WorldWideScience

Sample records for bike and ride

  1. Bike Riding and the Art of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Robert G.

    1978-01-01

    Suggestions for becoming an effective teacher and motivating students to think creatively are proposed based on the author's personal experience and theories of Rogers, Dewey, Piaget, and Maslow. Maslow's hierarchy of human needs is adapted to stages of learning readiness. (LBH)

  2. Riding Bikes: A Pastime for Every Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    People have heard the expression "It's as easy as riding a bike." But the idea of a child with special needs balancing, steering, and pedaling a bike can seem out of reach for some; especially when he may be unable to walk unaided or hold his head up without support. Physical capabilities or stamina need not keep a child from this pleasurable…

  3. Stay Safe Riding Bikes or Skating Outside

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-02

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about safety when outside, riding bikes or skating.  Created: 2/2/2011 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 2/2/2011.

  4. Bike racing, recreational riding, impact sport and bone health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmont Michael R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cycling has been shown to confer considerable benefits in terms of health, leading to reductions in death rates principally due to cardiovascular improvements and adaptation. Given the disparity between the benefits of cycling on cardiovascular fitness and previous research finding that cycling may not be beneficial for bone health, Hugo Olmedillas and colleagues performed a systematic review of the literature. They concluded that road cycling does not appear to confer any significant osteogenic benefit. They postulate that the cause of this is that, particularly at a competitive level, riders spend long periods of time in a weight-supported position on the bike. Training programs may be supplemented with impact loading to preserve bone health; however, the small increased risk of soft tissue injury must also be considered. See related commentary http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/168

  5. Comparing hiking, mountain biking and horse riding impacts on vegetation and soils in Australia and the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine Marina; Hill, Wendy; Newsome, David; Leung, Yu-Fai

    2010-01-01

    Hiking, horse riding and mountain biking are popular in protected areas in Australia and the United States of America. To help inform the often contentious deliberations about use of protected areas for these three types of activities, we review recreation ecology research in both countries. Many impacts on vegetation, soils and trails are similar for the three activities, although there can be differences in severity. Impacts include damage to existing trails, soil erosion, compaction and nutrification, changes in hydrology, trail widening, exposure of roots, rocks and bedrock. There can be damage to plants including reduction in vegetation height and biomass, changes in species composition, creation of informal trails and the spread of weeds and plant pathogens. Due to differences in evolutionary history, impacts on soil and vegetation can be greater in Australia than in the USA. There are specific social and biophysical impacts of horses such as those associated with manure and urine, grazing and the construction and use of tethering yards and fences. Mountain bike specific impacts include soil and vegetation damage from skidding and the construction of unauthorised trails, jumps, bridges and other trail technical features. There are gaps in the current research that should be filled by additional research: (1) on horse and mountain bike impacts to complement those on hiking. The methods used need to reflect patterns of actual usage and be suitable for robust statistical analysis; (2) that directly compares types and severity of impacts among activities; and (3) on the potential for each activity to contribute to the spread of weeds and plant pathogens. Additional research will assist managers and users of protected areas in understanding the relative impacts of these activities, and better ways to manage them. It may not quell the debates among users, managers and conservationists, but it will help put it on a more scientific footing. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All

  6. Overuse Injuries Associated with Mountain Biking: Is Single-Speed Riding a Predisposing Factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Lebec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though mountain bikers are at significant risk for overuse injury, there is minimal quality research describing this relationship. Single-speed mountain biking, in which participants pedal a bike with only a single gear, may place riders at even greater risk for overuse problems due to the disproportionate physical effort associated with this type of riding. The focus of this study was to provide additional perspective on overuse injuries sustained by mountain bikers and to determine if single-speed mountain biking places participants at greater risk for overuse conditions. Four hundred and four (404 mountain bikers were surveyed concerning overuse injuries sustained during the previous year. Findings indicate that 63% of respondents reported an overuse injury affecting at least one area with the most commonly reported areas being the lumbar spine, knees, hand/wrist, and cervical spine. Individuals riding single-speed mountain bikes did not have a higher incidence of overuse injuries than riders of multiple-geared bikes. However, respondents who split time between riding single-speed and multiple-geared bikes were significantly more likely to report an overuse syndrome than those only riding single-speed or multiple-geared bikes (p = 0.0104. This group of riders may be at greater risk for overuse injury due to excessive fatigue and poor biomechanics.

  7. Watching Your Back While Riding Your Bike

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Tomas; Bagalkot, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    series of investigations looking into the broader notion of integrating measures for preventive self-care with existing everyday activities (e.g daily motorcycle commute) by means of digital technology. We are guided by the concept of embodied self-monitoring grounded in theories on the embodied...... for interaction design in the domain of preventive self-care. We report on the outcome of in-situ enactments performed by four motorbike riders as co-explorers engaging with our interactive soft&hardware sketches while actually riding in traffic. Insitu enactments and follow-up interviews with the riders...

  8. Bike Infrastructures and Design Qualities: Enhancing Cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor; Jensen, Ole B.; Harder, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    as well as to describe what specific design element primarily motivated them to travel by bike. The findings highlight the critical role of fast connectivity and fast bike lanes in motivating cyclists to ride their bikes more often. It also indicates that it is challenging to ensure the perception...... infrastructures. This article aims to present findings of the research project titled Bikeability – funded by the Danish Research Council. The overall purpose of the Bikeability project is to investigate and document relations between cycling motivation from different socio- demographic groups and distinct design...

  9. Ride with Abandon: Practical Ideas to Include Mountain Biking in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Cycling and mountain biking are among the most popular fitness activities in America. Considering that the purpose of physical education is to encourage lifelong activity for all, it is logical to include lifetime activities such as mountain biking in physical education programs. Many perceived barriers to adding mountain biking in physical…

  10. Doping research on and off the bike

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest; Gleaves, John

    2014-01-01

    completely valid to say something like: “You know, I prefer the feeling of wind in my face while sitting on my bike with the firm knowledge of having a hobby that can easily take the surplus of money I should have, rather than sitting at my desk and bringing knowledge to the world and merit to my institution.......” But having spent time in Southern California, not only researching and teaching together with John Gleaves, but also riding bikes, it has become clearer how such a hobby can bring new insights and opportunities for research and knowledge....

  11. Evaluation of Factors Affecting E-Bike Involved Crash and E-Bike License Plate Use in China Using a Bivariate Probit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyong Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study is to evaluate factors affecting e-bike involved crash and license plate use in China. E-bike crashes data were collected from police database and completed through a telephone interview. Noncrash samples were collected by a questionnaire survey. A bivariate probit (BP model was developed to simultaneously examine the significant factors associated with e-bike involved crash and e-bike license plate and to account for the correlations between them. Marginal effects for contributory factors were calculated to quantify their impacts on the outcomes. The results show that several contributory factors, including gender, age, education level, driver license, car in household, experiences in using e-bike, law compliance, and aggressive driving behaviors, are found to have significant impacts on both e-bike involved crash and license plate use. Moreover, type of e-bike, frequency of using e-bike, impulse behavior, degree of riding experience, and risk perception scale are found to be associated with e-bike involved crash. It is also found that e-bike involved crash and e-bike license plate use are strongly correlated and are negative in direction. The result enhanced our comprehension of the factors related to e-bike involved crash and e-bike license plate use.

  12. Mountain biking injuries in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Kylee B; Meyers, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, the sport of mountain biking has experienced extensive growth in youth participation. Due to the unpredictable nature of outdoor sport, a lack of rider awareness and increased participation, the number of injuries has unnecessarily increased. Many believe that the actual incidence of trauma in this sport is underestimated and is just the 'tip of the iceberg'. The most common mechanism of injury is usually attributed to downhill riding and forward falling. Although rare, this type of fall can result in serious cranial and thoraco-abdominal trauma. Head and neck trauma continue to be documented, often resulting in concussions and the possibility of permanent neurological sequelae. Upper limb injuries range from minor dermal abrasions, contusions and muscular strains to complex particular fracture dislocations. These are caused by attempting to arrest the face with an outstretched hand, leading to additional direct injury. Common overuse injuries include repeated compression from the handlebars and vibration leading to neurovascular complications in the hands. Along with reports of blunt abdominal trauma and lumbar muscle strains, lower extremity injuries may include various hip/pelvic/groin contusions, patellofemoral inflammation, and various muscle strains. The primary causes of mountain biking injuries in children and adolescents include overuse, excessive fatigue, age, level of experience, and inappropriate or improperly adjusted equipment. Additional factors contributing to trauma among this age group involve musculoskeletal immaturity, collisions and falls, excessive speed, environmental conditions, conditioning and fitness status of the rider, nonconservative behavioural patterns, and inadequate medical care. The limited available data restrict the identification and understanding of specific paediatric mountain biking injuries and injury mechanisms. Education about unnecessary risk of injury, use of protective equipment, suitable bikes

  13. Borges & Bike Rides: Toward an Understanding of Autoethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O. Wamsted

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author—a full-time high school mathematics teacher and concurrent doctoral candidate in Department of Middle-Secondary Education and Instructional Technology at Georgia State University—will make a case for the use of an autoethnographic methodological tool he is calling narrative mining. He will begin by briefly summarizing his experiences attempting to write and publish autoethnography; a short story by Argentine mystery writer Jorge Luis Borges will serve as a frame to provide three examples of barriers the author believes lie between a writer and any attempt at self-knowledge. A partial solution to these barriers is proposed in the form of an examination of the personal stories a writer has told over time. An example is then shown, and a call made for a deeper look into the possible spaces opened up in a continued examination of the personal story.

  14. Barriers to children walking and biking to school--United States, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-16

    Physical activity is an important part of a healthy lifestyle; however, many children in the United States do not meet recommended levels of physical activity. Although walking and biking to school can increase physical activity among children, motor-vehicle traffic and other factors can make these activities difficult. The majority of U.S. children do not walk or bike to school, approximately one third ride a school bus, and half are driven in a private vehicle. Less than one trip in seven is made by walking or biking. To examine why the majority of children do not walk or bike to school, CDC analyzed data from the national HealthStyles Survey. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicate that long distances and dangerous motor-vehicle traffic pose the most common barriers to children walking and biking to school. Public health and community-based efforts that encourage walking and biking to school should address these barriers.

  15. Your brain on bikes: P3, MMN/N2b, and baseline noise while pedaling a stationary bike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Joanna E M; Sieben, Alex J; Holyk, Kevin R; Mathewson, Kyle E

    2017-06-01

    Increasingly, there is a trend to measure brain activity in more ecologically realistic scenarios. Normally, the confines of the laboratory and sedentary tasks mitigate sources of electrical noise on EEG measurement. Moving EEG outside of the lab requires understanding of the impact of complex movements and activities on traditional EEG and ERP measures. Here, we recorded EEG with active electrodes while participants were either riding or sitting on a stationary bike in an electrical and sound-attenuated chamber in the lab. Participants performed an auditory oddball task, pressing a button when they detected rare target tones in a series of standard frequent tones. We quantified both the levels of spectral, single-trial baseline, and ERP baseline noise, as well as classic MMN/N2b and P3 ERP components measured during both biking and sitting still. We observed slight increases in posterior high frequency noise in the spectra, and increased noise in the baseline period during biking. However, morphologically and topographically similar MMN/N2b and P3 components were measured reliably while both biking and sitting. A quantification of the power to reliably measure ERPs as a function of the number of trials revealed slight increases in the number of trials needed during biking to achieve the same level of power. Taken in sum, our results confirm that classic ERPs can be measured reliably during biking activities in the lab. Future directions will employ these techniques outside the lab in ecologically valid situations. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  16. Healthy Ride Trip Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — A dataset that shows trips taken using the Healthy Ride system by quarter. The dataset includes bike number, membership type, trip start and end timestamp, and...

  17. Dirt bikes injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgawad, A A; Maxfield, D; Tran, S; Mclean, S; Kanlic, E M

    2013-12-01

    Dirt bike riding is becoming a more popular recreational activity among children. Injuries associated with this recreational activity did not gain attention in the medical literature. The purpose of this study is to assess orthopedic injuries associated with dirt bike riding. We retrospectively studied injuries occurring in children less than 18 years old, while riding dirt bikes, that required admission to the trauma department in our level one trauma center during the period 2000-2010. There were 24 admissions (23 patients). The mean age was 13. Fourteen patients had brain injuries. Six patients had abdominal injuries. One patient died shortly after arriving to the emergency department. Fourteen patients had face and neck injuries. The average injury severity score was 8.5. Thirteen patients' admissions (54 %) had orthopedic fractures. Five of 13 patients (38 %) suffered more than one fracture. Eight patients needed orthopedic intervention (seven of these were in operating room under general anesthesia and one in the emergency department under conscious sedation). Femur fracture was the most common cause for performing surgery in this group of patients. Riding dirt bikes is not a safe recreational activity. Orthopedic injuries constitute a major component of the injuries affecting children riding dirt bikes. Orthopedic surgeons (being responsible for treating most of these children) have the obligation to warn the community against the possible dangers facing children who ride dirt bikes.

  18. Assessing the impacts of mountain biking and hiking on subalpine grassland in Australia using an experimental protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine Marina; Rossi, Sebastian; Barros, Agustina

    2011-12-01

    Mountain biking is an increasingly popular, but sometimes controversial, activity in protected areas. Limited research on its impacts, including studies comparing biking with hiking, contributes to the challenges for mangers in assessing its appropriateness. The impacts of mountain bike riding off trail were compared to those of hiking on subalpine grassland in Australia using a modification of a common trampling experimental methodology. Vegetation and soil parameters were measured immediately and two weeks after different intensities of mountain biking (none, 25, 75, 200 and 500 passes across slope, 200 pass up and down slope) and hiking (200 and 500 passes across slope). There were reductions in vegetation height, cover and species richness, as well as changes in species composition and increases in litter and soil compaction with riding. Riding up and down a moderate slope had a greater impact than riding across the slope. Hiking also affected vegetation height, cover and composition. Mountain biking caused more damage than hiking but only at high use (500 passes). Further research including other ecosystems, topography, styles of riding, and weather conditions are required, but under the conditions tested here, hiking and mountain biking appear to be similar in their environmental impacts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Blender Bikes: Blending Nutrition and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Theresa M.; Smathers, Carol A.

    2018-01-01

    Many Americans do not meet the recommendations for diet and physical activity. A blender bike can be an effective tool when coupled with hands-on activities that reinforce health recommendations. We created "Blending Nutrition and Physical Activity: An Activity Guide for Use with Blender Bikes" to use when incorporating a blender bike…

  20. Cranking Out Adventure: A Bike Leader's Guide to Trial and Error Touring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohnke, Karl

    The product of a 3,355 mile bicycle trip involving a co-ed group of teenagers and a leader (N=12), this guide to bike riding trips presents practical and philosophical insights gained by the Project Adventure leader who conducted the trip. Detailed lists of pre- and on-trip requirements are presented. Specifically, there are sections devoted to…

  1. Mountain bikes as seed dispersers and their potential socio-ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabio; Brummer, Tyler J; Pufal, Gesine

    2016-10-01

    Seed dispersal critically influences plant community composition and species distributions. Increasingly, human mediated dispersal is acknowledged as important dispersal mechanism, but we are just beginning to understand the different vectors that might play a role. We assessed the role of mountain bikes as potential dispersal vectors and associated social-ecological consequences in areas of conservation concern near Freiburg, Germany. Seed attachment and detachment on a mountain bike were measured experimentally at distances from 0 to 500 m. We assessed effects of seed traits, weather conditions, riding distance and tire combinations using generalized linear mixed effect models. Most seeds detached from the mountain bike within the first 5-20 m. However, a small proportion of seeds remained on tires after 200-500 m. Attachment was higher, and the rate of detachment slower, in semi-wet conditions and lighter seeds travelled farther. Seed dispersal by mountain bikes was moderate compared to other forms of human mediated dispersal. However, we found that lighter seeds could attach to other bike parts and remain there until cleaning which, depending on riders' preferences, might only be after 70 km and in different habitats. Ecological impacts of mountain biking are growing with the popularity of the activity. We demonstrate that mountain bikes are effective seeds dispersers at landscape scales. Thus, management to mitigate their potential to spread non-native species is warranted. We suggest bike cleaning between rides, control of non-native species at trailheads and increased awareness for recreationalists in areas of conservation concern to mitigate the potential negative consequences of seed dispersal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Joy of Biking Together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses how adults and children elicit and share their everyday experiences of cycling together in a variety of circumstances. Video data was collected of commuter cyclists, family bike rides and school bike tours. Using an ethnomethodologically informed approach to talk, mobile action......, social activities, the analysis focuses on how embodied displays of emotion are accomplished, maintained, assessed and resisted by co-riders in motion....

  3. Active living and biking: tracing the evolution of a biking system in Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Royce; Young, Garry

    2008-06-01

    In Arlington, Virginia, a steady evolutionary change in biking policy during the last three decades has yielded some of the nation's best biking assets. It has a comprehensive, well-connected, highly integrated, well-mapped, and well-signed system of shared-use paved trails, bike lanes, bike routes, and other biking assets, such as workplace showers. Understanding the conditions that led to Arlington's current biking system can provide lessons in the strategy and tactics of active-living politics. One potentially effective political strategy that was successful in Arlington is for activists to pressure elected officials to select professional managers who see bike-ways as crucial to the overall transportation system. Then it is important to formalize the government-citizen relationship through an advisory panel. Also, in Arlington, the incremental creation of biking assets helped create demand for more and better facilities. In turn, this created political support for expanding and upgrading. Finally, Arlington used potentially negative circumstances (e.g., the building of highway corridors, the introduction of the Metro) as opportunities to change the built environment in ways that have encouraged more active living.

  4. BikePGH's Pittsburgh Bike Map Geographic Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Files include data for bike lanes, protected bike lanes, trails, bike routes, shared lane markings, cautionary bike routes, and bridge data from the BikePGH...

  5. Mountain biking. Breezy ups and traumatic downs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, G.

    2010-01-01

    For more than two decades the popularity of mountain biking as a national pastime as well as a competitive sport has been undiminished. However, its related risks are not monitored as closely as those, for example, of skiing. The injuries caused by mountain biking are specific and cannot be compared with those caused by other cycling sports. This is due not only to the characteristics of the terrain but also to the readiness to assume a higher risk compared to cycle racing. The particular value of radiology is in the acute trauma setting. Most often musculoskeletal lesions must be examined and digital radiography and MRI are the most useful techniques. Severe trauma of the cranium, face, spine, thorax and abdomen are primarily evaluated with CT, particularly in dedicated trauma centers. Therefore, radiology can play a role in the rapid diagnosis and optimal treatment of the trauma-related injuries of mountain biking. Thus, the unnecessarily high economical damage associated with mountain biking can be avoided. (orig.) [de

  6. [Mountain biking : Breezy ups and traumatic downs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueller, G

    2010-05-01

    For more than two decades the popularity of mountain biking as a national pastime as well as a competitive sport has been undiminished. However, its related risks are not monitored as closely as those, for example, of skiing. The injuries caused by mountain biking are specific and cannot be compared with those caused by other cycling sports. This is due not only to the characteristics of the terrain but also to the readiness to assume a higher risk compared to cycle racing.The particular value of radiology is in the acute trauma setting. Most often musculoskeletal lesions must be examined and digital radiography and MRI are the most useful techniques. Severe trauma of the cranium, face, spine, thorax and abdomen are primarily evaluated with CT, particularly in dedicated trauma centers. Therefore, radiology can play a role in the rapid diagnosis and optimal treatment of the trauma-related injuries of mountain biking. Thus, the unnecessarily high economical damage associated with mountain biking can be avoided.

  7. Bike2Work: and the winners are...

    CERN Multimedia

    Jens Vigen, "Bike2Work" coordinator for CERN

    2015-01-01

    Bike2Work is a popular initiative to promote cycling that was launched in Switzerland in 2004. Every summer, it mobilises some 50,000 employees from more than 1100 companies and organisations across Switzerland. This year, CERN established itself as the main player in French-speaking Switzerland.   The main motivation for Bike2Work is the joy of the cycle commute. Biking contributes to your fitness and reduces pollution and congestion on the roads and in car parks. During this year’s Bike2Work, over 9 million kilometres were recorded across Switzerland! Out of these, 97,462 kilometres were pedaled by the 126 CERN teams participating in the initiative. In this friendly competition, CERN established itself as the main player in French-speaking Switzerland, although EPFL was not far behind with 124 teams. However, CERN beat EPFL by a large margin with regard to the number of kilometres cycled, as our colleagues in the canton of Vaud reached only 63,000 kilometres. Even ETH in Zurich w...

  8. Electric Bike Sharing--System Requirements and Operational Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherry, Christopher; Worley, Stacy; Jordan, David

    2010-08-01

    Bike sharing is an exciting new model of public-private transportation provision that has quickly emerged in the past five years. Technological advances have overcome hurdles of early systems and cities throughout the globe are adopting this model of transportation service. Electric bikes have simultaneously gained popularity in many regions of the world and some have suggested that shared electric bikes could provide an even higher level of service compared to existing systems. There are several challenges that are unique to shared electric bikes: electric-assisted range, recharging protocol, and bike and battery checkout procedures. This paper outlines system requirements to successfully develop and deploy an electric bike sharing system, focusing on system architecture, operational concepts, and battery management. Although there is little empirical evidence, electric bike sharing could be feasible, depending on demand and battery management, and can potentially improve the utility of existing bike sharing systems. Under most documented bike sharing use scenarios, electric bike battery capacity is insufficient for a full day of operation, depending on recharging protocol. Off-board battery management is a promising solution to address this problem. Off-board battery management can also support solar recharging. Future pilot tests will be important and allow empirical evaluation of electric bikesharing system performance. (auth)

  9. Neighborhood Design for Walking and Biking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara B.; Smith, Ken R.; Hanson, Heidi; Fan, Jessie X.; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Zick, Cathleen D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Neighborhood designs often relate to physical activity and to BMI. Purpose Does neighborhood walkability/bikeability relate to BMI and obesity risk and does moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) account for some of the relationship? Methods Census 2000 provided walkability/bikeability measures—block group proportions of workers who walk or bike to work, housing age, and population density—and National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES 2003–2006) provided MVPA accelerometer measures. Regression analyses (2011–2012) adjusted for geographic clustering and multiple control variables. Results Greater density and older housing were associated with lower male BMI in bivariate analyses, but there were no density and housing age effects in multivariate models. For women, greater proportions of neighborhood workers who walk to work (M=0.02) and more MVPA was associated with lower BMI and lower obesity risk. For men, greater proportions of workers who bike to work (M=0.004) and more MVPA was associated with lower BMI and obesity risk. For both effects, MVPA partially mediated the relationships between walkability/bikeability and BMI. If such associations are causal, doubling walk and bike-to-work proportions (to 0.04 and 0.008) would have –0.3 and –0.33 effects on the average BMIs of adult women and men living in the neighborhood. This equates to 1.5 lbs for a 64” woman and 2.3 lbs for a 69” man. Conclusions Although walking/biking to work is rare in the U.S., greater proportions of such workers in neighborhoods relate to lower weight and higher MVPA. Bikeability merits greater attention as a modifiable activity-friendliness factor, particularly for men. PMID:23415119

  10. 2013 Bike safety campaign: outcome and feedback

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    From 3 to 17 June, the HSE Unit, in collaboration with the Reception and Access Control Service, led a campaign targeting CERN cyclists.   Photo: Laëtitia Wohlgemuth. In exchange for vouchers distributed by the security guards, 195 persons received a helmet and a reflective vest as well as documents on safety issues (ex: how to adjust one’s safety helmet properly; how to avoid blind spots; what is the required equipment for bikes and bike users, etc.). These persons also took part in a survey that contained questions on their cycling habits and level of knowledge on bike safety issues. It appeared that, for instance, 43% of the participants were aware that wearing a reflective vest is mandatory whenever visibility is poor (in France). 95% gave particular attention to the need to protect their heads (by assuming that wearing a helmet is either “mandatory” or “highly recommended”). The HSE Unit provided the participants with further i...

  11. Mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders: A case study of Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long T; Nguyen, Hang T T; De Gruyter, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Motorcyclist injuries and fatalities are a major concern of many developing countries. In Vietnam, motorcycles are involved in more than 70% of all road traffic crashes. This paper aims to explore the prevalence and factors associated with mobile phone use among motorcyclists and electric bike riders, using a case study of Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional observation survey was undertaken at 12 sites, in which each site was surveyed during a two-hour peak period from 16:30 to 18:30 for two weekdays and one weekend day. A total of 26,360 riders were observed, consisting of 24,759 motorcyclists and 1601 electric bike riders. The overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding was 8.4% (95% CI: 8.06-8.74%) with calling having higher prevalence than screen operation: 4.64% (95% CI: 4.39-4.90%) vs. 3.76% (95% CI: 3.52-3.99%) respectively. Moreover, the prevalence of mobile phone use was higher among motorcyclists than electric bike riders: 8.66% (95%CI: 8.30-9.01%) vs. 4.43% (95% CI: 3.40-5.47%) respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that mobile phone use while riding was associated with vehicle type, age, gender, riding alone, weather, day of week, proximity to city centre, number of lanes, separate car lanes, red traffic light duration, and police presence. Combining greater enforcement of existing legislations with extensive education and publicity programs is recommended to reduce potential deaths and injuries related to the use of mobile phones while riding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hippotherapy and Therapeutic Riding Highlight!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, Laura, Comp.

    2007-01-01

    Horses have always been appreciated by humans for their strength, beauty, and gentle demeanor. Children, especially, have gravitated toward them and many experience their first horseback riding lesson at a young age. However, horses can play a very different role in the lives of children and adults with disabilities. Hippotherapy is physical,…

  13. California Amusement Rides and Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-three-year-old Cristina Moreno traveled from Spain to California for her honeymoon in 2000. As part of her visit, she rode the Indiana Jones amusement ride at Disneyland with her new husband. On June 25, 2000, she suffered a brain injury, and she eventually died on September 1, 2000, as a result of injuries allegedly sustained while riding…

  14. Physiological demands of downhill mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Jamie F; Drury, C Taylor; Ivey, Adam C; Warburton, Darren E R

    2012-12-01

    Mountain biking is a popular recreational pursuit and the physiological demands of cross-country style riding have been well documented. However, little is known regarding the growing discipline of gravity-assisted downhill cycling. We characterised the physiological demands of downhill mountain biking under typical riding conditions. Riding oxygen consumption (VO(2)) and heart rate (HR) were measured on 11 male and eight female experienced downhill cyclists and compared with data during a standardised incremental to maximum (VO(2max)) exercise test. The mean VO(2) while riding was 23.1 ± 6.9 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1) or 52 ± 14% of VO(2max) with corresponding heart rates of 146 ± 11 bpm (80 ± 6% HRmax). Over 65% of the ride was in a zone at or above an intensity level associated with improvements in health-related fitness. However, the participants' heart rates and ratings of perceived exertion were artificially inflated in comparison with the actual metabolic demands of the downhill ride. Substantial muscular fatigue was evident in grip strength, which decreased 5.4 ± 9.4 kg (5.5 ± 11.2%, P = 0.03) post-ride. Participation in downhill mountain biking is associated with significant physiological demands, which are in a range associated with beneficial effects on health-related fitness.

  15. Precauciones al andar en bicicleta o patinar (Stay Safe Riding Bikes or Skating Outside)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-02

    En este podcast para niños, los chicos de Kidtastics hablan sobre las medidas de seguridad que se deben observar al salir para andar en bicicleta o patinar.  Created: 2/2/2011 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 4/19/2011.

  16. MOUNTAIN BIKE, MONITORING AND HEART RATE MONITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Scotton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chi pratica sport, sia con obiettivi agonistici sia di fitness, cerca di mantenere il proprio stato di forma ad un livello che gli permetta di essere prestativo e contemporaneamente di prevenire eventi traumatici (Scotton et Al 2006; Viru, Viru 2002. L’atleta che compete, amatore o professionista, dovrebbe seguire scrupolosamente la periodizzazione (Scotton, Gollin 2006 e la programmazione più idonee ai propri scopi, privilegiando i mezzi e i metodi di allenamento più congeniali a lui e più utili per lo specifico periodo. E’ noto che quando si avvicinano le gare il tipo di allenamento seguito assomiglia sempre più alla tipologia di competizione. E’ abitudine consolidata per chi svolge una qualsiasi specialità sportiva (Scotton 2003 con finalità non agonistiche cercare di mantenere efficiente l’apparato locomotore ed i sistemi ad esso collegati (Wilmore, Costill 2005 per ottenere divertimento e, appunto, il fitness, senza considerare troppo le norme che regolano l’allenamento sportivo. Un soggetto, non professionista, indossando il cardiofrequenzimetro Polar S710i ha effettuato due sessioni di allenamento su una mountain bike da free-ride in due distinte giornate e sullo stesso percorso.Il software dello strumento consente di sovrapporre i files del medesimo giro evidenziando le somiglianze dei tratti principali delle sedute: la durata della salita e della discesa con le velocità ottenute e i km percorsi, le frequenze cardiache medie e massime relative alle singole frazioni dell’allenamento e nel totale.Obiettivo: Nel lavoro si propone di utilizzare i dati raccolti sul percorso “reale” per permettere all’atleta di replicarlo a casa o in palestra mantenendo le frequenze cardiache per il tempo indicato abbinando all’uso dei rulli, su cui è posizionata la bicicletta, anche l’impiego del cardiofrequenzimetro (Wirnitzer KC, Kornexl E 2008.

  17. Breaking Barriers to Bike Share: Insights on Equity from a Survey of Bike Share System Owners and Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The number of public bike share systems has been increasing rapidly across the United States over the past five to 10 years. To date, most academic research around bike share in the U.S. has focused on the logistics of planning and operationalizing s...

  18. Bike Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor; Harder, Henrik; Jensen, Ole B.

    Bike Infrastructures aims to identify bicycle infrastructure typologies and design elements that can help promote cycling significantly. It is structured as a case study based research where three cycling infrastructures with distinct typologies were analyzed and compared. The three cases......, the findings of this research project can also support bike friendly design and planning, and cyclist advocacy....

  19. SAFEBIKE: A Bike-sharing Route Recommender with Availability Prediction and Safe Routing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Weisheng; Chen, Fanglan; Fu, Kaiqun; Lu, Chang-Tien

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents SAFEBIKE, a novel route recommendation system for bike-sharing service that utilizes station information to infer the number of available bikes in dock and recommend bike routes according to multiple factors such as distance and safety level. The system consists of a station level availability predictor that predicts bikes and docks amount at each station, and an efficient route recommendation service that considers safety and bike/dock availability factors. It targets use...

  20. An Analysis of Technology-Related Distracted Biking Behaviors and Helmet Use Among Cyclists in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethan, Danna; Basch, Corey H; Johnson, Glen D; Hammond, Rodney; Chow, Ching Man; Varsos, Victoria

    2016-02-01

    Bicycling is becoming an increasingly utilized mode of transportation in New York City. Technology-related distracted bicycling and helmet use are behaviors that can impact bike safety. The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to determine rates and types of technology-related distracted behaviors among bicyclists in the borough of Manhattan in New York City; and (2) to assess the rate of bicycle helmet use among these cyclists. Bicyclists in five popular riding areas in Manhattan were observed for a total of 50 h using a digital video camera during summer months in 2014. Videos were coded and enumerated for the total number and gender of cyclists, type of bicycle, number wearing headphones/earbuds and/or using a mobile phone, and whether the cyclist was wearing a helmet. Almost 25,000 cyclists were observed across the five selected locations (n = 24,861). Riders were almost four times more likely not to wear a helmet on rental bikes as compared with non-rentals (Citi Bike(®) OR 3.8; 95% CI 2.5, 5.9: other rental OR 3.8; 95% CI 3.0, 4.9). Significantly increased odds of not wearing a helmet were observed for females relative to males (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1, 1.8) across varied times and locations. Overall, rates of technology-related distraction were low, with headphone use being most prevalent. Males were more likely to wear headphones/earbuds (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4, 2.9), as were cyclists on Citi Bikes relative to other rental bikes (OR 2.2; 95% CI 1.3, 3.6). Findings from this study contribute to the growing literature on distracted biking and helmet use among bike share program riders and other cyclists and can inform policymakers and program planners aiming to improve bicycle safety in urban settings.

  1. Building the BIKE: Development and Testing of the Biotechnology Instrument for Knowledge Elicitation (BIKE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Stephen B.; Rebello, Carina M.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Izci, Kemal; McClure, Bruce

    2014-10-01

    Identifying students' conceptual scientific understanding is difficult if the appropriate tools are not available for educators. Concept inventories have become a popular tool to assess student understanding; however, traditionally, they are multiple choice tests. International science education standard documents advocate that assessments should be reform based, contain diverse question types, and should align with instructional approaches. To date, no instrument of this type targeting student conceptions in biotechnology has been developed. We report here the development, testing, and validation of a 35-item Biotechnology Instrument for Knowledge Elicitation (BIKE) that includes a mix of question types. The BIKE was designed to elicit student thinking and a variety of conceptual understandings, as opposed to testing closed-ended responses. The design phase contained nine steps including a literature search for content, student interviews, a pilot test, as well as expert review. Data from 175 students over two semesters, including 16 student interviews and six expert reviewers (professors from six different institutions), were used to validate the instrument. Cronbach's alpha on the pre/posttest was 0.664 and 0.668, respectively, indicating the BIKE has internal consistency. Cohen's kappa for inter-rater reliability among the 6,525 total items was 0.684 indicating substantial agreement among scorers. Item analysis demonstrated that the items were challenging, there was discrimination among the individual items, and there was alignment with research-based design principles for construct validity. This study provides a reliable and valid conceptual understanding instrument in the understudied area of biotechnology.

  2. Setting the pace: insights and advancements gained while preparing for an FES bike race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, John; Lombardo, Lisa M; Foglyano, Kevin M; Marasco, Paul D; Triolo, Ronald J

    2017-11-17

    The reduction in physical activity following a spinal cord injury often leads to a decline in mental and physical health. Developing an exercise program that is effective and enjoyable is paramount for this population. Although functional electrical stimulation (FES) stationary cycling has been utilized in rehabilitation settings, implementing an overground cycling program for those with spinal cord injuries has greater technical challenges. Recently our laboratory team focused on training five individuals with compete spinal cord injuries utilizing an implanted pulse generator for an overground FES bike race in CYBATHLON 2016 held in Zurich, Switzerland. The advancements in muscle strength and endurance and ultimately cycling power our pilots made during this training period not only helped propel our competing pilot to win gold at the CYBATHLON 2016, but allowed our pilots to ride their bikes outside within their communities. Such a positive outcome has encouraged us to put effort into developing more widespread use of FES overground cycling as a rehabilitative tool for those with spinal cord injuries. This commentary will describe our approach to the CYBATHLON 2016 including technological advancements, bike design and the training program.

  3. Bike Sharing and the Economy, the Environment, and Health-Related Externalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Yi Qiu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, bike-sharing has experienced rapid development; however, controversies about the externalities of bike-sharing programs have arisen as well. While bike-sharing programs have impacts on traffic, the environment, and public health, the social impacts, the management, and sustainable development of bike-sharing has also been of interest. The debate regards whether there are externalities, as well as whether and how such externalities can be determined. Based on the rapidly diffused bike-sharing in China, this paper quantitatively explores bike-sharing externalities. Specifically, this paper estimates the impacts of bike-sharing on the economy, energy use, the environment, and public health. The empirical results show that bike-sharing programs have significant positive externalities. The bike-sharing systems can provide urban residents with a convenient and time-saving travel mode. We find that the bike-sharing dramatically decreases traffic, reduces energy consumption, decreasing harmful gas emissions, improves public health generally, and promotes economic growth. This study contributes to a better comprehension of the externalities of bike-sharing and provides empirical evidence of the impacts of bike-sharing. Findings suggest that bike-sharing can play a critical role in the process of urban transportation development and provide information useful for urban transportation policies.

  4. The Intermodal Bike: multi-modal integration of cycling mobility through product and process innovations in bicycle design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Francesca; Belli, Alessandro; Rinaldi, Alessandra; Tucci, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the early results of the UE-FP7 project "The Intermodal Bike". The research aim is to provide a super-compactable, super-lightweight folding bicycle as a realistic solution to graft the cycling mode onto the root of the public or private transportation systems. The folding bikes now on the international market reach weighs between 12-15 kg, with a variable footprint but occupying -when compacted- an average volume of about 100 liters. To encourage the use of this vehicle and to extend it to a larger number of users with different characteristics, the research project has set its goal in increasing as possible compactness and light weight, creating a bicycle with a volume when compacted of 20 liters (reduction factor =5), with a shape of 48 × 36 × 12 cm and a weight of 5 kg. max., ensuring stability and improving vehicle usability and efficiency, during the ride and in the phase of bike folding. To achieve this goal ergonomic and usability tests have been carried out. The tests allowed to find a posture that would ensure efficiency and comfort in the ride to as many users as possible. Parallel tests were made on the vehicle usability in the urban transport system and intermodal. The need for light weight has required special studies on the optimization of the vehicle's architecture and research on super-lightweight materials.

  5. Behavior and Development: Physical Development--"Riding Along" Outdoors!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Riding toys and push-pull toys are traditionally part of every early childhood program. Young children can develop a wide variety of skills and get numerous health benefits from riding toys if one is careful and thoughtful in setting up the riding-toy area. This article describes various types of riding toys and activity ideas to enhance…

  6. eBikes and sustainable communities : a new opportunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J. [Magna Marque, Aurora, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that more than half of all commute trips and 3 out of 4 shopping trips are under 5 miles in length. Recent polls have also suggested that nearly 20 per cent of all adults would cycle to work if safe routes, and workplace facilities were provided. This presentation suggested that funding bicycle facilities and program is a cost-effective means of reducing motor vehicle emissions and reducing congestion. Several municipalities have placed an emphasis on the provision of safe travel lanes and traffic signals for cyclists. The Velib program in Paris includes 20,600 bicycles. Velib riders are currently taking 120,000 trips per day. Bike infrastructure and bike share programs will encourage community members to participate in active transportation. Over 23 million electric bicycles were sold in 2008. It is expected that eBike sales will double in 4 years. New electric bike systems incorporate a battery-powered electric motor to supplement pedalling efforts. The hybrid technology uses a torque sensor to measure how much pressure the rider is exerting with each stroke. The electric batteries can assist riders for up to 113 km. Use of the bikes may encourage members of the community to leave their cars at home for shorter trips. tabs., figs.

  7. Age and attitude: Changes in cycling patterns of different e-bike user segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Møller, Mette

    2016-01-01

    looked into these effects by differentiating between different segments of e-bike users. We distinguished four age groups as well as three segments based on cycling attitudes and motives for the use and purchase of e-bikes: (1) enthusiastic e-bikers who showed the most positive attitudes towards e......-bikes and mainly bought an e-bike to increase cycling frequency; (2) utilitarian e-bikers who already cycled regularly before having access to an e-bike and used the e-bike particularly for practical purposes and to reduce travel time; (3) recreational e-bikers who were very positive about e-bike use but used...... at workplaces, intended to address not only instrumental but also affective motives of e-bike use....

  8. Global bike share: What the data tells us about road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Elliot; Schepers, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Bike share has emerged as a rapidly growing mode of transport in over 800 cities globally, up from just a handful in the 1990s. Some analysts had forecast a rise in the number of bicycle crashes after the introduction of bike share, but empirical research on bike share safety is rare. The goal of this study is to examine the impact of bike share programs on cycling safety. The paper has two substudies. Study 1 was a secondary analysis of longitudinal hospital injury data from the Graves et al. (2014) study. It compared cycling safety in cities that introduced bike share programs with cities that did not. Study 2 combined ridership data with crash data of selected North American and European cities to compare bike share users to other cyclists. Study 1 indicated that the introduction of a bike share system was associated with a reduction in cycling injury risk. Study 2 found that bike share users were less likely than other cyclists to sustain fatal or severe injuries. On a per kilometer basis, bike share is associated with decreased risk of both fatal and non-fatal bicycle crashes when compared to private bike riding. The results of this study suggest that concerns of decreased levels of cycling safety are unjustified and should not prevent decision makers from introducing public bike share schemes, especially if combined with other safety measures like traffic calming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  9. From cars to bikes - the feasibility and effect of using e-bikes, longtail bikes and traditional bikes for transportation among parents of children attending kindergarten: design of a randomized cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, Helga Birgit; Berntsen, Sveinung; Te Velde, Saskia J; Fegran, Liv; Fyhri, Aslak; Deforche, Benedicte; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bere, Elling

    2017-12-28

    The present study aims to increase bicycling and level of physical activity (PA), and thereby promote health in parents of toddlers, by giving access to different bicycle types. There is a need for greater understanding of e-bikes and their role in the transportation network, and further effects on PA levels and health. Moreover, longtail bikes could meet certain practical needs not fulfilled by e-bikes or traditional bikes, hence increased knowledge regarding their feasibility should be obtained. No previous studies have investigated whether providing an e-bike or a longtail bike over an extended period in a sample of parents of toddlers influence objectively assessed amount of bicycling and total PA level, transportation habits, cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and blood pressure. A randomized cross-over trial will be performed, entailing that participants in the intervention group (n = 18) complete the following intervention arms in random order: (i) three months access to an e-bicycle with trailer for child transportation (n = 6), (ii) three months access to a longtail bicycle (n = 6), and (iii) three months access to a regular bicycle with trailer (n = 6), in total nine months. Also, a control group (n = 18) maintaining usual transportation and PA habits will be included. A convenience sample consisting of 36 parents of toddlers residing in Kristiansand municipality, Southern Norway, will be recruited. Total amount of bicycling (distance and time), total level of PA, and transportation habits will be measured at baseline and in connection to each intervention arm. Cardiorespiratory fitness, body composition and blood pressure will be measured at baseline and post-intervention. Main outcome will be bicycling distance and time spent cycling. New knowledge relevant for the timely issues of public health and environmental sustainability will be provided among parents of toddlers, representing a target group of greatest importance

  10. E-bike safety: Individual-level factors and incident characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haustein, Sonja; Møller, Mette

    2016-01-01

    safety critical incident that they believed would not have happened on a conventional bike. The most frequent explanation offered for these situations was that other road users had underestimated the speed of the e-bike, followed by rider problems regulating e-bike speed. Older cyclists were more likely...... to report problems maintaining balance due to the weight of the e-bike. Preventive measures discussed include awareness campaigns and making it easier to distinguish e-bikes from conventional bicycles to address the problem of underestimation of speed. We also identified a need to familiarise with the e...

  11. Road traffic injuries among riders of electric bike/electric moped in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xujun; Yang, Yaming; Yang, Jie; Hu, Jie; Li, Yang; Wu, Ming; Stallones, Lorann; Xiang, Henry

    2018-05-19

    Electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries have become a burgeoning public health problem in China. The objective of this study was to identify the prevalence and potential risk factors of electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries among electric bike/moped riders in southern China. A cross-sectional study was used to interview 3,151 electric bike/moped riders in southern China. Electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries that occurred from July 2014 to June 2015 were investigated. Data were collected by face-to-face interviews and analyzed between July 2015 and June 2017. The prevalence of electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries among the investigated riders was 15.99%. Electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries were significantly associated with category of electric bike (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.82), self-reported confusion (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI, 1.13-2.78), history of crashes (AOR = 6.14, 95% CI, 4.68-8.07), running red lights (AOR = 3.57, 95% CI, 2.42-5.25), carrying children while riding (AOR = 1.96, 95% CI, 1.37-2.85), carrying adults while riding (AOR = 1.68, 95% CI, 1.23-2.28), riding in the motor lane (AOR = 2.42, 95% CI, 1.05-3.93), and riding in the wrong traffic direction (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI, 1.13-2.35). In over 77.58% of electric bike/moped-related road traffic crashes, riders were determined by the police to be responsible for the crash. Major crash-causing factors included violating traffic signals or signs, careless riding, speeding, and riding in the wrong lane. Traffic safety related to electric bikes/moped is becoming more problematic with growing popularity compared with other 2-wheeled vehicles. Programs need to be developed to prevent electric bike/moped-related road traffic injuries in this emerging country.

  12. The impact of uphill cycling and bicycle suspension on downhill performance during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Miller, Matthew C; Stannard, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Non-propulsive work demand has been linked to reduced energetic economy of cross-country mountain biking. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanical, physiological and performance differences and observe economy while riding a downhill section of a cross-country course prior to and following the metabolic "load" of a climb at race pace under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension) expected to alter vibration damping mechanics. Participants completed 1 lap of the track incorporating the same downhill section twice, under two conditions (hardtail and full suspension). Performance was determined by time to complete overall lap and specific terrain sections. Power, cadence, heart rate and oxygen consumption were sampled and logged every second while triaxial accelerometers recorded accelerations (128 Hz) to quantify vibration. No differences between performance times (P = 0.65) or power outputs (P = 0.61) were observed while physiological demand of loaded downhill riding was significantly greater (P  0.05) measures. This study showed minimal advantage of a full suspension bike in our trial, with further investigations over a full race distance warranted.

  13. Influence of wheel size on muscle activity and tri-axial accelerations during cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Sinclair, Jonathan; Atkins, Stephen; Rylands, Lee; Metcalfe, John

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of different mountain bike wheel diameters on muscle activity and whether larger diameter wheels attenuate muscle vibrations during cross-country riding. Nine male competitive mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) participated in the study. Riders performed one lap at race pace on 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheeled mountain bikes. sEMG and acceleration (RMS) were recorded for the full lap and during ascent and descent phases at the gastrocnemius, vastus lateralis, biceps brachii and triceps brachii. No significant main effects were found by wheel size for each of the four muscle groups for sEMG or acceleration during the full lap and for ascent and descent (P > .05). When data were analysed between muscle groups, significant differences were found between biceps brachii and triceps brachii (P biking. However, more activity was observed in the biceps brachii during 26 inch wheel descending. This is possibly due to an increased need to manoeuvre the front wheel over obstacles.

  14. Bike sharing: A review of evidence on impacts and processes of implementation and operation

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing popularity of bike sharing, there is a lack of in-depth impact and process evaluations of existing schemes, especially with regard to measuring the ‘success’ of a scheme against its original objectives. This paper is concerned with identifying and critically interpreting the available evidence on bike sharing to date, on both impacts and processes of implementation and operation. The growing yet limited evidence base suggests that bike sharing can increase cycling levels b...

  15. Performance Evaluation and Development of Virtual Reality Bike Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.Y.; Song, C.G.; Kim, N.G. [Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    This paper describes a new bike system for the postural balance rehabilitation training. Virtual environment and three dimensional graphic model is designed with CAD tools such as 3D Studio Max and World Up. For the real time bike simulation, the optimized WorldToolKit graphic library is embedded with the dynamic geometry generation method, multi-thread method, and portal generation method. In this experiment, 20 normal adults were tested to investigate the influencing factors of balancing posture. We evaluated the system by measuring the parameters such as path deviation, driving velocity, COP(center of pressure), and average weight shift. Also, we investigated the usefulness of visual feedback information by weight shift. The results showed that continuous visual feedback by weight shift was more effective than no visual feedback in the postural balance control. It is concluded this system might be applied to clinical use as a new postural balance training system. (author). 19 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Performance differences when using 26- and 29-inch-wheel bikes in Swiss National Team cross-country mountain bikers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thomas; Müller, Beat; Maier, Thomas; Wehrlin, Jon Peter

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of bike type - the 26-inch-wheel bike (26" bike) and the 29-inch-wheel bike (29" bike) - on performance in elite mountain bikers. Ten Swiss National Team athletes (seven males, three females) completed six trials with individual start on a simulated cross-country course with 35 min of active recovery between trials (three trials on a 26" bike and three trials on a 29" bike, alternate order, randomised start-bike). The course consisted of two separate sections expected to favour either the 29" bike (section A) or the 26" bike (section B). For each trial performance, power output, cadence and heart rate were recorded and athletes' experiences were documented. Mean overall performance (time: 304 ± 27 s vs. 311 ± 29 s; P < 0.01) and performance in sections A (P < 0.001) and B (P < 0.05) were better when using the 29" bike. No significant differences were observed for power output, cadence or heart rate. Athletes rated the 29" bike as better for performance in general, passing obstacles and traction. The 29" bike supports superior performance for elite mountain bikers, even on sections supposed to favour the 26" bike.

  17. Advice on 'E-Bike'. Feasibility study 'Mobility and Commuting'; Adviesrapport 'E-Bike'. Haalbaarheidsonderzoek 'Mobiliteit en Forenzen'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dasselaar, J.; Jonker, C.

    2011-01-15

    Based on the results of a study on electric bicycles the following research question and related subquestions have been answered: What are the requirements, wishes and needs of commuters to make them use e-bikes instead of the car to go to work, and thus decrease traffic jams? Based on the results, recommendations were made to the municipality of Groningen, Netherlands [Dutch] Met behulp van het onderzoek naar fietsen met elektrische trapondersteuning is er antwoord gegeven op de volgende onderzoeksvraag met de bijbehorende deelvragen: Aan welke eisen, wensen en behoeften moet een E-Bike voor forenzen voldoen waardoor ze minder vaak de auto pakken en daardoor minder files komen? Op basis van de resultaten is advies uitgebracht aan de gemeente Groningen.

  18. Primary or secondary tasks? Dual-task interference between cyclist hazard perception and cadence control using cross-modal sensory aids with rider assistance bike computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Yang; Wu, Cheng-Tse

    2017-03-01

    This research investigated the risks involved in bicycle riding while using various sensory modalities to deliver training information. To understand the risks associated with using bike computers, this study evaluated hazard perception performance through lab-based simulations of authentic riding conditions. Analysing hazard sensitivity (d') of signal detection theory, the rider's response time, and eye glances provided insights into the risks of using bike computers. In this study, 30 participants were tested with eight hazard perception tasks while they maintained a cadence of 60 ± 5 RPM and used bike computers with different sensory displays, namely visual, auditory, and tactile feedback signals. The results indicated that synchronously using different sense organs to receive cadence feedback significantly affects hazard perception performance; direct visual information leads to the worst rider distraction, with a mean sensitivity to hazards (d') of -1.03. For systems with multiple interacting sensory aids, auditory aids were found to result in the greatest reduction in sensitivity to hazards (d' mean = -0.57), whereas tactile sensory aids reduced the degree of rider distraction (d' mean = -0.23). Our work complements existing work in this domain by advancing the understanding of how to design devices that deliver information subtly, thereby preventing disruption of a rider's perception of road hazards. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation and treatment of biking and running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Sean M; Oser, Tamara K; Silvis, Matthew L

    2013-12-01

    Exercise is universally recognized as a key feature for maintaining good health. Likewise, lack of physical activity is a major risk factor for chronic disease and disability, an especially important fact considering our rapidly aging population. Biking and running are frequently recommended as forms of exercise. As more individuals participate in running-related and cycling-related activities, physicians must be increasingly aware of the common injuries encountered in these pursuits. This review focuses on the evaluation and management of common running-related and cycling-related injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Youth Walking and Biking Rates Vary by Environments around 5 Louisiana Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustat, Jeanette; Richards, Katherine; Rice, Janet; Andersen, Lori; Parker-Karst, Kathryn; Cole, Shalanda

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity in children is high, and many do not meet physical activity recommendations. The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program encourages school-aged children to walk and bike to school. We assessed the condition of the walking/biking environment around schools in Louisiana prior to the state's first SRTS program.…

  1. I like riding my bike. If it doesn't rain of course'. Accounts of embodied practices of rain in the face of climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Laura Bang

    . Secondly, the paper focuses more thoroughly on conceptualisations of cycling in rain by showing how rain is used in making socially legitimate meanings of everyday transportation practices. It shows the subtle ways in which matters of rain are used as justifications for not biking. It also shows...

