the perception of prosody in cochlear implant listening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, David Jackson

    2011-01-01

    ’Du må ikke. Hold op.’ og ’Du må ikke holde op’ består af det samme ord, men semantisk set er de direkte modsætninger. I mundtlig kommunikation er det prosodi som tegner forskellen mellem de to. Cochlear Implant lyttere har det svært ved at opfatte prosodi især i støjende omgivelserne. Mit...

  18. Investigating benefits of current focusing on complex pitch perception in cochlear implants

    OpenAIRE

    Fielden, Claire Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear implants are a recognised treatment for severe and profound hearing losses, and can greatly improve speech discrimination in a quiet listening environment. However, poor specificity of neural excitation resulting from wide current spread within the cochlea leads to inadequate complex pitch perception, affecting speech discrimination in noisy environments and music perception. Tripolar is a stimulation mode with a greater degree of current focusing than the monopolar mode currently us...

  19. Sensitivity to pulse phase duration in cochlear implant listeners: Effects of stimulation mode

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, Monita; Kulkarni, Aditya M.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate charge-integration at threshold by cochlear implant listeners using pulse train stimuli in different stimulation modes (monopolar, bipolar, tripolar). The results partially confirmed and extended the findings of previous studies conducted in animal models showing that charge-integration depends on the stimulation mode. The primary overall finding was that threshold vs pulse phase duration functions had steeper slopes in monopolar m...

  20. Spectral-Ripple Resolution Correlates with Speech Reception in Noise in Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2007-01-01

    Speech perception ability in noise is one of the most practical measures of success with a cochlear implant; however, with experience, this ability can change dramatically over time, making it a less than ideal tool for comparing performance among different processing strategies. This study examined performance on a spectral discrimination task and compared it to speech perception in noise. An adaptive procedure was used to determine the spectral-ripple density that subjects could discriminat...

  1. PET imaging of cochlear-implant and normal-hearing subjects listening to speech and nonspeech

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Donald; Miyamoto, Richard T.; Pisoni, David B.; Sehgal, Mark; Hutchins, Gary D.

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) was used to compare the brain activation patterns of normal-hearing (NH) with postlingually deaf, cochlear-implant (CI) subjects listening to speech and nonspeech signals. The speech stimuli were derived from test batteries for assessing speech-perception performance of hearing-impaired subjects with different sensory aids. Subjects were scanned while passively listening to monaural (right ear) stimuli in five conditions: Silent ...

  2. Nonverbal Cognition in Deaf Children Following Cochlear Implantation: Motor Sequencing Disturbances Mediate Language Delays

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Christopher M.; Karpicke, Jennifer; Anaya, Esperanza M.; Henning, Shirley C.; Kronenberger, William G.; Pisoni, David B.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed profoundly deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) (N = 24) and age-matched normal-hearing children (N = 31) on several nonverbal cognition measures: motor sequencing, tactile discrimination, response inhibition, visual-motor integration, and visual-spatial processing. The results revealed that the children with CIs showed disturbances solely on motor sequencing and that performance on this task was significantly correlated with scores on the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fun...

  3. Brain Responses to Musical Feature Changes in Adolescent Cochlear Implant Users

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørn Petersen; Ethan Weed; Pascale Sandmann; Elvira Brattico; Mads Hansen

    2015-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are primarily designed to assist deaf individuals in perception of speech, although possibilities for music fruition have also been documented. Previous studies have indicated the existence of neural correlates of residual music skills in postlingually deaf adults and children. However, little is known about the behavioral and neural correlates of music perception in the new generation of prelingually deaf adolescents who grew up with CIs. With electroencephalography (...

  4. Assessment of Electrically Evoked Auditory Brain Stem Response of 30 Implanted Patients With Nucleus Multichannel Cochlear Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Soqrat Faghihzadeh

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods and Materials: Investigation of electrically evoked auditory brain stem response (EABR is a new issue, especially in implanted patients. Experiments were performed in C.I Center of Iranian Institute for Science and research expansion,1996 on 30 implanted patients with 22 spectra and MSP cochlear implant system and 30 normal subjects with the range of 3-33 years. Findings: I- EABR was obtained in the implanted patients. 2- Absolute latency of EABR waves is 1-1.5 ms shorter than ABR waves ‘P<0.05. 3-Absolute latency of wave V decreases as a function of electric stimulus magnitude (P<0.05. 4- No significant difference was observed in IPL Ill-V between ABR and EABR.

  5. Evaluation of surgical complications after cochlear implantation in Fars center, south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cochlear implant, which used in patients with profound hearing loss, may followed by some major or minor complications. These complications depend on age of patient, kind of device, kind of incision, surgical technique and surgeon’s skill. Major complications mostly need surgical intervention for treatment and, may persist for long time. Minor complications need medical treatment and don’t need surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study between 2004-2007, 100 patients subjected to cochlear implantation were evaluated for post operative complications. Results: Overall complication rate was 14%. We had 4 major complications, including 2 device failure, one misplaced electrode and one cases with major hematoma .These complications managed successfully by surgical intervention or reimplantation. Facial nerve damage or wound breakdown were not seen in these patients. Minor complications including small hematoma, edema, wound infection, dizziness were seen in 10 cases that managed medically. Conclusion: In the recent years complications of cochlear implantation are reduced with increasing surgeon’s skill, new surgical methods and development in device technology.  

  6. Hydrogel limits stem cell dispersal in the deaf cochlea: implications for cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Bryony A.; Backhouse, Steven S.; Cimenkaya, Cengiz; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2012-12-01

    Auditory neurons provide the critical link between a cochlear implant and the brain in deaf individuals, therefore their preservation and/or regeneration is important for optimal performance of this neural prosthesis. In cases where auditory neurons are significantly depleted, stem cells (SCs) may be used to replace the lost population of neurons, thereby re-establishing the critical link between the periphery (implant) and the brain. For such a therapy to be therapeutically viable, SCs must be differentiated into neurons, retained at their delivery site and damage caused to the residual auditory neurons minimized. Here we describe the transplantation of SC-derived neurons into the deaf cochlea, using a peptide hydrogel to limit their dispersal. The described approach illustrates that SCs can be delivered to and are retained within the basal turn of the cochlea, without a significant loss of endogenous auditory neurons. In addition, the tissue response elicited from this surgical approach was restricted to the surgical site and did not extend beyond the cochlear basal turn. Overall, this approach illustrates the feasibility of targeted cell delivery into the mammalian cochlea using hydrogel, which may be useful for future cell-based transplantation strategies, for combined treatment with a cochlear implant to restore function.

  7. Bilateral dorsal cochlear nucleus lesions prevent acoustic-trauma induced tinnitus in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozoski, Thomas Jeffrey; Wisner, Kurt W; Sybert, Lauren T; Bauer, Carol A

    2012-02-01

    Animal experiments suggest that chronic tinnitus ("ringing in the ears") may result from processes that overcompensate for lost afferent input. Abnormally elevated spontaneous neural activity has been found in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) of animals with psychophysical evidence of tinnitus. However, it has also been reported that DCN ablation fails to reduce established tinnitus. Since other auditory areas have been implicated in tinnitus, the role of the DCN is unresolved. The apparently conflicting electrophysiological and lesion data can be reconciled if the DCN serves as a necessary trigger zone rather than a chronic generator of tinnitus. The present experiment used lesion procedures identical to those that failed to decrease pre-existing tinnitus. The exception was that lesions were done prior to tinnitus induction. Young adult rats were trained and tested using a psychophysical procedure shown to detect tinnitus. Tinnitus was induced by a single unilateral high-level noise exposure. Consistent with the trigger hypothesis, bilateral dorsal DCN lesions made before high-level noise exposure prevented the development of tinnitus. A protective effect stemming from disruption of the afferent pathway could not explain the outcome because unilateral lesions ipsilateral to the noise exposure did not prevent tinnitus and unilateral lesions contralateral to the noise exposure actually exacerbated the tinnitus. The DCN trigger mechanism may involve plastic circuits that, through loss of inhibition, or upregulation of excitation, increase spontaneous neural output to rostral areas such as the inferior colliculus. The increased drive could produce persistent pathological changes in the rostral areas, such as high-frequency bursting and decreased interspike variance, that comprise the chronic tinnitus signal. PMID:21969021

  8. Neurocognitive testing and cochlear implantation: insights into performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosetti MK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Maura K Cosetti,1,2 James B Pinkston,3 Jose M Flores,4 David R Friedmann,5 Callie B Jones,3 J Thomas Roland Jr,5,6 Susan B Waltzman5 1Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, 4Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MA, 5Department of Otolaryngology, 6Department of Neurosurgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Objective: The aim of this case series was to assess the impact of auditory rehabilitation with cochlear implantation on the cognitive function of elderly patients over time. Design: This is a longitudinal case series of prospective data assessing neurocognitive function and speech perception in an elderly cohort pre- and post-implantation. Setting: University cochlear implant center. Participants: The patients were post-lingually deafened elderly female (mean, 73.6 years; SD, 5.82; range, 67–81 years cochlear implant recipients (n=7. Measurements: A neurocognitive battery of 20 tests assessing intellectual function, learning, short- and long-term memory, verbal fluency, attention, mental flexibility, and processing speed was performed prior to and 2–4.1 years (mean, 3.7 after cochlear implant (CI. Speech perception testing using Consonant–Nucleus–Consonant words was performed prior to implantation and at regular intervals postoperatively. Individual and aggregate differences in cognitive function pre- and post-CI were estimated. Logistic regression with cluster adjustment was used to estimate the association (%improvement or %decline between speech understanding and years from implantation at 1 year, 2 years, and 3 years post-CI. Results: Improvements after CI were observed in 14 (70% of all subtests administered. Declines occurred in five (25% subtests. In 55 individual tests (43%, post-CI performance improved

  9. The child after cochlear implant: Implications for rehabilitation in language development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiot Yenealem Derbie

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A cochlear implant (CI is a technology assisted device that can be putted in the inner ear through a surgical procedure to help to provide a sense of sound for profoundly deaf or severely hard-of-hearing persons (NIDCD, 2013 and Peng et al., 2007. The present review was to uncover different (verbal and non-verbal, psychosocial, timing of implantation, and parental dilemma challenges beyond the surgical procedures. Existing literatures in this area have been thoroughly reviewed based on eight themes. Themes were selected based on children’s developmental needs. Concluding remarks, then, forwarded which constructed from the review.

  10. Speech recognition materials and ceiling effects: considerations for cochlear implant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, René H; Shallop, Jon K; Peterson, Anna Mary

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear implant recipients have demonstrated remarkable increases in speech perception since US FDA approval was granted in 1984. Improved performance is due to a number of factors including improved cochlear implant technology, evolving speech coding strategies, and individuals with increasingly more residual hearing receiving implants. Despite this evolution, the same recommendations for pre- and postimplant speech recognition testing have been in place for over 10 years in the United States. To determine whether new recommendations are warranted, speech perception performance was assessed for 156 adult, postlingually deafened implant recipients as well as 50 hearing aid users on monosyllabic word recognition (CNC) and sentence recognition in quiet (HINT and AzBio sentences) and in noise (BKB-SIN). Results demonstrated that for HINT sentences in quiet, 28% of the subjects tested achieved maximum performance of 100% correct and that scores did not agree well with monosyllables (CNC) or sentence recognition in noise (BKB-SIN). For a more difficult sentence recognition material (AzBio), only 0.7% of the subjects achieved 100% performance and scores were in much better agreement with monosyllables and sentence recognition in noise. These results suggest that more difficult materials are needed to assess speech perception performance of postimplant patients - and perhaps also for determining implant candidacy. PMID:18212519

  11. The use of rare-earth magnet couplers in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormer, K J; Richard, G L; Hough, J V; Nordquist, R E

    1981-11-01

    The cochlear implant is an electronic auditory prosthesis gaining widespread acceptance as a means of restoring partial hearing to the totally deaf. A number of engineering and biological hurdles remain toward the improvement of existing implantable systems and development of multichannel systems. One hurdle concerns reliable transcutaneous coupling of the external electric signal to the implanted device. To date this has been accomplished by inductive means through coils which were mechanically held in place. The incorporation of small, permanent, rare-earth (SmCo5) magnets with the coil assemblies has eliminated the unreliable mechanical supporting devices. Magnetic attachment was simulated in dogs to examine for biological compatibility. Electron micrographs indicated normal subcellular structures in tissue exposed for 10 weeks. Five patients were implanted with magnet-modified coil assemblies and tested for the proper alignment and support of the external coil assembly, as well as efficiency of inductive coupling. Electromagnetic coupling was not interfered with and mechanical support was adequate. We conclude that rare-earth magnets provide an effective means for supporting and positioning in place medical devices, such as the cochlear implant. PMID:6895397

