WorldWideScience

Sample records for bights

  1. Modelling cyclonic eddies in the Delagoa Bight region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossa, O.; Pous, S.; Penven, P.; Capet, X.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to document and shed light on the circulation around the Delagoa Bight region in the southern Mozambique Channel using a realistic modelling approach. A simulation including mesoscale forcings at the boundaries of our regional configuration succeeds in reproducing the general circulation in the region as well as the existence of a semi-permanent cyclonic eddy, whose existence is attested by in situ measurements in the Bight. Characterised by a persistent local minimum in SSH located around 26°S-34°E, this cyclonic eddy termed herein the Delagoa Bight lee eddy occurs about 25% of the time with no clear seasonal preference. Poleward moving cyclones, mostly generated further north, occur another 25% of the time in the Bight area. A tracking method applied to eddies generated in Delagoa Bight using model outputs as well as AVISO data confirms the model realism and provides additional statistics. The diameter of the eddy core varies between 61 and 147 km and the average life time exceeds 20 days. Additional model analyses reveal the systematic presence of negative vorticity in the Bight that can organise and form a Delagoa Bight lee eddy depending on the intensity of an intermittent southward flow along the shore and the spatial distribution of surrounding mesoscale features. In addition, the model solution shows other cyclonic eddies generated near Inhambane and eventually travelling through the Bight. Their generation and pathways appears to be linked with large Mozambique Channel rings.

  2. Modelling cyclonic eddies in the Delagoa Bight region

    OpenAIRE

    Cossa, O.; Pous, Stéphane; Penven, P.; Capet, Xavier; Reason, C.J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to document and shed light on the circulation around the Delagoa Bight region in the southern Mozambique Channel using a realistic modelling approach. A simulation including mesoscale forcings at the boundaries of our regional configuration succeeds in reproducing the general circulation in the region as well as the existence of a semi-permanent cyclonic eddy, whose existence is attested by in situ measurements in the Bight. Characterised by a persistent local m...

  3. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  4. The unique south: marine biodiversity in the Great Australian Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edyvane, K.S. [South Australian Research and Development Institute, Henley Beach, SA (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Great Australian Bight is an area of international conservation significance, containing globally significant breeding populations of rare and endangered marine mammals, and also, some of the highest levels of endemism and marine biodiversity in Australia (and the world). The fauna and flora of the in-shore and offshore regions of the Bight, however, particularly the seabirds, fish and invertebrates, remains poorly known. Existing marine biodiversity research and conservation management efforts in the region are low with, until recently, only 260 hectares of the 18.6 million hectares of the Bight being formally protected and managed as marine Protected Areas. Despite the risk of increasing conflicts with marine biodiversity in the region from existing uses, such as commercial fisheries, and also from emerging uses such as marine mammal-based ecotourism (in WA and SA) and sea-based aquaculture (in SA), regional multiple-use management arrangements or management plans are generally lacking. The proposed Great Australian Bight Marine Park, which has been developed with industry and community participation, will, if established, represent the first multiple-use management regime and the first formal reservation of the ecosystems and habitats of the Great Australian Bight. (author). 6 figs., refs.

  5. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report, June 1, 1978--May 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, L P

    1979-03-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: nitrogen inputs to the South Atlantic Bight; eddy experiments for obtaining quasi-synoptic map of South Atlantic Bight; cruise experiment for observation of stranded intrusion in the South Atlantic Bight; geographic distribution of hydrographic data; and computer plotting and contouring of data. (HLW)

  6. Monitoring in beech forest stands in the Westphalian Bight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of monitoring immissions by the observation of the so-called trunk base phenomena in beech forests of the Westphalian Bight are presented and compared with those of two other monitoring methods: recording heavy metal accumulation of mosses and repetition of phytosociological releves. Results from investigations of the trunk base phenomena (differences of Fe + H cation exchange saturation between the soil of trunk base areas and soil only influenced by canopy drip and the exchangeable Pb-content of trunk base areas) and the Pb accumulation of the moss Mnium hornum show similar patterns of immission load in the Westphalian Bight: high immissions in the Ruhr area, decreasing immissions with increasing distance from the Ruhr area in east and north directions and increasing immissions with increasing altitude in the adjoining fringe mountains. The results obtained by repetition of phytosociological releves were less detailed. This, however, does not seem to be a fault of the method itself but results from the fact that the releve areas were not selected to monitor effects of air pollution but to classify vegetation. The combined investigation of trunk base phenomena of beeches and heavy metal accumulation of mosses is a suitable method monitoring immissions in larger areas. Nevertheless, attention should also be paid to observation of permanent plots and root investigations. (orig.)

  7. Ecological stress and the New York Bight: science and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, G.F.

    1982-01-01

    An often-voiced criticism of the environmental regulatory process is the failure to maintain adequate lines of communication among legislators and managers charged with developing and implementing environmental policy and scientists engaged in environmental research. The former two groups have a need for definitive information and unequivocal pronouncements on the environmental effects or ecological implications of specific actions. Members of the latter group, on the other hand, often are unable to respond precisely. They are trained to report on observations, to avoid speculation, and to enumerate the strengths and weaknesses of conclusions. Such opposing approaches have estranged these groups and have limited their interactions. The organization of the volume reflects that of the symposium. In all, nine panels were convened: five on science and four on management. Three science panels reviewed organismic effects of pollutants on fishes, bottom-dwelling organisms, and plankton/neuston (i.e., effects on cells, tissues, and individual plants and animals). The remaining two science panels explored implications of toxicant additions and nutrient and carbon loadings to communities and ecosystems of the New York Bight. Reports of the science panels are presented in the first section of the volume. By adopting a two-part format, the Editorial Board sought to produce a volume on the New York Bight of use to a range of readers from technical specialists to governmental leaders, decision-makers, members of the public, and students who may lack extensive technical backgrounds.

  8. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area...

  9. Habitat classification from multibeam. SEFIS Survey Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a vector shapefile describing the geomorphology of 21 areas along the shelf edge off the South Atlantic Bight where NOAA South East Fisheries...

  10. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  11. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    Progress is reported on research conducted during 1979 on the biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. The presentation consists of a number of published articles and abstracts of oral presentations. (ACR)

  12. Spatio-temporal distribution of floating objects in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Martin; Hinojosa, Iván A.; Joschko, Tanja; Gutow, Lars

    2011-04-01

    Floating objects facilitate the dispersal of marine and terrestrial species but also represent a major environmental hazard in the case of anthropogenic plastic litter. They can be found throughout the world's oceans but information on their abundance and the spatio-temporal dynamics is scarce for many regions of the world. This information, however, is essential to evaluate the ecological role of floating objects. Herein, we report the results from a ship-based visual survey on the abundance and composition of flotsam in the German Bight (North Sea) during the years 2006 to 2008. The aim of this study was to identify potential sources of floating objects and to relate spatio-temporal density variations to environmental conditions. Three major flotsam categories were identified: buoyant seaweed (mainly fucoid brown algae), natural wood and anthropogenic debris. Densities of these floating objects in the German Bight were similar to those reported from other coastal regions of the world. Temporal variations in flotsam densities are probably the result of seasonal growth cycles of seaweeds and fluctuating river runoff (wood). Higher abundances were often found in areas where coastal fronts and eddies develop during calm weather conditions. Accordingly, flotsam densities were often higher in the inner German Bight than in areas farther offshore. Import of floating objects and retention times in the German Bight are influenced by wind force and direction. Our results indicate that a substantial amount of floating objects is of coastal origin or introduced into the German Bight from western source areas such as the British Channel. Rapid transport of floating objects through the German Bight is driven by strong westerly winds and likely facilitates dispersal of associated organisms and gene flow among distant populations.

  13. Phytoplankton Assemblage Patterns in the Southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinen, Carla; Moisan, Tiffany A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Wallops Coastal Oceans Observing Laboratory (Wa-COOL) Project, we sampled a time-series transect in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) biweekly. Our 2-year time-series data included physical parameters, nutrient concentrations, and chlorophyll a concentrations. A detailed phytoplankton assemblage structure was examined in the second year. During the 2-year study, chlorophyll a concentration (and ocean color satellite imagery) indicated that phytoplankton blooms occurred in January/February during mixing conditions and in early autumn under stratified conditions. The chlorophyll a concentrations ranged from 0.25 microgram 1(exp -1) to 15.49 microgram 1(exp -1) during the 2-year period. We were able to discriminate approximately 116 different species under phase contrast microscopy. Dominant phytoplankton included Skeletonema costatum, Rhizosolenia spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens. In an attempt to determine phytoplankton species competition/succession within the assemblage, we calculated a Shannon Weaver diversity index for our diatom microscopy data. Diatom diversity was greatest during the winter and minimal during the spring. Diatom diversity was also greater at nearshore stations than at offshore stations. Individual genera appeared patchy, with surface and subsurface patches appearing abruptly and persisting for only 1-2 months at a time. The distribution of individual species differed significantly from bulk variables of the assemblage (chlorophyll a ) and total phytoplankton assemblage (cells), which indicates that phytoplankton species may be limited in growth in ways that differ from those of the total assemblage. Our study demonstrated a highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage throughout the year, with opportunistic species dominating during spring and fall in response to seasonal changes in temperature and nutrients in the southern MAB.

  14. Inventory of ocean monitoring in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Kenneth C; Weisberg, Stephen B; Raco-Rands, Valerie

    2002-06-01

    Monitoring of the ocean environment in southern California, USA, has been conducted by a diverse array of public and private organizations with different motivations, working on a variety of spatial and temporal scales. To create a basis from which to integrate information from these diverse programs, we conducted an inventory of ocean monitoring activities in the Southern California Bight to address the following questions: (1) How much money is being expended annually on marine monitoring programs? (2) Which organizations are conducting the most monitoring? (3) How are resources allocated among the different types of monitoring programs? This inventory focused on programs existing, or those expected to be in existence, for at least 10 years and that were active at any time between 1994 and 1997. For each program identified for inclusion in this study, information was collected on the number of sites, sampling intensity, parameters measured, and methods used. Levels of effort were translated into cost estimates based upon a market survey of local consulting firms. One hundred fourteen marine monitoring programs, conducted by 65 organizations and costing US $31 million annually, were identified. Most of the effort (81 programs, 65% of samples, 70% of costs) was expended by ocean dischargers as part of their compliance with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit requirements. Federal programs (11 programs, 25% of samples, 10% of total expenditures) expended more than state or local government programs. More than one quarter of monitoring expenditures were conducted to measure concentrations and mass of effluent inputs to the ocean. The largest effort expended on receiving water monitoring was for measuring bacteria, followed by sediments, fish/shellfish, water quality, and intertidal habitats. The large level of expenditures by individual agencies has presented opportunities for integrating small, site-specific ocean monitoring programs into

  15. Summary of marine mammal and seabird surveys of the Southern California Bight area, 1975-1978. Volume III - investigators' reports. Part I - pinnipeds of the Southern California Bight. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnell, M.L.; Le Boeuf, B.J.; Pierson, M.O.; Dettman, D.H.; Farrens, G.D.

    1981-04-01

    This volume contains the findings of a three year study of the Pinnipedia of the Southern California Bight area. The distribution, abundance, movements, seasonality and reproductive status of the pinnipedia of the SBC area are discussed.

  16. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: South Carolina 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area...

  17. Towards an integrated view of benthic and pelagic processes in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea can be classified as a semi-enclosed shelf on the western-European continent. Atlantic influences are mainly through the Fair Isle current Channel in the North, and through the Strait of Dover in the South. An anti-clockwise circulation prevails, driven by mainly semi-diurnal tides and winds. The German Bight is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea, and is strongly influenced by continental rivers. The outflow from the rivers Scheldt, Maas and Rhine is carried towards the German Bight with the residual currents. The German rivers Ems, Weser and Elbe directly debouche into the German Bight. On the shallow shelf, the water column is completely mixed by tidal forces and wind, largely preventing downward flux of particles and instead fostering temporary deposition and resuspension, which influences benthic mineralization. Hence, complex interactions between pelagic and benthic processes occur. Previous budget calculations indicate that the nutrient inventory has to be processed several times to support observed primary production, and, depending on water depth; only 10-20% remineralisation occurs in sediments of the German Bight whereas about 50% of organic matter is remineralised in the sediments of the shallow Wadden Sea. In this presentation, we use in-situ and ex-situ field data on pelagic and benthic oxygen respiration and benthic nutrient fluxes to assess the intense mineralization activity in the German Bight, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization. Measurements of pelagic oxygen respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic oxygen uptake measurements based on flux-chamber landers and ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores revealed that benthic remineralisation rates are about an order of magnitude smaller than pelagic rates, in agreement with previous budget estimates. Both benthic and pelagic oxygen respiration show a strong seasonality; with higher

  18. MOCHA: A three dimensional climatology of salinity and temperature of the Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, N. E.; Wilkin, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    A 3-D climatology of the salinity and temperature of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) is developed to provide a synthesis of observations and a tool for understanding the heat and freshwater budgets, and dynamics, of this area. 150 years of historical data are quality controlled and combined by weighted least squares to a 3-D grid encompassing the Middle Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Maine, including Chesapeake Bay, Delaware Bay, and the Hudson River Estuary. Half degree grid spacing, along with weighted fitting in horizontal distance, vertical distance, time and bathymetry provide highly resolved maps for each month of the year that compare well to independent data sets. Features such as the MAB "Cold Pool", and the seasonal cycle of heating and cooling are clearly visible throughout the months.

  19. Developing New Management Techniques for Sharks in the Drift Gillnet Fishery of the Southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Jeffrey B.; Cartamil, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    The Southern California Bight (SCB) is a contiguous geographical region that extends from Point Conception, California to northern Baja California and west into the California Current. This region’s productive ecosystem supports various recreational and commercial fisheries, some of which target pelagic sharks. For example, the common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) comprises the largest commercial shark fishery in California waters (the California drift gillnet fishery, or CA-DGF. Mako sha...

  20. Cetaceans in the Southern California Bight : behavioral, acoustical and spatio-temporal modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, E Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation examines the behavior, occurrence patterns, and distribution of small cetaceans in the Southern California Bight (SCB) across a variety of temporal and spatial scales in order to elucidate how they interact with their environment. I begin by correlating the surface behavior and vocalizations of two exemplar species, the common dolphin (Delphinus sp.) and the Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens). Surface behaviors of both species were classified based on t...

  1. Coastal Ocean Observing System Elements for the Southern California Bight and Santa Monica

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Nicolas; Mcwilliams, James C.

    2004-01-01

    We propose to establish, maintain, and augment the sensors for UCLA's oceanographic mooring near the edge of the continental shelf in Santa Monica Bay; extensively sample the water quality within the surrounding region, and interpret the measurements in combination with satellite sensing and three-dimensional, fine-scale numerical simulations of the local region. This will be done in coordination with other proposed measurements in the Southern California Bight that collectively are establis...

  2. Coastal Ocean Observing System Elements for the Southern California Bight and Santa Monica Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Nicolas; Mcwilliams, James C.

    2005-01-01

    We propose to establish, maintain, and augment the sensors for UCLA's oceanographic mooring near the edge of the continental shelf in Santa Monica Bay; extensively sample the water quality within the surrounding region; and interpret the measurements in combination with satellite sensing and three-dimensional, fine-scale numerical simulations of the local region. This will be done in coordination with other proposed measurements in the Southern California Bight that collectively are establish...

  3. Life history aspects of 19 rockfish species (Scorpaenidae: Sebastes) from the Southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Love, Milton S.; Morris, Pamela; McCrae, Merritt; Collins, Robson

    1990-01-01

    The authors investigated various life history aspects of 19 rockfish species (Sebastes chlorostictus, S. constellatus, S. dalli, S. elongatus, S. ensifer, S. entomelas, S. flavidus, S. goodei, S. hopkinsi, S. levis, S. melanostomus, S. miniatus, S. ovalis, S. paucispinis, S. rosaceus, S. rosenblatti, S. rufus, s. saxicola, S. semicinctus) from the southern California Bight. These aspects included depth distribution, age-length relationships (of 7 species), length-weight relationships, size...

  4. Recruitment of meroplanktonic larvae in the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Belgrano, A.; Vincx, M.; Dewarumez, J.-M.; A. Richard; Craeymeersch, J.A.; Heip, C. H. R.

    1990-01-01

    The density distribution of meroplanktonic larvae is compared with the density distribution of adults in the benthos, at five coastal stations in the Southern Bight of the North Sea (Abra alba community). Plankton communities were sampled during one tidal cycle, along a buoy traject or at a fixed point; southern and northern locations, 250 m from each central sampling point, have been investigated too. Benthos samples were taken only at the central points of this traject. Meroplankton consist...

  5. Contaminated sediments database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecray, Ellen L.; Reid, Jamey M.; Hastings, Mary E.; Buchholtz ten Brink, Marilyn R.

    2003-01-01

    The Contaminated Sediments Database for Long Island Sound and the New York Bight provides a compilation of published and unpublished sediment texture and contaminant data. This report provides maps of several of the contaminants in the database as well as references and a section on using the data to assess the environmental status of these coastal areas. The database contains information collected between 1956-1997; providing an historical foundation for future contaminant studies in the region.

  6. Benthic dynamics at the carbonate mound regions of the Porcupine Sea Bight continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Martin

    2007-02-01

    A brief review is given of some dynamical processes that influence the benthic dynamics within the carbonate mound provinces located at the Porcupine Bank/Sea Bight margin, NE Atlantic. The depth range of the mounds in this region (600-1,000 m) marks the upper boundary of the Mediterranean outflow water above which Eastern North Atlantic Water dominates. Both water masses are carried northwards by the eastern boundary slope current. In the benthic boundary layer both the action of internal waves, and other tidal period baroclinic waves, may enhance the bottom currents and add to both the residual and maximum flow strength. Both residual and maximum bottom currents vary at different mound locations, with stronger currents found at Belgica (SE Porcupine Sea Bight) mound and Pelagia (NW Porcupine Bank) mound regions, whilst weakest currents are found at the Hovland and Magellan Mounds at the northern Sea Bight margin. The differences may be attributed to the presence of internal waves (Pelagia) or bottom intensified diurnal waves (Belgica). These different dynamical regimes are likely to have implications for the distribution patterns of live coral at the different locations.

  7. Determination of shell deposition rates of Arctica islandica from the New York Bight using natural 228Ra and 228Th and bomb-produced 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shell deposition rates of specimens of Arctica islandica (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the New York Bight were determined using natural 228Ra and 228Th and bomb 14C. The specimens from deep (>55 m) offshore waters show annual growth banding. A shell obtained from the inner bight at <30-m depth seems to be younger than indicated by band counting

  8. A seafloor crater in the German Bight and its effect on the benthos

    OpenAIRE

    Thatje, S.; Gerdes, Dieter; Rachor, Eike

    1999-01-01

    In 1963 a deep crater was formed about 65 m below sea level in the western part of the German Bight, due to a gas eruption caused by drilling carried out from the platform ŽMr. LouieŽ. The study area is situated in a sandy to muddy bottom area inhabited by an Amphiura-filiformis-association (sensu Salzwedel et al., 1985). The crater, sometimes called ŽFigge-MaarŽ, functions as a sediment-trap, concentrating particles and organisms from the water column, thus leading to extreme sedimentation r...

  9. The recovery of benthos following the impact of low oxygen content in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermann, U.; Bauerfeind, E.; Hickel, W.; Westernhagen, H. V.

    The oxygen deficiency in the German Bight and in Danish waters 1981-1983 with ensuing benthos mortality was the reason for studying the development and re-establishment of the macrofauna in the following years. These years, from 1984-1987, exhibited more favourable oxygen conditions. The macrofauna of this region with its predominantly sandy substrate belongs to the Tellina fabula community. It is dominated by regular seasonal and ephemeral species such as Spio filicornis, Phoronis spec., Spiophanes bombyx and Lanice conchilega. In 1983, a year with exceptionally low oxygen content in bottom waters (Echinocardium cordatum and crustaceans have been observed since 1984 in larger numbers.

  10. A seafloor crater in the German Bight and its effects on the benthos

    OpenAIRE

    Thatje, S.; Gerdes, D.; Rachor, E.

    1999-01-01

    In 1963 a deep crater was formed about 65 m below sea level in the western part of the German Bight, due to a gas eruption caused by drilling carried out from the platform ’Mr. Louie'. The study area is situated in a sandy to muddy bottom area inhabited by an Amphiura filiformis association (sensu Salzwedel et al. 1985). The crater, sometimes called ’Figge-Maar', functions as a sediment trap, concentrating particles and organisms from the water column, thus leading to extreme sedimentation ra...

  11. Geology and geochemistry of the Geyser Bight Geothermal Area, Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, C.J. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst. Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairbanks, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Motyka, R.J. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Juneau, AK (USA). Div. of Geological and Geophysical Surveys); Turner, D.L. (Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (USA). Geophysical Inst.); Liss, S.A. (Alaska Dept. of Natural Resources, Fairba

    1990-10-01

    The Geyser Bight geothermal area is located on Umnak Island in the central Aleutian Islands. It contains one of the hottest and most extensive areas of thermal springs and fumaroles in Alaska, and is only documented site in Alaska with geysers. The zone of hot springs and fumaroles lies at the head of Geyser Creek, 5 km up a broad, flat, alluvial valley from Geyser Bight. At present central Umnak is remote and undeveloped. This report describes results of a combined program of geologic mapping, K-Ar dating, detailed description of hot springs, petrology and geochemistry of volcanic and plutonic rock units, and chemistry of geothermal fluids. Our mapping documents the presence of plutonic rock much closer to the area of hotsprings and fumaroles than previously known, thus increasing the probability that plutonic rock may host the geothermal system. K-Ar dating of 23 samples provides a time framework for the eruptive history of volcanic rocks as well as a plutonic cooling age.

  12. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1978-03-01

    The objectives of the project were to determine the physical/dynamical processes controlling/affecting the distribution of phytoplankton nutrients on the continental shelf in the South Atlantic Bight. The initial objectives were to determine the short term, i.e., 2 to 10 day and longer term flux of nutrients onto the continental shelf. This is clearly related to the more general problem of combined physical and biogenic control of phytoplankton nutrients. During the period from June, 1975 to March, 1978 the study of the continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight has been principally involved with a substantial, coordinated field effort. The success of the data acquisition phase of the program has now required an intensive data analysis phase which has been slowly increasing in effort. Emphasis is placed on the main phase of the field program, located in Onslow Bay, which has beel completed and the data are being analyzed. During the three-year period 20 cruises were made into the Carolina Capes area and samples were collected. A list is included of some 100 publications during the period.

  13. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities of Arctic sea ice (Malene Bight, SW Greenland) as measured by 2 different approaches: (1) standard incubation techniques ((HCO3-)-C-14 and [H-3] thymidine incubation) on sea ice cores brought to the laboratory and (2) cores incubated ...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  17. Temperature and salinity profile data collected by CTD in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2/4/1999 - 2/14/2000 (NODC Accession 0000063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 04 February 1999 to 14 February 2000.

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  1. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in μg/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 μg/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods

  2. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo Renato [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: dorneles@biof.ufrj.br; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Aguiar dos Santos, Roberta [Centro de Pesquisa e Gestao de Recursos Pesqueiros do Litoral Sudeste e Sul, IBAMA, 88301-700 Itajai, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: gibteuthis@yahoo.com.br; Silva da Costa, Paulo Alberto [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Populacoes Marinhas, UNIRIO, 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pauloascosta@uol.com.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br; Azevedo, Alexandre Freitas [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: azevedo.alex@uol.com.br; Machado Torres, Joao Paulo [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-07-15

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in {mu}g/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 {mu}g/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods.

  3. A seafloor crater in the German Bight and its effects on the benthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatje, S.; Gerdes, D.; Rachor, E.

    1999-08-01

    In 1963 a deep crater was formed about 65 m below sea level in the western part of the German Bight, due to a gas eruption caused by drilling carried out from the platform 'Mr. Louie'. The study area is situated in a sandy to muddy bottom area inhabited by an Amphiura filiformis association (sensu Salzwedel et al. 1985). The crater, sometimes called 'Figge-Maar', functions as a sediment trap, concentrating particles and organisms from the water column, thus leading to extreme sedimentation rates of about 50 cm, on average, per year. Crater stations, compared with stations situated in the vicinity, show enrichments of juveniles. Echinoderms, especially the subsurface-dwelling heart urchin Echinocardium cordatum and ophiuroids are responsive to enrichment. Other species that are typical of the Amphiura filiformis association are shown to be unable to cope with the special conditions in the crater.

  4. Ocean-atmosphere pollutant circulation processes: The Heligoland Bight ecosystem (PRISMA). 2. interim report (1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PRISMA BMFT project is an important stage on the way to a comprehensive knowledge of the impacts of pollutants on the North Sea/Heligoland Bight ecosystem. The overall project is dedicated to the development, verification and application of a complex shelf-sea model which provides qualitative and quantitative data about the causal interactions between the basic atmospheric conditions, the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the water, the chemical reactons in the air, in the water and the sediments, and the activity of organisms. The model comprises a compact set of formulae, process formulations, initial and marginal conditions and empirical parameters which serves to describe the origin, transport, reactions and final deposition of pollutants in the North Sea, helps to analyze and elucidate the present condition of the ecosystem and its spatial and temporal variability, and provides forecasts in accordance with the changing natural and anthropogenic environmental conditions. (orig.)

  5. Occurrence and distribution of triclosan in the German Bight (North Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of triclosan (TCS) acting as an endocrine disruptor has led to growing concern about the presence of TCS in the environment. In this study, seawater samples were collected from the German Bight during sampling campaigns conducted with the German research ships Gauss and Ludwig Prandtl. TCS was determined both in the dissolved phase and in the suspended particulate matters with concentrations ranging 0.8-6870 pg L-1 and -1, respectively. High concentrations of TCS were present in the estuaries of the Elbe and the Weser, indicating significant input of TCS by the river discharge. The correlation coefficient (R2) between the dissolved concentration and salinity was 0.79 for the data obtained from the Gauss cruise, showing an obvious declining trend from the coast to the open sea. - Investigation with coastal survey reveals distribution of triclosan in marine waters

  6. Occurrence and distribution of triclosan in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)], E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Floeser, Goetz; Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ruck, Wolfgang [Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The potential of triclosan (TCS) acting as an endocrine disruptor has led to growing concern about the presence of TCS in the environment. In this study, seawater samples were collected from the German Bight during sampling campaigns conducted with the German research ships Gauss and Ludwig Prandtl. TCS was determined both in the dissolved phase and in the suspended particulate matters with concentrations ranging 0.8-6870 pg L{sup -1} and <1-95 pg L{sup -1}, respectively. High concentrations of TCS were present in the estuaries of the Elbe and the Weser, indicating significant input of TCS by the river discharge. The correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) between the dissolved concentration and salinity was 0.79 for the data obtained from the Gauss cruise, showing an obvious declining trend from the coast to the open sea. - Investigation with coastal survey reveals distribution of triclosan in marine waters.

  7. Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasiliensis spawning in the southeast Brazilian Bight over the period 1976-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunobu Matsuura

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on sampling over the period 1976-1993 in the southeast Brazilian Bight, the distribution of spawning of the Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasi/iensis is described in relation to environmental conditions. The area of intense spawning occurs in the southern part of the bight where coastal upwelling was less /Tequent. Spawning intensity showed high interannllal variation and the egg abundance in the survey area ranged /Tom 99 billion eggs in the January 1988 cruise to 4669 billion eggs in the January 1981 cruise. Peak spawning takes place one hour after midnight and eggs hatch . out within 19 hours with a water temperature of 24 °e.Baseado nos dados coletados durante nove cruzeiros oceanográficos realizados na região sudeste, as áreas de desova da sardinha-verdadeira (Sardinella brasiliensis foram apresentadas c discutidas em relação às condições oceanográficas. As áreas de desova intensiva foram localizadas na parte sul da área de investigação, onde a ressurgência costeira foi menos freqüente. A intensidade de desova demonstrou uma variação anual relativamente grande. A produção total de ovos da sardinha- ­verdadeira variou de 99 bilhões de ovos durante o cruzeiro de janeiro de 1988 para 4669 bilhões de ovos em janeiro de 1981. O pico de desova ocorre na camada de mistura de superfície uma hora após a meia noite e os ovos eclodem em 19 horas com a temperatura de água 24 °e.

  8. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight. Progress report, July 12--August 20, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.; Dunstan, W.M.

    1977-02-01

    Preliminary results are reported from a study of the relationship between intrusions of phytoplankton, zooplankton, and particulate matter in the South Atlantic Bight off the coast of Georgia and Northeast Florida. The relationship between temperature, chlorophyll, and particle volume in bottom water from various locations was determined and the data were correlated with data on water mass movements. Samples were collected from a ship following a specified grid pattern.

  9. Movement patterns, habitat preferences, and fisheries biology of the common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) in the Southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Cartamil, Daniel Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is a pelagic species that constitutes the largest commercial shark fishery in California waters. Despite its commercial value, little is known of thresher shark biology, nor is there adequate data on which to base fishery management decisions. This dissertation entails four studies dealing with the biology and fisheries interactions of common thresher shark in the Southern California Bight (SCB). Chapter 1 examines the movement patterns of adult an...

  10. Development and validation of hydroacoustic monitoring concepts for the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander; Neumann, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reimers, Hans-Christian; Capperucci, Ruggero

    2016-04-01

    The joint research project WIMO (Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht/Scientific Monitoring Concepts for the German Bight, NE North Sea) aims at providing methods for detection and analysis of seabed habitats using modern remote sensing techniques. Our subproject focuses on hydroacoustic techniques in order to gain information about seafloor environments and sediment dynamics. In a timeframe of four years, several key areas in the German Bight were repeatedly observed using different hydroacoustic gear (i. e. sidescan sonars, single/multibeam echo sounders and sub-bottom profilers). In order to ground-truth the acoustic data, hundreds of grab samples and underwater videos were taken. With these techniques it is possible to distinguish between different seafloor habitats, which range from muddy to sandy seafloors (esp. near the barrier islands) to rugged or vegetated/populated reefs around Helgoland. The conducted monitoring program revealed seasonal changes regarding the abundance of the sand mason worm (Lanice conchilega) and the brittle star (Amphiora filiformis) as well as ongoing sedimentary processes driven by tidal currents and wind/storms. It was also possible to determine relationships between sediment characteristics and benthos in some key areas. An essential part of our project included a comparison between the datasets obtained with different hydroacoustic devices, configurations, and evaluation methods in the same study areas. The investigation reveals that there could be distinct differences in interpreting the data and hence in the determination of prevailing seafloor habitats, especially in very heterogeneous areas and at transition zones between the habitats. Therefore, it is recommended to employ more than one hydroacoustic system (preferably a singlebeam device combined with a wide-swath sonar system) synchronously during a survey in order to gain more reliable and detailed information about the seafloor environments. The

  11. Circulation in the Hudson Shelf Valley: MESA Physical Oceanographic Studies in New York Bight, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Han, Gregory C.; Hansen, Donald V.

    1982-11-01

    Over 900 days of current velocity data were obtained at mainly two locations in the inner and outer Hudson Shelf Valley (HSV). The large cross-axis depth gradients in the HSV, together with the strong winter cyclones and the baroclinic density distribution over the shelf, are primarily responsible for the major circulation features observed in the valley. CSTD data from 12 cruises and meteorological data from JFK International Airport and an environmental buoy were collected concurrently with the current meter data. Although the mean cross-shelf pressure gradient is generally seaward in the Middle Atlantic Bight, it is shoreward in the HSV below the level of the adjacent continental shelf (shelf horizon), thus imposing a bias toward upvalley flow. The average velocity below the surrounding shelf horizon in the HSV is upvalley or shoreward (west-northwestward ≈ 290° T) in the range of 2-5 cm/s. The circulation in the HSV is seasonal and individual events can drastically alter the mean picture. The several day average upvalley flow can sometimes approach 20 cm/s when intense winter cyclones pass over the bight and can sometimes also be directed downvalley depending upon the path of the winter cyclone. A topographically controlled barotropic flow commonly opposes the dominant (southeast-ward) wind direction even near the surface in the winter. In the context of circulation on the open shelf, upvalley (downvalley) flow events generated by winter cyclones are associated with reduced (enhanced) southwestward flow or flow reversals that are northeastward in the lower half of the water column at LTM, a typical mid/shelf site (Mayer et al., 1979). Current meter data suggest that whether or not reversals occur on the open shelf depends upon the interannual variability of the winter wind regime. Upvalley flow events are not confined only to the winter (unstratified) season but are stronger in the winter and can last for several days and longer. During the summer

  12. Spatial and temporal patterns in oxygen and nutrient fluxes in sediment of German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2016-04-01

    The German Bight in the southern North Sea is affected by intensive anthropogenic exploitation. Over a century of intensive use by shipping, fishery, and input by polluted rivers has pushed the coastal ecosystem far from its pristine state. The nutrient load reached a maximum in the early 1990s (Amann et al. 2012), and implementation of environmental protection policies substantially decreased the riverine nutrient load. While the riverine input of pollutants has constantly reduced since then, new forms of sea exploitation emerge. The most noticeable example is the installation of more than 600 wind turbines over the past few years in the German EEZ, and additionally 1,200 are already planned. The impact of these installations on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles is largely unclear. In a series of monitoring cruises we repeatedly sampled the sediment at a set of monitoring stations, which represent all typical habitats of the German Bight. We deployed benthic landers for in-situ chamber incubations and performed ex-situ whole-core incubations to investigate the benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients, and their spatial and temporal variability. Our first results indicate that benthic nutrient recycling is more intense during summer than during winter, which suggests that biological processes contribute substantially to the recycling of nutrients. The fluxes of reactive nitrogen appear lower than observations from 1992 (Lohse et al. 1993), when riverine N loads were at their maximum (Amann et al. 2012). The comparison of our recent measurements with observations from the past decades will enable us to assess the effect of decreasing nutrient discharge into the coastal North Sea. Our results will further set a baseline for elucidating the impact of the massive installation of wind turbines in the near future. This study contributes to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats). References Amann T., A. Weiss, and J. Hartmann (2012): Carbon

  13. High Resolution Quaternary Seismic Stratigraphy of the New York Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, J.F.; Foster, D.S.; Lotto, L.L.; Allison, M.A.; Uchupi, E.; Swift, B.A.; Danforth, W.W.; Thieler, E.R.; Butman, Bradford

    2003-01-01

    A principal focus for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (marine.usgs.gov) is regional reconnaissance mapping of inner-continental shelf areas, with initial emphasis on heavily used areas of the sea floor near major population centers. The objectives are to develop a detailed regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in order to provide information for a wide range of management decisions and to form a basis for further investigations of marine geological processes. In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE), New York District, began to generate reconnaissance maps of the continental shelf seaward of the New York - New Jersey metropolitan area. This mapping encompassed the New York Bight inner-continental shelf, one of the most heavily trafficked and exploited coastal regions in the United States. Contiguous areas of the Hudson Shelf Valley, the largest physiographic feature on this segment of the continental shelf, also were mapped as part of a USGS study of contaminated sediments (Buchholtz ten Brink and others, 1994; 1996). The goal of the reconnaissance mapping was to provide a regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in the New York Bight area, including: (a) a description of sea-floor morphology; (b) a map of sea-floor sedimentary lithotypes; (c) the geometry and structure of the Cretaceous strata and Quaternary deposits; and (d) the geologic history of the region. Pursuing the course of this mapping effort, we obtained sidescan-sonar images of 100 % of the sea floor in the study area. Initial interpretations of these sidescan data were presented by Schwab and others, (1997a, 1997b, 2000a). High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles collected along each sidescan-sonar line used multiple acoustic sources (e.g., watergun, CHIRP, Geopulse). Multibeam swath-bathymetry data also were obtained for a portion of the study area (Butman and others, 1998;). In this report, we present a series

  14. Identification of polyamine-responsive bacterioplankton taxa in South Atlantic Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinxin; Sun, Shulei; Hollibaugh, James T; Mou, Xiaozhen

    2015-12-01

    Putrescine and spermidine are short-chained aliphatic polyamines (PAs) that are ubiquitously distributed in seawater. These compounds may be important sources of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen for marine bacterioplankton. Here, we used pyrotag sequencing to quantify the response of bacterioplankton to putrescine and spermidine amendments in microcosms established using surface waters collected at various stations in the South Atlantic Bight in October 2011. Our analysis showed that PA-responsive bacterioplankton consisted of bacterial taxa that are typically dominant in marine systems. Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria) was the taxon most responsive to PA additions at the nearshore site. Gammaproteobacteria of the families Piscirickettsiaceae; Vibrionaceae; and Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, were the dominant PA-responsive taxa in samples from the river-influenced coastal station, offshore station and open ocean station, respectively. The spatial variability of PA-responsive taxa may be attributed to differences in composition of the initial bacterial community and variations of in situ physiochemical conditions among sites. Our results also provided the first empirical evidence that Gammaproteobacteria might play an important role in PA transformation in marine systems. PMID:26109269

  15. Invertebrate communities associated with hard bottom habitats in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, E. L.; Knott, D. M.; Van Dolah, R. F.; Burrell, V. G.