  2. Proposal for optimal placement platform of bikes using queueing networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Shinya; Iwamoto, Shogo; Seki, Mutsumi; Yamaki, Naokazu

    2016-01-01

    In recent social experiments, rental motorbikes and rental bicycles have been arranged at nodes, and environments where users can ride these bikes have been improved. When people borrow bikes, they return them to nearby nodes. Some experiments have been conducted using the models of Hamachari of Yokohama, the Niigata Rental Cycle, and Bicing. However, from these experiments, the effectiveness of distributing bikes was unclear, and many models were discontinued midway. Thus, we need to consider whether these models are effectively designed to represent the distribution system. Therefore, we construct a model to arrange the nodes for distributing bikes using a queueing network. To adopt realistic values for our model, we use the Google Maps application program interface. Thus, we can easily obtain values of distance and transit time between nodes in various places in the world. Moreover, we apply the distribution of a population to a gravity model and we compute the effective transition probability for this queueing network. If the arrangement of the nodes and number of bikes at each node is known, we can precisely design the system. We illustrate our system using convenience stores as nodes and optimize the node configuration. As a result, we can optimize simultaneously the number of nodes, node places, and number of bikes for each node, and we can construct a base for a rental cycle business to use our system.

  3. Acute Effect of Virtual Reality Exercise Bike Games on College Students' Physiological and Psychological Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Nan; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2017-07-01

    Commercially available virtual reality (VR) exercise systems are extensively used in many health domains among clinical populations. However, evidence regarding the efficacy of this technology on healthy adults' health-related outcomes is unknown. This pilot study compared physiological and psychological responses following exercise on a VR-based exercise bike (VirZoom) and traditional stationary exercise bike. Twelve healthy college students (9 females; M age  = 25.01, SD = ± 4.74; M BMI  = 22.84, SD = ± 3.68) completed two separate 20-minute exercise sessions on the VR-based exercise bike and traditional stationary exercise bike. Blood pressure (BP), ratings of perceived exertion, self-efficacy, and enjoyment were assessed as primary outcomes. Dependent t-tests indicated no significant differences in mean systolic or diastolic BP changes from pre to postexercise between the VR-based exercise and traditional stationary biking sessions (all p > 0.05). Notably, participants reported significantly higher ratings of perceived exertion (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.68) during the traditional exercise biking session compared with VR-based exercise biking session. However, participants had significantly higher self-efficacy (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = -0.83) and enjoyment (p < 0.05, Cohen's d = -0.89) during the VR-based exercise biking session compared with traditional stationary biking. The commercially available VR-based exercise bike (VirZoom) may be considered an effective, enjoyable, and motivating physical activity tool. Further interventions with larger and more diverse samples and examinations of more health-related outcomes are warranted to determine optimal application of VR-based exercise programming among various populations.

  4. Bringing Bike Share to a Low-Income Community: Lessons Learned Through Community Engagement, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Kretman Stewart, Sarah; Johnson, David C.; Smith, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Background High prevalence of physical inactivity contributes to adverse health outcomes. Active transportation (cycling or walking) is associated with better health outcomes, and bike-sharing programs can help communities increase use of active transportation. Community Context The Minneapolis Health Department funded the Nice Ride Minnesota bike share system to expand to the Near North community in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Near North is a diverse, low-income area of the city where residents ...

  5. Economic impact and policy implications from urban shared transportation: The case of Pittsburgh's shared bike system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelechrinis, Konstantinos; Zacharias, Christos; Kokkodis, Marios; Lappas, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    During the last years the number of cities that have installed and started operating shared bike systems has significantly increased. These systems provide an alternative and sustainable mean of transportation to the city dwellers. Apart from the energy sustainability benefits, shared bike systems can have a positive effect on residents' health, air quality and the overall condition of the currently crumbling road network infrastructure. Anecdotal stories and survey studies have also identified that bike lanes have a positive impact on local businesses. In this study, driven by the rapid adoption of shared bike systems by city governments and their potential positive effects on a number of urban life facets we opt to study and quantify the value of these systems. We focus on a specific aspect of this value and use evidence from the real estate market in the city of Pittsburgh to analyze the effect on dwellers' properties of the shared bike system installed in the city in June 2015. We use quasi-experimental techniques and find that the shared bike system led to an increase in the housing prices (both sales and rental prices) in the zip codes where shared bike stations were installed. We further bring into the light potential negative consequences of this impact (i.e., gentrification) and discuss/propose two public policies that can exploit the impact of the system for the benefit of both the local government as well as the city dwellers.

  6. Economic impact and policy implications from urban shared transportation: The case of Pittsburgh's shared bike system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Pelechrinis

    Full Text Available During the last years the number of cities that have installed and started operating shared bike systems has significantly increased. These systems provide an alternative and sustainable mean of transportation to the city dwellers. Apart from the energy sustainability benefits, shared bike systems can have a positive effect on residents' health, air quality and the overall condition of the currently crumbling road network infrastructure. Anecdotal stories and survey studies have also identified that bike lanes have a positive impact on local businesses. In this study, driven by the rapid adoption of shared bike systems by city governments and their potential positive effects on a number of urban life facets we opt to study and quantify the value of these systems. We focus on a specific aspect of this value and use evidence from the real estate market in the city of Pittsburgh to analyze the effect on dwellers' properties of the shared bike system installed in the city in June 2015. We use quasi-experimental techniques and find that the shared bike system led to an increase in the housing prices (both sales and rental prices in the zip codes where shared bike stations were installed. We further bring into the light potential negative consequences of this impact (i.e., gentrification and discuss/propose two public policies that can exploit the impact of the system for the benefit of both the local government as well as the city dwellers.

  7. Mountain Biking Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Majid; Nourian, Ruhollah; Khodaee, Morteza

    With the increasing popularity of mountain biking, also known as off-road cycling, and the riders pushing the sport into extremes, there has been a corresponding increase in injury. Almost two thirds of acute injuries involve the upper extremities, and a similar proportion of overuse injuries affect the lower extremities. Mountain biking appears to be a high-risk sport for severe spine injuries. New trends of injury patterns are observed with popularity of mountain bike trail parks and freeride cycling. Using protective gear, improving technical proficiency, and physical fitness may somewhat decrease the risk of injuries. Simple modifications in bicycle-rider interface areas and with the bicycle (bike fit) also may decrease some overuse injuries. Bike fit provides the clinician with postural correction during the sport. In this review, we also discuss the importance of race-day management strategies and monitoring the injury trends.

  8. Promoting safe walking and biking to school: the Marin County success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Catherine E; Hubsmith, Deb; Kallins, Wendi

    2003-09-01

    Walking and biking to school can be an important part of a healthy lifestyle, yet most US children do not start their day with these activities. The Safe Routes to School Program in Marin County, California, is working to promote walking and biking to school. Using a multipronged approach, the program identifies and creates safe routes to schools and invites communitywide involvement. By its second year, the program was serving 4665 students in 15 schools. Participating public schools reported an increase in school trips made by walking (64%), biking (114%), and carpooling (91%) and a decrease in trips by private vehicles carrying only one student (39%).

  9. Urban form, demographic and socio-economic correlates of walking, cycling, and e-biking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Chunli; Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Olafsson, Anton Stahl

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This paper explores the urban form, demographic and socio-economic dependencies of walking, cycling and e-biking in Beijing based on a survey (N = 1427) of daily travel among residents in eight neighborhoods, enriched with urban form variables. The results show that walking is most...... frequently used, followed by cycling, which in turn is more frequent than e-biking. Walking and cycling are preferred when the accessibility of public facilities and services is good, while e-bikes are used when public transport provision is low. Urban form variables of population density, job employment...... be encouraged to keep on walking, cycling and e-biking even if their income situation may improve in the future....

  10. Vertigo in downhill mountain biking and road cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, Alexis; Vibert, Dominique; Bosser, Gilles; Gauchard, Gérome C; Perrin, Philippe P

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo has been described after the practice of mountain bike. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of vertigo following competitions or training sessions of downhill mountain biking (DMB) or road cycling (RC). One hundred and two DMB riders, 79 road cyclists and 73 control participants filled in a survey intended to evaluate the prevalence of vertigo in daily living activities and following competitions or training sessions. Vertigo causal factors (crashes, head trauma, fatigue, characteristics of the path/road ridden) were recorded. DMB riders and road cyclists did not report more vertigo during daily living activities than controls. But DMB riders older than 30 had more risk to report vertigo than age-matched road cyclists (OR: 5.06, 95% CI: 1.23-20.62). Road cyclists aged between 20 and 29 were 2.59-fold (95% CI: 1.06-6.27) more likely to report vertigo than controls. After competitions and training sessions, DMB riders were 2.33-fold (95% CI: 1.22-4.41) more likely to report vertigo than road cyclists. Vertigo causal factors were crash with head trauma in DMB riders and fatigue in road cyclists. Vertigo during daily living activities may be of concern for cyclists, particularly older DMB riders. The accumulation of impacts (crashes, vibrations) during the career of a DMB rider may generate micro-traumatisms of the central nervous system and/or peripheral vestibular structures, particularly the otolith organs. In RC, the pathophysiological mechanisms generating vertigo might be effort-related disturbance of homeostasis. To avoid injuries, DMB riders should be aware that vertigo may occur at the end of training sessions or competitions.

  11. Environmental supports for walking/biking and traffic safety: income and ethnicity disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chia-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigates the influence of income, ethnicity, and built environmental characteristics on the percentages of workers who walk/bike as well as on pedestrian/cyclist crash rates. Furthermore, income and ethnicity disparities are also explored. This study chose 162 census tracts in Austin as the unit of analysis. To explore income and ethnicity differences in built environments, this study examined the associations of the poverty rate, the percentage of white population, and the percentage of Hispanic population to each built environmental variable. Path models were applied to examine environmental supports of walking/biking and pedestrian/cyclist safety. Areas with high poverty rates had more biking trips and experienced more cyclist crashes, while areas with a high percentage of white population generated more walking trips and fewer pedestrian crashes. Sidewalk completeness and mixed land uses promoted walking to work but increased the crash risk for pedestrians as well. In terms of biking behaviors, road density and transit stop density both increased biking trips and cyclist crashes. Environmental designs that both encourage walking/biking trips and generate more safety threats should attract more attention from policy makers. Policies should also be more devoted to enhancing the mobility and health for areas with high poverty rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of bike lane infrastructure improvements on ridership in one New Orleans neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kathryn M; Rice, Janet; Gustat, Jeanette; Ruley, Jennifer; Spriggs, Aubrey; Johnson, Carolyn

    2013-02-01

    Incorporating cycling into daily life is one way to increase physical activity. This study examined the impact of building new bike lanes in New Orleans to determine whether more people were cycling on the street and with the flow of traffic after bike lanes were built. Through direct observation of one intervention and two adjacent streets, observers counted cyclists riding on the street and sidewalk, with and against traffic, before and after installation of the lanes. Data were tallied separately for adults, children, males, females, and by race for each location. There was an increase in cyclists on all three streets after the installation of the bike lanes, with the largest increase on the street with the new lane. Additionally, the proportion of riders cycling with traffic increased after the lanes were striped. Bike lanes can have a positive impact in creating a healthy neighborhood.

  13. Function combined method for design innovation of children's bike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Qiu, Tingting; Chen, Huijuan

    2013-03-01

    As children mature, bike products for children in the market develop at the same time, and the conditions are frequently updated. Certain problems occur when using a bike, such as cycle overlapping, repeating function, and short life cycle, which go against the principles of energy conservation and the environmental protection intensive design concept. In this paper, a rational multi-function method of design through functional superposition, transformation, and technical implementation is proposed. An organic combination of frog-style scooter and children's tricycle is developed using the multi-function method. From the ergonomic perspective, the paper elaborates on the body size of children aged 5 to 12 and effectively extracts data for a multi-function children's bike, which can be used for gliding and riding. By inverting the body, parts can be interchanged between the handles and the pedals of the bike. Finally, the paper provides a detailed analysis of the components and structural design, body material, and processing technology of the bike. The study of Industrial Product Innovation Design provides an effective design method to solve the bicycle problems, extends the function problems, improves the product market situation, and enhances the energy saving feature while implementing intensive product development effectively at the same time.

  14. Biking practices and preferences in a lower income, primarily minority neighborhood: Learning what residents want.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Anne C; Anastasio, Albert; Shaffer, Nicholas; Wu, Juan; Li, Yanping

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines if, in a lower-income minority neighborhood, bicycling practices and bicycle-environment preferences of Blacks and Hispanics were different from Whites. During the summer of 2014, surveys were mailed to 1537 households near a proposed cycle track on Malcolm X Boulevard in Roxbury, MA. On the Boulevard, intercept surveys were distributed to cyclists and observations noted about passing cyclist's characteristics. Data were analyzed from 252 returned-mailed surveys, 120 intercept surveys, and 709 bicyclists. White (100%), Hispanic (79%), and Black (76%) bicyclists shown pictures of 6 bicycle facility types in intercept surveys perceived the cycle track as safest. More White mailed-survey respondents thought bikes would not be stolen which may explain why more Hispanics (52%) and Blacks (47%) preferred to park their bikes inside their home compared with Whites (28%), with H/W B/W differences statistically significant ( p  bike compared with Whites (75%). Minority populations are biking on roads but prefer cycle tracks. They also prefer to park bikes inside their homes and bicycle with family and friends. Wide cycle tracks (bicycling with family/friends) and home bike parking should be targeted as capital investments in lower-income minority neighborhoods.

  15. Complex shoulder girdle injuries following mountain bike accidents and a review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Matthew Alexander; Makaram, Navnit; Srinivasan, Makaram S

    2016-01-01

    Background Mountain and road bike accidents are particularly common with the increased popularity of the sport. We reviewed the attendances in our emergency department over a 4-year period looking at cycling injuries to detect the level and grade of these injuries and their outcomes. Method Royal Blackburn Hospital caters for a population of 550 000. A search through the Hospital information system revealed 104 patients with fractures following mountain bike injuries. These were looked at in more detail. We present a series of 5 severe shoulder girdle injuries following mountain bike accidents in this cohort, to highlight the serious level of injury sustained in this sport. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases over the past 10 years using the keywords, mountain, biking and fracture. This yielded 7 papers. We compared our series with the literature. Results 104 fractures following mountain bike accidents between 2008 and 2011. Fractures of the upper limb were the most common (88.5%) with the clavicle being the most commonly fractured bone (28.8%). Conclusions Major scapular injuries with destruction or disruption of the four bar linkage of the shoulder girdle are very common following mountain accidents. Clavicular fractures are the commonest upper limb injury. It is easy to miss a disruption to the four-bar linkage associated with a clavicular injury. This paper highlights the severity of the injuries sustained in mountain bike accidents of the upper limb and requirement of adequate protection in this exhilarating sport. PMID:27900147

  16. Port Authority of Allegheny County Park and Rides

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset includes the GIS shapefile for Port Authority of Allegheny County's Park and Ride facilities. This layer is updated annually or on an as-needed basis...

  17. Elevator ride comfort monitoring and evaluation using smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhao, Xuefeng; Su, Wensheng

    2018-05-01

    With rapid urbanization, the demand for elevators is increasing, and their level of safety and ride comfort under vibrating conditions has also aroused interest. It is therefore essential to monitor the ride comfort level of elevators. The traditional method for such monitoring depends significantly on regular professional inspections, and requires expensive equipment and professional skill. With this regard, a new method for elevator ride comfort monitoring using a smartphone is demonstrated herein in detail. A variety of high-precision sensors are installed in a smartphone with strong data processing and telecommunication capabilities. A series of validation tests were designed and completed, and the international organization for standardization ISO2631-1997 was applied to evaluate the level of elevator ride comfort. Experimental results indicate that the proposed method is stable and reliable, its precision meets the engineering requirements, and the elevator ride comfort level can be accurately monitored under various situations. The method is very economical and convenient, and provides the possibility for the public to participate in elevator ride comfort monitoring. In addition, the method can both provide a wide range of data support and eliminate data errors to a certain extent.

  18. Extremity fractures associated with ATVs and dirt bikes: a 10-year national epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, D J; Jelsema, T; Gambone, A; Weisman, M; Petersen-Fitts, G; Whaley, J D; Sabesan, V J

    2017-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality of all-terrain vehicles and dirt bikes have been studied, as well as the association of helmet use and head injury. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the patterns of extremity fractures associated with ATVs and dirt bikes. We believe there will be unique and potentially preventable injury patterns associated with dirt bikes and three-wheeled ATVs due to the poor stability of these vehicles. Descriptive epidemiology study. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data for extremity fractures related to ATV (three wheels, four wheels, and number of wheels undefined) and dirt bike use from 2007 to 2012. Nationwide estimation of injury incidence was determined using NEISS weight calculations. The database yielded an estimate of 229,362 extremity fractures from 2007 to 2012. The incidence rates of extremity fractures associated with ATV and dirt bike use were 3.87 and 6.85 per 1000 participant-years. The largest proportion of all fractures occurred in the shoulder (27.2%), followed by the wrist and lower leg (13.8 and 12.4%, respectively). There were no differences in the distribution of the location of fractures among four-wheeled or unspecified ATVs. However, three-wheeled ATVs and dirt bikes had much larger proportion of lower leg, foot, and ankle fractures compared to the other vehicle types. While upper extremity fractures were the most commonly observed in this database, three-wheeled ATVs and dirt bikes showed increased proportions of lower extremity fractures. Several organizations have previously advocated for better regulation of the sale and use of these specific vehicles due to increased risks. These findings help illustrate some of the specific risks associated with these commonly used vehicles.

  19. Analysis of Free-floating Bike Sharing and Insights on System Operations : or Analyzing Mobility Patterns and Imbalance of Free Floating Bike Sharing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-31

    Aritra Pal (ORCID ID 0000-0002-2256-2464) Yu Zhang (ORCID ID 0000-0003-1202-626X) Changhyun Kwon (ORCID ID 0000-0001-8455-6396) Bike Sharing is a sustainable mode of urban mobility, not only for regular commuters but also for casual users and tourist...

  20. Impacts of experimentally applied mountain biking and hiking on vegetation and soil of a deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, E; Reader, R J

    2001-03-01

    Many recent trail degradation problems have been attributed to mountain biking because of its alleged capacity to do more damage than other activities, particularly hiking. This study compared the effects of experimentally applied mountain biking and hiking on the understory vegetation and soil of a deciduous forest. Five different intensities of biking and hiking (i.e., 0, 25, 75, 200 and 500 passes) were applied to 4-m-long x 1-m-wide lanes in Boyne Valley Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada. Measurements of plant stem density, species richness, and soil exposure were made before treatment, two weeks after treatment, and again one year after treatment. Biking and hiking generally had similar effects on vegetation and soil. Two weeks after treatment, stem density and species richness were reduced by up to 100% of pretreatment values. In addition, the amount of soil exposed increased by up to 54%. One year later, these treatment effects were no longer detectable. These results indicate that at a similar intensity of activity, the short-term impacts of mountain biking and hiking may not differ greatly in the undisturbed area of a deciduous forest habitat. The immediate impacts of both activities can be severe but rapid recovery should be expected when the activities are not allowed to continue. Implications of these results for trail recreation are discussed.

  1. Bringing bike share to a low-income community: lessons learned through community engagement, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretman Stewart, Sarah; Johnson, David C; Smith, William P

    2013-08-15

    High prevalence of physical inactivity contributes to adverse health outcomes. Active transportation (cycling or walking) is associated with better health outcomes, and bike-sharing programs can help communities increase use of active transportation. The Minneapolis Health Department funded the Nice Ride Minnesota bike share system to expand to the Near North community in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Near North is a diverse, low-income area of the city where residents experience health disparities, including disparities in physical activity levels. The installation of new bike share kiosks in Near North resulted in an environmental change to support physical activity. Community engagement was conducted pre-intervention only and consisted of focus groups, community meetings, and interviews. Postintervention data on bike share trips and subscribers were collected to assess intervention effectiveness. Focus group participants offered insights on facilitators and barriers to bike share and suggested system improvements. Community engagement efforts showed that Near North residents were positive about Nice Ride and wanted to use the system; however, the numbers of trips and subscriptions in Near North were low. Results show that the first season of the expansion was moderately successful in improving outreach efforts and adapting bike share to meet the needs of low-income populations. However, environmental change without adequate, ongoing community engagement may not be sufficient to result in behavior change.

  2. Injuries in mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulrapp, H; Weber, A; Rosemeyer, B

    2001-01-01

    Despite still growing attraction mountain biking as a matter of sports traumatology still lacks relevant data based on large cross-sectional surveys. To obtain an overview of risk factors, types, and main body sites of injuries occurring in mountain biking we assessed the results of a questionnaire answered by 3873 athletes. A total of 8133 single lesions were reported by 3474 athletes, 36% of whom regularly participated in competitions. The incidence of injuries in mountain biking is comparable to that in other outdoor sports, the majority of injuries being minor. Mountain biking athletes were found to have an overall injury risk rate of 0.6% per year and 1 injury per 1000 h of biking. The main risk factors included slippery road surface, cyclist's poor judgement of the situation, and excessive speed, representing personal factors that could be altered by preventive measures. Of all injuries 14% were due to collision with some part of the bike, especially the pedals and the handlebar. While 75% of the injuries were minor, such as skin wounds and simple contusions, 10% were so severe that hospitalization was required. A breakdown of the injuries according to body site and frequency of occurrence is presented.

  3. Pediatric fractures during skateboarding, roller skating, and scooter riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalavras, Charalampos; Nikolopoulou, Georgia; Essin, Daniel; Manjra, Nahid; Zionts, Lewis E

    2005-04-01

    Skateboarding, roller skating, and scooter riding are popular recreational and sporting activities for children and adolescents but can be associated with skeletal injury. The purpose of this study is to describe the frequency and characteristics of fractures resulting from these activities. Fractures from skateboarding, roller skating, and scooter riding compose a considerable proportion of pediatric musculoskeletal injuries. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Demographic data and injury characteristics were analyzed for all patients who presented to the pediatric fracture clinic of the level I trauma center from January 2001 to May 2002 after sustaining fractures due to skateboarding, roller skating, and scooter riding. Among a total of 2371 fractures, the authors identified 325 fractures (13.7%) that occurred during one of these activities. There were 187 patients (mean age, 13 years; 95% male) who sustained 191 skateboard-related fractures, 64 patients (mean age, 10.8 years; 54% male) who sustained 65 fractures while roller skating, and 66 patients (mean age, 9.7 years; 64% male) who sustained 69 fractures while riding a scooter. The forearm was fractured most often, composing 48.2% of skate-boarding fractures, 63.1% of roller-skating fractures, and 50.7% of fractures due to scooter riding. Of the forearm fractures, 94% were located in the distal third. In the skateboarding group, 10 of 191 (5.2%) fractures were open injuries of the forearm, compared to 6 of 2046 (0.3%) fractures caused by other mechanisms of injury (significant odds ratio, 18.8). Skateboarding, roller-skating, and scooter-riding accidents result in a large proportion of pediatric fractures. An open fracture, especially of the forearm, was more likely to be caused by skateboarding than by other mechanisms of injury. Use of wrist and forearm protective equipment should be considered in all children who ride a skateboard.

  4. Dental injuries in mountain biking--a survey in Switzerland, Austria, Germany and Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kathrin E; Persic, Robert; Pohl, Yango; Krastl, Gabriel; Filippi, Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Mountain biking is considered an extreme sport, causing not only head and neck injuries, but also injuries to every part of the body. Using standardised interview, the aim of this work was to survey the frequency of dental injuries in mountain biking, as well as the behaviour of athletes after experiencing dental trauma, depending on their intensity level. Furthermore, habits of wearing helmets and mouthguards as well as knowledge about the tooth rescue kit were investigated. A total of 423 male mountain bikers from Germany, Italy, Austria and Switzerland were surveyed for this study, including 50 juniors from Switzerland. 27 athletes (5.7%) had endured tooth accidents in mountain biking. Only 246 (52%) were aware of the fact that avulsed teeth can be replanted, and only 30 individuals knew about the tooth rescue kit (6.3%). 71.9% (n=340) were familiar with mouthguards; however, only 21 individuals (4.4%) used mouthguards while mountain biking. The results show that where mountain biking is concerned, more information about prevention is required.

  5. Lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries for the Chinese electric bike market and implications on future technology advancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Burke, Andrew F.; Wei, Xuezhe

    2007-01-01

    China has been experiencing a rapid increase in battery-powered personal transportation since the late 1990s due to the strong growth of the electric bike and scooter (i.e. e-bike) market. Annual sales in China reached 17 million bikes year -1 in 2006. E-bike growth has been in part due to improvements in rechargeable valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery technology, the primary battery type for e-bikes. Further improvements in technology and a transition from VRLA to lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will impact the future market growth of this transportation mode in China and abroad. Battery performance and cost for these two types are compared to assess the feasibility of a shift from VRLA to Li-ion battery e-bikes. The requirements for batteries used in e-bikes are assessed. A widespread shift from VRLA to Li-ion batteries seems improbable in the near future for the mass market given the cost premium relative to the performance advantages of Li-ion batteries. As both battery technologies gain more real-world use in e-bike applications, both will improve. Cell variability is a key problematic area to be addressed with VRLA technology. For Li-ion technology, safety and cost are the key problem areas which are being addressed through the use of new cathode materials. (author)

  6. Acute hand and wrist injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kevin; Meredith, Steve; Demsey, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Recreational mountain biking continues to increase in popularity and is a significant source of traumatic injury, including injuries to the hand and wrist. A prospective survey of all hand and wrist injuries sustained while participating in recreational mountain biking presenting to the emergency department at the Municipality of Whistler and the District of Squamish was conducted over a 12-month consecutive period. An analysis of 765 unique emergency department visits with 1,079 distinct injuries was performed. Of these injuries, 511 were sustained to the upper limb. Injury to the metacarpal and metacarpal phalangeal joints was the most common hand injury (52) followed by proximal phalanx and proximal interphalangeal joint (20). Mountain biking is a frequent source of a variety of upper limb trauma, and preventative efforts are necessary to minimize the burden of these injuries.

  7. Conversion Of An Ordinary N Bicycle Into An Electric Bike And Related Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Janavičius

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An electric bicycle as a transport and leisure vehicle is expected to have a promising future. Currently, he market offers a great choice of factory electric bicycles and conversion kits to remake an ordinary bicycle into an electric bike. Also, the increasing number of electric vehicles is determined by the reduction in costs for manufacturing of batteries and an evolution in battery technology. This article presents the implementation of an electric bike by selecting the “Golden Motor Technology” company’s electric front wheel conversion kit MagicPie3 and 16 cell 10Ah LiFePO4 battery. After installation of the engine and other components, experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance characteristics of the electric bike and check the manufacturer’s specifications.

  8. Bike Desks in the Office: Physical Health, Cognitive Function, Work Engagement, and Work Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeyns, Tine; de Geus, Bas; Bailey, Stephen; De Pauw, Kevin; Decroix, Lieselot; Van Cutsem, Jeroen; Meeusen, Romain

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal effect of implementing bike desks in an office setting on physical health, cognition, and work parameters. Physical health, cognitive function, work engagement, and work performance measured before (T0) and after (T2) the intervention period were compared between office workers who used the bike desk (IG, n = 22) and those who did not (CG, n = 16). The IG cycled approximately 98 minutes/week. The IG showed a significantly lower fat percentage and a trend toward a higher work engagement at T2 relative to T0, while this was not different for the CG. No effects on other parameters of health, cognition, or work performance were found. Providing bike desks in the office positively influences employees' fat percentage and could positively influence work engagement without compromising work performance.

  9. Biking practices and preferences in a lower income, primarily minority neighborhood: Learning what residents want

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C. Lusk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines if, in a lower-income minority neighborhood, bicycling practices and bicycle-environment preferences of Blacks and Hispanics were different from Whites. During the summer of 2014, surveys were mailed to 1537 households near a proposed cycle track on Malcolm X Boulevard in Roxbury, MA. On the Boulevard, intercept surveys were distributed to cyclists and observations noted about passing cyclist's characteristics. Data were analyzed from 252 returned-mailed surveys, 120 intercept surveys, and 709 bicyclists. White (100%, Hispanic (79%, and Black (76% bicyclists shown pictures of 6 bicycle facility types in intercept surveys perceived the cycle track as safest. More White mailed-survey respondents thought bikes would not be stolen which may explain why more Hispanics (52% and Blacks (47% preferred to park their bikes inside their home compared with Whites (28%, with H/W B/W differences statistically significant (p < 0.05. More Hispanic (81% and Black (54% mailed-survey respondents thought they would bicycle more if they could bicycle with family and friends compared with Whites (40%. Bicyclists observed commuting morning and evening included Blacks (55%, Whites (36% and Hispanics (9%. More Whites (68% wore helmets compared with Hispanics (21% and Blacks (17% (p < 0.001. More Blacks (94% and Hispanics (94% rode a mountain bike compared with Whites (75%. Minority populations are biking on roads but prefer cycle tracks. They also prefer to park bikes inside their homes and bicycle with family and friends. Wide cycle tracks (bicycling with family/friends and home bike parking should be targeted as capital investments in lower-income minority neighborhoods.

  10. Mobile EEG on the bike: disentangling attentional and physical contributions to auditory attention tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Rob; Hunyadi, Borbála; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In the past few years there has been a growing interest in studying brain functioning in natural, real-life situations. Mobile EEG allows to study the brain in real unconstrained environments but it faces the intrinsic challenge that it is impossible to disentangle observed changes in brain activity due to increase in cognitive demands by the complex natural environment or due to the physical involvement. In this work we aim to disentangle the influence of cognitive demands and distractions that arise from such outdoor unconstrained recordings. Approach. We evaluate the ERP and single trial characteristics of a three-class auditory oddball paradigm recorded in outdoor scenario’s while peddling on a fixed bike or biking freely around. In addition we also carefully evaluate the trial specific motion artifacts through independent gyro measurements and control for muscle artifacts. Main results. A decrease in P300 amplitude was observed in the free biking condition as compared to the fixed bike conditions. Above chance P300 single-trial classification in highly dynamic real life environments while biking outdoors was achieved. Certain significant artifact patterns were identified in the free biking condition, but neither these nor the increase in movement (as derived from continuous gyrometer measurements) can explain the differences in classification accuracy and P300 waveform differences with full clarity. The increased cognitive load in real-life scenarios is shown to play a major role in the observed differences. Significance. Our findings suggest that auditory oddball results measured in natural real-life scenarios are influenced mainly by increased cognitive load due to being in an unconstrained environment.

  11. Pedelec, the electric assisted bike : market and product opportunities in Canada 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, A.

    2002-01-01

    The mission statement of Airstream Technologies Corp. is to become the Canadian leader in marketing and distribution of advanced personal hybrid electric vehicles. This Power Point presentation describes the trends of the bicycle industry, with reference to environment, air pollution and urban transport. A new role is emerging for the bicycle as society ages and peoples' attitudes towards health awareness changes. A graph depicting the bicycle market size in major countries around the world showed that China is the world leader in market size, followed by the European Union, United States and Japan, with Canada ranking at number 12 out of 17 countries. The paper presented the Pedelec electric bike, a completely new class of vehicle which is neither a motorcycle nor a bicycle. The idea was first developed by Panasonic/National Bicycle Co. in 1978. Since then, the technology has evolved, enabling lightweight, long-range bikes. In a Pedelec, the motor is linked to muscle power, unlike a classic electric bike in which the motor is independent from pedalling. The pedal electric cycle helps the user by delivering aid when pedaling becomes strenuous. The electric motor augments the pedaling action and is only active while pedaling. The intelligent battery system allows for greater range and more precise readout of remaining charge. In major cities in Japan and China, there are currently many parking facilities with outlets for charging these bikes. The environmental benefits of these bikes include zero emission transportation and no noise. The bikes range in price from $1500 to $3000 CDN. They are perceived to be just as safe as regular bicycles. The market outlook for the bikes appears promising with potential buyers being enthusiastic baby boomers, retirees, and youth. The paper describes some of the current and future models suitable for the Canadian marketplace and describes a possible rental infrastructure. Pedelec is already federally legislated. The bikes are legal

  12. Measuring Systemic Impacts of Bike Infrastructure Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    This paper qualitatively identifies the impacts of bicycle infrastructure on all roadway users, including safety, operations, and travel route choice. Bicycle infrastructure includes shared lanes, conventional bike lanes, and separated bike lanes. Th...

  13. Road Cycling and Mountain Biking Produces Adaptations on the Spine and Hamstring Extensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyor, J M; Zabala, M

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were as follows: 1) to analyse the influence of training in road cycling or cross-country mountain biking on sagittal spinal curvatures, pelvic tilt and trunk inclination in cyclists of both cycling modalities; 2) to evaluate the specific spinal posture and pelvic tilt adopted on the road bicycle and cross-country mountain bike; and 3) to compare the spinal sagittal capacity of flexion and pelvic tilt mobility as well as hamstring muscle extensibility among road cyclists, cross-country mountain bikers and non-cyclists. Thirty matched road cyclists, 30 mountain bikers and 30 non-cyclists participated in this study. The road cyclists showed significantly greater thoracic kyphosis and trunk inclination than did the mountain bikers and non-cyclists in a standing posture. On the bicycle, the road bicycling posture was characterised by greater lumbar flexion and more significant anterior pelvic tilt and trunk inclination compared with the mountain biking posture. The thoracic spine was more flexed in mountain biking than in road cycling. Road cyclists had significantly greater hamstring muscle extensibility in the active knee extension test, and showed greater anterior pelvic tilt and trunk inclination capacity in the sit-and-reach test, compared with mountain bikers and non-cyclists. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Extremity Fractures Associated With ATVs and Dirt Bikes: A 6 Year National Epidemiological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambone, Andrew; Lombardo, Daniel Joseph; Jelsema, Timothy; Sabesan, Vani

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: All-terrain vehicle (ATV) and dirt bike use is increasing in the US and is associated with risk of traumatic injury. Extremity fractures are common injures associated with these vehicles. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the patterns extremity fractures associated with ATVs and dirt bikes. Our hypothesis is that these different vehicles will result in similar rates of high impact injuries, but differences in vehicle stability will result in greater proportions of upper extremity fractures associated with ATV use. Methods: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) was used to acquire data for extremity fractures related to ATV (3-wheels, 4-wheels, and number of wheels undefined) and dirt bike use from 2007-2012. Locations were coded as shoulder, upper arm, elbow, lower arm, wrist, hand, upper leg, knee, lower leg, ankle, foot, and toe. The data were stratified according to age and gender for each year. Incidence rates were calculated on a per vehicle basis using previous estimates of the number of ATVs and dirt bikes in the country. Results: The database yielded an estimate of 229,362.52 extremity fractures from 2007-2012. An estimated total of 130,319.20 fractures were associated with ATVs, while 99,043.37 were associated with dirt bikes. The incidence rates of extremity fractures associated with ATV and dirt bike use were 3.87 and 6.85 per 1000 vehicle-years. Most fractures were in patients 10-19 years of age, after which the number of fractures decreased with age. The largest proportion of all fractures occurred in the shoulder (27.19%), followed by the wrist and lower leg (13.77% and 12.36%, respectively). This distribution of fractures was consistent among ATV use for all age groups except in the 0-9 year olds, where the lower arm and wrist were the most commonly fractured locations. Fracture distribution associated with dirt bike use also followed this general pattern, with the exception of 0-9 and 10-19 year

  15. Cycling for Transportation in Sao Paulo City: Associations with Bike Paths, Train and Subway Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florindo, Alex Antonio; Barrozo, Ligia Vizeu; Turrell, Gavin; Barbosa, João Paulo Dos Anjos Souza; Cabral-Miranda, William; Cesar, Chester Luiz Galvão; Goldbaum, Moisés

    2018-03-21

    Cities that support cycling for transportation reap many public health benefits. However, the prevalence of this mode of transportation is low in Latin American countries and the association with facilities such as bike paths and train/subway stations have not been clarified. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the relationship between bike paths, train/subway stations and cycling for transportation in adults from the city of Sao Paulo. We used data from the Sao Paulo Health Survey ( n = 3145). Cycling for transportation was evaluated by a questionnaire and bike paths and train/subway stations were geocoded using the geographic coordinates of the adults' residential addresses in 1500-m buffers. We used multilevel logistic regression, taking account of clustering by census tract and households. The prevalence of cycling for transportation was low (5.1%), and was more prevalent in males, singles, those active in leisure time, and in people with bicycle ownership in their family. Cycling for transportation was associated with bike paths up to a distance of 500 m from residences (OR (Odds Ratio) = 2.54, 95% CI (Confidence interval) 1.16-5.54) and with the presence of train/subway stations for distances >500 m from residences (OR = 2.07, 95% CI 1.10-3.86). These results are important to support policies to improve cycling for transportation in megacities such as Sao Paulo.

  16. Active transportation among elementary-aged students: walking or biking to and from school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney Knollenberg; Pavlina Latkova; Christine Vogt; Ariel Rodriguez

    2009-01-01

    Heightened attention is being drawn to the health conditions linked to physical inactivity, particularly in children. Encouraging students to walk and bike to school encourages them to develop healthier lifestyles and to choose nonmotorized transportation at other times. The Safe Routes to School program, administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation National...

  17. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect.

  18. Bike Desks in the Classroom: Energy Expenditure, Physical Health, Cognitive Performance, Brain Functioning, and Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeyns, Tine; de Geus, Bas; Bailey, Stephen; Decroix, Lieselot; Van Cutsem, Jeroen; De Pauw, Kevin; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity is positively associated with physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of bike desks in the classroom on adolescents' energy expenditure, physical health, cognitive performance, brain functioning and academic performance. Forty-four adolescents were randomly assigned to control group (CG) or intervention group (IG). During 5 months, the IG used a bike desk for 4 class hours/week. Energy expenditure was measured during 6 consecutive days. Anthropometric parameters, aerobic fitness, academic performance, cognitive performance and brain functioning were assessed before (T0) and after (T1) the intervention. Energy expenditure of the IG was significantly higher during the class hours in which they used the bike desks relative to normal class hours. The CG had a significantly higher BMI at T1 relative to T0 while this was not significantly different for the IG. Aerobic fitness was significantly better in the IG at T1 relative to T0. No significant effects on academic performance cognitive performance and brain functioning were observed. As the implementation of bike desks in the classroom did not interfere with adolescents' academic performance, this can be seen as an effective means of reducing in-class sedentary time and improving adolescents' physical health.

  19. Economic impact and policy implications from urban shared transportation: The case of Pittsburgh’s shared bike system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Christos; Kokkodis, Marios; Lappas, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    During the last years the number of cities that have installed and started operating shared bike systems has significantly increased. These systems provide an alternative and sustainable mean of transportation to the city dwellers. Apart from the energy sustainability benefits, shared bike systems can have a positive effect on residents’ health, air quality and the overall condition of the currently crumbling road network infrastructure. Anecdotal stories and survey studies have also identified that bike lanes have a positive impact on local businesses. In this study, driven by the rapid adoption of shared bike systems by city governments and their potential positive effects on a number of urban life facets we opt to study and quantify the value of these systems. We focus on a specific aspect of this value and use evidence from the real estate market in the city of Pittsburgh to analyze the effect on dwellers’ properties of the shared bike system installed in the city in June 2015. We use quasi-experimental techniques and find that the shared bike system led to an increase in the housing prices (both sales and rental prices) in the zip codes where shared bike stations were installed. We further bring into the light potential negative consequences of this impact (i.e., gentrification) and discuss/propose two public policies that can exploit the impact of the system for the benefit of both the local government as well as the city dwellers. PMID:28859121

  20. All you need to know on... EU regulations for e-bikes, pedelecs, and speed pedelecs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    For clarity, in the following article pedelec means a bicycle with a motor that only functions on condition the cyclist pedals, whilst e-bike means a bicycle with a motor that functions by turning the throttle, so irrespective of the cyclist pedalling. The term electric bicycle is generic and

  1. Mountain Biking at Tsali: An Assessment of Users, Preferences, Conflicts, and Management Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Donald B.K. English

    2002-01-01

    Tsali Recreation Area is part of the Cheoah Ranger District of the Nantahala National Forest. Overlooking the Great Smoky Mountains, it is one of the premier mountain biking sites in the Eastern United States. The results of a 13-month on-site survey of 1,359 Tsali visitors examine the demographics, behavior, current trip profile, and attitudes toward user fees,...

  2. Free riding and the provision of candy bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, M.A.; Kooreman, P.

    A wealth of experimental literature studies the effect of repetition and group size on the extent of free riding in the provision of public goods. In this paper, we use data from honor systems for candy bars in 166 firms to test whether such effects can be found outside the laboratory. We find that

  3. Characteristics of single-vehicle crashes with e-bikes in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertach, Patrizia; Uhr, Andrea; Niemann, Steffen; Cavegn, Mario

    2018-08-01

    In Switzerland, the usage and accident numbers of e-bikes have strongly increased in recent years. According to official statistics, single-vehicle accidents constitute an important crash type. Up to date, very little is known about the mechanisms and causes of these crashes. To gain more insight, a survey was conducted among 3658 e-cyclists in 2016. The crash risk and injury severity were analysed using logistic regression models. 638 (17%) e-cyclists had experienced a single-vehicle accident in road traffic since the beginning of their e-bike use. Risk factors were high riding exposure, male sex, and using the e-bike mainly for the purpose of getting to work or school. There was no effect of age on the crash risk. Skidding, falling while crossing a threshold, getting into or skidding on a tram/railway track and evasive actions were the most important accident mechanisms. The crash causes mentioned most often were a slippery road surface, riding too fast for the situation and inability to keep the balance. Women, elderly people, riders of e-bikes with a pedal support up to 45 km/h and e-cyclists who considered themselves to be less fit in comparison to people of the same age had an increased risk of injury. This study confirms the high relevance of single-vehicle crashes with e-bikes. Measures to prevent this type of accident could include the sensitisation of e-cyclists regarding the most common accident mechanisms and causes, a regular maintenance of bicycle pathways, improvements regarding tram and railway tracks and technological advancements of e-bikes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Dirt bikes and all terrain vehicles: the real threat to pediatric kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yang; Gaines, Barbara A

    2007-10-01

    Recent reviews show that bicycles are the major cause of significant renal injury with few injuries occurring during contact sports. All-terrain vehicles are also responsible for significant pediatric renal trauma. We determined whether dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles cause more significant renal injuries than contact sports. A retrospective review of our pediatric trauma database revealed 115 consecutive patients treated for renal trauma from 2000 to 2005. A total of 20 bicycle injuries occurred, including 6 on dirt bikes. A total of 13 all-terrain vehicle injuries occurred, including 4 involving rollovers. A total of 12 contact sport injuries occurred, including 2 during pick-up games. The mean grade of renal injury was compared among the mechanisms, with grades III-V considered high grade. In descending order of renal injury the mechanisms were dirt bike (2.8), all-terrain vehicle rollover (2.8), bicycle (2.3), all-terrain vehicle (2.1), contact sports (1.8) and organized contact sports (1.4). Dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicle rollovers caused significantly greater renal trauma than organized contact sports (2.8 vs 1.4, p = 0.007 and 0.02, respectively), whereas overall bicycle and all-terrain vehicle accidents resulted in similar renal trauma grades compared to those of all contact sports. The 2 high grade renal injuries during contact sports occurred during pick-up football games without protective gear. Physician advice regarding children with a solitary kidney should include avoiding dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles. Efforts to limit all-terrain vehicle use in children younger than 16 years would decrease the risk of significant renal injury in this population more effectively than limiting contact sports participation.

  5. Characteristics explaining performance in downhill mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidley, Joel B; MacGregor, Alexandra L; Martin, Caoimhe; Arthur, Calum A; Macdonald, Jamie H

    2015-03-01

    To identify physiological, psychological, and skill characteristics that explain performance in downhill (DH) mountain-bike racing. Four studies were used to (1) identify factors potentially contributing to DH performance (using an expert focus group), (2) develop and validate a measure of rider skill (using video analysis and expert judge evaluation), (3) evaluate whether physiological, psychological, and skill variables contribute to performance at a DH competition, and (4) test the specific contribution of aerobic capacity to DH performance. STUDY 1 identified aerobic capacity, handgrip endurance, anaerobic power, rider skill, and self-confidence as potentially important for DH. In study 2 the rider-skill measure displayed good interrater reliability. Study 3 found that rider skill and handgrip endurance were significantly related to DH ride time (β=-0.76 and -0.14, respectively; R2=.73), with exploratory analyses suggesting that DH ride time may also be influenced by self-confidence and aerobic capacity. Study 4 confirmed aerobic capacity as an important variable influencing DH performance (for a DH ride, mean oxygen uptake was 49±5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), and 90% of the ride was completed above the 1st ventilatory threshold). In order of importance, rider skill, handgrip endurance, self-confidence, and aerobic capacity were identified as variables influencing DH performance. Practically, this study provides a novel assessment of rider skill that could be used by coaches to monitor training and identify talent. Novel intervention targets to enhance DH performance were also identified, including self-confidence and aerobic capacity.

  6. A Bike Built for Magnetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, U.; Segev, A.; Lyakhovsky, V.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the magnetic signature of the subsurface geology is crucial for structural, groundwater, earthquake propagation, and mineral studies. The cheapest measuring method is by walking with sensors. This approach yields high-resolution maps, yet its coverage is limited. We invented a new design that records magnetic data while riding a bicycle. The new concept offers an efficient, low-cost method of collecting high-resolution ground magnetic field data over rough terrain where conventional vehicles dare not venture. It improves the efficiency of the traditional method by more than five times. The Bike-magnetic scales up ground magnetism from a localized site survey to regional coverage. By now we covered 3300 square KM (about the size of Rhode Island) across northern Israel, in profile spacing of 1-2 km. Initial Total Magnetic Intensity maps reveal a myriad of new features that were not detected by the low-resolution regional aeromagnetic survey that collected data from 1000 m height.

  7. Bike to Work: On yer bike!

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Sign up now for "Bike to Work" initiative! It's the best way to combine a gesture for the environment with an action for your health!      This year CERN takes part again in the Swiss national campaign "Bike to Work", which is expected to attract more than 50,000 participants. In teams of four, colleagues will encourage each other to cycle to work throughout the month of June. Last year CERN was the organization in French-speaking Switzerland with the most participants; 126 teams pedaled some 97,462 kilometers. And several of the nice prizes were given to CERN participants. Let’s aim to keep our position at the top of the leaderboard in 2016!  Participating is easy! Simply get together with three of your colleagues and register your "Bike to Work" team online before 31 May. There are no fees for registering teams, there is no mi...

  8. Biking Is Booming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdell, William H.; Wicks, Carol A.

    1978-01-01

    One hundred thousand bicycle-motor vehicle accidents will occur this year. Close to 1,100 of the mishaps will result in death. Education is the first, last and best hope for cyclists and motorists alike and one facet of bike safety programs is teaching students to understand a machine they may take for granted. Here are some ideas for starters.…

  9. Bike to work safely

    CERN Multimedia

    Simon Baird

    2016-01-01

    As the fine weather appears and CERN fills up with summer visitors, the number of people cycling to and from CERN and around the CERN campus rises dramatically – and so does the number of accidents involving bicycles. So far this summer, there have been 10 reported accidents, all of which could have been avoided. There are many things that road users of all kinds can do to make cycling safer and stop that number rising any further.   If you’re on a bike, make sure you’re visible by using lights and wearing high-visibility clothing. Wear a helmet, and remember that you are subject to the same rules of the road as any other vehicle. There’s also an online course in the SIR application on ‘Road traffic-bike riding’, which is freely available for you to follow. If you’re a motorised vehicle user, be sensitive to cyclists. Bike lanes and cycle paths are for cyclists, so leave them clear, and when overtaking a bike, leave plenty of room...

  10. Neighborhood design for walking and biking: physical activity and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barbara B; Smith, Ken R; Hanson, Heidi; Fan, Jessie X; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori; Zick, Cathleen D

    2013-03-01

    Neighborhood designs often relate to physical activity and to BMI. Does neighborhood walkability/bikeability relate to BMI and obesity risk and does moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) account for some of the relationship? Census 2000 provided walkability/bikeability measures-block group proportions of workers who walk or bike to work, housing age, and population density-and National Health and Nutrition Examination Study (NHANES 2003-2006) provided MVPA accelerometer measures. Regression analyses (2011-2012) adjusted for geographic clustering and multiple control variables. Greater density and older housing were associated with lower male BMI in bivariate analyses, but there were no density and housing age effects in multivariate models. For women, greater proportions of neighborhood workers who walk to work (M=0.02) and more MVPA was associated with lower BMI and lower obesity risk. For men, greater proportions of workers who bike to work (M=0.004) and more MVPA was associated with lower BMI and obesity risk. For both effects, MVPA partially mediated the relationships between walkability/bikeability and BMI. If such associations are causal, doubling walk and bike-to-work proportions (to 0.04 and 0.008) would have -0.3 and -0.33 effects on the average BMIs of adult women and men living in the neighborhood. This equates to 1.5 pounds for a 64-inch-tall woman and 2.3 pounds for a 69-inch-tall man. Although walking/biking to work is rare in the U.S., greater proportions of such workers in neighborhoods relate to lower weight and higher MVPA. Bikeability merits greater attention as a modifiable activity-friendliness factor, particularly for men. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neighborhood design and rates of walking and biking to elementary school in 34 California communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braza, Mark; Shoemaker, Wendy; Seeley, Anne

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between neighborhood design and rates of students walking and biking to elementary school. Pairwise correlations and multiple regression models were estimated based on a cross-sectional study of elementary schools and their surrounding neighborhoods. Setting and Subjects. Thirty-four (23%) of 150 California public elementary schools holding October 1999 Walk to School Day events participated in the study. Teachers asked fifth-grade students how they arrived to school 1 week before Walk to School Day. 1990 U.S. Census data measured population density and number of intersections per street mile, whereas 1998-1999 California Department of Education data measured school size, the percentage of students receiving public welfare, and the percentage of students of various ethnicities. Population density (p = .000) and school size (p = .053) were significantly associated with walking and biking rates in regression models controlling for number of intersections per street mile, the percentage of students receiving public welfare, and the percentage of students of various ethnicities. The number of intersections per street mile was associated with walking and biking rates in pairwise correlations (p = .003) but not in regression models. The results support the hypothesis that the walking and biking rates are higher in denser neighborhoods and to smaller schools but do not support the hypothesis that rates are higher in neighborhoods with a high number of intersections per street mile. We suggest that detailed data for a larger sample of students would allow statistical models to isolate the effect of specific design characteristics.