  12. Cochlear implant surgery at the Clinical Center of Vojvodina - ten-year experience

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    Dankuc Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The first cochlear implant surgery was performed at the Center for Cochlear Implantation of the Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Clinical Center of Vojvodina in 2002 after long preparations and that was the first successful cochlear implantation in Serbia. Material and Methods. Over the period from November 2002 to November 2013, 99 patients underwent surgical procedures and 100 cochlear implants were placed. Results. The analysis encompassed 99 patients, the youngest and the oldest one being 1 year and 61 years old, respectively. Prelingual and postlingual deafness developed in 84 (84.9% and in 15 (15.1%, respectively. Postlingual deafness was observed in all 11 adult patients. The prelingual deafness was diagnosed in 84 (95.4% children, whereas in four (4.6% children it occurred after the development of speech between 6 and 8 years of age. Progressive hearing loss was observed in 11 patients - seven adults and four children. The majority of our patients, i.e. 74 (74.75% manifested idiopathic deafness of unknown cause. A range of usually reported hearing loss etiologies included ototoxic medications in seven (7.07%, hereditary factor in six (6.06%, and bacterial meningitis in four (4.04% patients. Somewhat less common causes were perinatal hypoxia in three (3.03%, premature birth in three (3.03%, Down syndrome in one (1.01%, and chronic otitis media in one (1.01% patient. Conclusion. Both intraoperative and postoperative complications were analyzed in the investigated patient population. The complications developed in 11 patients, i.e. in 10.5% of 105 surgical procedures. The majority of procedures (89.5% were not accompanied by any post-surgical complications. Unsuccessful implantation in a single-step procedure and transient facial nerve paralysis can be considered most frequent among our patients, whereas cochlear ossification and transient ataxia occurred more rarely. Stimulation of facial nerve, intraoperative

  13. Rehabilitation of deaf persons with cochlear implants; Rehabilitation Hoergeschaedigter mit Cochlearimplantaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gstoettner, W.; Hamzavi, J. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde, Wien (Austria); Czerny, C. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie, Wien (Austria)

    1997-12-01

    In the last decade, the rehabilitation of postlingually deaf adults and prelingually deaf children with cochlear implants has been established as a treatment of deafness. The technological development of the implant devices and improvement of the surgical technique have led to a considerable increase of hearing performance during the last years. The postlingually deaf adults are able to use the telephone and may be integrated in their original job. Prelingually deaf children can even visit normal schools after cochlear implantation and hearing rehabilitation training. In order to preoperatively establish the state of the cochlear, radiological diagnosis of the temporal bone is necessary. High resolution computerized tomography imaging of the temporal bone with coronar and axial 1 mm slices and MRI with thin slice technique (three dimensional, T2 weighted turbo-spinecho sequence with 0.7 mm slices) have proved to be valuable according to our experience. Furthermore a postoperative synoptical X-ray, in a modified Chausse III projection, offers good information about the position of the implant and insertion of the stimulating electrode into the cochlea. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der letzten Dekade hat sich der operative Einsatz von Cochlearimplantaten fuer die Rehabilitation taubgeborener Kinder und ertaubter Erwachsenen als erfolgreiche Therapie etabliert. Durch technische Weiterentwicklung der Implantatsysteme und Verbesserung der Operationstechnik konnten in den letzten Jahren die Hoerleistungen der Patienten deutlich verbessert werden. Postlingual ertaubte Erwachsene koennen nun oftmals wieder ins Berufsleben eingegliedert werden und praelingual ertaubte Kinder koennen regulaere Schulen besuchen. Im Rahmen der Voruntersuchung fuer die Cochlearimplantation ist die radiologische Felsenbeindiagnostik von besonderer Bedeutung. Hochaufloesendes CT des Felsenbeins in koronaren und axialen Ebenen mit 1 mm Schichtdicke und MRT in Duennschichttechnik (dreidimensionale, T2

  14. The sound sensation of apical electric stimulation in cochlear implant recipients with contralateral residual hearing.

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    Diane S Lazard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies using vocoders as acoustic simulators of cochlear implants have generally focused on simulation of speech understanding, gender recognition, or music appreciation. The aim of the present experiment was to study the auditory sensation perceived by cochlear implant (CI recipients with steady electrical stimulation on the most-apical electrode. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five unilateral CI users with contralateral residual hearing were asked to vary the parameters of an acoustic signal played to the non-implanted ear, in order to match its sensation to that of the electric stimulus. They also provided a rating of similarity between each acoustic sound they selected and the electric stimulus. On average across subjects, the sound rated as most similar was a complex signal with a concentration of energy around 523 Hz. This sound was inharmonic in 3 out of 5 subjects with a moderate, progressive increase in the spacing between the frequency components. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: For these subjects, the sound sensation created by steady electric stimulation on the most-apical electrode was neither a white noise nor a pure tone, but a complex signal with a progressive increase in the spacing between the frequency components in 3 out of 5 subjects. Knowing whether the inharmonic nature of the sound was related to the fact that the non-implanted ear was impaired has to be explored in single-sided deafened patients with a contralateral CI. These results may be used in the future to better understand peripheral and central auditory processing in relation to cochlear implants.

  15. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Perception of Emotions by Individuals with Cochlear Implants, Hearing Aids, and Normal Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Aviner, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the benefits of cochlear implant (CI) with regard to emotion perception of participants differing in their age of implantation, in comparison to hearing aid users and adolescents with normal hearing (NH). Emotion perception was examined by having the participants identify happiness, anger, surprise, sadness, fear, and disgust.…

  16. Auditory, Visual, and Auditory-Visual Speech Perception by Individuals with Cochlear Implants versus Individuals with Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Rothem, Hilla; Luntz, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The researchers evaluated the contribution of cochlear implants (CIs) to speech perception by a sample of prelingually deaf individuals implanted after age 8 years. This group was compared with a group with profound hearing impairment (HA-P), and with a group with severe hearing impairment (HA-S), both of which used hearing aids. Words and…

  17. Digital imaging: a valuable technique for the postoperative assessment of cochlear implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, J.T. [Department of Radiology, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cranley, K. [Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Agency, Forster Green Hospital, Belfast (United Kingdom); Toner, J.G. [Regional Cochlear Implant Centre, Belfast City Hospital Trust, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Cochlear implantation with a multi-channel electrode array which provides stimulation via the auditory nerve has become a standard treatment for profound deafness. Postoperative radiography demonstrates electrode position and enables confirmation of satisfactory intra-cochlear electrode placement. The number of active electrodes which have been inserted can be determined and possible complications such as electrode kinking or slippage can be assessed. We evaluated digital radiography with confirmation of electrode position by intermittent fluoroscopy and assessed the relative radiation dose of the digital technique, conventional radiography and CT scanning. Radiation dose for this method usually ranges between 40 {mu}Gy and 440 {mu}Gy compared with a single exposure on the skull stand which produces a dose to the region of the cochlea of 470 {mu}Gy and a CT exposure of 950 {mu}Gy. The digital technique is comfortable for the patient, easily reproducible and provides images of high diagnostic quality enabling each electrode to be identified, which is especially valuable in association with postoperative electrode mapping. It also involves a lower radiation dose than conventional radiography. We now use digital radiography for all postoperative cochlear implant assessment. (orig.) With 4 figs., 13 refs.

  18. Image guidance could aid performance of atraumatic cochlear implantation surgical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Jack H.; Labadie, Robert F.; Wanna, George B.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2013-03-01

    It is widely believed that major factors in achieving atraumatic insertion of the electrode array into the cochlea in cochlear implant (CI) surgery include amount of tissue resection, selection of the entry point, and angle of insertion. Our group is interested in developing an image guidance (IG) system for electrode insertion if IG can improve outcomes. Thus, in this work we conducted the first study evaluating whether IG could aid atraumatic electrode insertion. To do this, we measured the performance of experienced surgeons when tasked to perform cochleostomy resection and to select CI insertion trajectories in virtual 3D surgical field-of-view simulation software. This software, which simulates views through the surgical microscope, was designed to allow a user to manually perform cochleostomy resection and to select a preferred insertion trajectory in one of two modes: (a) where the traditional approach is simulated and sub-surface anatomy is not visible; and (b) where an IG approach is simulated and the surgical view is augmented with rendering of subsurface intra-cochlear structures. We used this software to compare two surgeons' performance in selecting insertion trajectories with and without IG. Our results show that when using virtual IG, both surgeons could choose insertion trajectories with less variability, select higher quality insertion trajectories, and create the cochleostomy with substantially less tissue resection. These results suggest that IG could indeed aid performance of atraumatic cochlear implantation techniques.

  19. Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient

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    Gavriel D. Kohlberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI listener. Methods. Normal hearing (NH adults (N=16 and CI listeners (N=9 evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less complex, versions created by including subsets of the musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation processing. Results. Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1–3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation. Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners. Conclusions. Reengineering a piece of music to reduce its complexity has the potential to enhance music enjoyment for the cochlear implantee. Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

  20. Sources of Variability in Language Development of Children with Cochlear Implants: Age at Implantation, Parental Language, and Early Features of Children's Language Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szagun, Gisela; Schramm, Satyam A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relative influence of age at implantation, parental expansions, and child language internal factors on grammatical progress in children with cochlear implants (CI). Data analyses used two longitudinal corpora of spontaneous speech samples, one with twenty-two and one with twenty-six children,…

  1. The relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted children

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    Farideh Nazarzadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim : Theory of mind refers to the ability to understand the others have mental states that can be different from one's own mental states or facts. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of theory of mind and executive functions in normal hearing, deaf, and cochlear-implanted children.Methods: The study population consisted of normal, deaf and cochlear-implanted girl students in Mashhad city, Iran. Using random sampling, 30 children (10 normal, 10 deaf and 10 cochlear-implanted in age groups of 8-12 years old were selected. To measure the theoty of mind, theory of mind 38-item scale and to assess executive function, Coolidge neuropsychological and personality test was used. Research data were analyzed using the Spearman correlation coefficient, analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests.Results: There was a significant difference between the groups in the theory of mind and executive function subscales, organization, planning-decision-making, and inhibition. Between normal and deaf groups (p=0.01, as well as cochlear-implanted and deaf groups (p=0.01, there was significant difference in planning decision-making subscale. There was not any significant relationship between the theory of mind and executive functions generally or the theory of mind and executive function subscales in these three groups independently.Conclusion: Based on our findings, cochlear-implanted and deaf children have lower performance in theory of mind and executive function compared with normal hearing children.

  2. Automatic electrode configuration selection for image-guided cochlear implant programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Dawant, Benoit M.; Noble, Jack H.

    2015-03-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are neural prosthetics that stimulate the auditory nerve pathways within the cochlea using an implanted electrode array to restore hearing. After implantation, the CI is programmed by an audiologist who determines which electrodes are active, i.e., the electrode configuration, and selects other stimulation settings. Recent clinical studies by our group have shown that hearing outcomes can be significantly improved by using an image-guided electrode configuration selection technique we have designed. Our goal in this work is to automate the electrode configuration selection step with the long term goal of developing a fully automatic system that can be translated to the clinic. Until now, the electrode configuration selection step has been performed by an expert with the assistance of image analysis-based estimates of the electrode-neural interface. To automatically determine the electrode configuration, we have designed an optimization approach and propose the use of a cost function with feature terms designed to interpret the image analysis data in a similar fashion as the expert. Further, we have designed an approach to select parameters in the cost function using our database of existing electrode configuration plans as training data. The results we present show that our automatic approach results in electrode configurations that are better or equally as good as manually selected configurations in over 80% of the cases tested. This method represents a crucial step towards clinical translation of our image-guided cochlear implant programming system.