    1983-08-01

    Epibenthic invertebrates associated with nine hard bottom areas in the South Atlantic Bight between South Carolina and northern Florida were collected with dredge, trawl, suction and grab samplers to evaluate species composition, biomass, abundance, diversity, spatial distributions, and seasonality (winter and summer). Species composition changed noticeably with depth and season. Inner and outer shelf stations were least similar in species composition. Middle shelf areas were transitional and contained taxa characteristic of both inner and outer sites. Bryozoa (88 taxa), Cnidaria (85 taxa), Porifera (67 taxa), Annelida (261 taxa) and Mollusca (203 taxa) represented the richest taxonomic groups of the 1175 taxa collected. Both diversity (1175 total taxa) and biomass (1995 kg total) of invertebrates from hard bottom areas exceeded those reported in the literature for sand bottom communities. Sponges accounted for >60% of the total invertebrate biomass collected by dredge and trawl during both seasons. High diversity values were attributed primarily to habitat complexity and did not exhibit any discernible pattern with depth or latitude.

  16. On analysing sea level rise in the German Bight since 1844

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wahl

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a methodology to analyse observed sea level rise (SLR in the German Bight, the shallow south-eastern part of the North Sea, is presented. The paper focuses on the description of the methods used to generate and analyse mean sea level (MSL time series. Parametric fitting approaches as well as non-parametric data adaptive filters, such as Singular System Analysis (SSA are applied. For padding non-stationary sea level time series, an advanced approach named Monte-Carlo autoregressive padding (MCAP is introduced. This approach allows the specification of uncertainties of the behaviour of smoothed time series near the boundaries. As an example, the paper includes the results from analysing the sea level records of the Cuxhaven tide gauge and the Heligoland tide gauge, both located in the south-eastern North Sea. For comparison, the results from analysing a worldwide sea level reconstruction are also presented. The results for the North Sea point to a weak negative acceleration of SLR since 1844 with a strong positive acceleration at the end of the 19th century, to a period of almost no SLR around the 1970s with subsequent positive acceleration and to high recent rates.

  17. Seasonal patterns of surface wind stress and heat flux over the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Clinton D.; Dorman, Clive E.

    1997-03-01

    Patterns of wind stress and heat flux between the atmosphere and the ocean over the Southern California Bight are described based on observations from buoys and ships. During the winter, the wind stress is spatially homogeneous and temporally variable, with strong events corresponding to low-pressure systems sweeping through the area. During the summer, spatial patterns are more persistent, with large gradients. Inshore of a line running approximately between Point Conception and Ensenada, Mexico, winds are weak. Offshore wind speeds are comparable in magnitude to those found over the continental shelf north of Point Conception. The boundary is the location of maximum wind stress curl, and the spatial resolution afforded by California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CalCOFI) observations suggests maximum wind stress curls over 3 times larger than the values proposed by Nelson [1977]. Net heat flux estimates derived from the CalCOFI measurements are somewhat larger than the values proposed by Nelson and Husby [1983], due to differences in latent heat flux estimates. Possible mechanisms responsible for the spring-summer spatial structure in the wind and the relationship between these gradients and the properties of the underlying ocean are discussed.

  18. The role of density gradients on tidal asymmetries in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, Emil V.; Al-Nadhairi, Rahma; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the German Bight associated with river plumes and fresh water intrusions from tidal flats have been studied with numerical simulations. The horizontal and vertical patterns of the M2, M4 and M6 tides revealed complex distortions along the bathymetric channels connecting the coast and the open sea. A major focus was on the surface-to-bottom change in tidal asymmetries, which provides a major control on draining the tidal flats around the Elbe and Weser River mouths. Comparisons between baroclinic and barotropic experiments demonstrated that the estuarine gravitational circulation is responsible for pronounced differences in surface and bottom asymmetries. These differences could be considered as a basic control mechanism for sediment dynamics. The most prominent area of tidal distortions, manifested by a delay of the tidal wave, was located between the estuarine turbidity maximum and the estuarine mouth north of Cuxhaven. This area was characterized by the strongest periodic convergence and divergence of the flow and by the largest salinity gradients. The enhancement of the gravitational circulation occurred during the transition between spring and neap tides. The large-scale dynamics and small-scale topographic features could impact the sediment distribution as there was a marked interplay in the channels between stratification and turbulence. Also an explanation has been given for the mechanisms supporting the existence of a mud area ( Schlickgebiet) south of Helgoland Island, associated with trapping suspended particular matter.

  19. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  20. Newly Digitized Historical Climate Data of the German Bight and the Southern Baltic Sea Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrbein, Dörte; Tinz, Birger; von Storch, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The detection of historical climate information plays an important role with regard to the discussion on climate change, particularly on storminess. The German Meteorological Service houses huge archives of historical handwritten journals of weather observations. A considerable number of original observation sheets from stations along the coast of the German Bight and the southern Baltic Sea exists which has been until recently almost unnoticed. These stations are called signal stations and are positioned close to the shore. However, for this region meteorological observation data of 128 stations exist from 1877 to 1999 and are partly digitized. In this study we show an analysis of firstly newly digitized wind and surface air pressure data of 15 stations from 1877 to 1939 and we also present a case study of the storm surge at the coast of the southern Baltic Sea in December 1913. The data are quality controlled by formal, climatological, temporal and consistency checks. It is shown that these historical climate data are usable in consistency and quality for further investigations on climate change, e.g. as input for regional and global reanalysis.

  1. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  2. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea) in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight)

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Codina, Juan Carlos Ugaz

    2015-01-01

    The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore) in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45’S; 47°33’W) and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Wa...

  3. Analysis of the upscaling problem - A case study for the barotropic dynamics in the North Sea and the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The upscaling problem is investigated using the barotropic dynamics of the North Sea and the German Bight as an example. The impact of small scale perturbations of bathymetry, bottom roughness, wind forcing, and boundary forcing is quantified using a two-dimensional linear barotropic model for the entire North Sea with 5 km resolution. The model is solved in the spectral domain for the dominant M2 tide. Comparisons with results from a fully nonlinear 3D circulation model show that the main circulation features are well captured by the spectral model. The impact of different types of perturbations is estimated by inversion of the model using the perturbation covariance matrix as input. Case studies with white noise and fully correlated noise are presented. It is shown that the German Bight area stands out in its sensitivity with respect to small scale uncertainties of bathymetry. Small scale changes of bottom roughness have a particularly strong effect in the English Channel. Small scale wind perturbations have a significant local effect only in very shallow near coastal areas. It is shown that uncorrelated noise introduced along an open boundary around the German Bight only has a very local effect. Perturbations with long correlation length are shown to lead to significant far field effects along the east coast of England. It is demonstrated that this effect is related to the boundary conditions used for the North Sea model. In a next step a German Bight grid with 1 km resolution is nested into the North Sea grid and the spectral model is solved in a two way nested configuration. It is shown that there are some significant local and far field effects caused by the change of resolution in this coastal area. Finally, the potential impact of observations taken in coastal areas is investigated by evaluating the Kalman a posteriori distribution of analysis vectors based on different assumptions about model errors. The area of influence of a single tide gauge is

  4. Drifter Observations Of Wave-Current Evolution Through The San Francisco Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, D. W.; Herbers, T. H.; Janssen, T. T.; McIntyre, S.; Jessen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean waves approaching the Golden Gate, the narrow strait connecting the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean, are affected by refraction over the San Francisco Bar and the strong tidal currents in the area. During ebb tides, when currents through the Golden Gate can exceed 2.5 m/s, the approach to San Francisco Bay is characterized by focusing and steepening of the incident wave field on the opposing current jet. These dynamics are not uncommon in coastal inlets and are known to present hazardous navigation conditions. The strong inhomogeneity and enhanced nonlinearity of the waves can result in deviations from non-Gaussian statistics and changes in the likelihood of extreme waves. However, since observations of wave-current dynamics are so difficult to make with conventional instruments, these dynamics remain still poorly understood. In this work we present the development and testing of a compact, low-cost, Wave-Resolving Drifter (WRD), designed to resolve the wave orbital surface motions and surface drifts in high-energy areas. The WRDs consist of a 30cm buoy equipped with an off-the-shelf GPS receiver and a three-axis accelerometer. The combined GPS-accelerometer package is functionally equivalent to a conventional pitch-roll (or PUV) wave height and direction instrument, but at a fraction of the price. In our presentation we will discuss results from several WRD array deployments in the San Francisco Bight during high-energy conditions with strong ebb currents. The buoys are shown to resolve the surface waves and surface drift with remarkable accuracy and allow the analysis of the evolution of the wave group structure over the opposing current. To obtain statistical results for currents and waves, WRDs were released in clusters (ensemble) from which shoaling effects over the bar and wave-current interaction can be identified.

  5. Chemical composition and cycling of dissolved organic matter in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Repeta, Daniel J.; Chen, Robert F.

    This study focuses on the chemical characterization of high molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (HMW DOM) isolated from the Middle Atlantic Bight in April 1994 and March 1996. Using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1HNMR) and monosaccharide analysis we compared both spatial and temporal variations in the chemical structure of HMW DOM across this region. Our analyses support the presence of at least two compositionally distinct components to HMW DOM. The major component is acyl polysaccharide (APS), a biopolymer rich in carbohydrates, acetate and lipid, accounting for between 50% and 80% of the total high molecular-weight dissolved organic carbon (HMW DOC) in surface samples. APS is most abundant in fully marine, surface-water samples, and is a product of autochthonous production. Organic matter with spectral properties characteristic of humic substances is the second major component of HMW DOM. Humic substances are most abundant (up to 49% of the total carbon) in samples collected from estuaries, near the coast, and in deep water, suggesting both marine and perhaps terrestrial sources. Radiocarbon analyses of neutral monosaccharides released by the hydrolysis of APS have similar and modern (average 71‰) Δ 14C values. Radiocarbon data support our suggestion that these sugars occur as part of a common macromolecule, with an origin via recent biosynthesis. Preliminary radiocarbon data for total neutral monosaccharides isolated from APS at 300 and 750 m show this fraction to be substantially enriched relative to total HMW DOC and DOC. The relatively enriched radiocarbon values of APS at depth suggest APS is rapidly transported into the deep ocean.

  6. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  7. The role of Callionymus lyra (L.) and C. reticulatus in the life cycle of Lernaeocera lusci in Belgian coastal waters (Southern Bight of the North Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Damme, P.A.; Maertens, D.; Arrumm, A.; Hamerlynck, O.; Ollevier, F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of the dragonet Callionymus lyra and the reticulated dragonet C. reticulatus from Belgian coastal waters (Southern Bight of the North Sea) in June 1991 revealed 34% of dragonets infected with 1–7 Lernaeocera lusci. This same parasite infected 9% of the reticulated dragonets (mean intensity

  8. Terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter in the chesapeake bay and the middle atlantic bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Guo, Laodong; Santschi, Peter H.

    2000-10-01

    Concentrations of lignin-phenols were analyzed in high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (0.2 μm > HMW DOM > 1 kDa) isolated from surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay (C. Bay), and surface and bottom waters of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). The abundance of lignin-phenols in HMW DOM was higher in the C. Bay (0.128 ± 0.06 μg L -1) compared to MAB surface waters (0.016 ± 0.004 μg L -1) and MAB bottom waters (0.005 ± 0.003 μg L -1). On an organic carbon-normalized basis, lignin-phenol abundances in the HMW DOM (i.e., Λ 6), were significantly higher ( p vanillin (Ad/Al) V in HMW DOM, indicative of lignin decay, ranged from 0.611 to 1.37 in C. Bay, 0.534 to 2.62 in MAB surface waters, and 0.435 to 1.96 in MAB bottom water. Ratios of S/V and (Ad/Al) V showed no significant differences between each environment, providing no evidence of any compositionally distinct input of terrestrial organic matter into each environment. When considering depth profiles of suspended particulate matter in the MAB, with C:N ratios, and bulk radiocarbon ages and stable carbon isotopic values in HMW DOM isolated from these areas, two scenarios present themselves regarding the sources and transport of terrestrially derived HMW DOM in the MAB. Scenario #1 assumes that a low amount of refractory terrestrial organic matter and old DOC are uniformly distributed in the oceans, both in surface and bottom waters, and that primary production in surface waters increases DOC with low lignin and younger DOC which degrades easily. In this case, many of the trends in age and biomarker composition likely reflect general patterns of Atlantic Ocean surface and bottom water circulation in the area of the MAB. Scenario 2 assumes terrestrial organic matter in bottom waters of the MAB may have originated from weathered shelf and slope sediments in nearshore areas via a combination of mechanisms (e.g., diffusion, recent resuspension events, and/or desorption of DOM from riverine POM buried deep

  9. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight - estimates of hydrophysical states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, E. V.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Staneva, J.; Grayek, S.; Seemann, J.; Petersen, W.

    2011-09-01

    A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF) radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data assimilation significantly

  10. Atlantic surfclam connectivity within the Middle Atlantic Bight: Mechanisms underlying variation in larval transport and settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Munroe, Daphne; Haidvogel, Dale; Powell, Eric N.

    2016-05-01

    Larval transport and settlement have been shown in various studies to be essential in determining population abundance and connectivity for benthic invertebrates. This transport is influenced by both the physical environment and biological behavior. The Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, is a commercially important benthic invertebrate fishery species along the U.S northeastern coast. In this study, a physical circulation model is coupled to a surfclam larval model to investigate the dynamics of larval transport and settlement within the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf in 2006. The main physical mechanisms causing variability in larval transport and settlement are also examined. Model results show that surfclam larvae released from July to early October experience relatively larger settlement rates, due to higher average temperatures experienced by larvae. Larval along-shore transport exhibits a mean down-coast pattern following the coastal current from the northeast to the southwest, with most high-frequency (period of 2-10 days) variations caused by fluctuations in the along-shore surface wind stress, and with seasonal variations speculated to be driven mainly by changes in the across-shelf density gradient. Larval across-shelf movement is highly correlated with the along-shore surface wind stress mediated by coastal upwelling and downwelling episodes, but the correlation is further dependent on the vertical distribution of the larvae, particularly their position relative to the thermocline. Most surfclam larvae released from the Middle Atlantic shelf stay below the thermocline and experience a net onshore transport during the summer-stratified season when upwelling-favorable wind forcing dominates. A proposed critical value of water temperature at the thermocline successfully regulates the observed patterns of vertical distribution of surfclam larvae and their across-shelf movement off the New Jersey and South Virginia shelves; that is, when the water

  11. Taxonomic code, physical, and other data collected from DELAWARE II and other platforms in New York Bight from net casts and other instruments; 20 February 1973 to 16 December 1975 (NODC Accession 7601402)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Taxonomic Code, physical, and other data were collected using net casts and other instruments in the New York Bight from DELAWARE II and other platforms. Data were...

  12. Temperature and other data collected using visual observations and other instruments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and other Seas from GYRE from 01 August 1985 to 26 May 1990 (NODC Accession 9300074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and other data were collected using visual observations, bottle casts, and other instruments from GYRE and other platforms in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and...

  13. HYDROCARBONS - TOTAL RESOLVED, CAS (CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE) PARAMETER CODES and PCB, and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight on 1901-01-01 (NODC Accession 8600271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This submission contains the master data set assembled in a study called "Contaminant Body Burdens, Variability and Monitoring Implications for the New York Bight"....

  14. Current, temperature, backscatter, and other data from bottom instrument packages deployed from the RV Oceanus and other platforms in support of sediment transport observation in the Middle Atlantic Bight from 11 December 1975 to 30 October 1980 (NODC Accession 0066005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A series of studies to assess environmental hazards to petroleum development in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Long-term observations of currents and near-bottom...

  15. Physical, taxonomic code, and other data from current meter and other instruments in New York Bight from DOLPHIN and other platforms; 14 March 1971 to 03 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using current meter and other instruments from DOLPHIN and other platforms in New York Bight. Data were...

  16. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2012-10-25 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0145723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider ru23 was deployed prior to the movement of Hurrican Sandy into the Mid-Atlantic Bight and was deployed to sample the sub-surface waters during the...

  18. Distribution of planktonic cnidarians in response to South Atlantic Central Water intrusion in the South Brazilian Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico P.; Codina, Juan C. U.

    2014-10-01

    Five oceanographic cruises were made between November 2005 and June 2006, sampling a cross-shelf transect off the South Brazilian Bight (SBB; 26°46‧S) to follow the seasonal development of the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) intrusion over the shelf and its influence on the assemblage of planktonic cnidarians. An onshore wind-driven bottom intrusion of the SACW was clearly perceptible, reaching the coast in January. From March onward, the SACW influence was gradually displaced seaward due to wind and tidal mixing. By late June the SACW influence was offshore and the inshore was dominated by low-salinity waters (20 mm in diameter) Solmaris corona were observed exclusively in cold waters, suggesting this medusa is a SACW indicator.

  19. Sulphur diagenesis in the sediments of the Kiel Bight, SW Baltic Sea, as reflected by multiple stable sulphur isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Harald; Bast, Rebecca; Cording, Anja; Diekrup, David; Fugmann, Artur; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Lutter, Andreas; Oeser, Martin; Rabe, Katharina; Reinke, Debora; Teichert, Barbara M A; Westernströer, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the biogeochemistry of marine sediments from the Kiel Bight, coastal SW Baltic Sea, is studied based on the abundance and isotopic composition of organic carbon and different forms of sedimentary sulphur. Active bacterial sulphate reduction, partly under sulphate-limiting conditions, is evident from paired δ(34)S and δ(18)O values of pore water sulphate. The resulting pore water sulphide is partly precipitated as acid-volatile iron sulphide and subsequently forms sedimentary pyrite, partly serves in later diagenetic sulphurisation of organic matter, or remains dissolved in the pore water, all evident from the respective δ(34)S values. Microbial sulphate turnover is associated with an apparent isotopic fractionation between dissolved sulphate and dissolved sulphide (Δ(34)S) that varies between 46 and 66‰. PMID:22303924

  20. Ecological evaluation of proposed reference sites in the New York Bight, Great South Bay, and Ambrose Light, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The current reference site used in evaluations of dredged material proposed for open water disposal in the New York Bight is the Mud Dump Reference Site. The sediment at this reference site is predominantly sand. The US Army Corps of Engineers New York District is considering designation of a new reference site that (1) includes a fine-grained component, believed to be necessary for adequate amphipod survival in laboratory tests, (2) better reflects the physical characteristics of the fine-grained sediment dredged from the New York/New Jersey Harbor and (3) is further removed from the Mud Dump Site than the current Mud Dump Reference Site. The Battelle Marine Science Laboratory was requested to characterize sediment collected from seven candidate reference sites during two study phases. This report presents the results of physical, chemical, and toxicological characterizations of sediment from these sites in comparisons with those of the original Mud Dump Reference Site.

  1. Validation of Open-Sea CRYOSAT-2 Data in SAR Mode in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinardo, Salvatore; Benveniste, Jérôme; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Scharroo, Remko

    This work aims to generate and validate the altimetric geophysical parameters measured by the CryoSat-2 in SAR Mode in the temporal interval 2011-2012 in the area of the German Bight at distance to coast larger than 10 Kilometers (open-sea). Instantaneous sea surface height (SSH), significant wave height (SWH) and wind speed at 10 meter from sea surface (U10), measured by CryoSat-2, are compared to in-situ measurements at platforms, buoys and tide gauges and to results from an operational circulation model run by the German Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). The in-situ data were made available by the Wasser- und Schifffahrtsverwaltung des Bundes (WSV). These stations are part of a network of tide gauges and offshore platforms equipped with continuously operation Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. Since the coordinates of the zero point of the tide gauge are computed in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) the absolute comparison between sea level from tide gauge and altimetry is possible. The relevant in-situ data are sea level, wave and wind data. The CryoSat-2 Data have been Delay-Doppler processed as from the FBR (Full Bit Rate) Level 1A to Level 1B and subsequently re-tracked using the SAMOSA's SAR Echo Model (full solution) and a curve-fitting scheme based on Levenberg-Marquard Least Square Minimization Algorithm. Sea surface height, significant wave height and wind speed at 20 Hz and 1 Hz have been derived. The Delay-Doppler processing (L1B) and the re-tracking processing (L2) has been carried out by the EOP-SER Altimetry Team at ESA/ESRIN. Pseudo pulse-limited (PLRM) data derived from CryoSat-2 in SAR mode and provided via the RADS database are compared with the same parameters derived from the CryoSat-2 SAR Data to estimate possible biases and trends between SAR mode and LRM mode and tune-up the SAR re-tracking scheme. Special attention will be paid to spot trends between SAR and PLRM with respect the orbital

  2. Delineation of estuarine fronts in the German Bight using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter and fluorescence of water column constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    The acquisition and application of airborne laser induced emission spectra from German Bight water during the 1979 MARSEN experiment is detailed for the synoptic location of estuarine fronts. The NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) was operated in the fluorosensing mode. A nitrogen laser transmitter at 337.1 nm was used to stimulate the water column to obtain Gelbstoff or organic material fluorescence spectra together with water Raman backscatter. Maps showing the location and relative strength of estuarine fronts are presented. The distribution of the fronts indicates that mixing within the German Bight takes place across a relatively large area. Reasonable agreement between the patterns observed by the AOL and published results are obtained. The limitations and constraints of this technique are indicated and improvements to the AOL fluorosensor are discussed with respect to future ocean mapping applications.

  3. Syrticola flandricus n.g., n.sp., a harpacticoid copepod from the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, K.A.; Claeys, D.

    1982-01-01

    During a comprehensive study of the macro- and meiobenthos of the Kwintebank, a sandbank in the Southern Bight of the North Sea, eleven female specimens of a cylindropsyllid, belonging to a new genus, were collected from one of the stations sampled. The station's coordinates are 51°18'00''N 2°40'10''E. The sediment at this stations is a pure, very well sorted, coarse sand (median grain size: 517 µm; sorting: 0.24; mud

  4. Annual and seasonal evaluation of reproductive status in hornyhead turbot at municipal wastewater outfalls in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsgren, Kristy L; Bay, Steven M; Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Deng, Xin; Lu, Guanghua; Armstrong, Jeff; Gully, Joseph R; Schlenk, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Treated wastewater effluent containing endocrine-disrupting chemicals is discharged into the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight (SCB) daily. The present study investigated changes in indicators of reproductive health and environmental estrogen exposure in hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) near wastewater outfalls. Fish were collected from discharge areas, farfield stations, and a reference location in the SCB to examine spatial and temporal patterns. Fish from the Orange County outfall farfield site were younger and less sexually mature than fish from other sites. The sex ratio was skewed in some fish from outfall sites as well as from the Dana Point reference site. However, no consistent pattern in sex ratio was present over time. Low-level induction of vitellogenin was frequently observed in male fish from all sites, suggesting widespread exposure to estrogenic compounds, but did not appear to impact reproductive function as there was no incidence of gonad abnormalities (ova-testis). Analysis of historical hornyhead turbot trawl data indicated that populations are either increasing or stable in the SCB; thus, environmental estrogen exposure was not adversely impacting fish abundance. Additional research is needed to determine the cause of the estrogenic response in hornyhead turbot and whether the source of the estrogenic compounds is a consequence of historical contamination or of ongoing sources or representative of baseline characteristic of this species. PMID:22987602

  5. Coupling of wave and circulation models in coastal-ocean predicting systems: a case study for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, J.; Wahle, K.; Günther, H.; Stanev, E.

    2015-12-01

    This study addresses the impact of coupling between wind wave and circulation models on the quality of coastal ocean predicting systems. This is exemplified for the German Bight and its coastal area known as the Wadden Sea. The latter is the area between the barrier islands and the coast. This topic reflects the increased interest in operational oceanography to reduce prediction errors of state estimates at coastal scales, which in many cases are due to unresolved nonlinear feedback between strong tidal currents and wind-waves. In this study we present analysis of wave and hydrographic observations, as well as results of numerical simulations. A nested-grid modelling system is used to producing reliable nowcasts and short-term forecasts of ocean state variables, including wind waves and hydrodynamics. The data base includes ADCP observations and continuous measurements from data stations. The individual and collective role of wind, waves and tidal forcing are quantified. The performance of the forecast system is illustrated for the cases of several extreme events. Effects of ocean waves on coastal circulation and sea level are investigated by considering the wave-dependent stress and wave breaking parameterization. Also the effects which the circulation exerts on the wind waves are tested for the coastal areas using different parameterizations. The improved skill of the coupled forecasts compared to the non-coupled ones, in particular during extreme events, justifies the further enhancements of coastal operational systems by including wind wave models.

  6. A continuous multi-millennial record of surficial bivalve mollusk shells from the São Paulo Bight, Brazilian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Troy A.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Krause, Richard A.; Barbour Wood, Susan L.; Simões, Marcello G.; Huntley, John Warren; Yanes, Yurena; Romanek, Christopher S.; Kowalewski, Michał

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the potential of using surficial shell accumulations for paleoenvironmental studies, an extensive time series of individually dated specimens of the marine infaunal bivalve mollusk Semele casali was assembled using amino acid racemization (AAR) ratios (n = 270) calibrated against radiocarbon ages (n = 32). The shells were collected from surface sediments at multiple sites across a sediment-starved shelf in the shallow sub-tropical São Paulo Bight (São Paulo State, Brazil). The resulting 14C-calibrated AAR time series, one of the largest AAR datasets compiled to date, ranges from modern to 10,307 cal yr BP, is right skewed, and represents a remarkably complete time series: the completeness of the Holocene record is 66% at 250-yr binning resolution and 81% at 500-yr binning resolution. Extensive time-averaging is observed for all sites across the sampled bathymetric range indicating long water depth-invariant survival of carbonate shells at the sediment surface with low net sedimentation rates. Benthic organisms collected from active depositional surfaces can provide multi-millennial time series of biomineral records and serve as a source of geochemical proxy data for reconstructing environmental and climatic trends throughout the Holocene at centennial resolution. Surface sediments can contain time-rich shell accumulations that record the entire Holocene, not just the present.

  7. The modulation of the seasonal cross-shelf sea level variation by the cold pool in the Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jin; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-Hai; Liu, W. T.

    2015-11-01

    This study explores the influence of the cold pool in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) to cross-shelf sea surface slope by fitting an annual harmonic to temperature and salinity profiles from 1993 to 2012 and compares to the 20 year averaged altimetry sea level anomaly (SLA). The consistency within the bottom temperature, thermal steric height, total steric height, and altimetry observation validates that the cold pool induces a depressed sea level in the middle shelf overlapping with the dominant surface seasonal cycles. Temporally, the cold pool pattern is most apparent in July and August as a result of magnitude competition between the thermal and haline steric height. In addition, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) is employed to reconstruct the altimetry SLA and reveals the middle-shelf depression pattern from single year's SLA data. The locations of the SLA depression from 1993 to 2012 agree with the cold pool locations identified from in situ measurements, suggesting a promising application of altimetry SLA in the cold pool study. Conclusively, this study reveals the modulation of the cross-shelf sea level variation by the cold pool, and contributes to the understanding of the sea level response to water masses on the continental shelf.

  8. Simulation analysis of moored fluorometer time series from the Mid-Atlantic Bight during 1987--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the previous research during 1987-1990 within the DOE (Department of Energy) Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program in the Mid-Atlantic Bight was to understand the physical and biogeochemical processes effecting the diffusive exchange of the proxies of energy-related, by-products associated with particulate matter between estuarine, shelf, and slope waters on this continental margin. As originally envisioned in the SEEP program plan, SEEP-III would take place at Cape Hatteras to study the advective exchange of materials by a major boundary current. One problem of continuing interest is the determination of the local assimilative capacity of slope waters and sediments off the eastern seaboard of the US to lengthen the pathway between potentially harmful energy by-products and man. At basin scales, realistic specification of the lateral transport by western boundary currents of particulate matter is a necessary input to global models of carbon/nitrogen cycling. Finally, at these global scales, the generic role of continental margins in cycling greenhouse gases, e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O, is now of equal interest. This continuing research of model construction and evaluation within the SEEP program focuses on all three questions at local, regional, and basin scales. Results from SEEP-I and II are discussed as well as plans for SEEP-III. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Long-term impact of bottom trawling on pelagic-benthic coupling in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine; Janssen, Felix; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Holtappels, Moritz; Schueckel, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The southern North Sea, and the German Bight, has been systematically bottom-trawled at least since the late 19th century (Christiansen, 2009; Reiss et al., 2009; Kröncke 2011; Emeis et al., 2015, Neumann et al., 2016). As a result, benthic habitats and benthic biogenic structures created by bivalves, polychaetes and hydroids where destroyed or reduced. The parallel removal of hard substrate (gravel and boulders) avoids the resettlement of hard-substrate depended species. For example, the Oyster ground, a huge oyster bank a hundred years ago (Olsen, 1883), turned into a muddy depression today. In addition, shallow depth of max 40 m, strong tidal currents and frequent storms result in a high-energy environment with low sedimentation rates and recurrent sediment resuspension. The decrease in benthic filtering capacity by disturbance in epifauna and bottom roughness (Callaway et al., 2007) apparently influence pelagic-benthic coupling of biogeochemical fluxes. Heip et al. (1995) indicate that benthic respiration at depths prevailing in the German Bight accounts for 10-40% of total respiration, whereas pelagic respiration accounts for 60-90%. Previous estimates are in the middle of this range (Heip et al., 1995). To test these hypotheses and to assess the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes, and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization, we measured pelagic production and respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic fluxes using chamber landers, we did ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores and analysed still images from a towed benthic video sled. In addition, O2 fluxes in permeable sediments were estimated by integrating the volumetric rate measurements of the upper sediment layer over in-situ microsensor-measured O2 penetration depth. Our current results show significant seasonality in benthic respiration, with highest rates in summer and lowest rates in winter. No significant differences in total benthic respiration rates

  10. The recent arrival of the oceanic isopod Idotea metallica Bosc off Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea): an indication of a warming trend in the North Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, H.-D.; Gutow, L.; Janke, M.

    1998-09-01

    In 1988 a long-term study was started of the isopod fauna associated with surface drift material off Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea). In the summer of 1994 specimens of Idotea metallica Bosc were recorded for the first time. There is no evidence that this species has ever been present in the German Bight before. The samples contained males, both gravid and non-gravid females, and juveniles, indicating that the species reproduced successfully in the Helgoland region. Interbreeding of specimens from Helgoland and the western Mediterranean produced fertile off-spring. As a neustonic species, I. metallica shows a high natural capacity for dispersal. It thus seems unlikely that the arrival of the species in the North Sea resulted from an accidental introduction by man. We are probably witnessing an extension of the species’ geographical range by natural means of dispersal, as a response to recent changes in the ecological conditions of the German Bight. Temperature data measured by the Biologische Anstalt Helgoland since 1962 show that the last decade (except 1996) was characterized by unusually mild winters. Following the severe winter of 1996, I. metallica was again absent from the Helgoland region. After the subsequent mild winters (1997 and 1998), however, the species reappeared in the summer of 1998 with higher numbers than ever before. This suggests that the observed phenomena are closely connected with the recent temperature anomalies. I. metallica can be regarded as a potential immigrant to a warmer North Sea, and may be useful as a sensitive indicator of the predicted long-term warming trend.

  11. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight.

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    Miodeli Nogueira Júnior

    Full Text Available The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45'S; 47°33'W and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW in the lower layer (>70 m; warm (>20°C Tropical Water in the upper 40 m; and an intermediate thermocline with a deep chlorophyll-a maximum layer (0.3-0.6 mg m-3. Two distinct general patterns were observed, emphasizing the role of (i physical and (ii biological processes: (i a strong influence of the vertical stratification, with most zooplankton absent or little abundant in the lower layer. The influence of the cold SACW on the bottom layer apparently restricted the vertical occupation of most species, which typically inhabit epipelagic warm waters. Even among migratory species, only a few (Aglaura hemistoma, Abylopsis tetragona eudoxids, Beroe sp., Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis crossed the thermocline and reached the bottom layer. (ii A general tendency of partial migrations, with variable intensity depending on the different species and developmental stages; populations tended to be more widely distributed through the water column during daylight, and to become more aggregated in the upper layer during the night, which can be explained based on the idea of the "hunger-satiation hypothesis", maximizing feeding and minimizing the chances of being predated.