  12. Bike 2 Work

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Are you a CERN cyclist? If so, join the Bike 2 Work competition that has just started! The more kilometres you travel by bike, the closer you’ll get to winning…   Yngve Inntjore Levinsen works at CERN, in the BE Department, and is one of the many people who travel to work by bike. Convinced by the benefits and the well-being that this mode of transport brings, he decided to promote it by running a competition. “Everyone working at CERN can participate,” says Yngve. “They just need to sign up on the competition website, or via their Facebook login. Then, participants simply have to report regularly the number of kilometres they cover by bike, travelling between home and work, or during the day between different points at CERN. ” The competition began on 1 March and will last all year long. The 2012 results will be announced at the end of the year. Of course, the winner will be the cyclist who has travelled the most kilometres during the ...

  13. Union Free-Riding in Britain and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Bryson

    2006-01-01

    The percentage of workers who choose not to join the union available to them at their workplace has been rising in Britain and New Zealand. Social custom, union instrumentality, the fixed costs of joining, employee perceptions of management attitudes to unionization and employee problems at work all influence the propensity to free-ride. Ideological convictions regarding the role of unions also play some role, as do private excludable goods. There is little indication of employer-inspired pol...

  14. Radiative inflation and dark energy RIDEs again after BICEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, Pasquale Di; King, Stephen F.; Merle, Alexander; Luhn, Christoph; Schmidt-May, Angnis

    2014-01-01

    Following the ground-breaking measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r=0.20 +0.07 -0.05 by the BICEP2 collaboration, we perform a statistical analysis of a model that combines Radiative Inflation with Dark Energy (RIDE) based on the M 2 |Φ| 2 ln(|Φ| 2 /Λ 2 ) potential and compare its predictions to those based on the traditional chaotic inflation M 2 |Φ| 2 potential. We find a best-fit value in the RIDE model of r=0.18 as compared to r=0.17 in the chaotic model, with the spectral index being n S =0.96 in both models

  15. Challenging the 'King of the Road' - exploring mobility battles between cars and bikes in the USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jacob Bjerre; Smith, Shelley; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is explorative in both theoretical and empirical terms. Theoretically the paper explores the potential of merging and including ‘assemblage theories’ into mobilities research. Empirically the paper explores the battle of mobilities between bikes and cars in the USA. With the bicycle...... mobility practices (Furness 2010). In a contribution to the repositioning of the bicycle, the qualities and positive impacts of bicycling on urban life are discussed (Jensen 2007, Petersen, 2007). Repositioning and reevaluating the car in American society implies examination and discussion of the main...... Assemblages’ of American cities are related to the existing hegemonic systems, norms, and practices related to the car. This paper contains empirical field studies conducted in the city of Philadelphia, USA where the ongoing dispute between car-drivers and bicyclists, in news media termed ‘bike wars...

  16. Performance and physiological effects of different descending strategies for cross-country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew C; Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Phil W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the performance-related feasibility and physiological benefits of purposefully eliminating propulsive work while descending in mountain biking and compared values to those measured during road descending. Participants cycled uphill on a road at race pace before descending over three conditions (off-road pedalling; off-road coasting; road coasting). Relatively low power output during off-road pedalling was associated with a greater oxygen uptake (p  .05). Importantly, pedalling did not invoke a performance benefit (p > .05) on the descent used in this study. Significantly greater heart rate and oxygen uptake (both p bike athletes focus on skills to increase descending speed without the addition of pedalling, and that equipment be used to decrease vibrations nearer to those seen on the road.

  17. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    OpenAIRE

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J.; Norton, Alyssa N.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to partici...

  18. BikeMaps.org: A Global Tool for Collision and Near Miss Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Trisalyn A; Denouden, Taylor; Jestico, Benjamin; Laberee, Karen; Winters, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    There are many public health benefits to cycling, such as chronic disease reduction and improved air quality. Real and perceived concerns about safety are primary barriers to new ridership. Due to limited forums for official reporting of cycling incidents, lack of comprehensive data is limiting our ability to study cycling safety and conduct surveillance. Our goal is to introduce BikeMaps.org, a new website developed by the authors for crowd-source mapping of cycling collisions and near misses. BikeMaps.org is a global mapping system that allows citizens to map locations of cycling incidents and report on the nature of the event. Attributes collected are designed for spatial modeling research on predictors of safety and risk, and to aid surveillance and planning. Released in October 2014, within 2 months the website had more than 14,000 visitors and mapping in 14 countries. Collisions represent 38% of reports (134/356) and near misses 62% (222/356). In our pilot city, Victoria, Canada, citizens mapped data equivalent to about 1 year of official cycling collision reports within 2 months via BikeMaps.org. Using report completeness as an indicator, early reports indicate that data are of high quality with 50% being fully attributed and another 10% having only one missing attribute. We are advancing this technology, with the development of a mobile App, improved data visualization, real-time altering of hazard reports, and automated open-source tools for data sharing. Researchers and citizens interested in utilizing the BikeMaps.org technology can get involved by encouraging citizen mapping in their region.

  19. Bike and run pacing on downhill segments predict Ironman triathlon relative success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evan C; Pryor, J Luke; Casa, Douglas J; Belval, Luke N; Vance, James S; DeMartini, Julie K; Maresh, Carl M; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2015-01-01

    Determine if performance and physiological based pacing characteristics over the varied terrain of a triathlon predicted relative bike, run, and/or overall success. Poor self-regulation of intensity during long distance (Full Iron) triathlon can manifest in adverse discontinuities in performance. Observational study of a random sample of Ironman World Championship athletes. High performing and low performing groups were established upon race completion. Participants wore global positioning system and heart rate enabled watches during the race. Percentage difference from pre-race disclosed goal pace (%off) and mean HR were calculated for nine segments of the bike and 11 segments of the run. Normalized graded running pace (accounting for changes in elevation) was computed via analysis software. Step-wise regression analyses identified segments predictive of relative success and HP and LP were compared at these segments to confirm importance. %Off of goal velocity during two downhill segments of the bike (HP: -6.8±3.2%, -14.2±2.6% versus LP: -1.2±4.2%, -5.1±11.5%; p<0.020) and %off from NGP during one downhill segment of the run (HP: 4.8±5.2% versus LP: 33.3±38.7%; p=0.033) significantly predicted relative performance. Also, HP displayed more consistency in mean HR (141±12 to 138±11 bpm) compared to LP (139±17 to 131±16 bpm; p=0.019) over the climb and descent from the turn-around point during the bike component. Athletes who maintained faster relative speeds on downhill segments, and who had smaller changes in HR between consecutive up and downhill segments were more successful relative to their goal times. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mountain biking. Breezy ups and traumatic downs; Mountainbiking. Luftige Hoehen und traumatische Tiefen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    For more than two decades the popularity of mountain biking as a national pastime as well as a competitive sport has been undiminished. However, its related risks are not monitored as closely as those, for example, of skiing. The injuries caused by mountain biking are specific and cannot be compared with those caused by other cycling sports. This is due not only to the characteristics of the terrain but also to the readiness to assume a higher risk compared to cycle racing. The particular value of radiology is in the acute trauma setting. Most often musculoskeletal lesions must be examined and digital radiography and MRI are the most useful techniques. Severe trauma of the cranium, face, spine, thorax and abdomen are primarily evaluated with CT, particularly in dedicated trauma centers. Therefore, radiology can play a role in the rapid diagnosis and optimal treatment of the trauma-related injuries of mountain biking. Thus, the unnecessarily high economical damage associated with mountain biking can be avoided. (orig.) [German] Mountainbiking erfreut sich seit mehr als 2 Jahrzehnten sowohl im Breiten- als auch Wettkampfsport einer ungebrochenen Popularitaet. Die assoziierten Risiken werden allerdings nicht mit derselben Aufmerksamkeit beobachtet wie etwa jene des Skisports. Die Verletzungen beim Mountainbiking sind spezifisch und nicht mit den Verletzungen vergleichbar, die bei anderen Radsportarten entstehen. Dies ist z. T. durch die Besonderheiten des Terrains und z. T. durch eine im Vergleich zum Rennradfahren hoehere Risikobereitschaft zu erklaeren. Die Radiologie hat ihren Stellenwert besonders in der Akutdiagnostik. Hier beschaeftigt sie sich v. a. mit muskuloskelettalen Verletzungen und setzt in erster Linie auf die digitale Projektionsradiographie und die MRT. Zur Evaluierung schwerer Verletzungen des Kopfs, der Wirbelsaeule, des Thorax und des Abdomens wird die CT bevorzugt, insbesondere in dezidierten Traumazentren. Damit kann die Radiologie ihren Teil

  1. Bike to Work Day: A Potential Tool for Planning and Fostering Sustainable Mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Claudio Brito Patricio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bike to Work Day (BTWD takes place all over the world and a nation-wide campaign was recently started in Brazil. Despite the growing interest, national research in this area is non-existent. This article seeks to investigate the impacts of such a campaign, using data collected on a survey in Curitiba that obtained 320 valid answers during BTWD 2015. Results showed that 38,4% of participants always commute by bike and 29,4% never or rarely commute by bike. The barriers and motivations are basically the same for both behavior groups. The main motivation was personal health and the main barrier was lack of cycling infrastructure. Origin and destination were also mapped pointing the downtown area as the most visited region. Although long term impacts weren't assessed, this research revealed the potential of a BTWD campaign to promote behavior change and also provide information about cyclists and their travel patterns, thus aiding cycling urban planning.

  2. Power output of field-based downhill mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Atkins, Stephen

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the power output of field-based downhill mountain biking. Seventeen trained male downhill cyclists (age 27.1 +/- 5.1 years) competing nationally performed two timed runs of a measured downhill course. An SRM powermeter was used to simultaneously record power, cadence, and speed. Values were sampled at 1-s intervals. Heart rates were recorded at 5-s intervals using a Polar S710 heart rate monitor. Peak and mean power output were 834 +/- 129 W and 75 +/- 26 W respectively. Mean power accounted for only 9% of peak values. Paradoxically, mean heart rate was 168 +/- 9 beats x min(-1) (89% of age-predicted maximum heart rate). Mean cadence (27 +/- 5 rev x min(-1)) was significantly related to speed (r = 0.51; P biking. The poor relationships between power and run time and between cadence and run time suggest they are not essential pre-requisites to downhill mountain biking performance and indicate the importance of riding dynamics to overall performance.

  3. Understanding Spatiotemporal Patterns of Biking Behavior by Analyzing Massive Bike Sharing Data in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolu

    2015-01-01

    The growing number of bike sharing systems (BSS) in many cities largely facilitates biking for transportation and recreation. Most recent bike sharing systems produce time and location specific data, which enables the study of travel behavior and mobility of each individual. However, despite a rapid growth of interest, studies on massive bike sharing data and the underneath travel pattern are still limited. Few studies have explored and visualized spatiotemporal patterns of bike sharing behavior using flow clustering, nor examined the station functional profiles based on over-demand patterns. This study investigated the spatiotemporal biking pattern in Chicago by analyzing massive BSS data from July to December in 2013 and 2014. The BSS in Chicago gained more popularity. About 15.9% more people subscribed to this service. Specifically, we constructed bike flow similarity graph and used fastgreedy algorithm to detect spatial communities of biking flows. By using the proposed methods, we discovered unique travel patterns on weekdays and weekends as well as different travel trends for customers and subscribers from the noisy massive amount data. In addition, we also examined the temporal demands for bikes and docks using hierarchical clustering method. Results demonstrated the modeled over-demand patterns in Chicago. This study contributes to offer better knowledge of biking flow patterns, which was difficult to obtain using traditional methods. Given the trend of increasing popularity of the BSS and data openness in different cities, methods used in this study can extend to examine the biking patterns and BSS functionality in different cities.

  4. Severe Sunburn After a Hot Air Balloon Ride: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Sinan; Karagoz, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Hot air balloon tours are very popular among travelers worldwide. Preventable burn injuries associated with hot air balloon rides have been reported during crashes into power lines, in propane burner explosions, and following contact with the propane burner tanks. We present a case of severe repeated sunburn, which poses another risk of preventable injury during hot air balloon rides, and briefly discuss the injury epidemiology of hot air balloon rides. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. Cavernous Angioma and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bike and scooter riding – Wear a helmet Skydiving Hiking Canoeing – Wear a life vest and helmet Caving ... 2000, he may not be eligible for government benefits such as Medicare/Medicaid or SSI. There are ...

  6. TESTING FOR DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF FOREST FIRES ON HIKING AND MOUNTAIN BIKING DEMAND AND BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Loomis, John B.; Gonzalez-Caban, Armando; Englin, Jeffrey E.

    2001-01-01

    Surveys of visitors to National Forests in Colorado were conducted to determine whether different fire ages and presence of crown fires have different effects on hiking and mountain biking recreation visits and benefits. Actual and intended behavior data were combined using a count-data travel cost model. The intended behavior trip questions asked about changes in number of trips due to the presence of a high-intensity crown fire, prescribed fire, and a 20-year-old high-intensity fire at the ...

  7. User Behaviour Analysis of the Public Bike System in Taipei

    OpenAIRE

    Jen, Te Pai; Shih, Ying Pai

    2015-01-01

    Public Bike System, PBS, usually named Bike-sharing System in the west, is a category of green transport to provide a low-carbon solution of the “first/last mile” problem in a city. Indeed, there were only five bike-sharing programs in 2000. Now over 400 cities in 30 different countries have PBS programs, with more than 350,000 bikes worldwide. However, the studies for bike-sharing are still limited, and it is hard to find some related research of bike-sharing programs in the East-Asia region...

  8. Alternative pavement designs : Randolph park and ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Previous research on alternative pavement type bidding has proven that various treatments : are unique in terms of constructability, material characteristics, and associated performance. : While some treatments may have higher initial costs, it is im...

  9. Distracted Biking: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Elizabeth Suzanne; Arabian, Sandra Strack; Breeze, Janis L; Salzler, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Commuting via bicycle is a very popular mode of transportation in the Northeastern United States. Boston, MA, has seen a rapid increase in bicycle ridership over the past decade, which has raised concerns and awareness about bicycle safety. An emerging topic in this field is distracted bicycle riding. This study was conducted to provide descriptive data on the prevalence and type of distracted bicycling in Boston at different times of day. This was a cross-sectional study in which observers tallied bicyclists at 4 high traffic intersections in Boston during various peak commuting hours for 2 types of distractions: auditory (earbuds/phones in or on ears), and visual/tactile (electronic device or other object in hand). Nineteen hundred seventy-four bicyclists were observed and 615 (31.2%), 95% CI [29, 33%], were distracted. Of those observed, auditory distractions were the most common (N = 349; 17.7%), 95% CI [16, 19], p = .0003, followed by visual/tactile distractions (N = 266; 13.5%), 95% CI [12, 15]. The highest proportion (40.7%), 95% CI [35, 46], of distracted bicyclists was observed during the midday commute (between 13:30 and 15:00). Distracted bicycling is a prevalent safety concern in the city of Boston, as almost a third of all bicyclists exhibited distracted behavior. Education and public awareness campaigns should be designed to decrease distracted bicycling behaviors and promote bicycle safety in Boston. An awareness of the prevalence of distracted biking can be utilized to promote bicycle safety campaigns dedicated to decreasing distracted bicycling and to provide a baseline against which improvements can be measured.

  10. Children and Sports: Choices for All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lifetime. Take family bike rides, check out local hiking trails or visit indoor climbing walls. Encourage active ... 2016. Faigenbaum AD, et al. Pediatric resistance training: Benefits, concerns, and program design considerations. Current Sports Medicine ...

  11. Supernetwork approach for modeling traveler response to park-and-ride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, F.; Arentze, T.A.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Park-and-ride has been identified by transport planners as a key element of any sustainability package to promote multimodal trips, improve air quality, and alleviate congestion in urban areas. This paper presents a supernetwork approach that can assess traveler response to park-and-ride in an

  12. The development of bike sharing : A comparison of the Stockholm and Hangzhou cases

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Qian

    2011-01-01

    Bike sharing is not a new concept in Europe, it’s getting more popular especially in recent years as a method to reduce the impacts of human traffic behaviours on environment, solve the problem of last mile to end a trip and provide an alternative way of travel mode. Speaking about China, although this country used to have a nickname “The Kingdom of Bicycles”, the mode share of traffic for bicycles is decreasing annually. Cars, on the other hand, a symbol of rich, is becoming more popular and...

  13. The Effects of Ride Hailing Services on Travel and Associated Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Towards the close of the first decade of the 21st Century, ride-hailing services began to enter the transportation market through smart phone applications that allowed consumers to hail and pay for a ride from drivers using their own vehicle. The inf...

  14. An Operator's Guide to Safe and Enjoyable Bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Jose Dept. of Public Works, CA.

    Addressed to young persons and adults, this booklet delineates the duties and rights applicable to bicyclists as drivers of vehicles. The following topics are discussed: Rules of the road, defensive bicycling techniques, the bicycle as a machine, registration and theft prevention, walking the bike, bike routes, and recreational and group rides.…

  15. Analyzing e-bike commuters’ motives, travel behaviour and experiences using GPS-tracking and interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazier, Paul

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionA major development in transportation in the past years has been the growth of electrically assisted cycling or e-biking. E-bikes (pedal-assisted or bicycle-style electric bicycles) make it possible to cover longer distances at higher speeds against reduced physical effort. Coupled with

  16. New gate for pedestrians and bikes on Prévessin site

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On Wednesday 1 June, the SMB Department announced the opening of a new pedestrian and bike automated gate on the Prévessin site, near the “Déchetterie” of Saint-Genis-Pouilly, on the road “Chemin du Moulin des Ponts”.   The gate is open to all CERN personnel 24h/24h with their access card. (Find it here on the GIS website). This gate was generously financed with the help of the EN, BE and TE Departments, and the planning and construction were completed in record time by the team taking care of CERN site access. The timing is perfect for the start of the Bike2Work initiative, which started on 1 June. A record number of 136 teams signed up. If you want to participate, it is not too late, you can sign up here. We remind that safe commuting is imperative. It is now possible to cycle from the CERN hostel in Saint-Genis-Pouilly to the CERN Prévessin site using quiet back ...

  17. Mountain biking injuries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmont, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    Mountain biking is a fast, exciting adventure sport with increasing numbers of participants and competitions. A search of PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, DH data, and Embase databases was performed using the following keywords: mountain, biking and injuries. This revealed 2 review articles, 17 case controlled studies, 4 case series and 5 case reports. This review summarises the published literature on mountain biking injuries, discusses injury frequency and common injury mechanisms. Riders are quick to adopt safety measures. Helmet usage is now increasingly common and handlebar adaptations have been discontinued. Although the sport has a reputation for speed and risk with research and awareness, injury prevention measures are being adopted making the sport as safe as possible.

  18. ReRide: Performing Lower Back Rehabilitation While Riding Your Motorbike in Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen; Sokoler, Tomas; Baadkar, Suraj

    2016-01-01

    controlled mechanically moving display mounted on top of the bike's speedometer that alters the visibility of the speedometer to the rider indicating the correctness of back posture. Informed by embodied perception, the ReRide design emphasizes a rapid coupling between adjusting your back posture...

  19. The Theory of Dynamic Public Transit Priority with Dynamic Stochastic Park and Ride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengming Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Public transit priority is very important for relieving traffic congestion. The connotation of dynamic public transit priority and dynamic stochastic park and ride is presented. Based on the point that the travel cost of public transit is not higher than the travel cost of car, how to determine the level of dynamic public transit priority is discussed. The traffic organization method of dynamic public transit priority is introduced. For dynamic stochastic park and ride, layout principle, scale, and charging standard are discussed. Traveler acceptability is high through the analysis of questionnaire survey. Dynamic public transit priority with dynamic stochastic park and ride has application feasibility.

  20. Hiking and biking with GPS: The Canadian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaníček, Petr

    The paper attempts to review and put into perspective the findings of a recent by-invitation-only workshop on GPS held in Ottawa. The workshop brought together both GPS-information suppliers and consumers coming from all walks of life. Some unique exchanges of views took place which are worth bringing to the attention of the geodetic community.

  1. Planning, implementing and evaluating a social and communication skills course for riding instructors

    OpenAIRE

    Seefeld, Annika

    2016-01-01

    Social and emotional skills are very important for effective coaching. As research in this field is still very limited, the purpose of this study was to plan, implement and evaluate a course teaching social and emotional skills to riding instructors. The objective of this research project was to analyse the usefulness and feasibility of a social and communication skills course for riding instructors. The present research study is an educational action research case study approa...

  2. A qualitative study of gender and work in a British riding school

    OpenAIRE

    Calamatta, Katherine F G

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on employees of the horse riding school sector within the United Kingdom. It is based on qualitative fieldwork at two riding schools that took place over the course of three years and asks two questions: why do women numerically dominate within the setting of the riding school? How can we best understand this phenomenon using sociological literature? The subject for this thesis was motivated by my own prior experience as a worker within this industry.\\ud \\ud The thesis wil...

  3. Service network design of bike sharing systems analysis and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a tactical planning approach for service network design in metropolitan areas. Designing the service network requires the suitable aggregation of demand data as well as the anticipation of operational relocation decisions. To this end, an integrated approach of data analysis and mathematical optimization is introduced. The book also includes a case study based on real-world data to demonstrate the benefit of the proposed service network design approach. The target audience comprises primarily research experts in the field of traffic engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  4. The characteristics of bike-sharing usage : case study in Zhongshan, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ying; Thomas, Tom; Brussel, M.J.G.; van Maarseveen, M.F.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Public bike systems have grown in popularity and are expanding rapidly across cities worldwide. Such systems provide access to pickup and drop-off public bikes at numerous bike stations for free or for an affordable fee and aim at increasing bike use and extending the accessibility of traditional

  5. Biking in fresh air: consideration of exposure to traffic-related air pollution in bicycle route planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Active transportation modes such as walking and biking are key elements of sustainable : transportation systems. In order to promote biking as an alternative form of transportation, a : holistic approach to improving the quality of the biking experie...

  6. Long-distance mountain biking does not disturb the measurement of total, free or complexed prostate-specific antigen in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Markus; Scharhag, Jürgen; Sand-Hill, Marga; Kindermann, Wilfried; Herrmann, Wolfgang

    2004-03-01

    Mechanical manipulation of the prostate is a generally accepted interfering factor for the measurement of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). However, only few studies have focused on common daily mechanical manipulations, such as bicycle riding. Furthermore, physical exercise is also supposed to modulate PSA serum concentration. Long-distance mountain biking is an excellent model to study the combined effect of mechanical prostate manipulation by bicycle riding and strenuous endurance exercise on total, free and complexed PSA (tPSA, fPSA, cPSA). We investigated tPSA, fPSA and cPSA in 42 healthy male cyclists (mean age 35+/-6 years) before and after a 120 km off-road mountain bike race. Blood sampling was done before, 15 min and 3 h after the race. Mean race time was 342+/-65 min. All athletes had normal serum levels of tPSA, fPSA or cPSA. None of these parameters was modified by the race. In healthy men the measurement of tPSA, fPSA and cPSA is not disturbed by preceding long distance mountain biking or endurance exercise. Based on the present data, there is no evidence for a recommendation to limit bicycle riding or physical activity before the measurement of tPSA, fPSA or cPSA.

  7. Ubiquitous Integrity via Network Integration and Parallelism—Sustaining Pedestrian/Bike Urbanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Yen Hsu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the concern regarding environmental issues, establishing pedestrian/bike friendly urbanism is widely encouraged. To promote safety-assured, mobile communication environments, efficient, reliable maintenance, and information integrity need to be designed, especially in highly possibly interfered places. For busy traffic areas, regular degree-3 dedicated short range communication (DSRC networks are safety and information featured with availability, reliability, and maintainability in paths of multi-lanes. For sparsely populated areas, probes of wireless sensors are rational, especially if sensor nodes can be organized to enhance security, reliability, and flexibility. Applying alternative network topologies, such as spider-webs, generalized honeycomb tori, and cube-connected cycles, for comparing and analyzing is proposed in DSRC and cellular communications to enhance integrity in communications.

  8. Understanding Spatiotemporal Patterns of Biking Behavior by Analyzing Massive Bike Sharing Data in Chicago.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Zhou

    Full Text Available The growing number of bike sharing systems (BSS in many cities largely facilitates biking for transportation and recreation. Most recent bike sharing systems produce time and location specific data, which enables the study of travel behavior and mobility of each individual. However, despite a rapid growth of interest, studies on massive bike sharing data and the underneath travel pattern are still limited. Few studies have explored and visualized spatiotemporal patterns of bike sharing behavior using flow clustering, nor examined the station functional profiles based on over-demand patterns. This study investigated the spatiotemporal biking pattern in Chicago by analyzing massive BSS data from July to December in 2013 and 2014. The BSS in Chicago gained more popularity. About 15.9% more people subscribed to this service. Specifically, we constructed bike flow similarity graph and used fastgreedy algorithm to detect spatial communities of biking flows. By using the proposed methods, we discovered unique travel patterns on weekdays and weekends as well as different travel trends for customers and subscribers from the noisy massive amount data. In addition, we also examined the temporal demands for bikes and docks using hierarchical clustering method. Results demonstrated the modeled over-demand patterns in Chicago. This study contributes to offer better knowledge of biking flow patterns, which was difficult to obtain using traditional methods. Given the trend of increasing popularity of the BSS and data openness in different cities, methods used in this study can extend to examine the biking patterns and BSS functionality in different cities.

  9. Biking to work in Miami. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, O.

    1982-08-01

    The objective of the project was to produce and distribute a guide to commuting by bicycle in the Miami metropolitan area. The area is uniquely suited to bicycling because of its pleasant year-round climate and relatively flat topography. Persuading even a small percentage of automobile commuters to try biking to work could result in substantial energy savings in Miami as in most other major metropolitan areas. Seven of the largest employment centers in the area were selected as major commuter destinations suitable for bicycle commuters. Safe and scenic ways of commuting to these areas by bicycle were mapped and described in a series of short narratives. Additional material on safe riding techniques and the choice of equipment was developed. The resulting 40 page booklet, Biking to Work in Miami, was printed and distributed by the author to local cycling groups, bicycle interests, and others. Copies were also sent to interested parties outside the Miami area. The initial reception has been very encouraging and a number of favorable reply cards have been received with useful comments and suggestions. A revised version aimed at stimulating bikers to avail of the soon-to-be-opened rapid transit system is being considered. A writer for the Miami Herald is interested in using parts of the Guide for a series in the newspaper.

  10. The Theory of Dynamic Public Transit Priority with Dynamic Stochastic Park and Ride

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chengming; Chen, Yanyan; Ma, Changxi

    2014-01-01

    Public transit priority is very important for relieving traffic congestion. The connotation of dynamic public transit priority and dynamic stochastic park and ride is presented. Based on the point that the travel cost of public transit is not higher than the travel cost of car, how to determine the level of dynamic public transit priority is discussed. The traffic organization method of dynamic public transit priority is introduced. For dynamic stochastic park and ride, layout principle, scal...

  11. Fault ride-through and voltage support of permanent magnet synchronous generator wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalke, G.; Hartkopf, T. [Darmstadt Technical Univ., Dept. of Renewable Energies (Germany); Hansen, A.D. [Risoe National Lab., DTU, Wind Energy Dept. (Denmark)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a control strategy of direct driven multipole PMSG wind turbines, which enhances the fault ride-through and voltage support capability of such wind turbines during grid faults. A dynamic simulation model of the turbine is implemented in the simulation software DIgSILENT. Simulation results approve the effectiveness of the developed control strategy. It is shown that PMSG wind turbines equipped with such control even enable nearby connected conventional wind turbines to ride-through grid faults. (au)

  12. The characteristics of bike-sharing usage : case study in Zhongshan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Thomas, Tom; Brussel, M.J.G.; van Maarseveen, M.F.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Public bike systems have grown in popularity and are expanding rapidly across cities worldwide. Such systems provide access to pickup and drop-off public bikes at numerous bike stations for free or for an affordable fee and aim at increasing bike use and extending the accessibility of traditional public transport systems. A variety of studies have examined the characteristics of bike-sharing systems, mostly in American and European cities and with a focus on user demographics. The objective o...

  13. Gearing Up for Mountain Biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Examines the gear system of a mountain bike to discover any redundancy in the many gear settings available to the cyclist. Suggests a best strategy for changing up through the gears on a typical 21-gear system and an adjustment to the available gears that would result in a smoother change. (Author/ASK)

  14. Driving self-regulation and ride service utilization in a multicommunity, multistate sample of U.S. older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Donna C; Freund, Katherine; Fortinsky, Richard H; Staplin, Loren; West, Bethany A; Bergen, Gwen; Downs, Jonathan

    2017-04-03

    This study examined a multicommunity alternative transportation program available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for any purpose, offering door-through-door service in private automobiles to members who either do not drive or are transitioning away from driving. Specific aims were to describe the characteristics of members by driving status and ride service usage of these members. Data came from administrative records maintained by a nonprofit ride service program and include 2,661 individuals aged 65+ residing in 14 states who joined the program between April 1, 2010, and November 8, 2013. Latent class analysis was used to group current drivers into 3 classes of driving status of low, medium, and high self-regulation, based on their self-reported avoidance of certain driving situations and weekly driving frequency. Demographics and ride service use rate for rides taken through March 31, 2014, by type of ride (e.g., medical, social, etc.) were calculated for nondrivers and drivers in each driving status class. The majority of ride service users were female (77%) and aged 65-74 years (82%). The primary method of getting around when enrolling for the transportation service was by riding with a friend or family member (60%). Among the 67,883 rides given, nondrivers took the majority (69%) of rides. Medical rides were the most common, accounting for 40% of all rides. Reported ride usage suggests that older adults are willing to use such ride services for a variety of trips when these services are not limited to specific types (e.g., medical). Further research can help tailor strategies to encourage both nondrivers and drivers to make better use of alternative transportation that meets the special needs of older people.

  15. Public awareness of and support for infrastructure changes designed to increase walking and biking in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Barragan, Noel C; Simon, Paul A; Jackson, Richard J; Kuo, Tony

    2015-03-01

    Policies to promote active transportation are emerging as a best practice to increase physical activity, yet relatively little is known about public opinion on utilizing transportation funds for such investments. This study sought to assess public awareness of and support for investments in walking and biking infrastructure in Los Angeles County. In the fall of 2013, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health conducted a telephone survey with a random sample of registered voters in the region. The survey asked respondents to report on the presence and importance of walking and biking infrastructure in their community, travel behaviors and preferences, and demographics. One thousand and five interviews were completed (response rate 20%, cooperation rate 54%). The majority of participants reported walking, biking, and bus/rail transportation investments as being important. In addition, participants reported a high level of support for redirecting transportation funds to active transportation investment - the population average was 3.28 (between 'strongly' and 'somewhat' support) on a 4 point Likert scale. Voters see active transportation infrastructure as being very important and support redirecting funding to improve the infrastructure. These findings can inform policy-decisions and planning efforts in the jurisdiction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Review of the system compatibility and ride-through options for AC and DC drives including multilevel inverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouanne, A. von [Power Electronics Lab. - Elect. and Compt. Engineering Dept. - Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Ben Banerjee, B. [Electric Power Research Inst. - Power Electronics, Energy Delivery, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Adjustable speed drive (ASD) compatibility and ride-through issues have caused increased concerns due to the susceptibility of AC and DC drives to power disturbances, and the costly results of process disruptions. These losses can be avoided for critical production processes by using ASDs with ride-through capabilities. This paper assesses industrial ride-through requirements and application issues for AC and DC drives, including medium voltage (2300/4160 V) multi-level inverter topologies. Ride-through alternatives are evaluated based on design, implementation and cost considerations in order to determine the most suitable solutions for various kVA ratings and time duration requirements. (orig.)

  17. Road following for blindBike: an assistive bike navigation system for low vision persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Lynne; Overell, William

    2017-05-01

    Road Following is a critical component of blindBike, our assistive biking application for the visually impaired. This paper talks about the overall blindBike system and goals prominently featuring Road Following, which is the task of directing the user to follow the right side of the road. This work unlike what is commonly found for self-driving cars does not depend on lane line markings. 2D computer vision techniques are explored to solve the problem of Road Following. Statistical techniques including the use of Gaussian Mixture Models are employed. blindBike is developed as an Android Application and is running on a smartphone device. Other sensors including Gyroscope and GPS are utilized. Both Urban and suburban scenarios are tested and results are given. The success and challenges faced by blindBike's Road Following module are presented along with future avenues of work.

  18. Using functional traits to assess the resistance of subalpine grassland to trampling by mountain biking and hiking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine Marina; Barros, Agustina

    2015-12-01

    Functional traits reflect plant responses to disturbance, including from visitor impacts. The impacts of mountain biking and hiking on functional composition were compared using a common experimental protocol in a subalpine grassland in the Australian Alps. The overlapping cover of all species was recorded two weeks after different intensities of hiking (200 and 500 passes) and mountain biking (none, 25, 75, 200 and 500 passes). Species' functional trait data were combined with their relative cover to calculate community trait weighted means for plant height, leaf area, percentage leaf dry matter content and Specific Leaf Area (SLA). Species such as Poa fawcettiae with larger leaves and SLA but lower dry weight content of leaves were more resistant to use, with differences between bikers and hikers only apparent at the highest levels of use tested. This differs from some vegetation communities in Europe where plants with smaller leaves were more resistant to hiking. More research using functional traits may account for differences in species responses to trampling. Managers of conservation areas used for hiking and biking need to minimise off trail use by both user groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rene Munk

    2003-01-01

    The Dial-a-Ride problem is a Vehicle Routing problem in its most general form. The problem was formulated in the beginning of the 1970's and since then a large number of researchers have worked on developing efficient algorithms for use in automated planning of Dial-a-Ride transportation systems....... In a Dial-a-Ride transportation system, passengers request a trip between two stops with either a desired time of departure from the pickup stop or a desired time of arrival at the destination. The time windows at the stops are then calculated by the operator based on additional parameters such as maximum...... to the problem. The metod used in this thesis is based on a clustering first insertion second technique developed at CRT in Canada in the mid 1980's. The algorithm is extended to include constraints imposed by a practical Dial-a-Ride problem at a Danish transportation operator. These constraints are mainly...

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou, Alexandra; Tzoufi, Meropi; Ntzani, Evangelia; Varvarousis, Dimitrios; Beris, Alexandros; Ploumis, Avraam

    2017-10-01

    Equine-assisted therapies, such as therapeutic riding and hippotherapy, are believed to have positive physical and emotional effects in individuals with neuromotor, developmental, and physical disabilities. The purpose of this review was to determine whether therapeutic riding and hippotherapy improve balance, motor function, gait, muscle symmetry, pelvic movement, psychosocial parameters, and the patients' overall quality of life. In this study, a literature search was conducted on MEDLINE, CINAHL, MBASE, SportDiscus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PEDro, DARE, Google Scholar, and Dissertation Abstracts. Only studies with a control/comparison group or self-controlled studies performing preintervention and postintervention assessment were included. Excluded were (1) studies not providing data on baseline score or end-point outcome, (2) single-subject studies, (3) studies providing only qualitative data, and (4) studies that used a mechanical horse. Sixteen trials were included. The methodologic quality of each study was evaluated using Downs and Black quality assessment tool. Most of the studies showed a trend toward a beneficial effect of therapeutic riding and hippotherapy on balance and gross motor function. The meta-analysis showed improvement in both the Berg Balance Scale and the Gross Motor Function Measure in therapeutic riding and hippotherapy programs. Programs such as therapeutic riding and hippotherapy are a viable intervention option for patients with balance, gait, and psychomotor disorders.

  1. Biking with Particles: Junior Triathletes' Learning about Drafting through Exploring Agent-Based Models and Inventing New Tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsh, Alon; Levy, Sharona T.

    2013-01-01

    The present research addresses a curious finding: how learning physical principles enhanced athletes' biking performance but not their conceptual understanding. The study involves a model-based triathlon training program, Biking with Particles, concerning aerodynamics of biking in groups (drafting). A conceptual framework highlights several…

  2. An examination of the relationship of interpersonal influences with walking and biking to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew E; Bopp, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Active commuting (AC) to the workplace is a successful strategy for incorporating more physical activity into daily life and is associated with health benefits. The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between interpersonal influences and AC. A cross-sectional online survey was delivered to workplaces in the mid-Atlantic region. A volunteer convenience sample of adults (N = 1234) completed questions about demographics, number of times per week actively commuting, spouse and coworker AC patterns, and spousal and coworker normative beliefs for AC. Basic descriptive and frequencies described the sample; bivariate correlations examined the relationship between AC and spouse and coworker variables. A multivariate regression analysis predicted the variance in AC with interpersonal independent variables. The sample was primarily middle-aged, white (92.7%), female (67.9%), and well-educated (83.3% college graduate or higher). Of those surveyed, 20.3% report AC to work at least once per week by means of walking or biking. The number of times per week of AC for spouse (P < .001) and coworkers (P = .006) and AC norms for spouse (P < .001) and coworker (P < .001) were positively related to AC. The multivariate regression model accounted for 37.9% of the variance in AC (F = 101.83, df = 4, P < .001). This study demonstrates that interpersonal influences are significantly related to actively commuting to work. Future interventions targeting AC should consider these interpersonal influences in addition to individual and environmental influences that have been previously documented.

  3. Active commuting among K-12 educators: a study examining walking and biking to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Hastmann, Tanis J; Norton, Alyssa N

    2013-01-01

    Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC) is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators (n = 437) was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors). t-tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Participants actively commuted 0.51 ± 1.93 times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population.

  4. Active Commuting among K-12 Educators: A Study Examining Walking and Biking to Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bopp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Walking and biking to work, active commuting (AC is associated with many health benefits, though rates of AC remain low in the US. K-12 educators represent a significant portion of the workforce, and employee health and associated costs may have significant economic impact. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the current rates of AC and factors associated with AC among K-12 educators. Methods. A volunteer sample of K-12 educators ( was recruited to participate in an online survey. Participants responded about AC patterns and social ecological influences on AC (individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors. -tests and ANOVAs examined trends in AC, and Pearson correlations examined the relationship between AC and dependent variables. Multiple regression analysis determined the relative influence of individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental levels on AC. Results. Participants actively commuted times/week. There were several individual, interpersonal, institutional, community, and environmental factors significantly related to AC. The full model explained 60.8% of the variance in AC behavior. Conclusions. This study provides insight on the factors that determine K-12 educators mode of commute and provide some insight for employee wellness among this population.

  5. Motocross biking for competition and for recreation: a prospective analysis of 423 injured riders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Theobald, Peter; Hamad, A K; Hay, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Motocross is a form of motorcycle racing held on established off-road circuits and has been a recreational and competitive sport across the world for over 100 years. In the UK alone, motocross has grown into a phenomenally ambitious and popular franchise. There are over 200 motocross clubs across the country, permitting over 900 events annually. Data were collected prospectively over 4 years (from 2010 to 2014) at our unit. All injuries caused by motocross biking that were referred to our trauma and orthopaedic department were included in this study, regardless of whether the rider was performing the sport competitively or recreationally. During the period studied (4 years), 423 patients were included with a total of 485 injuries, ranging from 1 to 6 injuries per patient. The patient's age range was from 4 to 73 years, with most of the injuries being sustained within the early spring and summer months representing the start of the motocross season. We present the first epidemiological study of motocross injuries in the UK. Within the growing culture of 'adrenaline sports', motocross has become an exhilarating and extremely fashionable pastime. This study has identified and categorised the spectrum of injuries from upper limb fracture dislocations to life-threatening head and chest injuries, some of which are serious and may cause significant morbidity and possible mortality. These injuries could have significant resource implications, especially for smaller rural hospitals.

  6. A new pneumatic suspension system with independent stiffness and ride height tuning capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhihong; Khajepour, Amir; Cao, Dongpu; Ebrahimi, Babak; Guo, Konghui

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces a new pneumatic spring for vehicle suspension systems, allowing independent tuning of stiffness and ride height according to different vehicle operating conditions and driver preferences. The proposed pneumatic spring comprises a double-acting pneumatic cylinder, two accumulators and a tuning subsystem. This paper presents a detailed description of the pneumatic spring and its working principle. The mathematical model is established based on principles of thermo and fluid dynamics. An experimental setup has been designed and fabricated for testing and evaluating the proposed pneumatic spring. The analytical and experimental results confirm the capability of the new pneumatic spring system for independent tuning of stiffness and ride height. The mathematical model is verified and the capabilities of the pneumatic spring are further proved. It is concluded that this new pneumatic spring provides a more flexible suspension design alternative for meeting various conflicting suspension requirements for ride comfort and performance.

  7. Power-Up: Exploration and Play in a Novel Modified Ride-On Car for Standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samuel W; Lobo, Michele A; Feldner, Heather A; Schreiber, Melynda; MacDonald, Megan; Winden, Haylee N; Stoner, Tracy; Galloway, James Cole

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the physical activity and play behaviors of preschoolers without disabilities and 1 preschooler with physical disability. Participants were 42 preschoolers without disabilities and 1 preschooler with physical disability (Child A). Child A used either crutches or a modified ride-on car while in the gymnasium and playground. In the gymnasium, Child A engaged in less solitary play and more parallel play while using the modified ride-on car compared with crutches. On the playground, Child A engaged in more sitting and less running while using crutches compared with preschoolers without disabilities. On the playground, Child A engaged in more peer interaction and less teacher interaction when using the modified ride-on car compared with crutches. For children with disabilities who may use assistive devices, clinicians, families, and teachers are encouraged to embrace a "right device, right time, right place" approach.

  8. Pricing Decision under Dual-Channel Structure considering Fairness and Free-Riding Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmei Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under dual-channel structure, the free-riding behavior based on different service levels between online channel and offline channel cannot be avoided, which would lead to channel unfairness. This study implies that the dual-channel supply chain is built up by online channel controlled by manufacturer and traditional channel controlled by retailer, respectively. Under this channel structure, we rebuild the linear demand function considering free-riding behavior and modify the pricing model based on channel fairness. Then the influences of fair factor and free-riding behavior on manufacturer and retailer pricing and performance are discussed. Finally, we propose some numerical analysis to provide some valuable recommendations for manufacturer and retailer improving channel management performance.

  9. School Factors Associated With the Percentage of Students Who Walk or Bike to School, School Health Policies and Practices Study, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Active school transport, such as by walking or biking, increases physical activity levels, which has health and academic benefits for children. We examined school demographic and other characteristics to determine their association with the percentage of students who walk or bike to school. Methods We analyzed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study. The response rate for the module containing questions about transportation was 70% (N = 577). Multivariate logistic regression models examined whether certain school characteristics were associated with a school having 26% or more of students who walk or bike to school in the morning on an average school day. Results In most (61.5%) schools, 10% or fewer students walked or biked to school in the morning on an average school day; in 22.7% of schools, 26% or more students did so. Although having crossing guards (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9–6.0), having bicycle racks (AOR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2–5.8), and providing promotional materials to students or families on walking or biking to school (AOR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.7–5.1) were associated with having 26% or more students who walk or bike to school, only 47.7% of schools had crossing guards, 62.4% had bicycle racks, and 33.3% provided promotional materials. Conclusion Several low-cost or no-cost strategies were associated with having 26% or more students who walked or biked to school, but these strategies are not commonly used in schools. PMID:27172258

  10. School Factors Associated With the Percentage of Students Who Walk or Bike to School, School Health Policies and Practices Study, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Sliwa, Sarah

    2016-05-12

    Active school transport, such as by walking or biking, increases physical activity levels, which has health and academic benefits for children. We examined school demographic and other characteristics to determine their association with the percentage of students who walk or bike to school. We analyzed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study. The response rate for the module containing questions about transportation was 70% (N = 577). Multivariate logistic regression models examined whether certain school characteristics were associated with a school having 26% or more of students who walk or bike to school in the morning on an average school day. In most (61.5%) schools, 10% or fewer students walked or biked to school in the morning on an average school day; in 22.7% of schools, 26% or more students did so. Although having crossing guards (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-6.0), having bicycle racks (AOR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2-5.8), and providing promotional materials to students or families on walking or biking to school (AOR = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.7-5.1) were associated with having 26% or more students who walk or bike to school, only 47.7% of schools had crossing guards, 62.4% had bicycle racks, and 33.3% provided promotional materials. Several low-cost or no-cost strategies were associated with having 26% or more students who walked or biked to school, but these strategies are not commonly used in schools.

  11. Perception of Safety and Liking Associated to the Colour Intervention of Bike Lanes: Contribution from the Behavioural Sciences to Urban Design and Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Villarroel, Pablo; Contreras, Daniela; Lillo, Sebastián; Segovia, Ariel; Rojo, Natalia; Moreno, Sandra; Oyarzo, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The perception of colour and its subjective effects are key issues to designing safe and enjoyable bike lanes. This paper addresses the relationship between the colours of bike lane interventions—in particular pavement painting and intersection design—and the subjective evaluation of liking, visual saliency, and perceived safety related to such an intervention. Utilising images of three real bike lane intersections modified by software to change their colour (five in total), this study recruited 538 participants to assess their perception of all fifteen colour-design combinations. A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) with the Bonferroni post hoc test was performed to assess the effect of the main conditions (colour and design) on the dependent variables (liking towards the intervention, level of visual saliency of the intersection, and perceived safety of the bike lane). The results showed that the colour red was more positively associated to the outcome variables, followed by yellow and blue. Additionally, it was observed that the effect of colour widely outweighs the effect of design, suggesting that the right choice and use of colour would increase the effectiveness on bike-lanes pavement interventions. Limitations and future directions are discussed. PMID:27548562

  12. The social context of motorcycle riding and the key determinants influencing rider behavior: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliff, Deborah; Watson, Barry; White, Katherine M; Lewis, Ioni; Wishart, Darren

    2011-08-01

    Given the increasing popularity of motorcycle riding and heightened risk of injury or death associated with being a rider, this study explored rider behavior as a determinant of rider safety and, in particular, key beliefs and motivations that influence such behavior. To enhance the effectiveness of future education and training interventions, it is important to understand riders' own views about what influences how they ride. Specifically, this study sought to identify key determinants of riders' behaviors in relation to the social context of riding, including social and identity-related influences relating to the group (group norms and group identity) as well as the self (moral/personal norm and self-identity). Qualitative research was undertaken via group discussions with motorcycle riders (n = 41). The findings revealed that those in the group with which one rides represent an important source of social influence. Also, the motorcyclist (group) identity was associated with a range of beliefs, expectations, and behaviors considered to be normative. Exploration of the construct of personal norm revealed that riders were most cognizant of the "wrong things to do" when riding; among those issues raised was the importance of protective clothing (albeit for the protection of others and, in particular, pillion passengers). Finally, self-identity as a motorcyclist appeared to be important to a rider's self-concept and was likely to influence on-road behavior. Overall, the insight provided by the current study may facilitate the development of interventions including rider training as well as public education and mass media messages. The findings suggest that these interventions should incorporate factors associated with the social nature of riding in order to best align it with some of the key beliefs and motivations underpinning riders' on-road behaviors.

  13. AD-venture program: therapeutic biking for the treatment of depression in long-term care residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Linda L; Fitzsimmons, Suzanne

    2002-01-01

    This project tested an innovative intervention in a controlled clinical investigation of a nonpharmacological treatment of depression in long-term care residents with dementia. This treatment utilized a wheelchair bicycle in a recreation therapy protocol, which combined small group activity therapy and one-to-one bike rides with a staff member. Depression levels were significantly reduced in the two-week portion of the study with levels maintained in the 10-week maintenance period. Improvements were also found in sleep and levels of activity engagement.

  14. Promoting sustainable mobility by modelling bike sharing usage in Lyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T. D.; Ovtracht, N.

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims to present a modelling of bike sharing demand at station level in the city of Lyon. Multiple linear regression models were used in order to predict the daily flows of each station. The data used in this project consists of over 6 million bike sharing trips recorded in 2011. The built environment variables used in the model are determined in a buffer zone of 300 meters around each bike sharing station. The results show that bike sharing is principally used for commuting purposes. An interesting finding is that the bike sharing network characteristics are important parameters to improve the prediction quality of the models. The present results could be useful for others cities which want to adopt a bike sharing system and also for a better planning and operation of existing systems. The approach in this paper can be useful for estimating car-sharing demand.

  15. Urban Design Interventions Towards a Bike Friendly City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Victor; Harder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    and design qualities of the streetscape. The research focuses on a bike infrastructure with a distinct typology: Hans Broges Gade in Aarhus where a dedicated bike lane function as an extension of a bicycle route linking the suburb to Aarhus Central Station. Based on the data collected and analyzed......, the findings of this research project can also support bike friendly design and planning, and cyclist advocacy....

  16. Fast Coordinated Control of DFIG Wind Turbine Generators for Low and High Voltage Ride-Through

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Wu, Qiuwei; Xu, Honghua

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fast coordinated control scheme of the rotor side converter (RSC), the DC chopper and the grid side converter (GSC) of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) wind turbine generators (WTGs) which is to improve the low voltage ride through (LVRT) and high voltage ride through...... were proposed considering the characteristics of the DFIG WTGs during voltage changes. The fast coordinated control of RSC and GSC were developed based on the characteristic analysis in order to realize efficient LVRT and HVRT of the DFIG WTGs. The proposed fast coordinated control schemes were...

  17. Improving E-Bike Safety on Urban Highways in China

    OpenAIRE

    Linjun Lu; Chen Wang; Tao Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to examine characteristics of e-bike fatal crashes on urban highways in China. Crash data were retrieved from the three-year crash reports (2010–2012) of Taixing City. Descriptive analysis was conducted to examine characteristics of e-bike riders, drivers, and crashes. The important findings include the following: (1) most fatal crashes were related to e-bike riders’ aberrant driving behaviors, including driving in motorized lanes, red-light running, driving against the direct...

  18. Calling, texting, and searching for information while riding a motorcycle: A study of university students in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long T; De Gruyter, Chris; Nguyen, Hang T T

    2017-08-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of calling, texting, and searching for information while riding a motorcycle among university students and the influences of sociodemographic characteristics, social norms, and risk perceptions on these behaviors. Students at 2 university campuses in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the 2 largest cities in Vietnam, were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Data collection was conducted during March and May 2016. There were 741 respondents, of whom nearly 90% of students (665) were motorcycle riders. Overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding is 80.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 77.9-83.9%) with calling having a higher level of prevalence than texting or searching for information while riding: 74% (95% CI, 70.7-77.3%) vs. 51.7% (95% CI, 47.9-55.5%) and 49.9% (95% CI, 46.1-53.7%), respectively. Random parameter ordered probit modeling results indicate that mobile phone use while riding is associated with gender, motorcycle license duration, perceived crash risk, perceived risk of mobile phone snatching, and perceptions of friends' mobile phone use while riding. Mobile phone use while riding a motorcycle is highly prevalent among university students. Educational programs should focus on the crash and economic risk of all types of mobile phone use while riding, including calling, texting, and searching for information. In addition, they should consider targeting the influence of social norms and peers on mobile phone use while riding.