  3. Musical Methods for Little Digital Ears — Musical Learning with Preschool Cochlear Implant Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjørn; Hardgrove Hansen, Roberta; Beyer, Karen;

    2010-01-01

    Prelingually deaf children who receive cochlear implants (CI) early can successfully develop age-appropriate language skills provided sufficient intervention measures are initiated. However, little is known about the music perception and enjoyment of these children, though the enhanced developmen......, the subjects’ response, the feedback, and the test results indicate that music offers an enjoyable supplement to standard auditory-oral therapy, with a potential long term impact on the linguistic, cultural, social, and personal development of these children.......Prelingually deaf children who receive cochlear implants (CI) early can successfully develop age-appropriate language skills provided sufficient intervention measures are initiated. However, little is known about the music perception and enjoyment of these children, though the enhanced development...... in the central auditory system in early-implanted children may benefit music processing. We hypothesized that early-implanted, prelingually deaf children with CI’s, who were exposed to group-oriented music learning activities, would increase their music discrimination skills and — as a potential near transfer...

  4. Delayed low frequency hearing loss caused by cochlear implantation interventions via the round window but not cochleostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, David; Chambers, Scott; Hampson, Amy; Eastwood, Hayden; Campbell, Luke; O'Leary, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Cochlear implant recipients show improved speech perception and music appreciation when residual acoustic hearing is combined with the cochlear implant. However, up to one third of patients lose their pre-operative residual hearing weeks to months after implantation, for reasons that are not well understood. This study tested whether this "delayed" hearing loss was influenced by the route of electrode array insertion and/or position of the electrode array within scala tympani in a guinea pig model of cochlear implantation. Five treatment groups were monitored over 12 weeks: (1) round window implant; (2) round window incised with no implant; (3) cochleostomy with medially-oriented implant; (4) cochleostomy with laterally-oriented implant; and (5) cochleostomy with no implant. Hearing was measured at selected time points by the auditory brainstem response. Cochlear condition was assessed histologically, with cochleae three-dimensionally reconstructed to plot electrode paths and estimate tissue response. Electrode array trajectories matched their intended paths. Arrays inserted via the round window were situated nearer to the basilar membrane and organ of Corti over the majority of their intrascalar path compared with arrays inserted via cochleostomy. Round window interventions exhibited delayed, low frequency hearing loss that was not seen after cochleostomy. This hearing loss appeared unrelated to the extent of tissue reaction or injury within scala tympani, although round window insertion was histologically the most traumatic mode of implantation. We speculate that delayed hearing loss was related not to the electrode position as postulated, but rather to the muscle graft used to seal the round window post-intervention, by altering cochlear mechanics via round window fibrosis. PMID:26739790

  5. Semantic and syntactic reading comprehension strategies used by deaf children with early and late cochlear implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Carlos; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; López-Higes, Ramón; Pisón, Guzmán

    2016-01-01

    Deaf students have traditionally exhibited reading comprehension difficulties. In recent years, these comprehension problems have been partially offset through cochlear implantation (CI), and the subsequent improvement in spoken language skills. However, the use of cochlear implants has not managed to fully bridge the gap in language and reading between normally hearing (NH) and deaf children, as its efficacy depends on variables such as the age at implant. This study compared the reading comprehension of sentences in 19 children who received a cochlear implant before 24 months of age (early-CI) and 19 who received it after 24 months (late-CI) with a control group of 19 NH children. The task involved completing sentences in which the last word had been omitted. To complete each sentence children had to choose a word from among several alternatives that included one syntactic and two semantic foils in addition to the target word. The results showed that deaf children with late-CI performed this task significantly worse than NH children, while those with early-CI exhibited no significant differences with NH children, except under more demanding processing conditions (long sentences with infrequent target words). Further, the error analysis revealed a preference of deaf students with early-CI for selecting the syntactic foil over a semantic one, which suggests that they draw upon syntactic cues during sentence processing in the same way as NH children do. In contrast, deaf children with late-CI do not appear to use a syntactic strategy, but neither a semantic strategy based on the use of key words, as the literature suggests. Rather, the numerous errors of both kinds that the late-CI group made seem to indicate an inconsistent and erratic response when faced with a lack of comprehension. These findings are discussed in relation to differences in receptive vocabulary and short-term memory and their implications for sentence reading comprehension.

  6. Quality of Life for Children with Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Efrat A.; Roth, Froma P.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined children's self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children's actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated. Method: A…

  7. EARLY DIAGNOSIS AS A PRECONDITION FOR A SUCCESSFUL COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora JACHOVA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available All researches point to the fact that the early de­tection and diagnosis are still performed late (after the third year of life, so in the first three years of life there is no establishment of the developmental changes in a way that they include the interrelation aspects of the human development and its natural sequences. With the start of early rehabilitation procedures we encourage the positive manner of communication in the small deaf child, so that it manufactures and processes information that can lead to positive quality changes in the develop­mental process.The hearing technology has dramatically changed over the last decades. With the contribution of audiometers in the 40-ties of the last century we started to learn how to precisely estimate the de­gree and type of the hearing impairment, which has an enormous meaning for the optimal fitting of the powerful hearing aids and the cochlear im­plants. In the same period hearing aids for small children are developed which enabled children with a sig­nificant hearing loss a better opportunity to de­velop speech and their spoken language.

  8. Estudo molecular em crianças candidatas e submetidas ao implante coclear Molecular investigation in children candidates and submitted to cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Bernardes

    2006-06-01

    mutation is called 35delG. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of 35delG mutation in children submitted to cochlear implantation who had severe and profound hearing loss previously diagnosed as idiopathic. METHOD: The study was done at the Cochlear Implantation Clinic of the Otolaryngology Department and at the Laboratório Genética Humana-CBMEG, UNICAMP-SP. 32 children with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. The detection of the 35delG mutation was made by a allele -specific PCR, using primers and polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: 69% had a normal exam, 12% were homozygous for the mutation, 19% of the cases were heterozygous. The 35delG mutation in heterozygousity is not a cause of hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The data confirm the high prevalence of the 35delG mutation in nonsyndromic bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss. It was also possible to diagnose the cause of hearing loss as genetic in a significant percentage of patients. That stresses the importance of the molecular investigation in those cases formerly classified as idiopathic.

  9. Cochlear implants in children: surgical site infections and prevention and treatment of acute otitis media and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Papsin, Blake

    2010-08-01

    The use of cochlear implants is increasingly common, particularly in children younger than 3 years. Bacterial meningitis, often with associated acute otitis media, is more common in children with cochlear implants than in groups of control children. Children with profound deafness who are candidates for cochlear implants should receive all age-appropriate doses of pneumococcal conjugate and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines and appropriate annual immunization against influenza. In addition, starting at 24 months of age, a single dose of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine should be administered. Before implant surgery, primary care providers and cochlear implant teams should ensure that immunizations are up-to-date, preferably with completion of indicated vaccines at least 2 weeks before implant surgery. Imaging of the temporal bone/inner ear should be performed before cochlear implantation in all children with congenital deafness and all patients with profound hearing impairment and a history of bacterial meningitis to identify those with inner-ear malformations/cerebrospinal fluid fistulas or ossification of the cochlea. During the initial months after cochlear implantation, the risk of complications of acute otitis media may be higher than during subsequent time periods. Therefore, it is recommended that acute otitis media diagnosed during the first 2 months after implantation be initially treated with a parenteral antibiotic (eg, ceftriaxone or cefotaxime). Episodes occurring 2 months or longer after implantation can be treated with a trial of an oral antimicrobial agent (eg, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate at a dose of approximately 90 mg/kg per day of amoxicillin component), provided the child does not appear toxic and the implant does not have a spacer/positioner, a wedge that rests in the cochlea next to the electrodes present in certain implant models available between 1999 and 2002. "Watchful waiting" without antimicrobial

  10. The Effects of Noise on Speech Recognition in Cochlear Implant Subjects: Predictions and Analysis Using Acoustic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus, Jeremiah J.; Collins, Leslie M.

    2005-12-01

    Cochlear implants can provide partial restoration of hearing, even with limited spectral resolution and loss of fine temporal structure, to severely deafened individuals. Studies have indicated that background noise has significant deleterious effects on the speech recognition performance of cochlear implant patients. This study investigates the effects of noise on speech recognition using acoustic models of two cochlear implant speech processors and several predictive signal-processing-based analyses. The results of a listening test for vowel and consonant recognition in noise are presented and analyzed using the rate of phonemic feature transmission for each acoustic model. Three methods for predicting patterns of consonant and vowel confusion that are based on signal processing techniques calculating a quantitative difference between speech tokens are developed and tested using the listening test results. Results of the listening test and confusion predictions are discussed in terms of comparisons between acoustic models and confusion prediction performance.

  11. Cochlear implant and inflammation reaction: Safety study of a new steroid-eluting electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, L; Simoni, E; Giarbini, N; Giordano, P; Pannella, M; Hatzopoulos, S; Martini, A

    2016-06-01

    Dexamethasone is a common anti-inflammatory agent added to cochlear implants to reduce hearing loss due to electrode insertion trauma. We evaluated the safety of eluting silicone rods containing 10% dexamethasone in a Guinea pig model. Animals were implanted with a dexamethasone eluting silicone electrode (DER) or with a non-eluting electrode (NER). The control group only underwent a cochleostomy (CS). Prior to implantation and during the two weeks following implantation, the hearing status of the animals was assessed by means of Compound Action Potentials (CAPs) with an electrode placed near the round window. Two weeks after implantation, the mean click threshold shifts were 1 dB ± 10 dB in the DER group, 10 dB ± 10 dB in the NER group and -4 dB ± 10 dB in the control group. After two weeks the bullae of each animal were extracted to verify the presence of macrophages, the percent of tissue growth in the scala tympani and the tissue sealing around cochleostomy. Silicone electrodes samples were also explanted and examined for bacterial infection. Neither bacterial infection nor enhanced number of macrophages were observed. A limited, but not significant, tissue growth was found in the scala tympani between the experimental and the control group. The data suggest that, in the Guinea pig model, the use of DER is apparently safe as an anti-inflammatory slow-release additive to the cochlear implant. PMID:27109196

  12. Speech perception with interaction-compensated simultaneous stimulation and long pulse durations in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzer, Reinhold; Koroleva, Inna; Griessner, Andreas; Levin, Sergey; Kusovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Zierhofer, Clemens

    2015-04-01

    Early multi-channel designs in the history of cochlear implant development were based on a vocoder-type processing of frequency channels and presented bands of compressed analog stimulus waveforms simultaneously on multiple tonotopically arranged electrodes. The realization that the direct summation of electrical fields as a result of simultaneous electrode stimulation exacerbates interactions among the stimulation channels and limits cochlear implant outcome led to the breakthrough in the development of cochlear implants, the continuous interleaved (CIS) sampling coding strategy. By interleaving stimulation pulses across electrodes, CIS activates only a single electrode at each point in time, preventing a direct summation of electrical fields and hence the primary component of channel interactions. In this paper we show that a previously presented approach of simultaneous stimulation with channel interaction compensation (CIC) may also ameliorate the deleterious effects of simultaneous channel interaction on speech perception. In an acute study conducted in eleven experienced MED-EL implant users, configurations involving simultaneous stimulation with CIC and doubled pulse phase durations have been investigated. As pairs of electrodes were activated simultaneously and pulse durations were doubled, carrier rates remained the same. Comparison conditions involved both CIS and fine structure (FS) strategies, either with strictly sequential or paired-simultaneous stimulation. Results showed no statistical difference in the perception of sentences in noise and monosyllables for sequential and paired-simultaneous stimulation with doubled phase durations. This suggests that CIC can largely compensate for the effects of simultaneous channel interaction, for both CIS and FS coding strategies. A simultaneous stimulation paradigm has a number of potential advantages over a traditional sequential interleaved design. The flexibility gained when dropping the requirement of

  13. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3–14.2 years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5–16 years who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ and performance IQ for “mentally retarded” and “average,” respectively (Spearman’s rho = 0.42, P=0.15. There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman’s rho = 0.8977, P=0.0008. “Picture arrangement” and “picture completion,” reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes.

  14. A Psychophysics experimental software to evaluate electrical pitch discrimination in Nucleus cochlear implanted patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Zaballos, M. T.; Ramos de Miguel, A.; Killian, M.; Ramos Macías, A.