  12. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea) in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Codina, Juan Carlos Ugaz

    2015-01-01

    The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore) in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45'S; 47°33'W) and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) in the lower layer (>70 m); warm (>20°C) Tropical Water in the upper 40 m; and an intermediate thermocline with a deep chlorophyll-a maximum layer (0.3-0.6 mg m-3). Two distinct general patterns were observed, emphasizing the role of (i) physical and (ii) biological processes: (i) a strong influence of the vertical stratification, with most zooplankton absent or little abundant in the lower layer. The influence of the cold SACW on the bottom layer apparently restricted the vertical occupation of most species, which typically inhabit epipelagic warm waters. Even among migratory species, only a few (Aglaura hemistoma, Abylopsis tetragona eudoxids, Beroe sp., Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis) crossed the thermocline and reached the bottom layer. (ii) A general tendency of partial migrations, with variable intensity depending on the different species and developmental stages; populations tended to be more widely distributed through the water column during daylight, and to become more aggregated in the upper layer during the night, which can be explained based on the idea of the "hunger-satiation hypothesis", maximizing feeding and minimizing the chances of being predated. PMID:26637179

  13. Mapping and Monitoring of Dynamic Seafloor Features with Hydroacoustic Devices in Sandy Coastal Areas (German Bight, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenmeier, S.; Mielck, F.; Hass, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand marine ecosystems and to provide basic data for a sustainable management in these vulnerable areas, seafloor mapping has become increasingly important. Since the knowledge regarding the seabed environments and their dynamics are still sparse, new mapping techniques have evolved in the last years and hydroacoustic devices became an important tool for quick and reliable mapping. In 2007 we started a monitoring program in the German Bight (North Sea) using sidescan sonar (Imagenex YellowFin, 330 kHz) in a study site comprising approximately 1,500 km2. In subsequent years, the area was mapped repeatedly with a resolution of ~25 cm. For ground truthing, several hundred sediment samples were taken. The investigations reveal that the area is mainly characterized by fine to coarse sand which is arranged in different seafloor features such as subaquatic dunes or relicts of Pleistocene moraines. While the alignment and position of the moraines was stable throughout the years, the dunes can be highly dynamic. Their migration indicates the amount of sediment transport in these areas. Some seafloor features could be identified as so-called sorted bedforms, which are spatially-grain-size-sorted patterns on the seafloor consisting of small rippled medium sand surrounded by smooth fine sand. These flow-transverse features are morphological linked to ridges and depressions and are further maintained by ebb and flood currents of almost equal strengths. The medium sand is separated from the fine sand by sharp boundaries in all directions which were generated by the bidirectional flow field. The extend and alignment of the sorted bedforms seem to be relatively stable in a time frame of 6 years, however small-scale variabilities up to serveral meters could be detected. We suppose that these processes mainly occur during storm surges while the fine-sand layers are winnowed away and hence the shapes of the bedforms changes.

  14. Analysis of phytoplankton distribution and community structure in the German Bight with respect to the different size classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Wiltshire, Karen Helen; Petersen, Wilhelm; Metfies, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of phytoplankton biodiversity, ecology, and biogeography is crucial for understanding marine ecosystems. Research is often carried out on the basis of microscopic observations, but due to the limitations of this approach regarding detection and identification of picophytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm), these investigations are mainly focused on the microphytoplankton (20-200 μm). In the last decades, various methods based on optical and molecular biological approaches have evolved which enable a more rapid and convenient analysis of phytoplankton samples and a more detailed assessment of small phytoplankton. In this study, a selection of these methods (in situ fluorescence, flow cytometry, genetic fingerprinting, and DNA microarray) was placed in complement to light microscopy and HPLC-based pigment analysis to investigate both biomass distribution and community structure of phytoplankton. As far as possible, the size classes were analyzed separately. Investigations were carried out on six cruises in the German Bight in 2010 and 2011 to analyze both spatial and seasonal variability. Microphytoplankton was identified as the major contributor to biomass in all seasons, followed by the nanophytoplankton. Generally, biomass distribution was patchy, but the overall contribution of small phytoplankton was higher in offshore areas and also in areas exhibiting higher turbidity. Regarding temporal development of the community, differences between the small phytoplankton community and the microphytoplankton were found. The latter exhibited a seasonal pattern regarding number of taxa present, alpha- and beta-diversity, and community structure, while for the nano- and especially the picophytoplankton, a general shift in the community between both years was observable without seasonality. Although the reason for this shift remains unclear, the results imply a different response of large and small phytoplankton to environmental influences.

  15. On the mass and salt budgets for a region of the continental shelf in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Yin; Weatherly, Georges L.; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.

    2001-12-01

    Two field studies were conducted across and along the continental shelf, one from February to May 1996 (deployment 1) and the other from July to October 1996 (deployment 2), in part to determine the mass and salt budgets of shelf water from south of Cape Henry to north of Cape Hatteras, the southernmost portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The temporal means of current meter records indicated that most of the water enters the region across its northern boundary near the shelf break as part of a southward, alongshore current and exits the southeast corner as a southeastward flowing current. Estimates of the volume transports indicated that not all the transport across the northern boundary was accounted for by transport across the southern boundary, and that the remainder occurred as a broad, diffusive flow across the eastern boundary at the shelf break. Time series of volume transport across northern and southern boundaries were very similar and associated with variations in the alongshore wind stress and sea level, indicative of a geostrophic balance. Examination of the individual current meter records indicated these fluctuations were very barotropic even during deployment 2, which included the stratified summer season. Time series of the volume transport across the eastern boundary at the shelf break strongly mirrored the volume transport across the northern boundary minus that across the southern boundary, suggesting that the inferred eastern boundary transport was real and accommodated whatever the southern boundary could not. The turbulent salt flux across each boundary contributes very little to the net respective mass fluxes because the salt fluxes are almost governed by current velocity fields. The instantaneous and mean salt fluxes across each boundary were very well approximated by the instantaneous and mean volume transports across the boundary times the deployment average salinity across that boundary, respectively. The Ocean Margins Program (OMP) moored

  16. The barred grunt Conodon nobilis (Perciformes: Haemulidae) in shallow areas of a tropical bight: spatial and temporal distribution, body growth and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Maíra; Denadai, Márcia Regina; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flávia Borges; de Faria, Vanessa Hermann; Turra, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the population biology of Conodon nobilis (Perciformes, Haemulidae) in Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. Monthly trawls were performed from October 2003 through October 2004 in two areas of the bight that are similar to but distant from each other, South and North. For all specimens, the size was measured and the sex and reproductive stage identified. Abundance and size were compared over areas and months. Body growth parameters were parameterized according to the Von Bertalanffy growth function. The stomach contents were identified and quantified. C. nobilis occurred mainly in the North area and showed an erratic pattern of abundance over time. Several cohorts entered in different periods, but very few large and mature individuals were observed. The results indicate a preference for shallow, ocean-influenced habitats and some degree of segregation between young and older individuals. The species showed a distribution consistent with an r-strategist species, with high abundance and a high growth constant ( K = 0.68 year-1 and L max = 34.2 cm). Both the relative length of the digestive tube and the prey items indicated a carnivorous feeding habit; mysids were the main item of the diet throughout the study period, indicating that this grunt is a specialist feeder. Other frequently observed items were amphipods and fish fragments. Ingestion of scales is possibly intentional.

  17. Temporal and spatial patterns in wind stress and wind stress curl over the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Rosenfeld, Leslie K.; Robertson, George L.

    2012-04-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, together with several other federal and municipal agencies, began a series of field programs to determine along and cross-shelf transport patterns over the continental shelves in the central Southern California Bight. As a part of these programs, moorings that monitor winds were deployed off the Palos Verdes peninsula and within San Pedro Bay for six 3-4 month summer and winter periods between 2001 and 2008. In addition, nearly continuous records of winds for this 7-year period were obtained from a terrestrial site at the coast and from a basin site offshore of the long-term coastal site. The mean annual winds are downcoast at all sites. The alongshelf components of wind stress, which are the largest part of the low-frequency wind stress fields, are well correlated between basin, shelf and coastal sites. On average, the amplitude of alongshelf fluctuations in wind stress are 3-4 times larger over the offshore basin, compared to the coastal site, irrespective of whether the fluctuations represent the total, or just the correlated portion of the wind stress field. The curl in the large-scale wind stress tends to be positive, especially in the winter season when the mean wind stress is downcoast and larger at the offshore basin site than at the beach. However, since the fluctuation in wind stress amplitudes are usually larger than the mean, periods of weak negative curl do occur, especially in the summer season when the largest normalized differences in the amplitude of wind stress fluctuations are found in the nearshore region of the coastal ocean. Even though the low-frequency wind stress field is well-correlated over the continental shelf and offshore basins, out to distances of 35 km or more from the coast, winds even 10 km inshore of the beach do not represent the coastal wind field, at least in the summer months. The seasonal changes in the spatial structures in wind stress amplitudes suggest that an assessment of the

  18. Influence of tides on the sea breeze in the German Bight: How much model complexity is needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischereit, Jana; Heinke Schlünzen, K.; Gierisch, Andrea M. U.; Grawe, David; Petrik, Ronny; Hübner, Udo; Backhaus, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The state of the atmosphere near the coast is affected by the interaction of atmosphere and ocean. Thus, in order to predict the state of the atmosphere in coastal areas correctly, different oceanic characteristics and processes need to be considered. The goal of the present study is to identify whether tidal effects are relevant for the prediction of sea breezes at the German North Sea coast. For that an atmosphere model was extended to simulate the ocean in different complexities, leading to a coupled ocean-atmosphere-model. In contrast to many other studies the present study considers a two-way-coupling for momentum. That is, the simulation not only consideres a transfer of momentum from the atmosphere to the ocean but also a transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere. The model system is tested for a sea breeze situation, which is a common phenomenon in the German Bight in May and June. Six different scenarios with a grid size of 1.5 km are calculated: Inundated/dry mudflats for the entire simulation, high/low tide at Heligoland at midday and high/low tide at Heligoland at midday with a two-way-coupling for momentum. Tides influence sea breezes in two ways. Firstly, they influence the heat budget in coastal areas, as mudflats are inundated and fall dry. The study reveals that the air temperature in 10 m height follows the tidal cycle and thus reflects an inundated scenario during high tide and a dry scenario during low tide, respectively. Because of the alternation of the air temperature above the mudflats, the temperature gradient between land and sea areas is influenced, which modifies the sea breeze development. A time difference of one hour is found for the formation of the sea breeze front and its related cloud formation between those scenarios where low tide and high tide occur at midday respectively. Also the inland penetration of sea breezes is influenced by tides: with incoming tide their fronts are moved further inland. Secondly, tidal currents

  19. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean and others from 1992-10-19 to 2001-12-12 (NODC Accession 0115153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115153 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from 1998-02-28 to 1998-04-01 (NODC Accession 0115154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115154 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean...

  1. Analysis of Thematic Mapper data for studying the suspended matter distribution in the coastal area of the German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerffer, R.; Fischer, J.; Stoessel, M.; Brockmann, C.; Grassl, H.

    1989-01-01

    Thematic Mapper data were analyzed with respect to its capability for mapping the complex structure and dynamics of suspended matter distribution in the coastal area of the German Bight (North Sea). Three independent pieces of information were found by factor analysis of all seven TM channels: suspended matter concentration, atmospheric scattering, and sea surface temperature. For the required atmospheric correction, the signal-to-noise ratios of Channels 5 and 7 have to be improved by averaging over 25 x 25 pixels, which also makes it possible to monitor the aerosol optical depth and aerosol type over cloud-free water surfaces. Near-surface suspended matter concentrations may be detected with an accuracy of factor less than 2 by using an algorithm derived from radiative transfer model calculation. The patchiness of suspended matter and its relation to underwater topography was analyzed with autocorrelation and cross-correlation.

  2. Biological interactions and their role in community structure in the rocky intertidal of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Klaus

    1990-06-01

    Over 3 successive seasonal cycles (April 1986 to October 1988), field experiments were established within 3 intertidal levels in the sheltered rocky intertidal of Helgoland (North Sea, German Bight). Competitors for space ( Mytilus edulis, macroalgae), herbivores ( Littorina spp.) and predators ( Carcinus maenas) were either excluded from areas (0.25 m2) covered by undisturbed communities or enclosed at natural densities on areas that were cleared before of animals and plants. All the experimental fields (each 0.25 m2) were covered by cages with 4 mm gauze at the sides and a plexiglas top. The results of the experiments in the upper intertidal (occupied by Littorina spp. and Enteromorpha) showed that a natural density of herbivores could not prevent algal settlement and had only little influence on algal growth. Instead abiotic factors (storms, algae washed ashore) decreased the stock of the green algae. Experiments in the mid intertidal, dominated by Mytilus (50% cover), Fucus spp. (20%) and grazing L. littorea (100 ind. m-2) showed that community structure was directly changed both by grazing periwinkles and by competition for space between mussels and macroalgae. Whenever Littorina was excluded, the canopy of Fucus spp. increased continuously and reached total cover within two years. In addition to the increase of Fucus spp., the rock surface and the mussel shells were overgrown by Ulva pseudocurvata, which covered the experimental fields during parts of the summer in the absence of herbivores. As soon as perennial species (fucoids) covered most of the experimental areas, the seasonal growth of Ulva decreased drastically. Presence and growth of macroalgae were also controlled by serious competition for space with mussels. Established Mytilus prevented the growth of all perennial and ephemeral algae on the rocks. However, the shells of the mussels provided free space for a new settlement of Fucus and Ulva. In the lower intertidal (dominated by total algal cover

  3. Seismo-acoustic imaging of marine hard substrate habitats: a case study from the German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2016-04-01

    comparably small foot print which results in high spatial resolution (decimeter in the xyz directions) and hence allows a more precise demarcation of hard substrate areas. Data for this study were recorded in the "Sylt Outer Reef" (German Bight, North Sea) in May 2013 and March 2015. The investigated area is characterized by heterogeneously distributed moraine deposits and rippled coarse sediments partly draped with Holocene fine sands. The relict sediments and the rippled coarse sediments indicate both high backscatter intensities but can be distinguished by means of the hyperbola locations. The northeast of the study area is dominated by rippled coarse sediments (without hyperbolas) and the southwestern part by relict sediments with a high amount of stones represented by hyperbolas which is also proven by extensive ground-truthing (grab sampling and high quality underwater videos). An automated procedure to identify and export the hyperbola positions makes the demarcation of hard substrate grounds (here: relict sediments) reproducible, faster and less complex in comparison to the visual-manual identification on the basis of sidescan sonar data.

  4. Distribution and Mass Inventories of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE in the Water Column of the Southern California Bight, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, E. Y.; Peng, J.; Tsukada, D.; Diehl, D.; Noblet, J.; Schiff, K.

    2005-05-01

    As part of the Southern California Bight(SCB) 2003 Regional Marine Monitoring Survey (Bight' 03), we examined the concentrations and distribution patterns of p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE in the water columns at randomly-selected sites throughout SCB using solid phase microextraction (SPME) technique. The technique involves deployment of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated fibers at certain depths of the water column for a prolonged time (3 weeks or longer). The fibers were then retrieved and analyzed by GC-MS, and water column concentrations of DDTs were calculated based on an equilibrium partitioning between water and PDMS coating. Our results showed that p,p'-DDE concentrations were in the range of 0.05-0.22ng/L, and 0.005-0.036 for o,p'-DDE. For p,p'-DDE, there is a general increasing trend toward the sediment-water interface. Santa Monica Bay contains the highest concentrations of both p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE, indicative of the influence of `hot spots' at Palos Verdes Shelf. Concentrations of DDTs were lower in San Pedro Shelf and Santa Barbara Basin, and were mostly under detection limit in other areas. The results showed that water column DDT concentrations have decreased significantly compared with previous investigations, but a constant source of DDTs from sediment to the overlying water column is still significant. The spatial distribution patterns of water column p,p'-DDE and o,p'-DDE suggest that the Palos Verdes Shelf remains a dominant source of DDT contamination to the SCB. Based on the spatial data, we estimated that the total mass of DDTs in the entire SCB is rather low ( under 1 kg). The annual loss of DDTs from SCB to the open ocean should be about tens of kg. Based on the historical trend of the DDT input into SCB since the 1970s, SCB should have contributed considerable amount of DDTs to the open ocean.

  5. Population dynamics and diet of the madamango Sea catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 (Siluriformes: Ariidae in a tropical bight in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Denadai

    Full Text Available The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae, is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16 corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z was 1.01 yr(-1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

  6. Atmospheric concentrations and size distributions of aircraft-sampled Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn over the southern bight of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injuk, J.; Otten, Ph.; Laane, R.; Maenhaut, W.; Van Grieken, R.

    In an effort to assess the atmospheric input of heavy metals to the Southern Bight of the North Sea, aircraft-based aerosol samplings in the lower troposphere were performed between September 1988 and October 1989. Total atmospheric particulate and size-differentiated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were determined as a function of altitude, wind direction, air-mass history and season. The obtained data are compared with results of ship-based measurements carried out previously and with literature values of Cu, Pb and Zn, for the marine troposphere of the southern North Sea. The results point out the high variability of the concentrations with the meterological conditions, as well as with time and location. The experimentally found particle size distribution are bimodal with a significant difference in fractions of small and large particles. These large aerosol particles have a direct and essential impact on the air-to-sea transfer of anthropogenic trace metals, in spite of their low numerical abundance and relatively low heavy metal content.

  7. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  8. Seasonal and interannual variability of physical and biological dynamics at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight: nutrient supply mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. He

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution, 3-dimensional coupled biophysical model is used to simulate ocean circulation and ecosystem variations at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB. Favorable comparisons between satellite observations and model hindcast solutions from January 2004 to November 2007 indicate the model has intrinsic skills in resolving fundamental physical and biological dynamics at the MAB shelfbreak. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean physical and biological states and their driving mechanisms are further analyzed. The domain-wide upper water column nutrient content is found to peak in late winter-early spring. Phytoplankton spring bloom starts 1–2 months later, followed by zooplankton bloom in early summer. Our analysis shows the variability of shelfbreak nutrient supply is controlled by local mixing that deepens the mixed layer and injects deep ocean nutrients into the upper water column and alongshore nutrient transport by the shelfbreak jet and associated currents. Nutrient vertical advection associated with the shelfbreak bottom boundary layer convergence is another significant contributor. Spring mean nutrient budget diagnostics along the Nantucket transect are compared between nutrient rich 2004 and nutrient poor 2007. Physical advection and diffusion play the major role in determining strong interannual variations in shelfbreak nutrient content. The biological (source minus sink term is very similar between these two years.

  9. Sources, fate, and pathways of Leeuwin Current water in the Indian Ocean and Great Australian Bight: A Lagrangian study in an eddy-resolving ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yit Sen Bull, Christopher; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The Leeuwin Current is the dominant circulation feature in the eastern Indian Ocean, transporting tropical and subtropical water southward. While it is known that the Leeuwin Current draws its water from a multitude of sources, existing Indian Ocean circulation schematics have never quantified the fluxes of tropical and subtropical source water flowing into the Leeuwin Current. This paper uses virtual Lagrangian particles to quantify the transport of these sources along the Leeuwin Current's mean pathway. Here the pathways and exchange of Leeuwin Current source waters across six coastally bound sectors on the south-west Australian coast are analyzed. This constitutes the first quantitative assessment of Leeuwin Current pathways within an offline, 50 year integration time, eddy-resolving global ocean model simulation. Along the Leeuwin Current's pathway, we find a mean poleward transport of 3.7 Sv in which the tropical sources account for 60-78% of the transport. While the net transport is small, we see large transports flowing in and out of all the offshore boundaries of the Leeuwin Current sectors. Along the Leeuwin Current's pathway, we find that water from the Indonesian Throughflow contributes 50-66% of the seasonal signal. By applying conditions on the routes particles take entering the Leeuwin Current, we find particles are more likely to travel offshore north of 30°S, while south of 30°S, particles are more likely to continue downstream. We find a 0.2 Sv pathway of water from the Leeuwin Current's source regions, flowing through the entire Leeuwin Current pathway into the Great Australian Bight.

  10. In Situ Measurements of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Coastal Waters of the Southern California Bight with a Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME)-Based Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, E. Y.; Tsukada, D.; Diehl, D.; Noblet, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Global distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have become an increasingly significant topic in environmental research, as POPs are potential agents of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity to both humans and non-human species. One of the important transport mechanisms for POPs is advection and dispersion from point sources via oceanic currents. Therefore, measurements of POPs in open coastal waters can provide key information about the global geochemical cycling of POPs. However, because concentrations of POPs in ocean waters are typically in sub-ppt (ng/L) levels or lower, accurate measurement of ambient concentrations is challenging. To obtain sufficient mass that can be detected by current analytical instrumentation, extremely large water volumes (e.g., thousands of liters) have to be processed. Such large sample volumes represent a practical impediment for regional-scale sampling efforts. In an attempt to improve our ability to study the fate of POPs in oceanic environments, we have developed an in-situ sampling approach based on the technique of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and tested it at several coastal locations within the Southern California Bight. A custom-made SPME sampler consists of a polydimethylsioxane-coated (100-μm thickness) fiber supported on a stainless steel needle and a copper cage shielding the SPME assembly (to slow bacterial growth). We were able to deploy a large number of the samplers simultaneously at different locations and water depths known to contain varying concentrations of DDTs. The SPME samplers were retrieved after about 15 to 30 days of deployment, and the organics partitioned on the SPME fibers were analyzed with GC/MS under optimized chromatographic conditions suitable for SPME analysis. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE (the most dominant component of all DDTs) measured by the in situ SPME approach were very similar as a function of water depth and spatial location as concentrations previously measured

  11. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  12. Response of the Bight of Benin (Gulf of Guinea, West Africa) coastline to anthropogenic and natural forcing, Part1: Wave climate variability and impacts on the longshore sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almar, R.; Kestenare, E.; Reyns, J.; Jouanno, J.; Anthony, E. J.; Laibi, R.; Hemer, M.; Du Penhoat, Y.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2015-11-01

    The short, medium and long-term evolution of the sandy coastline of the Bight of Benin in the Gulf of Guinea, West Africa, has become a major regional focal point due to the rapid socio-economic development that is occurring in the region, including rapid urbanization and a sharp increase in harbor-based trade. Harbors have a significant impact on the present evolution of this coast, notably by affecting longshore sediment transport. However, little is known of the environmental drivers, notably the wave climate, that governs longshore sediment transport and the ensuing pattern of shoreline evolution of this coastal zone. This article aims to address this important knowledge gap by providing a general overview of coastal evolution in the Bight of Benin and the physical processes that control this evolution. Here, the 1979-2012 ERA-Interim hindcast is used to understand the temporal dynamics of longshore sediment transport. Oblique waves (annual average Hs=1.36 m, Tp=9.6 s, S-SW incidence) drive an eastward drift of approximately 500,000 m3/yr. The waves driving this large longshore transport can be separated into two components with distinct origins and behavior: wind waves generated locally in the Gulf of Guinea and swell waves generated in the southern hemisphere sub- (30-35°S), and extra-tropics (45-60°S). The analysis undertaken here shows that the contribution to the gross annual longshore transport from swell wave-driven longshore currents is an order of magnitude larger than the local wind wave-driven longshore currents. Swell waves are dominantly generated by westerlies in the 40-60°S zone and to a lesser extent by trade winds at 30-35°S. The longshore sediment drift decay (-5% over 1979-2012) is found to be linked with a decrease in the intensity of westerly winds associated with their southward shift, in addition to a strengthening of the trade winds, which reduces the eastward sediment transport potential. The equatorial fluctuation of the Inter

  13. The complex influences of back-barrier deposition, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in barrier island response to sea-level rise: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Owen T.; Moore, Laura J.; Murray, A. Brad

    2015-10-01

    To understand the relative importance of back barrier environment, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in determining barrier island response to RSLR (relative sea-level rise), we use a morphological-behavior model (GEOMBEST) to conduct a series of sensitivity experiments, based on late-Holocene hindcast simulations of an island in the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (Metompkin Island, VA) having both salt marsh and lagoonal back-barrier environments, and we draw comparisons between these results and future simulations (2000-2100 AD) of island response to RSLR. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, as a whole, the island is highly sensitive to factors that reduce overall sand availability (i.e., high sand-loss rates and substrates containing little sand). Results also indicate that for all predicted future RSLR scenarios tested, islands having high substrate sand proportions (if allowed to migrate freely) will likely remain subaerial for centuries because of sufficient substrate sand supply and elevation to assist in keeping islands above sea level. Simulation results also lead to basic insights regarding the interactions among substrate slope, back-barrier deposition and island migration rates. In contrast to previous studies, which suggest that changes in substrate slope directly affect the island migration trajectory, we find that-in the presence of back-barrier deposition-the connection between substrate slope and island behavior is modulated (i.e., variability in migration rates is dampened) by changes in back-barrier width. These interactions-which tend to produce changes in shoreface sand content-lead to a negative feedback when the back-barrier deposit contains less sand than the underlying layer, resulting in a stable back-barrier width. Alternatively, a positive feedback arises when the back-barrier deposit contains more sand than the underlying layer, resulting in either back-barrier disappearance or perpetual widening.

  14. Trace element geochemistry of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes research conducted during the past year under DOE Contract EY-76-S-09-0890. During this time, studies have been continued in the mid to outer continental shelf region. We have also initiated nearshore studies designed to elucidate processes influencing the fate of trace elements in estuaries and the coastal frontal zone. A smaller effort has been concerned with preliminary geochemical studies of uranium-thorium natural decay series radionuclides and with improvement, calibration, and expansion of our trace element laboratory procedures

  15. Phycoerythrin-containing picoplankton in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Jackie L.; Palenik, Brian

    2003-08-01

    Flow cytometry was used to examine the distribution of phycoerythrin-rich picophytoplankton, referred to here as Synechococcus, off the Southern California coast during six California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) cruises. Depth profiles revealed that Synechococcus was most abundant in the surface mixed layer, gradually disappearing with depth below the thermocline. Within the surface mixed layer, Synechococcus abundance was generally greater and more variable at stations shoreward of the California Current than at stations offshore of it. In waters associated with the California Current not impacted by upwelling, Synechococcus abundance increased with increasing bulk chlorophyll. In contrast, Synechococcus abundance declined with increasing bulk chlorophyll at stations that were impacted by upwelling. Synechococcus at stations impacted by upwelling also had more phycoerythrin per cell than at non-upwelling stations. Offshore of the California Current, Synechococcus cells in waters intruding from the Central North Pacific displayed higher side-scatter relative to forward scatter than did Synechococcus cells elsewhere in the region. Flow cytometrically distinct Synechococcus cell types were also detected below the thermocline at most of the stations where depth profiles were analyzed. These patterns in Synechococcus abundance and cellular characteristics might reflect physiological and/or genetic differences among Synechococcus associated with the various water masses that comprise the CalCOFI region. The data presented here provide a framework from which to launch more detailed and mechanistic studies examining the role of Synechococcus in the CalCOFI ecosystem.

  16. New York Bight sub-estuaries Study following Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs,...

  17. Southern California Bight Sea Level Response to Local Atmospheric Forcing

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, T C-Y; Flick, R E; D. R. Cayan; Talley, L D

    1988-01-01

    In terms of loss of life and property damage, storm induced coastal flooding has become the world's foremost natural hazard. As atmospheric weather systems pass over ocean areas, water level oscillations are induced both by the wind stress and the horizontal gradients in atmospheric pressure associated with such systems. Storm surge is by definition restricted to the storm induced oscillations of water level with periods ranging from a few minutes to a few days. This definition excludes the w...

  18. A high resolution water level forecast for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal regions worldwide are potentially endangered by storm surges which can cause disastrous damages and loss of life. Due to climate change induced sea level rise, an accumulation of such events is expected by the end of the 21th century. Therefore, advanced storm surge warnings are needed to be prepared when another storm surge hits the coast. In the shallow southeastern North Sea these storm surge warnings are nowadays routinely provided for selected tide gauge locations along a coastline through state-of-the-art forecast systems, which are based on a coupled system of empirical tidal predictions and numerical storm surge forecasts. Along the German North Sea coastline, the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency in cooperation with the German Weather Service is responsible for the storm surge warnings. They provide accurate, high frequency and real-time water level forecasts for up to six days ahead at selected tide gauge sites via internet, telephone and broadcast. Since water levels along the German North Sea coastline are dominated by shallow water effects and a very complex bathymetric structure of the seabed, the pointwise forecast is not necessarily transferable to un-gauged areas between the tide gauges. Here we aim to close this existing gap and develop water level forecasts with a high spatial (continuously with a resolution of at least 1 kilometer) as well as a high temporal (at least 15-minute values) resolution along the entire German North Sea coastline. We introduce a new methodology for water level forecasts which combines empirical or statistical and numerical models. While the tidal forecast is performed by non-parametric interpolation techniques between un-gauged and gauged sites, storm surges are estimated on the basis of statistical/empirical storm surge formulas taken from a numerical model hindcast. The procedure will be implemented in the operational mode forced with numerical weather forecasts.

  19. Estimation of The Physico-Chemical Parameters in Marine Environment (Yumurtalik Bight- Iskenderun Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Tamer Kayaalp

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate the temperature, light intensity, salinity, Dissolved O2 (DO, pH values and the biotic parameter chlorophyll- a in the water column related with the depth. Because, the physico-chemical parameters affect greatly both primary and secondary producers in marine life. For this purpose the physico-chemical properties were determined day and night for 40 meter depth during the eight days. The means were compared by using the analysis of variance method and Duncan’s Multiple Comparison Test. Also physico-chemical parameters were estimated by using the analysis of regression and correlation. The effect of temperature and salinity were found significant according to the result of the analysis of variance during the day. Also the similar results were found for the night. While the effect of the depth on the chloropyll-a a was significant in the night, the effect of the depth on the DO was not significant in the day and night. The correlations among the depth and the parameters were defined. It was found the negative correlation between the depth and the temperature and light intensity. Determination coefficient of the model for salinity was also found different for day time. The correlation values among the depth and the temperature, salinity and pH were found different for the night.

  20. Canyon and channel networks of Peru-Chile fore arc at Arica Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulbourn, W.T. (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Canyons and channels of the Peru-Chile fore arc between 17{degree}30'S to 19{degree}30'S form a complex, integrated network revealed in SeaMARC II side-scan mosaics. The largest canyon, incised 200-600 m, is bordered by a series of sidewall slumps, producing a sinuosity that mimics subaerial meanders. The canyon courses across the Arequipa fore-arc basin floor, across a structural high and onto the middle trench slope to about 4,000 m where it disappears into a background of complex small-scale structures, From 500-2,500 m depth the canyon strikes north-south oblique to the regional slope. At 2,500 m, it abruptly turns to the southwest toward the trench axis. At this elbow, a second canyon heads on the midslope and also trends north-south until 3,500 m, where it too abruptly changes to a southwest course. A history of stream piracy analogous to subaerial systems is implied in this geometry. Tributaries join this main canyon from the landward side, forming a dendritic pattern. These channels have levees which are linked by submarine crevasse splays to sediment waves on the Arequipa basin floor. The orientation of the waves is reminiscent of bow waves from a passing ship, oblique to channel and pointing downslope, and may provide an indication of the vertical extent of passing turbidity currents. Sediments are dominantly olive gray, hemipelagic silts with sands present only immediately adjacent to the canyons. Boulders of mudstone line portions of the canyon floor. Sands are absent from the lowermost slope and trench axis, as are any indications of submarine fans. Sands may be rare in this system, with those that are present kneaded into the active margin system along the lower trench slope.

  1. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads;

    2010-01-01

    contours immediately off the shelf–slope break. They are asymmetrical, showing up-slope migration, and mainly occur in trains. The sediment waves were drilled during ODP leg 182 in 1998, and were interpreted as biogenic reef mounds. New high-quality seismic and multibeam bathymetry data were acquired on...

  2. Seasonal cycling of phosphorus in the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Zee, C.; Chou, L.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the seasonal cycle of nutrients and the phosphorus speciation, i.e. dissolved inorganic and organic phosphorus (DIP and DOP) and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (PIP and POP), for 10 stations in the Belgian coastal zone. The Belgian part of the southern North Sea is strongly influenced by the river plumes of the Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. In winter, high nutrient concentrations are observed, whereas in April-May these have all been consumed during the spring b...

  3. 4 meter composite sidescan sonar mosaic of the New York Bight Apex (APEX_OF.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, began a program designed to generate reconnaissance maps of the sea...

  4. Seasonal cycling of phosphorus in the southern bight of the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chou

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the seasonal cycle of nutrients and the phosphorus speciation, i.e. dissolved inorganic and organic phosphorus (DIP and DOP and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (PIP and POP, for 10 stations in the Belgian coastal zone. The Belgian part of the southern North Sea is strongly influenced by the river plumes of the Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. In winter, high nutrient concentrations are observed, whereas in April-May these have all been consumed during the spring bloom and silica or phosphorus limitation develops. The phosphate concentrations increase rapidly again in summer-fall, whereas nitrate and silicate return to their winter values much later. This shows the efficient phosphorus recycling that takes place in the water column. The DOP concentration exhibits two peaks during a seasonal cycle: one in April-May when the phosphate concentration is at its lowest and a second one in fall when the POP content decreases. This indicates two periods of increased phosphorus recycling activity. The seasonal cycle of the DOP is different from that of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON.

  5. Developing a Pilot Maritime Spatial Plan for the Pomeranian Bight and Arkona Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käppeler, Bettina; Toben, Susan; Chmura, Grazyna;

    2012-01-01

    , Germany and Sweden, the aims were (1) to identify the main conflicts of use in the pilot area, (2) bring together transboundary approaches for dealing with these, and (3) develop a draft maritime spatial plan that actively supports the principle of sustainable maritime development. Apart from generating......, ice conditions, wind conditions, as well as natural assets such as sea birds, fish and harbour porpoise. This was complemented by a description of demographic trends, the economic situation in the respective coastal regions, international legislation affecting the pilot area, and the existing spatial...... offshore wind farming, tourism and offshore wind farming, and nature conservation and fisheries. The third stage was to test various methods for spatially dealing with the conflicts identified. All these are examples only, which are presented here as potential contributions to decision support. Marxan...

  6. NY_GOME_CONTOURS: New York Bight and Gulf of Maine bathymetric contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This bathymetric shapefile contains 10 m contours for the continental shelf and 100 m beyond the 200 m shelf edge. The contours have been derived from the National...