  19. Park-and-Ride motivations and air quality norms in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Marc; de Haes, Jan; Montalvo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Transport congestion and the quality of the air in cities is a persistent concern for urban planners, and in this context Park and Ride (P. +. R) facilities have been proposed as an element of urban sustainability strategies in many cities in Europe. In 2008 a European Commission directive aimed at

  20. Mountain biking injuries: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronisch, Robert L; Pfeiffer, Ronald P

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the available literature regarding injuries in off-road bicyclists. Recent progress in injury research has allowed the description of several patterns of injury in this sport. Mountain biking remains popular, particularly among young males, although sales and participation figures have decreased in the last several years. Competition in downhill racing has increased, while cross-country racing has decreased somewhat in popularity. Recreational riders comprise the largest segment of participants, but little is known about the demographics and injury epidemiology of noncompetitive mountain cyclists. Most mountain bikers participating in surveys reported a history of previous injuries, but prospective studies conducted at mountain bike races have found injury rates of bike racing the risk of injury may be higher for women than men. Minor injuries such as abrasions and contusions occur frequently, but are usually of little consequence. Fractures usually involve the torso or upper extremities, and shoulder injuries are common. Head and face injuries are not always prevented by current helmet designs. Fatal injuries are rare but have been reported. Improvements in safety equipment, rider training and racecourse design are suggested injury prevention measures. The authors encourage continued research in this sport.

  1. CD16xCD33 bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) activates NK cells against primary MDS and MDSC CD33+ targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Michelle K; Ross, Julie A; Warlick, Erica D; Lund, Troy C; Verneris, Michael R; Wiernik, Andres; Spellman, Stephen; Haagenson, Michael D; Lenvik, Alexander J; Litzow, Mark R; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K; Blazar, Bruce R; Weiner, Louis M; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Vallera, Daniel A; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-05-08

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders that can progress to acute myeloid leukemia. Although hematopoietic cell transplantation can be curative, additional therapies are needed for a disease that disproportionally afflicts the elderly. We tested the ability of a CD16xCD33 BiKE to induce natural killer (NK) cell function in 67 MDS patients. Compared with age-matched normal controls, CD7(+) lymphocytes, NK cells, and CD16 expression were markedly decreased in MDS patients. Despite this, reverse antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays showed potent degranulation and cytokine production when resting MDS-NK cells were triggered with an agonistic CD16 monoclonal antibody. Blood and marrow MDS-NK cells treated with bispecific killer cell engager (BiKE) significantly enhanced degranulation and tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production against HL-60 and endogenous CD33(+) MDS targets. MDS patients had a significantly increased proportion of immunosuppressive CD33(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that negatively correlated with MDS lymphocyte populations and CD16 loss on NK cells. Treatment with the CD16xCD33 BiKE successfully reversed MDSC immunosuppression of NK cells and induced MDSC target cell lysis. Lastly, the BiKE induced optimal MDS-NK cell function irrespective of disease stage. Our data suggest that the CD16xCD33 BiKE functions against both CD33(+) MDS and MDSC targets and may be therapeutically beneficial for MDS patients.

  2. Cognition and relative importance underlying consumer valuation of park-and-ride facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, D.M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; vd Heijden, R.E.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    Results are reported of a study designed to identify the cognitive constructs underlying the valuation of park-and-ride (P&R) facilities and to measure the relative importance attached to the attributes of such facilities. Results show that the reliability of public transport is quite important.

  3. The magnitude of translational and rotational head accelerations experienced by riders during downhill mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Howard T; Atkins, Stephen; Dickinson, Ben D

    2018-03-21

    To determine the magnitude of translational and rotational head accelerations during downhill mountain biking. Observational study. Sixteen male downhill cyclists (age 26.4±8.4years; stature 179.4±7.2cm; mass 75.3±5.9kg) were monitored during two rounds of the British Downhill Series. Riders performed two runs on each course wearing a triaxial accelerometer behind the right ear. The means of the two runs for each course were used to determine differences between courses for mean and maximum peak translational (g) and rotational accelerations (rad/s 2 ) and impact duration for each course. Significant differences (p10g), FW=12.5±7.6, RYF=42.8±27.4 (t (22.96) =-4.70; p<0.001; 95% CI=17.00 to 43.64); maximum peak rotational acceleration, FW=6805.4±3073.8rad/s 2 , RYF=9799.9±3381.7rad/s 2 (t (32) =-2.636; p=0.01; 95% CI=680.31 to 5308.38); mean acceleration duration FW=4.7±1.2ms, RYF=6.5±1.4ms (t (32) =-4.05; p<0.001; 95% CI=0.91 to 2.76) and maximum acceleration duration, FW=11.6±4.5ms, RYF=21.2±9.1 (t (29.51) =-4.06; p=0.001; 95% CI=4.21 to 14.94). No other significant differences were found. Findings indicate that downhill riders may be at risk of sustaining traumatic brain injuries and course design influences the number and magnitude of accelerations. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. How challenging is a riding horse’s life? Field studies on fitness, workload and welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsters, C.C.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis were to evaluate in practice workload, fitness and welfare of riding horses under work and training conditions. Chapter II presents an overview of the parameters used in earlier studies on training, behaviour and equine welfare, and describes the evaluation of the

  5. Benefits of Hippotherapy and Horse Riding Simulation Exercise on Healthy Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliere, Camille; Collado-Mateo, Daniel; Villafaina, Santos; Duque-Fonseca, Paulo; Parraça, José A

    2018-04-05

    To provide an up-to-date research analysis on equine-assisted therapies and horse riding simulation exercise in older adults, and to suggest future directions in clinical practice and research. TYPE: Systematic review. A comprehensive search of studies was performed in 4 electronic databases (Cochrane, PubMed, PEDro, and Web of Science) regarding the effects of equine-assisted therapies and horse riding simulation exercise in older adults. Eight articles were selected, 5 of them focused on hippotherapy, 2 on horse riding simulation, and a single article that used the 2 types of therapy. PRISMA guidelines were followed for the data extraction process. The studies were all randomized controlled trials, but not double-blind, so they were classified as level of evidence B. Duration of hippotherapy programs ranged from 8-12 weeks. Sessions lasted between 15 and 60 minutes and were performed 2-5 times per week. Interventions using a horse simulator spanned 8 weeks and were conducted for 20 minutes 5 times per week. Results indicate that hippotherapy might improve balance, mobility, gait ability, and muscle strength, as well as could induce hormonal and cerebral activity changes in healthy older adults. Benefits of horse riding simulation could be limited to physical fitness and muscular activity. ▪▪▪. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Therapeutic Riding for a Student with Multiple Disabilities and Visual Impairment: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrman, Jennifer; Ross, David B.

    2001-01-01

    A 9-year-old with multiple disabilities and visual impairments was the focus of a 10-week developmental therapeutic riding program incorporating hippotherapy. The program has led to increased mobility, an increase in visual attention span and fixation time, signs of greater verbal communication, and the acquisition of new functional signs.…

  7. A Motion Simulator Ride Associated With Headache and Subdural Hematoma: First Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scranton, Robert A; Evans, Randolph W; Baskin, David S

    2016-02-01

    We report the first case report of symptomatic bilateral subdural hematomas (SDH) associated with riding a centrifugal motion simulator ride. A previously healthy 55-year-old male developed new onset daily headaches 1 week after going on the ride that were due to symptomatic bilateral SDH requiring operative intervention with a full recovery. There was no history of other trauma or other systemic or intracranial abnormality to account for the development of the SDH. We review the headaches and other clinical features associated with chronic SDH. Twelve cases of roller coaster headaches due to SDH associated with riding roller coasters have been reported. The pathophysiology is reviewed, which we believe is the same mechanism that may be responsible in this case. Although it is possible that this neurovascular injury is truly rare, it is also possible that this injury is underreported as patients and physicians may not make the association or physicians have not reported additional cases. The risk of this injury likely increases with age, as the size of the subdural space increases, and may support the maxim that "roller coasters and simulators are for kids." © 2015 American Headache Society.

  8. Traveler Preference for Park-and-Ride Facilities: Empirical Evidence of Generalizability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, D.M.; Heijden, R.E.C.M. van der; Molin, E.; Timmermans, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the main findings of a study, conducted in the Netherlands, aimed at testing whether preference functions for park-and-ride facilities, estimated from data collected in a specific Dutch region, can be generalized to a nationwide sample. Preference data in both samples were

  9. Can Walking or Biking to Work Really Make a Difference? Compact Development, Observed Commuter Choice and Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojan, Timothy R; Hamrick, Karen S

    2015-01-01

    Promoting active commuting is viewed as one strategy to increase physical activity and improve the energy balance of more sedentary individuals thereby improving health outcomes. However, the potential effectiveness of promotion policies may be seriously undermined by the endogenous choice of commute mode. Policy to promote active commuting will be most effective if it can be demonstrated that 1) those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity, and 2) that current active commuting is not explained by unobserved characteristics that may be the true source of a lower body mass index (BMI). Daily time-use diaries are used in combination with geographical characteristics of where respondents live and work to test 1) whether residents of more compact settlements are characterized by higher activity levels; and 2) whether residents of more compact settlements are more likely to bike or walk to work. An endogenous treatment model of active commuting allows testing whether reductions in BMI associated with walking or biking to work are in fact attributable to that activity or are more strongly associated with unobserved characteristics of these active commuters. The analysis of general activity levels confirms that residents of more compact cities do not expend more energy than residents of more sprawling cities, indicating that those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity. The endogenous treatment model is consistent with walking or biking to work having an independent effect on BMI, as unobserved factors that contribute to a higher likelihood of active commuting are not associated with lower BMI. Despite evidence that more compact settlement patterns enable active commuting, only a small share of workers in these areas choose to walk or bike to work. In general, the activity level of residents in more compact cities and residents in more sprawling areas is very similar. But, there is a

  10. Can Walking or Biking to Work Really Make a Difference? Compact Development, Observed Commuter Choice and Body Mass Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R Wojan

    Full Text Available Promoting active commuting is viewed as one strategy to increase physical activity and improve the energy balance of more sedentary individuals thereby improving health outcomes. However, the potential effectiveness of promotion policies may be seriously undermined by the endogenous choice of commute mode. Policy to promote active commuting will be most effective if it can be demonstrated that 1 those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity, and 2 that current active commuting is not explained by unobserved characteristics that may be the true source of a lower body mass index (BMI.Daily time-use diaries are used in combination with geographical characteristics of where respondents live and work to test 1 whether residents of more compact settlements are characterized by higher activity levels; and 2 whether residents of more compact settlements are more likely to bike or walk to work. An endogenous treatment model of active commuting allows testing whether reductions in BMI associated with walking or biking to work are in fact attributable to that activity or are more strongly associated with unobserved characteristics of these active commuters.The analysis of general activity levels confirms that residents of more compact cities do not expend more energy than residents of more sprawling cities, indicating that those in compact cities do not necessarily have a preference for more physical activity. The endogenous treatment model is consistent with walking or biking to work having an independent effect on BMI, as unobserved factors that contribute to a higher likelihood of active commuting are not associated with lower BMI.Despite evidence that more compact settlement patterns enable active commuting, only a small share of workers in these areas choose to walk or bike to work. In general, the activity level of residents in more compact cities and residents in more sprawling areas is very similar. But

  11. Transference of 3D accelerations during cross country mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Paul W; Fink, Philip W; Stannard, Stephen R

    2014-06-03

    Investigations into the work demands of Olympic format cross country mountain biking suggest an incongruent relationship between work done and physiological strain experienced by participants. A likely but unsubstantiated cause is the extra work demand of muscle damping of terrain/surface induced vibrations. The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between vibration mechanics and their interaction with terrain, bicycle and rider during a race pace effort on a cross country mountain bike track, on both 26″ and 29″ wheels. Participants completed one lap of a cross country track using 26″ and 29″ wheels, at race pace. Power, cadence, speed, heart rate and geographical position were sampled and logged every second for control purposes. Tri-axial accelerometers located on the bicycle and rider, recorded accelerations (128Hz) and were used to quantify vibrations experienced during the whole lap and over terrain sections (uphill and downhill). While there were no differences in power output (p=0.3062) and heart rate (p=0.8423), time to complete the lap was significantly (p=0.0061) faster on the 29″ wheels despite increased vibrations in the larger wheels (p=0.0020). Overall accelerometer data (RMS) showed location differences (pbike-body compared to those experienced at the lower back and head. The reduction in accelerations at both the lower back and head are imperative for injury prevention and demonstrates an additional non-propulsive, muscular, challenge to riding. Stress was greatest during downhill sections as acceleration differences between locations were greater when compared to uphill sections, and thus possibly prevent the recovery processes that may occur during non-propulsive load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Paediatric ride-on mower related injuries and plastic surgical management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2011-05-01

    Lawnmower related injuries cause significant morbidity in children and young teenagers. The \\'ride-on\\' mowers which are more powerful than the \\'walk behind\\' mowers are becoming increasingly popular. The incidence and severity of injuries from either type of lawnmower appears to be steadily rising as is the burden placed on local plastic surgical and emergency services in managing the care of these patients. The aims of the study were to demonstrate changing trends in lawnmower-related injuries to children presenting to a single unit over a ten-year period and to identify any association between injury severity and machine subtype (\\'ride-on\\' versus \\'walk-behind\\'). Hospital databases, theatre records and medical case notes were reviewed retrospectively of all patients under the age of 16 treated for lawnmower related injuries over a 10 year period from July 1998 to June 2008. Data gathered included patient demographics, injury site and severity, management (type and number of surgical procedures), length of hospital stay and outcome. Injury severity score was also calculated for each case. Controlling for estimated regional population changes, there was a significant increase in the number of ride-on mower related accidents in the time period 2003-2008, compared to the time period 1998-2003. Ride-on injuries had significantly higher injury severity scores, longer hospital stays and were more likely to involve amputations as compared with walk-behind injuries. Children can sustain significant injuries with unsafe lawnmower use. The current study demonstrates the increasing incidence of ride-on mower related injuries in children and identifies a greater morbidity associated with such injuries. Such presentations place intense demands on local plastic surgical services.

  13. WannaBike - one of the teams that participated in Bike2Work 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Bike2Work is a healthy living initiative involving companies across Switzerland, and in May and June this year it inspired 54 780 participants from 1 885 companies to take to the saddle for their daily commute, while simultaneously promoting a sustainable approach to transport. In the photo one can see the team "WannaBike" from CERN. The members of the team, from left to right, were: Nick Walter, Ludivine Ceard, Cecilia Uribe Estrada and Manuel Silva.

  14. Locating Portable Stations to Support the Operation of Bike Sharing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-26

    Redistributing bikes has been a major challenge for the daily operation of bike sharing system around the world. Existing literature explore solution strategies that rely on pick-up-and-delivery routing as well as user incentivization approaches. The...

  15. Bike Map Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Chapel Hill Bike Map Lines from KMZ file.This data came from the wiki comment board for the public, not an “official map” showing the Town of Chapel Hill's plans or...

  16. Effect of mountain biking on red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Kaupanger, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Scholten, Janneke

    2016-01-01

    Human outdoor activities, like mountain biking, often affect animal behaviour. Ungulates might avoid roads and trails, and increase their avoidance with increasing human activity. Recently, biking on forest trails has increased considerably in Norway, but we still have limited knowledge about how forest biking may affect wildlife. In this study, I used pellet group counts and camera traps to study the effect of biking trails on red deer occurrence in Kaupanger, Norway. Based on pellet group c...

  17. Bike Skills Training in PE Is Fun, Keeps Kids Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Judi Lawson; Sutton, Nancy P.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating bike skills into the elementary- and middle-school physical education curriculum encourages students to be physically active in a fun way while also learning bike safety skills. Winston-Salem's (NC) Safe Routes to School program demonstrates how collaboration with the public schools' health and physical education program can…

  18. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  19. Pilot Testing of a Sampling Methodology for Assessing Seed Attachment Propensity and Transport Rate in a Soil Matrix Carried on Boot Soles and Bike Tires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Nigel; Dietz, Kristina Charlotte; Bride, Ian; Passfield, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Land managers of natural areas are under pressure to balance demands for increased recreation access with protection of the natural resource. Unintended dispersal of seeds by visitors to natural areas has high potential for weedy plant invasions, with initial seed attachment an important step in the dispersal process. Although walking and mountain biking are popular nature-based recreation activities, there are few studies quantifying propensity for seed attachment and transport rate on boot soles and none for bike tires. Attachment and transport rate can potentially be affected by a wide range of factors for which field testing can be time-consuming and expensive. We pilot tested a sampling methodology for measuring seed attachment and transport rate in a soil matrix carried on boot soles and bike tires traversing a known quantity and density of a seed analog (beads) over different distances and soil conditions. We found % attachment rate on boot soles was much lower overall than previously reported, but that boot soles had a higher propensity for seed attachment than bike tires in almost all conditions. We believe our methodology offers a cost-effective option for researchers seeking to manipulate and test effects of different influencing factors on these two dispersal vectors.

  20. Speed choice and mental workload of elderly cyclists on e-bikes in simple and complex traffic situations : a field experiment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlakveld, W.P. Twisk, D.A.M. Christoph, M.W.T. Boele, M.J. Sikkema, R. Remy, R. & Schwab, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    To study the speed choice and mental workload of elderly cyclists on electrical assisted bicycles (e-bikes) in simple and complex traffic situations compared to these on conventional bicycles, a field experiment was conducted using two instrumented bicycles. These bicycles were identical except for

  1. Preliminary results from a field experiment on e-bike safety : Speed choice and mental workload for middle-aged and elderly cyclists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, D.A.M.; Boele, M.J.; Vlakveld, W.P.; Christoph, M.; Sikkema, R.; Remij, R.; Schwab, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    To study the safety of e-bikes for the elderly, an experimental field study was conducted, using instrumented bicycles and comparing two age groups: older cyclists, n= 29, mean age = 70, SD = 4.2 and middle-aged cyclists, n = 29, mean age = 38, SD = 4.3. All were regular cyclists. They rode a fixed

  2. The potential for e-biking among the younger population: a study of Dutch students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazier, Paul; Weitkamp, Gerd; Berg, van den A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the benefits and limitations of e-bike use for students participating in a pilot in a university town in the Netherlands. It targets a gap in the literature regarding e-bike use in early adulthood. Thirty-seven pilot participants completed a survey on their e-bike experiences,

  3. 14 CFR 23.1399 - Riding light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Riding light. 23.1399 Section 23.1399... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1399 Riding light. (a) Each riding (anchor) light required for a seaplane or amphibian, must be installed so that it...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1399 - Riding light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Riding light. 27.1399 Section 27.1399... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 27.1399 Riding light. (a) Each riding light required for water operation must be installed so that it can— (1) Show a white light for at least two...

  5. 14 CFR 29.1399 - Riding light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Riding light. 29.1399 Section 29.1399... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Lights § 29.1399 Riding light. (a) Each riding light required for water operation must be installed so that it can— (1) Show a white light for at least two...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1399 - Riding light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Riding light. 25.1399 Section 25.1399... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1399 Riding light. (a) Each riding (anchor) light required for a seaplane or amphibian must be installed so that it can— (1) Show a white light for...

  7. Cognitive motivations of free riding and cooperation and impaired strategic decision making in schizophrenia during a public goods game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dongil; Kim, Yang-Tae; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is generally characterized by various positive and negative symptoms that are accompanied by significant social dysfunction. Various researchers investigated the functional impairments in schizophrenia including impaired theory of mind (TOM), poor integration of affective and cognitive information, and malfunctioning of adaptive and strategic learning process. However, most of the studies were limited to simplified cognitive tests or computerized choice games that exclude real social interaction. The aim of the current study was to investigate human strategies based on the incentives and particularly the cognitive and emotional motivations of free riding. We examined the decision patterns of 41 healthy subjects (HSs) and 37 schizophrenia patients (SZ) during the public goods game (PGG), one of the games simulating human cooperation and free riding in group interactions. Strategic decision processes during the iterative binary PGG were assessed in terms of cognitive understanding, loss sensitivity, and TOM. We found that greed and loss sensitivity both motivated free-riding behavior in the HS, but that they were more vulnerable to greedy incentives than to possible loss. More significantly, the SZ clearly displayed a lower prevalence of free riding and distinct decision patterns from HS. Nonstrategic and unexpectedly low free ridings in the SZ likely arise from poor integration of cognitive and affective information. We suggest that loss sensitivity and TOM as well as cognitive understanding are involved in regulation of the free riding and cooperative behavior.

  8. The age-related performance decline in ultraendurance mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Samuel; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2013-01-01

    The age-related changes in ultraendurance performance have been previously examined for running and triathlon but not mountain biking. The aims of this study were (i) to describe the performance trends and (ii) to analyze the age-related performance decline in ultraendurance mountain biking in a 120-km ultraendurance mountain bike race the "Swiss Bike Masters" from 1995 to 2009 in 9,325 male athletes. The mean (±SD) race time decreased from 590 ± 80 min to 529 ± 88 min for overall finishers and from 415 ± 8 min to 359 ± 16 min for the top 10 finishers, respectively. The mean (±SD) age of all finishers significantly (P Bike Masters" appears to start earlier compared with other ultraendurance sports.

  9. A study for prevent theft of the bike design and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Che; Huang, Tai-Shen

    2017-10-01

    This research will deal with the analysis and design of an anti-theft bicycle. At the first, the structure of the bicycle lock device will be focused. Therefore, all related academic journals, dissertations, and patent were collected, ordered, classified, and analysis in order to understand the phase of the developing tendency towards the bicycle lock apparatus presently. Nowadays, a wave of riding bicycles all over the world is quite prevailing. Also, the bicycles incline to be high-price sporting and recreational equipment. Due to this, the rate of stolen bicycles has increased as well. Even though there are many different types of bicycle locks sold on the market, they are unable to work out effectively to prevent from being stolen because they are easy to be broken. In this case, the target design in this research will be mainly put on the simple structure and facile use enabling users feeling secure to park their bicycles. The design also includes a lock that works together with the bicycle frame to provide a new option of anti-theft design for bicycles. We defined the functional requirements by the process of an innovative mechanical design, before designing the fundamental bicycle structure of the present anti-theft bicycle and finally integrate all the requirements of design. The SolidWorks software was used to draw a 3D model of the anti-theft bicycle; the ANSYS software was also used to do CAE analysis, to understand the distribution of stress, so that the design and the requirements of use are met.

  10. Fast Coordinated Control of DFIG Wind Turbine Generators for Low and High Voltage Ride-Through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fast coordinated control scheme of the rotor side converter (RSC, the Direct Current (DC chopper and the grid side converter (GSC of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG wind turbine generators (WTGs to improve the low voltage ride through (LVRT and high voltage ride through (HVRT capability of the DFIG WTGs. The characteristics of DFIG WTGs under voltage sags and swells were studied focusing on the DFIG WTG stator flux and rotor voltages during the transient periods of grid voltage changes. The protection schemes of the rotor crowbar circuit and the DC chopper circuit were proposed considering the characteristics of the DFIG WTGs during voltage changes. The fast coordinated control of RSC and GSC were developed based on the characteristic analysis in order to realize efficient LVRT and HVRT of the DFIG WTGs. The proposed fast coordinated control schemes were verified by time domain simulations using Matlab-Simulink.

  11. Gust Wind Effects on Stability and Ride Quality of Actively Controlled Maglev Guideway Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ju Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a framework to analyze the interaction between an actively controlled magnetic levitation vehicle and a guideway structure under gusty wind. The equation of motion is presented for a 30-dof maglev vehicle model consisting of one cabin and four bogies. In addition, a lateral electromagnetic suspension (EMS system is introduced to improve the running safety and ride quality of the maglev vehicle subjected to turbulent crosswind. By using the developed simulation tools, the effects of various parameters on the dynamic response of the vehicle and guideway are investigated in the case of the UTM maglev vehicle running on a simply supported guideway and cable-stayed guideway. The simulation results show that the independent lateral EMS and associated control scheme are definitely helpful in improving the running safety and ride quality of the vehicle under gusty wind. In the case of the cable-stayed guideway, at low wind speed, vehicle speed is the dominant factor influencing the dynamic responses of the maglev vehicle and the guideway, but at wind speed over 10 m/s, wind becomes the dominant factor. For the ride quality of the maglev vehicle, wind is also the most influential factor.

  12. Demographic and psychological variables affecting test subject evaluations of ride quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, N. C.; Conley, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Ride-quality experiments similar in objectives, design, and procedure were conducted, one using the U.S. Air Force Total In-Flight Simulator and the other using the Langley Passenger Ride Quality Apparatus to provide the motion environments. Large samples (80 or more per experiment) of test subjects were recruited from the Tidewater Virginia area and asked to rate the comfort (on a 7-point scale) of random aircraft motion typical of that encountered during STOL flights. Test subject characteristics of age, sex, and previous flying history (number of previous airplane flights) were studied in a two by three by three factorial design. Correlations were computed between one dependent measure, the subject's mean comfort rating, and various demographic characteristics, attitudinal variables, and the scores on Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. An effect of sex was found in one of the studies. Males made higher (more uncomfortable) ratings of the ride than females. Age and number of previous flights were not significantly related to comfort ratings. No significant interactions between the variables of age, sex, or previous number of flights were observed.

  13. CircleRides: developing an older adult transportation application and evaluating feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Melinda; Kelly, Norene

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess perceptions of CircleRides, a paper prototype of a service website designed to meet older adult transportation needs. Researchers used purposive sampling to conduct two focus groups comprised of older adults to obtain feedback on the CircleRides prototype at the beginning of its iterative design process. One focus group was conducted in a continuing care retirement community (n = 13) and the other in an independent living community for older adults (n = 11). The study assessed perceptions of the CircleRides prototype as well as self-reported older adult transportation preferences and needs. Three themes emerged from the data: (a) trust and concern, (b) socialization, and (c) flexibility and options. Researchers found that participants are interested in transportation options; however, concern exists about trusting a new system or prototype that has not established a reputation. Findings from the current study offer lessons learned for future iterations and for creating transportation prototypes for older adults. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. The Effects of Senses of Direction on Wayfinding Behaviors: Evidence from Biking Tourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jo-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine and observe the effects of senses of direction (i.e., abilities of memory and awareness of orientation on wayfinding behaviors for biking tourists. A total of 295 biking tourists completed a questionnaire using a purposive sampling method. The hierarchical regression model was employed to test the proposed hypotheses. Results show that biking tourists’ abilities of memory and awareness of orientation have a direct effect on their wayfinding behaviors. The contribution of this study is to demonstrate the implication of senses of direction to biking tourists’ wayfinding behaviors and to provide biking tourists suggestions for wayfinding strategies.

  15. Investigating the Role of Auditory Feedback in a Multimodal Biking Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Grani, Francesco; Serafin, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the role of auditory feedback in affecting perception of effort while biking in a virtual environment. Subjects were biking on a stationary chair bike, while exposed to 3D renditions of a recumbent bike inside a virtual environment (VE). The VE simulated a park...... and was created in the Unity5 engine. While biking, subjects were exposed to 9 kinds of auditory feedback (3 amplitude levels with three different filters) which were continuously triggered corresponding to pedal speed, representing the sound of the wheels and bike/chain mechanics. Subjects were asked to rate...... the perception of exertion using the Borg RPE scale. Results of the experiment showed that most subjects perceived a difference in mechanical resistance from the bike between conditions, but did not consciously notice the variations of the auditory feedback, although these were significantly varied. This points...

  16. Overall Bike Effectiveness as a Sustainability Metric for Bike Sharing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Nugroho Yahya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bike sharing systems (BSS have been widely accepted as an urban transport scheme in many cities around the world. The concept is recently expanded and followed by many cities to offer citizen a “green” and flexible transportation scheme in urban areas. Many works focus on the issues of bike availability while the bike performance, i.e., life cycle issues and its sustainability, for better management has been abandoned. As a consequence, mismanagement of BSS would lead to cost inefficiency and, the worst case, end with operation termination. This study proposes a design science approach by developing an Overall Bike Effectiveness (OBE framework. By incorporating the concept of overall equipment analysis (OEE, the proposed framework is used to measure the bike utilization. Accordingly, the OBE is extended into Theoretical OBE to measure the sustainability of the early-stage of BSS. The framework has been verified and evaluated using a real dataset of BSS. The proposed method provides valuable results for benchmarking, life cycle analysis, system expansion and strategy planning toward sustainability. The paper concludes with a discussion to show the impact of the proposed approach into the real practices of BSS including an outlook toward sustainability of BSS.

  17. Mountain Biking with Groups: A "Safe" Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Terry

    2001-01-01

    A survey mailed to 200 British mountain bike leaders found that rates of cycling accidents and injuries were greater in forests and woodlands than on terrain where a license is required to lead groups of young cyclists. Excessive speed was mentioned in most accidents, coupled with poor use of breaks in many cases. (SV)

  18. Stay Fit - Have Fun - Bike To Work

    CERN Multimedia

    Jens Vigen, CERN coordinator for Bike2Work

    2013-01-01

    This June, CERN will take part in the Swiss "Bike to Work" campaign once again. In this Swiss national campaign, which has attracted more than 50,000 participants, teams of four colleagues encourage each other to cycle to work throughout the month of June.   Participants of the “2012 Bike2CERN through the year” campaign - with the campaign winners, Tim Smith, Martial Dujardin and Mika Huhtinen - alongside the organisers and cycling enthusiasts. Participating is easy! Simply get together with three of your colleagues and register your Bike to Work team online before 31 May. There are no fees for registering teams, there is no minimum distance, and parts of the journey can be done using public transport. There is even an opening for non-cyclists: one member per team can be a pedestrian or a skateboarder or use any other means of transport that does not depend on an engine. In addition to the June event, CERN is also supporting "Bike to CERN throu...

  19. Towards automatic decision support for bike-sharing system design

    OpenAIRE

    Ter Beek, Maurice H.; Gnesi, Stefania; Latella, Diego; Massink, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Public bike-sharing systems are a popular means of sustainable urban mobility, but their successful introduction in a city stands or falls with their specific designs. What kind of bikes and docking stations are needed, how many and where to install them? How to avoid as much as possible that stations are completely empty or full for some period? Hence, a bike-sharing system can be seen both as a highly (re)configurable system and as a collective adaptive system. In this paper, we present two...

  20. A novel "hitch-and-ride" deep biliary cannulation method during rendezvous endoscopic ultrasound-guided ERCP technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Saburo; Kogure, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Suguru; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Takahara, Naminatsu; Nakamura, Tomoka; Sato, Tatsuya; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; Ishigaki, Kazunaga; Saito, Kei; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-10-01

    Background and study aim Endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) is increasingly reported as a treatment option after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. We developed a novel "hitch-and-ride" catheter for biliary cannulation to reduce the risk of guidewire loss during EUS-RV. Patients and methods We retrospectively evaluated safety and technical success of EUS-RV between June 2011 and May 2016. Biliary cannulation during EUS-RV using three methods - over-the-wire, along-the-wire, and hitch-and-ride - were compared. Results A total of 30 EUS-RVs were attempted and the technical success rate was 93.3 %, with two failures (one bile duct puncture and one guidewire insertion). After 28 cases of successful guidewire passage, cannulation was attempted by the over-the-wire (n = 13), along-the-wire (n = 4) or hitch-and-ride (n = 11) method. Only the hitch-and-ride method achieved biliary cannulation without guidewire loss or conversion to the other methods. Time to cannulation was shorter with the hitch-and-ride method (4 minutes) than with over-the-wire and along-the-wire methods (9 and 13 minutes, respectively). The adverse event rate of EUS-RV was 23.3 %. Conclusion A novel hitch-and-ride catheter was feasible for biliary cannulation after EUS-RV. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Risky riding behavior on two wheels: the role of cognitive, social, and personality variables among young adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Alessandra; Piccirelli, Alessandra; Girardi, Damiano; Dal Corso, Laura; De Carlo, Nicola A

    2013-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze and estimate the relations between risky riding behaviors and some personality and sociocognitive variables through structural equation modeling. We focused on two-wheel riding behavior among a sample of 1,028 Italian adolescents at their first driving experience. The main findings confirmed the role of personality in influencing riding behavior directly as well as indirectly through risk perception. In particular, risk perception was a significant mediator between personality, social norm, and riding behavior. The significant relations that emerged in the general sample were further confirmed in the two specific sub-samples of males and females. In terms of social marketing and educational communication, it may consequently be advisable to proceed in an integrated and coordinated manner at both the cognitive and social level, taking into account some "dispositions to risk" related to personality. The integrated and coordinated action on different levels--cognitive, social, and personality--may therefore allow more effective and significant results in reducing those risky riding behaviors that often underlie young two-wheel riders' higher involvement in traffic accidents. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic Effects of Mechanical Horseback Riding on Gait and Balance Ability in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun Young; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Chung, Jin Sang; Lee, Hyun-Cheol; Lim, Jae Kuk; Lee, Jiwon; Park, Kawn Yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the therapeutic effects of mechanical horseback riding for gait and balance parameters in post-stroke patients. Method This study was a non randomized prospective positive-controlled trial over a 12 week period. From May 2011 to October 2011, 37 stroke patients were recruited from our outpatient clinic and divided into two groups. The control group received the conventional physiotherapy while the intervention group received the conventional physiotherapy along with mechanical horseback riding therapy for 12 weeks. Outcome measurements of gait included the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC) and gait part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (G-POMA) while those of balance included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the balance part of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (B-POMA). These measurements were taken before and after treatment. Results There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics and initial values between the two groups. When comparing baseline and 12 weeks post treatment in each group, the intervention group showed significant improvement on BBS (39.9±5.7 → 45.7±4.8, p=0.001) and B-POMA (10.4±2.6 → 12.6±2.1, p=0.001), but significant improvement on gait parameters. When comparing the groups, the dynamic balance category of BBS in post treatment showed significant difference (p=0.02). Conclusion This study suggests that mechanical horseback riding therapy may be an effective treatment tool for enhancing balance in adults with stroke. PMID:23342307

  3. Magneto-rheological suspensions for improving ground vehicle's ride comfort, stability, and handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Mehdi

    2017-10-01

    A state-of-the-art discussion on the applications of magneto-rheological (MR) suspensions for improving ride comfort, handling, and stability in ground vehicles is discussed for both road and rail applications. A historical perspective on the discovery and engineering development of MR fluids is presented, followed by some of the common methods for modelling their non-Newtonian behaviour. The common modes of the MR fluids are discussed, along with the application of the fluid in valve mode for ground vehicles' dampers (or shock absorbers). The applications span across nearly all road vehicles, including automobiles, trains, semi-trucks, motorcycles, and even bicycles. For each type of vehicle, the results of some of the past studies is presented briefly, with reference to the originating study. It is discussed that Past experimental and modelling studies have indicated that MR suspensions provide clear advantages for ground vehicles that far surpasses the performance of passive suspension. For rail vehicles, the primary advantage is in terms of increasing the speed at which the onset of hunting occurs, whereas for road vehicles - mainly automobiles - the performance improvements are in terms of a better balance between vehicle ride, handling, and stability. To further elaborate on this point, a single-suspension model is used to develop an index-based approach for studying the compromise that is offered by vehicle suspensions, using the H2 optimisation approach. Evaluating three indices based on the sprung-mass acceleration, suspension rattlespace, and tyre deflection, it is clearly demonstrated that MR suspensions significantly improve road vehicle's ride comfort, stability, and handling in comparison with passive suspensions. For rail vehicles, the simulation results indicate that using MR suspensions with an on-off switching control can increase the speed at which the on-set of hunting occurs by as much as 50% to more than 300%.

  4. Therapeutic riding followed by rhythmic auditory stimulation to improve balance and gait in a subject with orthopedic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungermann, Cathryn M; Gras, Laura Z

    2011-12-01

    The study objectives were to investigate the effect of therapeutic riding with a subject who had an orthopedic diagnosis. This is a single-subject case report. The study was conducted at an equestrian facility with an indoor riding arena. The subject was a 59-year-old woman with grade I spondylolisthesis at L4/L5 and multilevel lumbar spinal stenosis in central and foraminal canals. The subject had an anterior cervical fusion of C3-C7. The subject has been ambulating with a straight cane due to her history of frequent falls. Gait, agility, strength, range of motion, and balance testing were performed. The subject had impairments of bilateral lower extremities with an ataxic gait pattern and was at risk for continued falls according to the balance measures. The intervention comprised therapeutic riding sessions 3 times a week for 20 minutes for 4 weeks. Each riding session was immediately followed by a 10-minute independent walking program with a metronome for rhythmic auditory stimulation. The outcome measures were as follows: Manual muscle testing and range of motion of the lower extremities, Gait Speed Test, Dynamic Gait Index, Four-Square Step Test, Chair Stand Test, Single Leg Stance. Improvements were seen in lower extremity strength and range of motion and balance. The subject improved on balance scores, placing her out of the risk for falls category. Therapeutic riding followed by rhythmic auditory stimulation improved lower extremity range of motion, strength, and balance with this subject.

  5. The physiology of mountain biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impellizzeri, Franco M; Marcora, Samuele M

    2007-01-01

    Mountain biking is a popular outdoor recreational activity and an Olympic sport. Cross-country circuit races have a winning time of approximately equal 120 minutes and are performed at an average heart rate close to 90% of the maximum, corresponding to 84% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). More than 80% of race time is spent above the lactate threshold. This very high exercise intensity is related to the fast starting phase of the race; the several climbs, forcing off-road cyclists to expend most of their effort going against gravity; greater rolling resistance; and the isometric contractions of arm and leg muscles necessary for bike handling and stabilisation. Because of the high power output (up to 500W) required during steep climbing and at the start of the race, anaerobic energy metabolism is also likely to be a factor of off-road cycling and deserves further investigation. Mountain bikers' physiological characteristics indicate that aerobic power (VO2max >70 mL/kg/min) and the ability to sustain high work rates for prolonged periods of time are prerequisites for competing at a high level in off-road cycling events. The anthropometric characteristics of mountain bikers are similar to climbers and all-terrain road cyclists. Various parameters of aerobic fitness are correlated to cross-country performance, suggesting that these tests are valid for the physiological assessment of competitive mountain bikers, especially when normalised to body mass. Factors other than aerobic power and capacity might influence off-road cycling performance and require further investigation. These include off-road cycling economy, anaerobic power and capacity, technical ability and pre-exercise nutritional strategies.

  6. Stupidity, Sloth and Public Policy: Social Darwinism Rides Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Bernard C.

    This paper identifies and analyzes some of the arguments employed by those who feel that "we have done enough" for the less fortunate members of society, who wish to curtail or end Federal involvement in social change, and who have lost sight of the dual goals of individualism and equality of opportunity. These arguments fall roughly into three…

  7. Free riding and the provision of candy bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, M.; Kooreman, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper uses Canadian data to study the relationship between sterilisation and the work careers of women. The study is motivated by the observation that childbearing and child rearing are the main reasons for the intermittency of womens ’work. Sterilisation may be correlated with a change in the

  8. Acute injury and chronic disability resulting from surfboard riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D McD; Bennett, D; Carter, M; Garewal, D; Finch, C F

    2004-12-01

    We undertook a cross-sectional survey of surfers at eight Victorian beaches between February and May 2003 and analysed acute injury and chronic disability sustained while surfing during the preceding 12 months. Significant injuries were defined as requiring medical attention or time off surfing/work. 646 surfers were enrolled (90.2% male, median age 27 years, median years of surfing 10). 145 surfers sustained 168 significant acute injuries in the preceding 12 months (0.26 injuries/surfer/year, 95% CI 0.22-0.30). Most were caused by striking a surfboard or another surfer (45.2%, 95% CI 37.6-53.1), "wiping out" (36.3%, 95% CI 29.1-44.1) or striking the seabed (17.9%, 95% CI 12.6-24.7). Injuries included lacerations (46.4%, 95% CI 38.8-54.3), sprains (28.6%, 95% CI 22.0-36.1), dislocations (10.7%, 95% CI 6.7-16.6) and fractures (8.9%, 95% CI 5.3-14.6). Body parts most frequently injured were the lower limb (45.8%, 95% CI 38.2-53.7) and the head/face (26.2%, 95% CI 19.9-33.6). Surfing injuries that were treated in Victorian emergency departments over a six year period revealed a similar pattern, although there was a greater proportion of head/face injuries (42.0%, 95% CI 36.0-48.1, p = 0.001). 20 surfers reported long-term effects from acute injuries, mainly unstable/stiff/painful joints. 136 surfers reported chronic health problems not related to acute injury including chronic/recurrent otitis externa and exostoses, muscle and joint pain/stiffness and pterygium. Significant injury while surfing is not uncommon. Although head injury accounts for a considerable proportion, very few surfers wear protective headgear. Greater use of protective headgear should be considered.

  9. Unrealistic optimism, fatalism, and risk-taking in New Zealand farmers' descriptions of quad-bike incidents: a directed qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Lynne; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Treharne, Gareth J; Milosavljevic, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Quad-bike incidents are a major cause of occupational injury and fatality on farms warranting health and safety attention. As part of a larger study, we carried out a face-to-face survey with 216 farmers in New Zealand. We quantitatively identified farmers' propensity for risk-taking, unrealistic optimism, and fatalism as risk factors in quad-bike loss-of-control events (LCEs). The purpose of the analysis presented in this article was to use these same farmers' recollections of LCEs to explore the a priori constructs in more detail using qualitative methods. Participants reporting one or more LCEs described their first LCE and any experienced in the previous 12 months. Participants provided open-text responses about what occurred at each LCE, their reflections, and general thoughts on LCE risk factors. Directed qualitative content analysis (QCA) was used to "unpack" risk-taking, unrealistic optimism, and fatalism whilst also delineating any additional concepts that farmers associate with LCEs. Risk-taking elements were more evident than unrealistic optimism or fatalism and more suggestive of farmers finding themselves in risky situations rather than engaging in risk-seeking behavior per se. Additional inductively derived categories of fatigue/stress, multitasking, inexperience, and quad-bike faults highlight the complex nature of LCEs and the importance of risk assessment covering these concepts as well as risky situations.

  10. Jazz Researchers: Riding the Dissonance of Pedagogy and Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozenski, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from a two-year ethnographic study, this article establishes jazz as an epistemological metaphor for critical participatory action research. The author juxtaposes the tensions inherent in jazz music and critical participatory research methodologies to provide a framework for understanding how dissonance can become a productive element for…

  11. Neuropsychological benefits of stationary bike exercise and a cybercycle exergame for older adults with diabetes: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay; Arciero, Paul J; Westen, Sarah C; Nimon, Joseph; Zimmerman, Earl

    2012-07-01

    This quasi-experimental exploratory study investigated neuropsychological effects of exercise among older adults with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with adults without diabetes (non-DM), and it examined the feasibility of using a stationary bike exergame as a form of exercise for older adults with and without diabetes. It is a secondary analysis that uses a small dataset from a larger randomized clinical trial (RCT) called the Cybercycle Study, which compared cognitive and physiological effects of traditional stationary cycling versus cybercycling. In the RCT and the secondary analysis, older adults living in eight independent living retirement facilities in the state of New York were enrolled in the study and assigned to exercise five times per week for 45 min per session (two times per week was considered acceptable for retention in the study) by using a stationary bicycle over the course of 3 months. They were randomly assigned to use either a standard stationary bicycle or a "cybercycle" with a video screen that displayed virtual terrains, virtual tours, and racing games with virtual competitors. For this secondary analysis, participants in the RCT who had type 2 DM (n = 10) were compared with age-matched non-DM exercisers (n = 10). The relationship between exercise and executive function (i.e., Color Trials 2, Digit Span Backwards, and Stroop C tests) was examined for DM and non-DM patients. Older adults with and without diabetes were able to use cybercycles successfully and complete the study, so the feasibility of this form of exercise for this population was supported. However, in contrast with the larger RCT, this small subset did not demonstrate statistically significant differences in executive function between the participants who used cybercycles and those who used stationary bikes with no games or virtual content on a video screen. Therefore, the study combined the two groups and called them "exercisers" and compared cognitive outcomes for DM versus

  12. Replacing car trips by increasing bike and public transport in the greater Barcelona metropolitan area: a health impact assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Rueda, D; de Nazelle, A; Teixidó, O; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J

    2012-11-15

    Estimate the health risks and benefits of mode shifts from car to cycling and public transport in the metropolitan area of Barcelona, Spain. We conducted a health impact assessment (HIA), creating 8 different scenarios on the replacement of short and long car trips, by public transport or/and bike. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality and change in life expectancy related to two different assessments: A) the exposure of travellers to physical activity, air pollution to particulate matter car trips, starting and ending in Barcelona City, to cycling (n=141,690) would be for the travellers who shift modes 1.15 additional deaths from air pollution, 0.17 additional deaths from road traffic fatality and 67.46 deaths avoided from physical activity resulting in a total of 66.12 deaths avoided. Fewer deaths would be avoided annually if half of the replaced trips were shifted to public transport (43.76 deaths). The annual health impact in the Barcelona City general population (n=1,630,494) of the 40% reduction in car trips would be 10.03 deaths avoided due to the reduction of 0.64% in exposure to PM2.5. The deaths (including travellers and general population) avoided in Barcelona City therefore would be 76.15 annually. Further health benefits would be obtained with a shift of 40% of the car trips from the Greater Barcelona Metropolitan which either start or end in Barcelona City to public transport (40.15 deaths avoided) or public transport and cycling (98.50 deaths avoided).The carbon dioxide reduction for shifting from car to other modes of transport (bike and public transport) in Barcelona metropolitan area was estimated to be 203,251t/CO₂ emissions per year. Interventions to reduce car use and increase cycling and the use of public transport in metropolitan areas, like Barcelona, can produce health benefits for travellers and for the general population of the city. Also these interventions help to reduce green house gas emissions. Copyright © 2012

  13. Effects of the Horse Riding Simulator and Ball Exercises on Balance of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, SeongGil; Yuk, Goon-chang; Gak, Hwangbo

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of horse riding exercise using a horse riding simulator (HRS) and a ball on static and dynamic balance of elderly people. [Methods] Thirty-two elderly people hospitalized in geriatric hospitals were randomly assigned to the HRS exercise group or the ball exercise groups, and they performed exercise for eight weeks. [Results] The length of postural sway during quite standing with and without eyes closed significantly decreased in both groups after the exercises and there was no significant difference between both groups in the Romberg test. In the functional reach test (FRT), there were significant increases in distance in both groups after the exercises, and the distance of the HRS exercise group was significantly greater than that of the ball exercise group. In the Timed Up & Go test (TUG) and Timed 10-meter walk test (10MWT), the time significantly decreased in both groups, and there was a more significant decrease in the HRS exercise group than in the ball exercise group. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that HRS and ball exercises may improve the balance and gait ability of elderly people hospitalized in nursing homes or geriatric hospitals. PMID:24396203

  14. The Environmental Impacts of Electric Bikes in Chinese Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Cherry, Christopher; Weinert, Jonathan; Ma, Chaktan

    2007-01-01

    Electric bikes have captured a large share of trips in many Chinese cities. They provide high levels of mobility and use little energy, two things that Chinese cities need to optimize. However, these benefits come at a cost, particularly emissions from primarily coal power plants and increased lead waste from battery use. Chinese policy makers are struggling with developing appropriate policy that maximizes modal options and mobility and minimizes environmental impacts. Electric bikes us...

  15. A behavioral choice model of the use of car-sharing and ride-sourcing services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Felipe F.; Lavieri, Patrícia S.; Garikapati, Venu M.; Astroza, Sebastian; Pendyala, Ram M.; Bhat, Chandra R.

    2017-07-26

    There are a number of disruptive mobility services that are increasingly finding their way into the marketplace. Two key examples of such services are car-sharing services and ride-sourcing services. In an effort to better understand the influence of various exogenous socio-economic and demographic variables on the frequency of use of ride-sourcing and car-sharing services, this paper presents a bivariate ordered probit model estimated on a survey data set derived from the 2014-2015 Puget Sound Regional Travel Study. Model estimation results show that users of these services tend to be young, well-educated, higher-income, working individuals residing in higher-density areas. There are significant interaction effects reflecting the influence of children and the built environment on disruptive mobility service usage. The model developed in this paper provides key insights into factors affecting market penetration of these services, and can be integrated in larger travel forecasting model systems to better predict the adoption and use of mobility-on-demand services.

  16. Aging effect on plasma metabolites and hormones concentrations in riding horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kawasumi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Age effects on plasma metabolites, hormone concentrations, and enzyme activities related to energy metabolism were investigated in 20 riding horses. Animals were divided into two groups: Young (3-8 years and aged (11-18 years. They were clinically healthy, and not obese. Plasma adiponectin (ADN concentrations in aged horses were significantly lower than those in young horses (mean±SE, 6.5±1.3 μg mL-1 vs, 10.9±1.7 μg mL-1, Mann-Whitney U test, respectively; P=0.0233. Plasma non-esterified fatty acid levels and Insulin and malondialdehyde concentrations in aged group tended to increase compared to those in young group although there were not significant differences statistically. In aged group, malate dehydrogenase/lactate dehydrogenase (M/L ratio, which is considered an energy metabolic indicator, did not change significantly compared to that in young group. Present data suggest that aging may negatively affect nutrition metabolism, but not induce remarkable changes in M/L ratio in riding horses.

  17. Planning for Bike Share Connectivity to Rail Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Greg Phillip; Sener, Ipek Nese

    2016-01-01

    Bike sharing can play a role in providing access to transit stations and then to final destinations, but early implementation of these systems in North America has been opportunistic rather than strategic. This study evaluates local intermodal plan goals using trip data and associated infrastructure such as transit stops and bike share station locations in Austin, Texas, and Chicago, Illinois. Bike sharing use data from both cities suggest a weak relationship with existing rail stations that could be strengthened through collaborative, intermodal planning. The study suggests a planning framework and example language that could be tailored to help address the linkage between bike sharing and transit. Rather than an exhaustive study of the practice, this study provides evidence from these two cities that identify opportunities to improve intermodal planning. Cities that are planning or expanding a bike sharing system should consider carefully how to leverage this mode with existing modes of transport. Regardless of a city’s status in implementing a bike sharing system, planners can leverage information on existing transport systems for planning at regional and local levels. PMID:27872554

  18. Improving E-Bike Safety on Urban Highways in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine characteristics of e-bike fatal crashes on urban highways in China. Crash data were retrieved from the three-year crash reports (2010–2012 of Taixing City. Descriptive analysis was conducted to examine characteristics of e-bike riders, drivers, and crashes. The important findings include the following: (1 most fatal crashes were related to e-bike riders’ aberrant driving behaviors, including driving in motorized lanes, red-light running, driving against the direction of traffic, inattentive driving, and drunk driving; (2 e-bike riders with lower educational background tended to perform illegal or inattentive driving behaviors in fatal crashes; (3 most drivers were not found to commit any faults and very few drivers were found to commit drunk driving offences; (4 most nighttime fatal crashes were related to absence of street lightings; (5 heavy good vehicles (HGVs and small passenger cars were the two vehicle types that were mostly involved in the e-bike fatal crashes. This study provides useful information that can help traffic engineers better understand e-bike safety in China and develop safety countermeasures.