    2016-02-01

    Multichannel electrode array design in cochlear implants has evolved into two major categories: straight and perimodiolar electrodes. When implanted, the former lies along the outer wall of the scala tympani, while the later are located closer to the modiolus, where the neural ends are. Therefore, a perimodiolar position of the electrode array could be expected to result in reduced stimulus thresholds and stimulating currents, increased dynamic range, and more localized stimulation of the neural elements. However, their advantage for pitch discrimination has not been conclusively stated. Therefore, in order to study electrode independence, a psychophysical software has been developed, making use of Nucleus Implant Communicator tools provided by Cochlear company under a research agreement. The application comprises a graphical interface to facilitate its use, since previous software has always required some type of computer language skills. It allows for customization of electrical pulse parameters, measurement of threshold and comfort levels, loudness balancing and alternative forced choice experiments to determine electrode discrimination in Nucleus© users.

  15. Voice emotion recognition by cochlear-implanted children and their normally-hearing peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monita; Zion, Danielle J; Deroche, Mickael L; Burianek, Brooke A; Limb, Charles J; Goren, Alison P; Kulkarni, Aditya M; Christensen, Julie A

    2015-04-01

    Despite their remarkable success in bringing spoken language to hearing impaired listeners, the signal transmitted through cochlear implants (CIs) remains impoverished in spectro-temporal fine structure. As a consequence, pitch-dominant information such as voice emotion, is diminished. For young children, the ability to correctly identify the mood/intent of the speaker (which may not always be visible in their facial expression) is an important aspect of social and linguistic development. Previous work in the field has shown that children with cochlear implants (cCI) have significant deficits in voice emotion recognition relative to their normally hearing peers (cNH). Here, we report on voice emotion recognition by a cohort of 36 school-aged cCI. Additionally, we provide for the first time, a comparison of their performance to that of cNH and NH adults (aNH) listening to CI simulations of the same stimuli. We also provide comparisons to the performance of adult listeners with CIs (aCI), most of whom learned language primarily through normal acoustic hearing. Results indicate that, despite strong variability, on average, cCI perform similarly to their adult counterparts; that both groups' mean performance is similar to aNHs' performance with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech; that cNH achieve excellent scores in voice emotion recognition with full-spectrum speech, but on average, show significantly poorer scores than aNH with 8-channel noise-vocoded speech. A strong developmental effect was observed in the cNH with noise-vocoded speech in this task. These results point to the considerable benefit obtained by cochlear-implanted children from their devices, but also underscore the need for further research and development in this important and neglected area. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  16. Principles of creation of complex physical rehabilitation program for children after cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zastavna O.M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to elucidate main principles of complex physical rehabilitation program for senior pre-school age children after cochlear implantation. Material: 40 hard hearing children of senior pre-school (main group were tested. Main group №1 consisted of hard hearing children (10 boys and 11 girls, who did not underwent cochlear implantation and learned by program of pre-school educational establishment for hard-hearing children. Main group №2 consisted of 19 children after cochlear implantation, registered at oral-aural specialists (10 boys and 9 girls. For them the author’s program of physical rehabilitation was worked out. Comparison group consisted of 40 children with normal hearing (18 boys and 22 girls. Effectiveness of the worked out program was assessed by parameters of physical and psycho-motor condition, by children’s physical qualities. Results: the offered program of children’s physical rehabilitation was developed on the base of assessment of physical and psycho-motor condition, physical fitness. The program is of complex character and includes the following elements: domestic habilitation, kinetisotherapy methodic (morning hygienic exercises, Yoga for children, health related training complex, fit-ball training, breathing and articulation exercises, massage (general, speech therapy massage, hardening. Conclusions: Complex character of the worked out program implies diverse influence on different disorders in children’s organisms. All these are realized against the background of main etiological factor of these changes (deafness removal. Such approach results in improvement of children’s condition, their quicker socialization and possibility to study in comprehensive school in due time.

  17. Cochlear implantation for hearing rehabilitation in single-sided deafness after translabyrinthine vestibular schwannoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassepass, Frederike; Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the option of cochlear implantation (CI) in resultant single-sided deafness associated with unilateral translabyrinthine resection of sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). This is a retrospective study performed at Tertiary Care Academic Centre. Following extensive counselling regarding the potential for delayed CI, translabyrinthine VS resection was performed and an intracochlear placeholder was inserted to allow later CI in 11 patients who showed intraoperative microscopic confirmation of preserved cochlear nerve anatomy. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and promontory testing were performed 1 year after surgery to confirm the absence of VS recurrence and viable cochlea. Confirmed CI candidates underwent a second procedure where the placeholder was removed and the CI inserted (4/11). Preimplant unaided and CI-aided evaluations at 12 and 24 months were performed for subjective and objective hearing outcomes. Tinnitus suppression was also measured for implant on and off effects. Available audiological data for three patients demonstrated significant hearing benefits for 'speech from deaf/implanted side, noise from the normal-hearing side' in all three patients and localisation ability improved for 2/3 patients. Subjective findings presented similar results. For the two patients with preimplant tinnitus, complete suppression occurred during active CI. CI is beneficial for hearing rehabilitation and tinnitus reduction in SSD patients with remaining viable cochlear nerve after translabyrinthine VS surgery. Counselling on the risks of intracochlear placeholder insertion and the inherent limitations for ongoing MRI investigations of VS recurrence is essential. PMID:26498948

  18. Perceptual interference effects on phonetic categorization by second-language learners and cochlear implant patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Paul

    2002-05-01

    This talk will outline a new theory that describes how distortions in auditory processing, due to language experience or to hearing impairment, can interfere with phonetic categorization processes. Experimental data will be presented on the perception of American English /r/ and /l/ by American and Japanese listeners. Native-language tests of adult cochlear implant patients, for the /t/-/d/ contrast, will also be presented. The results suggest that the formation and adaptability of phonetic categories are impaired when the auditory processing of speech stimuli increases the salience of within-category acoustic variation.

  19. Experience with cochlear implants in Greenlanders with profound hearing loss living in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Homøe, Preben; Andersen, Ture; Grøntved, Aksel;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cochlear implant (CI) treatment was introduced to the world in the 1980s and has become a routine treatment for congenital or acquired severe-to-profound hearing loss. CI treatment requires access to a highly skilled team of ear, nose and throat specialists, audiologists and speech...... years are in need of a CI every second year in Greenland often due to sequelae from meningitis, which may cause postinfectious deafness. Screening of new-borns for hearing has been started in Greenland establishing the basis for early diagnosis of congenital hearing impairment and subsequent...

  20. Prediction of Speech Recognition in Cochlear Implant Users by Adapting Auditory Models to Psychophysical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svante Stadler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Users of cochlear implants (CIs vary widely in their ability to recognize speech in noisy conditions. There are many factors that may influence their performance. We have investigated to what degree it can be explained by the users' ability to discriminate spectral shapes. A speech recognition task has been simulated using both a simple and a complex models of CI hearing. The models were individualized by adapting their parameters to fit the results of a spectral discrimination test. The predicted speech recognition performance was compared to experimental results, and they were significantly correlated. The presented framework may be used to simulate the effects of changing the CI encoding strategy.

  1. The Phonics Approach in Swedish Children using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids: Inspecting Phonological Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia; Lyxell, Björn; Sahlén, Birgitta; Dahlström, Örjan; Lindgren, Magnus; Ors, Marianne; Kallioinen, Petter; Uhlén, Inger

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated cognitive abilities (i.e. Phonological Processing Skills (PhPS), lexical access, complex and visual Working Memory (WM), and letter knowledge) in Deaf and Hard of Hearing children (DHH) 5, 6 and 7 years of age using cochlear implants or hearing aids. Children with Normal Hearing (NH) served as a reference group. All children took part of a computer-assisted intervention with a phonics approach for 4 weeks aimed to support PhPS. The first aim of the study was to ...

  2. Parents' Stress and Coping Related to Children's Use of a Cochlear Implant: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anmyr, Lena; Larsson, Kjerstin; Olsson, Mariann

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to increase understanding of parents' experiences of having a child with a cochlear implant (CI) and to explore how these related to children's use of CI. Twelve parents of children, full-time users or limited users of CIs, participated in the study. Qualitative content analysis showed that the parents of children who used their CI differed from the parents with limited users in how they handled stressors. Support from health care professionals was seen as insufficient. Parents need to get involved in dynamic processes in which health care resources promote parental coping. PMID:26958933

  3. Beyond hearing: social-emotional outcomes following cochlear implantation in young children

    OpenAIRE

    Ketelaar, Lizet

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to hearing children, children with hearing loss more often experience social-emotional problems. This thesis aimed to assess whether this was also true for 1-to-5-year-old children who had received a cochlear implant (CI) to remediate their hearing loss. In comparison to hearing peers, children with CI were found to be delayed on some but not all aspects of social-emotional functioning. No delays were found regarding social behavior or empathy. However, children with CI did show...

  4. [Effect of cochlear implantation on sound localization for patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J F; Dai, J S; Wang, N Y

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding application of cochlear implantation on patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) for improvement on sound localization. The literature were searched in the PubMed database with 'cochlear implantation AND single-sided deafness' or 'cochlear implantation AND unilateral deafness' as keywords. The publication date of the articles was up to 2015-2-12. A total of 12 articles were included. The results show that the ability of sound localization for most of the USNHL subjects (90%) with cochlear implantation was significantly improved than that without CI, which suggests that CI is a superior auditory rehabilitation treatment than BAHA and CROS hearing aids for patients with USNHL, because of the re-establishment of the benefits of binaural hearing. In addition, the benefit of CI for USNHL requires a period of auditory experience or training. About 30% subjects showed significantly improvement on sound localization ability after CI worked for three months. For most of the patients (90%), the sound localization ability improved after CI worked for six months. When CI worked for nine months, all the subjects would show improvement on sound localization ability. Sound localization of the USNHL subjects with a CI is based primarily on interaural level differences (ILD) while interaural time differences (ITD) provide little advantage or probably not perceptible at all. The younger subject suffers from USNHL, the stronger the plasticity of the auditory center shows, which results in more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side of the auditory pathway. Similarly, the longer duration of USNHL lead to more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side. An adaptive enhancement of auditory pathway corresponding to the healthy ear will rely more on the monaural spatial cues that available to the

  5. Speech Intelligibility of Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients With 7 Years of Device Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Shu-Chen; Spencer, Linda J.; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Speech intelligibility of 24 prelingually deaf pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 84 months of device experience was investigated. Each CI participant's speech samples were judged by a panel of 3 listeners. Intelligibility scores were calculated as the average of the 3 listeners' responses. The average write-down intelligibility score was 71.54% (SD = 29.89), and the average rating-scale intelligibility score was 3.03 points (SD = 1.01). Write-down and rating-scale intelligibilit...

  6. The Perception of Stress Pattern in Young Cochlear Implanted Children: An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavatzanidis, Niki K; Mürbe, Dirk; Friederici, Angela D; Hahne, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (re)gain hearing with a cochlear implant-a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-) long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months) during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable "baba," which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern). A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls. Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not for trochaic

  7. The perception of stress pattern in young cochlear implanted children: an EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Katerina Vavatzanidis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Children with sensorineural hearing loss may (regain hearing with a cochlear implant – a device that transforms sounds into electric pulses and bypasses the dysfunctioning inner ear by stimulating the auditory nerve directly with an electrode array. Many implanted children master the acquisition of spoken language successfully, yet we still have little knowledge of the actual input they receive with the implant and specifically which language sensitive cues they hear. This would be important however, both for understanding the flexibility of the auditory system when presented with stimuli after a (life-long phase of deprivation and for planning therapeutic intervention. In rhythmic languages the general stress pattern conveys important information about word boundaries. Infant language acquisition relies on such cues and can be severely hampered when this information is missing, as seen for dyslexic children and children with specific language impairment. Here we ask whether children with a cochlear implant perceive differences in stress patterns during their language acquisition phase and if they do, whether it is present directly following implant stimulation or if and how much time is needed for the auditory system to adapt to the new sensory modality. We performed a longitudinal ERP study, testing in bimonthly intervals the stress pattern perception of 17 young hearing impaired children (age range: 9-50 months; mean: 22 months during their first 6 months of implant use. An additional session before the implantation served as control baseline. During a session they passively listened to an oddball paradigm featuring the disyllable baba, which was stressed either on the first or second syllable (trochaic vs. iambic stress pattern. A group of age-matched normal hearing children participated as controls.Our results show, that within the first 6 months of implant use the implanted children develop a negative mismatch response for iambic but not

  8. Literacy Skills among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students and Students with Cochlear Implants in Bilingual/Bicultural Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that many deaf students do not develop age-appropriate reading and writing abilities. This study evaluates the literacy skills of deaf students, hard of hearing students, and students with cochlear implants in bilingual/bicultural schools in Denmark. The results show that 45 per...... cochlear implantation was found to be significantly related to literacy skills. The results are discussed in relation to the Danish bilingual/bicultural approach in deaf education, an approach which appears to improve literacy skills among students with hearing impairment but does not eliminate all...