  7. Dissolved hydrocarbon flux from natural marine seeps to the southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, JF; Washburn, L; Hornafius, JS; Luyendyk, BP

    2000-01-01

    Natural marine seepage near Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara Channel, California, injects large quantities of hydrocarbons into the coastal ocean. The dispersal and source strength of the injected methane, ethane, and propane from this seep field was determined using a variety of oceanographic and geochemical techniques. The results show that hydrocarbons seep into stratified coastal waters creating plumes that extend for at least 12 km. The plume structure is complex because of the large geogra...

  8. The exceptional influence of storm ‘Xaver’ on design water levels in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Ludwig, Patrick; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Design water levels for coastal structures are usually estimated based on extreme value statistics. Since their robustness depends heavily on the sample size of observations, regular statistical updates are needed, especially after extreme events. Here, we demonstrate the exceptional influence of such an event based on storm ‘Xaver’, which caused record breaking water levels for large parts of the southwestern German North Sea coastline on 6 December 2013. We show that the water level estimates for a 1 in 200 years event increased by up to 40 cm due to the update after ‘Xaver’, a value twice as large as the estimated regional sea level rise for the entire 20th century. However, a thorough analysis of different independent meteorological (winds and pressure) and oceanographic components (tides, surges, mean sea level (MSL) anomalies) driving the event reveals that their observed combination does not yet represent the physically possible worst case scenario. Neither tides, nor surges nor MSL anomalies were at their observational maximum, suggesting that there is a realistic risk of a storm like ‘Xaver’ to cause even higher extreme water levels by a few decimetres under current climate conditions. Our results question purely statistical design approaches of coastal structures, which neglect the physical boundary conditions of individual extreme events.

  9. Benthos of a sublittoral sandbank in the Southern Bight of the North Sea: general considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, K.A.; Vanosmael, C.; Claeys, D; Vincx, M.; Heip, C. H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The benthic fauna of the Kwinte Bank, a linear sandbank in the Belgian coastal waters of the North Sea, was sampled on ten stations in September 1978. This sandbank shows a linear gradient from fine sandy sediments in the south to coarser sandy sediments in the north as a result of the tidal current pattern in the region. The influence of this gradient on macro- and meiofauna was studied. Diversity of polychaetes and harpacticoid copepods is correlated with median grain size of the sand fract...

  10. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Osudar, R.; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, M.; Wagner, D.; Bussmann, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 160, July (2015), s. 10-21. ISSN 0272-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-00243S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : methanotrophy * estuary * Elbe River Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2014

  11. Benthos of the Kwinte Bank (an exploited sandbank in the Southern Bight)

    OpenAIRE

    Vanosmael, C.; Willems, K.; Vincx, M.; Claeys, D; C. H. R. Heip

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies on the meio- and macrofauna of a linear subtidal sandbank, the Kwinte Bank, situated in the Belgian Coastal waters, which is exploited for sand and gravel. The distribution of the macrofauna is strongly correlated with the gradient in grain size, but this is much less the case for the meiofauna. Especially nematodes seem to be able to exploit microhabitats more efficiently than the macrofauna.

  12. Turbulence Observations in the Northern Bight of Monterey Bay from a Small AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Louis; Wang, Zhankun

    2009-06-01

    In this manuscript we show that in shallow water an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) can be used to quantify the horizontal and vertical structure of turbulence. We present data obtained during the Layered Organization in the Coastal Ocean (LOCO) experiment, which took place in a very shallow region of Monterey Bay at nighttime in the summer of 2006. The AUV employed was the T-REMUS vehicle, which contains a variety of the microscale and finescale sensors as well as supporting "hotel" sensors which monitor its position and performance. The vehicle was run in a 5-degree yoyo mode and, using the Rockland Microstructure Measurement System (RMMS), was able to obtain direct estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate on a vertical scale of 0.5 m. The yoyo sampling scheme allowed the finestructure and microstructure data to be obtained with an average horizontal sampling distance of 150 m. We examine the spatial structure of turbulence over a horizontal range of 2.5 km and throughout most of the water column, from 1 m from the surface to 4 m above the bottom. Eight hours of such data were collected. The experiment took place during a time period of very light wind forcing, little air sea exchange, and weak tidal flow. Nonetheless, strong turbulence, characterized by a turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate of ɛ > 10 - 7 W/kg and buoyancy Reynolds number of Reb > 10 3, was observed throughout the experimental region. The turbulence, for the most part, was patchy and typically confined to the surface and bottom boundary layer regions. However, towards the end of the experiment a spatially continuous region of turbulence of at least 2.5 km extent was observed in the upper part of the thermocline. This occurred during the time period when an internal wave train appeared in the experimental area. Evidence is presented which suggests that the internal wave induced vertical strain gradient was responsible for producing this turbulent field.

  13. Interannual variability of sorted bedforms in the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielck, F.; Holler, P.; Bürk, D.; Hass, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Sorted bedforms are ubiquitous on the inner continental shelves worldwide. They are described as spatially-grain-size-sorted features consisting of small rippled medium-to-coarse sand and can remain stable for decades. However, the knowledge about their genesis and development is still fragmentary. For this study, a representative investigation area (water depthNorth Sea, Germany) was periodically surveyed with hydroacoustic means (i.e. sidescan sonar, multibeam echo sounder, and sub-bottom profiler) during 2010-2014. Since this area is influenced by tidal and wind-driven currents, the aim was to detect and examine interannual variabilities in the characteristics of the prevailing sorted bedforms. Our measurements reveal sinuous stripes of rippled medium sand which are embedded in shallow symmetrical depressions. These domains are surrounded by relatively smooth fine-sand areas. These sorted bedforms were identified as flow-transverse features that are maintained by ebb and flood currents of almost equal strengths that flow in opposite directions. This bidirectional flow field generates sharp boundaries between the medium- and fine-sand domains in both current directions. Further to the north, where flood currents are dominant, asymmetric sorted bedforms were detected which show sharp boundaries only in flood-current direction. Comparisons between the measurements of the different years show no significant variations in morphology and distribution of the sorted bedforms. However, variations of the boundaries between the medium and the fine-sand domains were observed. Additionally, new minor sorted bedforms and rippled excavation marks as well as new fine-sand areas developed and disappeared occasionally. It can be supposed that such sediment winnowing and focusing processes take place during periodically recurring storm surges, which change the shapes of the features. Moreover, variations in alignments and sizes of the small ripple formations were detected. They seem to indicate the directions and intensities of previous storm events.

  14. Seasonal cycling of phosphorus in the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, C. van der, Saskia; Chou, L.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the seasonal cycle of nutrients, chlorophyll a, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC and POC) for 10 stations in the Belgian coastal zone. Special attention was given to phosphorus speciation, i.e. dissolved inorganic and organic phosphorus (DIP and DOP) and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (PIP and POP). Spatial and temporal trends of the inorganic nutrients and the organic species are di...

  15. Aerosol Retrieval from MERIS and Ground-Based Radiometers in the German Bight, Turbid Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnert, I.; Doerffer, R.; Becu, G.; Deschamps, P.-Y.; Fomferra, N.

    2004-05-01

    Optical properties of aerosols vary with regions and seasons. Thus, radiative transfer simulations, which are used for the atmospheric correction of remotely sensed imagery of ocean surfaces, have to be based on a regional aerosol climatology [1]. Furthermore data of aerosol optical properties is used also for the global radiative budget and aerosol pollution, caused by biomass burning such as forest fires and by traffic. Data from coastal regions are collected with high temporal frequency by ground-based measurements like the AERONET network of sun-photometers from NASA [2] or by hand-held radiometers as Simbada-LOA, University Lille [3, 4] but they contain only little spatial information. In contrast, ocean colour satellite sensors, as MERIS on Envisat, provide a high spatial information, but the data is limited generally to one sequence per day. Analysis and comparison of both data is presented.

  16. Biological processes in the water column of the south Atlantic bight. Annual progress report, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    A study of Summer Intrusions, consisting of 7 weekly cruises between 28/sup 0/50' and 31/sup 0/00'N, was conducted from July 5 to August 17, 1979. Additional chlorophyll and nutrient samples were collected in the study area during the week of August 23. Our goal was to follow a newly intruded water mass for several seeks to determine rates and magnitudes of phyto- and zooplankton for development.

  17. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1981-02-01

    Research progress for 1980 is reported. The development of a wind-induced upwelling and its effect on outer shelf chlorophyll distributions was followed. Phytoplankton productivity measurements obtained during GABEX I and other DOE-sponsored cruises were used to estimate primary and new production of the outer shelf during winter and spring. (ACR)

  18. Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Delagoa Bight Mozambique: Application of remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kyewalyanga, M.S.; Naik, R.; Hegde, S.; Raman, M.; Barlow, R.; Roberts, M.

    @rediffmail.com (R. Naik), hegdesahana@rediffmail. com (S. Hegde), mraman@sac.isro.gov.in (M. Raman), rgbarlow@deat.gov. za (R. Barlow), squid@metroweb.co.za (M. Roberts). 0272-7714/$ - see front matter C211 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j...

  19. 210Pb balance and implications for particle transport on the continental shelf, U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, M.P.; Belastock, Rebecca A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1994-01-01

    Supply of 210Pb to the continental shelf off the northeastern United States is dominated by the deposition from the atmosphere, the rate of which is reliably known from previously published work. Excess 210Pb inventories in the shelf sediments show accumulations that are nearly in balance with the supply, even in areas of relict sands where it is believed that no net accumulation of sediment presently occurs. The 210Pb distributions in shelf and slope water indicate that the two-way fluid exchange at the shelf-slope front and the net transport in the alongshore flow make comparatively small contributions to the shelf 210Pb budget. The near balance between supply and decay of 210Pb on the shelf implies a limit to the particle export flux. It is concluded that the export of particulate organic carbon does not exceed 60 g m−2 y−1 (∼25% of primary production) and is probably lower. The hypothesis is advanced that fine particulate matter introduced to the continental shelf is detained in its transit of the shelf because of bioturbational trapping in the sediment due to benthic animals. Distributions of 210Pb in suspended particulate matter and in the fine fraction of shelf sediments suggest that the average fine particle must undergo several cycles of deposition-bioturbation-resuspension-redeposition and requires a number of decades for its transit and ultimate export from the shelf. Thus, only the most refractory organic matter is likely to be exported.

  20. Sea level height, sea surface temperature, and tuna yields in the Panama bight during El Niño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Pedraza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Between 1988 and 1998, annual tuna landings at Buenaventura (Colombian Pacific are correlated with the sea surface temperature in the central Equatorial Pacific (r=0.78, p<0.05 and the sea level height at Buenaventura (r=0.76, p<0.05 and Balboa (Panama (r=0.79, p<0.05. Seasonal oceanic upwelling is forced by the Panama wind jet, which may favour oceanic fisheries such as tuna. Here we first apply a bivariate correlation method (Pyper and Peterman, 1994 and then a multivariate approach (principal components analysis or PCA to investigate the relationships of these environmental variables with landings. With the first method, we find that landing is best correlated with the sea surface temperature in the Niño 3 region, whereas the other relationships are less clear. In contrast, with PCA we find that PC1 explains 90.6% of the total variance and suggests that sea surface temperature plays a major role in determining tuna availability in the area (especially during El Niño events. Since PC2 is mainly correlated with sea level height at Balboa but only represents 6.8% of the total variance, we suggest that oceanic upwelling effects on tuna landings at Buenaventura are not significant at interannual scales.

  1. South Atlantic Bight Habitat Mapping on NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in North Atlantic Ocean between 20070626 and 20070702

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This expedition on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster used the recently-developed National Undersea Research Center for the North Atlantic and Great Lakes (NURC-NAGL) ROV...

  2. Binational Studies Leading to an Ecosystems-based Management Strategy for Common Thresher Shark in the Southern California Bight (SCB).

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Jeffrey B.; Cartamil, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    Survey of the Mexican SCB Sector Artisanal and Commercial Shark Fisheries Hypotheses: a) Common thresher sharks represent a substantial portion of the catch of artisanal and commercial shark fisheries in the Mexican SCB sector. b) Exploitation of common threshers and other elasmobranchs is important to the economy of northern Baja California and, by extension, is directly linked to U.S. fishery management. Mexican SCB Longlining Survey Hypotheses: a) Thresher shark nursery grounds extend sout...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  4. Archive of Water Gun Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  5. A temporal and spatial study of invertebrate communities associated with hard-bottom habitats in the South Atlantic Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Wenner, E. L.; Hinde, P.; Knott, D. M; Van Dolah, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    Species composition, biomass, density, and diversity of benthic invertebrates from six bard-bottom areas were evaluated. Seasonal collections using a dredge, trawl, and suction and grab samplers yielded 432, 525, and 845 taxa, respectively. Based on collections wltb the different gear types, species composition of invertebrates was found to change bathymetrically. Inner- and mlddle-shelf sites were more similar to each other in terms of invertebrate species composition than they were to outer...

  6. Archive of Water Gun Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 95007 New York Bight, 7-25 May, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field water gun subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 7-25 May, 1995. The coverage is in...

  7. Comparison of the diel and spatial distribution patterns of ichthyoplankton and ichthyoneuston in the Southeastern Brazilian Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Katsuragawa

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish larvae were collected by neuston and bongo nets, in the Southeastern Brazil, during four océanographie cruises (January 1980; January 1981; October 1981; and March 1982. The results are compared and analyzed in order to study the patterns of diel vertical distributions of fish larvae and to detect sampling problems. Larvae collected with neuston net were quite different in types and size composition, when compared with those collected with bongo net in oblique tows. Clear tendency of stratification in size composition at the uppermost layer can be observed on juveniles ( > 19 mm of Sardinella brasiliensis which also showed day time avoidance. Most of the neustonic taxa were also caught in the deeper layers, although some groups, e.g. Mugilidae, Mullidae, and Gerreidae, were more abundant at the surface. Density of ichthyoneuston is much higher than those observed in the Northwest Atlantic and number of fish larvae collected during the day by neuston net exceeded that of night samples.Larvas de peixes foram coletadas com rede de nêuston e rede bongô, na costa sudeste do Brasil, durante quatro cruzeiros oceanográficos (Jan/1980; Jan/1981; Out/1981; Mar/1982. São estudados os padrões de distribuição diária de larvas e problemas de amostragem. Numa comparação entre coletas de superfície e coletas oblíquas, observam-se diferenças em composição, tanto em termos de espécies como de tamanho de larvas. Pode ser observada uma clara tendência de estratificação por composição de tamanho para Sardinella brasiliensis em que espécimes juvenis (> 19 mm ocorreram preferencialmente na camada superficial. Estes juvenis também apresentaram maior capacidade de fuga da boca da rede durante o período diurno. A maioria dos táxons de ocorrência neustônica foi também capturada em camadas mais profundas, mas alguns grupos como Mugilidae, Mullidae e Gerreidae predomiram na camada superficial. A densidade do ictionêuston é mais elevada na nossa região do que a observada no Atlântico noroeste, e o numero de larvas de peixes da coleta diuna com rede de nêuston excedeu o da coleta noturna.

  8. Environmental survey of two interim dumpsites, Middle Atlantic Bight from 05 November 1973 to 10 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7501280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A second oceanographic survey cruise was made to an interim municipal sludge dumpsite and initially to an interim dumpsite for the disposal of industrial acid waste...

  9. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice: seasonal study from Malene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren; Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Hansen, Per Juel; Hillingsøe, Karen Marie

    2010-01-01

    followed by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic...

  10. Tidal-controlled variations of primary- and secondary bedform height: Innenjade tidal channel (Jade Bay, German Bight)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, C.; Becker, M.; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Coastal, estuarine, fluvial and submarine morphodynamics encompass some of the leading processes shaping our planet. They stem mainly, but not only, from the interaction of water in motion and movable sediment boundaries, resulting in morphological changes produced by erosion, transport and...... deposition of sediments that generate a variety of landscapes and seascapes over time. Morphodynamics allows for a better understanding and interpretation of self adjustments in drainage basins, longitudinal river profiles and shorelines shapes, as well as characteristic features such as beach cusps, bed...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Plan Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Plan Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth Range of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth Range GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Mean Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Mean Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Rugosity of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Rugosity GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Profile Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Profile Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Sun Illuminated Bathymetry for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Sun Illuminated Bathymetry GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  1. Archive of Boomer Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise.The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  2. Southern California Hook and Line Survey - Annual So. CA Bight hook and line data collection/survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an annual, fishery-independent survey aimed at collecting abundance and biological data for use in the stock assessments of several key rockfish species...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  4. Continental shelf processes effecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Hydrography of Onslow Bay, North Carolina: September 1975 (OBIS II). Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, L P; Singer, J J; Dunstan, W M; Pietrafesa, L J

    1976-03-12

    Over the course of OBIS II, 3-14 September, two intrusion cores were observed. One was apparently trapped nearshore over much of the study period, but as time went on, it either dissipated, moved too far shoreward or moved too far laterally along the shelf to be detected by the existing observational grid. The other (later) intrusion was first detected on 5-7 September and was observed to be moving into the Bay from the southeast over the remainder of the study period. Plots of the horizontal temperature and salinity distribution were suggestive of these phenomenon by means of the higher salinity-lower temperature relationship. However, the real confirmation rests in the vertical distributions of sigma-t and chlorophyll presented in conjunction with the Bio and Hydrogrids, and the T--S plot which reveals slope waters on the shelf. The intruded waters were not of low enough temperature to carry high nutrient concentrations onto the shelf for study. However, the general results of this study tend to confirm the view that our basic grid array and methods are compatible with measurement of the processes we initially set out to study. Analyses of these data relative to the current meter data will allow a nearly complete description of the Onslow Bay system during the observational period.

  5. Thematic mapper research in the earth sciences: Small scale patches of suspended matter and phytoplankton in the Elbe River Estuary, German Bight and Tidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, H.; Doerffer, R.; Fischer, J.; Brockmann, C.; Stoessel, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Thematic Mapper (TM) field experiment was followed by a data analysis to determine TM capabilities for analysis of suspended matter and phytoplankton. Factor analysis showed that suspended matter concentration, atmospheric scattering, and sea surface temperature can be retrieved as independent factors which determine the variation in the TM data over water areas. Spectral channels in the near infrared open the possibility of determining the Angstrom exponent better than for the coastal zone color scanner. The suspended matter distribution may then be calculated by the absolute radiance of channel 2 or 3 or the ratio of both. There is no indication of whether separation of chlorophyll is possible. The distribution of suspended matter and sea surface temperature can be observed with the expected fine structure. A good correlation between water depth and suspended matter distribution as found from ship data can now be analyzed for an entire area by the synoptic view of the TM scenes.

  6. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004 New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996 Series Information:

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 1 May - 9 June, 1996. The coverage is...

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Miami, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the continental shelf off of Jacksonville, FL in the South Atlantic...

  8. All their eggs in one basket: a rocky reef nursery for the longnose skate (Raja rhina Jordan & Gilbert, 1880) in the southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Love, Milton S.; Schroeder, Donna M.; Snook, Linda; York, Anne; Cochrane, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Skates (family Rajidae) are oviparous and lay tough, thick-walled eggs. At least some skate species lay their eggs in spatially restricted nursery grounds where embryos develop and hatch (Hitz, 1964; Hoff, 2007). After hatching, neonates may quickly leave the nursery grounds (Hoff, 2007). Egg densities in these small areas may be quite high. As an example, in the eastern Bering Sea, a site

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - USNS Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of the 2003 multibeam bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of the multibeam bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the...

  11. MAB_mobile_freq.SHP: recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  13. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon turnover in sinking marine snow from surface waters of Southern California Bight: implications for the carbon cycle in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Grossart, HP; Azam, F.;

    1999-01-01

    techniques. Both the respiration rate per aggregate volume and the bacterial densities decreased with increasing aggregate size. The respiration rates normalized to the number of bacteria in single aggregates were 7.4 to 70 fmol C cell(-1) d(-1). The aggregate community respired 433 to 984 ng C d(-1) per...... aggregate in darkness, which yielded a turnover time of 8 to 9 d for the total organic carbon in aggregates. Thus, marine snow is not only a vehicle for vertical flux of organic matter; the aggregates are also hotspots of microbial respiration which cause a fast and efficient respiratory turnover of...

  14. Astaxanthin in the calanoid copepod Calanus helgolandicus: dynamics of esterfication and vertical distribution in the German Bight, North Sea.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Frank; Agurto, Cristian; Henriksen, Peter; Kioerboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Zooplankton synthesise astaxanthin, a carotenoid pigment believed to protect against high-energy irradiance, from precursors in their diet. Different patterns of astaxanthin vertical distribution would be expected from the benefits of photoprotection, the costs of visual predation and the availability of food. Despite a highly resolved sampling approach (4 m depth intervals), no clear pattern of vertical distribution or correlation with chlorophyll a concentrations was found for Calanus helgo...

  15. Benthic and biological data in the New York Bight from 2010-06-01 to 2012-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0128996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets show the distribution of key species and habitats, such as seabirds, bathymetry, surficial sediments, deep sea corals, and oceanographic habitats....

  16. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner; Christian, Winter; Becker, Marius;

    2010-01-01

    channels in these inlets are characterized by high flow velocities and, accordingly, the channel beds are typically sandy and covered with bedforms. The bedform fields in nature are often complex systems with larger primary-bedforms superimposed by smaller secondary-bedforms (cf. Bartholdy et al., 2002......). There is a considerable amount of detailed field investigations on the dynamics of primary-bedforms at various temporal scales, ranging from short- to long-term tide-related cycles to flood hydrographs to seasonality. However, Julien et al. (2002) stated that a composite analysis of primary- and...... secondary-bedforms is recommended for future studies on resistance to flow. Such knowledge on the behaviour of compound bedforms is still deficient. In this study, we combine the findings on the dynamics of primary- and secondary-bedform height from detailed field investigations carried out in two high...

  17. [The role of zooplankton and micronektron in the cycling and remineralization of chemical materials in the Southern California Bight: Progress report, November 1985-June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Progress Report on Grant FG05-85ER60340 has already been submitted to DOE, and is appended here. The appended report covers much of the work completed during the current contract period. Work on the just-completed May 1986 cruise samples is just beginning at the time of writing. Sediment traps deployed at two locations in Santa Monica Basin in October 1985 were recovered in February 1986. The traps have sequentially rotating cups set to collect material for 14 days each during the deployment period. We have finished radiochemical analyses on the sediment trap samples collected on the February 1986 Cruise. Pellet production rates for salps and euphausiids were reported earlier. The February cruise was principally a hydrographic and trap recovery cruise, and there was no time for pellet production rate experiments. Thus, all the February hauls are being analyzed to assess diel biomass estimates of selected size classes of zooplankton in the vicinity of the traps. 5 tabs

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric PCA GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  19. DISTRIBUTION OF SQUID PARALARVAE, LOLIGO OPALESCENS (CEPHALOPODA: MYOPSIDA), IN THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BIGHT IN THE THREE YEARS FOLLOWING THE 1997 EL NINO. (R825381)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. Median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_median.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  1. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight : lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    OpenAIRE

    Briseño-Avena, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Us...

  2. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 95007 New York Bight, 7-25 May, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 7-25 May, 1995. The coverage is in the...

  3. Data collected in the Southern California Bight in order to understand the coastal waters ecological systems, 1977 - 1999 (NODC Accession 0001162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemistry, fish species, atmospheric pollutants, and temperature profile were collected using CTD casts and other collection methods in the Southern California...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 5m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 5x5 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  6. 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_95th_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  7. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB_mobile_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-07-17 to 2013-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0137972)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  9. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 09 June 1979 to 12 September 1979 (NODC Accession 8000037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 09 June 1979 to 12 September 1979. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  10. Half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_hIPR.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  11. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 23 August 1973 to 10 December 1973 (NODC Accession 7700171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 23 August 1973 to 10 December 1973. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-09-16 to 2014-09-29 (NCEI Accession 0137968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  13. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight and Long Island Sound from 1972-08-01 to 1973-09-20 (NCEI Accession 9000039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession consists of nutrient data from Long Island Sound provided by Mr. Robert N. Reid from NOAA/NMFS Sandy Hook Laboratory. The data were collected from...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the USS CURTS and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the South Atlantic Bight project from 30 April 1980 to 24 April 1986 (NODC Accession 8600175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the USS CURTS and other platforms from 30 April 1980 to 24 April 1986. Data were submitted by the by the...

  15. Current measurements from five ARGOS-tracked drifters in the Mid-Atlantic Bight, April 2003, in support of investigations of across-margin transport of biologically, geological, and chemically important materials (NODC Accession 0002346)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data collectors: Dr. Richard Garvine, University of Delaware, College of Marine Studies and Dr. Charles Tilburg, University of Georgia

  16. Chemical data from moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 18 May 1978 - 19 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical data were collected using moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 18, 1978 to October 19,...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 28 April 1977 - 19 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 28, 1977 to October 19,...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-12 to 2013-10-24 (NCEI Accession 0145661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  19. Multibeam Collection for Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continential Shelf on the R/V Cape Fear in the North Atlantic Ocean between June 13, 2005 and July 7, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-10-17 to 2013-11-06 (NCEI Accession 0137966)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-09-17 to 2015-10-07 (NCEI Accession 0145711)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider blue deployed by University of Massachusetts; University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-06-27 to 2015-07-17 (NCEI Accession 0138008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment. This is the first of a series of yearly seasonal deployments to...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-08-18 to 2015-09-09 (NCEI Accession 0145710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides...

  4. U.S. Geological Survey calculated percentage of time sediment is mobile for May 2010 to May 2011 at select points in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB_mobile_perc, point shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  5. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight (GMAINE_mobile_perc.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  6. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_95th_perc.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  7. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_mobile_freq_v1_1.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  8. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (GMAINE_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  9. The median of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_median.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  10. U.S. Geological Survey calculated recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  11. U.S. Geological Survey calculated median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_median, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  12. The half interpercentile range of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_hIPR, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  13. U.S. Geological Survey calculated 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress for the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_95th_perc, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  15. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - R/V Maurice Ewing - (1997), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  16. Current direction, bathythermograph (xbt), CTD, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Gulf of Mexico Physical Oceanography (GMPO) project, 11 June 1985 - 03 September 1986 (NODC Accession 8700196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, bathythermograph (xbt), CTD, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and...

  17. NOAA's Web Service for the New York Offshore Biogeographic Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This web service provides key ecological data layers in the New York Bight via the Internet and which can be loaded into client side GIS software. The web service...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - R/V Maurice Ewing - (1997), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Whiting - (2001), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 50x50 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Nancy Foster - (2006), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  3. Chlorophyll_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included chlorophyll for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came from...

  4. Primary Productivity (PP_Master)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included primary production for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came...

  5. Wind_Speeds_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included wind speeds for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came from...

  6. EX1305: Summer Ecosystem Monitoring Survey on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between 20130821 and 20130901

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The survey consists of 120 random stratified stations in the Middle Atlantic Bight, Southern New England, Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine. Depending on the...

  7. NYHOPS Forecast Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 3D Marine Nowcast/Forecast System for the New York Bight NYHOPS subdomain. Currents, waves, surface meteorology, and water conditions.

  8. NYHOPS Forecast Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 3D Marine Nowcast/Forecast System for the New York Bight Apex NYHOPS subdomain. Currents, waves, surface meteorology, and water conditions.

  9. Analyses of otoliths from juvenile black sea bass collected from estuaries in SC, FL, NJ, and NY: 2008-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Snappers/Groupers have traditionally been some of the most desired demersal fishes in the South Atlantic Bight and are the most abundant and diverse group of large...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Little Hales - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Little Hales - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  12. Delayed XBT data collected by Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from 2009-2011 (NODC Accession 0089585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Arafura Sea, Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean, Molukka Sea, North Pacific...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Slope, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Whiting - (2001), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 50x50 meter cell size representing the bathymetry Bight, derived from data collected in 2001 by the of the Charleston...

  14. The impact of climate warming on plankton spring succession : a mesocosm study

    OpenAIRE

    Lengfellner, Kathrin

    2008-01-01

    Our mesocosm studies focused on marine plankton spring succession in Kiel Bight under climate change conditions. Kiel Bight serves as a model for moderately deep water bodies of temperate regions where the plankton bloom can start before the onset of thermal stratification. Plankton spring blooms are critical periods in the seasonal cycle because they form the first food impulse in the year and thus can be linked to reproductive success of many species. The conducted experiments stand...

  15. Evolution of secondary cellular circulation flow above submarine bedforms imaged by remote sensing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hennings, Ingo; Herbers, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Normalized radar cross section (NRCS) modulation and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements above submarine sand ribbons and sand waves are presented. The two study areas are located in the Southern Bight of the North Sea at the Birkenfels wreck and in the sand wave field of the Lister Tief in the German Bight of the North Sea. These measurements reveal the developments of secondary cellular circulations in tidally induced coastal sea areas. Secondary circulation cells can deve...

  16. Ammonia, silicate, phosphate, dissolved oxygen, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, nutrient autoanalyzer, and other instruments from R/V Delaware II, Gordon Gunter, Henry B. Bigelow, Okeanos Explorer, and Pisces in the Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank, and Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2009-11-03 to 2014-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0127524)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains nutrient concentrations, temperature, salinity, density and dissolved oxygen values measured by CTD profiles on the U.S. Northeast Continental...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight and others from 2011-04-06 to 2011-11-26 (NODC Accession 0115708)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115708 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Great Australian...

  18. U.S. Geological Survey calculated half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_hIPR.shp, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  19. Origins of the deep-sea sediments and their variations with time. Annual progress report No. 6, May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques for studying water mass mixing and sediment transport in the benthic layer of the deep sea and the effects of these processes on the continental shelf specifically in the New York Bight were studied. Results are presented for the first major combined geochemistry-physical oceanography cruise. Data on the nature of the bottom sediments are presented principally in context of their potential as sources of both radon and methane in the lower water column. Preliminary data on the nature and composition of suspended particulates also indicate potential for tracing the mechanisms of solids dispersal in the Bight. (PCS)

  20. Uptake of phytodetritus by meiobenthos using 13C labelled diatoms and Phaeocystis in two contrasting sediments from the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, M.A.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Costa, M.J.; Vincx, M.; Vanaverbeke, J.

    2008-01-01

    Meiobenthic uptake of 13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum and Prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis was investigated in permeable and fine grained depositional sediments from the Southern Bight of the North Sea at different sediment horizons. Both the diatom and Phaeocystis–derived organic matter (OM) cas

  1. The chemistry Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Cofino, Wp; Smedes, F.; De Jong, Sa; Abarnou, Alain; Boon, Jp; Oostingh, I; Davies, Im; Klungsoyr, J.; Wilhelmsen, S; Law, RJ; Whinnett, Ja; Schmidt, D.; Wilson, S

    1992-01-01

    The Bremerhaven Workshop required chemical data to help interpret the biological findings. Polychlorobiphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, total hydrocarbons and trace metals were determined in sediments, dab liver and benthic invertebrates collected at stations along the German Bight and drilling site transects. In this paper, the chemical data are presented and reviewed.

  2. 29 CFR 1918.52 - Specific requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to join sections of, preventer guys. (b) Stoppers. (1) Chain topping lift stoppers shall be in good... chain. (2) Chain stoppers shall be shackled or otherwise secured so that their links are not bent by... employee works in the bight formed by the heel block, a preventer at least three-quarters of an inch...

  3. A GIS approach to model sediment reduction susceptibility of mixed sand and gravel beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikaas, Hans S; Hemmingsen, Maree A

    2006-06-01

    The morphological form of mixed sand and gravel beaches is distinct, and the process/response system and complex dynamics of these beaches are not well understood. Process response models developed for pure sand or gravel beaches cannot be directly applied to these beaches. The Canterbury Bight coastline is apparently abundantly supplied with sediments from large rivers and coastal alluvial cliffs, but a large part of this coastline is experiencing long-term erosion. Sediment budget models provide little evidence to suggest sediments are stored within this system. Current sediment budget models inadequately quantify and account for the processes responsible for the patterns of erosion and accretion of this coastline. We outline a new method to extrapolate from laboratory experiments to the field using a geographical information system approach to model sediment reduction susceptibility for the Canterbury Bight. Sediment samples from ten representative sites were tumbled in a concrete mixer for an equivalent distance of 40 km. From the textural mixture and weight loss over 40 km tumbling, we applied regression techniques to generate a predictive equation for Sediment Reduction Susceptibility (SRS). We used Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) to extrapolate the results from fifty-five sites with data on textural sediment composition to field locations with no data along the Canterbury Bight, creating a continuous sediment reductions susceptibility surface. Isolines of regular SRS intervals were then derived from the continuous surface to create a contour map of sediment reductions susceptibility for the Canterbury Bight. Results highlighted the variability in SRS along this coastline. PMID:16538418

  4. Competitive interactions between two fishing fleets in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sys, Klaas; Poos, Jan Jaap; Meensel, van Jef; Polet, Hans; Buysse, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We examine whether the landing rates of Belgian beam trawlers in the Southern Bight of the North Sea were affected through competitive interactions with the Dutch beam trawler fleet and whether the development of a pulse trawler fleet has altered competitive interactions between both fleets. Effe

  5. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    in the North Atlantic as part of the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series program as well as data collected off Southern California as part of the Southern California Bight Study program. The observed maximum particulate organic carbon and volumetric particle concentrations are consistent with the...

  6. Variability of the Southern California wave climate and implications for sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed wave and wind data from 18 buoys in the Southern California Bight to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of the regional wave climate. Point Conception shelters most of the Bight from being directly impacted by North Pacific weather. The wave height inside the sheltered zone and to the east of the Channel Islands is less than half the wave height in the open ocean to the west. Within the sheltered Bight, storm waves (by proxy of being greater than the 95th percentile wave height for more than 6 hours) are mainly from the west, but long period swells (Tp >15 seconds) are mainly from the south-southwest. There are on average two to four storms during each winter month (November-March) and fewer than two storms per month for the rest of the year. The Channel Islands selectively block the westerly swells and make the wave climate in the Santa Barbara Channel different from the rest of the sheltered Bight. A statistically significant wave-height minimum exists in the area offshore Dana Point and Oceanside. The multiyear (2-23 years) wave-data records from all 18 buoys show negligible temporal trend, positive or negative. Like the wave climate, the long-term probability of sediment transport on the continental shelves of the Bight displays large difference between the sheltered and open-ocean (near Point Conception) sites. The return period of incipient sediment motion on the sheltered shelf breaks (one to five months) is at least two orders of magnitude longer than that on the Point Conception shelf break (0.6 day). Similar to the spatial distribution of wave heights, there is a systematic return-period maximum on the shelf off Dana Point and Oceanside. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Continental margin atmospheric climatology and sea level (Historical setting 1974--1975)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.; D' Amato, R.; Gabriel, C.; Sawyer, R.J. Jr.