  19. Simulations of Carnival Rides and Rube Goldberg Machines for the Visualization of Concepts of Statics and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, William; Williams, Richard; Yao, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Solid modeling is widely used as a teaching tool in summer activities with high school students. The addition of motion analysis allows concepts from statics and dynamics to be introduced to students in both qualitative and quantitative ways. Two sets of solid modeling projects--carnival rides and Rube Goldberg machines--are shown to allow the…

  20. Physical Exercise Keeps the Brain Connected: Biking Increases White Matter Integrity in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatkova, Alena; Mandl, René C W; Scheewe, Thomas W; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2015-07-01

    It has been shown that learning a new skill leads to structural changes in the brain. However, it is unclear whether it is the acquisition or continuous practicing of the skill that causes this effect and whether brain connectivity of patients with schizophrenia can benefit from such practice. We examined the effect of 6 months exercise on a stationary bicycle on the brain in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Biking is an endemic skill in the Netherlands and thus offers an ideal situation to disentangle the effects of learning vs practice. The 33 participating patients with schizophrenia and 48 healthy individuals were assigned to either one of two conditions, ie, physical exercise or life-as-usual, balanced for diagnosis. Diffusion tensor imaging brain scans were made prior to and after intervention. We demonstrate that irrespective of diagnosis regular physical exercise of an overlearned skill, such as bicycling, significantly increases the integrity, especially of motor functioning related, white matter fiber tracts whereas life-as-usual leads to a decrease in fiber integrity. Our findings imply that exercise of an overlearned physical skill improves brain connectivity in patients and healthy individuals. This has important implications for understanding the effect of fitness programs on the brain in both healthy subjects and patients with schizophrenia. Moreover, the outcome may even apply to the nonphysical realm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Come on and take a free ride : Contributing to public goods in native and foreign language settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbig, Diemo; Terjesen, Siri; Procher, Vivien; Muehlfeld, Katrin; Van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2016-01-01

    Business schools around the world must prepare their students for two realities: operating in an English-speaking business world and working in teams. As yet, there is limited understanding of how operating in a native or a foreign language impacts students' propensity to free ride in group

  2. Come on and take a free ride : Contributing to public goods in native and foreign language settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbig, D.; Terjesen, S.; Procher, V.; Muhlfeld, K.S.; van Witteloostuijn, A.

    Business schools around the world must prepare their students for two realities: operating in an English-speaking business world and working in teams. As yet, there is limited understanding of how operating in a native or a foreign language impacts students' propensity to free ride in group

  3. An Effective Grouping Method for Privacy-Preserving Bike Sharing Data Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S M Touhidul Hasan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Bike sharing programs are eco-friendly transportation systems that are widespread in smart city environments. In this paper, we study the problem of privacy-preserving bike sharing microdata publishing. Bike sharing systems collect visiting information along with user identity and make it public by removing the user identity. Even after excluding user identification, the published bike sharing dataset will not be protected against privacy disclosure risks. An adversary may arrange published datasets based on bike’s visiting information to breach a user’s privacy. In this paper, we propose a grouping based anonymization method to protect published bike sharing dataset from linking attacks. The proposed Grouping method ensures that the published bike sharing microdata will be protected from disclosure risks. Experimental results show that our approach can protect user privacy in the released datasets from disclosure risks and can keep more data utility compared with existing methods.

  4. The Effects of Senses of Direction on Wayfinding Behaviors: Evidence from Biking Tourists

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Jo-Hui; Ho Ching-Hua; Ngan Kok-Lim; Tu Jin-Hua; Weerapaiboon Wongladda

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine and observe the effects of senses of direction (i.e., abilities of memory and awareness of orientation) on wayfinding behaviors for biking tourists. A total of 295 biking tourists completed a questionnaire using a purposive sampling method. The hierarchical regression model was employed to test the proposed hypotheses. Results show that biking tourists’ abilities of memory and awareness of orientation have a direct effect on their wayfinding behaviors. ...

  5. Evaluating Cumulative Ascent:. Mountain Biking Meets Mandelbrot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    The problem of determining total distance ascended during a mountain bike trip is addressed. Altitude measurements are obtained from GPS receivers utilizing both GPS-based and barometric altitude data, with data averaging used to reduce fluctuations. The estimation process is sensitive to the degree of averaging, and is related to the well-known question of determining coastline length. Barometric-based measurements prove more reliable, due to their insensitivity to GPS altitude fluctuations.

  6. Mountain biking: downhill for the environment or chance to up a gear?

    OpenAIRE

    Hardiman, Nigel; Burgin, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    The paper examines mountain biking as an increasingly popular adventure recreation activity. Some of its extreme derivatives have been incorporated into international events (e.g. Olympics). We review trends in mountain biking, consider the appropriateness of this activity in public natural areas with a conservation mandate (e.g. national parks, nature reserves) and consider alternative locations. We conclude that (1) mountain biking will continue to increase in popularity; and (2...

  7. Motorized dirt bike injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shah, Chetan; Parnell-Beasley, Donna; Greenberg, Bruce S

    2013-04-01

    The number of dirt bike injuries in children in the United States is increasing and poses a public health problem. The purpose of our study was to identify the imaging patterns of dirt bike injuries in children and associations with morbidity and mortality. The study included 85 children (83 boys, 2 girls) dirt bike injury treated at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. Imaging studies and hospital medical records were reviewed. Outcomes were classified into the following categories: short-term disability, long-term disability or no follow-up available. Imaging studies were reviewed for head, torso, and extremity injuries. One-tailed z test for two proportions was used to determine significant differences between various proportions. Chi-square test with Yates correction was used to determine the significance of long-term disability with injury type. Long bone fractures were the most common injuries. Lower extremity fractures accounted for 79% of extremity fractures and were significantly more common than upper extremity fractures (p = 0.001). Head injuries included fractures (n = 9), brain contusion (n = 5), and meningeal hemorrhage (n = 2). Head injury was associated with long-term disability (p < 0.0001). All torso injuries were solitary. Long-term disability was associated with head injuries but not with torso or extremity injuries. Lower extremity injuries were significantly more common than upper extremity injuries. Torso solid organ injuries were uniformly solitary. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Effects of Indoor Horseback Riding and Virtual Reality Exercises on the Dynamic Balance Ability of Normal Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to determine the effect of indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises on the dynamic balance ability of normal adults. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 normal adults and divided them into two groups: an indoor horseback riding exercise group (IHREG, n = 12) and a virtual reality exercise group (VREG, n = 12). [Methods] IHREG exercised on indoor horseback riding equipment and VREG exercised using the Nintendo Wii Fit three times a week for six weeks. The Biodex Balance System was used to analyze dynamic balance as measured by the overall stability index (OSI), anteroposterior stability index (APSI), and mediolateral stability index (MLSI). [Results] In the within-group comparison, IHREG and VERG both showed significant decreases in the dynamic balance indexes of OSI, APSI, and MLSI after the intervention, but no significant difference was found between the groups. [Conclusion] Both indoor horseback riding and virtual reality exercises were effective at improving the subjects’ dynamic balance ability as measured by OSI, APSI, and MLSI, and can be used as additional exercises for patients with conditions affecting postural control. PMID:25540494

  9. A comparison of leisure constraints among three outdoor recreation activities: whitewater rafting, canoeing and overnight horseback riding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyan P. Nyaupane; Duarte B. Morais; Alan Graefe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare leisure constraints across three outdoor recreation activities, whitewater rafting, canoeing, and overnight horseback riding, in the context of the three-dimensional leisure constraints model proposed by Crawford and Godbey (1987). The sample consisted of 650 outdoor enthusiasts from 14 U.S. states who showed an interest in...

  10. Improving Vehicle Ride and Handling Using LQG CNF Fusion Control Strategy for an Active Antiroll Bar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses a comparison of performance for an active antiroll bar (ARB system using two types of control strategy. First of all, the LQG control strategy is investigated and then a novel LQG CNF fusion control method is developed to improve the performances on vehicle ride and handling for an active antiroll bar system. However, the ARB system has to balance the trade-off between ride and handling performance, where the CNF consists of a linear feedback law and a nonlinear feedback law. Typically, the linear feedback is designed to yield a quick response at the initial stage, while the nonlinear feedback law is used to smooth out overshoots in the system output when it approaches the target reference. The half car model is combined with a linear single track model with roll dynamics which are used for the analysis and simulation of ride and handling. The performances of the control strategies are compared and the simulation results show the LQG CNF fusion improves the performances in vehicle ride and handling.

  11. The choice of park and ride facilities : an analysis using a context-dependent hierarchical choice experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, D.M.; vd Heijden, R.E.C.M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Park and ride (P & R) facilities have been proposed in several countries to alleviate the accessibility problems in cities. Despite growing accessibility problems, these facilities do not seem to attract the expected number of car drivers and are underused. In an attempt to measure consumer

  12. A review on the major sources of the interior sound vibration and riding comfort in vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlDhahebi, Adel Mohammed; Junoh, Ahmad Kadri; Ahmed, Amran

    2016-10-01

    Vehicle interior comfort is a crucial criteria that is considered by the perspective customer when purchasing a new vehicle. Meanwhile, automotive industries face the challenges for producing vehicles with better design criteria that meet the expectations of customers and eventually promote higher competitive advantages in areas of acoustic performance, cost effectiveness, product weight, and global competitive market. This review presents the major sources that influence the generation of noise and vibration in the interior part of the vehicles. It also demonstrates the relative methods that are used to assess the interior acoustics and vibration and further improve the riding comfort. This study is of a particular importance for acoustical researchers and automobile engineers, where it brings about suggestions and fundamentals that can contribute to acoustical comfort in vehicles.

  13. Mountain biking-related injuries treated in emergency departments in the United States, 1994-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicolas G; McKenzie, Lara B

    2011-02-01

    Injury research on mountain biking has been mostly limited to examining professional riders and off-road biking. Mountain bikes represent the largest segment of bike sales in the United States. Recreational mountain bike use is popular and understudied. To describe the scope, distribution, and trends of mountain bike-related injuries treated in US emergency departments. Descriptive epidemiologic study. A retrospective analysis was conducted with data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for patients aged ≥ 8 years from 1994 through 2007. Sample weights provided by the system were used to calculate national estimates of mountain bike-related injuries based on 4624 cases. Bivariate comparisons between categorical variables were assessed with injury proportion ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Nationwide, an estimated 217 433 patients were treated for mountain bike-related injuries in US emergency departments from 1994 to 2007, an average of 15 531 injuries per year. The annual number of injuries decreased 56%, from a high of 23 177 in 1995 to 10 267 in 2007 (P bike-related injuries decreased from 1994 to 2007. Upper extremity fractures were the most common injury. Girls and women may be more likely than boys and men to sustain more severe injuries requiring hospitalization. Despite the decline over the past decade, more can be done to improve safety and reduce injuries in this popular recreational activity.

  14. An Inquiry-Oriented Approach to Span and Linear Independence: The Case of the Magic Carpet Ride Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawro, Megan; Rasmussen, Chris; Zandieh, Michelle; Sweeney, George Franklin; Larson, Christine

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an innovative instructional sequence for an introductory linear algebra course that supports students' reinvention of the concepts of span, linear dependence, and linear independence. Referred to as the Magic Carpet Ride sequence, the problems begin with an imaginary scenario that allows students to build rich imagery and…

  15. Time-domain simulation and nonlinear analysis on ride performance of four-wheel vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y S; He, H; Geng, A L [School of Automobile and Traffic Engineering, Liaoning University of Technology, Jinzhou 121001 (China)], E-mail: jzwbt@163.com

    2008-02-15

    A nonlinear dynamic model with eight DOFs of a four-wheel vehicle is established in this paper. After detaching the nonlinear characteristics of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, the multi-step linearizing method is used to simulate the vehicle vibration in time domain, under a correlated four-wheel road roughness model. Experimental verifications suggest that the newly built vehicle model and simulation procedure are reasonable and feasible to be used in vehicle vibration analysis. Furthermore, some nonlinear factors of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, which affect the vehicle ride performance (or comfort), are investigated under different vehicle running speeds. Some substaintial rules of the nonlinear vehicle vibrations are revealed in this paper.

  16. Time-domain simulation and nonlinear analysis on ride performance of four-wheel vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y S; He, H; Geng, A L

    2008-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model with eight DOFs of a four-wheel vehicle is established in this paper. After detaching the nonlinear characteristics of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, the multi-step linearizing method is used to simulate the vehicle vibration in time domain, under a correlated four-wheel road roughness model. Experimental verifications suggest that the newly built vehicle model and simulation procedure are reasonable and feasible to be used in vehicle vibration analysis. Furthermore, some nonlinear factors of the leaf springs and shock absorbers, which affect the vehicle ride performance (or comfort), are investigated under different vehicle running speeds. Some substaintial rules of the nonlinear vehicle vibrations are revealed in this paper

  17. Influence of Crowbar and Chopper Protection on DFIG during Low Voltage Ride Through

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita M. Monteiro Pereira

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The energy sector is evolving rapidly, namely due to the increasing importance of renewable energy sources. The connection of large amounts of wind power generation poses new challenges for the dynamic voltage stability analysis of an electric power system, which has to be studied. In this paper, the traditional Doubly-Fed Induction Generator model is employed. Based on this model, a crowbar and chopper circuit is set up to protect the turbine during the short-circuit period. The EUROSTAG software package was used for the simulation studies of the system, and numerical results were obtained. Conclusions are drawn that provide a better understanding of the influence of crowbar and chopper protection on Doubly-Fed Induction Generators (DFIG, during low voltage ride through, in a system with wind power generation.

  18. A prospective study of downhill mountain biking injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Johannes; Runer, Armin; Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Frick, Nora; Resch, Herbert; Moroder, Philipp

    2013-05-01

    Downhill mountain biking (DMB) has become an increasingly popular extreme sport in the last few years with high velocities and bold manoeuvres. The goal of this study was to provide information on the pattern and causes of injuries in order to provide starting points for injury prevention measures. We performed a monthly e-mail-based prospective survey of 249 riders over one summer season ranging from April until September 2011. A total of 494 injuries occurred during the 29 401 h of downhill exposure recorded, of these 65% were mild, 22% moderate and 13% severe, of which 41% led to a total restriction greater than 28 days. The calculated overall injury rate was 16.8 injuries per 1000 h of exposure. For experts it was 17.9 injuries per 1000 h of exposure, which is significantly higher than the 13.4 for professional riders (OR 1.34; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.75; p=0.03). A significantly higher rate of injury was reported during competition (20 per 1000 h) than during practice (13 per 1000 h) (OR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.01; p=0.0022). The most commonly injured body site was the lower leg (27%) followed by the forearm (25%). Most frequent injury types were abrasions (64%) and contusions (56%). Main causes of injury reported by the riders were riding errors (72%) and bad trail conditions (31%). According to our data DMB can be considered an extreme sport conveying a high risk of serious injury. Strategies of injury prevention should focus on improvements in riders' technique, checking of local trail conditions and protective equipment design.

  19. Increasing the Intensity over Time of an Electric-Assist Bike Based on the User and Route: The Bike Becomes the Gym

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H. De La Iglesia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many citizens have busy days that make finding time for physical activity difficult. Thus, it is important to provide citizens with tools that allow them to introduce physical activity into their lives as part of the day’s routine. This article proposes an app for an electric pedal-assist-system (PAS bicycle that increases the pedaling intensity so the bicyclist can achieve higher and higher levels of physical activity. The app includes personalized assist levels that have been adapted to the user’s strength/ability and a profile of the route, segmented according to its slopes. Additionally, a social component motivates interaction and competition between users based on a scoring system that shows the level of their performances. To test the training module, a case study in three different European countries lasted four months and included nine people who traveled 551 routes. The electric PAS bicycle with the app that increases intensity of physical activity shows promise for increasing levels of physical activity as a regular part of the day.

  20. Coordination between Fault-Ride-Through Capability and Overcurrent Protection of DFIG Generatorsfor Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Kawady, Tamer A.; Abdel-Rahman, Mansour H.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the increasing penetration of wind farms in power systems, stability issues arise strongly for power system operation. Doubly-Fed Induction Generators (DFIG) are charac-terized with some unique features during normal/abnormal op-erating conditions as compared with singly-fed ones. Fault ri...... on protective relaying coordination in wind farms.......-Through (FRT) mainly aims to delay a disconnecting of the DFIG units during grid faults for a possible time to restore the system stability if the fault is cleared within a permissible time. This strategy may, however, affect the performance of related protective elements during fault periods. In this paper......, the Coor-dination between Fault Ride-Through Capability and Overcur-rent Protection of DFIG Wind Generators in MV Networks is in-vestigated. Simulation test cases using MATLAB-Simulink are implemented on a 345-MW wind farm in AL-Zaafarana, Egypt. The simulation results show the influence of FRT capability...

  1. Exposure to whole-body vibration and mechanical shock: a field study of quad bike use in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljevic, Stephan; McBride, David I; Bagheri, Nasser; Vasiljev, Radivoj M; Mani, Ramakrishnan; Carman, Allan B; Rehn, Borje

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and mechanical shock in rural workers who use quad bikes and to explore how personal, physical, and workplace characteristics influence exposure. A seat pad mounted triaxial accelerometer and data logger recorded full workday vibration and shock data from 130 New Zealand rural workers. Personal, physical, and workplace characteristics were gathered using a modified version of the Whole Body Vibration Health Surveillance Questionnaire. WBVs and mechanical shocks were analysed in accordance with the International Standardization for Organization (ISO 2631-1 and ISO 2631-5) standards and are presented as vibration dose value (VDV) and mechanical shock (S(ed)) exposures. VDV(Z) consistently exceeded European Union (Guide to good practice on whole body vibration. Directive 2002/44/EC on minimum health and safety, European Commission Directorate General Employment, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities. 2006) guideline exposure action thresholds with some workers exceeding exposure limit thresholds. Exposure to mechanical shock was also evident. Increasing age had the strongest (negative) association with vibration and shock exposure with body mass index (BMI) having a similar but weaker effect. Age, daily driving duration, dairy farming, and use of two rear shock absorbers created the strongest multivariate model explaining 33% of variance in VDV(Z). Only age and dairy farming combined to explain 17% of the variance for daily mechanical shock. Twelve-month prevalence for low back pain was highest at 57.7% and lowest for upper back pain (13.8%). Personal (age and BMI), physical (shock absorbers and velocity), and workplace characteristics (driving duration and dairy farming) suggest that a mix of engineered workplace and behavioural interventions is required to reduce this level of exposure to vibration and shock.

  2. Air Pollution alongside Bike-Paths in Bogota - Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Felipe Franco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study we present in this paper aims at characterizing the range of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 and black carbon (BC concentrations to which bike-path users in Bogotá are exposed to. Using a bike equipped with a DustTrak and a micro-aethalometer we measured PM2.5 and BC concentration levels along bike-paths corridors, during weekdays and weekends. Experiments were conducted in fours streets, representing four typical configurations of bike-paths in the city. Traffic data for workdays was also available from local mobility authority. Results indicate that bike-paths users in Bogota are exposed to air pollution levels far exceeding the threshold values established as potentially dangerous for human health. Average concentrations for PM2.5 ranged between 80 and 136 ug/m3 in workdays and between 30 and 72 ug/m3 in weekends. BC mean concentrations were between 16 and 38 µg/m3 during workdays and in the range 10 to 32 µg/m3 during weekends. A statistically significant difference exists in the levels of pollutants concentrations measured during workdays and weekends for all the considered bike paths. According to our results, both traffic volume and diffusions conditions, which are affected by many factors including street geometry, affect bike-path user’s exposure levels. Taking into account the important role that bicycling is playing as an alternative transport mode in Latin American cities, we consider these results provide useful insights to increase the appreciation of the excessive bikers´ exposure to air pollution in Bogotá. Moreover, these findings contribute with technical elements that should lead to the inclusion of air quality variable when designing and planning sustainable urban mobility infrastructures.

  3. The Prevalence of "Drinking and Biking" and Associated Risk Factors: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Se Hwan; Ahn, Ma Rhip; Han, Kyung Do; Lee, Jung Ho

    2017-09-01

    With the steady rise of health and environmental awareness, the number of bicyclists is increasing. However, there are few epidemiologic studies on bicycling under the influence (BUI). The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of BUI and the associated risk factors in a representative Korean population. The data of 4,833 adult bicyclists who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012) were analyzed. Among the 4,833 participants investigated in this study, 586 (12.1%) had experienced BUI. As participants' age increased, so did the prevalence of BUI (P < 0.001), with the participants who were aged 60-69 showing the highest prevalence of BUI (19.6%). With regard to BUI and drinking habits, the likelihood of being a heavy or high-risk drinker increased with the frequency of BUI (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a positive relationship between the frequency of BUI and alcohol use disorder identification score level. Finally, those who had previous experiences of BUI were significantly more likely to drive and ride motorcycles under the influence (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the prevalence of BUI was 12.1% and several associated risk factors for BUI were elucidated in this study. The development of specific preventive strategies and educational programs aimed at deterring individuals at a high risk of engaging in BUI is expected to reduce the number of alcohol-related bicycle injuries. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  4. Regole di sicurezza e responsabilità civile nella attività di mountain biking e downhill montano = Safety Rules and Civil Liability in the Practice of Mountain Biking and Downhill

    OpenAIRE

    Salvadori, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Il paper si prefigge l’obiettivo di esaminare, sotto diversi profili, le regole di sicurezza e la responsabilità civile nascente dall’esercizio del mountain biking e del downhill, due attività sportive in grande espansione che costituiscono ormai un volano importante nelle strategie di marketing connesse alla fruizione turistica della montagna estiva. L’analisi si focalizza sulla evoluzione del fenomeno sportivo e turistico connessa a questi sport e sulle responsabilità nascenti in capo ai so...

  5. Peak oxygen uptake in a sprint interval testing protocol vs. maximal oxygen uptake in an incremental testing protocol and their relationship with cross-country mountain biking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebisz, Rafał; Hebisz, Paulina; Zatoń, Marek; Michalik, Kamil

    2017-04-01

    In the literature, the exercise capacity of cyclists is typically assessed using incremental and endurance exercise tests. The aim of the present study was to confirm whether peak oxygen uptake (V̇O 2peak ) attained in a sprint interval testing protocol correlates with cycling performance, and whether it corresponds to maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O 2max ) determined by an incremental testing protocol. A sample of 28 trained mountain bike cyclists executed 3 performance tests: (i) incremental testing protocol (ITP) in which the participant cycled to volitional exhaustion, (ii) sprint interval testing protocol (SITP) composed of four 30 s maximal intensity cycling bouts interspersed with 90 s recovery periods, (iii) competition in a simulated mountain biking race. Oxygen uptake, pulmonary ventilation, work, and power output were measured during the ITP and SITP with postexercise blood lactate and hydrogen ion concentrations collected. Race times were recorded. No significant inter-individual differences were observed in regards to any of the ITP-associated variables. However, 9 individuals presented significantly increased oxygen uptake, pulmonary ventilation, and work output in the SITP compared with the remaining cyclists. In addition, in this group of 9 cyclists, oxygen uptake in SITP was significantly higher than in ITP. After the simulated race, this group of 9 cyclists achieved significantly better competition times (99.5 ± 5.2 min) than the other cyclists (110.5 ± 6.7 min). We conclude that mountain bike cyclists who demonstrate higher peak oxygen uptake in a sprint interval testing protocol than maximal oxygen uptake attained in an incremental testing protocol demonstrate superior competitive performance.

  6. Bike-powered electricity generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ŞTEFAN MOCANU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Finding new energy sources is an important challenge of our times. A lot of research focuses on identifying such sources that can also be exploited with relatively simple and efficient systems. These sources can be either new materials that can be used to generate energy, or solutions to scavenge already existing forms of energy. Part of the latter class of solutions, the system presented in this paper converts the energy consumed by many people in gyms (or even at home, during exercise into electric energy. This energy exists anyway, because people want to be healthier or to look better. Currently, this significant (in our opinion amount of energy is actually wasted and transformed into heat. Instead, in this study, a prototype scavenging system (dedicated to fitness/stationary bikes to collect and (reuse this energy is presented. Specifically, we depict the design of a low-budget system that uses existing, discrete components and is able to scavenge some of the energy spent by the biker. The experimental results show that the system is functional, but its efficiency is limited by (mechanical losses before the collection.

  7. Variability of Black Carbon and Ultrafine Particle Concentration on Urban Bike Routes in a Mid-Sized City in the Po Valley (Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lonati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyclists might experience increased air pollution exposure, due to the proximity to traffic, and higher intake, due to their active travel mode and higher ventilation. Several local factors, like meteorology, road and traffic features, and bike lanes features, affect cyclists’ exposure to traffic-related pollutants. This paper investigates the concentration levels and the effect of the features of the bike lanes on cyclists’ exposure to airborne ultrafine particulate matter (UFP and black carbon (BC in the mid-sized city of Piacenza, located in the middle of the Po Valley, Northern Italy. Monitoring campaigns were performed by means of portable instruments along different urban bike routes with bike lanes, characterized by different distances from the traffic source (on-road cycle lane, separated cycle lane, green cycle path, during morning (9:00 am–10:00 am and evening (17:30 pm–18:30 pm workday rush hours in both cold and warm seasons. The proximity to traffic significantly affected cyclists’ exposure to UFP and BC: exposure concentrations measured for the separated lane and for the green path were 1–2 times and 2–4 times lower than for the on-road lane. Concurrent measurements showed that exposure concentrations to PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 were not influenced by traffic proximity, without any significant variation between on-road cycle lane, separated lane, or green cycle path. Thus, for the location of this study PM mass-based metrics were not able to capture local scale concentration gradients in the urban area as a consequence of the rather high urban and regional background that hides the contribution of local scale sources, such as road traffic. The impact of route choice on cyclists’ exposure to UFPs and BC during commuting trips back and forth from a residential area to the train station has been also estimated through a probabilistic approach through an iterative Monte Carlo technique, based on the measured data. Compared

  8. On-line single server dial-a-ride problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feuerstein, E.; Stougie, L.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper results on the dial-a-ride problem with a single server are presented. Requests for rides consist of two points in a metric space, a source and a destination. A ride has to be made by the server from the source to the destination. The server travels at unit speed in the metric space

  9. "Paul Revere's Ride": Awakening Abolitionists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used to be both the best-known poet in the English-speaking world and the most beloved, adored by the learned and the lowly alike, read by everyone from Nathaniel Hawthorne and Abraham Lincoln to John Ruskin and Queen Victoria--and, just as avidly, by the queen's servants. "Paul Revere's Ride" is Longfellow's best-known…

  10. 76 FR 52046 - Final Policy Statement on the Eligibility of Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements Under Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... important for pedestrian comfort and safety. The most successful and useful public transportation systems... could take light rail, a bus, or ride a bike.'' \\4\\ As the Secretary further described, ``livable...; (G) Eligible Activities; (H) Bicycle Sharing Programs; (I) Planning Issues; (J) Safety Concerns; (K...

  11. Comparing the impacts of hiking, skiing and horse riding on trail and vegetation in different types of forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Törn, A; Tolvanen, A; Norokorpi, Y; Tervo, R; Siikamäki, P

    2009-03-01

    Nature-based tourism in protected areas has increased and diversified dramatically during the last decades. Different recreational activities have a range of impacts on natural environments. This paper reports results from a comparison of the impacts of hiking, cross-country skiing and horse riding on trail characteristics and vegetation in northern Finland. Widths and depths of existing trails, and vegetation on trails and in the neighbouring forests were monitored in two research sites during 2001 and 2002. Trail characteristics and vegetation were clearly related to the recreational activity, research site and forest type. Horse trails were as deep as hiking trails, even though the annual number of users was 150-fold higher on the hiking trails. Simultaneously, cross-country skiing had the least effect on trails due to the protective snow cover during winter. Hiking trail plots had little or no vegetation cover, horse riding trail plots had lower vegetation cover than forest plots, while skiing had no impact on total vegetation cover. On the other hand, on horse riding trails there were more forbs and grasses, many of which did not grow naturally in the forest. These species that were limited to riding trails may change the structure of adjacent plant communities in the long run. Therefore, the type of activities undertaken and the sensitivity of habitats to these activities should be a major consideration in the planning and management of nature-based tourism. Establishment of artificial structures, such as stairs, duckboards and trail cover, or complete closure of the site, may be the only way to protect the most sensitive or deteriorated sites.

  12. Research into the Impact of Bikeability Training on Children's Ability to Perceive and Appropriately Respond to Hazards When Cycling on the Road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Claire; Worth, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Bikeability (2014) is described as "cycling proficiency for the 21st century". The training is practical, skill-based, outcome-led and designed to "boost the confidence of the trainee and to minimise risk". There are three levels of training and children typically start Bikeability lessons once they have learned to ride a bike.…

  13. Baseline Testing of The EV Global E-Bike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Kolacz, John S.; Tavernelli, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated baseline testing of the EV Global E-Bike as a way to reduce pollution in urban areas, reduce fossil fuel consumption and reduce Operating costs for transportation systems. The work was done Linder the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program, which includes the Hybrid Electric Transit Bus (HETB). The E-Bike is a state of the art, ground up, hybrid electric bicycle. Unique features of the vehicle's power system include the use of an efficient, 400 W. electric hub motor and a 7-speed derailleur system that permits operation as fully electric, fully pedal, or a combination of the two. Other innovative features, such as regenerative braking through ultracapacitor energy storage are planned. Regenerative braking recovers much of the kinetic energy of the vehicle during deceleration. The E-Bike is an inexpensive approach to advance the state of the art in hybrid technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future space applications. A description of the E-bike, the results of performance testing, and future vehicle development plans is the subject of this report. The report concludes that the E-Bike provides excellent performance, and that the implementation of ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant performance improvements.

  14. IMPORTANT INFORMATION - Flagstaff Car-Park and Park-and-Ride (P+R)

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    As part of the new arrangements following the arrival of the tram-line at CERN, an Automatic Number-Plate Recognition (ANPR) system has been installed restricting access to the Flagstaff Car-park and the Park-and-Ride (P+R) zone according to the conditions set out below: Holders of a valid P+R user card may enter the car-park at all hours but may only park in the area specifically designated as the P+R zone. P+R user cards can be purchased from the Fondation des Parkings de Genève (http://www.ge.ch/parkings/abonnements.html)   Members of CERN personnel and of contractors' personnel, whatever their status, may freely access the Flagstaff Car-Park at all hours, as long as their vehicle is duly registered with CERN, but they may not use the P+R zone, which is reserved for holders of P+R user cards. Please check that your vehicle number-plates are properly registered via AdaMS (http://cern.ch/adams). If this is not the case, the following action must be taken: - for private or co...

  15. 75 FR 11107 - Revision of Land Management Plan for the George Washington National Forest, Virginia and West...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ..., mountain biking, All-Terrain Vehicle use, Off-Highway Vehicle use, horseback riding), roadless areas, wilderness, forest health, roads, minerals, fire, subsurface mineral rights, lands, air quality, special uses...--Ecological Health, Restoration and Sustainability Changes are needed in management direction for maintaining...

  16. Breaking Barriers to Bike Share: Insights from Residents of Traditionally Underserved Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Evidence has shown that higher income and white populations are overrepresented in both access to and use of bike share. Efforts to overcome underserved communities barriers to access and use of bike share have been initiated in a number of cities...

  17. "Cycling was never so easy!" An analysis of e-bike commuters' motives, travel behaviour and experiences using GPS-tracking and interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazier, Paul A.; Weitkamp, Gerd; van den Berg, Agnes E.

    2017-01-01

    The market for electrically-assisted cycling is growing fast. When substituting motorized travel, it could play an important role in the development of sustainable transport systems. This study aimed to assess the potential of e-bikes for low-carbon commuting by analysing a-bike commuters' motives,

  18. TEACHING PHYSICS: Biking around a hollow sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    1999-11-01

    The conditions required for a cyclist riding a motorbike in a horizontal circle on or above the equator of a hollow sphere are derived using concepts of equilibrium and the condition for uniform circular motion. The result is compared with an empirical analysis based on a video show. Some special cases of interest derived from the general solution are elaborated.

  19. Free Riding or Trust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard; Nilsson, Jerker

    2011-01-01

    It is often observed that members have little interest in monitoring their cooperatives. One explanation is that the members are free-riders, hoping that others will perform the task. Another explanation is that the weak member interest is a consequence of members having trust in the leadership....... These competing explanations refer to the theory of collective action and the social capital paradigm, respectively, and may be linked to the classical Gesellschaft and Gemeinschaft concepts. Hence, one may expect free-rider behavior when conditions of Gesellschaft exist and trustful behavior when Gemeinschaft...... conditions rule. These propositions get support from five studies of members’ readership of their cooperatives’ annual reports. In large and heterogeneous memberships there is free-riding behavior, which explains the members’ low interest in governing their cooperatives. To a limited extent a membership may...

  20. Usage Patterns of Electric Bicycles: An Analysis of the WeBike Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gorenflo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of data collected through the Waterloo WeBike project: a field trial in which over 30 sensor-equipped electric bicycles (e-bikes were given to members of the University of Waterloo for personal use. Our dataset includes e-bike trips and battery charging sessions spanning nearly three years, from summer 2014 until spring 2017. We also conducted three surveys both before and during the trial. Our main findings were that the primary purpose of the e-bikes in our trial was for commuting, with most trips lasting less than 20 minutes and most trips taking place in the summer months. Our battery charging analysis revealed no evidence of range anxiety, and our analysis of survey results showed little correlation between anticipated and actual use. Furthermore, when asked about their opinions about various modes of transportation, our participants rated regular bicycles higher than e-bikes even after becoming familiar with e-bikes through the field trial. Based on our analysis, we draw several conclusions, including the fact that the general population in Canada is still unaware of e-bikes and their potential. Moreover, e-bike manufacturers should target sales to nonbike users, such as seniors, rather than trying to displace sales of regular bicycles.

  1. Cooperate or Free Ride?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per H.

    2012-01-01

    of international cooperation. On the other hand, the evidence seems to confirm Kindleberger's hypothesis that small countries were free riding during the international financial crisis of 1931, and that therefore there is a need for some coordinating mechanism, or a hegemon, in such crises....... in the establishment of the BIS and free riders in the Austrian crisis, even though there were marked differences in their attitude to international cooperation. These results run counter to the views of those International Political Economy (IPE) theorists who argue that small states should be in favour......In this article, I discuss the role of the three Scandinavian central banks in the establishment of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in 1930, and in the international lender of last resort operation towards Austria in 1931. I argue that small central banks were reluctant supporters...

  2. Sibelius: Pohjola's Daughter; Night Ride and Sunrise; Four Legends from Kalevala (Lemminkäinen Suite). Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra, Neeme Järvi / Brian Hunt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hunt, Brian

    1997-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Sibelius: Pohjola's Daughter; Night Ride and Sunrise; Four Legends from Kalevala (Lemminkäinen Suite). Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra / Neeme Järvi. Deutsche Grammophon 453 426-2; 70:37 DDD

  3. [Riding therapy in the rehabilitation of mobility-impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäenpää, Helena; Kela, Katri; Sätilä, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Riding therapy is a comprehensive and functional form of rehabilitation, in which the rehabilitee, the horse and the riding therapist collaborate in order to achieve individually assigned goals that support rehabilitation. In Finland, riding therapy is therapeutic rehabilitation carried out by riding therapists who have undergone approved training. The therapy is mainly implemented in an individual form, but small group working is also applied, e.g. in the form of pair therapy and therapeutic vaulting. In Europe, this form of rehabilitation has been divided into hippotherapy supporting motor functions and heilpedagogical riding therapy functioning in support of upbringing.

  4. Bike Helmets and Black Riders: Experiential Approaches to Helping Students Understand Natural Hazard Assessment and Mitigation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, S. A.; Kley, J.; Hindle, D.; Friedrich, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Defending society against natural hazards is a high-stakes game of chance against nature, involving tough decisions. How should a developing nation allocate its budget between building schools for towns without ones or making existing schools earthquake-resistant? Does it make more sense to build levees to protect against floods, or to prevent development in the areas at risk? Would more lives be saved by making hospitals earthquake-resistant, or using the funds for patient care? These topics are challenging because they are far from normal experience, in that they involve rare events and large sums. To help students in natural hazard classes conceptualize them, we pose tough and thought-provoking questions about complex issues involved and explore them together via lectures, videos, field trips, and in-class and homework questions. We discuss analogous examples from the students' experiences, drawing on a new book "Playing Against Nature, Integrating Science and Economics to Mitigate Natural Hazards in an Uncertain World". Asking whether they wear bicycle helmets and why or why not shows the cultural perception of risk. Individual students' responses vary, and the overall results vary dramatically between the US, UK, and Germany. Challenges in hazard assessment in an uncertain world are illustrated by asking German students whether they buy a ticket on public transportation - accepting a known cost - or "ride black" - not paying but risking a heavy fine if caught. We explore the challenge of balancing mitigation costs and benefits via the question "If you were a student in Los Angeles, how much more would you pay in rent each month to live in an earthquake-safe building?" Students learn that interdisciplinary thinking is needed, and that due to both uncertainties and sociocultural factors, no unique or right strategies exist for a particular community, much the less all communities. However, we can seek robust policies that give sensible results given

  5. The Impact of Free Riding on Price and Service Competition in the Presence of E-Commerce Retailers

    OpenAIRE

    Steven Strauss

    2002-01-01

    An extensive literature has focused on price competition and the Internet; however, little attention has been given to the Internet's impact on service competition. Services include activities such as the provision of product information, repairs, faster checkout, after-sales advice/information, retail advertising, certification of products by limiting the available assortment size, and the ability to examine/test merchandise. A consumer "free rides" when the customer uses services at one ret...

  6. The choice of park and ride facilities: an analysis using a context-dependent hierarchical choice experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Ilona D M Bos; Rob E C M Van der Heijden; Eric J E Molin; Harry J P Timmermans

    2004-01-01

    Park and ride (P & R) facilities have been proposed in several countries to alleviate the accessibility problems in cities. Despite growing accessibility problems, these facilities do not seem to attract the expected number of car drivers and are underused. In an attempt to measure consumer evaluations of the attributes of P & R facilities, a stated choice experiment, based on the method of hierarchical information integration, was conducted in the city of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. This pape...

  7. Diseases and parasites in wolves of the Riding Mountain National Park region, Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronen, Astrid V; Sallows, Tim; Forbes, Graham J; Wagner, Brent; Paquet, Paul C

    2011-01-01

    We examined wolf (Canis lupus) blood and fecal samples from the Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP) region of Manitoba, Canada. In 601 fecal samples collected during two study periods in RMNP and the Duck Mountain Provincial Park and Forest (DMPPF) we found gastrointestinal helminth eggs from Alaria sp. (15.5%), Capillaria sp. (1.0%), taeniid tapeworms (30.8%), Toxascaris sp. (1.7%), Toxocara sp. (0.2%), Trichuris sp. (2.2%), and Moniezia sp. (0.5%). In addition, we found Demodex sp. (0.2%) and the protozoal cysts/oocysts of Sarcocystis sp. (37.3%), Cryptosporidium sp. (1.2%), coccidia (Isospora sp. or Eimeria sp.) (1.7%), and Giardia sp. (29.5%). No fecal shedding of canine parvovirus (CPV, n=387) was detected. All 18 blood samples collected in RMNP showed CPV exposure and eight of 18 blood samples indicated canine distemper virus (CDV) exposure. One wolf died from CDV. Our results are consistent with previous findings on pathogens affecting wolves and with high Giardia sp. prevalence in wolves inhabiting agricultural regions.

  8. The Development of the Model for the Park and Ride System in the Major Lithuanian Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vytautas Palevičius

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Park and Ride (P&R is the original transport system of public passengers, acting as a traditional supplement of public transport. The system is becoming widely popular in European cities. The central core of this system is composed of parking facilities in the specified parking areas at the approaches to the city with connections to public transport or special buses that allow people reach the city centre. The P&R system is based on a reduction in car density in the city centre as well as on a decrease in traffic noise, air and visual pollution. Furthermore, the P&R system is an economical and time-saving way to travel. This article has been prepared according to structural support provided by the European Union (EU for the purpose of developing the P&R system in five major Lithuanian cities – Vilnius, Kaunas, Klaipeda, Siauliai and Panevezys. Therefore, this paper is aimed at the development and application of the theoretical model of the P&R system to Lithuanian cities according to external good and bad practice.

  9. The Effects of Hippotherapy and a Horse Riding Simulator on the Balance of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Na, Sang Su

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We with respect to their effects on the compared hippotherapy with a horseback riding simulator (JOBA, Panasonic Inc. JP) static and dynamic balance of children with cerebral palsy (CP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-six children were randomly divided into two groups: a hippotherapy group that included 13 children, and a horseback riding simulator (JOBA, Panasonic Inc., Japan) group, which was also composed of 13 children. The two groups participated in 1 hour of exercise per day, 3 times a week, for 12 weeks. The subjects’ static balance ability was measured using BPM (software 5.3, SMS Healthcare Inc., UK) as the center of pressure sway length while standing for 30 seconds with their eyes open and looking to the front. Dynamic balance ability was measured using the PBS (Pediatric Balance Scale). [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in static and dynamic balance but significant differences between the two groups were not found. [Conclusion] The horseback riding simulator could be a useful alternative to hippotherapy for the improvement of static and dynamic balance of children with CP. PMID:24707098

  10. Exploring the Mode Change Behavior of Park-and-Ride Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahi Taphsir Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mode change behavior of park-and-ride (P&R users, which is of considerable significance to analyze the effectiveness of P&R site on the commuters’ travel mode change as well as the increase of public transport mode share. Data from an intercept interview survey conducted at different P&R facilities in Metropolitan Melbourne is used. A questionnaire containing revealed preference (RP and stated preference (SP questions is used to interview the individuals who park at the facility and catch public transport to go to city. This study firstly aims to know the factors affecting current travel behavior using RP data and secondly to investigate the importance of the factors on influencing the commuters’ decision of travel mode choice using the SP data. The empirical models using multinomial logistic regression reveal that travel time taken by transit vehicle and transfer time at P&R stations are the primary factors affecting individuals’ decision on choosing public transport whereas parking fare is the additional factor affecting commuters’ choice of driving. Based on the results of this study, the effectiveness of P&R scheme on commuters’ travel mode change is evaluated which would be helpful to shed lights on the future construction of P&R sites.

  11. Why People Are Not Willing to Let Their Children Ride in Driverless School Buses: A Gender and Nationality Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. Anania

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available As driverless vehicles proliferate, it is possible that this technology will be applied in mass transport vehicles. School buses may be suited for autonomous operations as they follow set routes and schedules. However, a research gap exists in whether or not parents would be willing to have their children ride in autonomously operated school buses. The purpose of this study was to examine parents’ willingness to allow their child to ride in an autonomous school bus. Participant gender and nationality were also two independent variables, along with affect measures as a possible mediating variable. The research used a two-study approach. In study one, it was found that participants were less willing to have their child ride in a driverless school bus than a traditional human-operated vehicle. In study two, findings suggest a significant interaction between the type of driver, participant gender, and nationality. In general, American females were less willing than Indian females and overall, Americans were less willing than Indians in the driverless conditions. Affect was found to be a mediating variable, which suggests that emotions were playing a role in the responses of participants. The paper concludes with theoretical contributions, practical applications, and suggestions for future research.

  12. Preliminary results from a field experiment on e-bike safety : speed choice and mental workload for middle-aged and elderly cyclists. Paper presented at the International Cycling Safety Conference 2013, Helmond, The Netherland, 20-21 November 2013.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twisk, D.A.M. Boele, M.J. Vlakveld, W.P. Christoph, M. Sikkema, R. Remij, R. & Schwab, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    To study the safety of e-bikes for the elderly, an experimental field study was conducted, using instrumented bicycles and comparing two age groups: older cyclists, n= 29, mean age = 70, SD = 4.2 and middle-aged cyclists, n = 29, mean age = 38, SD = 4.3. All were regular cyclists. They rode a fixed

  13. Effects of 4 Weeks of Horseback Riding on Anxiety, Depression, and Self-Esteem in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wi-Young So

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: There is no report on the effects of horseback riding on children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 4 weeks of horseback riding on anxiety, depression, self-esteem, attention, and learning disorder in children with ADHD. Material and Methods: Subjects comprised a convenience sample of 10 children aged 10-12 years with ADHD and 10 children without ADHD. Horseback riding sessions were performed 2 times (40 minutes/day per week for 4 weeks. Before and after the horseback riding program, we measured the children’s anxiety, depression, self-esteem, attention, and learning disorder. The pre-test and post-test scores were analyzed with repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results: After participating in the 4-week horseback riding program, anxiety (p = 0.013, depression (p = 0.007, attention (p < 0.001, and learning disorder (p < 0.001 were significantly improved in the ADHD group compared to the control group. However, self-esteem was not significantly different between the two groups (p=0.096. Conclusion: These results indicate that the 4-week horseback riding program used in this study was very effective for significantly improving anxiety, depression, and attention in children with ADHD.

  14. Prevalence and correlates of walking and biking to school among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungum, Timothy J; Lounsbery, Monica; Moonie, Sheniz; Gast, Julie

    2009-04-01

    Increasing the rates that our adolescents walk and bicycle to school, also called active transport to school (ATS), could increase the physical activity (PA) levels of that age group. This type of activity has been identified as a missed opportunity for PA. It is currently estimated that 15% of American youth walk or bicycle to school. These rates of ATS are lower than those of European and Asian youth. Efforts to enhance levels of non-motorized transport to school could aid in reducing obesity rates among American youth, decrease traffic congestion and attenuate emission of greenhouse gasses. The objective was to identify demographic, environmental and psychosocial predictors of ATS. A 30-questionnaire was completed by 2,692 students. Logistic regression was used to identify psychosocial, demographic and environmental predictors of ATS. Only 4.6% of students used ATS. Predictors of ATS were street connectedness (density of street intersections) and gender, (boys had higher ATS rates). Public health officials should be alert for opportunities to select sites for new schools that are in neighborhoods with well connected street systems. Interventions promoting ATS will need to target male and female students and there appears to be an opportunity to increase rates that students bicycle to school.

  15. PrivateRide: A Privacy-Enhanced Ride-Hailing Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Anh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, we have witnessed a rise in the popularity of ride-hailing services (RHSs, an online marketplace that enables accredited drivers to use their own cars to drive ride-hailing users. Unlike other transportation services, RHSs raise significant privacy concerns, as providers are able to track the precise mobility patterns of millions of riders worldwide. We present the first survey and analysis of the privacy threats in RHSs. Our analysis exposes high-risk privacy threats that do not occur in conventional taxi services. Therefore, we propose PrivateRide, a privacy-enhancing and practical solution that offers anonymity and location privacy for riders, and protects drivers’ information from harvesting attacks. PrivateRide lowers the high-risk privacy threats in RHSs to a level that is at least as low as that of many taxi services. Using real data-sets from Uber and taxi rides, we show that PrivateRide significantly enhances riders’ privacy, while preserving tangible accuracy in ride matching and fare calculation, with only negligible effects on convenience. Moreover, by using our Android implementation for experimental evaluations, we show that PrivateRide’s overhead during ride setup is negligible. In short, we enable privacy-conscious riders to achieve levels of privacy that are not possible in current RHSs and even in some conventional taxi services, thereby offering a potential business differentiator.

  16. [Mountain biking. Cool way to enjoy nature with side effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, M P

    2005-05-01

    Mountain biking grew from a trend to a serious branch of sport. This article presents the different subspecialties within the sport, the injury rates and the types of injuries among high-class and recreational bikers. The experiences made during several years as a team physician of top athletes as well as the statistics from the Swiss accident insurance company SUVA are the basis for the data presented. The issue of mountain bike-related concussions is particularly discussed since this type of injury is a point of increasing concern in the recent sports traumatology literature.

  17. Effect of suspension systems on the physiological and psychological responses to sub-maximal biking on simulated smoothand bumpy tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlestad, John; Fairlie-Clarke, Tony; Whittaker, Arthur; Davie, Mark; Watt, Ian; Grant, Stanley

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physiological and psychological responses of cyclists riding on a hard tail bicycle and on a full suspension bicycle. Twenty males participated in two series of tests. A test rig held the front axle of the bicycle steady while the rear wheel rotated against a heavy roller with bumps (or no bumps) on its surface. In the first series of tests, eight participants (age 19-27 years, body mass 65-82 kg) were tested on both the full suspension and hard tail bicycles with and without bumps fitted to the roller. The second series of test repeated the bump tests with a further six participants (age 22-31 years, body mass 74-94 kg) and also involved an investigation of familiarization effects with the final six participants (age 21-30 years, body mass 64-80 kg). Heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO(2)), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and comfort were recorded during 10 min sub-maximal tests. Combined data for the bumps tests show that the full suspension bicycle was significantly different (P < 0.001) from the hard tail bicycle on all four measures. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and RPE were lower on average by 8.7 (s = 3.6) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1), 32.1 (s = 12.1) beats . min(-1) and 2.6 (s = 2.0) units, respectively. Comfort scores were higher (better) on average by 1.9 (s = 0.8) units. For the no bumps tests, the only statistically significant difference (P = 0.008) was in VO(2), which was lower for the hard tail bicycle by 2.2 (s = 1.7) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1). The results indicate that the full suspension bicycle provides a physiological and psychological advantage over the hard tail bicycle during simulated sub-maximal exercise on bumps.

  18. Developing a bike-sharing program at Kent State University and Kent, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable transportation frequently describes the use of non-motorized transportation : sources, primarily walking and bicycling (Toor and Havlick, 2004). Walking is a time : honored method of getting around that most people can easily access. But ...

  19. An MCDA approach for the selection of bike projects based on structuring and appraising activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Michael Bruhn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an MCDA approach for the structuring and appraising activities of a large and complex decision problem. More specifically, the paper makes use of the three-step structuring process for decision analysis proposed by von Winterfeldt and Edwards: 1) identifying the problem; 2) se...

  20. Genetic correlations between conformation traits and radiographic findings in the limbs of German Warmblood riding horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Distl Ottmar

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studbook inspection (SBI data of 20 768 German Warmblood mares and radiography results (RR data of 5102 Hanoverian Warmblood horses were used for genetic correlation analyses. The scores on a scale from 0 to 10 were given for conformation and basic quality of gaits, resulting in 14 SBI traits which were used for the correlation analyses. The radiographic findings considered included osseous fragments in fetlock (OFF and hock joints (OFH, deforming arthropathy in hock joints (DAH and distinct radiographic findings in the navicular bones (DNB which were analyzed as binary traits, and radiographic appearance of the navicular bones (RNB which was analyzed as a quasi-linear trait. Genetic parameters were estimated multivariately in linear animal models with REML using information on 24 448 horses with SBI and/or RR records. The ranges of heritability estimates were h2 = 0.14–0.34 for the RR traits and h2 = 0.09–0.50 for the SBI traits. Negative additive genetic correlations of rg = -0.19 to -0.56 were estimated between OFF and conformation of front and hind limbs and walk at hand, and between DNB and hind limb conformation. There were indications of negative additive genetic correlations between DAH and all SBI traits, but because of low prevalence and low heritability of DAH, these results require further scrutiny. Positive additive genetic correlations of rg = 0.37–0.52 were estimated between OFF and withers height and between OFH and withers height, indicating that selection for taller horses will increase disposition to develop OFF and OFH. Selection of broodmares with regards to functional conformation will assist, but cannot replace possible selection against radiographic findings in the limbs of young Warmblood riding horses, particularly with regards to OFF.