  9. Auditory cortical activity during cochlear implant-mediated perception of spoken language, melody, and rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Molloy, Anne T; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Braun, Allen R

    2010-03-01

    Despite the significant advances in language perception for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, music perception continues to be a major challenge for implant-mediated listening. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie successful implant listening remains limited. To our knowledge, this study represents the first neuroimaging investigation of music perception in CI users, with the hypothesis that CI subjects would demonstrate greater auditory cortical activation than normal hearing controls. H(2) (15)O positron emission tomography (PET) was used here to assess auditory cortical activation patterns in ten postlingually deafened CI patients and ten normal hearing control subjects. Subjects were presented with language, melody, and rhythm tasks during scanning. Our results show significant auditory cortical activation in implant subjects in comparison to control subjects for language, melody, and rhythm. The greatest activity in CI users compared to controls was seen for language tasks, which is thought to reflect both implant and neural specializations for language processing. For musical stimuli, PET scanning revealed significantly greater activation during rhythm perception in CI subjects (compared to control subjects), and the least activation during melody perception, which was the most difficult task for CI users. These results may suggest a possible relationship between auditory performance and degree of auditory cortical activation in implant recipients that deserves further study.

  10. Cortical activation in profoundly deaf patients during cochlear implant stimulation demonstrated by H sub 2 (15)O PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, H.; Lamprecht, A.; Kuehn, A.R.; Roden, W.; Vosteen, K.H.; Feinendegen, L.E. (Institute of Medicine, Juelich, (West Germany))

    1991-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are used to provide sensations of sound to profoundly deaf patients. The performance of the CI is assessed mainly by the subjective reports of patients. The aim of this study was to look for objective cortical responses to the stimulation of the CI. Two postlingually and two prelingually deaf patients were investigated by positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 15}O-labeled water (H{sub 2}{sup 15}O) to determine the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Instead of quantifying rCBF in absolute terms, it was estimated by referring the regional tissue concentration of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O to the mean whole brain concentration. CI stimulation encoded from white noise and sequential words led to an increased rCBF in the primary and secondary (Wernicke) auditory cortex. Relative elevations of up to 33% were observed bilaterally, although they were higher contralateral to the CI. These results were obtained not only in the postlingually deaf patients but also in two patients who had never been able to hear. Thus, it could be demonstrated that PET measurements of cerebral H{sub 2}{sup 15}O distribution yield objective responses of the central auditory system during electrical stimulation by CIs in profoundly deaf patients.

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire into Italian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, F; Iacona, E; Sykopetrites, V; Schindler, A; Mozzanica, F

    2016-08-01

    The NCIQ is a quantifiable self-assessment health-related quality of life instrument specific for cochlear implant users. The aim of this study was to culturally adapt the NCIQ into Italian (I-NCIQ). A prospective instrument validation study was conducted. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation were accomplished. Cronbach α was used to test internal consistency in 51 CI users and in a control group composed by 38 post-lingual deaf adult on a waiting list for a CI. ICC test was used for test-retest reliability analysis. Kruskal-Wallis test with Mann-Whitney post hoc were used to compare the I-NCIQ scores in CI users before and after the cochlear implantation and in control patients. I-NCIQ scores obtained in CI users were compared with the results of Italian version of disyllabic testing without lip-reading and without masking. Good internal consistency and good test-retest reliability were found. I-NCIQ scores obtained in the 51 CI users after implantation were consistently higher than those obtained before implantation and in the control group. Moreover, no differences were found in the results of I-NCIQ obtained in the group of 51 CI users before implantation and in the group of control patients on post hoc Mann-Whitney analysis. Positive correlations between I-NCIQ scores and the results of disyllabic testing without lip-reading and without masking were found. The I-NCIQ is a reliable, valid, self-administered questionnaire for the measurement of QOL in CI users; its application is recommended. PMID:26324881

  12. Bilateral use of Active Middle Ear Implants: Speech Discrimination Results in Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf-Magele, A; Koci, V; Sprinzl, G; Zorowka, P; Riechelmann, H.; Schnabl, J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Binaural sound reception has advantages over unilateral perception, including better localization and sound quality as well as speech and tone reception in both quiet and noisy environments. Up to now, most active middle ear implant (AMEI) users have been unilaterally implanted, but patient demand for an implant on the other side is increasing.Material & Methods: Ten bilaterally-AMEI implanted native German-speaking adults were included in the study. The Oldenburg sentence test...

  13. Factors associated with hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model of Hybrid cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Chiemi; Nguyen-Huynh, Anh; Loera, Katherine; Stark, Gemaine; Reiss, Lina

    2014-10-01

    The Hybrid cochlear implant (CI), also known as Electro-Acoustic Stimulation (EAS), is a new type of CI that preserves residual acoustic hearing and enables combined cochlear implant and hearing aid use in the same ear. However, 30-55% of patients experience acoustic hearing loss within days to months after activation, suggesting that both surgical trauma and electrical stimulation may cause hearing loss. The goals of this study were to: 1) determine the contributions of both implantation surgery and EAS to hearing loss in a normal-hearing guinea pig model; 2) determine which cochlear structural changes are associated with hearing loss after surgery and EAS. Two groups of animals were implanted (n = 6 per group), with one group receiving chronic acoustic and electric stimulation for 10 weeks, and the other group receiving no direct acoustic or electric stimulation during this time frame. A third group (n = 6) was not implanted, but received chronic acoustic stimulation. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were followed over time at 1, 2, 6, and 16 kHz. At the end of the study, the following cochlear measures were quantified: hair cells, spiral ganglion neuron density, fibrous tissue density, and stria vascularis blood vessel density; the presence or absence of ossification around the electrode entry was also noted. After surgery, implanted animals experienced a range of 0-55 dB of threshold shifts in the vicinity of the electrode at 6 and 16 kHz. The degree of hearing loss was significantly correlated with reduced stria vascularis vessel density and with the presence of ossification, but not with hair cell counts, spiral ganglion neuron density, or fibrosis area. After 10 weeks of stimulation, 67% of implanted, stimulated animals had more than 10 dB of additional threshold shift at 1 kHz, compared to 17% of implanted, non-stimulated animals and 0% of non-implanted animals. This 1-kHz hearing loss was not associated with changes in any of the cochlear measures

  14. Children Using Cochlear Implants Capitalize on Acoustical Hearing for Music Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopyan, Talar; Peretz, Isabelle; Chan, Lisa P.; Papsin, Blake C.; Gordon, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) electrically stimulate the auditory nerve providing children who are deaf with access to speech and music. Because of device limitations, it was hypothesized that children using CIs develop abnormal perception of musical cues. Perception of pitch and rhythm as well as memory for music was measured by the children’s version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) in 23 unilateral CI users and 22 age-matched children with normal hearing. Children with CIs were less accurate than their normal hearing peers (p musical pieces (p music improved as the age at implantation increased (p aids. Access to early acoustical hearing in the lower frequency ranges appears to establish a base for music perception, which can be accessed with later electrical CI hearing. PMID:23133430

  15. Use of Pericranial Flap Coverage in Cochlear Implantation of the Radical Cavity: Rationale, Technique, and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Carrie L; Weinreich, Heather M; Sharon, Jeffrey D; Chien, Wade W; Francis, Howard W

    2016-09-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) surgery in the setting of an open mastoid cavity is evolving. Two strategies are commonly pursued: a staged approach, clearing the disease, closing the meatus or the external auditory canal (EAC), and reevaluating in 3 to 6 months prior to implantation, or a single-stage procedure with mastoid obliteration without EAC closure. Meatal closure is often employed in the setting of an open mastoid cavity to reduce the risk of electrode extrusion and infection. An open cavity offers the advantages of being a single-stage procedure, permitting direct surveillance for recurrent cholesteatoma, and reducing the need for repeat computed tomography scans. We describe an approach to the coverage of a CI within a dry, open mastoid cavity using an anteriorly-based postauricular pericranial flap.

  16. Children using cochlear implants capitalize on acoustical hearing for music perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopyan, Talar; Peretz, Isabelle; Chan, Lisa P; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) electrically stimulate the auditory nerve providing children who are deaf with access to speech and music. Because of device limitations, it was hypothesized that children using CIs develop abnormal perception of musical cues. Perception of pitch and rhythm as well as memory for music was measured by the children's version of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) in 23 unilateral CI users and 22 age-matched children with normal hearing. Children with CIs were less accurate than their normal hearing peers (p musical pieces (p music improved as the age at implantation increased (p music perception, which can be accessed with later electrical CI hearing. PMID:23133430

  17. Number processing and arithmetic skills in children with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixner, Silvia; Leyrer, Martin; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Though previous findings report that hearing impaired children exhibit impaired language and arithmetic skills, our current understanding of how hearing and the associated language impairments may influence the development of arithmetic skills is still limited. In the current study numerical/arithmetic performance of 45 children with a cochlea implant were compared to that of controls matched for hearing age, intelligence and sex. Our main results were twofold disclosing that children with CI show general as well as specific numerical/arithmetic impairments. On the one hand, we found an increased percentage of children with CI with an indication of dyscalculia symptoms, a general slowing in multiplication and subtraction as well as less accurate number line estimations. On the other hand, however, children with CI exhibited very circumscribed difficulties associated with place-value processing. Performance declined specifically when subtraction required a borrow procedure and number line estimation required the integration of units, tens, and hundreds instead of only units and tens. Thus, it seems that despite initially atypical language development, children with CI are able to acquire arithmetic skills in a qualitatively similar fashion as their normal hearing peers. Nonetheless, when demands on place-value understanding, which has only recently been proposed to be language mediated, hearing impaired children experience specific difficulties. PMID:25566152

  18. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hearing impairment, cochlear implants, and aging, via (a) phonemic restoration as a measure of top-down filling of missing speech, (b) listening effort and response times as a measure of increased cognitive processing, and (c) visual world paradigm and eye gazing as a measure of the use of context and its time course. Our results indicate that between speech degradations and their cognitive compensation, there is a fine balance that seems to vary greatly across individuals. Hearing impairment or inadequate hearing device settings may limit compensation benefits. Cochlear implants seem to allow the effective use of sentential context, but likely at the cost of delayed processing. Linguistic and lexical knowledge, which play an important role in compensation, may be successfully employed in advanced age, as some compensatory mechanisms seem to be preserved. These findings indicate that cognitive compensation in hearing impairment can be highly complicated—not always absent, but also not easily predicted by speech intelligibility tests only.