    1978-02-01

    From the many continental shelf dynamics studies which have been made in the past decade, it has become increasingly apparent that a detailed analysis of continental margin waters can only be accomplished with an appreciation of the coastal meteorology. Fortunately, coastal meteorological and, in addition, coastal sea level data have been archived and thus provide coastal oceanographers with inexpensive, priceless and complimentary data sets. Past coastal sea level studies have demonstrated that these data contain not only tidal data but also sub-inertial frequency information which measurably details shelf reesponse to atmospheric forcing. Additionally, a particular region, such as the South Atlantic Bight, can be characterized by the statistics of the temporal spectra of both data sets as well by the alonshore coherences which may exist between stations. In this study, atmospheric wind and pressure have been examined and correlated with coastal sea level changes at various coastal stations along the South Atlantic Bight.

  8. A freshwater species wintering in a brackish environment: Habitat selection and diet of Slavonian grebes in the southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Nicole; Garthe, Stefan; Adler, Sven

    2009-09-01

    After the breeding season, Slavonian grebes ( Podiceps auritus) leave their freshwater breeding habitats and migrate to wintering grounds in marine or brackish waters. The most important wintering area in northwestern Europe is located in the southern Baltic Sea, with the largest concentrations in the offshore area of the Pommeranian Bight. Analysis of ship-based surveys revealed that the habitat selection of Slavonian grebes in this brackish area is significantly influenced by water depth and bottom sediment type. The grebes prefer shallow waters of 4-14 m depth and occur only over sandy sediments. While the diving depths of endothermic animals is limited due to energetic constraints and thermoregulation, sediment type is regarded to be a proxy for food choice. The diet of Slavonian grebes in the Pomeranian Bight consists mainly of demersal gobies (Gobiidae) that frequently occur over sandy bottom substrates.

  9. Storm-induced semidiurnal perturbations to surges on the US Eastern Seaboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xi; Olabarrieta, Maitane; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of 19-year-long tidal gauge records along the US East Coast has revealed the appearance of semidiurnal perturbations to storm surges in the South Atlantic Bight. A total of 85 events with semidiurnal-surge amplitudes higher than 20% of the astronomic tidal amplitude and durations longer than two days were identified. These semidiurnal surge events were triggered by the passage of tropical storms and cold fronts. As a consequence of the storm-induced forcing, observed tides were delayed and partially damped with respect to the predictions. Such delay and damping resulted in a semidiurnal signal on the surge. Parallel-to-shore winds in the shelf region between Cape Hatteras and the South Atlantic Bight were highly correlated with the generation of the semidiurnal perturbations. Increased bottom friction combined with Coriolis acceleration, resulting from enhanced wind-driven alongshore currents, are proposed to be the primary factors delaying and attenuating astronomic tides.

  10. Satellite images track “black water” event off Florida Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    South-West Florida Dark-Water Observations Group (SWFDOG),

    A mass of dark water, at times exceeding 60 km in diameter and spinning slowly in a clockwise eddy, occupied most of the Florida Bight between January and March 2002, capturing the attention of fishermen, the public, and government agencies. The "black water," as it was dubbed in the national and international press (for example, see http://www.naplesnews.com), was first reported by fishery pilots in the Florida Bight in January 2002. Fishermen reported that fish were not to be found in the black water and there were dead sponges in the vicinity, suggesting that the area could be a "dead zone" similar to the one found every summer off the Louisiana coast.

  11. Caractéristiques ecohydrodynamiques de la Baie Sud de la Mer du Nord en régime d'été

    OpenAIRE

    Hecq, J.H.; Mingelbier, M.; Goffart, A.; Brylinski, J.-M.; Djendi, S.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of the hydrological context, an optimal sarnpling network bas been set up to obtain a synoptic picture of temperature. Salinity, nutrients, chlorophyll and zooplankton distributions in the Southem Bight of the North Sea. The data confirm the general tendency of isolines to be para11el to the coast. The plankton distribution shows the influence of Scheldt water farer to the south-west than proposed by previous models and observations.

  12. On action- and affectpsychology of human reliability. An access by training simulators for complex man-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical part and its topics: errors at the interface between man and machine; reliability analysis for man; the psychological explanation of action reliability of man (intention and control); a paradigma for human reliability (frustration and regression). Empirical part: Control room in a nuclear power plant: Influences on repeated blockages on component care in case of start-up operation; ship bridge: Frustration and regression while steering in a bight. Appendix: analysis of a social interaction.(GL)

  13. Infrared view of Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Bight of Bangkok and the city of Bangkok, Thailand are visible in this west looking view. The city, of almost four million people, long famous as a jewelry, silver and bronze ware trading center is also a major rice grower. Situated in a vast lowland ideal for rice agriculture, it is now a major export commodity. The vast network of canals are used for irrigation and drainage and the deforested hills of the Bilauktaung Range are seen nearby.

  14. Pattern in Space and Time of Clupeoid Fish Eggs in the California Current Region

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Katherine A.

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation examines spawning behavior and habitat in Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) and northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax) in the Southern California Bight (SCB). The fine-scale horizontal and vertical distributions of anchovy and sardine eggs are characterized and their potentials for interaction with the predator Euphausia pacifica are assessed under varying environmental conditions. In Chapter 2, fine-scale horizontal pattern of sardine and anchovy eggs is characteriz...

  15. Archival tagging of subadult and adult common thresher sharks (Alopias vulpinus) off the coast of southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Cartamil, Daniel P.; Sepulveda, Chugey A.; Wegner, Nicholas C.; Aalbers, Scott A.; Baquero, Andres; Graham, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    The common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus) is a secondary target species of the California drift gillnet fishery (CA-DGN) and supports a growing recreational fishery in California waters. This study used archival tags to examine the movement patterns and habitat preferences of common threshers of the size range captured in the CA-DGN (>120 cm fork length). Depth and temperature-logging archival tags were deployed on 57 subadult and adult common threshers in the Southern California Bight. Ta...

  16. Distribution and Demographics of Marine Mammals in SOCAL Through Photo-Identification, Genetics, and Satellite Telemetry: A Summary of Surveys Conducted 15 June 2010 - 24 June 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Falcone, Erin A.; Schorr, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    In the first year of a three-year project, from June 2010 to June 2011 small boat-based surveys for cetaceans were conducted in the U. S. Navy's SOCAL training range, particularly in the Southern California Anti-Submarine Warfare Range (SOAR) and the Southern California Offshore Range (SCORE) centered on San Clemente Island in the Southern California Bight. Surveys included species verification tests, photo-identification, satellite tagging, and biopsy sampling. Because of their apparent sen...

  17. Biological and Behavioral Response Studies of Marine Mammals in Southern California, 2011 (“SOCAL-11”) Final Project Report.

    OpenAIRE

    Southall, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the results from SOCAL-11, the second year of the research project Southern California Behavioral Response Study (SOCAL-BRS) conducted in the Southern California Bight. The study’s overall objective is to provide a better understanding of marine mammal behavior and a direct scientific basis to estimate the risk and minimize adverse effects of human sounds, particularly military sonar, on marine mammals. During a scouting phase and two operational legs of SOCAL-...

  18. Broad-scale distribution patterns of sardine and their predators in relation to remotely sensed environmental conditions during the KwaZulu-Natal sardine run

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donoghue, S.H.; Drapeau, Laurent; Peddemors, V M

    2010-01-01

    The annual movement of South African sardine Sardinops sagax up the east coast of South Africa, known as the 'sardine run', was investigated using data from aerial surveys for the period 1988-2005 and compared with remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll a data. Sardine sighting rates were highest within the Waterfall Bluff Bight off the Eastern Cape Coast, where conditions appeared to be most favourable. Sardine and predator sightings decreased significantly northwards ...

  19. Hydroclimatic modulation of diatom/Phaeocystis blooms in nutrient-enriched Belgian coastal waters (North Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, E.; Rousseau, V.; Parent, J.-Y.; Ozer, J.; C. Lancelot

    2006-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 14 yr (1988-2001) of intensive phytoplankton monitoring at Station 330 in the central Belgian Coastal Zone (BCZ, Southern Bight of the North Sea) indicates that the long-term diatom biomass trend and the spring dominance of Phaeocystis colonies over diatoms are determined by the combined effect of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and freshwater and continental nitrate carried by the Scheldt. The strong correlation between diatoms and the NAO index is largely explai...

  20. Cambios en el macrozoobentos de sustrato rocoso del abra de Bilbao: 14 años de seguimiento de la recuperación biológica

    OpenAIRE

    Pagola-Carte, S.; Saiz-Salinas, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Benthic communities on rocky shores from the Bight of Bilbao, known as the Abra de Bilbao (northern Spain) and the adjacent coast have been studied during 14 years (1984-1998) within the framework of an environmental monitoring programme for both subtidal and intertidal zones. The study area is now experiencing a process of generalised environmental improvement in its water quality, as a result of the region's industrial recession and the implementation of a comprehensive renovation sewage sy...

  1. Evidence for fine scale genetic structure and estuarine colonisation in a potential high gene flow marine goby (Pomatoschistus minutus)

    OpenAIRE

    Pampoulie, C.; Gysels, E.S.; Maes, G.E.; Hellemans, B.; Leentjes, V.; A. G. Jones; Volckaert, F.A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Marine fish seem to experience evolutionary processes that are expected to produce genetically homogeneous populations. We have assessed genetic diversity and differentiation in 15 samples of the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus (Pallas, 1770) (Gobiidae, Teleostei) from four major habitats within the Southern Bight of the North Sea, using seven microsatellite and 13 allozyme loci. Despite its high dispersal potential, microsatellite loci revealed a moderate level of differentiation (overall F...

  2. Using blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) photographic-identification sightings to assess potential vessel-whale encounters in the Santa Barbara Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Stingle, Kelli Faye

    2012-01-01

    In 2007 six blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) were found dead in the Southern California Bight with four of the deaths resulting from vessel strikes. To reduce the spatial overlap of vessels and whales, the United States Coast Guard proposed shifting the southern Santa Barbara Channel shipping lane north by one nmi. We used sighting rate predictions from generalized additive models to assess potential vessel-whale encounters in the current and proposed traffic separation schemes. Sightings ...

  3. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar

    OpenAIRE

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Southall, Brandon L.; De Ruiter, Stacy Lynn; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S.; Elliott L Hazen; Falcone, Erin A.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J.; Kyburg, Chris; Megan F. McKenna; Tyack, Peter Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    Mid-frequency military (1–10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some op...

  4. INTEGRATED MODELING OF THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COASTAL OCEAN: BIOGEOCHEMISTRY AND PARTICULATE DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; Mcwilliams, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Southern California Coastal Ocean (SCCO), defined as the region inclusive of the Southern California Bight and the Santa Barbara Channel, from the shoreline to beyond the continental shelf, has significant anthropogenic injections of many materials through the air, rivers, runoff, outfalls, sediments, and marine spills. These inputs are superposed on a dynamic system of internal processes including water motions, biological production in the surface layers, particle sinking, dissolution...

  5. Modeling of Water and Sediment Quality in Impacted Coastal Embayments

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenbach, Keith D.; Mcwilliams, James C.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present in a compact form the capabilities of the UCLA version of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), incorporating sediment transport algorithms developed in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey, to address water and sediment quality issues in the coastal ocean with particular reference to the Southern California Bight and the coastal region near Los Angeles and Orange County. In the following sections the components of the ROMS model are di...

  6. Water type quantification in the Skagerrak, the Kattegat and off the Jutland west coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Kristiansen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An extensive data series of salinity, nutrients and coloured dissolved organic material (CDOM was collected in the Skagerrak, the northern part of the Kattegat and off the Jutland west coast in April each year during the period 1996–2000, by the Institute of Marine Research in Norway. In this month, after the spring bloom, German Bight Water differs from its surrounding waters by a higher nitrate content and higher nitrate/phosphate and nitrate/silicate ratios. The spreading of this water type into the Skagerrak is of special interest with regard to toxic algal blooms. The quantification of the spatial distributions of the different water types required the development of a new algorithm for the area containing the Norwegian Coastal Current, while an earlier Danish algorithm was applied for the rest of the area. From the upper 50 m a total of 2227 observations of salinity and CDOM content have been used to calculate the mean concentration of water from the German Bight, the North Sea (Atlantic water, the Baltic Sea and Norwegian rivers. The Atlantic Water was the dominant water type, with a mean concentration of 79%, German Bight Water constituted 11%, Baltic Water 8%, and Norwegian River Water 2%. At the surface the mean percentages of these water types were found to be 68%, 15%, 15%, and 3%, respectively. Within the northern part of the Skagerrak, closer to the Norwegian coast, the surface waters were estimated to consist of 74% Atlantic Water, 20% Baltic Water, and 7% Norwegian River Water. The analysis indicates that the content of German Bight Water in this part is less than 5%.

  7. Molecular and phenotypic distinction of the very recently evolved insular subspecies Mus musculus helgolandicus ZIMMERMANN, 1953

    OpenAIRE

    Babiker, Hiba; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-01-01

    Background Populations and subspecies of the house mouse Mus musculus were able to invade new regions worldwide in the wake of human expansion. Here we investigate the origin and colonization history of the house mouse inhabiting the small island of Heligoland on the German Bight - Mus musculus helgolandicus. It was first described by Zimmermann in 1953, based on morphological descriptions which were considered to be a mosaic between the subspecies M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. Since m...

  8. Population Structure and Dynamics of White Seabass (Atractoscion nobilis) and the Genetic Effect of Hatchery Supplementation on the Wild Population

    OpenAIRE

    Coykendall, Dolly K.

    2005-01-01

    We utilize 430 base pairs of D-Loop sequence data to characterize mitochondrial polymorphism and estimate the female evolutionary effective population size, Nef, of the Southern California Bight population of white seabass, (Atractoscion nobilis). The D- Loop sequence data is highly polymorphic and reflects a population expansion signal according to both a coalescent-based and moment-based estimation procedures. The coalescent-based approach produces a Nef of 54,260, based on a mutation rate ...

  9. Contesting "Le corps militaire": Antimilitarism, Pacificism, Anarcho-Communism and 'Le Douanier' Rousseau's La Guerre

    OpenAIRE

    Brauer, Fae

    2012-01-01

    When the 1889 Military Law was passed, it established three-year universal conscription and a greater army of citizens to boost military preparedness for war in French colonies and against Germany.Far from its ramifications being of no concern to neo-impressionists, it was the subject of bightingly bitter antimilitarist cartoons by Maximilien Luce and antimilitarist paintings by the neo-impressionist outsider, 'Le douanier' Rousseau. Far from picturing the patriotic honor of becoming a soldie...

  10. Simulation du cycle de l'azote à travers l'écosystème pélagique de la baie sud de la mer du Nord

    OpenAIRE

    Pichot, G.

    1980-01-01

    The present work aims at establishing a mathematical model which describes the seasonal evolution of the most characteristic constituents of the pelagic phase of the ecosystem in the southern bight of the North Sea. After the notions of system and model, as applied to the analysis of the marine environment, have been defined, the different analytical forms that are required to describe the various ecological interactions are explained and the principal ecological models which were published i...

  11. Co-occurrence patterns for abundant marine archaeal and bacterial lineages in the deep chlorophyll maximum of coastal California

    OpenAIRE

    Beman, J. Michael; Steele, Joshua A; Fuhrman, Jed A.

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms remineralize and respire half of marine primary production, yet the niches occupied by specific microbial groups, and how these different groups may interact, are poorly understood. In this study, we identify co-occurrence patterns for marine Archaea and specific bacterial groups in the chlorophyll maximum of the Southern California Bight. Quantitative PCR time series of marine group 1 (MG1) Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes varied substantially over time but were well-correlated (r...

  12. The marine macroalgae of Helgoland (North Sea): an annotated list of records between 1845 and 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Bartsch, Inka; Kuhlenkamp, Ralph

    2000-01-01

    AbstractThe earliest records of marine macroalgae from Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) are known from the middle of the 19th century. Since then 274 marine macroalgal species have been reported: 77 species of Chlorophycota; 100 species of Phaeophycota; and 97 species of Rhodophycota. Additionally 11 species were only recorded as drift and 51 species as doubtful for Helgoland. Remains of the herbarium of Paul Kuckuck, the first curator for botany at the Helgoland Biological Station between...

  13. Effects of the Cessation of Sewage Sludge Dumping at the 12-Mile Site: Proceedings of the 12-Mile Dumpsite Symposium, Ocean Place Hilton Hotel, Long Branch, New Jersey, 18-19 June 1991

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    This study owes its inception to the wisdom and experience of the staff of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center who, after several decades of surveys in the New York Bight, recognized a unique opportunity to capitalize on the decision to stop ocean dumping of sewage sludge and designed an innovative field study to evaluate effects on living marine resources and their habitats. For decades ocean dumping was viewed as a cheap and effective means for disposal of wastes generated by urbanize...

  14. Blue Whales Respond to Anthropogenic Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana L Melcón; Amanda J Cummins; Kerosky, Sara M; Lauren K Roche; Wiggins, Sean M.; John A. Hildebrand

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to...

  15. Acoustic Telemetry, Cape Hatteras, and ocean Migratory Corridors: Defining Critical Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Rulifson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available North Carolina continental shelf waters are being targeted for development for wind farms and for oil and gas exploration. The main site for the latter is only 38 miles from Cape Hatteras, a major topographic feature that changes the dynamics of near-shore large ocean currents including the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. The Cape constricts shelf habitat and restricts the migratory corridors of highly migratory species. The Hatteras Acoustic Array just south of the Cape indicates that this area is heavily used by species of concern year-around. Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrhynchus migrate southward through Hatteras Bight in the fall and northward in the spring; some remain in the area throughout the winter months. Sandbar Sharks, Sand Tiger Sharks, and some Atlantic Sturgeon seem to migrate to Hatteras Bight and remain in the area throughout the winter, while other Atlantic sturgeon and White Sharks tend to migrate through Hatteras Bight on the way to other overwintering grounds. The period November through April seems to be the most critical period for these four species. Agencies need to expand the area of focus for these studies, as well as gather new information about resident species and marine mammals, before science-based environmental assessment can be made.

  16. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille de la Vega

    Full Text Available The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight.

  17. Natural variability in hard-bottom communities and possible drivers assessed by a time-series study in the SW Baltic Sea: know the noise to detect the change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wahl

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to detect shifts in community structure and function associated with global change, the natural background fluctuation in these traits must be known. In a 6 yr study we characterized the composition of young benthic communities at 7 sites along the 300 km coast of the Kiel and Lübeck bights in the German Baltic Sea and we quantified their interannual variability of taxonomic and functional composition. Along the salinity gradient from NW to SE, the relative abundance of primary producers decreased while that of heterotrophs increased. Along the same gradient, annual productivity tended to increase. Taxonomic and functional richness were higher in Kiel Bight as compared to Lübeck Bight. With increasing species richness functional group richness showed saturation indicating an increasing functional redundancy in species rich communities. While taxonomic fluctuations between years were substantial, functionality of the communities seem preserved in most cases. Environmental conditions potentially driving these fluctuations are winter temperatures and current regimes. We tentatively define a confidence range of natural variability in taxonomic and functional composition a departure from which might help identifying an ongoing regime shift driven by global change. In addition, we propose to use RELATE, a statistical procedure in the PRIMER (Plymouth Routines in Multivariate Ecological Research package to distinguish directional shifts in time ("signal" from natural temporal fluctuations ("noise".

  18. Spatial distribution of PAHs and associated laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, L.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Barrows, E.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediment core samples from New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Sediment was also collected from a reference site in the New York Bight as a comparison. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for PAHs, sediment grain size, and total organic carbon. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples, as well as for lipid content. The results highlight the range and magnitude of PAH concentrations in sediments of NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from undetected to 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations as much as 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated compounds, along with benthic toxicity data, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  19. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, L.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Barrows, E.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  20. FerryBox within the Coastal Observatory COSYNA: Examples of observations and potential benefit for data assimilation in hydrodynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, W.; Staneva, J.; Grayek, S.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the Coastal Observation System for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) is to obtain a synoptic description of the key state variables of coastal seas and their physical, chemical and ecological drivers and responses in the German Bight (North Sea). The system consists of a network of in situ observations, remote sensing, and coastal predictions systems. The modules of in-situ measurements will be briefly described. One of these major components for continuous observations are FerryBox systems aboard different types of ships as well as at fixed stations on shore. The long-term experiences with FerryBox systems for monitoring typical coastal processes will be presented by means of examples of observation. The benefit of FerryBox data compared to other observations will be critical assessed. Short term processes such as algal blooms or freshwater intrusions with subsequent higher nutrient loads at certain locations can be successfully monitored due to the high density of FerryBox measurements in space and time. From the same reason FerryBox data can be ideally combined with hydrodynamic models using data assimilation techniques. The potential of FerryBox sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) measurements for the improvement of model state estimates in the German Bight will be shown critically assessed. Model-data comparison shows that the reanalysis produced by data assimilation fairly well represents the physical properties in the German Bight. The overall root-mean-square errors between temperature and salinity fields of reanalysis and observation are significantly reduced after the assimilation of the FerryBox data. Furthermore, seasonal variation in temperature is well reproduced and the predicted synoptic variation is significantly correlated with its counterpart from the mooring measured temperature.

  1. Invasion of Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798, in the western north Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam L.; Knott, David M.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Morris, James A.; Buckel, Christine A.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Hartman, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    After going unreported in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean for 18 years (1988 to 2006), the Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, has recently reappeared in the South Atlantic Bight and, for the first time ever, in the Gulf of Mexico. Potential vectors and sources of this recent invader include: 1) discharged ballast water from its native range in Asia or other areas where it has become established; 2) transport of larvae from established non-native populations in the Caribbean or South America via ocean currents; or 3) escape and subsequent migration from active aquaculture facilities in the western Atlantic. This paper documents recent collections of P. monodon from the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico, reporting demographic and preliminary phylogenetic information for specimens collected between North Carolina and Texas from 2006 through 2012. The increased number of reports in 2011 and 2012, ranging from 102 mm to 298 mm total length, indicates that an adult population is present in densities sufficient for breeding, which is indicative of incipient establishment. Based on these reports of P. monodon, its successful invasion elsewhere, and its life history, we believe that this species will become common in the South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico in less than 10 years. Penaeus monodon is an aggressive predator in its native range and, if established, may prey on native shrimps, crabs, and bivalves. The impacts of an established P. monodon population are potentially widespread (e.g., alterations in local commercial fisheries, direct and indirect pressures on native shrimp, crab and bivalve populations, and subsequent impacts on the populations of other predators of those organisms) and should be considered by resource managers. The impacts of P. monodon on native fauna and the source(s) or vector(s) of the invasion, however, remain unknown at this time.

  2. Ocean color spectral variability studies using solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.

    1987-01-01

    It is suggested that chlorophyll-induced ocean color spectral variability can be studied using only a passive airborne spectroradiometer instrument, with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence used as the standard against which all correlations are performed. The intraspectral correlation (ISC) method is demonstrated with results obtained during an airborne mapping mission in the New York Bight. The curvature algorithm is applied to the solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence at about 690 nm, and good agreement is found with results obtained using active-passive correlation spectroscopy. The ISC method has application to spectral variability and resulting chlorophyll concentration measurement in different environmental conditions and in different water types.

  3. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  4. Current-wave interaction in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river plume on the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zengrui; Hetland, Robert D.; Zhang, Wenxia; Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2014-12-01

    Wave-current interaction over the Texas-Louisiana shelf, and its effects on the dispersal and mixing of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya river plume, have been investigated using the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System. The modeling system is driven by realistic wave and current conditions at the open boundaries and high frequency1-D wind measured from a nearby meteorological station. Skill analysis demonstrates that the model reproduces the wave and salinity fields reasonably well. Waves over the Texas-Louisiana shelf are dominated by locally forced wind seas, and generally propagate in the same direction as the winds. Investigation into the spatial differences in the effect of waves reveals two distinct dynamical regions: the Chenier shelf, the shelf region extending roughly offshore from Sabine Lake to Vermilion Bay, and the Louisiana Bight, the region between the Mississippi Delta and Terrebonne Bay. A variety of model runs are performed, where specific wave processes are either included or excluded, in order to isolate the processes acting in different regions. The Chenier shelf is mainly affected by wave enhanced bottom stress, whereas the Louisiana Bight is mostly affected by the surface wave induced mixing and 3-D wave forces. The wave enhanced bottom stress suppresses cross-shore exchange, and acts to trap more freshwater in the nearshore regions shallower than 50 m over the Chenier shelf. Wave enhanced bottom stress plays only a minor role in the Louisiana Bight, where the surface-trapped Mississippi plume rarely feels the bottom. The surface intensified wave mixing and 3-D wave forces reduce the surface salinity and weaken the stratification in the region associated with the thin recirculating Mississippi plume in the Louisiana Bight. Model results indicate that the surface wave mixing, the 3-D wave forces, and the wave bottom stress exhibit little interaction over the Texas-Louisiana shelf. Finally, we have demonstrated

  5. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  6. Atlantic Coastal experiment III, FRV Delaware II cruise, 17-27 May 1977 and R/V ONRUST cruise, 28-30, June 1977. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, S.; Stoddard, A.; von Bock, K. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    The DELAWARE II and ONRUST cruises, continuations of Atlantic Coastal Experiment III, were made during May and late June, 1977, to compare seasonal changes in chlorophyll a, nitrogen nutrient, dissolved oxygen and phytoplankton composition within the mid-Atlantic and New York Bights. Data from 106 stations and 3300 km of surface mapping are reported as classical hydrographic listings, areal and/or vertical contours of chlorophyll a, inorganic nitrogen and salinity, and listings of phytoplankton species abun- dance. Temperature profiles from 100 stations are included, as well as res- piration experiments [ETS assay] for the dinoflagellate, Ceratium tripos.

  7. Circulation and exchange at the continental shelf and slope, SEEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, R.W.; Ou, Hsien-Wang.

    1990-01-01

    This project is a component of the SEEP-2 program to study shelf-slope exchange in the southern Middle Atlantic bight (MBA). It represents the physical oceanographic portion of the SEEP-2 research at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (L-DGO). Since the work consists of two parts: data analysis and theoretical modeling, this report will be divided into two parts to describe the progress of each activity. It covers work performed during the time interval March to December 1990 and is a sequel to the report submitted in February 1990. 25 figs.

  8. Macrobenthos characteristics and distribution, following intensive sand extraction from a subtidal sandbank

    OpenAIRE

    Bonne, W

    2010-01-01

    Macrobenthic fauna are investigated, to establish the nature and vulnerability of benthic communities to aggregate mining on a subtidal sandbank, the Kwinte Bank, in the Southern Bight of the North Sea. Within the central part of this sandbank, a depression (5 m deep) has been created, as a result of 20 years of dredging over the same small area (1 km long and 700 m wide). Three stations were sampled within this central depression; two on the western border; and two to the east of the depress...

  9. Sand dynamics along the Belgian coast based on airborne hyperspectral data and lidar data

    OpenAIRE

    Deronde, B; Houthuys, R.; Sterckx, S.; Fransaer, D.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project was to explore the possibilities of airborne hyperspectral data and airborne lidar data to study sand dynamics on the Belgian backshore and foreshore. The Belgian coast is formed by a sandy strip at the southern edge of the North Sea Basin which is commonly known as the Southern Bight. Since the beach is prone to structural and occasional erosion, it is very important to obtain a better understanding of the processes controlling it. The combination of multi-temporal h...

  10. Life history, food consumption and resource partitioning in two sympatric gobies Pomatoschistus minutus and P. lozanoi in the Belgian coastal waters

    OpenAIRE

    Hamerlynck, O.; Heip, C. H. R.; Redant, F.

    1986-01-01

    Gobies were obtained monthly from the bycatch of a commercial shrimp trawler operating in the shallow waters (less than 20m depth) of the Westdiep area, Southern Bight of the North Sea, from May through December 1984. Pomatoschistus lozanoi juveniles appear later than P. minutus juveniles, indicating a temporal segregation of reproduction. Yearly average density of P. minutus is about twice that of P. lozanoi. Food consumption by the two species amounts to 1-2 g AFDW/m2/year. Stomach analysis...

  11. Fallout deposits of Chernobyl radiocesium in the Norwegian Sea and North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of Cs-137 and Cs-134 from the Chernobyl fallout in the marine environment is described and quantified. Seawater samples and sediments from the Norwegian Sea were analysed by γ-spectroscopy. The influence of biogenic processes in the surface layer of the ocean on sedimentation was investigated and the type and bonding of radiocesium to suspended particles from the German Bight was assessed by sequential extractions. The results are compared with long-standing pollution from fuel reprocessing plants and nuclear arms tests. (HP) With 44 figs., 15 tabs

  12. Range extension for Sagitta peruviana (Chaetognatha:Sagittoidea) in Bahia Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Cota Meza, María Soledad; Fernández del Alamo, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    In August and September of 1982 we recorded 6 041 and 318 individuals/100 m3 of S. peruviana (Sund, 1961), at 24° 15¢ to 25° 20¢ N and 111° 30¢, to 112° 12¢ W, respectively. It was first described from Perú (Sund, P. N. 1961. Pac. Sci. 15: 1-350) and later found in Colombia (Pineda-Polo, F 1971, p. 309-335 In Costlow (ed.). Fertility of the sea), Panamá (Pineda-Polo, F. 1978. Taxonomy of chaetognaths of the Bight of Panamá... Bol. Dept. Biol. Universidad de Valle, Colombia: 371-439.), Costa R...

  13. Fluorescence of dissolved organic matter: A comparison of north Pacific and north Atlantic Oceans during April 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Vodacek, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    Profiles of airborne-laser-induced fluorescence emission from dissolved organic matter in the upper ocean have been produced and compared for the Southern California Bight (SCB) and the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Findings were as follows. (1) The fluorescent components of dissolved organic matter (FDOM) are present in easily measurable quantities from near shore to well over 300 km offshore in the SCB and are likewise easily measurable in the coastal, shelf, slope, and Gulf Stream waters of the MAB. (2) The reange of FDOM in the MAB is considerably greater than that in the SCB. (3) The lowest FDOM levels observed in the SCB were higher than those found in the Gulf Stream. (4) The onshore-to-offshore spatial gradient of the FDOM was found to be considerably lower in the SCB than in the MAB, with the highest levels of FDOM being found immediately adjacent to the coast in the MAB. This suggests that the water adjacent to the SCB shoreline is not as strongly influenced by terrestrial and estuarine sources of FDOM as the MAB is. (5) The spatial distribution of the FDOM within both the SCB and the MAB is frequently coherent with the spatial distribution of chlorophyll determined form the concurrent airborne- laser- induced phytoplankton pigment fluorescence measurements. However, distinct noncoherency is sometimes observed, especially at water mass boundaries.

  14. Dynamics of the Cold Water Event off the Southeast Coast of the United States in the Summer of 2003: An Application of NASA's Remote Sensing Data to Coastal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dongliang; Savtchenko, Andrey; Li, Chunyan,

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard of Terra and Aqua satellites provide, for the first time, concurrent measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean color, which are suitable for coastal upwelling studies. The accuracy, the 1-km spatial resolution, and the almost complete daily coverage of the MODIS data compared with historical measurements make it advantageous for resolving important coastal fronts of chlorophyll concentration and temperature. The cold SST anomaly during summer 2003 off the coast of the South Atlantic Bight is an event that is comprehensively covered by NASA's MODIS and SeaWinds satellite observations. These data combined with in situ tide gauge, mooring, and ship measurements can be used to identify important dynamics responsible for the anomalous cold water event. The analysis of the data suggests that coastal upwelling occurs in the climatological summer forced by the climatological southerlies over the South Atlantic Bight area in summer. However, the strong buoyancy barrier in summer prevents the cold water below the thermocline from reaching the ocean surface. In summer 2003, the southwesterlies in July through August were extraordinarily strong and persistent, which generated the upwelling currents strong enough to overcome the buoyancy resistance. The results of this analysis demonstrate the possibility of monitoring and forecasting the event using combination of the satellite and in situ observations. The MODIS data are archived and distributed by the NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data can be accessed via the URL http://wwv.daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/MODIS.

  15. Lead and cadmium contents in selected macrofauna species from the Dogger Bank and the eastern North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroencke, I.

    1987-01-01

    Lead and cadmium concentrations were measured in the polychaetes Nephtys hombergi and N. caeca, in the sea-urchin Echinocardium cordatum, and in the bivalve Venus striatula obtained from the Dogger Bank and the eastern North Sea. The cadmium concentrations determined in all four species from these areas were relatively equal, except for an increase in concentration found in those species from the northeastern part of the Dogger Bank. A lower lead content was generally observed in the individuals taken from the German Bight than in those from the Dogger Bank, especially from its northeastern part. In the case of lead, it is possible to divide the southern North Sea into three regions according to the different concentration levels by statistical treatment: The less contaminated German Bight, the more contaminated central Dogger Bank and the highly affected northeastern Dogger Bank. The results obtained contradict the prevailing opinion that offshore invertebrate populations are, in comparison to individuals from coastal regions, less affected by contaminants such as heavy metals.

  16. Lead and cadmium contents in selected macrofauna species from the Dogger Bank and the eastern north Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröncke, Ingrid

    1987-12-01

    Lead and cadmium concentrations were measured in the polychaetes Nephtys hombergi and N. caeca, in the sea-urchin Echinocardium cordatum, and in the bivalve Venus striatula obtained from the Dogger Bank and the eastern North Sea. The cadmium concentrations determined in all four species from these areas were relatively equal, except for an increase in concentration found in those species from the northeastern part of the Dogger Bank. A lower lead content was generally observed in the individuals taken from the German Bight than in those from the Dogger Bank, especially from its northeastern part. In the case of lead, it is possible to divide the southern North Sea into three regions according to the different concentration levels by statistical treatment: the less contaminated German Bight, the more contaminated central Dogger Bank and the highly affected northeastern Dogger Bank. The results obtained contradict the prevailing opinion that offshore invertebrate populations are, in comparison to individuals from coastal regions, less affected by contaminants such as heavy metals.

  17. The North Sea: Satellite colour atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holligan, P. M.; Aarup, T.; Groom, S. B.