  1. [Prolonged diarrhea and weight loss after a biking trip from Tibet to Nepal: infection with Cyclospora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, E; Kager, P A

    2002-08-10

    A 39-year-old man, who had made a cycling tour from Tibet to Nepal, visited the outpatients' clinic one month later because of prolonged diarrhoea, abdominal complaints and serious weight loss. Parasitological examination of the stool revealed oocysts of Cyclospora cayetanensis and the patient was treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) with good result. C. cayetanensis has only recently been discovered as a protozoal cause of diarrhoea. Infections are primarily reported from areas with a low hygienic standard e.g. Central and South America, the Indian subcontinent (Nepal), Indonesia and South-East Asia. Clinical symptoms of infection are diarrhoea (usually watery), abdominal cramps and discomfort. The infection can have a prolonged course. Diagnosis is made by parasitological examination of the stool (one should be cautious not to confuse with cryptosporidia) and treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is effective.

  2. Wildfire effects on hiking and biking demand in New Mexico: a travel cost study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesseln, Hayley; Loomis, John B; González-Cabán, Armando; Alexander, Susan

    2003-12-01

    We use a travel cost model to test the effects of wild and prescribed fire on visitation by hikers and mountain bikers in New Mexico. Our results indicate that net benefits for mountain bikers is $150 per trip and that they take an average of 6.2 trips per year. Hikers take 2.8 trips per year with individual net benefits per trip of $130. Both hikers' and mountain bikers' demand functions react adversely to prescribed burning. Net benefits for both groups fall as areas recover from prescribed burns. Because both visitation and annual recreation benefits decrease to these two types of visitors, this gives rise to multiple use costs associated with prescribed burning. With respect to wildfire, hikers and mountain bikers both exhibit decreased visitation as areas recover from wildfires, however, only hikers indicate an increase in per trip net benefits. Bikers' demand effectively drops to zero. These results differ from previous findings in the literature and have implications for efficient implementation of the National Fire Plan and whether prescribed burning is a cost effective tool for multiple use management of National Forests. Specifically, that fire and recreation managers cannot expect recreation users to react similarly to fire across recreation activities, or different geographic regions. What is cost effective in one region may not be so in another.

  3. The relationship of eco-friendly attitudes with walking and biking to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Wittman, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Active commuting (AC) to work is an effective strategy for integrating regular physical activity (PA) into daily life routines, but limited research exists on influences of AC among adults. Current trends and interests toward environmental consciousness and sustainable forms of travel could impact transportation-related PA. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between eco-friendly attitudes (EFA) and several variables related to AC. A cross-sectional study of respondents to an online survey. Employed adults, physically able to walk or bicycle. The survey included questions about EFA, AC patterns, motivators and barriers for AC, and demographics. Eco-friendly attitudes were measured using a 9-item scale (eg, "I subscribe to ecological publications"). Participants were divided into quartiles on the basis of their EFA summary score (higher score = more ecologically friendly), and t tests and analyses of variance were used to make comparisons across groups on several variables related to AC. The sample (n = 375) was primarily young to middle-aged adults (mean age 39.4 ± 12.9 years), female (60.7%), and Caucasian (90.3%), with at least a high school education (94.6% with high school diploma or greater). Participants reported actively commuting an average of 2.4 ± 4.5 times per week and driving on average 8.4 ± 3.8 times per week. The mean EFA score was 33.4 ± 12.1 out of 63. Age was negatively related and education was positively related to EFA. Compared with those in the lower 3 quartiles, individuals in the top quartile of EFA scores were more likely to actively commute and less likely to drive and reported more self-efficacy, fewer barriers, and more motivators for AC. This study provides insight into potential influences on AC and possible strategies for intervention. Future studies should continue to investigate ecological attitudes as a possible moderator of AC behavior. Public health-based interventions to promote AC may use ecology

  4. Predictive Sea State Estimation for Automated Ride Control and Handling - PSSEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance L.; Howard, Andrew B.; Aghazarian, Hrand; Rankin, Arturo L.

    2012-01-01

    PSSEARCH provides predictive sea state estimation, coupled with closed-loop feedback control for automated ride control. It enables a manned or unmanned watercraft to determine the 3D map and sea state conditions in its vicinity in real time. Adaptive path-planning/ replanning software and a control surface management system will then use this information to choose the best settings and heading relative to the seas for the watercraft. PSSEARCH looks ahead and anticipates potential impact of waves on the boat and is used in a tight control loop to adjust trim tabs, course, and throttle settings. The software uses sensory inputs including IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), stereo, radar, etc. to determine the sea state and wave conditions (wave height, frequency, wave direction) in the vicinity of a rapidly moving boat. This information can then be used to plot a safe path through the oncoming waves. The main issues in determining a safe path for sea surface navigation are: (1) deriving a 3D map of the surrounding environment, (2) extracting hazards and sea state surface state from the imaging sensors/map, and (3) planning a path and control surface settings that avoid the hazards, accomplish the mission navigation goals, and mitigate crew injuries from excessive heave, pitch, and roll accelerations while taking into account the dynamics of the sea surface state. The first part is solved using a wide baseline stereo system, where 3D structure is determined from two calibrated pairs of visual imagers. Once the 3D map is derived, anything above the sea surface is classified as a potential hazard and a surface analysis gives a static snapshot of the waves. Dynamics of the wave features are obtained from a frequency analysis of motion vectors derived from the orientation of the waves during a sequence of inputs. Fusion of the dynamic wave patterns with the 3D maps and the IMU outputs is used for efficient safe path planning.

  5. Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on balance and gait of people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Lasa, Susana; Ferriero, Giorgio; Valero, Raquel; Gomez-Muñiz, Fernando; Rabini, Alessia; Varela, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Exercise therapy is an important part of symptomatic and supportive treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). According to the literature, equine-assisted therapies--such as therapeutic horseback riding (THR) and hippotherapy (HT)--are exercise therapies that can have positive physical effects on coordination, muscle tone, postural alignment, stiffness/flexibility, endurance and strength, correcting abnormal movement patterns and improving gait and balance. While HT is known to have a positive effect on balance in PwMS, data about THR are limited. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of THR on the balance and gait of ambulatory PwMS. Twenty-seven PwMS were included in the study. Patients were divided into two groups: 12 underwent THR and 15 traditional physiotherapy (for both groups, two series of 10 weekly sessions were performed). Before and after the study period, the following outcome measures were applied: Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Barthel Index, Tinetti Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA). In addition, patients of the THR group underwent a gait analysis to assess spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction forces. The THR group showed a significant improvement in POMA scores (p<0.005) and two gait parameters: stride time (p<0.04) and ground reaction forces (p<0.01). No statistically significant change was found in the control group. The results of the study show that THR can improve balance and gait of ambulatory PwMS. Findings are preliminary, but promising and in line with the recent literature.

  6. Biking and Walking: The Position of Non-Motorised Transport Modes in Transport Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Piet

    2001-01-01

    Long run developments such as income growth and urban sprawl lead one to expect a continuous decline of thecontribution of non-motorised transport modes to the performance of transport systems. In terms of the total number of trips, non-motorised transport modes have retained high shares, however.

  7. 75 FR 32806 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Certain Upright and Recumbent Exercise Bikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... resistor/bracket/cable assembly; the PCB/ battery assembly; the reed switch/bracket subassembly; the shroud...; (alternator-pulley assembly) 9. Assembling resistor, resistor brackets, resistor rod and covering the assembly with cardboard insulator; (rear resistor/ bracket/cable assembly) 10. Installing wire harness to the...

  8. Guns, bikes & leather: moral panic and the 2008 South Australian 'anti-bikie' laws

    OpenAIRE

    Vakalis, David

    2017-01-01

    Reflective of the broad political consensus in Australia, 'anti-bikie' laws have recently been introduced by many state and territory governments. In the shadow of this year's federal election, the government has also proposed national anti-bikie laws. Given this, it is worthwhile to consider the context within which this trend emerged. Three days after a violent incident involving bikies outside Adelaide's Tonic nightclub on 2 June 2007, the South Australian (SA) Government announced that it...

  9. A cross-sectional survey of the relationship between walking, biking, and the built environment for adults aged over 70 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi PY

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paul Y Takahashi1, Mitzi A Baker3, Stephan Cha2, Paul V Targonski11Primary Care Internal Medicine, 2Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, 3Planning Department, Olmsted County, Rochester, MN, USAPurpose: Determine the relationship between walkability scores (using the Walk Score® and activity levels (both bicycle and walking in adults aged between 70 and 85 years in Rochester, Minnesota.Patients and methods: This was a self-reported cross-sectional survey in adults aged over 70 years living in Rochester, Minnesota. Analysis used t-tests or chi-square analysis as appropriate. The primary endpoint was bicycle use or walking. The predictor variables were the Walk Score® as determined by their address, Charlson index, Duke Activity Status Index (DASI, and a 12-item short-form survey (SF-12 scores. Secondary analysis used an outcome of functional status (using the DASI and walkability scores.Results: Fifty-three individuals completed the surveys (48% return rate. The average age in the overall cohort was 77.02 years. Eighty-nine percent of individuals could walk at least a block and 15.1% rode their bicycles. The Walk Scores® did not differ between those who walked (38.9 ± 27.4 and those that did not (40.0 ± 36.08; P = 0.93. In a similar fashion, the Walk Scores® were not different for those who biked (36.38 ± 27.68 and those that did not (39.44 ± 28.49; P = 0.78. There was no relationship between Walk Scores® and DASI; however, a decreased DASI score was associated with increased age and comorbid illness (Charlson Score.Conclusion: In this small pilot survey, there was no difference in Walk Scores® between those older adults who walked or biked, compared to those that did not. The Walk Scores® were low in both groups, which may indicate the lack of accessibility for all older adults living in Rochester, Minnesota. The functional status seemed to be more related to age or comorbid conditions than the built environment

  10. Bikes, helmets, and public health: decision-making when goods collide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman-House, Alison

    2014-06-01

    How ought public officials address policy choices that entail trade-offs between desirable public health goods? Increasing cycling improves public health both by promoting physical activity and by decreasing vehicle use, thus reducing vehicular emissions. Proponents of bicycle helmets argue that, used properly, they protect individual cyclists; however, there is concern that mandating helmet use may result in a decrease in cycling. In 2012, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg opposed a bicycle helmet mandate, concerned that it would have a negative impact on the city's cycling rate, which he had sought to increase. The mayor did not explain his rationale, leaving constituents unsure why he opposed the proposal. This case study underscores the challenge of creating public policy in the context of competing public health goods.

  11. Mountain biking injuries in rural England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeys, L M; Cribb, G; Toms, A D; Hay, S M

    2001-06-01

    Off road mountain biking is now an extremely popular recreation and a potent cause of serious injury. To establish the morbidity associated with this sport. Data were collected prospectively over one year on all patients presenting with an injury caused by either recreational or competitive off road mountain biking. Eighty four patients were identified, 70 males and 14 females, with a mean age of 22.5 years (range 8-71). Most accidents occurred during the summer months, most commonly in August. Each patient had an average of 1.6 injuries (n = 133) and these were divided into 15 categories, ranging from minor soft tissue to potentially life threatening. Operative intervention was indicated for 19 patients (23%) and several required multiple procedures. The commonest injuries were clavicle fractures (13%), shoulder injuries (12%), and distal radial fractures (11%). However, of a more sinister nature, one patient had a C2/3 dislocation requiring urgent stabilisation, one required a chest drain for a haemopneumothorax, and another required an emergency and life saving nephrectomy. This sport has recently experienced an explosion in popularity, and, as it carries a significant risk of potentially life threatening injury across all levels of participation, the use of protective equipment to reduce this significant morbidity may be advisable.

  12. Effects of alcohol on motorcycle riding skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Alcohol is known to disrupt the effect of neurotransmitters and impair various psychomotor skills. Indeed, alcohol intoxication is a significant risk factor for fatal traffic crashes, especially when riding a motorcycle. At present, there is sparse r...

  13. Spine fractures caused by horse riding

    OpenAIRE

    Siebenga, Jan; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Elzinga, Matthijs J.; Bakker, Fred C.; Haarman, Henk J. T. M.; Patka, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective study and review of literature. Objectives: Study of demographic data concerning spinal fractures caused by horse riding, classification of fractures according to the AO and Load Sharing classifications, evaluation of mid-term radiological results and long-term functional results. Methods: A review of medical reports and radiological examinations of patients presented to our hospital with horse riding-related spine fractures over a 13-year period; long-term functio...

  14. Modified Ride-On Cars and Young Children with Disabilities: Effects of Combining Mobility and Social Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Han Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundResearch has shown that the use of power mobility devices is safe and beneficial for motor and cognitive development in children with motor disabilities; nevertheless, strong evidence of the benefits for social skill development is limited. This study aimed to examine the effects of combining ride-on car training with an adult-directed, social interaction program in a hospital-based environment on mobility and social functions in young children with motor disabilities.MethodsThis study used a prospective, nonequivalent pretest–posttest control group design. Twenty-nine young children with motor disabilities, aged between 1 and 3 years, were recruited from local hospitals in Taiwan. The treatment group (n = 15 underwent 2-h ride-on car training sessions twice per week for a total of 9 weeks in the hospital environment. The control group (n = 14 underwent a 9-week home education program (mean: 200 min/week focusing on mobility and social skills training. The Chinese version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory, Parenting Stress Index, and Goal Attainment Scaling were administered to all participants before and after the intervention, and at the end of the 9-week follow-up phase.ResultsMobility and social functions significantly improved in both groups after the 9-week intervention, but this improvement was not maintained at the follow-up phase. The treatment group showed significantly better improvement in social function, parenting stress levels, and goal achievement than the control group at posttest.ConclusionThis two-group design study showed the benefits of combining a ride-on car use with a family-centered, structured, social interaction program for positive impacts on mobility, social function, and parenting stress levels. The combination of a modified ride-on car and a social training program has the potential to enhance socialization in young children with motor disabilities.Clinical Trial

  15. Mountain Biking: Does Rough Terrain Make Rugged Riders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Chris

    1987-01-01

    No formal research has been conducted on the training effects and injury risks of all-terrain bicycles in mountain biking, but experience indicates they are apparently safe and may provide greater fitness benefits than traditional bicycles. The bicycles are described, and their apparent benefits are discussed. (MT)

  16. Investigating Spatial Interdependence in E-Bike Choice Using Spatially Autoregressive Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Increased attention has been given to promoting e-bike usage in recent years. However, the research gap still exists in understanding the effects of spatial interdependence on e-bike choice. This study investigated how spatial interdependence affected the e-bike choice. The Moran’s I statistic test showed that spatial interdependence exists in e-bike choice at aggregated level. Bayesian spatial autoregressive logistic analyses were then used to investigate the spatial interdependence at individual level. Separate models were developed for commuting and non-commuting trips. The factors affecting e-bike choice are different between commuting and non-commuting trips. Spatial interdependence exists at both origin and destination sides of commuting and non-commuting trips. Travellers are more likely to choose e-bikes if their neighbours at the trip origin and destination also travel by e-bikes. And the magnitude of this spatial interdependence is different across various traffic analysis zones. The results suggest that, without considering spatial interdependence, the traditional methods may have biased estimation results and make systematic forecasting errors.

  17. A cross-sectional survey of the relationship between walking, biking, and the built environment for adults aged over 70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Paul Y; Baker, Mitzi A; Cha, Stephan; Targonski, Paul V

    2012-01-01

    Determine the relationship between walkability scores (using the Walk Score(®)) and activity levels (both bicycle and walking) in adults aged between 70 and 85 years in Rochester, Minnesota. This was a self-reported cross-sectional survey in adults aged over 70 years living in Rochester, Minnesota. Analysis used t-tests or chi-square analysis as appropriate. The primary endpoint was bicycle use or walking. The predictor variables were the Walk Score(®) as determined by their address, Charlson index, Duke Activity Status Index (DASI), and a 12-item short-form survey (SF-12) scores. Secondary analysis used an outcome of functional status (using the DASI) and walkability scores. Fifty-three individuals completed the surveys (48% return rate). The average age in the overall cohort was 77.02 years. Eighty-nine percent of individuals could walk at least a block and 15.1% rode their bicycles. The Walk Scores(®) did not differ between those who walked (38.9 ± 27.4) and those that did not (40.0 ± 36.08; P = 0.93). In a similar fashion, the Walk Scores(®) were not different for those who biked (36.38 ± 27.68) and those that did not (39.44 ± 28.49; P = 0.78). There was no relationship between Walk Scores(®) and DASI; however, a decreased DASI score was associated with increased age and comorbid illness (Charlson Score). In this small pilot survey, there was no difference in Walk Scores(®) between those older adults who walked or biked, compared to those that did not. The Walk Scores(®) were low in both groups, which may indicate the lack of accessibility for all older adults living in Rochester, Minnesota. The functional status seemed to be more related to age or comorbid conditions than the built environment.

  18. A Dynamic Approach to Rebalancing Bike-Sharing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiariotti, Federico; Pielli, Chiara; Zanella, Andrea; Zorzi, Michele

    2018-02-08

    Bike-sharing services are flourishing in Smart Cities worldwide. They provide a low-cost and environment-friendly transportation alternative and help reduce traffic congestion. However, these new services are still under development, and several challenges need to be solved. A major problem is the management of rebalancing trucks in order to ensure that bikes and stalls in the docking stations are always available when needed, despite the fluctuations in the service demand. In this work, we propose a dynamic rebalancing strategy that exploits historical data to predict the network conditions and promptly act in case of necessity. We use Birth-Death Processes to model the stations' occupancy and decide when to redistribute bikes, and graph theory to select the rebalancing path and the stations involved. We validate the proposed framework on the data provided by New York City's bike-sharing system. The numerical simulations show that a dynamic strategy able to adapt to the fluctuating nature of the network outperforms rebalancing schemes based on a static schedule.

  19. A Dynamic Approach to Rebalancing Bike-Sharing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Chiariotti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bike-sharing services are flourishing in Smart Cities worldwide. They provide a low-cost and environment-friendly transportation alternative and help reduce traffic congestion. However, these new services are still under development, and several challenges need to be solved. A major problem is the management of rebalancing trucks in order to ensure that bikes and stalls in the docking stations are always available when needed, despite the fluctuations in the service demand. In this work, we propose a dynamic rebalancing strategy that exploits historical data to predict the network conditions and promptly act in case of necessity. We use Birth-Death Processes to model the stations’ occupancy and decide when to redistribute bikes, and graph theory to select the rebalancing path and the stations involved. We validate the proposed framework on the data provided by New York City’s bike-sharing system. The numerical simulations show that a dynamic strategy able to adapt to the fluctuating nature of the network outperforms rebalancing schemes based on a static schedule.

  20. Mountain biking. Cool way to enjoy nature with side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, MP

    Mountain biking grew from a trend to a serious branch of sport. This article presents the different subspecialties within the sport, the injury rates and the types of injuries among high-class and recreational bikers. The experiences made during several years as a team physician of top athletes as

  1. Unveiling E-Bike Potential for Commuting Trips from GPS Traces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel J. Lopez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Common goals of sustainable mobility approaches are to reduce the need for travel, to facilitate modal shifts, to decrease trip distances and to improve energy efficiency in the transportation systems. Among these issues, modal shift plays an important role for the adoption of vehicles with fewer or zero emissions. Nowadays, the electric bike (e-bike is becoming a valid alternative to cars in urban areas. However, to promote modal shift, a better understanding of the mobility behaviour of e-bike users is required. In this paper, we investigate the mobility habits of e-bikers using GPS data collected in Belgium from 2014 to 2015. By analysing more than 10,000 trips, we provide insights about e-bike trip features such as: distance, duration and speed. In addition, we offer a deep look into which routes are preferred by bike owners in terms of their physical characteristics and how weather influences e-bike usage. Results show that trips with higher travel distances are performed during working days and are correlated with higher average speeds. Usage patterns extracted from our data set also indicate that e-bikes are preferred for commuting (home-work and business (work related trips rather than for recreational trips.

  2. Influence of girth strap placement and panel flocking material on the saddle pressure pattern during riding of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byström, A; Stalfelt, A; Egenvall, A; Von Peinen, K; Morgan, K; Roepstorff, L

    2010-11-01

    Saddle fit is well recognised as an important factor for the health and performance of riding horses. However, only few studies have addressed general effects of different saddle construction details within a group of horses. To assess the influence of girth strap placement, traditional vs. v-system, and panel flocking material, wool vs. synthetic foam, on the saddle pressure pattern during riding. Six horses were ridden by 3 riders in sitting and rising trot and sitting canter. Saddle pressure was measured with 3 different saddle variants: 1) wool flocked panels and traditional girthing (baseline); 2) wool flocked panels and v-system girthing; and 3) foam filled panels and traditional girthing. From the pressure data, a number of descriptive variables were extracted. These were analysed using ANCOVA models with horse, rider, saddle, seat (sitting/rising, trot only) and speed as independent variables. With foam filled panels stride maximum pressures under the hind part of the saddle increased by 7-12% and the area under the saddle with a stride mean pressure >11 kPa increased by 114 cm(2) in trot and 127 cm(2) in canter. With v-system girthing, the latter variable also increased, but only by 53 and 38 cm(2) in trot and canter, respectively. In addition, stride maximum pressures under the front part of the saddle tended to increase (≤ 9%). Both flocking material and girthing have a significant influence on the saddle pressure and should thus be considered in saddle fitting. Wool seems a better flocking material than foam of the type used in the current study. For girthing, traditional placement seems equally good if not better than the v-system. However, further studies are needed to show if these results are valid for a larger population of riding horses. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  3. The Influence of the Phase Difference between the Crank Angle of the Pilot and that of the Stoker on the Drag Acting on a Tandem Bike

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Seo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Two wind tunnel experiments were carried out to investigate the drag acting on a tandem bike. One experiment involved measurement of the drag acting on two full-scale human models on a tandem. These two human models can pedal the tandem. In the other experiment, two oscillating cylinders were used as a simplified model of the legs of the pilot and the stoker. These were arranged to represent the legs of the riders on a tandem. Measurements of the drag on this model were made. It was found that the drag decreases when the crank angle of the stoker’s pedal is delayed with respect to the pilot’s pedal.

  4. E-bike trials’ potential to promote sustained changes in car owners mobility habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Corinne; Blumer, Yann; Lena Hille, Stefanie

    2018-04-01

    Modal shifts hold considerable potential to mitigate carbon emissions. Electric bikes (e-bikes) represent a promising energy- and carbon-efficient alternative to cars. However, as mobility behaviour is highly habitual, convincing people to switch from cars to e-bikes is challenging. One strategy to accomplish this is the disruption of existing habits—a key idea behind an annual e-bike promotion programme in Switzerland, in which car owners can try out an e-bike for free over a two-week period in exchange for their car keys. By means of a longitudinal survey, we measured the long-term effects of this trial on mobility-related habitual associations. After one year, participants’ habitual association with car use had weakened significantly. This finding was valid both for participants who bought an e-bike after the trial and those who did not. Our findings contrast the results of other studies who find that the effect of interventions to induce modal shifts wears off over time. We conclude that an e-bike trial has the potential to break mobility habits and motivate car owners to use more sustainable means of transport.

  5. Augmented exercise biking with virtual environments for elderly users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersem, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2014-01-01

    residents used an audio-visual virtual environment (VE) augmentation for an exercise bike. Besides a visual display, a soundscape was played to the subjects using headphones. The soundscape was not no- ticed wand the headphones were found to be obtrusive. In this paper, we consider and discuss possible...

  6. Bike2Work 2017 - youngest participant 5 year old

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Daniel Holzer with his mother Reyes Alemany Fernandez. The two of them comes in on bike every day, Daniel to attend the CERN Nursery School and Reyes to work in the Operations Group. Daniel is a member of the team "The admirers of Daniel", while Reyes cycles for "Hypercycle-6.5TeV-ATS".

  7. Commuting by e-bike: a mixed methods approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazier, Paul; van den Berg, A. E.; Weitkamp, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the e-bike is one of the most important developments in transportation in recent years. When substituting for use of cars and public transportation, it can play an important role in the development of sustainable transport systems that support active, healthy lifestyles. However,

  8. Mountain biking injuries requiring trauma center admission: a 10-year regional trauma system experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter T W; Jangra, Dalbhir; Ritchie, Alec H; Lower, Mary Ellen; Kasic, Sharon; Brown, D Ross; Baldwin, Greg A; Simons, Richard K

    2006-02-01

    Mountain biking has become an increasingly popular recreational and competitive sport with increasingly recognized risks. The purpose of this study was to review a population based approach to serious injuries requiring trauma center admission related to mountain biking, identify trends and develop directions for related injury prevention programs. Three trauma centers in the Greater Vancouver area exclusively serve a major mountain bike park and the North Shore Mountains biking trails. The Trauma Registries and the patient charts were reviewed for mountain bike injuries from 1992 to 2002. The data were analyzed according to demographics, distribution, and severity of injuries, and need for operative intervention. Findings were reviewed with injury prevention experts and regional and national mountain-biking stakeholders to provide direction to injury prevention programs. A total of 1,037 patients were identified as having bicycling-related injuries. Of these, 399 patients sustained 1,092 injuries while mountain biking. There was a threefold increase in the incidence of mountain biking injuries over a 10-year period. Young males were most commonly affected. Orthopedic injuries were most common (46.5%) followed by head (12.2%), spine (12%), chest (10.3%), facial (10.2%), abdominal (5.4%), genitourinary (2.2%), and neck injuries (1%). High operative rate was observed: 38% of injuries and 66% of patients required surgery. One patient died from his injuries. Injury prevention programs were developed and successfully engaged the target population. Mountain biking is a growing cause of serious injuries. Young males are principally at risk and serious injuries result from intended activity and despite protective equipment. Injury prevention programs were developed to address these concerns.

  9. Fancy a ride?

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2014-01-01

    This Sunday 7 September, don’t miss your chance to climb into a supercar, one of those exceptional machines that tear up the tracks and that you sometimes hear revving their engines on the motorway. The 2014 supercar experience day, organised by members of CERN, will allow car lovers to go for a ride in style and all for a good cause!   Supercars at the 2013 experience day. Photo: Kevin Mazzilli. If you have always dreamt of sitting in a Ferrari, feeling the vibrations of a Lamborghini, or losing yourself in the hushed calm of a classic car, don’t miss the supercar experience day taking place on Sunday, 7 September! This event has been organised by CERN’s own car enthusiasts, in collaboration with the charity Kumansansa – Children of Zambia, founded by two CERN members. It will take place for the third consecutive year in the car park of the Macumba leisure centre in Saint-Julien-en-Genevois (France). From 9.30 a.m. to 6 p.m., visitors old and young (c...

  10. Never Riding the Tide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 10. Never Riding the Tide - Seymour Benzer–The Founder of Neurogenetics. K VijayRaghavan Veronica Rodrigues. General Article Volume 13 Issue 10 October 2008 pp 909-915 ...

  11. Assessment of muscle fatigue during biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaflitz, Marco; Molinari, Filippo

    2003-03-01

    The analysis of the surface myoelectric signal recorded while a muscle is performing a sustained contraction is a valuable tool for assessing the progression of localized fatigue. It is well known that the modifications of the spectral content of the myoelectric signal are mainly related to changes in the interstitial fluid pH, which, in turn, affect the membrane excitability of the active muscle fibers. This paper describes the effects of muscle fatigue on the surface myoelectric signal recorded from three thigh and leg muscles during biking, on a population consisting of 22 young healthy volunteers. The purpose of this study was to obtain normative data relative to an exercise protocol mild enough to be applicable, in the future, to pathological subjects as well. Each subject was asked to exercise 30 min on a cycloergometer at a constant velocity and against a constant torque. While subjects were biking, the surface myoelectric signal was recorded from the rectus femoris, the biceps femoris, and the gastrocnemius muscles. In this study, we considered two different aspects of muscle fatigue: first, the localized muscle fatigue as shown by the decrement of the instantaneous frequency of the myoelectric signal during the exercise; second, the modifications of the muscle ON-OFF timing, which could be explained as a strategy for increasing endurance by modifying the role of different muscles during the exercise. The first aspect was studied by obtaining the spectral characteristics of the signals by means of bilinear time-frequency transforms and by applying an original estimator of the instantaneous frequency of stochastic processes based on cross time-frequency transforms. Our results demonstrated that none of the subjects showed significant signs of localized muscle fatigue, since the decrement of the instantaneous frequency during the exercise was always lower than 5% of its initial value. Muscle ON-OFF timing was obtained by applying to the raw myoelectric signal

  12. A Novel Wind Turbine Concept Based on an Electromagnetic Coupler and the Study of Its Fault Ride-through Capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui You

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel type of variable speed wind turbine with a new drive train different from the variable speed wind turbine commonly used nowadays. In this concept, a synchronous generator is directly coupled with the grid, therefore, the wind turbine transient overload capability and grid voltage support capability can be significantly improved. An electromagnetic coupling speed regulating device (EMCD is used to connect the gearbox high speed shaft and synchronous generator rotor shaft, transmitting torque to the synchronous generator, while decoupling the gearbox side and the synchronous generator, so the synchronous generator torque oscillations during a grid fault are not transmitted to the gearbox. The EMCD is composed of an electromagnetic coupler and a one quadrant operation converter with reduced capability and low cost. A control strategy for the new wind turbine is proposed and a 2 MW wind turbine model is built to study the wind turbine fault ride-through capability. An integrated simulation environment based on the aeroelastic code HAWC2 and software Matlab/Simulink is used to study its fault ride-through capability and the impact on the structural loads during grid three phase and two phase short circuit faults.

  13. Girl's 24" bike | News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Financial Officer Finance Section Office of the Chief Operating Officer Facilities Engineering Services Accelerator Division Accelerator Physics Center Office of the Chief Safety Officer Environment, Safety, Health and Quality Section Office of the Chief Project Officer Office of Project Support Services Office of

  14. Bike2Work 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Herterich, Patricia Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    To celebrate the success of the 97 CERN teams, the participants gathered on Thursday 19th June at lunchtime for a "CERN critical mass". The bicyclists started at Restaurant 2 and cruised around the Meyrin site terminating with a photo session outside Restaurant 1. The colleagues based in Prevessin made a "pre-parade" to join their colleagues in Meyrin.

  15. Experimental Evaluation of Mountain Bike Suspension Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Titlestad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant distinction between competitive mountain bikes is whether they have a suspension system. Research studies indicate that a suspension system gives advantages, but it is difficult to quantify the benefits because they depend on so many variables, including the physiology and psychology of the cyclist, the roughness of the track and the design of the suspension system. A laboratory based test rig has been built that allows the number of variables in the system to be reduced and test conditions to be controlled. The test rig simulates regular impacts of the rear wheel with bumps in a rolling road. The physiological variables of oxygen consumption and heart rate were measured, together with speeds and forces at various points in the system. Physiological and mechanical test results both confirm a significant benefit in using a suspension system on the simulated rough track, with oxygen consumption reduced by around 30 % and power transmitted through the pedals reduced by 30 % to 60 %.

  16. Bike2Work 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)439147

    2015-01-01

    To celebrate the success of the 126 CERN teams (to be compared to the 97 teams of the year before), the participants gathered on Tuesday 23rd June at lunchtime for a "CERN critical mass". The bicyclists started at Restaurant 2 and cruised around the Meyrin site terminating with a photo session outside Restaurant 1. The colleagues based in Prevessin made a "pre-parade" to join their colleagues in Meyrin. The parade was escorted by the CERN Fire Brigade.

  17. Creating Three New Bike Tours in Santiago de Chile Case Study: Huaso Tours & Bike Rental

    OpenAIRE

    Heino, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this Bachelor´s thesis was to create new bike tour services for the thesis case company Huaso Tours & Bike Rental, based in Santiago de Chile. The idea for the thesis was perceived from a free time activity of mountain biking in Santiago de Chile´s popular tourist attraction San Cristobal hill. This park draws thousands of bikers monthly to enjoy the green areas of the city, however, there is no mountain bike service offered to visit this hill. By conducting a small pre-researc...

  18. How much can you drink before driving? The influence of riding with impaired adults and peers on the driving behaviors of urban and rural youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbeater, Bonnie J; Foran, Kathleen; Grove-White, Aidan

    2008-04-01

    Following an ecological model to specify risks for impaired driving, we assessed the effects of youth attitudes about substance use and their experiences of riding in cars with adults and peers who drove after drinking alcohol or smoking cannabis on the youths' own driving after drinking or using cannabis. Participants were 2594 students in grades 10 and 12 (mean age = 16 years and 2 months; 50% girls) from public high schools in urban (994) and rural communities (1600) on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada; 1192 of these were new drivers with restricted licenses. Self-report data were collected in anonymous questionnaires. Regression analyses were used to assess the independent and interacting effects of youth attitudes about substance use and their experiences of riding in cars with adults or peers who drove after drinking alcohol or smoking cannabis on youth driving. Youth driving risk behaviors were associated independently with their own high-risk attitudes and experiences riding with peers who drink alcohol or use cannabis and drive. However, risks were highest for the youth who also report more frequent experiences of riding with adults who drink alcohol or use cannabis and drive. Prevention efforts should be expanded to include the adults and peers who are role models for new drivers and to increase youths' awareness of their own responsibilities for their personal safety as passengers.

  19. Humanism, Modernism and Designing Education: Exploring Progressive Relations between Australia, New Zealand and the West Riding of Yorkshire 1930s-1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    This article takes as a starting point the career of Sir Alec Clegg, Chief Education Officer for the West Riding of Yorkshire (1945-1974), and traces his professional connections with educationists in Australia and New Zealand. In exploring the nature of global exchanges between educators, artists, architects and designers in the decades…

  20. Come muoversi a Roma con il trasporto pubblico e il Bike Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ieradi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The public transport-bike sharing integration in RomeBased on the success in Rome due to the launch of its bike sharing service (on June 13, 2008, ATAC (Rome Mobility Agency designed and implemented the integration of paths that connect the 19 bike sharing collection points, located in the heart of Rome, with the public transport network. The resulting database has been included in a new version of the Journey Planner service, Infopoint, already available on the ATAC website, which gives users the opportunity to calculate an itinerary with public transport and if possible to combine the public transport with the bike sharing schedule.

  1. Evaluation of motorcyclist's discomfort during prolonged riding process with and without lumbar support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmegam Karuppiah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study is to examine the effects of a backrest: using a prototype of a lumbar support presented in author's earlier study on the discomfort rating of the body parts of motorcyclist. METHODS: One hundred motorcyclists participated in this study, all in good physical condition and with no immediate complaint of musculoskeletal disorders. Each participant was asked to sit for 2 hours on a motorcycle in two different sessions (with and without the lumbar support in a controlled room environment. At every 15 minutes interval the participants were required to rate their discomfort level on the Borg's CR-10 questionnaire. RESULTS: The rate of discomfort level (in all body parts decreased over time during the testing period with the prototype. In terms of the discomfort 'break point', participants identified low back and upper back as the most affected body parts prior to comfort changes during the testing period with the use of the prototype. CONCLUSIONS: The use of this prototype provides a protective mechanism for the motorcyclist's musculoskeletal system, particularly the spinal column. Therefore, this prototype is capable of providing ideal posture while simultaneously enhancing the comfortability of the motorcyclist during the riding process (by reducing discomfort.OBJETIVO: O objetivo principal deste estudo é analisar os efeitos de um encosto, usando um protótipo de um apoio lombar apresentado em estudo anterior do autor sobre a avaliação de desconforto das partes do corpo do motociclista. MÉTODOS: Cem motociclistas participaram neste estudo, todos em boas condições físicas e sem queixa imediata de lesões músculo-esqueléticas. Cada participante foi convidado a se sentar por 2 horas em uma moto em duas sessões diferentes (com e sem o apoio lombar em uma sala com ambiente controlado. A cada intervalo de 15 minutos, os participantes foram solicitados a classificar o seu nível de desconforto no question

  2. Spinal Cord Injuries in Wave-Riding Sports: The Influence of Environmental and Sport-Specific Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, Audrey; Flick, David; Ferguson, Jason; Glorioso, John E

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a nonfatal, catastrophic consequence of wave-riding sports. With surfing at the core, a multitude of activities have evolved that attempt to harness the power of ocean waves. The unique qualities of each wave-riding sport, in combination with the environmental factors of the ocean, define the risk for potential injuries. As wave-riding sports have become more advanced, athletes continue to push physical barriers. Taller waves are attempted while incorporating aerial maneuvers, all without protective equipment.

  3. National Scientific-Practical Conference “Süyün-Bike: An Outstanding Woman and Ruler (to the history of Tatar States’ relations in the 16th century” (Kasimov, November 12, 2015 »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Rakhimzyanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available National Scientific-Practical Conference “Süyün-Bike: An Outstanding Woman and Ruler (to the history of Tatar States’ relations in the 16th century” has been held in Kasimov on 12th November, 2015. The conference has been organized by the public organization “Kasimov Local Tatar National-Cultural Autonomy of the Ryazan Region” as well as by Sh.Marjani Institute of History of the Academy of Sciences of the Respublic of Tatarstan. The conference was supported by a grant from the Government of the Republic of Tatarstan (agreement no. 176/10 of 24.08.2015. The conference was conceived as the first phase of a larger project, the final of which will be the erection of a monument dedicated to Süyün-Bike in Kasimov (Russian Federation. By the will of events, Süyün-Bike, a daughter of Yusuf, the future ruler of the Nogay Horde, became the most famous among the Nogay wives of the Kazan khans. After the fall of Kazan, her fate was connected with Kasimov, where she spent her last years and apparently was buried. In summary, the personal life of this woman contains the entire history of the Tatar medieval world, which was quite controversial. It contains intrigues and desire to keep power at any cost, a variety of coalitions both with each other and with people of other faiths, and love, and hate, and betrayal, and the captivity, and life far from her homeland. Süyün-Bike sacrificed personal happiness for the happiness of others. A confirmation of this fact is provided both by the numerous legends about the Kazan tsarina, still hovering in the minds of the Tatar people, as well as by the architectural tower in Kazan named after the Kazan tsarina. Through the conference, its organizers sought to demonstrate to the Kasimov and Tatarstan public that Kazan and Kasimov had a number of similarities as well as differences. One of the similarities was that the noble Nogay women linked Kazan and Kasimov, one of them being Süyün-Bike. Her fate

  4. Barriers and solutions for AC low voltage fault ride-through on multi-terminal HVDC grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, B.; Moreira, C.L.; Leite, H.; Pecas Lopes, J.A. [Porto Univ. (Portugal). Dept. de Engenharia Electrotecnica e de Computadores (DEEC); Tecnologia e Ciencia, Porto (Portugal). Inst. de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores (INESCTEC)

    2012-07-01

    This work analyzes the multi-terminal DC grids dynamics under AC mainland grid fault events envisioning to assess the feasibility of fault ride-through provision. The major bottleneck related with the operation under AC fault consists on the DC side power imbalance that takes place due to the HVDC converter current limits and consequent incapability of delivering all the generated power to the grid. It was also verified that the power imbalance leads to a DC overvoltage occurrence. The mechanism of including chopper devices at the onshore converters DC terminals has been studied as a mean of power equilibrium promotion. Simulations comparing the both cases were performed and the comparison and the effectiveness of the adopted approach are also presented. (orig.)

  5. Coordination between Fault-Ride-Through Capability and Over-current Protection of DFIG Generators for Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Kawady, T.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Mansour Hassan

    2010-01-01

    is investigated. Simulation test cases using MATLAB-Simulink are implemented on a 365-MW wind farm in AL-Zaafarana, Egypt. The simulation results show the influence of the FRT capability on the protective relaying coordination in wind farms, showing that the FRT may work in situations where is were expected......Fault Ride-Through (FRT) capabilities set up according to the grid codes may affect the performance of related protective elements during fault periods. Therefore, in this paper the coordination between the FRT capability and over-current protection of DFIG Wind Generators in MV networks...... not to work, and then disabling the over-current protection, which should have worked in this situation....

  6. Analyzing Forces on Amusement Park Rides with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieyra, Rebecca E.; Vieyra, Chrystian

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device accelerometers are a simple and easy way for students to collect accurate and detailed data on an amusement park ride. The resulting data can be graphed to assist in the creation of force diagrams to help students explain their physical sensations while on the ride. This type of activity can help students overcome some of the…

  7. Feasibility testing for dial-a-ride problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Dag; Ho, Sin C.

    Hunsaker and Savelsbergh have proposed an algorithm for testing feasibility of a route in the solution to the dial-a-ride problem. The constraints that are checked are load capacity constraints, time windows, ride time bounds and wait time bounds. The algorithm has linear running time. By virtue...

  8. Feasibility Testing for Dial-a-Ride Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugland, Dag; Ho, Sin C.

    2010-01-01

    Hunsaker and Savelsbergh have proposed an algorithm for testing feasibility of a route in the solution to the dial-a-ride problem. The constraints that are checked are load capacity constraints, time windows, ride time bounds and wait time bounds. The algorithm has linear running time. By virtue...

  9. Minimum Makespan Multi-Vehicle Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath; Ravi, R.

    2015-01-01

    of multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride, in which an object may be left at intermediate vertices and transported by more than one vehicle, while being moved from source to destination. Our main results are an O(log(3) n)-approximation algorithm for preemptive multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride, and an improved O(log t...

  10. Examination of a University-Affiliated Safe Ride Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieck, D. Joseph; Slagle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A university-affiliated safe ride program was evaluated to determine whether these programs can reduce drunk-driving related costs. Data was collected from 187 safe ride passengers during three nights of operation. Among the passengers, 93% were enrolled at a local University, 31% were younger than 21, and 40% reported a prior alcohol-related…

  11. Bringing Bike Share to a Low-Income Community

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-14

    This podcast is an interview with Sarah Kretman Stewart, MPH, MEd, Healthy Living Minneapolis Project Specialist at the Minneapolis Health Department. In this program, Sarah talks about the impact a bike share program had on the low-income town of Near North, Minnesota.  Created: 8/14/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/14/2013.

  12. Bike to work”, a successful motto

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    In June 2012, Switzerland launched a “Bike to work” campaign in which several tens of thousands took part. CERN personnel also took up the challenge.   "Bike to work" participants, 21 June 2012. The purpose of the campaign was to encourage the employees of Swiss companies to bike to work in June. Grouped into teams of four, no fewer than 50,000 cyclists accepted the challenge and clocked up a total of 6.8 million kilometres, 171 times the circumference of the Earth, thereby reducing CO2 emissions by 1088 tonnes (calculation basis: 160g CO2/km, for a small-cylinder car). At CERN, 316 people took part in this initiative, which was supported by the Medical Service. With their car left in the garage and their feet on the pedals, the CERN participants alone clocked up over  58,000 kilometres. The result was less stress - fortunately no accidents - less pollution, and a strong request for more cycle lanes! To build on this promising initial enthusia...

  13. Bike2Work 2016 is over – keep on pedalling!

    CERN Multimedia

    Kathryn Coldham

    2016-01-01

    142 CERN teams cycled more than twice around the Earth in the thirteenth year of Switzerland’s Bike2Work initiative.   Teams cycle to work at CERN’s Meyrin site in June, as part of Bike2Work 2016. (Image: Sophia Bennett/CERN) A record number of 142 CERN teams battled June rain to achieve ninth place in this year’s SwissBike2Work competition, in terms of the number of participating teams. Close to 54,000 employees from more than 1700 companies and organisations took part in this annual, national campaign, launched in 2004. It aims to encourage commuters to grab a helmet and travel on two wheels, improving fitness and reducing congestion on the roads. Overall, the CERN teams cycled 97,091 kilometres; amounting to a 15,000 kg reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, compared to what would have been produced by cars. A 15% participation rate also placed us third among companies with 1000-5000 employees. Both the École polytechnique féd&e...

  14. Reminder: Bike safety – e-learning module still available!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The “Safe bike riding” e-learning module offered by the Safety Training Section of the HSE Unit is designed for anyone who uses a bike on the CERN site.   The course, which takes around 10 minutes to complete, can be accessed via the SIR application. It presents safety information, such as the road traffic rules, and practical advice, such as the appropriate safety equipment to wear and to have fitted to your bike. Regarding the rules, we would like to remind you that CERN's Safety Code A7 applies to cyclists as well as motorists.  The training module was created by the accident prevention service of the HSE Unit after it was noticed that the number of occupational accidents involving cyclists had been constantly increasing since 2008, with a rise from about 20 in 2009 to about 50 in 2013. Since its launch in September 2013, the course has been taken by more than 670 people. It can be completed at any time, in either English or French. The Safety T...

  15. Physiological demands of off-road vehicle riding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Jamie F; Jamnik, Veronica K; Shaw, Jim A; Gledhill, Norman

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the physiological demands of recreational off-road vehicle riding under typical riding conditions using habitual recreational off-road vehicle riders (n = 128). Comparisons of the physical demands of off-road vehicle riding were made between vehicle types (all-terrain vehicle (ATV) and off-road motorcycle (ORM)) to the demands of common recreational activities. Habitual riders (ATV = 56, ORM = 72) performed strength assessments before and after a representative trail ride (48 +/- 24.2 min), and ambulatory oxygen consumption was measured during one lap (24.2 +/- 11.8 min) of the ride. The mean VO2 requirement (mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)) while riding an off-road vehicle was 12.1 +/- 4.9 for ATV and 21.3 +/- 7.1 for ORM (P = 0.002), which is comparable to the VO2 required of many common recreational activities. Temporal analysis of activity intensity revealed approximately 14% of an ATV ride and 38% of an ORM ride are within the intensity range (940% VO2 reserve) required to achieve changes in aerobic fitness. Riding on a representative course also led to muscular fatigue, particularly in the upper body. On the basis of the measured metabolic demands, evidence of muscular strength requirements, and the associated caloric expenditures with off-road vehicle riding, this alternative form of activity conforms to the recommended physical activity guidelines and can be effective for achieving beneficial changes in health and fitness.

  16. Sustainable Passenger Transportation: Dynamic Ride-Sharing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.H. Agatz (Niels); A. Erera (Alan); M.W.P. Savelsbergh (Martin); X. Wang (Xing)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRide-share systems, which aim to bring together travelers with similar itineraries and time schedules, may provide significant societal and environmental benefits by reducing the number of cars used for personal travel and improving the utilization of available seat capacity. Effective

  17. Free Riding Indexes for Ukrainian Economics Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkle, Sarapage; Watts, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the adaptation and replication of Jane Leuthold's experiment concerning consumer choice, investments, and free riding indexes. A similar experiment, conducted in a Ukrainian classroom, produced similar results with a few notable exceptions. The exceptions reflected the Ukrainians' lack of familiarity with western economic thought. (MJP)

  18. Calming the Waters or Riding the Waves?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Pernille; Kottika, Efthymia; Hossain, Muhammad Ismail

    Traditional consumer anger management tends to be compromising rather than empowering the brand. This paper conceptualizes and provides a case example on how consumer empowerment and negative emotions can in fact create opportunities for companies to ride the waves of consumer anger in a way that...

  19. The effects of active commuting by bike on cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition in healthy, sedentary and overweight adults -A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerulf, Nicolas; Nielsen, Susanne Grøn

    -kredsløb spirometrisk system (Oxycon Pro, Jaeger). Fedtmasse (FM), procent android fedtmasse (%AFM) og fedtfri masse (FFM) blev målt med dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), og analyseret justeret for baseline værdier med kovarians analyse. Effekten blev angivet som forskelle mellem grupperne. Resultater: I BIKE...... gennemførte 18 (51%) interventionen, og 17 blev inkluderet i analysen sammen med 16 i CON. Den gennemsnitlige V̇O2maxR øgning i BIKE var 402 ml O2/min (95% CI: 197-606), svarende til 16%. Den gennemsnitlige reduktion i FM var 4.9 kg (95% CI: 1.8 to 7.9) uden samtidigt tab af FFM. AFM reduceredes 4% (95% CI: 1...

  20. Braking Control for Improving Ride Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jonghyup

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available While many vehicle control systems focus on vehicle safety and vehicle performance at high speeds, most driving conditions are very low risk situations. In such a driving situation, the ride comfort of the vehicle is the most important performance index of the vehicle. Electro mechanical brake (EMB and other brake-by-wire (BBW systems have been actively researched. As a result, braking actuators in vehicles are more freely controllable, and research on improving ride comfort is also possible. In this study, we develop a control algorithm that dramatically improves ride comfort in low risk braking situations. A method for minimizing the inconvenience of a passenger due to a suddenly changing acceleration at the moment when the vehicle is stopped is presented. For this purpose, an acceleration trajectory is generated that minimizes the discomfort index defined by the change in acceleration, jerk. A controller is also designed to track this trajectory. The algorithm that updates the trajectory is designed considering the error due to the phase lag occurring in the controller and the plant. In order to verify the performance of this controller, simulation verification is completed using a car simulator, Carsim. As a result, it is confirmed that the ride comfort is dramatically improved.

  1. Cyclist's nodule: no smooth ride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Adam; Thway, Khin; Messiou, Christina; Smith, Myles

    2016-03-10

    A fit and active amateur cyclist was referred by his general practitioner to a surgical oncology outpatient clinic with a slowly-growing perineal mass. Following clinical examination, the patient underwent imaging and biopsy at a tertiary soft tissue tumour centre, which diagnosed perineal nodular induration: a rare, benign tumour caused by repetitive trauma associated with 'saddle sports' such as cycling or horse riding. It is important to consider soft tissue tumours in patients who present with 'lumps and bumps'; they can occur anywhere in the body including the groin or perineum, where it is sometimes referred to as a 'third' or 'accessory' testicle in men. Although unusual, the case emphasises the importance of rapid specialist referral from primary care, and consideration of a patient's occupation and hobbies when formulating diagnoses. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Bike to work safely (follow-up)

    CERN Document Server

    Simon Baird, HSE Unit Head

    2016-01-01

    Following a recent article about safe cycling (see here), the Bulletin received a request for more details on the type of accidents that are reported.   An analysis of the 38 accidents involving bicycles reported this year up to the end of August reveals that the most common single cause of accidents is slippery surfaces: ice, snow, water and gravel, so the message here is to take extra care, particularly when cycling in bad weather. The second item on the list is obstacles of various kinds: collisions with kerbs, potholes and even the transition from roads to cycle paths. The lesson here is to pay close attention to the surface you’re cycling over, and if you do spot a pothole, even if it does not lead to an accident, report it so that it can be repaired. It’s also worth remembering that you’re more likely to avoid coming off your bike if you keep your hands on the handlebars. The third highest cause is collisions with other vehicles, and here there are lessons for ...

  3. Mapping, Awareness, And Virtualization Network Administrator Training Tool Virtualization Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    bike rides. I learned so much from you all, and will miss each and every one of you. To Mr. John Gibson and Dr. Alan Shaffer: thank you for your...guidance, your long-leash approach to thesis advising, and for the laughs we shared during our meetings. I appreciate the enthusiasm you both had for the...Conclusion and Future Work. This chapter discusses the successes and limitations of the MAVNATT Virtualization Module’s prototype and identifies

  4. Device and method to determine perineal artery occlusion during road bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hotaling, James M; Ohlander, Samuel J; Baftiri, Amit P; Freels, Sally; Niederberger, Craig S

    2014-01-01

    Greater than 60 million American men who ride bicycles are at risk of developing erectile dysfunction. One possible reason is occlusion of the perineal arteries. Researchers relied on indirect methods and stationary models to study this problem. We developed a novel system to quantify occlusion among bicycle riders during a road bike ride. Our verification and validation activities show that this system can be safely used on human subjects to measure perineal artery occlusion. The method described in this paper provides a valuable tool to the researchers to study or to develop new solutions that alleviate this problem. The outcomes of these efforts will help millions of cyclists worldwide.