  19. How does visual language affect crossmodal plasticity and cochlear implant success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyness, C R; Woll, B; Campbell, R; Cardin, V

    2013-12-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are the most successful intervention for ameliorating hearing loss in severely or profoundly deaf children. Despite this, educational performance in children with CI continues to lag behind their hearing peers. From animal models and human neuroimaging studies it has been proposed the integrative functions of auditory cortex are compromised by crossmodal plasticity. This has been argued to result partly from the use of a visual language. Here we argue that 'cochlear implant sensitive periods' comprise both auditory and language sensitive periods, and thus cannot be fully described with animal models. Despite prevailing assumptions, there is no evidence to link the use of a visual language to poorer CI outcome. Crossmodal reorganisation of auditory cortex occurs regardless of compensatory strategies, such as sign language, used by the deaf person. In contrast, language deprivation during early sensitive periods has been repeatedly linked to poor language outcomes. Language sensitive periods have largely been ignored when considering variation in CI outcome, leading to ill-founded recommendations concerning visual language in CI habilitation. PMID:23999083

  20. Design and evaluation of a cochlear implant strategy based on a "Phantom" channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Waldo; Litvak, Leonid M; Saoji, Aniket A; Büchner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unbalanced bipolar stimulation, delivered using charge balanced pulses, was used to produce "Phantom stimulation", stimulation beyond the most apical contact of a cochlear implant's electrode array. The Phantom channel was allocated audio frequencies below 300 Hz in a speech coding strategy, conveying energy some two octaves lower than the clinical strategy and hence delivering the fundamental frequency of speech and of many musical tones. A group of 12 Advanced Bionics cochlear implant recipients took part in a chronic study investigating the fitting of the Phantom strategy and speech and music perception when using Phantom. The evaluation of speech in noise was performed immediately after fitting Phantom for the first time (Session 1) and after one month of take-home experience (Session 2). A repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) within factors strategy (Clinical, Phantom) and interaction time (Session 1, Session 2) revealed a significant effect for the interaction time and strategy. Phantom obtained a significant improvement in speech intelligibility after one month of use. Furthermore, a trend towards a better performance with Phantom (48%) with respect to F120 (37%) after 1 month of use failed to reach significance after type 1 error correction. Questionnaire results show a preference for Phantom when listening to music, likely driven by an improved balance between high and low frequencies. PMID:25806818

  1. Design and evaluation of a cochlear implant strategy based on a "Phantom" channel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Nogueira

    Full Text Available Unbalanced bipolar stimulation, delivered using charge balanced pulses, was used to produce "Phantom stimulation", stimulation beyond the most apical contact of a cochlear implant's electrode array. The Phantom channel was allocated audio frequencies below 300 Hz in a speech coding strategy, conveying energy some two octaves lower than the clinical strategy and hence delivering the fundamental frequency of speech and of many musical tones. A group of 12 Advanced Bionics cochlear implant recipients took part in a chronic study investigating the fitting of the Phantom strategy and speech and music perception when using Phantom. The evaluation of speech in noise was performed immediately after fitting Phantom for the first time (Session 1 and after one month of take-home experience (Session 2. A repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA within factors strategy (Clinical, Phantom and interaction time (Session 1, Session 2 revealed a significant effect for the interaction time and strategy. Phantom obtained a significant improvement in speech intelligibility after one month of use. Furthermore, a trend towards a better performance with Phantom (48% with respect to F120 (37% after 1 month of use failed to reach significance after type 1 error correction. Questionnaire results show a preference for Phantom when listening to music, likely driven by an improved balance between high and low frequencies.

  2. Learning and Memory Processes Following Cochlear Implantation: The Missing Piece of the Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, David B; Kronenberger, William G; Chandramouli, Suyog H; Conway, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    At the present time, there is no question that cochlear implants (CIs) work and often work very well in quiet listening conditions for many profoundly deaf children and adults. The speech and language outcomes data published over the last two decades document quite extensively the clinically significant benefits of CIs. Although there now is a large body of evidence supporting the "efficacy" of CIs as a medical intervention for profound hearing loss in both children and adults, there still remain a number of challenging unresolved clinical and theoretical issues that deal with the "effectiveness" of CIs in individual patients that have not yet been successfully resolved. In this paper, we review recent findings on learning and memory, two central topics in the field of cognition that have been seriously neglected in research on CIs. Our research findings on sequence learning, memory and organization processes, and retrieval strategies used in verbal learning and memory of categorized word lists suggests that basic domain-general learning abilities may be the missing piece of the puzzle in terms of understanding the cognitive factors that underlie the enormous individual differences and variability routinely observed in speech and language outcomes following cochlear implantation. PMID:27092098

  3. Bilateral transient pupil closure after iris supported intraocular lens implantation in a case with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necip Kara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old woman presented with Marfan syndrome and bilateral ectopia lentis. The surgical treatment including removal of the crystalline lens and implantation of an iris-supported intraocular lens in both eyes at a week interval. Postoperatively, the biomicroscopic examination showed total pupil closure bilaterally. After the topical tropicamide treatment, the pupil returned to normal shape.

  4. Pragmatic Abilities of Children with Hearing Loss Using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids Compared to Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Shina-August, Ella; Meilijson, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This study characterized the profile of pragmatic abilities among 24 children with hearing loss (HL) aged 6.3-9.4 years, 13 using hearing aids (HAs) and 11 using cochlear implants (CIs), in comparison to those of 13 hearing children with similar chronological and language ages. All the children with HL used spoken language, attended regular…

  5. Dual Language versus English-Only Support for Bilingual Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunta, Ferenc; Douglas, Michael; Dickson, Hanna; Cantu, Amy; Wickesberg, Jennifer; Gifford, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a critical need to understand better speech and language development in bilingual children learning two spoken languages who use cochlear implants (CIs) and hearing aids (HAs). The paucity of knowledge in this area poses a significant barrier to providing maximal communicative outcomes to a growing number of children who have…

  6. Perception of Suprasegmental Speech Features via Bimodal Stimulation: Cochlear Implant on One Ear and Hearing Aid on the Other

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Tova; Harel, Tamar; Shpak, Talma; Luntz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the contribution of acoustic hearing to the perception of suprasegmental features by adults who use a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in opposite ears. Method: 23 adults participated in this study. Perception of suprasegmental features--intonation, syllable stress, and word…

  7. The Modes of Communication Used by Children with Cochlear Implants and the Role of Sign in Their Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Merv; Punch, Renee

    2011-01-01

    In a mixed-methods study, which included surveys of 247 parents and 151 teachers, the researchers investigated the modes of communication used by children with cochlear implants and the role of signed communication in the children's lives. Findings indicated that 15%-20% of the children in the parent surveys and approximately 30% of the children…

  8. Pictorial review of MRI/CT Scan in congenital temporal bone anomalies, in patients for cochlear implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution CT scan (HRCT) and MRI are routinely performed prior to cochlear implant surgery. These modalities help assess the status of the inner ear structures. A few patients have significant anomalies, which need to be assessed and understood in detail. We present a pictorial essay of these anomalies and described our HRCT and MRI techniques in patients being imaged prior to surgery

  9. The Effect of Short-Term Auditory Deprivation on the Control of Intraoral Pressure in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David L.; Gao, Sujuan; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2003-01-01

    A study investigated whether two speech measures (peak intraoral air pressure (IOP) and IOP duration) obtained during production of intervocalic stops would be altered by the presence or absence of a cochlear implant in five children (ages 7-10). The auditory condition affected peak IOP more than IOP duration. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. Speech Production Accuracy and Variability in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Comparisons with Typically Developing Age-Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertmer, David J.; Goffman, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The speech production accuracy and variability scores of 6 young cochlear implant (CI) recipients with 2 years of device experience were compared with those of typically developing (TD) age-peers. Method: Words from the First Words Speech Test (FWST; Ertmer, 1999) were imitated 3 times to assess the accuracy and variability of initial…

  11. The effect of music on auditory perception in cochlear-implant users and normal-hearing listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, Christina Diechina

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implants (CIs) are auditory prostheses for severely deaf people that do not benefit from conventional hearing aids. Speech perception is reasonably good with CIs; other signals such as music perception are challenging. First, the perception of music and music related perception in CI users

  12. Speech recognition in noise as a function of the number of spectral channels : Comparison of acoustic hearing and cochlear implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen, LM; Shannon, RV; Baskent, D; Wang, YB

    2001-01-01

    Speech recognition was measured as a function of spectral resolution (number of spectral channels) and speech-to-noise ratio in normal-hearing (NH) and cochlear-implant (CI) listeners. Vowel, consonant, word, and sentence recognition were measured in five normal -hearing listeners, ten listeners wit

  13. How Do Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants Manage to Read Sentences: The Key Word Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Ana-Belén; Carrillo, María-Soledad; González, Virginia; Alegria, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms used by deaf children with and without cochlear implants (CIs) to read sentences and the linguistic bases (vocabulary and syntax) underlying those reading mechanisms. Previous studies have shown that deaf persons read sentences using the key word strategy (KWS), which consists of identifying some…

  14. Language Processing in Children with Cochlear Implants: A Preliminary Report on Lexical Access for Production and Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Richard G.; Steinman, Susan; Ying, Elizabeth; Mystal, Elana Ying; Houston, Derek M.

    2013-01-01

    In this plenary paper, we present a review of language research in children with cochlear implants along with an outline of a 5-year project designed to examine the lexical access for production and recognition. The project will use auditory priming, picture naming with auditory or visual interfering stimuli (Picture-Word Interference and…

  15. Simulating the Effects of Spread of Electric Excitation on Musical Tuning and Melody Identification with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Anthony J.; Litvak, Leonid M.; Dorman, Michael F.; Bohanan, Ashley R.; Mishra, Lakshmi N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine why, in a pilot study, only 1 of 11 cochlear implant listeners was able to reliably identify a frequency-to-electrode map where the intervals of a familiar melody were played on the correct musical scale. The authors sought to validate their method and to assess the effect of pitch strength on musical scale recognition in…

  16. The multi-channel cochlear implant: multi-disciplinary development of electrical stimulation of the cochlea and the resulting clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Graeme M

    2015-04-01

    This multi-disciplinary research showed sound could be coded by electrical stimulation of the cochlea and peripheral auditory nervous system. But the temporal coding of frequency as seen in the experimental animal, was inadequate for the important speech frequencies. The data indicated the limitation was due in particular to deterministic firing of neurons and failure to reproduce the normal fine temporo-spatial pattern of neural responses seen with sound. However, the data also showed the need for the place coding of frequency, and this meant multi-electrodes inserted into the cochlea. Nevertheless, before this was evaluated on people we undertook biological safety studies to determine the effects of surgical trauma and electrical stimuli, and how to prevent infection. Then our research demonstrated place of stimulation had timbre and was perceived as vowels. This led to our discovery in 1978 of the formant-extraction speech code that first enabled severely-profoundly deaf people to understand running speech. This result in people who had hearing before becoming severely deaf was an outcome not previously considered possible. In 1985 it was the first multi-channel implant to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It was also the fore runner of our advanced formant and fixed filter strategies When these codes were used from 1985 for those born deaf or deafened early in life we discovered there was a critical period when brain plasticity would allow speech perception and language to be developed near- normally, and this required in particular the acquisition of place coding. In 1990 this led to the first cochlear implant to be approved by the FDA for use in children. Finally, we achieved binaural hearing in 1989 with bilateral cochlear implants, followed by bimodal speech processing in 1990 with a hearing aid in one ear and implant in the other. The above research has been developed industrially, with for example 250,000 people worldwide receiving

  17. Resultados auditivos com o implante coclear multicanal em pacientes submetidos a cirurgia no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo Auditory results with multicanal cochlear implant in patients submitted to cochlear implant surgery at University of São Paulo Medical School - Hospital das Clínicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira Bento

    2004-10-01

    an important alert for dangerous situations in the daily life. They are also unable to hear their own voices and for this people with profound deaf do not modulate their voices. The hearing aids are the first choice to treat deafness, but there are patients with severe damage of the auditory systems who cannot receive a useful hearing from normal hearing aids. The cochlear implant is the alternative for patients that cannot have good discriminatory ability wearing a powerful hearing aid and wish or need a better hearing. AIM: To study the hearing results of the adult patients who are using a multichannel cochlear implant system at the Department of Otolaryngology - University of Sao Paulo. STUDY DESIGN: Series study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We selected 61 patients with a severe bilateral hearing loss that have been using the cochlear implant for at least six months. The hearing evaluation performed after using the device for six months included word and sentence recognition tests. RESULTS: The PTA of four patients reached 38.7 dB. Speech perception tests showed 713% recognition of open set sentences, 86.5% of vowels and 52.60% of monosyllabic. Most of our patients are able to speak on the telephone. CONCLUSION: Most of patients showed excellent results in open-set sentence and word tests.