    Satellite imagery of the North Sea from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) shows complex seasonal changes in the optical and biological properties of surface waters, features which have not been resolved, hitherto, through direct observations from ships. Selected scenes for the period 1979-1986, presented as single band (channel 3), colour composite (channels 1 + 2 + 3) and chlorophyll (channels 1/3 or 2/3) images, are used to demonstrate the relative surface distributions between February and October of suspended sediments, coccolithophores and plant pigments. Comparison are made also with sea surface temperature images from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Quantitative evaluation of the CZCS data is restricted by a lack of contemporary in situ optical and biological measurements. However, chlorophyll and Secchi disc distributions, determined by measurements from research ships have been compared qualitatively with images from the Southern Bight (13 May 1986) and for the east central North Sea (24 August 1984 and 24 October 1985). Mini series of CZCS images are presented to show the annual coccolithophore blooms, the development of the spring bloom in the Skagerrak, June 1983 and summer chlorophyl distributions in the German Bight.

  18. Annual dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton: seasonal variability superimposes short-term variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Judith; Wichels, Antje; Teeling, Hanno; Chafee, Meghan; Scharfe, Mirco; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of coastal marine microbial communities are driven by seasonally changing abiotic and biotic factors as well as by rapidly occurring short-term changes such as river fresh water influxes or phytoplankton blooms. We examined the variability of the free-living bacterioplankton at Helgoland Roads (German Bight, North Sea) over a period of one year with high temporal and taxonomic resolution to reveal variation patterns and main influencing factors. 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing of the bacterioplankton community hints at annual recurrence and resilience of few main taxa belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, Acidimicrobiia and Thermoplasmata. Multiple regression analyses with various environmental factors revealed changes in water current patterns and resulting phytoplankton blooms as the main driving factors for short-term variation and temperature as the overlying factor for seasonal variation. Comparison of bacterioplankton successions during spring and summer phytoplankton blooms revealed the same dominating Flavobacteriia operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but shifts in Roseobacter related OTUs (Alphaproteobacteria) and SAR92 clade members (Gammaproteobacteria). Network analysis suggests that during spring and summer phytoplankton blooms temperature-dependent guilds are formed. In conclusion, our data imply that short-term bacterioplankton successions in response to phytoplankton blooms are indirectly affected by temperature, which is a major niche-defining factor in the German Bight. PMID:26298013

  19. Applications of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner in oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Research activity has continued to be focused on the applications of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery in oceanography. A number of regional studies were completed including investigations of temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton populations in the South Atlantic Bight, Northwest Spain, Weddell Sea, Bering Sea, Caribbean Sea and in tropical Atlantic Ocean. In addition to the regional studies, much work was dedicated to developing ancillary global scale meteorological and hydrographic data sets to complement the global CZCS processing products. To accomplish this, SEAPAK's image analysis capability was complemented with an interface to GEMPAK (Severe Storm Branch's meteorological analysis software package) for the analysis and graphical display of gridded data fields. Plans are being made to develop a similar interface to SEAPAK for hydrographic data using EPIC (a hydrographic data analysis package developed by NOAA/PMEL).

  20. Computer derived coastal water classifications via spectral signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. K.; Zaitzeff, J. B.; Strees, L. V.; Glidden, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    In April 1973, the National Environmental Satellite Service conducted a remote sensing investigation within the coastal waters of the New York Bight. Remote sensor records acquired from the ERTS-1 Multispectral Scanner and the Bendix 24 Channel Multispectral Scanner records flown on the NASA C-130 were used for water mass classification. Computer-derived classifications are discussed and compared. Such features as the Hudson River's turbid discharge plumes, acid waste and shelf water are examined in terms of their distribution of suspended particulates (2-203 microns), transmissivity, diffuse attenuation, incident and returned spectral irradiances. The characteristics of these features and their relationship to the computer derived classifications are presented and discussed with respect to radiative transfer theory.

  1. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2015-04-01

    An observational study was performed in the central Southern California Bight in Spring 2010 to understand the relationship between seasonal spring phytoplankton blooms and coastal processes that included nutrient input from upwelling, wastewater effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development and evolution of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Results from the glider and ESP observations demonstrated that blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. A significant outbreak and surface manifestation of the blooms coincided with periods of upwelling, or other processes that caused shallowing of the pycnocline and subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Our results indicate that subsurface populations can be an important source for “seeding” surface Pseudo-nitzschia HAB events in southern California.

  2. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil spill drift paths in the German Bight—probabilistic assessment based on numerical ensemble simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; Groll, Nikolaus; Maßmann, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Oil dispersed in the water column remains sheltered from wind forcing, so that an altered drift path is a key consequence of using chemical dispersants. In this study, ensemble simulations were conducted based on 7 years of simulated atmospheric and marine conditions, evaluating 2,190 hypothetical spills from each of 636 cells of a regular grid covering the inner German Bight (SE North Sea). Each simulation compares two idealized setups assuming either undispersed or fully dispersed oil. Differences are summarized in a spatial map of probabilities that chemical dispersant applications would help prevent oil pollution from entering intertidal coastal areas of the Wadden Sea. High probabilities of success overlap strongly with coastal regions between 10 m and 20 m water depth, where the use of chemical dispersants for oil spill response is a particularly contentious topic. The present study prepares the ground for a more detailed net environmental benefit analysis (NEBA) accounting also for toxic effects.

  3. An evaluation of the concept of assimilative capacity as applied to marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of assimilative capacity has been suggested as a basis for permitting the controlled disposal of anthropogenic wastes in the ocean. It is suggested in this study that the term assimilative is a misnomer since there is no benefit for the receiving body of water from the addition of pollutants. The term accommodative capacity (AC) is suggested in its place. This procedure has been applied to the disposal of radioactive wastes, mercury and bacteria. In addition, two examples where the AC approach has been extended to the overall health of the ecosystem are considered: PCB's in the New York Bight and the disposal of sewage effluent off the coast of Southern California. From these examples, three schemes are put forward to implement the concept of AC on the basis of a) public health considerations, b) effects on the marine ecosystem and c) experimental strategies

  4. Contesting "Le corps militaire": Antimilitarism, Pacificism, Anarcho-Communism and 'Le Douanier' Rousseau's La Guerre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer, Fae

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When the 1889 Military Law was passed, it established three-year universal conscription and a greater army of citizens to boost military preparedness for war in French colonies and against Germany.Far from its ramifications being of no concern to neo-impressionists, it was the subject of bightingly bitter antimilitarist cartoons by Maximilien Luce and antimilitarist paintings by the neo-impressionist outsider, 'Le douanier' Rousseau. Far from picturing the patriotic honor of becoming a soldier and the victories of war, as did Edouard Detaille, Rousseau did the opposite. In the heat of military slaughter of families at Fourmies, Rousseau revealed how conscription would transform French citizens into le corps militaire to fight not just against their arch-enemy with machine-like precision but against their very own people.

  5. Application of a new automatic event-controlled sampler for heavy metals: studies on the behaviour of particle bound heavy metals in the Elbe estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automatic, remote-controlled sampling system for heavy metals (AISIT, automatic intelligent sampler for inorganic trace constituents) is presented and its functionality described. In order to characterize the automatic sampler (referring to cleanness/contamination) comparison to manual sampling methods was performed in several campaigns. Results of comparative samples from the German Bight as well as from the buoy META I near Brunsbuettel in the Elbe estuary are discussed. The automatic sampler allows event-triggered sampling, i.e. collecting water samples in dependence on measurement parameters (turbidity, conductivity, etc.). The functionality of automatic, event-controlled sampling within the MERMAID system is described. Time series of event-triggered samples are presented and interpreted. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  6. Distribution of the early larval stages of cod, plaice and lesser sandeel across haline fronts in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Peter; Wright, P.J.; Pihl, Niels Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    A number of commercially important fish species spawn in the coastal areas of the North Sea in the late winter, including cod (Gadus morhua), plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and lesser sandeel (Ammodytes marinus). The distribution of the early stages of these species overlap to some extent...... goals were to ascertain the major traits of larval distribution patterns and the spatial correspondence among species, focusing on the relationship between larval distributions and hydrographic characteristics. Larvae of all three species were found distributed within the shallow Regions of Freshwater...... Influence (ROFI), predominantly in the Dogger Bank and German Bight areas. There was a high degree of overlap between the distributions of cod and plaice, while the maximal abundance of lesser sandeel was found inshore of the other species. Larval distributions were to a large extent confined by the frontal...

  7. Topographic vorticity generation, submesoscale instability and vortex street formation in the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gula, J.; Molemaker, M. J.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    Meanders and eddies are routinely observed in the Gulf Stream along the South Atlantic Bight. We analyze here the instability processes that lead to the formation of submesoscale eddies on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream at the exit of the Florida Straits using very high resolution realistic simulations. The positive relative vorticity and potential vorticity on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream are strongly intensified in the Straits due to topographic drag along the continental slope. The bottom drag amplifies the cyclonic shear by generating large positive vertical vorticity values within the sloped turbulent bottom boundary layer. Downstream from the Straits the current becomes unstable to horizontal shear instability, rolls up, and forms a street of submesoscale vortices. The vortices expand as they propagate northward along the shelf, where they can generate large vertical displacements and enhance cross-shelf exchanges.

  8. Inverted barometer contributions to recent sea level changes along the northeast coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Christopher G.; Ponte, Rui M.

    2015-07-01

    Regional sea level (SL) changes reflect dynamic and isostatic ocean effects. Recent works have interpreted accelerated and extreme SL changes along the northeast coast of North America primarily in terms of dynamic changes; however, dedicated study of isostatic changes related to surface atmospheric pressure loading—the inverted barometer (IB) effect—has been lacking. This investigation uses five different atmospheric pressure products to analyze the influence of the IB effect on annual mean SL from tide gauge records. The IB effect explains ˜25% of interannual SL variance and accounts for ˜50% of the magnitude of a recent extreme event of SL rise along Atlantic Canada and New England. Estimated IB effects also amount to ˜10-30% of recent multidecadal SL accelerations over the Mid-Atlantic Bight and Southern New England. These findings reiterate the need for careful estimation and removal of isostatic effects for studies of dynamic SL.

  9. Spatial, seasonal and vertical distributions of currently-used pesticides in the marine boundary layer of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Carolin; Theobald, Norbert; Lammel, Gerhard; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich

    2013-08-01

    Pesticides are transported beyond source regions and reach coastal waters and shelf seas. 23 representatives of six chemical classes of currently-used pesticides (CUPs) were simultaneously quantified in the marine boundary layer and the surface seawater of the German Bight and the central North Sea in 2009 and 2010.Terbuthylazine, metolachlor, metazachlor, pendimethalin and trifluralin exhibited the highest concentrations, seasonally highly variable. Advection of contaminated air from land and subsequent atmospheric deposition was shown to contribute to surface seawater contamination significantly, in particular in regions beyond riverine input and during the main seasons of application in agriculture. Deposition was most significant for the seasonal and spatial distributions of pendimethalin and trifluralin. Atrazine and simazine levels in the air are lower than 1-2 decades ago.

  10. Time series analysis of monthly mean data of temperature, salinity, nutrients, suspended matter, phyto- and zooplankton at eight locations on the northwest european shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, M.; Batten, S.; Becker, G.; Bot, P.; Colijn, F.; Damm, P.; Danielssen, D.; van den Eynde, D.; Føyn, L.; Frohse, A.; Groeneveld, G.; Laane, R.; van Raaphorst, W.; Radach, G.; Schultz, H.; Sündermann, J.

    1996-09-01

    In this study an overview is given of the time series analysis of monthly mean data of physical, chemical and biological parameters. The time series are available at eight locations on the Northwest European Shelf. The integrated evaluation of those time series gives the opportunity to look for connections between the different parts of the shelf. Temperature and salinity seem to be externally forced. For the nutrients and biological parameters the local forcing is dominating the time series. It is concluded that there are areas that are comparable to each other (freshwater dominated boxes along the Belgian and Dutch coasts and German Bight; Atlantic dominated boxes in the English Channel and off the Scottish coast), although significant cross-correlations are hardly found. The Irish Sea can be regarded as a separate ecosystem.

  11. Methane production from bicarbonate and acetate in an anoxic marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, P. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    Methane production from C-14 labeled bicarbonate and acetate was measured over the top 28 cm of anoxic Cape Lookout Bight sediments during the summer of 1983. The depth distribution and magnitude of summed radioisotopically determined rates compare well with previous measurements of total methane production and the sediment-water methane flux. Methane production from CO2 reduction and acetate fermentation accounts for greater than 80 percent of the total production rate and sediment-water flux. Methane production from bicarbonate was found to occur in all depth intervals sampled except those in the top 2 cm, whereas significant methane production from acetate only occurred at depths below 10 cm where sulfate was exhausted. Acetate provided 20 to 29 percent of the measured methane production integrated over the top 30 cm of the sediments.

  12. Detecting relationships between the interannual variability in climate records and ecological time series using a multivariate statistical approach - four case studies for the North Sea region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyen, H. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Gewaesserphysik

    1998-12-31

    A multivariate statistical approach is presented that allows a systematic search for relationships between the interannual variability in climate records and ecological time series. Statistical models are built between climatological predictor fields and the variables of interest. Relationships are sought on different temporal scales and for different seasons and time lags. The possibilities and limitations of this approach are discussed in four case studies dealing with salinity in the German Bight, abundance of zooplankton at Helgoland Roads, macrofauna communities off Norderney and the arrival of migratory birds on Helgoland. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein statistisches, multivariates Modell wird vorgestellt, das eine systematische Suche nach potentiellen Zusammenhaengen zwischen Variabilitaet in Klima- und oekologischen Zeitserien erlaubt. Anhand von vier Anwendungsbeispielen wird der Klimaeinfluss auf den Salzgehalt in der Deutschen Bucht, Zooplankton vor Helgoland, Makrofauna vor Norderney, und die Ankunft von Zugvoegeln auf Helgoland untersucht. (orig.)

  13. Increase in dimethylsulfide (DMS emissions due to eutrophication of coastal waters offsets their reduction due to ocean acidification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eGypens

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Available information from manipulative experiments suggested that the emission of dimethylsulfide (DMS would decrease in response to the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean (ocean acidification. However, in coastal environments, the carbonate chemistry of surface waters was also strongly modified by eutrophication and related changes in biological activity (increased primary production and change in phytoplankton dominance during the last 50 years. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DMS emissions in marine coastal environments also strongly responded to eutrophication in addition to ocean acidification at decadal timescales. We used the R-MIRO-BIOGAS model in the eutrophied Southern Bight of the North Sea characterized by intense blooms of Phaeocystis that are high producers of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, the precursor of DMS. We showed that, for the period from 1951 to 2007, eutrophication actually led to an increase of DMS emissions much stronger than the response of DMS emissions to ocean acidification.

  14. Global detection and analysis of coastline associated rainfall using objective pattern recognition techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Martin; Lane, Todd P

    2015-01-01

    Coastally induced rainfall is a common feature especially in tropical and subtropical regions. However, it has been difficult to quantify the contribution of coastal rainfall features to the overall local rainfall. We develop a novel technique to objectively identify precipitation associated with land-sea interaction and apply it to satellite based rainfall estimates. The Maritime Continent, the Bight of Panama, Madagascar and the Mediterranean are found to be regions where land-sea interactions plays a crucial role in the formation of precipitation. In these regions $\\approx$ 40\\% to 60\\% of the total rainfall can be related to coastline effects. Due to its importance for the climate system, the Maritime Continent is a particular region of interest with high overall amounts of rainfall and large fractions resulting from land-sea interactions throughout the year. To demonstrate the utility of our identification method we investigate the influence of several modes of variability, such as the Madden-Julian-Osci...

  15. Deep primary production in coastal pelagic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsgaard, Maren Moltke; Richardson, Katherine; Markager, Stiig;

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring data (1999 to 2012) and data from a 2 wk field study at a seasonally stratified station in the Aarhus Bight near the Danish coast were used to demonstrate that the vertical distribution of photosynthesis influences both water column oxygen conditions and the fate of the organic material...... produced. The primary production (PP) occurring below the surface layer, i.e. in the pycnocline-bottom layer (PBL), is shown to contribute significantly to total PP. Oxygen concentrations in the PBL are shown to correlate significantly with the deep primary production (DPP) as well as with salinity....... Sinking rates (based on sediment trap collections) of carbon and nitrogen were highest in the PBL. Lyngsgaard et al. (2014; Limnol Oceanogr 59: 1679-1690) have demonstrated that the vertical distribution of PP in this region is influenced by anthropogenic nutrient loading. Thus, the present study...

  16. Carbon Isotope Biogeochemistry of Methane from Anoxic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Neal E.

    1993-01-01

    The isotopic composition of naturally occurring methane was used to constrain the tropospheric budget of that radiatively active gas. Numerous studies have shown that the isotopic composition is not constant, even for a specific source, and may vary temporally and spatially. The objective was to develop a process-level model that reproduced the seasonal variations in the C-13/C-12 composition of methane observed at the coastal site, Cape Lookout Bight, NC. Details of the mass balance are provided. Experiments and models designed to determine what factors incluence C-13/C-12 ratio of dissolved CO2 are reported. All the factors described were combined in a model that faithfully reproduces the seasonal C-13/C-12 variations observed at Cape Lookout. The model is described.

  17. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of methane production in anoxic sediments. 1: Field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Neal E.; Boehme, Susan E.; Carter, W. Dale, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The natural abundance C-13/C-12 ratio of methane from anoxic marine and freshwater sediments in temperate climates varies seasonally. Carbon isotopic measurements of the methanogenic precursors, acetate and dissolved inorganic carbon, from the marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina were used to determine the sources of the seasonal variations at that site. Movement of the methanogenic zone over an isotopic gradient within the dissolved CO2 pool appears to be the dominant control of the methane C-13/C-12 ratio from February to June. The onset of acetoclastic methane-production is a second important controlling process during mid-summer. An apparent temperature dependence on the fractionation factor for CO2-reduction may have a significant influence on the isotopic composition of methane throughout the year.

  18. Research on the marine food chain. Progress report, July 1974--June 1975. Part I. Introduction and account of work in progress. Part II. Manuscript reports of work concluded. Part III. Cruise summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The all-group field program during 1971-74 was on plankton dynamics in the central gyre of the North Pacific. Cruises to this area were completed, and the resultant manuscripts for the 1974-75 period are included in Part II of the report. During the past year the major field program was a series of four quarterly cruises in the Southern California Bight designed to evaluate the possible local and far-field effects of the cooling water system and thermal plume of the San Onofre Nuclear Power plant. Additional field programs included a cruise to the Gulf of California (R/V Alpha Helix) concerned with problems in marine photobiology, a cruise in Antarctic waters south of Buenos Aires (Islas Orcadas, formerly U.S.N.S. Eltanin) concerned with phytoplankton productivity, and a cruise in the Atlantic off northwestern Africa (F. S. Meteor) concerned with sediment microbiology. (auth)

  19. Do East Australian Current anticyclonic eddies leave the Tasman Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Gabriela S.; Oke, Peter R.; Rykova, Tatiana; Coleman, Richard; Ridgway, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Using satellite altimetry and high-resolution model output we analyze the pathway of large, long-lived anticyclonic eddies that originate near the East Australian Current (EAC) separation point. We show that 25-30% of these eddies propagate southward, around Tasmania, leave the Tasman Sea, and decay in the Great Australian Bight. This pathway has not been previously documented owing to poor satellite sampling off eastern Tasmania. As eddies propagate southward, they often "stall" for several months at near-constant latitude. Along the pathway eddies become increasingly barotropic. Eddy intensity is primarily influenced by merging with other eddies and a gradual decay otherwise. Surface temperature anomaly associated with anticyclonic eddies changes as they propagate, while surface salinity anomaly tends to remain relatively unchanged as they propagate.

  20. Diagenetic isotope effects in an anoxic marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon isotope effects associated with the remineralization of organic matter in the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, NC, have been investigated. Total organic carbon δ13C profiles and an isotopic mass balance of the diagenetic products, σCO2 and methane, indicate that the initial step in the breakdown of the organic matter, i.e. the transformation of biopolymeric material to biomonomers, does not express a significant isotope effect. Intramolecular δ13C measurements of the diagenetic intermediate, acetate indicates that large isotope effects (5-10 per-thousand) occur during the biosynthesis of that compound. Downcore δ13C variations in the acetate appear to be related to fractionations associated with methanogenesis. The fractionation factor for the conversion of the acetate methyl group to methane has been estimated to be 1.02 from the porewater profiles

  1. Comparing wavelengths simulated by the coastal wave model CWAM and TerraSAR-X satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Claus; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Rosenthal, Wolfgang; Lehner, Susanne; Hoffmann, Peter; Kieser, Jens; Bruns, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The accuracy of the high resolution coastal wave forecast model CWAM is validated on the basis of sea state information from satellite images of TerraSAR-X (TS-X). At the same time, the performance of the satellite retrieval of sea state parameters is demonstrated. Employing 2-dimensional spatial Fourier Transformation, image spectra are derived from TS-X and locally varying patterns of the peak wavelength are provided using state-of-the-art satellite retrieval. Subsequently, wavelength comparisons are performed between a typical set of TS-X scenes acquired in December 2013 over the German Bight and the model hindcasts. The results are mostly in reasonable agreement. Potential shortcomings of the wave model are discussed as well.

  2. Southeast continental shelf studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1979-02-12

    Research efforts on the southeast continental shelf currently describe the manner in which fluctuations in Gulf Stream motion influence biological and chemical processes. Current meter arrays are maintained in the Georgia Bight and in Onslow Bay to describe general circulation patterns and to identify forcing functions. biological studies describe processes affecting temporal and spatial variations on the shelf and have attempted to track the biological history of intruded Gulf Stream water masses. Chemical studies examine the influence of both physical and biological variables on the distribution and fate of trace elements. The current state of knowledge is reviewed, the hypotheses developed and are described, a rationale for testing these hypotheses is given. 1 figure, 1 table.

  3. Shelf export of particulates/transport in continental margin waters. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1995-07-01

    During the present funding period, research activities at NCSU have been directed towards: publishing the results of SEEP-I; publishing further results from NCSU`s South Atlantic Bight studies; designing and constructing four cages which house the 3 NCSU and 1 BNL RD-Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers used successfully in SEEP-II, calibrating all current meters, transmissometers, thermister chains and conductivity pressure and temperature sensors for SEEP-II phases 2 and 3; determining the temporal and spatial scales of physical processes observed during phase 1 of SEEP-II in preparation for finalizing the mooring positions and sampling intervals for SEEP-II; shipping all NCSU gear to the URI and ODU; and successful deployment of NCSU SEEP-II, phases 1 and 2 moorings.

  4. Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeling, Hanno; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Bennke, Christin M; Krüger, Karen; Chafee, Meghan; Kappelmann, Lennart; Reintjes, Greta; Waldmann, Jost; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Lucas, Judith; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Wiltshire, Karen H; Amann, Rudolf I

    2016-01-01

    A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing. PMID:27054497

  5. Episodicity in phytoplankton dynamics in a coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Bror F.; Salisbury, Joseph E.

    2016-06-01

    Much is still unknown about the control of oceanic biological production, especially in coastal areas where daily changes can be as large as seasonal variability. Both data scarcity and a lack of methods with sufficient coverage in space and time hinder our progress. Here we present a satellite-derived proxy for net community production where simulated velocity fields are combined with satellite data to create a comprehensive accounting of spatial and temporal scales of biological production in the Southern California Bight. Statistical analyses show that rare events exert a major influence when estimating mean production over seasonal time scales: about 65% of change in biomass is caused by the 10% highest values in our data set. The results suggest that frequencies of rare events might be as important for biological production as seasonal averages. Our work highlights the need for additional data sets sampled at higher frequencies and shorter spatial scales.

  6. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...... reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found...... at a site with very high concentrations of total sulfide and NH4+ within and below the layer in which NO3- reduction occurred. Sediment from two field sites, one with low and one with high DNRA activity in the core incubations, was also used for slurry incubations. Now, in both sediments high DNRA activity...

  7. Radio luminosity function of brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Z S; Wen, Z L

    2016-01-01

    By cross-matching the currently largest optical catalog of galaxy clusters and the NVSS radio survey database, we obtain the largest complete sample of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in the redshift range of 0.05bight galaxies located in more relaxed clusters. We derived the radio luminosity functions of BCGs from the largest complete sample of BCGs, and find that the functions depend on the optical luminosity of BCGs and the dynamical state of galaxy clusters. However, the radio luminosity function does not show significant evolution with redshift.

  8. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  9. Spatial impact of the Oder river plume on water quality along the south-western Baltic coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernewski, G; Neumann, T; Podsetchine, V; Siegel, H

    2001-11-01

    The Oder (Odra) river is the most important nutrient source and pollutant for the south-western Baltic Sea. Adjacent German-Polish coastal waters, the Oder (Szczecin) Lagoon and the Oder (Pomeranian) Bight therefore suffer from severe eutrophication and water quality problems. At the same time, summer (bathing) tourism is the most important economical factor in this coastal zone, especially on the islands of Usedom and Wolin. On the basis of model simulations and remote sensing data we analysed the spatial extent and variability of the Oder river plume in the lagoon and the Balic Sea in common summer situations and during the extreme Oder flood in August 1997. Water quality shows pronounced gradients between coastal waters and open Baltic Sea. In the lagoon, it usually takes more than 6 weeks until Oder water enters the large western bay, the Kleines Haff. During transport, degradation, transformation and sedimentation processes alter the water quality and prevent the inner coast of Usedom from direct impact of polluted Oder water. Ongoing nutrient supply promotes intensive algal proliferation in all parts of the lagoon and contributes to the low water transparency. Oder water passing the lagoon and entering the Baltic Sea is transported over long distances in narrow bands along the shore. Under easterly winds the water quality near well-known spas on Usedom is reduced due to Oder river plume impact. Upwelling effects can have negative impact on water quality, too. Intensive blooms of potentially toxic blue-green algae species, are the rule in the lagoon and frequent in the Oder Bight in summer. They are a hazard and limit the acceptance of swimming beaches at the inner coast of Usedom. Practical consequences of variable water quality gradients e.g. on hygienic water sampling are discussed. PMID:11759158

  10. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally

  11. Hydrographic Conditions At The Carbonate Mound Locations In The NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weering, T.; de Hass, H.; White, M.; de Stigter, H.

    As part of the component 5th framework projects that form part of the OMARC clus- ter, hydrographic measurements have been made in the region of the deep water car- bonate mounds provinces of the NE Atlantic. These mounds are located at depths 600-1000m depth along the continental slopes of the Porcupine Sea Bight and Bank and the SE Rockall Bank. These regions correspond to the vertical and horizontal boundaries of the intermediate water masses that occupy the region, providing differ- ent hydrographic regimes between mound locations,. In addition there is a large vari- ability in temperature/salinity conditions and both characteristics have implications for the distribution of mound fauna. The deep water coral associated with carbonate mound structures coincide with strong benthic current activity and this is confirmed from benthic current measurements from landers and current meters at the SE Rockall and NW Porcupine Bank mound loca- tions. Near seabed currents are strong, with a typical mean speed of 20cm/s and a max- imum in excess of 50cm/s. At the SE Rockall Bank site, a mean SW along isobath flow is measured, whilst at the NW Porcupine mound location, a poleward slope current is measured. Bottom Ekman dynamics is apparent with a changes in near seabed verti- cal stratification related to changes to overlying slope current strength. Strong diurnal variability is found at the Rockall Bank site, providing strong cross-slope currents. The diurnal current forcing over both the Rockall and Porcupine Banks may result in enclosed circulation patterns over the banks and retention of organic material supplied to the mounds. In contrast, currents at the Hovland and Magellan mound sites in the northern Porcupine Sea Bight, where there are numerous buried mounds, are relatively low.

  12. The Central Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System (CenGOOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howden, S. D.; Asper, V.; Lohrenz, S.; Roman, D.

    2005-05-01

    The University of Southern Mississippi has established a coastal ocean observing system in the north-central Gulf of Mexico, where there is a dearth of real-time oceanographic observations on the continental shelf. The development of the Central Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System (CenGOOS) follows overall guidelines for the Integrated Ocean Observing System as articulated by Ocean.US, and draft regional guidelines set forth by the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA). The present system consists of a 3-m discus buoy measuring both meteorological and oceanographic parameters that are telemetered to the USM Department of Marine Science every three hours via Globalstar satellite communications. Data are served via a web site (www.cengoos.org). The near-term development of the system will include: Further integration with the coastal and near coastal observatories in the region Deployment of a two station, long range, high frequency radar system for mapping surface currents in the Mississippi Bight Deployment of additional instrumented moorings in the Mississippi Bight Development of a data assimilative nowcast/forecast numerical model of the region Regional database of high resolution multibeam and side-scan sonar data The initial plan for development of CenGOOS was formulated based on input solicited from identified stakeholders, regional priorities identified through opinion surveys conducted by the GCOOS-RA, and guidance from both Ocean.US and GCOOS-RA. An overview of our accomplishments, and vision for the future will be presented. This will include the hardware infrastructure, data management and communications plans and implementation, and other activities to integrate CenGOOS with the other observing systems in the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. Distribution of N2O in the Baltic Sea during transition from anoxic to oxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Walter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2003, a major inflow of cold and oxygen-rich North Sea Water terminated an ongoing stagnation period in parts of the central Baltic Sea. In order to investigate the role of North Sea Water inflow in the production of nitrous oxide (N2O, we measured dissolved and atmospheric N2O at 26 stations in the southern and central Baltic Sea in October 2003. At the time of our cruise, water renewal had proceeded to the eastern Gotland Basin, whereas the western Gotland Basin was still unaffected by the inflow. The deep water renewal was detectable in the distributions of temperature, salinity, and oxygen concentrations as well as in the distribution of the N2O concentrations: Shallow stations in the Kiel Bight and Pomeranian Bight were well-ventilated with uniform N2O concentrations near equilibrium throughout the water column. In contrast, stations in the deep basins, such as the Bornholm and the Gotland Deep, showed a clear stratification with deep water affected by North Sea Water. Inflowing North Sea Water led to changed environmental conditions, especially enhanced oxygen (O2 or declining hydrogen sulphide (H2S concentrations, thus, affecting the conditions for the production of N2O. Pattern of N2O profiles and correlations with parameters like oxygen and nitrate differed between the basins. Because of the positive correlation between ΔN2O and AOU in oxic waters the dominant production pathway seems to be nitrification rather than denitrification. Advection of N2O by North Sea Water was found to be of minor importance. A rough budget revealed a significant surplus of in situ produced N2O after the inflow. However, due to the permanent halocline, it can be assumed that the N2O produced does not reach the atmosphere. Hydrographic aspects therefore are decisive factors determining the final release of N2O produced to the atmosphere.

  14. Gene expression and physiological changes of different populations of the long-lived bivalve Arctica islandica under low oxygen conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva E R Philipp

    Full Text Available The bivalve Arctica islandica is extremely long lived (>400 years and can tolerate long periods of hypoxia and anoxia. European populations differ in maximum life spans (MLSP from 40 years in the Baltic to >400 years around Iceland. Characteristic behavior of A. islandica involves phases of metabolic rate depression (MRD during which the animals burry into the sediment for several days. During these phases the shell water oxygen concentrations reaches hypoxic to anoxic levels, which possibly support the long life span of some populations. We investigated gene regulation in A. islandica from a long-lived (MLSP 150 years German Bight population and the short-lived Baltic Sea population, experimentally exposed to different oxygen levels. A new A. islandica transcriptome enabled the identification of genes important during hypoxia/anoxia events and, more generally, gene mining for putative stress response and (anti- aging genes. Expression changes of a antioxidant defense: Catalase, Glutathione peroxidase, manganese and copper-zinc Superoxide dismutase; b oxygen sensing and general stress response: Hypoxia inducible factor alpha, Prolyl hydroxylase and Heat-shock protein 70; and c anaerobic capacity: Malate dehydrogenase and Octopine dehydrogenase, related transcripts were investigated. Exposed to low oxygen, German Bight individuals suppressed transcription of all investigated genes, whereas Baltic Sea bivalves enhanced gene transcription under anoxic incubation (0 kPa and, further, decreased these transcription levels again during 6 h of re-oxygenation. Hypoxic and anoxic exposure and subsequent re-oxygenation in Baltic Sea animals did not lead to increased protein oxidation or induction of apoptosis, emphasizing considerable hypoxia/re-oxygenation tolerance in this species. The data suggest that the energy saving effect of MRD may not be an attribute of Baltic Sea A. islandica chronically exposed to high environmental variability (oxygenation

  15. Spatially-Resolved Influence of Temperature and Salinity on Stock and Recruitment Variability of Commercially Important Fishes in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimova, Anna; Núñez-Riboni, Ismael; Kempf, Alexander; Taylor, Marc H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the processes affecting recruitment of commercially important fish species is one of the major challenges in fisheries science. Towards this aim, we investigated the relation between North Sea hydrography (temperature and salinity) and fish stock variables (recruitment, spawning stock biomass and pre-recruitment survival index) for 9 commercially important fishes using spatially-resolved cross-correlation analysis. We used high-resolution (0.2° × 0.2°) hydrographic data fields matching the maximal temporal extent of the fish population assessments (1948-2013). Our approach allowed for the identification of regions in the North Sea where environmental variables seem to be more influential on the fish stocks, as well as the regions of a lesser or nil influence. Our results confirmed previously demonstrated negative correlations between temperature and recruitment of cod and plaice and identified regions of the strongest correlations (German Bight for plaice and north-western North Sea for cod). We also revealed a positive correlation between herring spawning stock biomass and temperature in the Orkney-Shetland area, as well as a negative correlation between sole pre-recruitment survival index and temperature in the German Bight. A strong positive correlation between sprat stock variables and salinity in the central North Sea was also found. To our knowledge the results concerning correlations between North Sea hydrography and stocks' dynamics of herring, sole and sprat are novel. The new information about spatial distribution of the correlation provides an additional help to identify mechanisms underlying these correlations. As an illustration of the utility of these results for fishery management, an example is provided that incorporates the identified environmental covariates in stock-recruitment models. PMID:27584155

  16. The distribution, diversity, and importance of cephalopods in top predator diets from offshore habitats of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudinger, M. D.; Juanes, F.; Salmon, B.; Teffer, A. K.