  5. Preference of e-Bike by Women in India–a Niche Market for Auto Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Alamelu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing urbanization with climate change, global warming issues and the related need to decarbonize the economy, is forcing urgency for identifying the alternate source for the global adoption and sustainable scalable solutions. The country’s demographic and road patterns and its natural resources availability provide enormous scope for the electric bike industry. As per the “Navigant Research Report”, it is predicted that by 2018, the sales of electric vehicles in India will shoot up by 17 percent. 1.1 million electric vehicles will be targeted within next five years. A recent study on the environment impact of e-bikes with other forms of transportation found that e-bikes are about 18 times more energy consumption than SUV, 13 times than a sedan, 6 times more than rail transit, and it is having considered as an innovated conventional bicycle. It is a frugal innovation strategy which provide safe carbon free environment, and moreover a part of health rehabilitation programmes. It is required that societal, economic and political and infrastructure systems integrate together to balance the energy environment. With this potential, the era of electric bike started its new avenues on the roads of India specifically focusing on Indian women. To develop this viewpoint, the present study focuses on the preference of e-bike among the women in Madurai city.

  6. Analisis Industri Bisnis Jasa Online Ride Sharing di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berto Mulia Wibawa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of Online Ride Sharing Business Industry in IndonesiaInnovation in transportation sector with sharing economy principal has create new service sector which is named online ride sharing service. There are a lot of online ride-sharing service players in Indonesia such as Go-Jek, Grab, and Uber. Nowadays, government also have rules on changing the condition of online ride-sharing. Therefore, industry analysis is needed to be analyze further to know the industry attractiveness of the online-ride sharing service. This study aims to analyze the level of attractiveness in online ride-sharing industry in Indonesia. This study used descriptive-explorative method on identifying Porter’s Five Forces as tools in industry analysis. Data collection is using ghost interview method to the selected driver. The conclusion is online-ride sharing industry in Indonesia is quite attractive to be developed in the future because the number of customers has not reached the maximum point, moreover the industry may offer a very diverse product differentiationDOI: 10.15408/ess.v8i1.5739

  7. Evaluating the Interference of Bicycle Traffic on Vehicle Operation on Urban Streets with Bike Lanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyuan Pu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many urban streets are designed with on-street bike lanes to provide right-of-way for bicycle traffic. However, when bicycle flow is large, extensive passing maneuvers could occupy vehicle lanes and thus cause interferences to vehicle traffic. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate how bicycle traffic affects vehicle operation on urban streets with bike lanes. Data were collected on six street segments in Nanjing, China. The cumulative curves were constructed to extract traffic flow information including individual bicycle and vehicle speeds and aggregated traffic parameters such as flow and density. The results showed that as bicycle density on bike lanes continuously increases faster bicycles may run into vehicle lanes causing considerable reductions in vehicle speeds. A generalized linear model was estimated to predict the vehicle delay. Results showed that vehicle delay increases as bicycle flow and vehicle flow increase. Number of vehicle lanes and width of bike lane also have significant impact on vehicle delay. Findings of the study are helpful to regions around the world in bike infrastructure design in order to improve operations of both bicycles and vehicles.

  8. Baseline Testing of the EV Global E-Bike with Ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Kolacz, John S.; Tavernelli, Paul F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center initiated baseline testing of the EV Global E-Bike SX with ultracapacitors as a way to reduce pollution in urban areas, reduce fossil fuel consumption, and reduce operating costs for transportation systems. The E-Bike provides an inexpensive approach to advance the state of art in hybrid technology in a practical application. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners, and provides power system data valuable for future space applications. The work was done under the Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program, which includes the Hybrid Electric Transit Bus (HETB). The E-Bike is a state of the art, ground up, hybrid electrical bicycle. Unique features of the vehicle's power system include the use of an efficient, 400 W electric hub motor, and a seven-speed derailleur system that permits operation as fully electric, fully pedal, or a combination of the two. Other innovative features, such as regenerative braking through ultracapacitor energy storage, are planned. Regenerative braking recovers much of the kinetic energy of the vehicle during deceleration. A description of the E-bike, the results of performance testing, and future vehicle development plans are given in this report. The report concludes that the E-Bike provides excellent performance, and that the implementation of ultracapacitors in the power system can provide significant performance improvements.

  9. Relation between riding quality of MAGLEV vehicle and guideway construction accuracy. Chodendo jiki fujoshiki tetsudo guideway no seko seido to norigokochi level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, A; Hashimoto, S; Furukawa, A [Railway Technology Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-01-15

    Good riding quality of MAGLEV vehicle requires construction of its guideway to a high level of accuracy. This paper discusses the relation of the power spectrum density (hereinafter the PSD) made up of guideway construction accuracy and its deviation with the level of riding comfort. The discussion uses the 'riding comfort affecting coefficient' consisting of the unit construction length, vehicle's travelling speed, and vibration characteristics. The PSD, which has been used to evaluate track deviation in the iron wheel/rail system railways, is derived from the number of limit exceeded point, the value 'P' as a track deviation coefficient, and the PSD. The relation between the standard deviation in construction errors and the PSD was derived based on track construction methods. This calculation method is characterized by a function with a step form. The relation between the deviation and the level was quantified using this PSD. Its practicability was verified by a simulated re-inspection of the guideway deviation. Correlation between the level and the construction accuracy was elucidated, and a method for determining the criteria for construction accuracy was established. A side wall beam installing vehicle has been fabricated on a trial basis for a side wall system for the guideway, and installation accuracy tests are being carried out. 14 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. The role of sensation seeking, perceived peer pressure, and harmful alcohol use in riding with an alcohol-impaired driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Hong; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2012-09-01

    Alcohol-related motor vehicle collisions have been the top of policy agenda for more than three decades in Korea. Despite implementation of various traffic safety measures, some drivers' alcohol use and abuse has resulted in a high number of alcohol-impaired traffic fatalities every year. This paper presents the association of theoretical factors with behavior of riding with an alcohol-impaired driver (RAID) among all age groups in the Korean adult sample. The theoretical factors of the drivers are personality factor, socio-psychological factor, and alcohol-related behavioral risk factor. We utilized national survey data from 1007 respondents consisting of 703 males and 304 females aged 20-66 collected by Korean Institute of Criminology (KIC) to test our theorized model. Our results indicated that there were three major predictors of RAID involvement: sensation seeking propensity, perceived peer pressure, and frequent harmful drinking. Overall, prediction of RAID behavior by gender was mediated entirely through these predictors. The issue of males' higher risk of RAID involvements was addressed for effective communication strategies such as campaigns. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Riding through red lights: the rate, characteristics and risk factors of non-compliant urban commuter cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marilyn; Newstead, Stuart; Charlton, Judith; Oxley, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the rate and associated factors of red light infringement among urban commuter cyclists. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted using a covert video camera to record cyclists at 10 sites across metropolitan Melbourne, Australia from October 2008 to April 2009. In total, 4225 cyclists faced a red light and 6.9% were non-compliant. The main predictive factor for infringement was direction of travel, cyclists turning left (traffic travels on the left-side in Australia) had 28.3 times the relative odds of infringement compared to cyclists who continued straight through the intersection. Presence of other road users had a deterrent effect with the odds of infringement lower when a vehicle travelling in the same direction was present (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.28-0.53) or when other cyclists were present (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.19-0.36). Findings suggest that some cyclists do not perceive turning left against a red signal to be unsafe and the opportunity to ride through the red light during low cross traffic times influences the likelihood of infringement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term bicycle riding ameliorates the depression of the patients undergoing hemodialysis by affecting the levels of interleukin-6 and interleukin-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao C

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Chunhui Zhao, Hui Ma, Lei Yang, Yong Xiao Blood Purification Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Hemodialysis patients with depression have a higher risk of death and hospitalization. Although there is pharmacological management for the depression of hemodialysis patients, the adverse effect of the drug limits the use. The nonpharmacological way, bicycle riding, may be an effective way for the therapy of the depression in hemodialysis patients. However, the underlying mechanism of this relationship is still not fully explained, while interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-18 (IL-18 are associated with depression and exercise. Thus, the effects of bicycle riding on the levels of the interleukin were explored. Participants and methods: One hundred and eighty-nine patients with chronic hemodialysis were selected and randomly assigned to three groups of medicine (MG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily, medicine and aerobic exercise (MAG, received 20-mg escitalopram daily and bicycle riding six times weekly, and only aerobic exercise (AG, received 20-mg placebo daily and bicycle riding six times weekly. The whole experiment lasted for 18 weeks. The quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and depression severity according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition [DSM-IV] were measured before and at the end of this study. The serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: The quality of life was improved and depression severity was reduced significantly in the MAG and AG groups when compared with the MG group (P<0.05. Serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were the highest in the MG group, moderate in the MAG group and the lowest in AG group. On the other hand, the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-18 were closely associated with depression scores (P<0.05. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise

  13. Energy harvesting from an exercise bike using a switch-mode converter controlled generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Lindberg-Poulsen, Kristian; Andersen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    output of the bike. The complete controller design consists of this power stage, a control circuit, a startup circuit and an overvoltage protection circuit. A functional overview of the entire controller is presented in the paper, along with in-depth descriptions of the specific subcircuits designed....... The system is self-starting and does not require an external power source. There are two modes of operation: Voltage regulated 12V output for connection to a standard inverter, and unregulated output for charging of a 24V battery, with direct linear control of the rotor current, thus simulating road bike...... gearing. Prototype bikes were built and used at several events, and the functionality was experimentally verified....

  14. INVESTIGATION OF ALTERNATIVE TOURISM TYPES AND SIGHTS VIA GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS: THE EXAPLE OF SAFRANBOLU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Aydın

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, alternative tourism types and sights belonging to Safranbolu were identified through Geographic Information System (GIS tools. In this manner, most favorable tourism activities, which are specific to field, and evaluation factors of these activities were determined. “Suitability classification values” of these factors were charted by receiving opinions from experts. Natural and cultural properties of study area were determined in the light of evaluation factors and a database was set via GIS. This database was examined according to evaluation factors of the activities and the most suitable and conditional suitable areas were determined. In this study, it is aimed to carry out the suitable place analysis for alternative tourism types of Safranbolu, which is a tourism town, such as riding, mountain biking, camping, trekking. 486 km2 area for riding, 319 m2 for trekking, 209 km2 for mountain biking and 148 km² for camping were figured out as suitable. These results reveal that tourism activities should be more professionally organized in order to apply alternative tourism types such as riding, mountain biking, camping, trekking. In addition, organizations such as festivals and fairs should be arranged in order to introduce products special to Safranbolu.

  15. Investigation of Alternative Tourism Types and Sights via Geographic Information Systems: the Exaple of Safranbolu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, F.; Çepni, O.; Turgut, T.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, alternative tourism types and sights belonging to Safranbolu were identified through Geographic Information System (GIS) tools. In this manner, most favorable tourism activities, which are specific to field, and evaluation factors of these activities were determined. "Suitability classification values" of these factors were charted by receiving opinions from experts. Natural and cultural properties of study area were determined in the light of evaluation factors and a database was set via GIS. This database was examined according to evaluation factors of the activities and the most suitable and conditional suitable areas were determined. In this study, it is aimed to carry out the suitable place analysis for alternative tourism types of Safranbolu, which is a tourism town, such as riding, mountain biking, camping, trekking. 486 km2 area for riding, 319 m2 for trekking, 209 km2 for mountain biking and 148 km2 for camping were figured out as suitable. These results reveal that tourism activities should be more professionally organized in order to apply alternative tourism types such as riding, mountain biking, camping, trekking. In addition, organizations such as festivals and fairs should be arranged in order to introduce products special to Safranbolu.

  16. Development of an ultra-portable ride quality meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    FRAs Office of Research and Development has funded the development of an ultra-portable ride quality meter (UPRQM) under the Small Business and Innovative Research (SBIR) program. Track inspectors can use the UPRQM to locate segments of track that...

  17. How May Bike-sharing Choice Be Affected By Air Pollution? A Seasonal Analysis In Taiyuan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Li, W.; Kamargianni, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bike-sharing has become a popular green transportation choice in many cities around the world. There has been a rapid expansion of bike-sharing schemes in developing countries at recent time. However, many of those were launched without the support of adequate scientific research and hence failed to create the expected demand. Given the increasingly significant urban transportation challenges in developing countries, such as congestion and air pollution caused by the continuously growing priv...

  18. Riding Pontic--Aesthetic Journey Aesthetic Goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Byajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Manisha, Kukreja; Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Nafria, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The increasing concern for esthetics during the orthodontic treatment can be measured by the increasing popularity ofaesthetic brackets, lingual technique, smaller sized metal brackets, and clear alignment therapy. Many clients, especially adolescents, are self-conscious about their appearance in social and professional situations, and they refuse to tolerate the inevitable "black holes" of edentulous spaces during orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use, fabrication, modifications, and shortcomings of riding pontics; and illustrates how their use provides aesthetic, psychological and functional benefits.

  19. BIOMECHANICS OF THERAPEUTIC RIDING DURING THE DISEASES OF I-II DEGREE DYSPLASTIC LUMBAR AND STATIC (SHORT LEG) SCOLIOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshaberidze, E; Merabishvili, I; Loria, M

    2015-11-01

    The goal of the paper is to substantiate the essence of ridetherapy biomechanics as the pathogenetic therapeutic and prophylactic method at lumbar dysplastic (the I and II degrees) and static (short-legged induced) scoliosis. Uneven lower extremities caused by any reason and asymmetric support induce the change in the arrangement of trochantin to the vertebra and correspondingly the uneven loading of lumbar muscles. The asymmetric strength of lumbar muscles evoked by the change in rotator condition becomes the cause of the formation of scoliosis primary arc which, in its turn, causes a compensatory spinal curvature. In case of dysplastic scoliosis a leading role belongs to the beginning of dystrophic changes in intervertebral discs and its further decentration. At riding position the lower extremities are completely disengaged from the antigravity redistribution, the child is in direct contact with vibrations and jolts coming from the horseback; the antigravity loading is distributed on the muscles of the torso and thus, it creates an opportunity to purposefully affect the correction of the spine. During scoliosis the pathogenic essence of ridetherapy is due to the comprehensiveness of its procedures, expressed in the fact that during one procedure several factors are influenced simultaneously: nucleus pulpous, the torso and iliopsoas muscles, the antigravity system, etc. According to the clinical-functional and radiographic studies carried out in the dynamics on 11-16 years old adolescents it has been established that in those groups where the rehabilitation was conducted in a complex with ridetherapy the authentically higher results were obtained as compared to the groups where the rehabilitation was held using therapeutic exercises and massage.

  20. Scaling Law of Urban Ride Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachet, R.; Sagarra, O.; Santi, P.; Resta, G.; Szell, M.; Strogatz, S. H.; Ratti, C.

    2017-03-01

    Sharing rides could drastically improve the efficiency of car and taxi transportation. Unleashing such potential, however, requires understanding how urban parameters affect the fraction of individual trips that can be shared, a quantity that we call shareability. Using data on millions of taxi trips in New York City, San Francisco, Singapore, and Vienna, we compute the shareability curves for each city, and find that a natural rescaling collapses them onto a single, universal curve. We explain this scaling law theoretically with a simple model that predicts the potential for ride sharing in any city, using a few basic urban quantities and no adjustable parameters. Accurate extrapolations of this type will help planners, transportation companies, and society at large to shape a sustainable path for urban growth.

  1. Testing the effectiveness of exercise videogame bikes among families in the home-setting: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Rachel S; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2013-02-01

    Interactive stationary bikes provide positive affective experiences and physiological benefits; however, research is limited. This study compared usage of GameBikes to traditional stationary bikes among families in the home following a 6-week randomized, controlled trial design. Parents completed questionnaires featuring constructs of the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Usage was tracked by all family members and belief elicitation with GameBike families followed the trial. Usage across the trial was significantly different for children in favor of the GameBike group (t36 = 2.61, P = .01, d = .85). No differences were identified for parents. Significant time effects for parents' (F5,48 = 5.07, P < .01; η2 = .35) and children's (F5,32 = 8.24, P < .01; η2 = .56) usage were found with declines across 6 weeks. Affective attitude was the only significant TPB variable between groups at both time one (t57 = 2.53, P = .01; d = .65) and follow-up (t52 = 2.70, P = .01; d = .74) in favor of the GameBike group. Elicited beliefs were primarily affective-and control-based. The results provide support for use of interactive video games to augment current PA initiatives. Larger-scale trials with longer durations are warranted.

  2. The effect of mountain bike wheel size on Cross-Country performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hurst, Howard Thomas; Atkins, Stephen; Metcalfe, John; Sinclair, Jonathan Kenneth; Rylands, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different wheel size diameters on indicators of cross-country mountain bike time trial performance. Nine competitive male mountain bikers (age 34.7 ± 10.7 years; stature 177.7 ± 5.6 cm; body mass 73.2 ± 8.6 kg) performed 1 lap of a 3.48 km mountain bike (MTB) course as fast as possible on 26″, 27.5″ and 29″ wheeled MTB. Time (s), mean power (W), cadence (revs · min−1) and velocity (km · h−1) were recorded for the whole lap and during...

  3. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  4. Critical Mass has become a tradition for the Bike2Work campaign at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2018-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  5. Solving a static repositioning problem in bike-sharing systems using iterated tabu search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Sin C.; Szeto, W. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the static bike repositioning problem where the problem consists of selecting a subset of stations to visit, sequencing them, and determining the pick-up/drop-off quantities (associated with each of the visited stations) under the various operational constraints. The objec......In this paper, we study the static bike repositioning problem where the problem consists of selecting a subset of stations to visit, sequencing them, and determining the pick-up/drop-off quantities (associated with each of the visited stations) under the various operational constraints...

  6. Comparison of Road Safety Behaviour of Rented Dublin Bike Users With That of Owner Cyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Deegan, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Cycling is a unique way of travelling and exercising. The Irish Heart Foundation recommends thirty minutes of exercise most days in the week to maintain a healthy heart (IHF, 2008). The introduction of the Dublin-bike scheme by Dublin city Council in connection with JCDecaux on the 13th of September 2009 has encouraged and allowed more people to cycle around the city of Dublin. Since their introduction, Dublin-bikes have grown rapidly in popularity. By the 31st of December 2009 24,016 people ...

  7. Re-examination of Chinese semantic processing and syntactic processing: evidence from conventional ERPs and reconstructed ERPs by residue iteration decomposition (RIDE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available A number of studies have explored the time course of Chinese semantic and syntactic processing. However, whether syntactic processing occurs earlier than semantics during Chinese sentence reading is still under debate. To further explore this issue, an event-related potentials (ERPs experiment was conducted on 21 native Chinese speakers who read individually-presented Chinese simple sentences (NP1+VP+NP2 word-by-word for comprehension and made semantic plausibility judgments. The transitivity of the verbs was manipulated to form three types of stimuli: congruent sentences (CON, sentences with a semantically violated NP2 following a transitive verb (semantic violation, SEM, and sentences with a semantically violated NP2 following an intransitive verb (combined semantic and syntactic violation, SEM+SYN. The ERPs evoked from the target NP2 were analyzed by using the Residue Iteration Decomposition (RIDE method to reconstruct the ERP waveform blurred by trial-to-trial variability, as well as by using the conventional ERP method based on stimulus-locked averaging. The conventional ERP analysis showed that, compared with the critical words in CON, those in SEM and SEM+SYN elicited an N400-P600 biphasic pattern. The N400 effects in both violation conditions were of similar size and distribution, but the P600 in SEM+SYN was bigger than that in SEM. Compared with the conventional ERP analysis, RIDE analysis revealed a larger N400 effect and an earlier P600 effect (in the time window of 500-800 ms instead of 570-810ms. Overall, the combination of conventional ERP analysis and the RIDE method for compensating for trial-to-trial variability confirmed the non-significant difference between SEM and SEM+SYN in the earlier N400 time window. Converging with previous findings on other Chinese structures, the current study provides further precise evidence that syntactic processing in Chinese does not occur earlier than semantic processing.

  8. Fault ride-through and grid support of permanent magnet synchronous generator-based wind farms with HVAC and VSC-HVDC transmission systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hongzhi; Chen, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes fault ride-through and grid support of offshore wind farms based on permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) wind turbines connected to the onshore AC network through two alternative transmission systems: high voltage AC (HVAC) or high voltage DC (HVDC) based on voltage...... source converters (VSC). The proposed configurations of the PMSG-based offshore wind farm and VSC-based HVDC are given as well as their control strategies under both steady state and fault state. The PMSG-based offshore wind farm is integrated into a test power transmission system via either HVAC or VSC...

  9. Pleistocene geology and geomorphology of the Riding Mountain and Duck Mountain areas, Manitoba-Saskatchewan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klassen, R. W

    1979-01-01

    ... materials forming the land surface. This information is intended as a basis for more specialized studies directed towards maximizing the economic and aesthetic potential of the land and has direct applications to land use studies...

  10. Round and Round We Go: An "Action" Ride on the Rehearsing and Performing Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the use of action research cycles on a course involving groupwork rehearsing and performance. The aim was to explore various pedagogic aspects of the activities and improve tutor practice. This account of four action research spirals, taking place over a 10-year period of rehearsing and performing, considers their management…

  11. Genetic variability within french race and riding horse breeds from genealogical data and blood marker polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    Moureaux, Sophie; Verrier, Etienne; Ricard, Anne; Meriaux, J-Claude

    1996-01-01

    The genetic variability of five horse breeds raised in France was analysed: Thoroughbred, Trotteur Français, Arab, Anglo-Arab and Selle Français. Genealogical data and genotypes at seven blood group and nine protein loci were used. Paternal family sizes were found to be unbalanced, especially in Trotteur français, Selle Franqais and Thoroughbred. Average coefficients of inbreeding for offspring born from 1989 to 1992 were 1.02 (Thoroughbred), 1.86 (Trotteur Français), 3.08 (Arab), 1.17 (...

  12. The science of vehicle dynamics handling, braking, and ride of road and race cars

    CERN Document Server

    Guiggiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle dynamics is often perceived as a quite intuitive subject. As a matter of fact, lots of people are able to drive a car. Nevertheless, without a rigorous mathematical formulation it is very difficult to truly understand the physical phenomena involved in the motion of a road vehicle. In this book, mathematical models of vehicles are developed, always paying attention to state the relevant assumptions and to provide explanations for each step. This approach allows for a deep, yet simple, analysis of the dynamics of vehicles, without having to resort to foggy concepts. The reader will soon achieve a clear understanding of the subject, which will be of great help both in dealing with the challenges of designing and testing new vehicles and in tackling new research topics. The book covers handling and performance of both road and race cars. A new approach, called MAP (Map of Achievable Performance), is presented and thoroughly discussed. It provides a global and intuitive picture of the handling features of...

  13. Identification and evaluation of pavement-bridge interface ride quality improvement and corrective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Bridge owners have long recognized that the approach pavement at bridges is prone to exhibiting both settlement and : cracking, which manifest as the bump at the end of the bridge. This deterioration requires considerable on-going : maintenance...

  14. Validation of the Chinese-language brief sensation seeking scale: implications for risky riding behaviors of parental motorcyclists and their child passengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hsiu-Ping; Lin, Mau-Roung; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Huang, Ping-Wen; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2014-12-01

    Motorcycles are the leading cause of road traffic deaths in the Western Pacific and Southeast Asia, where Mandarin Chinese is the most commonly used language. Sensation seeking (SS) is reported to correlate with many risky motor vehicle behaviors, and therefore a culture-adapted Chinese instrument is needed to assess this personality trait in Chinese-speaking motorcycling populations. The standard front and blinded-backward process was carried out to formulate the Chinese-language Brief Sensation Seeking Scale (C-BSSS). 193 parental motorcyclists who rode with their young children were interviewed concerning their SS levels, demographics, riding behaviors, and the driving/riding experiences. A random sample of 30 subjects was re-interviewed 1-2 weeks later to examine the test-retest reliability. Psychometric analyses revealed satisfactory item characteristics, internal consistency, intraobserver reliability, and interobserver reliability. Additionally, parental motorcyclists who had the following characteristics were more likely to be the high sensation seekers (SSers), including male, younger age, presenting risky motor vehicle behaviors of themselves (e.g., higher riding speeds, operating after drinking, using a mobile phone while operating, and receiving a traffic ticket), and carrying child passengers who demonstrated dangerous motorcycling behaviors (e.g., a younger age, non-helmeted, and overloaded). We conclude that the C-BSSS is a useful and reliable measure of SS for ethnic Chinese populations. This instrument may be helpful to develop the future prevention strategy of motorcycle injuries in Chinese parental motorcyclists and their young child passengers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. On your bike! a cross-sectional study of the individual, social and environmental correlates of cycling to school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trapp Georgina SA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active school transport (AST has declined rapidly in recent decades. While many studies have examined walking, cycling to school has received very little attention. Correlates of cycling are likely to differ to those from walking and cycling enables AST from further distances. This study examined individual, social and environmental factors associated with cycling to school among elementary school-aged children, stratified by gender. Methods Children (n = 1197 attending 25 Australian primary schools located in high or low walkable neighborhoods, completed a one-week travel diary and a parent/child questionnaire on travel habits and attitudes. Results Overall, 31.2% of boys and 14.6% of girls cycled ≥ 1 trip/week, however 59.4% of boys and 36.7% of girls reported cycling as their preferred school transport mode. In boys (but not girls, school neighborhood design was significantly associated with cycling: i.e., boys attending schools in neighborhoods with high connectivity and low traffic were 5.58 times more likely to cycle (95% CI 1.11-27.96 and for each kilometer boys lived from school the odds of cycling reduced by 0.70 (95% CI 0.63-0.99. Irrespective of gender, cycling to school was associated with parental confidence in their child's cycling ability (boys: OR 10.39; 95% CI 3.79-28.48; girls: OR 4.03; 95% CI 2.02-8.05, parental perceived convenience of driving (boys: OR 0.42; 95% CI 0.23-0.74; girls: OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.20-0.82; and child's preference to cycle (boys: OR 5.68; 95% CI 3.23-9.98; girls: OR 3.73; 95% CI 2.26-6.17. Conclusion School proximity, street network connectivity and traffic exposure in school neighborhoods was associated with boys (but not girls cycling to school. Irrespective of gender, parents need to be confident in their child's cycling ability and must prioritize cycling over driving.

  16. Physical Exercise Keeps the Brain Connected : Biking Increases White Matter Integrity in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svatkova, Alena; Mandl, Rene C. W.; Scheewe, Thomas W.; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    It has been shown that learning a new skill leads to structural changes in the brain. However, it is unclear whether it is the acquisition or continuous practicing of the skill that causes this effect and whether brain connectivity of patients with schizophrenia can benefit from such practice. We

  17. Investigation on Motorcyclist Riding Behaviour at Curve Entry Using Instrumented Motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Choon Wah; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Saifizul, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    This paper details the study on the changes in riding behaviour, such as changes in speed as well as the brake force and throttle force applied, when motorcyclists ride over a curve section road using an instrumented motorcycle. In this study, an instrumented motorcycle equipped with various types of sensors, on-board cameras, and data loggers, was developed in order to collect the riding data on the study site. Results from the statistical analysis showed that riding characteristics, such as changes in speed, brake force, and throttle force applied, are influenced by the distance from the curve entry, riding experience, and travel mileage of the riders. A structural equation modeling was used to study the impact of these variables on the change of riding behaviour in curve entry section. Four regression equations are formed to study the relationship between four dependent variables, which are speed, throttle force, front brake force, and rear brake force applied with the independent variables. PMID:24523660

  18. Education and the Political Arena: Riding the Train, Shaping the Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, David H.

    1983-01-01

    With a presidential election only one year away, now is the time for educators and educational researchers to become acquainted with and involved in legislative and policy initiatives that can improve education. (GC)

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Media Crises - How to ride off a CSR-related shitstorm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmeltz, Line; Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette

    This paper aims to explore and offer insights into the phenomenon of social media crises in a CSR-related context by reflexively merging theoretical and case insights (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2007, p. 2011). The phenomenon and the components of a social media crisis are theoretically identified, and...... strategy and communicative skills during a CSR-related social media crisis......., and the case of the Norwegian chocolate brand Freia is used to illustrate how CSR-related issues are particularly vulnerable and thus potentially responsible for creating a social media crisis. The case furthermore serves to illustrate the importance of social media readiness, responsiveness and not least...

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Media Crises - How to ride off a CSR-related shitstorm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette; Schmeltz, Line

    This paper aims to explore and offer insights into the phenomenon of social media crises in a CSR-related context by reflexively merging theoretical and case insights (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2007, p. 2011). The phenomenon and the components of a social media crisis are theoretically identified...... strategy and communicative skills during a CSR-related social media crisis....

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Media Crises - How to ride off a CSR-related shitstorm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerdal-Hjermind, Annette; Schmeltz, Line

    , and the case of the Norwegian chocolate brand Freia is used to illustrate how CSR-related issues are particularly vulnerable and thus potentially responsible for creating a social media crisis. The case furthermore serves to illustrate the importance of social media readiness, responsiveness and not least......This paper aims to explore and offer insights into the phenomenon of social media crises in a CSR-related context by reflexively merging theoretical and case insights (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2007, p. 2011). The phenomenon and the components of a social media crisis are theoretically identified...... strategy and communicative skills during a CSR-related social media crisis....

  2. Riding the dragon: enhancing resilient leadership and sensible self-care in the healthcare executive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Robert J; Buck, Tina C

    2013-01-01

    With challenges in the healthcare system growing, strengthened leader and organizational resilience is often overlooked as a factor that can support staff morale and sustain performance improvement and quality. Here we examine resilience-building practices related to self-awareness, alone time, mindfulness, and a healthy perspective. A key aspect of management resilience is weighing the costs and benefits to the executive personally and to the organization if the warning signals of impairment are left untended. To that end, we propose a leader self-care protocol, which even the busy healthcare executive can find time to undertake. Ifimplemented, the protocol will allow leaders to lessen their vulnerability to burnout and help teammates whose resilience may be stretched thin. Finally, we present healthy coping skills for daily stressors and for the sudden and overwhelming situations that can negatively affect resilience.

  3. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 9 through 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-nine learning activities grouped…

  4. Ride On! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Public Transportation for Grades 6 through 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the public transportation topic for grades 6-9. It contains forty-two learning activities grouped…

  5. The share-a-ride problem : people and parcels sharing taxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, B.; Krushynskyi, D.; Reijers, H.A.; van Woensel, T.

    2014-01-01

    New city logistics approaches are needed to ensure efficient urban mobility for both people and goods. Usually, these are handled independently in dedicated networks. This paper considers conceptual and mathematical models in which people and parcels are handled in an integrated way by the same taxi

  6. Railway testing using a portable ride quality and vibration measurement system with GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, Brian; Whitten, Brian; Neijikovsky, Boris

    1995-06-01

    To conduct the testing and evaluation of railway and railway vehicles, the Federal Railroad Administration developed a protable system that consists of accelerometers oriented in the vertical and horizontal directions, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, data collection and power systems, and a portable computer. Commercial software was used to collect and display the data, while software, developed by ENSCO, was used to analyze and display results. The GPS provided dynamic location to an accuracy of 30 meters or better, and vehicle speed to within one mile per hour. The system was used in the demonstration tests of several advanced high-speed trains on Amtrak's Northeast Corrider and on other tracks in the US. The portable measurement system proved to be a simple and effective device to characterize the vibration environment of any transportation system. It is ideal for use in the assessment of the safe performance of high-speed trains operating at high cant deficiency. The system has also been used for other field tests, including braking performance and bridge monitoring. This report discusses the portable measurement system, the test applications that the system has been used for, the results of thoses tests, and the potential for improvements.

  7. Influence Of Specialisation On Connectedness And Genetic Parameters In Dutch Warmblood Riding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovere, Gabriel Alejandro; Madsen, Per; Norberg, Elise

    During the last decades, a process of specialisation into show jumping (JH) and dressage (DH) has been taking place in the Dutch Warmblood studbook (KWPN). The objectives of this paper were to describe the evolution of the connectedness between JH and DH over the last 15 years and to analyse...

  8. Commuting Pattern with Park-and-Ride Option for Heterogeneous Commuters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjuan Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of the parking on heterogeneous commuters' travel choice in a competitive transportation system which consists of a subway and a parallel road with a bottleneck of limited service capacity. Every morning, commuters either use their private cars only or drive their cars to the bottleneck, park there, and then take the subway to the destination. Considering the effects caused by body congestion in carriage and the parking fees, we developed a bottleneck model to describe the commuters' travel choice. There exist several types of equilibrium that corresponds to user equilibrium. We investigated the influence of the capacity of the bottleneck and the total travel demand on the travel behaviors and on the total social cost. It is shown that there exists a scheme with suitable subway fare and parking fees to implement the minimum total social cost.

  9. Staff Ride Handbook and Atlas Battle of White Bird Canyon 17 June 1877

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    were excellent horseman , skilled marksmen, and aggressive fighters. * The Army officers of 1878 (and modern historians) most times referred to the...leadership of the Wallowa band (numbering about 200 persons) upon the death of Old Chief Joseph in 1871. Joseph, along with the other four non-treaty...inebriated Warriors taunted Shore Crossing that his honor was stained and that he must avenge his father’s death . On the morning of the 14th of June

  10. Riding on air: critical safety information for you and your tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This booklet is issued for public distribution by Transport Canada. It provides a few simple tips concerning automobile tire safety which, if followed, is expected to result in increased personal and vehicle safety, improved fuel economy, prolonged tire life, energy savings and reduced environmental pollution. The information provided include tips about tire pressure, tire inspection for damage and wear, rotation of tires for more even wear, replacing worn tires, the advantages of using snow tires in winter and an explanation of the meaning of the information found on the tire sidewall.

  11. Riding the wave: reconciling the roles of disease and climate change in amphibian declines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen R Lips

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the evidence for the role of climate change in triggering disease outbreaks of chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease of amphibians. Both climatic anomalies and disease-related extirpations are recent phenomena, and effects of both are especially noticeable at high elevations in tropical areas, making it difficult to determine whether they are operating separately or synergistically. We compiled reports of amphibian declines from Lower Central America and Andean South America to create maps and statistical models to test our hypothesis of spatiotemporal spread of the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, and to update the elevational patterns of decline in frogs belonging to the genus Atelopus. We evaluated claims of climate change influencing the spread of Bd by including error into estimates of the relationship between air temperature and last year observed. Available data support the hypothesis of multiple introductions of this invasive pathogen into South America and subsequent spread along the primary Andean cordilleras. Additional analyses found no evidence to support the hypothesis that climate change has been driving outbreaks of amphibian chytridiomycosis, as has been posited in the climate-linked epidemic hypothesis. Future studies should increase retrospective surveys of museum specimens from throughout the Andes and should study the landscape genetics of Bd to map fine-scale patterns of geographic spread to identify transmission routes and processes.

  12. Riding the wave: reconciling the roles of disease and climate change in amphibian declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Karen R; Diffendorfer, Jay; Mendelson, Joseph R; Sears, Michael W

    2008-03-25

    We review the evidence for the role of climate change in triggering disease outbreaks of chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease of amphibians. Both climatic anomalies and disease-related extirpations are recent phenomena, and effects of both are especially noticeable at high elevations in tropical areas, making it difficult to determine whether they are operating separately or synergistically. We compiled reports of amphibian declines from Lower Central America and Andean South America to create maps and statistical models to test our hypothesis of spatiotemporal spread of the pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and to update the elevational patterns of decline in frogs belonging to the genus Atelopus. We evaluated claims of climate change influencing the spread of Bd by including error into estimates of the relationship between air temperature and last year observed. Available data support the hypothesis of multiple introductions of this invasive pathogen into South America and subsequent spread along the primary Andean cordilleras. Additional analyses found no evidence to support the hypothesis that climate change has been driving outbreaks of amphibian chytridiomycosis, as has been posited in the climate-linked epidemic hypothesis. Future studies should increase retrospective surveys of museum specimens from throughout the Andes and should study the landscape genetics of Bd to map fine-scale patterns of geographic spread to identify transmission routes and processes.

  13. Impact of noise on hearing amongst commercial motor bike riders in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of noise on hearing amongst commercial motor bike riders in Benin- City, Nigeria. ... While there was no NIHI in control group, a significant hearing impairment for both air conduction (AC) and Bone conduction (BC) was observed in the study group. Unlike previous observations AC and BC impairment were ...

  14. Bus transit operational efficiency resulting from passenger boardings at park-and-ride facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to save time and money by not driving to an ultimate destination, some urban commuters drive themselves a few miles to specially designated parking lots built for transit customers and located where trains or buses stop. The focus of this pa...

  15. For Safety and Sanity's Sake, Help Bus Drivers Keep Peace on the Ride to School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Outlines common-sense tips for disciplining student bus riders that are recommended by several driver-training programs. Themes include the following: (1) Set a few clear rules for proper bus behavior; (2) be positive; and (3) establish amiable communication with the children and with the principal as well. (CJH)

  16. Let's Go Riding in the Car. An ESL/Geography Module. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Booklet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Peter; Howard, Joan

    The teacher's guide to a set of instructional materials for an English as a second language unit on automobiles as a form of transportation focuses on the history of the auto's development, importance to the Canadian economy, and impact on the lives of Canadians. The target audience is secondary students at intermediate and advanced English…

  17. The last ride of Henry II of France: orbital injury and a king's demise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Kian; Choe, Christina H; Vagefi, M Reza; Eckstein, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Jousting was a popular pastime for royalty in the Renaissance era. Injuries were common, and the eye was particularly at risk from the splinters of the wooden lance. On June 30, 1559, Henry II of France participated in a jousting tournament to celebrate two royal weddings. In the third match, Gabriel de Montgomery struck Henry on the right shoulder and the lance splintered, sending wooden shards into his face and right orbit. Despite being cared for by the prominent physicians Ambroise Paré and Andreas Vesalius, the king died 10 days later and was found to have a cerebral abscess. The wound was not explored immediately after the injury; nevertheless, wooden foreign bodies were discovered in the orbit at the time of autopsy. The dura had not been violated, suggesting that an infection may have traveled from the orbit into the brain. Nostradamus and Luca Guarico, the astrologer to the Medici family, had prophesied the death of Henry II of France, but he ignored their warnings and thus changed the course of history in Renaissance Europe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. E-Bike Injuries: Experience from an Urban Emergency Department—A Retrospective Study from Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvana Papoutsi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Between 2005 and 2012, annual sales of E-bikes in Switzerland increased from 1,792 to 52,941. This continuous and rapid transition from human-powered bicycles to an electric bicycle technology may indicate the increasing demand for low-cost transportation technology in combination with a healthy lifestyle. Material and Methods. In the present study, from April 2012 to September 2013, we retrospectively analysed E-bike accidents treated in the Emergency Department of our hospital by focusing on the following parameters: age, gender, time, period, and cause of the accident, as well as injury and outcome. Results. Patients were predominantly male. The mean age of injured E-cyclists was 47.5 years. The main causes of injury were self-accident. Most injuries were to the head/neck. The mean ISS was 8.48. The outcome showed that 9 patients were treated as outpatients, 9 were inpatients, and 5 patients were kept in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU. Only six patients underwent surgery (S. Discussion. This is the first attempt to evaluate E-bike injuries in Switzerland in an acute hospital setting. Since there is increasing popular preference for E-bikes as means of transportation and injuries to the head or neck are prevalent among E-cyclists, the hazard should not to be underestimated.

  19. Ride-along data LOS 130, 170 & LO330 shots z3139, 3140 and 3141

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Each instrument records the x-ray emission from the Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH); LOS 130 TIXTLs instruments record the absorption of the pinch backlighter through an expanding NaF/Mg foil; LOS 170 MLM instruments record monochromatic images at 276 and 528 eV energies near and before ZPDH stagnation time; LOS 330 TREX 6A & B: recoded time resolved absorption spectra from a radiatively heated Ne gas.

  20. On the Complexity of Computing Optimal Private Park-and-Ride Plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    or size of the parties inputs. This is despite the fact that in many cases the size of a party’s input can be confidential. The reason for this omission seems to have been the folklore belief that, as with encryption, it is impossible to carry out non-trivial secure computation while hiding the size...... that the folklore belief may not be fully accurate. In this work, we initiate a theoretical study of input-size hiding secure computation, and focus on the two-party case. We present definitions for this task, and deal with the subtleties that arise in the setting where there is no a priori polynomial bound...

  1. Dvandvas, Blocking, and the Associative: The Bumpy Ride from Phrase to Word

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparsky, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The oldest form of Sanskrit has a class of expressions that are in some respects like asyndetically coordinated syntactic phrases, in other respects like single compound words. I propose to resolve the conflicting evidence by drawing on prosodic phonology, stratal optimality theory, and the lexicalist approach to morphological blocking. I then…

  2. HIV and mature dendritic cells: Trojan exosomes riding the Trojan horse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Izquierdo-Useros

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are secreted cellular vesicles that can induce specific CD4(+ T cell responses in vivo when they interact with competent antigen-presenting cells like mature dendritic cells (mDCs. The Trojan exosome hypothesis proposes that retroviruses can take advantage of the cell-encoded intercellular vesicle traffic and exosome exchange pathway, moving between cells in the absence of fusion events in search of adequate target cells. Here, we discuss recent data supporting this hypothesis, which further explains how DCs can capture and internalize retroviruses like HIV-1 in the absence of fusion events, leading to the productive infection of interacting CD4(+ T cells and contributing to viral spread through a mechanism known as trans-infection. We suggest that HIV-1 can exploit an exosome antigen-dissemination pathway intrinsic to mDCs, allowing viral internalization and final trans-infection of CD4(+ T cells. In contrast to previous reports that focus on the ability of immature DCs to capture HIV in the mucosa, this review emphasizes the outstanding role that mature DCs could have promoting trans-infection in the lymph node, underscoring a new potential viral dissemination pathway.

  3. The contribution of Park and Ride to a robuust mobility system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snelder, M.; Egeter, B.; Hendriks, T.; Immers, L.H.

    2011-01-01

    Transport networks in many urbanized areas are vulnerable. Small disturbances can cause large delays for many travellers. In (Schrijver et al., 2008) and (Snelder et al., 2009), an architecture for designing robust road networks is presented. In this architecture robustness is defined as the extent

  4. Social evolution: reincarnation, free-riding and inexplicable modes of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Seirian; Keller, Laurent

    2008-03-11

    We like to believe that human societies are the most complex in the animal kingdom, with intricate family structures and a unique repertoire of sophisticated social interactions. A new study reveals an insect society so complex that we are forced to reconsider our role as conquerors of complexity.

  5. Tandem bike design for apartment residents as an idea to reduce air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandriawan Bambang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical housing is recently popular in urban areas since the availability of land is very limited. A strong preference for living in the city is mainly due to the home to work travel that is relatively close for those who work in the city. While residing in the vertical housing (i.e. apartment can be an advantage, several accommodation facilities are often provided at their minimum standards. As such, a special design of bicycle for apartment residents may an effective solution. Multi-function bike, ridden either by one or two riders and its aesthetic part of interior element can be an attractive offer. Identification of marketing objectives and observation of comparable products were a crucial step in the initial process of tandem bike design. The use of bicycle in urban areas can overcome a number of motorized vehicles operating wherever the using of them may create issues such as traffic jam and air pollution. This study aims to adjust the tandem bike which can be produced commercially for the apartment residents. Stated in the research problems, the design process was successfully fulfilled. Fabrication and product testing were positively completed. A concise and comfortable bike to carry from the lobby to the apartment unit, or vice versa, was successfully created.

  6. Intergovernmental (Dis)incentives, Free-Riding, Teacher Salaries and Teacher Pensions

    OpenAIRE

    Maria D. Fitzpatrick

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I document evidence that intergovernmental incentives inherent in public sector defined benefit pension systems distort the amount and timing of income for public school teachers. This intergovernmental incentive stems from the fact that, in many states, local school districts are responsible for setting the compensation that determines the size of pensions, but are not required to make contributions to cover the resulting pension fund liabilities. I use the introduction of a p...

  7. The effects of three days of sub-maximal-intensity mountain biking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pro- posed that each individual has a threshold of duration and intensity of exercise. Once this threshold is exceeded, sleep is negatively af- fected by the exercise. Possibly the most physically taxing exercise events are multi- day stage races of either cross-country skiing, running, road cycling, mountain biking or adventure ...

  8. Motivating Elderly To Exercise – Recreational Virtual Environment for Indoor Biking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    For most nursing home residents, regular physical exercise is a necessity to keep standard motor-function and strength. Meanwhile, many nursing home residents do not pursue this actively. This paper examines if augmenting a conventional chair-based bike exercise, with a suite of four recreational...

  9. Pension-Spiking, Free-Riding, and the Effects of Pension Reform on Teachers’ Earnings*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Maria D.

    2017-01-01

    In many states, local school districts are responsible for setting the earnings that determines the size of pensions, but are not required to make contributions to cover the resulting state pension fund liabilities. In this paper, I document evidence that this intergovernmental incentive inherent in public sector defined benefit pension systems distorts the amount and timing of income for public school teachers. I use the introduction of a policy that required experience-rating on earnings increases above a certain limit in a differences-in-differences framework to identify whether districts are willing to pay the full costs of their earnings promises. Because of the design of the policy, overall earnings of teachers near retirement did not change. Instead, districts that previously provided one-time pay increases shifted to smaller increments spread out over several years. In addition, some districts that did not practice pension-spiking prior to the reform appear to begin providing payments up to the new, lower limit, perhaps due to increased salience of the fiscal incentive. Therefore, the policy was ineffective at decreasing pension costs. PMID:28983134

  10. Study on the energy-efficiency of 'park and ride' systems (French/German version); Efficience energetique des P et R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume-Gentil, S.; Camandona, Ch.; Stucki, M. [Transitec Ingenieurs Conseils, Lausanne (Switzerland); Baumgartner, P.; Lippuner, Ch. [Ernst Basler und Partner AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the efficiency of 'park and ride' (P+R) systems from the energy-efficiency point of view. 'Park and ride' means: 'Leave your car on a parking area and travel by public transport services for the second part of your journey'. Five hypotheses are examined: that P+R helps improve the general energy-efficiency of traffic, P+R installations are not an economically advantageous measure for improving the energy-efficiency of traffic, that they are not cost-effective, that they are financed by other public transport services and that their contribution to energy efficiency is dependent on the characteristics of their particular locations. The study looks at the positive and negative effects of P+R on energy efficiency and develops criteria for choosing locations. Three typical P+R installations are looked at - at a main station in a city centre, on the edge of a city and on a main city access road. These locations are analysed with respect to their energy and financial balances and their cost-effectiveness. Also, the use of P+R installations is analysed and the importance of the results of the study for traffic planning is discussed.

  11. Study on the energy-efficiency of 'park and ride' systems (French version); Efficience energetique des P et R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume-Gentil, S.; Camandona, Ch.; Stucki, M. [Transitec Ingenieurs Conseils, Lausanne (Switzerland); Baumgartner, P.; Lippuner, Ch. [Ernst Basler und Partner AG, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) examines the efficiency of 'park and ride' (P+R) systems from the energy-efficiency point of view. 'Park and ride' means: 'Leave your car on a parking area and travel by public transport services for the second part of your journey'. Five hypotheses are examined: that P+R helps improve the general energy-efficiency of traffic, P+R installations are not an economically advantageous measure for improving the energy-efficiency of traffic, that they are not cost-effective, that they are financed by other public transport services and that their contribution to energy efficiency is dependent on the characteristics of their particular locations. The study looks at the positive and negative effects of P+R on energy efficiency and develops criteria for choosing locations. Three typical P+R installations are looked at - at a main station in a city centre, on the edge of a city and on a main city access road. These locations are analysed with respect to their energy and financial balances and their cost-effectiveness. Also, the use of P+R installations is analysed and the importance of the results of the study for traffic planning is discussed.

  12. Maintaining stability of standalone Micro-Grid by employing electrical and mechanical fault ride through techniques upon fixed speed wind generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, Rashad M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper presented two fault ride through techniques for fixed speed wind systems. • The first technique is implemented by inserting a series resistance with the terminals of wind generator. • Second technique is performed by adapting the gear ratio to spill some mechanical power. - Abstract: This study presents two different Fault Ride Through (FRT) techniques to keep and restore stability of Fixed Speed Wind Generation system (FSWGs) installed in standalone Micro-Grid (MG). The first technique is an electrical FRT and is implemented by inserting a series resistance with the terminals of FSWGs during fault to maintain reasonable value of terminal voltage and consequently help stability restoration. The second controller is a mechanical FRT controller and is performed by change the gear ratio of wind generation systems to spill part of extracted mechanical power and consequently improving stability issue. Obtained results proved that each controller able to maintain the stability of FSWGs under the most severe disturbance conditions (400 ms three phase fault at FSWGs terminals). The first controller is faster than the second controller in restoring FSWGs stability. Superior results and performances are obtained when the two FRT techniques are employed simultaneously. Without employing any one of the two FRT techniques, FSWGs is not able to maintain or restore its stability after fault clearing. Consequently, MG will lose one of its micro-sources and cannot keep its stability during the standalone mode, unless load shedding strategy is activated. The two proposed controllers are simple, effective, and economical attractive

  13. Dynamic Response of a Long-Span Concrete-Filled Steel Tube Tied Arch Bridge and the Riding Comfort of Monorail Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongye Gou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a dynamic response analysis procedure is proposed and applied to investigate the dynamic responses of a straddle-type concrete-filled steel tube tied arch bridge under train and truck loadings. A numerical model of the coupled monorail train–bridge system is established to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the bridge under moving trains. A refined three-dimensional finite element model is built for the bridge and a 15 degrees-of-freedom vehicle model is presented for the train. The numerical model is validated using in-situ test results and then used to analyze the dynamic displacement and acceleration of the bridge and the trains on the bridge. Based on the simulation results, the impact factor of the bridge is investigated and the riding comfort of the trains is evaluated. The investigation results show that the impact factor of vehicle loads reaches the maximum value when the resonance of the bridge is induced by the moving vehicles. The effect of train braking predominates the longitudinal vibration of the bridge but is negligible in the transverse and vertical directions. The vehicle speed is the dominating factor for the riding comfort of the train.

  14. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 10 minutes each. Moderate activities include brisk walking, dancing, bowling, riding a bike, working in a garden, ... Process Research Training & Career Development Funded Grants & Grant History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer ...