  18. Multivariate predictors of music perception and appraisal by adult cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, Kate; Oleson, Jacob; Knutson, John F; Breheny, Patrick; Driscoll, Virginia; Olszewski, Carol

    2008-02-01

    The research examined whether performance by adult cochlear implant recipients on a variety of recognition and appraisal tests derived from real-world music could be predicted from technological, demographic, and life experience variables, as well as speech recognition scores. A representative sample of 209 adults implanted between 1985 and 2006 participated. Using multiple linear regression models and generalized linear mixed models, sets of optimal predictor variables were selected that effectively predicted performance on a test battery that assessed different aspects of music listening. These analyses established the importance of distinguishing between the accuracy of music perception and the appraisal of musical stimuli when using music listening as an index of implant success. Importantly, neither device type nor processing strategy predicted music perception or music appraisal. Speech recognition performance was not a strong predictor of music perception, and primarily predicted music perception when the test stimuli included lyrics. Additionally, limitations in the utility of speech perception in predicting musical perception and appraisal underscore the utility of music perception as an alternative outcome measure for evaluating implant outcomes. Music listening background, residual hearing (i.e., hearing aid use), cognitive factors, and some demographic factors predicted several indices of perceptual accuracy or appraisal of music. PMID:18669126

  19. The Mi1000 CONCERTO PIN cochlear implant: An evaluation of its safety and stability in adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Sugarova, Serafima; Yanov, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion The study demonstrates the medium-term stability and safety of the CONCERTO PIN cochlear implant. The use of the CONCERTO PIN proved to be suitable for the use of a surgical technique without the need for suture fixation and resulted in short surgery duration and a low medium-term complication rate. Objective The primary aim was to provide data on medium-term safety and stability of the CONCERTO PIN cochlear implant in adults and children, and to collect feedback on the surgical technique used, which involved no drilling and no suture fixation. The secondary aim was to analyze surgery duration. Methods Implantation was performed using minimally invasive surgery. During surgery, data on the surgical procedure was collected by the attending surgeons or a designee. Safety and stability of the CONCERTO PIN were assessed at first fitting (1 month after implantation) and 6 months after first fitting. Results Ninety-nine patients were implanted with a CONCERTO PIN implant and one patient with a CONCERTO implant. The CONCERTO PIN implants implanted during this study were immobilized by pins and a tight periosteal pocket. The mean (± SD) surgery duration was 27:52 (± 9:19) min. PMID:26838578

  20. Bilateral use of active middle ear implants: speech discrimination results in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf-Magele, Astrid; Koci, Viktor; Schnabl, Johannes; Zorowka, Patrick; Riechelmann, Herbert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias

    2016-08-01

    Binaural sound reception has advantages over unilateral perception, including better localization and sound quality as well as speech and tone reception in both quiet and noisy environments. Up to now, most active middle ear implant (AMEI) users have been unilaterally implanted, but patient demand for an implant on the other side is increasing. Ten bilaterally-AMEI implanted native German-speaking adults were included in the study. The Oldenburg sentence test was used to measure speech reception thresholds in noise. The subject's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a speech reception score of 50 % was calculated for different noise conditions. SRT was measured as a function of noise condition (nc) and listening condition (lc)-for example, SRT (lc, nc), with nc from S0N0, S0N-90, or S0N90 and lc from left, right or both. For each noise condition, the squelch effect and the binaural summation effect were calculated. Patients in this study demonstrated improvement with bilateral AMEIs compared to right or left AMEI only in all three tested listening conditions. Statistical significance was found in the S0N0 condition to favor usage of bilateral AMI versus either the right or left side only. The benefits of binaural hearing are well known, also in normal-hearing individuals. In the future every bilateral implantation should be a part of the clinical routine. Bilateral implantation can help to reduce problems in background noise and restore directional hearing. PMID:26385811

  1. Benefits from upgrade to the CP810 sound processor for Nucleus 24 cochlear implant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosnier, Isabelle; Marx, Mathieu; Venail, Frederic; Loundon, Natalie; Roux-Vaillard, Samantha; Sterkers, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure performance benefits obtained by upgrading recipients of the Cochlear Nucleus CI24 cochlear implant to the new CP810 sound processor. Speech recognition in quiet and in spatially separated noise was measured in established users of the Cochlear ESPrit 3G (n = 22) and Freedom (n = 13) sound processors, using the "Everyday" listening program. Subjects were then upgraded to the CP810 processor and were re-assessed after a 3-month period, using both the "Everyday" program and the new "Noise" program, which incorporates several pre-processing features including a new directional microphone algorithm ("Zoom"). Subjective perceptions were also recorded using the abbreviated profile of hearing aid benefit (APHAB) questionnaire. Mean scores for monosyllables in quiet, presented at 50 and 60 dB SPL, increased by 11% (p < 0.0001) and 8% (p < 0.001), respectively, after upgrade, for all subjects combined. Significant increases were also recorded for both processor groups. In noise, the mean scores were 60.0 and 67.4% for the original and CP810 Everyday programs, respectively (difference not significant). With the CP810 Noise programs the mean score increased to 82.5% (p < 0.01), with significant increases in both processor groups. There was evidence of slightly greater upgrade benefit in users of the ESPrit 3G processor and in relatively poor performers. The APHAB questionnaire also indicated significant reduction in perceived difficulty in the background noise and reverberation sub-scales after upgrade. The findings of the study appear to support the expectation of increased benefit from the new CP810 sound processor. PMID:23408020

  2. Music and Quality of Life in Early-Deafened Late-Implanted Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fuller, Christina; Mallinckrodt, Lisa; Maat, Bert; Başkent, Deniz; Free, Rolien

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesis and Background: The early-deafened, late-implanted (EDLI) CI users constitute a relatively new and understudied clinical population. To contribute to a better understanding of the implantation outcome, this study evaluated this population for self-reported enjoyment and perception of musi

  3. Digital signal processing (DSP) applications for multiband loudness correction digital hearing aids and cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillier, N; Frölich, T; Kompis, M; Bögli, H; Lai, W K

    1993-01-01

    Single-chip digital signal processors (DSPs) allow the flexible implementation of a large variety of speech analysis, synthesis, and processing algorithms for the hearing impaired. A series of experiments was carried out to optimize parameters of the adaptive beamformer noise reduction algorithm and to evaluate its performance in realistic environments with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects. An experimental DSP system has been used to implement a multiband loudness correction (MLC) algorithm for a digital hearing aid. Speech tests in quiet and noise with 13 users of conventional hearing aids demonstrated significant improvements in discrimination scores with the MLC algorithm. Various speech coding strategies for cochlear implants were implemented in real time on a DSP laboratory speech processor. Improved speech discrimination performance was achieved with high-rate stimulation. Hybrid strategies incorporating speech feature detectors and complex decision algorithms are currently being investigated. PMID:8263833

  4. Cognitive development, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyxell, Björn; Wass, Malin; Sahlén, Birgitta; Samuelsson, Christina; Asker-Arnason, Lena; Ibertsson, Tina; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Larsby, Birgitta; Hällgren, Mathias

    2009-10-01

    This report summarizes some of the results of studies in our laboratory exploring the development of cognitive, reading and prosodic skills in children with cochlear implantation (CI). The children with CI performed at significantly lower levels than the hearing comparison group on the majority of cognitive tests, despite showing levels of nonverbal ability. The differences between children with CI and hearing children were most pronounced on tasks with relatively high phonological processing demands, but they were not limited to phonological processing. Impairment of receptive and productive prosody was also evident in children with CI. Despite these difficulties, 75% of the children with CI reached a level of reading skill comparable to that of hearing children. The results are discussed with respect to compensation strategies in reading.

  5. Relationships between spoken word and sign processing in children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giezen, Marcel R; Baker, Anne E; Escudero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The effect of using signed communication on the spoken language development of deaf children with a cochlear implant (CI) is much debated. We report on two studies that investigated relationships between spoken word and sign processing in children with a CI who are exposed to signs in addition to spoken language. Study 1 assessed rapid word and sign learning in 13 children with a CI and found that performance in both language modalities correlated positively. Study 2 tested the effects of using sign-supported speech on spoken word processing in eight children with a CI, showing that simultaneously perceiving signs and spoken words does not negatively impact their spoken word recognition or learning. Together, these two studies suggest that sign exposure does not necessarily have a negative effect on speech processing in some children with a CI. PMID:24080074

  6. Efficient algorithm development of CIS speech processing strategy for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Talha J; Ali, Hussnain; Ajaz, Muhammad Asim; Khan, Shoab A

    2009-01-01

    Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) is one of the most useful and famous speech processing strategies used in Cochlear Implant speech processors. However, algorithm realization in hardware is a laborious task due to high computation cost of the algorithm. Real-time issues and low-power design demands an optimized realization of algorithm. This paper proposes two techniques to cut the computation cost of CIS by using polyphase filters and by implementing the complete algorithm in frequency domain. About 70% reduction in computation cost can be achieved by using multi-rate, multistage filters; whereas computation cost decreases by a factor of five when the whole algorithm is implemented in frequency domain. Evaluation of the algorithm is done by a laboratory designed algorithm development and evaluation platform. Algorithm flow diagrams and their computation details have been given for comparison. Utilizing the given techniques can remarkably reduce the processor load without any compromise on quality. PMID:19964752

  7. Getting a decent (but sparse) signal to the brain for users of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Blake S

    2015-04-01

    The challenge in getting a decent signal to the brain for users of cochlear implants (CIs) is described. A breakthrough occurred in 1989 that later enabled most users to understand conversational speech with their restored hearing alone. Subsequent developments included stimulation in addition to that provided with a unilateral CI, either with electrical stimulation on both sides or with acoustic stimulation in combination with a unilateral CI, the latter for persons with residual hearing at low frequencies in either or both ears. Both types of adjunctive stimulation produced further improvements in performance for substantial fractions of patients. Today, the CI and related hearing prostheses are the standard of care for profoundly deaf persons and ever-increasing indications are now allowing persons with less severe losses to benefit from these marvelous technologies. The steps in achieving the present levels of performance are traced, and some possibilities for further improvements are mentioned. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:25500178

  8. Dichotic Listening Can Improve Perceived Clarity of Music in Cochlear Implant Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannson, Nicolas; Innes-Brown, Hamish; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Musical enjoyment for cochlear implant (CI) recipients is often reported to be unsatisfactory. Our goal was to determine whether the musical experience of postlingually deafened adult CI recipients could be enriched by presenting the bass and treble clef parts of short polyphonic piano pieces...... separately to each ear (dichotic). Dichotic presentation should artificially enhance the lateralization cues of each part and help the listeners to better segregate them and thus provide greater clarity. We also hypothesized that perception of the intended emotion of the pieces and their overall enjoyment...... would be enhanced in the dichotic mode compared with the monophonic (both parts in the same ear) and the diotic mode (both parts in both ears). Twenty-eight piano pieces specifically composed to induce sad or happy emotions were selected. The tempo of the pieces, which ranged from lento to presto...

  9. Design and implementation of a DSP with multi-level low power strategies for cochlear implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mai Songping; Zhang Chun; Chao Jun; Wang Zhihua

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a low power digital signal processor (THUCIDSP-1) targeting at application for cochlear implants. Multi-level low power strategies including algorithm optimization, operand isolation, clock gating and memory partitioning are adopted in the processor design to reduce the power consumption. Experimental results show that the complexity of the Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) algorithm is reduced by more than 80% and the power dissipation of the hardware alone is reduced by about 25% with the low power methods. The THUCIDSP-1 prototype, fabricated in 0.18-μm standard CMOS process, consumes only 1.91 mW when executing the CIS algorithm at 3 MHz.

  10. Written Language Ability in Mandarin-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Ming Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine narrative writing in cochlear implant (CI children and understand the factors associated with unfavorable outcomes. Materials and Methods. Forty-five CI children in grades 2–6 participated in this study. They received CIs at 4.1 ± 2.1 years of age and had used them for 6.5 ± 2.7 years. A story-writing test was conducted and scored on 4 subscales: Total Number of Words, Words per Sentence, Morphosyntax, and Semantics. Scores more than 1.5 SD lower than the mean of the normal-hearing normative sample were considered problematic. Language and speech skills were examined. Results. Significantly more implanted students were problematic on “Total Number of Words” (p<0.001, “Words per Sentence” (p=0.049, and “Semantics” (p<0.001. Poorer receptive language and auditory performance were independently associated with problematic “Total Number of Words” (R2=0.489 and “Semantics” (R2=0.213, respectively. “Semantics” problem was more common in lower graders (grades 2–4 than in higher graders (grades 5-6; p=0.016. Conclusion. Implanted children tend to write stories that are shorter, worse-organized, and without a plot, while formulating morphosyntactically correct sentences. Special attention is required on their auditory and language performances, which could lead to written language problems.

  11. Design of a radio-linked implantable cochlear prosthesis using surface acoustic wave devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeutter, D C; Josse, F

    1993-01-01

    Cochlear prosthesis systems for postlingually deaf individuals (those who have become deaf due to disease or injury after having developed mature speech capability) are considered. These systems require the surgical implantation of an array of electrodes within the cochlea and are driven by processed sound signals from outside the body. A system that uses an analog signal approach for transcutaneous transfer of six processed speech data channels using frequency multiplexing is described. The system utilizes a filterbank of six narrowband surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters in the range 72-78 MHz with a 1.2-MHz channel spacing to multiplex the six carrier signals, frequency modulated, by the processed speech signals, onto a composite signal. The same SAW filters are used in the receiver filterbank for signal separation, but are housed in a miniaturized package. The system includes a portable transmitter and a receiver package which is to be implanted in the patient. The implanted circuits are supplied exclusively from power transferred from outside the body via a separate 10-MHz transcutaneous link.