    2013-10-01

    Large pelagic predators were used as biological samplers to gain information on cephalopod diversity, abundance, distribution, and their role as prey in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Fish predators were caught by recreational anglers in offshore waters of New England (NE; 2007-2010), the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB; 2009-2010) and the South Atlantic Bight (SAB; 2010-2011). In total, 2362 cephalopods, including 22 species of squid and 4 octopods, were identified in the diets of 13 species of predatory fishes. Cephalopod body sizes were obtained for 1973 specimens through direct measurement of mantle lengths (ML) or estimated using lower rostral/hood lengths of lower beaks. Cephalopod diversity (number of species) was highest in predator diets from the SAB (N=19), intermediate in NE (N=18), and lowest in the MAB (N=9); however, differences may reflect unequal sampling effort among regions. The most important cephalopods across predator diets by number and frequency of occurrence were from the families Ommastrephidae, Argonautidae, Loliginidae, and Histioteuthidae. Shortfin squid (Illex illecebrosus) and paper nautilus (Argonauta sp.) were the most recurrent species identified across spatiotemporal scales; size distributions of these two species varied significantly among regions, and the largest individuals on average were found in the MAB. Results demonstrate that although pelagic predators consumed a broad range of cephalopod species, octopods and squids from the families Argonautidae and Ommastrephidae dominated the collective diets of numerous pelagic teleosts and elasmobranchs, and play a key role in offshore food-webs of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. This study emphasizes the value of using predators as biological samplers to gain information on cephalopod biogeography, and as a potential approach to track ecosystem changes in this region due to environmental and anthropogenic stressors.

  17. Interdisciplinary approach to the demography of Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deason Michael L

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trans-Atlantic slave trade dramatically changed the demographic makeup of the New World, with varying regions of the African coast exploited differently over roughly a 400 year period. When compared to the discrete mitochondrial haplotype distribution of historically appropriate source populations, the unique distribution within a specific source population can prove insightful in estimating the contribution of each population. Here, we analyzed the first hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA in a sample from the Caribbean island of Jamaica and compared it to aggregated populations in Africa divided according to historiographically defined segments of the continent's coastline. The results from these admixture procedures were then compared to the wealth of historic knowledge surrounding the disembarkation of Africans on the island. Results In line with previous findings, the matriline of Jamaica is almost entirely of West African descent. Results from the admixture analyses suggest modern Jamaicans share a closer affinity with groups from the Gold Coast and Bight of Benin despite high mortality, low fecundity, and waning regional importation. The slaves from the Bight of Biafra and West-central Africa were imported in great numbers; however, the results suggest a deficit in expected maternal contribution from those regions. Conclusions When considering the demographic pressures imposed by chattel slavery on Jamaica during the slave era, the results seem incongruous. Ethnolinguistic and ethnographic evidence, however, may explain the apparent non-random levels of genetic perseverance. The application of genetics may prove useful in answering difficult demographic questions left by historically voiceless groups.

  18. Comparison of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenylethers, and organochlorine pesticides in Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from offshore oil platforms and natural reefs along the California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael J.; Love, Milton S.; Nishimoto, Mary M.; Schroeder, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the relative exposure of Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at oil-production platforms was reported, indicating negligible exposure to PAHs and no discernible differences between exposures at platforms and nearby natural areas sites. In this report, the potential for chronic PAH exposure in fish is reported, by measurement of recalcitrant, higher molecular weight PAHs in tissues of fish previously investigated for PAH metabolites in bile. A total of 34 PAHs (20 PAHs, 11 alkylated PAHs, and 3 polycyclic aromatic thiophenes) were targeted. In addition, legacy contaminants—polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs),—and current contaminants, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) linked to endocrine disruption, were measured by gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection, to form a more complete picture of the contaminant-related status of fishes at oil production platforms in the Southern California Bight. No hydrocarbon profiles or unresolved complex hydrocarbon background were found in fish from platforms and from natural areas, and concentrations of aliphatics were low less than 100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) per component]. Total-PAH concentrations in fish ranged from 15 to 37 ng/g at natural areas and from 8.7 to 22 ng/g at platforms. Profiles of PAHs were similar at all natural and platform sites, consisting mainly of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Total-PCB concentrations (excluding non-ortho-chloro-substituted congeners) in fish were low, ranging from 7 to 22 ng/g at natural areas and from 10 to 35 ng/g at platforms. About 50 percent of the total-PCBs at all sites consisted of 11 congeners: 153 > 138/163/164 > 110 > 118 > 15 > 99 > 187 > 149 > 180. Most OCPs, except dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-related compounds, were not detectable or were at concentrations of less than 1 ng/g in fish. p

  19. Gulf Stream marine hydrokinetic energy resource characterization off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, M.; He, R.; Lowcher, C.; Bane, J.; Gong, Y.; Taylor, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf Stream off North Carolina has current velocities that approach 3 m/s and an average volume transport of 90 Sv (1 Sv= 106 m3/s) off of Cape Hatteras, making it the most abundant MHK (Marine Hydrokinetic Energy) resource for the state. Resource availability at a specific location depends primarily on the variability in Gulf Stream position, which is least offshore of Cape Hatteras after the stream exits the Florida Straits. Proximity to land and high current velocities in relatively shallow waters on the shelf slope make this an optimal location to quantify the MHK energy resource for NC. 3.5 years of current measurements beginning in August of 2013 from a moored 150 kHz ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) at an optimal location for energy extraction quantify the available energy resource and its variability, and establish the skill of a Mid-Atlantic Bight and South Atlantic Bight Regional Ocean Model in predicting the MHK energy resource. The model agrees well with long-term observed current averages and with weekly to monthly fluctuations in the current speeds. Model and observations over the first 9 months of the ADCP deployment period both averaged 1.15 m/s thirty meters below the surface. The model under estimates observed current speeds for the higher frequency current fluctuations of days to weeks. Comparisons between the model and ADCP observed currents, and velocity derived power density over the entire 3.5 years of observations demonstrate the significant inter-annual variability in power density. Shipboard 300 kHz ADCP cross-stream transects and hourly surface currents measurements off Cape Hatteras from a network of land based HF (high frequency) radars further quantify available MHK energy and assess model skill. Cross-stream transects were made with a vessel-mounted 300 kHz ADCP on a line from the 100-1000m isobaths, and measured currents in the top 100m. These measurements demonstrate the variability in the resource with water depth, and

  20. The importance of gobies (Gobiidae, Teleostei) as hosts and transmitters of parasites in the SW Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. D.; Strohbach, U.; Groenewold, S.

    1993-02-01

    The parasite fauna of five goby species (Gobiidae, Teleostei) was investigated in the Baltic Sea during the period 1987 to 1990. 13 parasite species were found in samples from the Lübeck Bight: Bothriocephalus scorpii, Schistocephalus sp. (Cestoda); Cryptocotyle concavum, Cryptocotyle lingua, Podocotyle atomon, Derogenes varicus (Digenea); Hysterothylacium sp. (cf. auctum), Contracaecum sp., Anisakis simplex (Nematoda); Corynosoma sp., Echinorhynchus gadi, Neoechinorhynchus rutili, Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala). The number of parasite species were: 10 in the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, 8 in the black goby Gobius niger, 7 in the two-spotted goby Gobiusculus flavescens, 6 in the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, and 5 in the painted goby Pomatoschistus pictus. Neoechinorhynchus rutili occurred only in P. minutus, and Corynosoma sp. only in G. niger. The extent to which the gobies were parasitized clearly depended on the respective ways of life and, moreover, on the kind of prey ingested by the hosts. Additionally, the age of the hosts might be important. The highest rate of parasitism, more than 60%, was reached by Hysterothylacium sp. in G. niger and by Cryptocotyle concavum in P. microps. Infestation incidence lay mostly below 40% which means a satellite species status (Holmes, 1991). The number of parasite species was highest in summer; the highest intensities of single parasites occurred in spring ( Podocotyle atomon) or autumn ( Crytocotyle concavum). Bothriocephalus scorpii, Hysterothylacium sp. and Podocotyle infested their juvenile hosts very early, but only Hysterothylacium was accumulated by G. niger during its whole life span, whereas Bothriocephalus persisted also in older gobies in low intensities. The cercariae of Cryptocotyle spp. penetrate actively into their hosts; all the other parasites named were transmitted in larval form by prey organisms which consisted mainly of planktonic and benthic crustaceans. The gobies were final hosts

  1. Nitrous oxide water column distribution during the transition from anoxic to oxic conditions in the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Walter

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In January 2003, a major inflow of cold and oxygen-rich North Sea Water in the Baltic Sea terminated an ongoing stagnation period in parts of the central Baltic Sea. In order to investigate the role of North Sea Water inflow to the Baltic Sea with regard to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O, we measured dissolved and atmospheric N2O at 26 stations in the southern and central Baltic Sea in October 2003.

    At the time of our cruise, water renewal had proceeded to the eastern Gotland Basin, whereas the western Gotland Basin was still unaffected by the inflow. The deep water renewal was detectable in the distributions of temperature, salinity, and oxygen concentrations as well as in the distribution of the N2O concentrations: Shallow stations in the Kiel Bight and Pomeranian Bight were well-ventilated with uniform N2O concentrations near equilibrium throughout the water column. In contrast, stations in the deep basins, such as the Bornholm and the Gotland Deep, showed a clear stratification with deep water affected by North Sea Water. Inflowing North Sea Water led to changed environmental conditions, especially enhanced oxygen (O2 or declining hydrogen sulfide (H2S concentrations, thus, affecting the conditions for the production of N2O. Pattern of N2O profiles and correlations with parameters like oxygen and nitrate differed between the basins. The dominant production pathway seems to be nitrification rather than denitrification.

    No indications for advection of N2O by North Sea Water were found. A rough budget revealed a significant surplus of in situ produced N2O after the inflow. However, due to the permanent halocline, it can be assumed that the formed N2O does not reach the atmosphere. Hydrographic aspects therefore are decisive factors determining the final release of produced N

  2. Marine habitat mapping, classification and monitoring in the coastal North Sea: Scientific vs. stakeholder interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Papenmeier, Svenja; Fiorentino, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Producing detailed maps of the seafloor that include both, water depth and simple textural characteristics has always been a challenge to scientists. In this context, marine habitat maps are an essential tool to comprehend the complexity, the spatial distribution and the ecological status of different seafloor types. The increasing need for more detail demands additional information on the texture of the sediment, bedforms and information on benthic sessile life. For long time, taking samples and videos/photographs followed by interpolation over larger distances was the only feasible way to gain information about sedimentary features such as grain-size distribution and bedforms. While ground truthing is still necessary, swath systems such as multibeam echo sounders (MBES) and sidescan sonars (SSS), as well as single beam acoustic ground discrimination systems (AGDS) became available to map the seafloor area-wide (MBES, SSS), fast and in great detail. Where area-wide measurements are impossible or unavailable point measurements are interpolated, classified and modeled. To keep pace with environmental change in the highly dynamic coastal areas of the North Sea (here: German Bight) monitoring that utilizes all of the mentioned techniques is a necessity. Since monitoring of larger areas is quite expensive, concepts for monitoring strategies were developed in scientific projects such as "WIMO" ("Scientific monitoring concepts for the German Bight, SE North Sea"). While instrumentation becomes better and better and interdisciplinary methods are being developed, the gap between basic scientific interests and stakeholder needs often seem to move in opposite directions. There are two main tendencies: the need to better understand nature systems (for theoretical purposes) and the one to simplify nature (for applied purposes). Science trends to resolve the most detail in highest precision employing soft gradients and/or fuzzy borders instead of crisp demarcations and

  3. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Processes in Long Bay of the Carolinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y.; Xu, K.; He, R.; Wren, P. A.; Gong, Y.; Quigley, B.; Tarpley, D.

    2010-12-01

    The coastline along Long Bay of the Carolinas is a fast-growing and heavily-developed area supporting local populations, infrastructure, and a large tourism industry. Myrtle Beach and its adjacent sandy beaches are popular tourist destinations that attract millions of visitors each year, representing one of the state’s most essential natural resources. The economy of this region is closely related to the stability of the sandy beaches, which are vulnerable to coastal erosion during severe storm events. Quantifying the sediment transport processes in the nearshore and inner continental shelf regions is thus critical for both understanding the regional sediment budget and implementing effective coastal management. As a first step toward investigating the sediment transport processes, a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic-sediment transport model for Long Bay in the Carolinas has been developed. The model, based on the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), spans from Cape Fear estuary in NC to Winyah Bay estuary in SC. It considers the delivery of fluvial sediment from the Cape Fear and Pee Dee Rivers, resuspension from seabed, and transport of suspended sediment by ambient currents and waves calculated using Simulating WAve Nearshore model (SWAN). Our model simulations are driven by observed wind fields, which were collected at nearby meteorological stations maintained by National Data Buoy Center as well as at six buoys by the Palmetto Wind Research Project at Coastal Carolina University. Spatially varying sea bed conditions consisting of both hard bottoms and sandy bodies are applied in the calculation. The model is one-way nested inside a large-scale coastal circulation model that covers both the Middle Atlantic Bight and the South Atlantic Bight and provides dynamically consistent and numerically accurate circulation open boundary conditions. Modeling results indicate both wind-driven currents and storm-induced waves are capable of resuspending sandy

  4. Hydrogen Biogeochemistry in Anaerobic and Photosynthetic Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of molecular hydrogen is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, a great majority of microbial redox processes involve hydrogen as a reactant, product or potential by-product. Accordingly, the energetics (thermodynamics) of each of these processes is affected by variations in local H2 concentrations. It has long been established that this effect is important in governing microbe-microbe interactions and there are multiple demonstrations that "interspecies hydrogen transfer" can alter the products of, inhibit/stimulate, or even reverse microbial metabolic reactions. In anoxic sediments, H2 concentrations themselves are thought to be controlled by the thermodynamics of the predominant H2-consuming microbial process. In sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, this relationship quantitatively describes the co-variation of H2 concentrations with temperature (for methanogens and sulfate reducers) and with sulfate concentration (for sulfate reducers). The quantitative aspect is import= for two reasons: 1) it permits the modeling of H2-sensitive biogeochemistry, such as anaerobic methane oxidation or pathways of organic matter remineralization, as a function of environmental controls; 2) for such a relationship to be observed requires that intracellular biochemistry and bioenergetics are being directly expressed in a component of the extracellular medium. H2 could therefore be utilized a non-invasive probe of cellular energetic function in intact microbial ecosystems. Based on the latter principle we have measured down-core profiles of H2 and other relevant physico-chemical parameters in order to calculate the metabolic energy yields (DG) that support microbial metabolism in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Methanogens in this system apparently function with energy yields significantly smaller than the minimum requirements suggested by pure

  5. Relative impact of seasonal and oceanographic drivers on surface chlorophyll a along a Western Boundary Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Jason D.; Baird, Mark E.; Roughan, Moninya; Suthers, Iain M.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2014-01-01

    Strengthening Western Boundary Currents (WBCs) advect warm, low nutrient waters into temperate latitudes, displacing more productive waters. WBCs also influence phytoplankton distribution and growth through current-induced upwelling, mesoscale eddy intrusion and seasonal changes in strength and poleward penetration. Here we examine dynamics of chlorophyll a (Chl. a) in the western Pacific Ocean, a region strongly influenced by the East Australian Current (EAC). We interpreted a spatial and temporal analysis of satellite-derived surface Chl. a, using a hydrodynamic model, a wind-reanalysis product and an altimetry-derived eddy-census. Our analysis revealed regions of persistently elevated surface Chl. a along the continental shelf and showed that different processes have a dominant effect in different locations. In the northern and central zones, upwelling events tend to regulate surface Chl. a patterns, with peaks in phytoplankton biomass corresponding to two known upwelling locations south of Cape Byron (28.5°S) and Smoky Cape (31°S). Within the central EAC separation zone, positive surface Chl. a anomalies occurred 65% of the time when both wind-stress (τw) and bottom-stress (τB) were upwelling-favourable, and only 17% of the time when both were downwelling-favourable. The interaction of wind and the EAC was a critical driver of surface Chl. a dynamics, with upwelling-favourable τW resulting in a 70% increase in surface Chl. a at some locations, when compared to downwelling-favourable τW . In the southern zone, surface Chl. a was driven by a strong seasonal cycle, with phytoplankton biomass increasing up to 152% annually each spring. The Stockton Bight region (32.25-33.25°S) contained ⩾20% of the total shelf Chl. a on 27% of occasions due to its location downstream of upwelling locations, wide shelf area and reduced surface velocities. This region is analogous to productive fisheries regions in the Aghulus Current (Natal Bight) and Kuroshio Current

  6. Sea state projections for the North Sea: Impact of climate change on very high waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Jens; Groll, Nikolaus; Heinrich, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The research program KLIWAS of the German Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and urban Development investigates the impacts of climate change on waterways and navigation and provides options for adaptations. One aspect of the research task is to analyse climate scenarios for the sea state, eg. Sea wave height (SWH), wave direction and wave periods for the North Sea. Of particular importance for the safety on waterways is the potential change of frequence and magnitude from severe waves. The scenarios together with the wave climate of the recent years will give an approximation of projected changes of the sea state in coastal and open sea areas. Here we show the results for projected changes of medium, high and very high waves in the North Sea for the period 2000-2100 in comparison to 1961-2000, based on the wave model WAM4.5.3 The wave model is driven with wind data from two different regional atmosphere-ocean-models (DMI-HIRHAM and MPI-REMO) in the scenario A1B. The wind data are delivered in a horizontal resolution of about 20 km and a time resolution of one hour, while the wave model provides data of the calculated sea state with a horizontal grid of 5 km and the time resolution of one hour. It is seen, that in the eastern North Sea and especially in the German Bight there is a trend to a increasing of the 99th percentile of SWH, while in the western part the 99th percentile of SWH decreases in the future. These changes are mainly caused by changing wind directions in the future, while the wind speed will be mostly unaltered. Supplementary, it was carried out an extrem value analysis with the same data. Although the very high waves (eg. waves with a return period of 1-, 5-, 10-, up to 100 years) displays a similar behavior as the median or 99th percentile, there are regions in the North Sea (eg. the German Bight) with stronger changes of the higher waves. For all wave heights a strong decadal variability is detected which superimposes the calculated trends.

  7. Meteo-Marine Parameters from High-Resolution Satellite-Based Radar Measurements and Impact of Wind Gusts on local Sea State Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Lehner, Susanne; Rosenthal, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    To investigate local geophysical processes, sea surface wind speed and the sea state field simultaneously estimated from X-band satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images acquired over North Sea were compared and analysed. The data were retrieved from TerraSAR-X (TS-X) satellite scenes with overflight covering ~300km×30km with resolution of 3m. The inhomogeneity of wind fields and the impact of wind gust systems on the local sea state are studied based on space-covered remote sensing data and in-situ buoy measurements in the German Bight of the North Sea. The sea state parameters and wind speed were estimated using newly developed Sea State Processor (SSP)for meteo-marine parameter estimation. The SSP is designed for supporting forecast services and providing validation in coastal areas with robust automatic space-covering processing in near real time (NRT). SSP includes a pre-filtering procedure for removing artefacts like ships, seamarks, buoys, offshore constructions and slicks from analysed images, the empirical XWAVEC (C=Coastal) algorithm developed for coastal seas for estimation significant wave height, XMOD-2 wind algorithm and an additional procedure performing a control of results based on the statistics of the whole scene. The collected, processed and analysed data base for the German Bight consists of more than 60 TS-X StripMap scenes/overflights with more than 200 images acquired since 2013. The acquired conditions vary in range 0-7m for significant wave height and in range 0-25m/s of the surface wind speed. The spatial comparison of sea state and wind field estimated form remote sensing data to the results of the wave prediction models show local variations due to distinctions in bathymetry and in wind front propagation. At the first time it was observed and registered: the local wave height increase of 1-2m is connected to wind gusts in kilometre-scale clusters. The statistical analysis allows to connect the typical weather conditions

  8. Distribution of chlorinated hydrocarbons in overlying water, sediment, polychaete, and hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) in the coastal ocean, Southern California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tran, Kim

    2002-08-01

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) and its primary metabolites (DDTs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a major source of concern in the Southern California Bight (SCB), USA. The fate of DDTs and PCBs is a key element in assessing the effects imposed by these potential carcinogens on the marine ecosystem. We found that DDTs and PCBs remained widely distributed in the overlying water, sediment, polychaetes, and liver and muscle tissues of the hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) collected from three nearshore locations of the SCB with different levels of contamination. Student's t tests indicated that the measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases (sediment, polychaete, and fish) and overlying water at a heavily contaminated location were significantly greater than those predicted by the equilibrium partitioning theory (EPT). Measured partition coefficients between the nonaqueous phases and overlying water for a few DDT components at two other stations (moderate and low contamination) were also generally greater than the EPT predictions. On the other hand, DDTs and PCBs in polychaetes and fish tissues may be taken up from sediments via equilibrium partitioning or from food sources. These findings are suggestive of the possibility that contaminated sediments may have become an important source of contamination. PMID:12152759

  9. Airborne polarized lidar detection of scattering layers in the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilkov, A P; Goldin, Y A; Gureev, B A; Hoge, F E; Swift, R N; Wright, C W

    2001-08-20

    A polarized lidar technique based on measurements of waveforms of the two orthogonal-polarized components of the backscattered light pulse is proposed to retrieve vertical profiles of the seawater scattering coefficient. The physical rationale for the polarized technique is that depolarization of backscattered light originating from a linearly polarized laser beam is caused largely by multiple small-angle scattering from particulate matter in seawater. The magnitude of the small-angle scattering is determined by the scattering coefficient. Therefore information on the vertical distribution of the scattering coefficient can be derived potentially from measurements of the time-depth dependence of depolarization in the backscattered laser pulse. The polarized technique was verified by field measurements conducted in the Middle Atlantic Bight of the western North Atlantic Ocean that were supported by in situ measurements of the beam attenuation coefficient. The airborne polarized lidar measured the time-depth dependence of the backscattered laser pulse in two orthogonal-polarized components. Vertical profiles of the scattering coefficient retrieved from the time-depth depolarization of the backscattered laser pulse were compared with measured profiles of the beam attenuation coefficient. The comparison showed that retrieved profiles of the scattering coefficient clearly reproduce the main features of the measured profiles of the beam attenuation coefficient. Underwater scattering layers were detected at depths of 20-25 m in turbid coastal waters. The improvement in dynamic range afforded by the polarized lidar technique offers a strong potential benefit for airborne lidar bathymetric applications. PMID:18360476

  10. Model of the Long Island Sound outflow: Comparison with year-long HF radar and Doppler current observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Jenq-Chi; Wang, Dong-Ping; Ullman, David S.; Codiga, Daniel L.

    2008-08-01

    A three-dimensional primitive-equation model is used to simulate the Long Island Sound (LIS) outflow for a 1-year (2001) period. The model domain includes LIS and New York Bight (NYB). Tidal and wind forcing are included, and seasonal salinity and temperature variations are assimilated. The model results are validated with the HF radar, moored acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and ferry-based ADCP observations. The agreement between simulated and observed flow patterns generally is very good. The difference in seasonal mean currents between the model and moored ADCP is about 0.01 m/s; the correlation of dominant velocity fluctuations between the model and HF radar is 0.83; and the difference in mean LIS transport between the model and shipboard ADCP is about 5%. However, the model predicts a prominent tidally generated headland eddy not supported by the HF radar observation. The model sensitivity study indicates that the tides, winds, and ambient coastal front all have important impact on the buoyant outflow. The tides and winds cause stronger vertical mixing, which reduces the surface plume strength. The ambient coastal front, on the other hand, tends to enhance the plume.

  11. Aggregation and sinking behaviour of resuspended fluffy layer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, Kai; Forster, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The influence of pelagic diatom addition ( Skeletonema costatum) on aggregation dynamics of resuspended fluffy layer material containing natural microorganism assemblages (bacteria and pennate diatoms) was studied during two roller table experiments. Sediment samples were taken at a fine sand site (16 m water depth) located in Mecklenburg Bight, south-western Baltic Sea. Fluff was experimentally resuspended from sediment cores and aggregation processes with and without S. costatum were studied in rotating tanks. Total particulate matter was incorporated into artificial aggregates in equal shares after both roller table experiments. However, biogenic parameters (particulate organic carbon, particulate organic nitrogen, and carbohydrate equivalents), as well as cell numbers of bacteria and pennate diatoms were found in higher percentages in S. costatum aggregates compared to aggregates without S. costatum. Transparent exopolymer particles were apparently irrelevant in the aggregation process during both experiments. Settling velocities of S. costatum aggregates exceeding 1000 μm in diameter showed a significantly higher mean settling velocity compared to aggregates without S. costatum of the same size. The pronounced effect of pelagic diatoms on aggregation processes of fluff in terms of particle attributes, size, and therewith sinking velocities could be demonstrated and may lead to further insight into near bed particle transport in coastal waters.

  12. Satellite-Derived Distributions, Inventories and Fluxes of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matter Along the Northeastern U.S. Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, A.; Hooker, S. B.; Hyde, K.; Novak, M. G.; Pan, X.; Friedrichs, M.; Cahill, B.; Wilkin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries and the coastal ocean experience a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a consequence of riverine and estuarine fluxes of terrigenous DOM, sediments, detritus and nutrients into coastal waters and associated phytoplankton blooms. Our approach integrates biogeochemical measurements, optical properties and remote sensing to examine the distributions and inventories of organic carbon in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine. Algorithms developed to retrieve colored DOM (CDOM), Dissolved (DOC) and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) from NASA's MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS satellite sensors are applied to quantify the distributions and inventories of DOC and POC. Horizontal fluxes of DOC and POC from the continental margin to the open ocean are estimated from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua distributions of DOC and POC and horizontal divergence fluxes obtained from the Northeastern North Atlantic ROMS model. SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery reveal the importance of estuarine outflow to the export of CDOM and DOC to the coastal ocean and a net community production of DOC on the shelf.

  13. Mitochondrial Genetic Structure and Matrilineal Origin of White Sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, in the Northeastern Pacific: Implications for Their Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate-González, Erick C; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl; Saavedra-Sotelo, Nancy C; Sosa-Nishizaki, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    White sharks (Carcharodon carcharias, WS henceforth) are globally and regionally threatened. Understanding their patterns of abundance and connectivity, as they relate to habitat use, is central for delineating conservation units and identifying priority areas for conservation. We analyzed mitochondrial data to test the congruence between patterns of genetic connectivity and of individual movements in the Northeastern Pacific (NEP) and to trace the matrilineal origin of immature WS from coastal California and Baja California to adult aggregation areas. We analyzed 186 mitochondrial control region sequences from sharks sampled in Central California (CC; n = 61), Southern California Bight (SCB; n = 25), Baja California Pacific coast (BCPC; n = 9), Bahía Vizcaíno (BV; n = 39), Guadalupe Island (GI; n = 45), and the Gulf of California (GC; n = 7). Significant mitochondrial differentiation between adult aggregation areas (CC, GI) revealed two reproductive populations in the NEP. We found general concordance between movement patterns of young and adult WS with genetic results. Young sharks from coastal California and Baja California were more likely born from females from GI. Mitochondrial differentiation of young-of-the-year from SCB and BV suggests philopatry to nursery areas in females from GI. These results provide a genetic basis of female reproductive behavior at a regional scale and point to a preponderance of sharks from GI in the use of the sampled coastal region as pupping habitat. These findings should be considered in Mexican and US management and conservation strategies of the WS NEP population. PMID:26034138

  14. The geographical variation in the potential annual fecundity of dover sole Solea solea (L.) from European shelf waters during 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthames, P. R.; Greer Walker, M.; Dinis, M. T.; Whiting, C. L.

    Measurements of the annual potential fecundity were made from sole Solea solea (L.) stocks inhabiting the European Continental Shelf from the coast of Portugal (latitude 38°N) to the North Sea (latitude 54°N). In total eight ICES divisions were sampled (IVb east, IVb west, IVc, VIId, VIIe, VIIa, VIII and IXa) during 1991. The highest fecundity (440·10 3 oocytes at 35 cm total fish length) was found in the northeast of the study area (German Bight, IVb east) and the lowest (205·10 3 at 35 cm total fish length) in the southwest (IXa, Portugal). No age effect on fecundity could be demonstrated independent of length. Growth in length of mature female sole from 3 to 6 years of age also varied between areas, from a minimum 5.5 cm in VIIe increasing to 8.0, 8.2 and 11.2 in IVB (west) VIId and IVb east-IVc combined, respectively. The area-specific fecundity and adult growth differences reflecting the ability of sole to exploit the local environment are considered in relation to phenotypic plasticity or genotypic evolution.

  15. Number One Reef: An overstepped segmented lagoon complex on the KwaZulu-Natal continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Vella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study of the bathymetry of the mid-shelf of the Durban Bight, KwaZulu-Natal revealed a series of previously undocumented seafloor features. These features were mapped using a high-resolution multibeam bathymetric echosounder and a detailed map of the seafloor topography was produced. We recognised several features that closely resemble features of contemporary segmented lagoon and lake systems: semicircular seafloor depressions, arcuate ridges, cuspate spits and prograding submerged barriers. Based on the striking similarity in morphology to Kosi Bay – a segmented lagoon system from the sandy northern KwaZulu-Natal coastal plain – a similar evolutionary model is proposed. This model is of an incised valley formed following a sea level lowering to the Last Glacial Maximum at about 18 000 BP. Thereafter, continued transgressive infilling occurred to a point where an extensive lagoon and back-barrier system was established. At this point, sea levels remained static, causing the net segmentation of the system and the slow closure of the tidal basins or circular depressions. This type of seafloor topography is rarely preserved and is the result of fortuitous cementation after deposition and the later removal of sediment that would ordinarily bury such features.

  16. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  17. Using heat as a tracer to estimate the depth of rapid porewater advection below the sediment-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alicia M.; Woodward, Gwendolyn L.; Savidge, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid exchange of surface waters and porewaters in shallow sediments has important biogeochemical implications for streams and marine systems alike, but mapping these important reaction zones has been difficult. As a means of bridging the gap between the stream and submarine groundwater discharge communities we suggest that the rapid, transient mixing in this zone be called "hydrodynamic exchange". We then present a new model, MATTSI, which was developed to estimate the timing, depth and magnitude of hydrodynamic exchange below the sediment-water interface by inverting thermal time-series observations. The model uses an effective thermal dispersion term to emulate 3-D hydrodynamic exchange in a 1-D model. The effective dispersion is assumed to decline exponentially below the sediment water interface. Application of the model to a synthetic dataset and two field datasets from 50 km offshore in the South Atlantic Bight shows that exchange events can be clearly identified from thermal data. The model is relatively insensitive to realistic errors in sensor depth and thermal conductivity. Although the datasets tested here were too shallow to fully span the depth of flushing, we were able to estimate the depth of hydrodynamic exchange via sensitivity studies.

  18. Levels of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs in a random sample of Australian aquaculture-produced Southern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padula, D.; Madigan, T.; Kiermeier, A.; Daughtry, B.; Pointon, A. [South Australian Research and Development Inst. (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    To date there has been no published information available on the levels of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs in Australian aquaculture-produced Southern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii). Southern Bluefin Tuna are commercially farmed off the coast of Port Lincoln in the state of South Australia, Australia. This paper reports the levels of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs in muscle tissue samples from 11 randomly sampled aquaculture-produced Southern Bluefin Tuna collected in 2003. Little published data exists on the levels of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs in Australian aquacultureproduced seafood. Wild tuna are first caught in the Great Australian Bight in South Australian waters, and are then brought back to Port Lincoln where they are ranched in sea-cages before being harvested and exported to Japan. The aim of the study was to identify pathways whereby contaminants such as dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs may enter the aquaculture production system. This involved undertaking a through chain analysis of the levels of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs in wild caught tuna, seafloor sediment samples from the marine environment, levels in feeds and final harvested exported product. Detailed study was also undertaken on the variation of dioxin (PCDD/F) and PCBs across individual tuna carcases. This paper addresses the levels found in final harvested product. Details on levels found in other studies will be published elsewhere shortly.

  19. Methane consumption in waters overlying a hydrate-associated mound in the Santa Monica Basin : a project synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M.B.; Mau, S.; Valentine, D.L.; Reed, J.H. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hallam, S.J.; Yang, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of methane hydrates in the global carbon cycle and climate change requires an understanding of methane consumption in hydrate-associated environments. A dual-component microbial biofilter consumes up to 80 per cent of methane produced in the marine environment. Throughout most of the oceans around the world, anaerobic methane oxidation within sediment prevents large quantities of methane from leaving the seafloor. However, in regions of increased methane production, methane is released to the water column. The water column component of the marine biofilter for methane is the largest uncharacterized global sink for methane. This study combined geochemical and molecular biology to develop a quantitative understanding of methane consumption in the marine water column of the Southern California Bight. The paper presented geochemical data demonstrating that the degree of basin enclosure and basin-scale circulation patterns, were first order controls on methane oxidation rates in the Santa Monica Basin (SMB). The paper also presented genetic data showing similarities and differences in methanotrophic communities in distinctive horizons within the SMB water column. It described the study site, sampling, and methods as well as the preliminary findings. A contrast was observed between methane concentration and methane turnover time profiles. It was concluded that although methane concentration is a first-order control on methanotrophic activity, community concentration, dilution and seeding control the broad scale efficacy of methane consumption. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  20. The Mobile Buoy: An Autonomous Surface Vehicle for Integrated Ocean-Atmosphere Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, P. M.; McGillis, W. R.; Moisan, J. R.; Higinbotham, J. R.; Schirtzinger, C.

    2009-05-01

    A solar-powered Autonomous Surface Vessel (ASV) called OASIS (Ocean-Atmosphere Sensor Integration System) has been developed that makes measurements spanning the ocean mixed layer and lower atmospheric surface layer. An OASIS ASV can be remotely commanded to act as a boat, drifter, or untethered buoy (when programmed to keep at a station). OASIS has performed cross-shelf transect surveys within the mid-Atlantic Bight (63 km), Gulf of Maine, and additional field tests to develop techniques to map harmful algal blooms. One example of the utility of the OASIS ASV is with carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes - predicting future climate change will require that scientists understand what controls exchanges of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and ocean interior. OASIS measurements from the Gulf of Maine transect included surface ocean CO2 partial pressures from 320 to 670 μatm, air-sea CO2 sea-to-air fluxes from -3.2 to +12.2 mmol m2 d-1, upper ocean currents (0-50 m depth), surface ocean fluorescence, temperature and salinity, and several additional measurements. We are also installing a cabled, autonomous ocean mixed- layer hydrographic profiling system for future deployments. The complete integration of atmosphere and ocean measurements onboard an autonomous navigating vehicle is a key advance for ocean observation technology and observational science programs. ASVs have great potential for ocean and climate studies, and can become a major component of earth observation systems in the coming decades.