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine in elite horseback riders: correlations with back pain, body mass index, trunk/leg-length coefficient, and riding discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Clayton N; Pennekamp, Peter H; Becker, Ute; Young, Mei; Diedrich, Oliver; Lüring, Christian; von Falkenhausen, Makus

    2009-11-01

    Most orthopaedic problems experienced by competitive horseback riders are related to pain in the lower back, hip joint, and hamstring muscles. Riders-especially, show jumpers-are frequently hampered in their performance because of lumbar pain. To date, there has been no research into lumbar disk degeneration in elite competitive riders. Competitive horseback riding accelerates lumbar disk degeneration. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Fifty-eight elite riders (18 men, 40 women; mean age, 32.4 years) and a control group of 30 nonriding volunteers (17 men, 13 women; mean age, 28.7 years) were evaluated for lumbar disk degeneration, cross-sectional area of paraspinal muscles, spondylolysis, and spondylolisthesis, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The prevalence of disk degeneration between the 2 groups was compared, and the relationship was investigated between low back pain (LBP), riding discipline, body mass index (BMI), trunk/leg-length coefficient, and MRI results. Eighty-eight percent of elite riders (n = 51) had a history of LBP, versus 33% of the controls (P back pain. Although riders have a high prevalence of LBP, there is no conclusive MRI evidence to suggest that the cause lies in undue disk degeneration, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, or pathologic changes of the paraspinal muscles of the lumbar spine.

  16. Flexible fault ride through strategy for wind farm clusters in power systems with high wind power penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Songyan; Chen, Ning; Yu, Daren; Foley, Aoife; Zhu, Lingzhi; Li, Kang; Yu, Jilai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A flexible fault ride through strategy is proposed. • The strategy comprises of grid code requirements and power restrictions. • Slight faults and moderate faults are the main defending objectives. • Temporary overloading capability of the doubly fed induction generator is considered. - Abstract: This paper investigates a flexible fault ride through strategy for power systems in China with high wind power penetration. The strategy comprises of adaptive fault ride through requirements and maximum power restrictions of the wind farms with weak fault ride through capabilities. The slight faults and moderate faults with high probability are the main defending objective of the strategy. The adaptive fault ride through requirement in the strategy consists of two sub fault ride through requirements, a temporary slight voltage ride through requirement corresponding to a slight fault incident, with a moderate voltage ride through requirement corresponding to a moderate fault. The temporary overloading capability of the wind farm is reflected in both requirements to enhance the capability to defend slight faults and to avoid tripping when the crowbar is disconnected after moderate faults are cleared. For those wind farms that cannot meet the adaptive fault ride through requirement, restrictions are put on the maximum power output. Simulation results show that the flexible fault ride through strategy increases the fault ride through capability of the wind farm clusters and reduces the wind power curtailment during faults

  17. PERANCANGAN PURWARUPA KOMIK INTERAKTIF SAFETY RIDING BERKONSEP DIGITAL STORYTELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godham Eko Saputro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Di Indonesia khususnya kota besar, kecelakaan yang disebabkan kendaraan bermotor menjadi persoalan yang serius. Salah satunya disebabkan kurangnya pemahaman tentang safety riding. Berbagai upaya kampanye safety riding pun telah dilaksanakan oleh polisi lalu lintas melalui talkshow, siaran radio, serta media leaflet bagi masyarakat yang dilakukan berulang-ulang. Hal itu mendorong peneliti dalam upaya menemukan strategi baru, salah satunya memanfaatkan perkembangan teknologi yang sangat pesat guna mengembangkan media pendukung kampanye safety riding yang tidak hanya dapat menyampaikan pesan, tetapi juga disukai dan bersifat menghibur. Data diperoleh melalui wawancara, observasi, serta studi literatur sebagai sumber konten purwarupa komik interaktif. Melalui pendekatan digital storytelling dan model komunikasi SMCR serta mengacu pada Penelitian Pengembangan, konsep purwarupa komik interaktif bisa dijabarkan lebih detail serta dapat diimplementasikan dalam perangkat mobile khususnya tablet PC. Diharapkan purwarupa ini dapat dikembangkan lebih lanjut sehingga benar-benar dapat dipublish secara umum sebagai media pendukung kampanye safety riding. Kata Kunci: komik, interaktif, safety riding, digital storytelling Abstract In Indonesia especially in big cities, the accident which caused by rider is still become serious issue. One factor which cause accident is the lack of knowledge about safety riding. A lot of efforts which have been carried by traffic policeman are talkshow, radio broadcast, and leaflet media for public society. On the other hand, it courage the researchers in effort to find new startegy, one of them is using the advance of technology to develop another media campaign which not only can deliver the messages, but also can entertain user. This research is an effort to find unconventional media for safety riding campaign. Data was obtained through interview, observation, and study of literature as sources of content for

  18. Effect of amusement park rides on programmable shunt valve settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Collins, Kelly; Stetler, William R; Smith, Brandon W; Garton, Thomas; Garton, Catherine; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2013-01-01

    Magnetically programmable shunt valves are susceptible to environmental factors including magnetic fields and accelerative forces. It is unknown if rollercoasters with or without magnetic brakes or linear induction motors (LIMs) are capable of altering the setting of a programmable shunt valve. Two different valve types (type A, n = 10; type B, n = 9) were tested at varying resistance settings in 2 trials on 6 different amusement park rides including 2 rides with LIMs, 2 rides with magnetic brakes, and 2 rides without magnetic technology. The performance level of valve type A and the setting of valve type B changed on rollercoasters with magnets (A = 2.5% [2/80]; B = 5.6% [4/72]) and without magnets (A = 7.5% [3/40]; B = 2.8% [1/36]). Neither valve setting changed when exposed to a Ferris wheel or during ambulation throughout the park. Magnetically programmable valves are susceptible to changes in pressure settings when exposed to amusement park rides with elevated vertical gravitational forces, irrespective of the presence of LIMs or magnetic brakes. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. With power comes responsibility: motorcycle engine power and power-to-weight ratio in relation to accident risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Markus; Summala, Heikki

    2010-02-01

    Current European legislation allows the EU member states to restrict the maximum power output of motorcycles to 74 kW even though evidence supporting the limit is scarce and has produced mixed results-perhaps because motorcycle performance has been measured by engine displacement, not engine power, in most of the previous studies. This study investigates the relationship of motorcycle engine power and power-to-weight ratio to risk of fatal and nonfatal crashes in Finland. The fatality rate (number of fatal accidents/number of registered motorbikes) for riders of different ages riding bikes belonging to different power and power-to-weight ratio classes was examined using a comprehensive in-depth database. Data on nonfatal accidents were acquired from a Web questionnaire (N = 2708), which also served as a basis for estimating riders' annual mileage. Mileage data allowed the calculation of accident risk per kilometer ridden for bikes differing in power and power-to-weight ratio. The fatality risk per number of registered motorcycles and per kilometer ridden increases both with power and power-to-weight ratio, independently of rider's age. No relationship between performance and risk of a less severe crash was found. The pre-accident speed of the most powerful bikes was 20 km/h or more over the speed limit in a large proportion of the fatal accidents (odds ratio = 4.8 for > 75 kW motorbikes; odds ratio = 6.2 for > 0.3 kW/kg motorbikes). The risk of being involved in a fatal crash is higher among the riders of powerful motorcycles. However, it is not clear whether the results are related to the riding habits of the riders that choose the most powerful bikes available or whether the high risk is due to the properties of the bikes themselves. Therefore, further research is needed before considering legal limits on motorcycle performance.

  20. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis from stationary biking: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inklebarger, J; Galanis, N; Kirkos, J; Kapetanos, G

    2010-10-01

    There are several reports concerning exercise and rabdomyolysis. There has been no report in the English literature of exercise induced rabdomyolisis from a stationary bike.A 63-year-old female recreational athlete presented to our hospital seeking treatment for lower back, leg pain and stiffness after exercising on a stationary bicycle one day prior. Blood work showed a raised CK of 38,120 U/L, a myoglobin of 5330 and an AST 495 U/L with normal urea and electrolytes. Urinalysis remained negative. She was admitted for oral and intravenous hydration and fluid balance monitoringThis is a very rare case of rhabdomyolysis due to exercise. This study highlights the difficulties faced by accident and emergency teams in distinguishing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) from exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis, and reinforces the concept that rhabdomyolysis can occur at any level of exercise intensity.

  1. Modeling and Control System Design for an Integrated Solar Generation and Energy Storage System with a Ride-Through Capability: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.; Yue, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a generic approach for PV panel modeling. Data for this modeling can be easily obtained from manufacturer datasheet, which provides a convenient way for the researchers and engineers to investigate the PV integration issues. A two-stage power conversion system (PCS) is adopted in this paper for the PV generation system and a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) can be connected to the dc-link through a bi-directional dc/dc converter. In this way, the BESS can provide some ancillary services which may be required in the high penetration PV generation scenario. In this paper, the fault ride-through (FRT) capability is specifically focused. The integrated BESS and PV generation system together with the associated control systems is modeled in PSCAD and Matlab platforms and the effectiveness of the controller is validated by the simulation results.

  2. VRACK: measuring pedal kinematics during stationary bike cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Amir B; Kong, Qingchao; Gade, Venkata K; Deutsch, Judith E; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2013-06-01

    Ankle impairment and lower limb asymmetries in strength and coordination are common symptoms for individuals with selected musculoskeletal and neurological impairments. The virtual reality augmented cycling kit (VRACK) was designed as a compact mechatronics system for lower limb and mobility rehabilitation. The system measures interaction forces and cardiac activity during cycling in a virtual environment. The kinematics measurement was added to the system. Due to the constrained problem definition, the combination of inertial measurement unit (IMU) and Kalman filtering was recruited to compute the optimal pedal angular displacement during dynamic cycling exercise. Using a novel benchmarking method the accuracy of IMU-based kinematics measurement was evaluated. Relatively accurate angular measurements were achieved. The enhanced VRACK system can serve as a rehabilitation device to monitor biomechanical and physiological variables during cycling on a stationary bike.

  3. Topology Optimization of Vehicle Body Structure for Improved Ride & Handling

    OpenAIRE

    Lövgren, Sebastian; Norberg, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Ride and handling are important areas for safety and improved vehicle control during driving. To meet the demands on ride and handling a number of measures can be taken. This master thesis work has focused on the early design phase. At the early phases of design, the level of details is low and the design freedom is big. By introducing a tool to support the early vehicle body design, the potential of finding more efficient structures increases. In this study, topology optimization of a vehicl...

  4. The Value of Optimization in Dynamic Ride-Sharing: a Simulation Study in Metro Atlanta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.A.H. Agatz (Niels); A. Erera (Alan); M.W.P. Savelsbergh (Martin); X. Wang (Xing)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractSmartphone technology enables dynamic ride-sharing systems that bring together people with similar itineraries and time schedules to share rides on short-notice. This paper considers the problem of matching drivers and riders in this dynamic setting. We develop optimization-based

  5. Ride Control Systems - Reduced Motions on the Cost of Increased Sectional Forces ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folsø, R.; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam; Torti, F.

    2003-01-01

    Implementation of passive and active ride control systems into both linear frequency and non-linear time domain strip theories is described. The ride control systems considered can consist of T-foils, fins or a combination of these. These appendages are taken into account by considering the lift...

  6. Riding the cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, G. [Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The current state of the Canadian oil and natural gas industry is reviewed as part of a discussion of economic cycles focusing in particular on the most recent cycle and the impact it has had on the industry. The review of the state of the industry includes discussion of production, exports, commodity prices, the stimulating effect of price increases on the number of oil and natural gas wells drilled, drilling rig operating days. Also discussed are the effect of foreign exchange rates, capital spending, industry financial performance in terms of return on capital employed, the impact of oil and gas prices on Alberta provincial revenues, estimates of Canada's ultimate crude oil and natural gas resources potential, pipelines and pipeline proposals for northern gas, and projection of crude oil and natural gas production in Canada to 2010.

  7. Riding the cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, G.

    2001-01-01

    The current state of the Canadian oil and natural gas industry is reviewed as part of a discussion of economic cycles focusing in particular on the most recent cycle and the impact it has had on the industry. The review of the state of the industry includes discussion of production, exports, commodity prices, the stimulating effect of price increases on the number of oil and natural gas wells drilled, drilling rig operating days. Also discussed are the effect of foreign exchange rates, capital spending, industry financial performance in terms of return on capital employed, the impact of oil and gas prices on Alberta provincial revenues, estimates of Canada's ultimate crude oil and natural gas resources potential, pipelines and pipeline proposals for northern gas, and projection of crude oil and natural gas production in Canada to 2010

  8. Renewable Energy Riding High

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    China is putting greater emphasis on green energy as it tries to clean up industry and meet target for cuts in carbon emissions over the past two years, China has already leapfrogged competitors from Denmark, Germany, Spain and the United States to become the world's largest maker of wind turbines and solar panels. At the same time, the country is also taking steps to build more nuclear reactors and energy-efficient coal power plants.

  9. ReRide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagalkot, Naveen; Sokoler, Tomas; Shaikh, Riyaj

    2017-01-01

    -situ evaluation of such tools. We present the system architecture and demonstrate the capabilities of the system by presenting a case instantiation in the form of an interactive soft-and-hardware prototype that collects rider’s posture data,visualizes the data on the motorbike dashboard in real-time, and pushes...

  10. Riding the RAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Melissa D.

    2016-01-01

    Writing about mathematics holds a wealth of benefits for students. When students are given opportunities to write in math class, it helps develop mathematical thinking and language, encourages self-reflection, and provides a better way to organize ideas. Many teachers incorporate journaling and other types of reflective writing into their…

  11. Riding the MOOC Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have the potential to revolutionize teaching and learning at universities. It is even conceivable that MOOCs can endanger the basic business model of higher education, because they have the potential to erase traditional brick-and-mortar advantages. I will discuss our experiences with 15 years of offering online physics courses at Michigan State University, and lessons learned in doing so.

  12. Riding the Technology Wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Pierre

    This paper presents an overview of information technology development. The first section sets the scene, comparing the first WAN (Wide Area Network) and Intel processor to current technology. The birth of the microcomputer is described in the second section, including historical background on semiconductors, microprocessors, and the microcomputer.…

  13. Riding the belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, A

    1998-04-01

    Recent developments in conveyor systems have focused on accessories rather than the belt itself. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a technology using transponders embedded in conveyor belts and this is the latest development at the German firm Contitech. The system described in the articles developed with Moers, features transponders for cooling, controlling and monitoring conveyor belts. Other developments mentioned include a JOKI drum motor featuring a fully integrated gearbox and electric motor enclosed in a steel shell, from Interoll; a new scraper cleaning system from Hosch, new steel cord belting from Fenner, a conveying system for Schleenhain lignite opencast mine by FAM Foerdelantigen Magdeburg; new bearings from Nadella (the sales arm of Intersoll-Rand), an anti-shock belt transfer table from Rosta and new caliper disc brakes from GE Industrial.

  14. Ride Motion Simulator (RMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The RMS is a simulator designed for crew station and man-in-the-loop experimentation. The simulator immerses users in a synthetic battlefield to experience realistic...

  15. Riding the ocean waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yemm, Richard

    2000-01-01

    It is claimed that important developments over the past five years mean that there will be a range of competing pre-commercial wave-energy systems by 2002. The generation costs should be on a par with biomass schemes and offshore wind systems. The environmental advantages of wave energy are extolled. Ocean Power Delivery (OPD) have produced a set of criteria to be satisfied for a successful wave power scheme and these are listed. OPD is responsible for the snake-like Pelamis device which is a semi-submerged articulated series of cylindrical sections connected through hinged joints. How the wave-induced movement of the hinges is used to generate electricity is explained. The system is easily installed and can be completely removed at the end of its life

  16. Riding a tiger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cube, A. von.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear energy, which has become somewhat shady by now, seems to be the evil demon of this age to many people. Therfore the author is striving for comprehensive information on nuclear energy, its technical aspects, its safety risks and its social accompaniments. With the help of this comprehensible and well-grounded basic knowledge on this complex of problems the reader might be able to make up his own mind. Nuclear energy remains a challenge to mankind by which it may fail but does not necessarily have to fail if it is aware of the social requirements of the Atomic age. (GL) [de

  17. Riding with the ants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, A. P. M.; Attili-Angelis, D.; Baron, N. C.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Crous, Pedro W.; Pagnocca, F. C.

    Isolates of Teratosphaeriaceae have frequently been found in the integument of attine ants, proving to be common and diverse in this microenvironment. The LSU phylogeny of the ant-isolated strains studied revealed that they cluster in two main lineages. The first was associated with the genus

  18. Riding the Nexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William L.

    cases. The first case deals with efforts to move from education to training through the teaching of Target Network Modeling as a common language and technique for the production of intelligence products to facilitate shared situational awareness. The second case, examines efforts to move from training...

  19. Cycle Tracks and Parking Environments in China: Learning from College Students at Peking University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Changzheng; Sun, Yangbo; Lv, Jun; Lusk, Anne C

    2017-08-18

    China has a historic system of wide cycle tracks, many of which are now encroached by cars, buses and bus stops. Even with these conditions, college students still bicycle. On campuses, students park their bikes on facilities ranging from kick-stand-plazas to caged sheds with racks, pumps and an attendant. In other countries, including Canada, some of the newer cycle tracks need to be wider to accommodate an increasing number of bicyclists. Other countries will also need to improve their bike parking, which includes garage-basement cages and two-tiered racks. China could provide lessons about cycle tracks and bike parking. This study applied the Maslow Transportation Level of Service (LOS) theory, i.e., for cycle tracks and bike parking, only after the basic needs of safety and security are met for both vehicle occupants and bicyclists can the higher needs of convenience and comfort be met. With random clustering, a self-administered questionnaire was collected from 410 students in six dormitory buildings at Peking University in Beijing and an environmental scan of bicycle parking conducted in school/office and living areas. Cycle tracks (1 = very safe/5 = very unsafe) shared with moving cars were most unsafe (mean = 4.6), followed by sharing with parked cars (4.1) or bus stop users (4.1) ( p racks and bicycle parking services (pumps, etc.). If parking were improved, three quarters indicated they would bicycle more. While caged sheds were preferred, in living areas with 1597 parked bikes, caged sheds were only 74.4% occupied. For the future of China's wide cycle tracks, perhaps a fence-separated bus lane beside a cycle track might be considered or, with China's recent increase in bike riding, shared bikes and E-bikes, perhaps cars/buses could be banned from the wide cycle tracks. In other countries, a widened cycle track entrance should deter cars. Everywhere, bike parking sheds could be built and redesigned with painted lines to offer more space and order, similar

  20. About the Little Red Riding Hood, Durex and anger: production, meaning and reception of one fairy tale and one commercial ad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available By applying the semiological analysis, this paper considers planned and unplanned readings of a provocative domestic commercial, which, in order to convey its message, transposed the Little Red Riding Hood’s character in accordance with the advertised product – Durex condoms. This commercial caused furious reactions of parents who took legal action for breaching the Law on public advertising and, especially, "harming children’s sensibility and integrity". Provocative billboards also caused numerous comments in the daily newspapers, in the Internet chat rooms, with some considering the commercial vulgar and offensive and others having no problem with it, adding that the ones who took offence belonged to those puritan and conservative layers of the society. In order to discover the reasons to this kind of reactions, I started with researching how the commercial was made and what kind of message it offered. Next, I reconsidered the meaning of the very fairy tale "The Red Riding Hood". Its original version, which contains open sexual allusions, is quite different to the changed versions offered by Charles Perrault and the Grimm brothers. Their versions can be seen as fakelore, since they outrageously intervened on the plot and the meaning of the original fairy tale. However, since the Grimm brothers’ version is the most popular, it is a fact that our public reacted with such anger led by the meaning of their version, which accentuates overeating and cannibalism, and not sexual development of girls, which is the basic message of the original version. This is where the "communicational noise" that led to those negative reactions came from. By discovering the true meaning of the tale, the answer is given to the question whether the advertising agency made a slip up, or it had actually found the right way to communicate the hidden message of the tale, and at the same time ruin the advertising campaign for which it was used. In the end, range and

  1. Saturday Subway Ride: A Report on the Initial Tryout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilling, Mary R.; And Others

    "Saturday Subway Ride," a program designed to teach pupils creative thinking techniques and positive attitudes toward creative ideas, is a 92-page workbook in a story-exercise format. Secondary objectives for the product include improving verbal fluency and creative writing. Three classrooms 61 sixth graders and 34 fifth graders at two…

  2. Easy rider wheelchair biking. A nursing-recreation therapy clinical trial for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, S

    2001-05-01

    Depression is a common condition among long-term care residents with limited treatment options available. There are few nonpharmacological interventions available to this population. This study examined the use of a prescribed, therapeutic recreation-nursing intervention, wheelchair biking, for treatment of symptoms of depression in older adults in a long-term care setting. A classical experimental design was used and was guided by the Roy Adaptation Model. Forty residents were pretested for depression and randomly assigned to two groups. A 2-week trial of biking therapy was provided to the treatment group. All participants were posttested. Findings indicated there was a statistically significant improvement in depression scores for the treatment group and no significant change for the control group. This study contributes to the body of knowledge of nursing regarding options for the treatment of depression in older adults, and is an encouraging indicator that psychosocial interventions may be effective in reducing depression.

  3. A participatory sensing approach to characterize ride quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgelall, Raj

    2014-03-01

    Rough roads increase vehicle operation and road maintenance costs. Consequently, transportation agencies spend a significant portion of their budgets on ride-quality characterization to forecast maintenance needs. The ubiquity of smartphones and social media, and the emergence of a connected vehicle environment present lucrative opportunities for cost-reduction and continuous, network-wide, ride-quality characterization. However, there is a lack of models to transform inertial and position information from voluminous data flows into indices that transportation agencies currently use. This work expands on theories of the Road Impact Factor introduced in previous research. The index characterizes road roughness by aggregating connected vehicle data and reporting roughness in direct proportion to the International Roughness Index. Their theoretical relationships are developed, and a case study is presented to compare the relative data quality from an inertial profiler and a regular passenger vehicle. Results demonstrate that the approach is a viable alternative to existing models that require substantially more resources and provide less network coverage. One significant benefit of the participatory sensing approach is that transportation agencies can monitor all network facilities continuously to locate distress symptoms, such as frost heaves, that appear and disappear between ride assessment cycles. Another benefit of the approach is continuous monitoring of all high-risk intersections such as rail grade crossings to better understand the relationship between ride-quality and traffic safety.

  4. Evidence-based practice guideline: wheelchair biking for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Schoenfelder, Deborah Perry

    2011-07-01

    Depression is a problem that will continue to burden older adults and challenge health care providers. Failing to recognize and effectively treat depression in institutionalized older adults is sanctioning these members of society to live their final years in despair and emotional suffering. The wheelchair biking program described in this evidence-based practice guideline provides a refreshing, safe, innovative tool to address depression and improve quality of life in older adults.

  5. Head and pelvic movement asymmetries at trot in riding horses in training and perceived as free from lameness by the owner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenvall, Agneta; Haubro Andersen, Pia; Pfau, Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies evaluating horses in training and considered free from lameness by their owners have identified a large proportion of horses with motion asymmetries. However the prevalence, type and magnitude of asymmetries when trotting in a straight line or on the lunge have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate the presence of motion asymmetries in riding horses in training by identifying the side and quantifying the degree and type (impact, pushoff) of forelimb and hind limb asymmetries found during straight line trot and on the lunge. In a cross-sectional study, vertical head and pelvic movement symmetry was measured in 222 Warmblood type riding horses, all without perceived performance issues and considered free from lameness by their owners. Body-mounted uni-axial accelerometers were used and differences between maximum and minimum head (HDmax, HDmin) and pelvic (PDmax, PDmin) vertical displacement between left and right forelimb and hind limb stances were calculated during straight line trot and on the lunge. Previously reported symmetry thresholds were used. The thresholds for symmetry were exceeded in 161 horses for at least one variable while trotting in a straight line, HDmin (n = 58, mean 14.3 mm, SD 7.1), HDmax (n = 41, mean 12.7 mm, SD 5.5), PDmax (n = 87, mean 6.5 mm, SD 3.10), PDmin (n = 79, mean 5.7 mm, SD 2.1). Contralateral and ipsilateral concurrent forelimb and hind limb asymmetries were detected in 41 and 49 horses, respectively. There was a linear association between the straight line PDmin values and the values on the lunge with the lame limb to the inside of the circle. A large proportion (72.5%) of horses in training which were perceived as free from lameness by their owner showed movement asymmetries above previously reported asymmetry thresholds during straight line trot. It is not known to what extent these asymmetries are related to pain or to mechanical abnormalities. Therefore, one of the most

  6. mitigating mitigating free riding in peer-to-peer networks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The performance of peer-to-peer systems is based on the quality and quantity of resource contributions from peer systems ... riding [3]. There are several measurement studies ...... J. S. Hua, D. C. Huang, S M Yen, and C. W. Chena, “A dynamic.

  7. Bike2Work celebration in honour of the colleagues who registered most kilometers in 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Vigen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Before the 2014 season was officially launched, the CERN bikers took time to celebrate the strong commitment of biking to work in 2013. The celebration took place in front of Restaurant 1. The president of the CERN Bike Club, Henrik Nissen, was the master of ceremonies and presented a set of prizes: The three first prizes, all corresponding to the so-called "Karma Level Sexy Bottom", went to Tim Smith (7182 km), Martial Dujardin (5109 km) and Gabriele Thiede (4326 km). For the remaining group of participants there were seven extra prizes, attributed from a prize draw - where each of their registered kilometers was used as lottery ticket. In addition all got a diploma stating their karma level .

  8. Mathematical Analysis of Vehicle Delivery Scale of Bike-Sharing Rental Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.

    2018-04-01

    Aiming at the lack of scientific and reasonable judgment of vehicles delivery scale and insufficient optimization of scheduling decision, based on features of the bike-sharing usage, this paper analyses the applicability of the discrete time and state of the Markov chain, and proves its properties to be irreducible, aperiodic and positive recurrent. Based on above analysis, the paper has reached to the conclusion that limit state (steady state) probability of the bike-sharing Markov chain only exists and is independent of the initial probability distribution. Then this paper analyses the difficulty of the transition probability matrix parameter statistics and the linear equations group solution in the traditional solving algorithm of the bike-sharing Markov chain. In order to improve the feasibility, this paper proposes a "virtual two-node vehicle scale solution" algorithm which considered the all the nodes beside the node to be solved as a virtual node, offered the transition probability matrix, steady state linear equations group and the computational methods related to the steady state scale, steady state arrival time and scheduling decision of the node to be solved. Finally, the paper evaluates the rationality and accuracy of the steady state probability of the proposed algorithm by comparing with the traditional algorithm. By solving the steady state scale of the nodes one by one, the proposed algorithm is proved to have strong feasibility because it lowers the level of computational difficulty and reduces the number of statistic, which will help the bike-sharing companies to optimize the scale and scheduling of nodes.

  9. The risk analysis during production process of an innovative baby carriage with a bike function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowiński Emil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the risk assesment of damages occurance in production stage of a babycarriage with a bike function. The analysis of risk is done by using the FMEA – Failure Made and Effect Analysis that is used in aviation and automotive industry. This way of innovative product assessment allows to evaluate the risk of defects and indicate the priorities of quality for key parts as well as the device.

  10. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS OF VEHICLE DELIVERY SCALE OF BIKE-SHARING RENTAL NODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the lack of scientific and reasonable judgment of vehicles delivery scale and insufficient optimization of scheduling decision, based on features of the bike-sharing usage, this paper analyses the applicability of the discrete time and state of the Markov chain, and proves its properties to be irreducible, aperiodic and positive recurrent. Based on above analysis, the paper has reached to the conclusion that limit state (steady state probability of the bike-sharing Markov chain only exists and is independent of the initial probability distribution. Then this paper analyses the difficulty of the transition probability matrix parameter statistics and the linear equations group solution in the traditional solving algorithm of the bike-sharing Markov chain. In order to improve the feasibility, this paper proposes a "virtual two-node vehicle scale solution" algorithm which considered the all the nodes beside the node to be solved as a virtual node, offered the transition probability matrix, steady state linear equations group and the computational methods related to the steady state scale, steady state arrival time and scheduling decision of the node to be solved. Finally, the paper evaluates the rationality and accuracy of the steady state probability of the proposed algorithm by comparing with the traditional algorithm. By solving the steady state scale of the nodes one by one, the proposed algorithm is proved to have strong feasibility because it lowers the level of computational difficulty and reduces the number of statistic, which will help the bike-sharing companies to optimize the scale and scheduling of nodes.

  11. Minimum Makespan Multi-vehicle Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li; Nagarajan, Viswanath; Ravi, R.

    2009-01-01

    be left at intermediate vertices and transported by more than one vehicle, while being moved from source to destination. Approximation algorithms for the single vehicle Dial-a-Ride problem (q = 1) have been considered in [3,10]. Our main results are an O(log3n)-approximation algorithm for preemptive multi...

  12. Talk, Mobility and Materialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    The intersection of the quotidian practices of social interaction, learning and mobility outside of the classroom – for example, the ways in which talk shapes how children learn to be actively mobile – has been little studied until recently. This paper develops a social interactional approach......-country, both within the context of familial social interaction. Audiovisual data was collected with mobile video cameras from family bike rides in Denmark and family skiing in Finland, in which among other things a parent instructs and guides a child to bike or to ski. Using an EMCA approach, the analysis...... and limitations of a more reflexive, auto-ethnographic approach to collecting data derived from video recordings of activities in which, to different degrees, the researcher is an active subject....

  13. Pedaling into high gear for bicycle policy in Canada : lessons from bike summit 2008 in Toronto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 bike summit provided a forum for the discussion of international and Canadian best practices related to bicycles and bicycling policy. The aim of the summit was to assist communities across Canada to improve conditions for cycling in the urban environment and help to generate a cultural shift towards greater acceptance of cycling on roads. This paper discussed lessons learned during the summit and outlined new methods of improving cycling in communities. The City of London has recently increased the amount of cyclists using its roads by 200 per cent. Cycling infrastructure is more affordable than constructing major public transit or road infrastructure. Savings in healthcare costs will be accrued over time as a result of the healthier lifestyles promoted by regular cycling activity. Bicycle trips can help to alleviate over-demand on heavy transit routes. Encouraging commuters to cycle will also reduce the amounts of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in urban areas. Lane width reductions will help to reduce speeds as drivers are forced to pay more attention when driving. Public bike sharing programs and bike stations are now being used in many North American cities. It was concluded that strong advocacy is needed to ensure the growth and acceptance of cycling in urban centres. 23 figs

  14. [Prevention of injuries associated with horseback riding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, Chantal A; de Kooter, Tabitha A; Kramer, William L M

    2015-01-01

    Each year 9,900 equestrians present at Accident and Emergency Departments, 40% of them 10-19 year old females. The most common horse-riding injuries are to the head, brain, neck and face, torso and extremities. Because of the relatively larger head, children more often fall on their head. Wearing a helmet gives considerable protection. Despite the common use of a helmet by horseback riders, serious head injury still occurs regularly. Further research into improvement of the protective function of the helmet is indicated. The current safety vest (body protector) does not significantly reduce the risk of torso injury. Improvement of its protective function is necessary. Injury to the lower extremities is caused when they become trapped in the stirrup in a fall from or with the horse. Safety stirrups and sturdy footwear are possible preventive measures. Investment in the quality and promotion of preventive measures could reduce the frequency and severity of equestrian injuries.

  15. Learning To Be Vélomobile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    to use a bike-friendly infrastructure, and how in such an environment they learn to ride with the help of others. Video and audio recordings of family bike rides as well as school bike training sessions and school bike tours were made to capture from multi-angles the aural and visual features......There are few qualitative studies to date of how children learn to become vélomobile, and of how parents and caregivers talk and interact with children to instruct them how to ride safely. This paper reports on a study of how children learn to sit in a carrier bike as a passenger and to ride...... their own bike. In my data from Denmark, these activities take place in urban areas with good biking infrastructure, including separate bike lanes and dedicated cycle paths, as well as bike-only traffic lights at intersections. Therefore, this study provides insight into how riders actually use and learn...

  16. Ride comfort analysis with physiological parameters for an e-health train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngbum; Shin, Kwangsoo; Lee, Sangjoon; Song, Yongsoo; Han, Sungho; Lee, Myoungho

    2009-12-01

    Transportation by train has numerous advantages over road transportation, especially with regard to energy efficiency, ecological features, safety, and punctuality. However, the contrast in ride comfort between standard road transportation and train travel has become a competitive issue. The ride comfort enhancement technology of tilting trains (TTX) is a particularly important issue in the development of the Korean high-speed railroad business. Ride comfort is now defined in international standards such as UIC13 and ISO2631. The Korean standards such as KSR9216 mainly address physical parameters such as vibration and noise. In the area of ride comfort, living quality parameter techniques have recently been considered in Korea, Japan, and Europe. This study introduces biological parameters, particularly variations in heart rate, as a more direct measure of comfort. Biological parameters are based on physiological responses rather than on purely external mechanical parameters. Variability of heart rate and other physiological parameters of passengers are measured in a simulation involving changes in the tilting angle of the TTX. This research is a preliminary study for the implementation of an e-health train, which would provide passengers with optimized ride comfort. The e-health train would also provide feedback on altered ride comfort situations that can improve a passenger's experience and provide a healthcare service on the train. The aim of this research was to develop a ride comfort evaluation system for the railway industry, the automobile industry, and the air industry. The degree of tilt correlated with heart rate, fatigue, and unrelieved alertness.

  17. Effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadnikar, Monika; Kastrin, Andrej

    2011-08-01

    This research review and meta-analysis presents an overview of the effects of hippotherapy and therapeutic horseback riding (THR) on postural control or balance in children with cerebral palsy (CP). To synthesize previous research findings, a systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken. Relevant studies were identified by systematic searches of multiple online databases from the inception of the database through to May 2010. Studies were included if they fulfilled the following criteria: (1) quantitative study design, (2) investigation of the effect of hippotherapy or THR on postural control or balance, and (3) the study group comprised children and adults with CP. The selected articles were rated for methodological quality. The treatment effect was coded as a dichotomous outcome (positive effect or no effect) and quantified by odds ratio (OR). The pooled treatment effect was calculated using a random-effects model. Meta-regression of the effect size was performed against study covariates, including study size, publication date, and methodological quality score. From 77 identified studies, 10 met the inclusion criteria. Two were excluded because they did not include a comparison group. Therapy was found to be effective in 76 out of 84 children with CP included in the intervention groups. The comparison groups comprised 89 children: 50 non-disabled and 39 with CP. A positive effect was shown in 21 of the children with CP in the comparison group regardless of the activity undertaken (i.e. physiotherapy, occupational therapy, sitting on a barrel or in an artificial saddle). The pooled effect size estimate was positive (OR 25.41, 95% CI 4.35, 148.53), demonstrating a statistically significant effectiveness of hippotherapy or THR in children with CP (phippotherapy and THR. Although the generalization of our findings may be restricted by the relatively small sample size, the results clearly demonstrate that riding therapy is indicated to improve postural control

  18. Global bike share: What the data tells us about road safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, E.; Schepers, J.P.

    Introduction Bike share has emerged as a rapidly growing mode of transport in over 800 cities globally, up from just a handful in the 1990s. Some analysts had forecast a rise in the number of bicycle crashes after the introduction of bike share, but empirical research on bike share safety is rare.

  19. The effect of robo-horseback riding therapy on spinal alignment and associated muscle size in MRI for a child with neuromuscular scoliosis: an experimenter-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Ryul; Lee, Nam Gi; Cha, Hyun Jung; Yun Sung, O; You, Sung Joshua Hyun; Oh, Jin Hwan; Bang, Hyo Seong

    2011-01-01

    This case study was conducted to highlight the clinical and radiological features of a patient with progressive neuromuscular scoliosis before and after robo-horseback riding therapy (HBRT). A clinical, laboratory, and radiological analysis of a single case. An 11-year-old child, dignosed right thoracolumbar neuromuscular scoliosis secondary to cerebral palsy. The child received a 5-week course of robo-HBRT, comprising of 60-minute periods a day, five times a week. Postural alignment was determined by Cobb's method. A real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine the robo-HBRT-induced changes in cross-sectional area (CSA) of bilateral thoracic (T2) and lumbar (L2) paraspinalis. Clinical tests including the standard Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and manual muscle testing (MMT) with the Lafayette Manual Muscle Tester were used to compare the intervention-related changes in motor performance and power. The surface EMG was also used to examine therapy-induced changes in muscle activity amplitude for bilateral T2 and L2 paraspinalis and rectus abdominis muscles. Clinical motor and strength scores increased after the intervention. Radiographic Cobb's angle, MRI, and electromyographic amplitude data demonstrated notably enhanced spinal alignment and muscle fiber CSA and symmetry, respectively. This is the first study to provide evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of a novel form of robo-HBRT on motor function and associated structural and motor control improvements, thus suggesting a method of augmenting therapy in neuromuscular scoliosis.

  20. Capability of DFIG WTS to ride through recurring asymmetrical grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chen, Min

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Turbine Systems (WTS) are required to ride through recurring grid faults in some countries. In this paper, the capability of Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) WTS to ride through recurring asymmetrical grid faults is evaluated and compared with the ride through capability under single...... asymmetrical grid fault. A mathematical model of the DFIG under recurring asymmetrical grid faults is represented. The analysis are verified by simulations on a 1.5MW DFIG model and by experiments on a reduced-scale DFIG test system....

  1. Photovoltaic-STATCOM with Low Voltage Ride through Strategy and Power Quality Enhancement in a Grid Integrated Wind-PV System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshman Naik Popavath

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The traditional configurations of power systems are changing due to the greater penetration of renewable energy sources (solar and wind, resulting in reliability issues. At present, the most severe power quality problems in distribution systems are current harmonics, reactive power demands, and the islanding of renewables caused by severe voltage variations (voltage sag and swell. Current harmonics and voltage sag strongly affect the performance of renewable-based power systems. Various conventional methods (passive filters, capacitor bank, and UPS are not able to mitigate harmonics and voltage sag completely. Based on several studies, custom power devices can mitigate harmonics completely and slightly mitigate voltage sags with reactive power supplies. To ensure the generating units remain grid-connected during voltage sags and to improve system operation during abnormal conditions, efficient and reliable utilization of PV solar farm inverter as STATCOMs is needed. This paper elaborates the dynamic performance of a VSC-based PV-STATCOM for power quality enhancement in a grid integrated system and low voltage ride through (LVRT capability. LVRT requirements suggest that the injection of real and reactive power supports grid voltage during abnormal grid conditions. The proposed strategy was demonstrated with MATLAB simulations.

  2. Use of a virtual reality physical ride-on sailing simulator as a rehabilitation tool for recreational sports and community reintegration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Albert C; Becker, Daniel; Morgan, Marjorie; Saunders, Norman R; Schramm, Lawrence P; McDonald, John W

    2013-12-01

    Participation in sailing by people with disabilities, particularly in small sailboats, is widely regarded as having positive outcomes on self-esteem and general health for the participants. However, a major hurdle for people with no previous experience of sailing, even by those without disabilities, is the perception that sailing is elitist, expensive, and dangerous. Real-time "ride-on" sailing simulators have the potential to bridge the gap between dry-land and on-the-water sailing. These provide a realistic, safe, and easily supervised medium in which nonsailors can easily and systematically learn the required skills before venturing out on the water. The authors report a 12-wk pilot therapeutic sailing program using the VSail-Access sailing simulation system followed by on-water experience. After completion of the training, all subjects demonstrated the ability to navigate a simple course around marker buoys (triangular configuration) on the computer screen, the ability to sail independently in winds of moderate strength (up to 14 knots) on water, and measurable improvements in their psychologic health. In addition, the subjects were able to participate in a sports activity with their respective family members and experienced a sense of optimism about their future.

  3. Genetic diversity in German draught horse breeds compared with a group of primitive, riding and wild horses by means of microsatellite DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberle, K S; Hamann, H; Drögemüller, C; Distl, O

    2004-08-01

    We compared the genetic diversity and distance among six German draught horse breeds to wild (Przewalski's Horse), primitive (Icelandic Horse, Sorraia Horse, Exmoor Pony) or riding horse breeds (Hanoverian Warmblood, Arabian) by means of genotypic information from 30 microsatellite loci. The draught horse breeds included the South German Coldblood, Rhenish German Draught Horse, Mecklenburg Coldblood, Saxon Thuringa Coldblood, Black Forest Horse and Schleswig Draught Horse. Despite large differences in population sizes, the average observed heterozygosity (H(o)) differed little among the heavy horse breeds (0.64-0.71), but was considerably lower than in the Hanoverian Warmblood or Icelandic Horse population. The mean number of alleles (N(A)) decreased more markedly with declining population sizes of German draught horse breeds (5.2-6.3) but did not reach the values of Hanoverian Warmblood (N(A) = 6.7). The coefficient of differentiation among the heavy horse breeds showed 11.6% of the diversity between the heavy horse breeds, as opposed to 21.2% between the other horse populations. The differentiation test revealed highly significant genetic differences among all draught horse breeds except the Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldbloods. The Schleswig Draught Horse was the most distinct draught horse breed. In conclusion, the study demonstrated a clear distinction among the German draught horse breeds and even among breeds with a very short history of divergence like Rhenish German Draught Horse and its East German subpopulations Mecklenburg and Saxon Thuringa Coldblood.

  4. Financial Feasibility of Public Bike Rental Systems in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Diaz, A.G.; Sastre, J.; Lopez-Sanchez, A.D.; Cuello, M.; Molina, J.

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, many public bike rental systems have proliferated in Spain. Unfortunately, many have had to close because of their poor financial feasibility. The aim of this paper is twofold. On the one hand, a benchmarking of the main public bicycle systems in Spain is conducted, analysing the growth in the last decades, with special emphasis on successful systems and on the recently failed. In addition, the financial feasibility of some successful systems in Spain is analysed: Seville, Valencia and Barcelona. Thus, major factors directly related to the viability of such systems are discussed. A proper and correct knowledge of these factors is essential when making decisions in mobility policies. The main factors on which the management company may decide are: pricing policy (annual and weekly rate), advertising rates, and system dimensions (number of docking stations, anchors and bicycles). There are other external factors not directly controlled by the company (subscribers, occupancy rate of advertising space and system maintenance cost) but which are crucial to their feasibility. To achieve the aforementioned objectives, mobility studies in Seville (1400 surveys) and Barcelona (1000 surveys) were conducted in order to achieve more accurate parameter values (time cycling, distances, used rate, frequencies, etc.). Despite the similarities between the systems in Valencia and Seville, they have shown very different profitability. The high profitability in Valencia and Barcelona is highlighted in contrast to the case of the Seville system. (Author)

  5. Roller-coaster Ride to, Relief From TMJ | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a roller coaster ride, seeking relief from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder, which causes pain and, sometimes, dysfunction in the jaw joint and muscles of the neck, head, and face. She has endured: excruciating pain ...

  6. Bringing Bike Share to a Low-Income Community

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is an interview with Sarah Kretman Stewart, MPH, MEd, Healthy Living Minneapolis Project Specialist at the Minneapolis Health Department. In this program, Sarah talks about the impact a bike share program had on the low-income town of Near North, Minnesota.

  7. Biking improves the air quality; Fietsen schept lucht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgman, F. [Fietsersbond, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-06-15

    The Dutch Association for Cyclists is looking for ways to create more interest for the use of bikes in the debate on improving the air quality in the Netherlands. [Dutch] De Fietsersbond zoekt naar mogelijkheden om de fiets hoger op de agenda te krijgen in het debat over de luchtkwaliteit in Nederland.

  8. Factors involved in the practice of mountain biking in nature

    OpenAIRE

    Paixão, Jairo Antônio da; Kowalski, Marizabel

    2013-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou analisar fatores motivacionais ligados à adesão e permanência na modalidade mountain bike de um grupo de 29 praticantes, entre amadores e profissionais, com média de idade de 30 anos (considerou-se o desvio-padrão com significância

  9. Mitigating Free Riding in Peer-To-Peer Networks: Game Theory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitigating Free Riding in Peer-To-Peer Networks: Game Theory Approach. ... In this paper, we model the interactions between peers as a modified gift giving game and proposed an utility exchange incentive ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  10. Ride comfort enhancement in railway vehicle by the reduction of the car body structural flexural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitriu, M.

    2017-08-01

    The paper approaches the issue of reduction in the vertical bending vibrations of the railway vehicle carbody and the ride comfort enhancement at high velocities, starting from the prospect of isolating the vibrations by the best possible selection of the passive suspension damping in the vehicle. To this purpose, the examination falls on the influence of the vertical suspension damping upon the vibrations regime of the vehicle at the bending resonance frequency and upon the ride comfort. The results of the numerical simulations regarding the frequency response of the carbody acceleration and the comfort index will be therefore used. A value of the secondary suspension damping can be thus identified that will provide the best ride comfort performance. Similarly, the ride comfort can be increased by raising the primary suspension damping ratio.

  11. Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator to Ride-Through Recurring Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenjie; Xu, Dehong; Zhu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    The wind turbine system (WTS) is required to ride-through recurring grid faults by the new grid codes. Under single grid faults, the fault ride-through (FRT) strategy with rotor-side crowbar is normally used for the doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) WTS. However, under recurring faults, larger...... transient current and voltage may be produced, and the DFIG may fail to ride-through the second fault even with the rotor-side crowbar. The crowbar can be active again during the voltage recovery, but large electromagnetic torque (EM-torque) fluctuations will be introduced. The reliability of the mechanical...... system will be influenced. In this paper, an FRT strategy for the DFIG WTS to ride-through recurring symmetrical grid faults is investigated. An improved control strategy is introduced and it is applied during the voltage recovery of the grid faults. The decay of the stator natural flux can...

  12. Effect of health education on the riding habits of commercial motorcyclists in Uyo, southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, O E; Owoaje, E T

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of motorcyclists in Nigeria has led to a rise in poor road safety practices leading to increased rate of accidents. This study was conducted to implement and evaluate the effect of safety education on riding habits of motorcyclists in Uyo, Nigeria. The intervention study was conducted among commercial motorcyclists in Uyo with controls from another town in Akwa Ibom State. Baseline information was collected from both groups on their riding habits. Motorcyclists in Uyo were educated on appropriate road safety practices. Data was collected from both groups three months later and analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 11. A total of 200 respondents participated in the study, 100 per group. At 3 months post-intervention, those riding when tired reduced in the intervention group from 69% at baseline to 42% (p Safety education improved many riding habits of motorcyclists in the intervention group. Road safety education is recommended for all motorcyclists to ensure safer road use.

  13. Influences of Carbody Vertical Flexibility on Ride Comfort of Railway Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitriu Mădălina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the influence of the carbody vertical flexibility on the ride comfort of the railway vehicles. The ride comfort is evaluated via the comfort index calculated in three reference points of the carbody. The results of the numerical simulations bring attention to the importance of the carbody symmetrical vertical bending upon the dynamic response of the vehicle, mainly at high velocities. Another conclusion is that the ride comfort can be significantly affected as a function of the symmetrical bending frequency of the carbody. Similarly, there are improvement possibilities for the ride comfort when the best selection of the stiffness in the longitudinal traction system between the carbody and bogie and the vertical suspension damping is made.

  14. Handlebar palsy--a compression syndrome of the deep terminal (motor) branch of the ulnar nerve in biking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Daniel; Beer, Serafin

    2002-10-01

    We describe 3 patients who developed a severe palsy of the intrinsic ulnar supplied hand muscles after bicycle riding. Clinically and electrophysiologically all showed an isolated lesion of the deep terminal motor branch of the ulnar nerve leaving the hypothenar muscle and the distal sensory branch intact. This type of lesion at the canal of Guyon is quite unusual, caused in the majority of cases by chronic external pressure over the ulnar palm. In earlier reports describing this lesion in bicycle riders, most patients experienced this lesion after a long distance ride. Due to the change of riding position and shape of handlebars (horn handle) in recent years, however, even a single bicycle ride may be sufficient to cause a lesion of this ulnar branch. Especially in downhill riding, a large part of the body weight is supported by the hand on the corner of the handlebar leading to a high load at Guyon's canal. As no sensory fibres are affected, the patients are not aware of the ongoing nerve compression until a severe lesion develops. Individual adaptation of the handlebar and riding position seems to be crucial for prevention of this type of nerve lesion.

  15. Ride control of surface effect ships using distributed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgeir J. Sørensen

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available A ride control system for active damping of heave and pitch accelerations of Surface Effect Ships (SES is presented. It is demonstrated that distributed effects that are due to a spatially varying pressure in the air cushion result in significant vertical vibrations in low and moderate sea states. In order to achieve a high quality human comfort and crew workability it is necessary to reduce these vibrations using a control system which accounts for distributed effects due to spatial pressure variations in the air cushion. A mathematical model of the process is presented, and collocated sensor and actuator pairs are used. The process stability is ensured using a controller with appropriate passivity properties. Sensor and actuator location is also discussed. The performance of the ride control system is shown by power spectra of the vertical accelerations obtained from full scale experiments with a 35 m SES.

  16. The choice of Park & Ride Facilities: an analysis using a context-dependent hierarchical choice experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Heijden, R.E.C.M. van der; Molin, E.J.E.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Park and Ride facilities have been proposed in several countries to alleviate the accessibility problems in cities. Despite growing accessibility problems, these facilities do not seem to attract the expected number of car drivers and are under-used. In an attempt to measure consumer evaluations of the attributes of Park and Ride facilities, a stated choice experiment, based on the method of hierarchical information integration, was conducted in the city of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. This pap...

  17. Hacking Your Ride: Is Web 2.0 Creating Vulnerabilities To Surface Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. HACKING YOUR RIDE...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE HACKING YOUR RIDE: IS WEB 2.0 CREATING VULNERABILITIES TO SURFACE...Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. HACKING

  18. Hardness of Preemptive Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Inge Li

    2006-01-01

    In the Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride problem the input is a metric space, a set of objects, each specifying a source and a destination, and an integer k---the capacity of the vehicle used for making the deliveries. The goal is to compute a shortest tour for the vehicle in which all objects can...... and Raghavachari [FOCS '98] gave a min{O(log N),O(k)}-approximation algorithm for the preemptive version of the problem. In this paper we show that the preemptive Finite Capacity Dial-a-Ride problem has no $min{O(log^{1/4-\\epsilon}N),k^{1-\\epsilon}}$-approximation algorithm for any $\\epsilon>0$ unless all problems...

  19. Solving the Dial-a-Ride Problem using Genetic algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergvinsdottir, Kristin Berg; Larsen, Jesper; Jørgensen, Rene Munk

    In the Dial-a-Ride problem (DARP) customers send transportation requests to an operator. A request consists of a specified pickup location and destination location along with a desired departure or arrival time and demand. The aim of DARP is to minimize transportation cost while satisfying custom...... routing problems for the vehicles using a routing heuristic. The algorithm is implemented in Java and tested on publicly available data sets....

  20. Are all-terrain vehicle riders willing to pay trail user fees to ride on public lands in the USA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Robert A. Smail

    2009-01-01

    Some public lands in the USA offer opportunities for all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riding, but few charge trail use fees. In a case study in the US state of Wisconsin, the contingent valuation method was used to examine riders' willingness to pay (WTP) to ride on public lands. Information on riders' habits, preferences and responses to a dichotomous choice WTP...