  12. Interplay between singing and cortical processing of music: a longitudinal study in children with cochlear implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torppa, Ritva; Huotilainen, Minna; Leminen, Miika; Lipsanen, Jari; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Informal music activities such as singing may lead to augmented auditory perception and attention. In order to study the accuracy and development of music-related sound change detection in children with cochlear implants (CIs) and normal hearing (NH) aged 4–13 years, we recorded their auditory event-related potentials twice (at T1 and T2, 14–17 months apart). We compared their MMN (preattentive discrimination) and P3a (attention toward salient sounds) to changes in piano tone pitch, timbre, duration, and gaps. Of particular interest was to determine whether singing can facilitate auditory perception and attention of CI children. It was found that, compared to the NH group, the CI group had smaller and later timbre P3a and later pitch P3a, implying degraded discrimination and attention shift. Duration MMN became larger from T1 to T2 only in the NH group. The development of response patterns for duration and gap changes were not similar in the CI and NH groups. Importantly, CI singers had enhanced or rapidly developing P3a or P3a-like responses over all change types. In contrast, CI non-singers had rapidly enlarging pitch MMN without enlargement of P3a, and their timbre P3a became smaller and later over time. These novel results show interplay between MMN, P3a, brain development, cochlear implantation, and singing. They imply an augmented development of neural networks for attention and more accurate neural discrimination associated with singing. In future studies, differential development of P3a between CI and NH children should be taken into account in comparisons of these groups. Moreover, further studies are needed to assess whether singing enhances auditory perception and attention of children with CIs. PMID:25540628

  13. Semitone frequency mapping to improve music representation for nucleus cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The frequency-to-channel mapping for Cochlear implant (CI signal processors was originally designed to optimize speech perception and generally does not preserve the harmonic structure of music sounds. An algorithm aimed at restoring the harmonic relationship of frequency components based on semitone mapping is presented in this article. Two semitone (Smt based mappings in different frequency ranges were investigated. The first, Smt-LF, covers a range from 130 to 1502 Hz which encompasses the fundamental frequency of most musical instruments. The second, Smt-MF, covers a range from 440 to 5040 Hz, allocating frequency bands of sounds close to their characteristic tonotopical sites according to Greenwood's function. Smt-LF, in contrast, transposes the input frequencies onto locations with higher characteristic frequencies. A sequence of 36 synthetic complex tones (C3 to B5, each consisting of a fundamental and 4 harmonic overtones, was processed using the standard (Std, Smt-LF and Smt-MF mappings. The analysis of output signals showed that the harmonic structure between overtones of all complex tones was preserved using Smt mapping. Semitone mapping preserves the harmonic structure and may in turn improve music representation for Nucleus cochlear implants. The proposed semitone mappings incorporate the use of virtual channels to allow frequencies spanning three and a half octaves to be mapped to 43 stimulation channels. A pitch difference limen test was done with normal hearing subjects discriminating pairs of pure tones with different semitone intervals which were processed by a vocoder type simulator of CI sound processing. The results showed better performance with wider semitone intervals. However, no significant difference was found between 22 and 43 channels maps.

  14. Interplay between singing and cortical processing of music: A longitudinal study in children with cochlear implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva eTorppa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Informal music activities such as singing may lead to augmented auditory perception and attention. In order to study the accuracy and development of music-related sound change detection in children with cochlear implants (CIs and normal hearing (NH aged 4-13 years, we recorded their auditory event-related potentials twice (at T1 and T2, 14-17 months apart. We compared their MMN (preattentive discrimination and P3a (attention towards salient sounds to changes in piano tone pitch, timbre, duration, and gaps. Of particular interest was to determine whether singing can facilitate auditory perception and attention of CI children. It was found that, compared to the NH group, the CI group had smaller and later timbre P3a and later pitch P3a, implying degraded discrimination and attention shift. Duration MMN became larger from T1 to T2 only in the NH group. Duration MMN became larger from T1 to T2 only in the NH group. The development of response patterns for duration and gap changes were not similar in the CI and NH groups. Importantly, CI singers had enhanced or rapidly developing P3a or P3a-like responses over all change types. In contrast, CI non-singers had rapidly enlarging pitch MMN without enlargement of P3a, and their timbre P3a became smaller and later over time. These novel results show interplay between MMN, P3a, brain development, cochlear implantation and singing. They imply an augmented development of neural networks for attention and more accurate neural discrimination associated with singing. In future studies, differential development of P3a between CI and NH children should be taken into account in comparisons of these groups. Moreover, further studies are needed to assess whether singing enhances auditory perception and attention of children with CIs.

  15. Clinical evaluation of the xDP output compression strategy for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg-Grayeli, Alexis; Guevara, Nicolas; Bebear, Jean-Pierre; Ardoint, Marine; Saaï, Sonia; Hoen, Michel; Gnansia, Dan; Romanet, Philippe; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Technological advances in the domain of digital signal processing adapted to cochlear implants (CI) are partially responsible for the ever-improving outcomes observed with this neural prosthesis. The goal of the present study was to evaluate audiometric outcomes with a new signal processing strategy implemented in Oticon Medical-Neurelec cochlear implant systems, the xDP strategy. The core of this approach is a preset-based back-end output compression system, modulating a multi-channel transfer function depending on the intensity and information content of input sounds. Twenty adult CI patients, matched for age and CI experience, were included in this study. Pure-tone thresholds and vocal audiometry scores were measured with their former signal processing strategy and with xDP. Speech perception was assessed using dissyllabic words presented in quiet, at different intensity levels: 40, 55, 70, and 85 dB SPL, and in a cocktail party noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB. Results with the xDP strategy showed, as awaited, no major modification of pure-tone thresholds. A global increase of speech perception scores was observed after a 1-month habituation period, with significant improvements for speech perception in quiet for moderate (55 dB SPL), loud speech sounds (85 dB SPL), and speech-in-noise comprehension. Subjective signal quality assessment showed a preference for Crystalis(xDP) over the former strategy. These results allow the quantification of improvements provided by the xDP signal processing strategy. PMID:26476927

  16. Relationship between Intelligence Quotient and Musical Ability in Children with Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanifar, Simin; Jafari, Zahra; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Asadi, Houman; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Children with cochlear implants (CIs) may experience few opportunities for positive musical experiences, and musical perception is therefore often not sufficiently developed. This paper investigates and discusses the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and musical ability in children with CIs compared with children with normal hearing. Materials and Methods: This was a comparative analytical study conducted in 48 children with unilateral CI and 48 normal-hearing children, 6–8 years of age, with ‘normal’ IQ and no formal music training. The average IQ score in the experimental and control groups were 105.41 and 106.31, respectively. No statistically significant differences were detected between Raven’s IQ scores in both groups. Data were collected by administering Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices IQ Tests and the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Musical Abilities (MBEMA) Test, consisting of scale, contour, interval, rhythm, and memory sections. Results: Mean total MBEMA score in the experimental and control groups was 58.93 and 72.16 (out of 100), respectively. Significant differences were evident between scores of children with CIs in comparison with their normal-hearing peers (P≤0.001). A remarkable direct correlation between IQ and musical scores in both the control (r≥0.38) and experimental (r≥0.37) groups was observed. Conclusion: IQ has a noticeable effect on music processing and facilitates the perception of various musical elements. With regard to the mutual relationship between IQ and musical skills, this study illustrates the advantage of determining music perception scores and highlights the importance of appropriate musical intervention in order to enhance auditory neural plasticity, especially in children with cochlear implantation. PMID:27738611

  17. Clinical evaluation of the xDP output compression strategy for cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorg-Grayeli, Alexis; Guevara, Nicolas; Bebear, Jean-Pierre; Ardoint, Marine; Saaï, Sonia; Hoen, Michel; Gnansia, Dan; Romanet, Philippe; Lavieille, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Technological advances in the domain of digital signal processing adapted to cochlear implants (CI) are partially responsible for the ever-improving outcomes observed with this neural prosthesis. The goal of the present study was to evaluate audiometric outcomes with a new signal processing strategy implemented in Oticon Medical-Neurelec cochlear implant systems, the xDP strategy. The core of this approach is a preset-based back-end output compression system, modulating a multi-channel transfer function depending on the intensity and information content of input sounds. Twenty adult CI patients, matched for age and CI experience, were included in this study. Pure-tone thresholds and vocal audiometry scores were measured with their former signal processing strategy and with xDP. Speech perception was assessed using dissyllabic words presented in quiet, at different intensity levels: 40, 55, 70, and 85 dB SPL, and in a cocktail party noise at a signal-to-noise ratio of +10 dB. Results with the xDP strategy showed, as awaited, no major modification of pure-tone thresholds. A global increase of speech perception scores was observed after a 1-month habituation period, with significant improvements for speech perception in quiet for moderate (55 dB SPL), loud speech sounds (85 dB SPL), and speech-in-noise comprehension. Subjective signal quality assessment showed a preference for Crystalis(xDP) over the former strategy. These results allow the quantification of improvements provided by the xDP signal processing strategy.

  18. Cochlear implantation through the round window with a straight slotted electrode array: optimizing the surgical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mom, Thierry; Bachy, Aurélie; Houette, Aubry; Pavier, Yoann; Pastourel, Rémy; Gabrillargues, Jean; Saroul, Nicolas; Gilain, Laurent; Avan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The question addressed here is how optimizing the quality of insertion through the round window with the lower morbidity, when using a straight and slotted electrode array of regular length. This retrospective analysis includes all cases implanted with a cochlear implant Digisonic SP (Neurelec-Oticon Medical) since 2004. We checked the operative charts, the depth of insertion, and the follow-up. For comparisons, contingency tables were used and a Chi-square test was performed. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. 126 cases of patients with non-malformed cochleas were implanted through the round window. The mean age was 53.8 ± 16.2 for adults and 3.6 ± 2.6 for children (24 cases). The mean follow-up was 33 ± 22 months. The straight electrode array had either a square or a soft pointed tip (n = 84). Full insertion was achieved in 79 out of 84 cases with a soft tip vs. 18 out of 42 square tips (χ (2) = 41.41, DOF = 1, p < 0.0001). Two cases were stuck at the round window niche by a prominent crista fenestrae. In all cases but one, the chorda tympany was preserved. In one case, a misrouting to the vestibule required a revision surgery. Implantation through the round window with a straight and slotted electrode array with a soft tip (Digisonic SP, Neurelec-Oticon Medical) can lead to a full insertion in 94 % of cases. Drilling out a prominent crista fenestrae is recommended. PMID:25894503

  19. Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Extended Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Nielsen, Henrik Toft;

    2015-01-01

    We present our experience of bilateral total breast reconstruction using a double-sided extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap in a case series of 10 patients. Reconstruction was successfully achieved in all cases with few complications. The median time for surgery was 275 minutes...... (200-330), and the average implant size used was 350 cm(3) (195-650). We demonstrate how the extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap allows for a swift and reliable direct to implant bilateral total breast reconstruction in a simple setting and is a valuable adjunct to our armamentarium...

  20. Survey of Cochlear Implant User Satisfaction with the Neptune™ Waterproof Sound Processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briaire, Jeroen J; Büchner, Andreas; Auletta, Gennaro; Arroyo, Helena; Zoilo, Carmen; Mancini, Patrizia; Buhagiar, Roberta; Vaid, Neelam; Mathias, Nathalie

    2016-04-20

    A multi-center self-assessment survey was conducted to evaluate patient satisfaction with the Advanced Bionics Neptune™ waterproof sound processor used with the AquaMic™ totally submersible microphone. Subjective satisfaction with the different Neptune™ wearing options, comfort, ease of use, sound quality and use of the processor in a range of active and water related situations were assessed for 23 adults and 73 children, using an online and paper based questionnaire. Upgraded subjects compared their previous processor to the Neptune™. The Neptune™ was most popular for use in general sports and in the pool. Subjects were satisfied with the sound quality of the sound processor outside and under water and following submersion. Seventy-eight percent of subjects rated waterproofness as being very useful and 83% of the newly implanted subjects selected waterproofness as one of the reasons why they chose the Neptune™ processor. Providing a waterproof sound processor is considered by cochlear implant recipients to be useful and important and is a factor in their processor choice. Subjects reported that they were satisfied with the Neptune™ sound quality, ease of use and different wearing options. PMID:27588162