  1. Trends in marine debris along the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai'i 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribic, Christine A; Sheavly, Seba B; Rugg, David J; Erdmann, Eric S

    2012-05-01

    We assessed amounts, composition, and trends of marine debris for the U.S. Pacific Coast and Hawai'i using National Marine Debris Monitoring Program data. Hawai'i had the highest debris loads; the North Pacific Coast region had the lowest debris loads. The Southern California Bight region had the highest land-based debris loads. Debris loads decreased over time for all source categories in all regions except for land-based and general-source loads in the North Pacific Coast region, which were unchanged. General-source debris comprised 30-40% of the items in all regions. Larger local populations were associated with higher land-based debris loads across regions; the effect declined at higher population levels. Upwelling affected deposition of ocean-based and general-source debris loads but not land-based loads along the Pacific Coast. LNSO decreased debris loads for both land-based and ocean-based debris but not general-source debris in Hawai'i, a more complex climate-ocean effect than had previously been found. PMID:22385753

  2. Evaluating VIIRS ocean color products for west coast and Hawaiian waters

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, Curtiss O.

    2013-06-03

    Automated match ups allow us to maintain and improve the ocean color products of current satellite instruments MODIS, and since February 2012 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). As part of the VIIRS mission Ocean Calibration and Validation Team, we have created a web-based automated match up tool that provides access to searchable fields for date, site, and products, and creates matchups between satellites (MODIS, VIIRS), and in-situ measurements (HyperPRO and SeaPRISM). The goal is to evaluate the standard VIIRS ocean color products produced by the IDPS and available through NOAA’s CLASS data system. Comparisons are made with MODIS data for the same location, and VIIRS data processed using the NRL Automated Processing System (APS) used to produce operational products for the Navy. Results are shown for the first year of VIIRS data matching the satellite data with the data from Platform Eureka SeaPRISM off L. A. Harbor in the Southern California Bight, and HyperPRO data from Station ALOHA near Hawaii. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  3. Sea ice terminology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    A group of definitions of terms related to sea ice is presented, as well as a graphic representation of late winter ice zonation of the Beaufort Sea Coast. Terms included in the definition list are belt, bergy bit, bight, brash ice, calving, close pack ice, compacting, compact pack ice, concentration, consolidated pack ice, crack, diffuse ice edge, fast ice, fast-ice boundary, fast-ice edge, first-year ice, flaw, flaw lead, floe, flooded ice, fractured, fractured zone, fracturing, glacier, grey ice, grey-white ice, growler, hummock, iceberg, iceberg tongue, ice blink, ice boundary, ice cake, ice edge, ice foot, ice free, ice island, ice shelf, large fracture, lead, medium fracture, multiyear ice, nilas, old ice, open pack ice, open water, pack ice, polar ice, polynya, puddle, rafted ice, rafting, ram, ridge, rotten ice, second-year ice, shearing, shore lead, shore polynya, small fracture, strip, tabular berg, thaw holes, very close pack ice, very open pack ice, water sky, young coastal ice, and young ice.

  4. Hydrocarbons in the snow-ice cover of different areas of the White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.

    2014-05-01

    The data on the content of hydrocarbons (HC) are presented and compared to the contents of organic carbon, lipids, and particulate matter in the snow-ice cover of the coastal areas of Dvina and Kandalaksha bays of the White Sea (2008-2012). The accumulation of HC in the snow-ice cover depends on the degree of atmosphere contamination, the conditions of the ice formation, and the intensity of the biogeochemical processes at the ice-water interface. Because of this, the aquatic area of Arkhangelsk is characterized by the highest HC concentrations in the snow and in the upper layer of ice. The peculiarities of the formation of the snow-ice cover in Rugozero bight of Kandalaksha Bay cause the concentrating of HC in different layers of ice. The decrease of the concentration of HC in the show-ice cover of the White Sea compared to earlier studies resulted from the recession of industrial activities during the recent years.

  5. Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 7. Sulfur mass balance, oxygen uptake and sulfide retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, J.P.; Martens, C.S.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfur and oxygen fluxes were quantified in the seasonally varying anoxic marine sedimentary system of Cape Lookout Bight, N.C., U.S.A. Over the three year study period, 1981-1983, the mean annual sulfate reduction rate was determined to be 18.2 ?? 1.6 moles ?? m-2 ?? y-1. This value, added to the estimate of the detrital sulfur input of 1.2 ?? 4.4 gave a total sulfur input of 19.4 ?? 4.7 moles ?? m-2 ?? y-1. The sulfide flux to the sediment-water interface, measured in anaerobic benthic chambers was 4.6 ?? 0.5 moles ?? m-2 ?? y-1, and represented 37% of the annual oxygen uptake rate of 25.2 ?? 2.8 moles ?? m-2 ?? y-1. The sulfide burial rate, determined to be 15.5 ?? 3.1 moles ?? m-2 ?? y-1, was within 5% of the value predicted by summing the fluxes at the sediment-water interface. The C S weight ratio of sediment below the depth of diagenetic reaction was determined to be 2.75. The sulfide retention rate in these rapidly accumulating sediments (10 cm/yr) was 77 ?? 19%. Comparison of this result with previous studies shows that rapid sediment accumulation and the lack of bioturbation control this unusually high degree of sulfide retention. ?? 1987.

  6. Mathematical model of nutrient distribution in coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, E.E.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Atkinson, L.P.; Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Dunstan, W.M.

    1977-02-01

    An approach to biological modelling involving the use of separation transformation theory has been developed. By use of the theory, it is possible to reduce the number of independent variables in the system. The original four dimensional system (x, y, z, t) can be reduced to a vertical plane conceptual model by assuming along isobath homogeneity in the flow field as a partial function of the baroclinic flow field. Both temporally dependent and independent nitrate concentration equations are then obtained and solved by conventional approximation methods. This technique has applicability to ecological modelling and results obtained by its use show good agreement with field data. Parameterization of the physical processes shows horizontal diffusion and advection to be the important forces in the system. Scaling of biological dynamics show nutrient uptake by phytoplankton and detrital decomposition to be the most important biological factors in the system. This technique permits the testing of various hypotheses with a minimum amount of computer time. Applications in studies on the continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight, with emphasis on nitrogen cycling in coastal waters of Onslow Bay, North Carolina, are described.

  7. Seasonal and annual variations in physiological and biochemical responses from transplanted marine bioindicator species Mytilus spp. during a long term field exposure experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmholz, Heike; Ruhnau, Christiane; Pröfrock, Daniel; Erbslöh, Hans-Burkhard; Prange, Andreas

    2016-09-15

    In a pilot field study the long term response of transplanted bioindicator organisms Mytilus spp. was analyzed on the basis of physiological indices and biochemical measurements related to the energy budget. Three different time series with deployment times of eight to twelve months were compared according to seasonality and repeatability of the responses. Test organisms were incubated at a coastal station in the anthropogenically impacted estuary of the river Elbe and at a North Sea station located in vicinity to the Island of Helgoland in the German Bight. The stations differ in their hydrological as well as chemical characteristics. They can be discriminated by statistical factor analysis based on the measured biochemical parameter. Levels of all energy budget biomarker varied between seasons; however, the degree of variation of the specific response was differently expressed. The mussels deployed at Helgoland showed a reproducible high Condition Index in each sampling series and an oscillating Gonadosomatic Index representing the reproduction cycle. The lowest available energy was recorded in mussels at the estuarine sampling station compared to the off-shore station. This may be caused by the energetically costly maintenance of osmotic balance and consequently result in a lower amount of energy available for defense again chemical stress, growth and reproduction. PMID:27203523

  8. Analytical characterization of selective benthic flux components in estuarine and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Benthic flux is the rate of flow across the bed of a water body, per unit area of bed. It is forced by component mechanisms, which interact. For example, pressure gradients across the bed, forced by tide, surface gravity waves, density gradients, bed–current interaction, turbulence, and terrestrial hydraulic gradients, drive an advective benthic flux of water and constituents between estuarine and coastal waters, and surficial aquifers. Other mechanisms also force benthic flux, such as chemical gradients, bioturbation, and dispersion. A suite of component mechanisms force a total benthic flux at any given location, where each member of the suite contributes a component benthic flux. Currently, the types and characteristics of component interactions are not fully understood. For example, components may interact linearly or nonlinearly, and the interaction may be constructive or destructive. Benthic flux is a surface water–groundwater interaction process. Its discharge component to a marine water body is referred to, in some literature, as submarine groundwater discharge. Benthic flux is important in characterizing water and constituent budgets of estuarine and coastal systems. Analytical models to characterize selective benthic flux components are reviewed. Specifically, these mechanisms are for the component associated with the groundwater tidal prism, and forced by surface gravity wave setup, surface gravity waves on a plane bed, and the terrestrial hydraulic gradient. Analytical models are applied to the Indian River Lagoon, Florida; Great South Bay, New York; and the South Atlantic Bight in South Carolina and portions of North Carolina.

  9. Investigation and evaluation of airborne pollution in the framework of PARCOM (North Sea) and HELCOM (Baltic Sea) - subproject: Measurements of trace metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of measurements of the deposition and concentrations of atmospheric trace metals the annual input of some selected elements (Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni, V) into the North Sea and the Baltic Sea was estimated. For the Baltic Sea, deposition measurements with a buoy system in the Kiel Bight and data from the EGAP(HELCOM)-monitoring network were used. Data from the measurement stations were extrapolated to related sub-basins according to the deposition fields obtained from model calculations (EMEP). For the North Sea, a mean atmospheric trace metal distribution was determined from numerous measurements at a coastal site and over the central North Sea and the annual input was calculated by multiplication with corresponding deposition velocities and scavenging ratios. A comparison of the deposition data based on measurements with those from model calculations show good agreement in the case of Pb in the Baltic Sea as well as in the North Sea. However, for Zn and Cd large discrepancies are observed. Additionally, deposition processes were studied. Scavenging ratios were determined and dry deposition velocities were estimated by the use of a new method for high time resolution measurements of atmospheric trace metal concentrations (impactor/TXRF). (orig.). 9 figs., 14 tabs

  10. Modeling the Dynamics and Export of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northeastern U.S. Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druon, J.N.; Mannino, A.; Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Friedrichs, M.; Wilkin, J.; Fennel, K.

    2009-01-01

    Continental shelves are believed to play a major role in carbon cycling due to their high productivity. Particulate organic carbon (POC) burial has been included in models as a carbon sink, but we show here that seasonally produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the shelf can be exported to the open ocean by horizontal transport at similar rates (1-2 mol C/sq m/yr) in the southern U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). The dissolved organic matter (DOM) model imbedded in a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model reveals a double dynamics: the progressive release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in the upper layer during summer increases the regenerated primary production by 30 to 300%, which, in turns ; enhances the DOC production mainly from phytoplankton exudation in the upper layer and solubilization of particulate organic matter (POM) deeper in the water column. This analysis suggests that DOM is a key element for better representing the ecosystem functioning and organic fluxes in models because DOM (1) is a major organic pool directly related to primary production, (2) decouples partially the carbon and nitrogen cycles (through carbon excess uptake, POM solubilization and DOM mineralization) and (3) is intimately linked to the residence time of water masses for its distribution and export.

  11. Champacyclin, a New Cyclic Octapeptide from Streptomyces Strain C42 Isolated from the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pesic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New isolates of Streptomyces champavatii were isolated from marine sediments of the Gotland Deep (Baltic Sea, from the Urania Basin (Eastern Mediterranean, and from the Kiel Bight (Baltic Sea. The isolates produced several oligopeptidic secondary metabolites, including the new octapeptide champacyclin (1a present in all three strains. Herein, we report on the isolation, structure elucidation and determination of the absolute stereochemistry of this isoleucine/leucine (Ile/Leu = Xle rich cyclic octapeptide champacyclin (1a. As 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy could not fully resolve the structure of (1a, additional information on sequence and configuration of stereocenters were obtained by a combination of multi stage mass spectrometry (MSn studies, amino acid analysis, partial hydrolysis and subsequent enantiomer analytics with gas chromatography positive chmical ionization/electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-PCI/EI-MS supported by comparison to reference dipeptides. Proof of the head-to-tail cyclization of (1a was accomplished by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS compared to an alternatively side chain cyclized derivative (2. Champacyclin (1a is likely synthesized by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS, because of its high content of (d-amino acids. The compound (1a showed antimicrobial activity against the phytopathogen Erwinia amylovora causing the fire blight disease of certain plants.

  12. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Southall, Brandon L; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S; Hazen, Elliott L; Falcone, Erin A; Schorr, Gregory S; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-22

    Mid-frequency military (1-10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health. PMID:23825206

  13. Distribution of marine birds on the mid- and north-Atlantic U. S. outer continental shelf. Technical progress report, September 1978-August 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, K.D.; Pittman, G.L.; Burrell, G.C.

    1979-10-01

    The scope of the project was not changed since the last annual report, but the study area was extended south to Cape Hatteras. The objectives were to determine spatial and temporal distributions of marine birds in mid- and north-Atlantic U.S. continental shelf waters; to identify marine bird food habits and distribution of prey items; and (3) to develop a marine bird data retrieval bank. Data from 1978-79 indicated that Georges Bank and its adjacent waters support an abundant and diverse bird population throughout the year. Species composition changed seasonally but diversity usually remained high. In contrast, the mid-Atlantic Bight demonstrated only a seasonal importance to birds. In all areas surveyed greatest bird densities were found at upwellings and in association with fishing activities. A stomach contents analysis of specimens collected in August 1978 indicated that Cory's, Greater and Sooty Shearwaters were feeding on squid and fish. Great Black-backed and Herring Gulls were utilizing fish, insects, birds, and crustaceans. All MBO seabird data collected prior to July 1979 have been keypunched. No data retrieval programs were developed.

  14. Inverted Barometer Contributions to Accelerated and Extreme Annual Mean Sea Level Changes Along the East Coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, C. G.; Ponte, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent works have interpreted accelerated and extreme sea level (SL) changes along the northeast coast of North America primarily in terms of dynamic changes related to the meridional overturning or coastal circulations. Isostatic changes related to surface atmospheric pressure loading —the inverted barometer (IB) effect— have been deemed relatively unimportant, but a comprehensive analysis of the IB effect has been lacking. In this work, we use five different atmospheric pressure products to analyze the influence of the IB effect on annual mean SL from tide gauge records. Consistently across all products, the IB effect accounts for about 50% of the magnitude of a recent extreme event of SL rise in 2009 along Atlantic Canada and New England. In fact, the unique nature of the event was largely a result of the extreme IB signal. Estimated IB effects also amount to about 10-30% of recent multidecadal SL accelerations over the Mid-Atlantic Bight and Southern New England. These findings reiterate the need for careful estimation of IB effects for studies that want to interpret observed SL in terms of dynamic ocean circulation changes.

  15. Apparent Minimum Free Energy Requirements for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Anoxic Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the most fundamental constraints governing the distribution of microorganisms in the environment is the availability of chemical energy at biologically useful levels. To assess the minimum free energy yield that can support microbial metabolism in situ, we examined the thermodynamics of H2-consuming processes in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA. Depth distributions of H2 partial pressure, along with a suite of relevant concentration data, were determined in sediment cores collected in November (at 14.5 C) and August (at 27 C) and used to calculate free energy yields for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. At both times of year, and for both processes, free energy yields gradually decreased (became less negative) with depth before reaching an apparent asymptote. Sulfate reducing bacteria exhibited an asymptote of -19.1 +/- 1.7 kj(mol SO4(2-)(sup -1) while methanogenic archaea were apparently supported by energy yields as small as -10.6 +/- 0.7 kj(mol CH4)(sup -1).

  16. Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 8. A sulfur isotopic budget balanced by differential diffusion across the sediment-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanton, J.P.; Martens, C.S.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1987-01-01

    The sulfur isotopic composition of the sulfur fluxes occurring in the anoxic marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, N.C., U.S.A., was determined, and the result of isotopic mass balance was obtained via the differential diffusion model. Seasonal pore water sulfate ??34S measurements yielded a calculated sulfate input of 0.6%.. Sulfate transported into the sediments via diffusion appeared to be enriched in the lighter isotope because its concentration gradient was steeper, due to the increase in the measured isotopic composition of sulfate with depth. Similarly, the back diffusion of dissolved sulfide towards the sediment-water interface appeared enriched in the heavier isotope. The isotopic composition of this flux was calculated from measurements of the ??34S of dissolved sulfide and was determined to be 15.9%.. The isotopic composition of buried sulfide was determined to be -5.2%. and the detrital sulfur input was estimated to be -6.2%.. An isotope mass balance equation based upon the fluxes at the sediment-water interface successfully predicted the isotopic composition of the buried sulfur flux within 0.5%., thus confirming that isotopes diffuse in response to their individual concentration gradients. ?? 1987.

  17. Burial, remineralization and utilization of organic matter at the sea floor under a strong western boundary current. Final report, May 1, 1992--April 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1995-08-24

    The overall goals of this project were to quantify the rates of organic carbon export from the southern mid-Atlantic Bight and to quantify the rates at which carbon is exchanged between the inorganic and organic pools within the bottom sediments. This information is necessary to constrain the role of the oceans in the control of carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere in association with energy production. During this project, in situ benthic flux chamber incubations have been performed at six sites on the continental slope and rise adjacent to Cape Hatteras. Based on the analysis of the time-series samples recovered during each experiment, the sea floor exchange rates of the major biogenic elements, oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon were calculated. From the estimated benthic flux rates and the ancillary pore water and sediment analyses, the deposition, remineralization and burial rates of organic carbon to the sea floor in this area was evaluated. This information has been incorporated into regional and global assessments of organic carbon fluxes to the deep sea.

  18. The use of innate immune responses as biomarkers in a programme of integrated biological effects monitoring on flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Andreas; Broeg, Katja; Dizer, Halim; von Westernhagen, Hein; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    Immunological biomarkers that reflect the effects of exposure to environmental contaminants in coastal marine habitats were sought in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from five locations in the German Bight with different anthropogenic impacts. During a 2-year period of sampling, innate immune responses were monitored from a total of 331 individual flounder of a body length of 18 to 25 cm. From the fish, plasma lysozyme, phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes were analysed and implemented as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring programme. As the measurements of the parameters applied here varied within wide ranges at some locations, spatial differences could not always be established, but some general trends could be drawn: plasma lysozyme activity was decreased in flounder contaminated with DDT adducts and some PCBs, while cellular functions such as phagocytosis and respiratory burst were stimulated by some chlorinated hydrocarbons. Correlation analysis also revealed connections not only between the parameters applied here and some contaminants but also with some biochemical parameters used as biomarkers in pollution monitoring: in flounder with decreased integrity of hepatocyte lysosomal membranes, immune functions also were impaired, and plasma lysozyme as well as phagocytosis activity of head kidney cells were impaired when the activity of cytochrome P450 1A was induced. The data presented here indicate that innate immune responses may be useful parameters to monitor cellular functions in a battery of biomarkers of different levels of biological organisation.

  19. Using Laser Ablation-ICP-MS to generate culture-based foraminiferal calibration relationships for Neogloboquadrina dutertrei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Russell, A. D.; Gagnon, A. C.; Davis, C. V.; Chu, E.; Bonnin, E. A.; Spero, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neogloboquadrina dutertrei is a deep-dwelling non-spinose planktic foraminifer that is abundant in tropical to mid-latitude regions. The Mg/Ca ratio and stable oxygen isotope geochemistry of this species are used to reconstruct thermocline hydrography (cf. Spero et al, 2003). Live culture experiments using this species are not common owing to the difficulty in collecting and maintaining these species in the laboratory. The existing calibration data for this species consists of two temperature points that were combined with data from live culture experiments on a related species, N. incompta (formerly N. pachyderma dextral) (Von Langen et al, 2004). We extended the temperature calibration for this species (from 16 - 19°C to 12 - 22°C) and developed a pH calibration (pH 7.85 - 8.4). Specimens were collected via plankton net from the Southern California Bight and cultured at the Wrigley Marine Science Center, Santa Catalina Island during the summer of 2013-2014. We use isotopically labeled seawater (43Ca, 87Sr, and 138Ba) to identify discrete portions of calcite that grew in culture. We use laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for trace element analysis and obtain paired stable isotope analyses on chambers that grew entirely in culture. The calcite-labeling technique we employ here can be applied to other marine calcifiers grown in culture and/or future culture work with foraminifers.

  20. Rapid detection of microbial cell abundance in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Andrea M; Yuan, Quan; Close, Dan M; O'Dell, Kaela B; Fortney, Julian L; Wu, Jayne; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-15

    The detection and quantification of naturally occurring microbial cellular densities is an essential component of environmental systems monitoring. While there are a number of commonly utilized approaches for monitoring microbial abundance, capacitance-based biosensors represent a promising approach because of their low-cost and label-free detection of microbial cells, but are not as well characterized as more traditional methods. Here, we investigate the applicability of enhanced alternating current electrokinetics (ACEK) capacitive sensing as a new application for rapidly detecting and quantifying microbial cellular densities in cultured and environmentally sourced aquatic samples. ACEK capacitive sensor performance was evaluated using two distinct and dynamic systems - the Great Australian Bight and groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. Results demonstrate that ACEK capacitance-based sensing can accurately determine microbial cell counts throughout cellular concentrations typically encountered in naturally occurring microbial communities (10(3)-10(6) cells/mL). A linear relationship was observed between cellular density and capacitance change correlations, allowing a simple linear curve fitting equation to be used for determining microbial abundances in unknown samples. This work provides a foundation for understanding the limits of capacitance-based sensing in natural environmental samples and supports future efforts focusing on evaluating the robustness ACEK capacitance-based within aquatic environments. PMID:27315516

  1. MODIS imagery as a tool for synoptic water quality assessments in the southern California coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlin, N.P.; DiGiacomo, P.M.; Jones, B.H.; Reifel, K.M.; Warrick, J.A.; Johnson, S.C.; Mengel, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of rainstorm plumes in the coastal waters of southern California was studied during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys. Measurements of surface salinity and bacterial counts collected from research vessels were compared to MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery. The spectra of normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) were different in plumes and ambient ocean waters, enabling plumes discrimination and plume area size assessments from remotely-sensed data. The plume/ocean nLw differences (i.e., plume optical signatures) were most evident during first days after the rainstorm over the San Pedro shelf and in the San Diego region and less evident in Santa Monica Bay, where suspended sediments concentration in discharged water was lower than in other regions. In the Ventura area, plumes contained more suspended sediments than in other regions, but the grid of ship-based stations covered only a small part of the freshwater plume and was insufficient to reveal the differences between the plume and ocean optical signatures. The accuracy of plume area assessments from satellite imagery was not high (77% on average), seemingly because of inexactitude in satellite data processing. Nevertheless, satellite imagery is a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of polluted plumes, which is hardly achievable by contact methods.

  2. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  3. Shelf Edge Exchange Processes, II: SEEP2-08, R/V ENDEAVOR cruise 188. Hydrographic data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.; Behrens, W.J.; Flagg, C.N.; Wallace, D.W.R.; Wilke, R.J.; Wyman, K.D.

    1989-12-01

    The Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is a multi-institutional effort designed to investigate the flux of suspended material from the continental shelf to the waters of the upper slope, and then possibly into the slope sediments. Phase I of SEEP consisted of a series of nine cruises and a mooring array across the outer continental shelf of New England during 1983--1984 (Behrens and Flagg, 1986). Phase II focused specifically on the shelf/slope frontal region of the mid-Atlantic bight off the Delmarva Peninsula. This project consisted of a series of ten cruises, a mooring array, and a series of over-flights by NASA aircraft. Hydrographic data were collected on eight of the cruises, six of which were primarily mooring deployment or recovery cruises. The cruises were consecutively designated SEEP2-01 to SEEP2-10. Two cruises (SEEP2-04 and SEEP2-07) were dedicated to investigating benthic processes and hydrographic data were not collected.

  4. Petroleum and PAH contamination of the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concern has been expressed regarding the extent of contamination of the Black Sea. Analyses of coastal sediments taken from throughout the region indicate, however, that levels of petroleum hydrocarbons (2-300μgg -1 dry wt total hydrocarbons) are generally comparable to those encountered in the Mediterranean and are lower than concentrations reported for highly contaminated areas such as the Gulf, Hong Kong, Taiwan and New York Bight. Highest concentrations of total hydrocarbons (> 100 μgg -1 dry wt) were associated with discharges from Odessa, Sochi and the River Danube. Chronic/degraded petroleum was the major contributor at these sites. Samples from the Ukrainian coastline were comparatively clean (-1 dry wt total hydrocarbons). Major contributions of fresh oil (as indicated by σn-C14-34) occur through the River Danube. Concerning total PAH, concentrations (7-638ngg -1 dry wt) compare to relatively unpolluted locations in the Mediterranean and are much lower than levels reported for polluted UK estuaries (e.g. Mersey, Tyne, Thames). Both pyrolytic and petrogenic PAH are present in most samples, although petroleum derived PAH are dominant at Sochi and pyrolytic sources are prevalent in the Bosphorus region. The absence of a correlation between total hydrocarbons and PAH (R 2=0.04) indicates different primary sources for the two. (author)

  5. Three-dimensional tracking of Cuvier's beaked whales' echolocation sounds using nested hydrophone arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2015-10-01

    Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) were tracked using two volumetric small-aperture (∼1 m element spacing) hydrophone arrays, embedded into a large-aperture (∼1 km element spacing) seafloor hydrophone array of five nodes. This array design can reduce the minimum number of nodes that are needed to record the arrival of a strongly directional echolocation sound from 5 to 2, while providing enough time-differences of arrivals for a three-dimensional localization without depending on any additional information such as multipath arrivals. To illustrate the capabilities of this technique, six encounters of up to three Cuvier's beaked whales were tracked over a two-month recording period within an area of 20 km(2) in the Southern California Bight. Encounter periods ranged from 11 min to 33 min. Cuvier's beaked whales were found to reduce the time interval between echolocation clicks while alternating between two inter-click-interval regimes during their descent towards the seafloor. Maximum peak-to-peak source levels of 179 and 224 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m were estimated for buzz sounds and on-axis echolocation clicks (directivity index = 30 dB), respectively. Source energy spectra of the on-axis clicks show significant frequency components between 70 and 90 kHz, in addition to their typically noted FM upsweep at 40-60 kHz. PMID:26520330

  6. Does medium-term emersion cause a mass extinction of tidal flat macrobenthos? The case of the Tricolor oil pollution prevention in the Zwin nature reserve (Belgium and The Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Colen, C.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2006-06-01

    As a result of the Tricolor oil pollution in the Southern Bight of the North Sea (winter 2003) the Zwin nature reserve, consisting of tidal flats and salt marshes, was blocked from the North Sea by use of a sand barrier. Hence, macrobenthic tidal flat organisms, by nature strongly dependent on the cyclic incoming seawater, were emersed during a period of 27 days. Because the effect of medium-term emersion on the ecologically important benthic life could not be assessed beforehand, the damming was taken as an opportunity to examine these effects. This study demonstrated that: (1) no species vanished due to emersion, (2) although the emersion might have caused some mortality, a mass mortality within the macrobenthos did not occur, and (3) the supra-littoral amphipods Talitrus saltator and Orchestia gammarellus performed a strong, though ephemeral immigration into the intertidal zone during the period of emersion. In view of both its minor impacts on the macrobenthos and its effectiveness in preventing oil pollution in the Zwin nature reserve, damming as a measure against oil pollution may be considered effective protection, especially during winter.

  7. Bioavailability of lead in North Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, M.; Kröncke, I.

    1991-12-01

    As part of an interdisciplinary research programme, lead contents were measured in the polychaete Nephtys spp. and in the sea-urchin Echinocardium cordatum as well as in the respective sediment fractions <20 μm taken from the Dogger Bank proper and the eastern coastal North Sea. A lower lead content was generally observed in the organisms taken from the German Bight than in those from the Dogger Bank, especially from its northeastern part. It is possible to divide both areas according to the slope found in the linear regression of lead versus total organic carbon contents in sediments, which is twice as steep for the Dogger Bank as for the eastern North Sea. This criterium points to a difference in sediment quality with regard to toxic metal contamination. The sediment quality of the Dogger Bank seems to be twice as bad compared with that of the eastern North Sea. This is in good agreement with the differences found in lead contamination of the sediment-dwelling polychaetes from both areas. The results indicate that lead is primarily accumulated by food ingestion.

  8. Characteristic levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons and trace metals in fish from coastal waters of North and Baltic sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckas, B; Harms, U

    1987-01-01

    During investigations on the occurrence and distribution of contaminants in coastal waters of the North Sea and the Baltic organochlorine compounds such as hexachlorobenzene (HCB), octachlorostyrene (OCS), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCH), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT) and its metabolites and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals such as mercury, cadmium and lead were determined in a selected flatfish species (flounder, Platichthys flesus L.). The sampling network covered the outer estuaries of the rivers Weser and Elbe, the German Bight, the Danish North Sea coast and coastal regions of the south-western Baltic. Organochlorine compounds were determined by high-resolution glass capillary gas chromatography with electron capture detector after sample pretreatment and clean up. For the determination of heavy metals a multi-stage analytical procedure was used, in which graphite furnace (for Cd and Pb) resp. cold vapour (for Hg) atomic absorption spectrometry was combined with pre-instrumental separation and enrichment techniques. Evaluation of the data from the programme made obvious significant geographical differences in the levels and the pattern with regard to the substances involved. For HCB, OCS and Hg a crucial point of contamination within the German Bright was recognized that was apparently influenced to a large extent by the inflow of waters from the Elbe. PMID:2439467

  9. Modelling transport and reproduction of the invasive comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Mnemiopsis leidyi is an invasive comb jelly fish species that originates from the Gulf of Mexico and the US east coast. It has high bloom potential, and can survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions. It was first introduced in Europe through ballast water discharges in the Black Sea, where it was associated with the anchovis stock collapse in the 1990's. From there, it has spread through the Mediterranean Sea. Since the mid 2000's it has been observed in ports and estuaries along the English Channel, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. In the North Sea, M. leidyi blooms occur in the Scheldt estuaries, the Wadden Sea, and in ports and canals. In winter, M. Leidyi has been observed at sea in the German Bight. A particle tracking model was modified to include a simple reproduction mechanism, using food fields from the coupled hydrodynamics-ecosystem model GETM-ERSEM. The model was used to study the potential spreading and bloom potential of M. Leidyi in the southern North Sea under present and increased temperature conditions. Under present conditions, the model suggested that M. Leidyi can survive in the North Sea, and can be transported over distances of several hundreds of km, enabling connectivity between estuarine populations. It could not, however, bloom at open sea because of temperature constraints. These constraints were lifted for increased temperature scenarios, suggesting increased bloom potential under climate change conditions.

  10. Meiofauna as food source for small-sized demersal fish in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schückel, Sabine; Sell, Anne F.; Kihara, Terue C.; Koeppen, Annemarie; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reiss, Henning

    2013-06-01

    Meiofauna play an essential role in the diet of small and juvenile fish. However, it is less well documented which meiofaunal prey groups in the sediment are eaten by fish. Trophic relationships between five demersal fish species (solenette, goby, scaldfish, dab samples and fish stomach contents collected seasonally between January 2009 and January 2010 in the German Bight. In all seasons, meiofauna in the sediment was numerically dominated by nematodes, whereas harpacticoids dominated in terms of occurrence and biomass. Between autumn and spring, the harpacticoid community was characterized by Pseudobradya minor and Halectinosoma canaliculatum, and in summer by Longipedia coronata. Meiofaunal prey dominated the diets of solenette and gobies in all seasons, occurred only seasonally in the diet of scaldfish and dab, and was completely absent in the diet of plaice. For all fish species (excluding plaice) and in each season, harpacticoids were the most important meiofauna prey group in terms of occurrence, abundance and biomass. High values of Ivlev's index of selectivity for Pseudobradya spp. in winter and Longipedia spp. in summer provided evidence that predation on harpacticoids was species-selective, even though both harpacticoids co-occurred in high densities in the sediments. Most surficial feeding strategies of the studied fish species and emergent behaviours of Pseudobradya spp. and Longipedia spp. might have caused this prey selection. With increasing fish sizes, harpacticoid prey densities decreased in the fish stomachs, indicating a diet change towards larger benthic prey during the ontogeny of all fish species investigated.

  11. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of acetate from a methanogenic marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, N. E.; Carter, W. D., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The delta C-13 value of porewater acetate isolated from the anoxic sediments of Cape Lookout Bight (North Carolina) ranged from -17.6 percent in the sulfate reduction zone to -2.8 percent in the underlying methanogenic zone. The large C-13 enrichment in the sulfate-depleted sediments appears to be associated with the dissimilation of acetate to CH4 and CO2. Fractionation factors for that process were estimated to be 1.032 +/- 0.014 and 1.036 +/- 0.019 for the methyl and carboxyl groups. A subsurface maximum in delta C-13 of the total acetate molecule, as well as the methyl and carboxyl carbons at 10-15 cm depth within the sediment column, indicate that changes in the relative rates of acetate cycling pathways occur in the methanogenic zone. The methyl group of the acetate was depleted in C-13 by 7-14 percent relative to the carboxyl moiety. The intramolecular heterogeneity may be the result of both synthetic and catabolic isotope effects.

  12. Tuna aggregation and feeding near fronts observed in satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Paul C.; Bernard, Hannah J.

    1987-08-01

    Stomach contents of albacore ( Thunnus alalunga) and skipjack ( Katsuwonus pelamis) caught off California in August 1983 showed they were feeding on juvenile northern anchovy ( Engraulis mordax), other fishes, and planktonic crustaceans. The distribution and diet of these predators were related to mesoscale frontal features visible in satellite sea surface temperature and phytoplankton pigment imagery. Albacore were caught in the vicinity of a filament of cold, pigment-rich surface water that varied with the intensity of coastal upwelling on time scales of several days. Stomachs of albacore caught closer to the filament contained relatively more juvenile anchovy and fewer pelagic red crabs ( Pleuroncodes planipes). Skipjack were caught in warm water in the Southern California Bight, north of their normal range due to El Nin˜o warming. They appeared to be feeding most successfully near the strong frontal boundary of a productive, cold water mass south of Pt. Conception, where dense patches of euphausiids were available. Both species were feeding near variable, mesoscale centers of high productivity where prey abundance may be enhanced.

  13. Lidar network observations of Cirrus morphological and scattering properties during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989: The 18 October 1989 case study and statistical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four lidars, located roughly 75 km from each other in the inner German Bight of the North Sea, were used to measure geometrical and optical properties of cirrus clouds during the International Cirrus Experiment 1989 (ICE '89). A complete cirrus life cycle was observed simultaneously with three lidars during a case study on 18 October 1989. Time series of particle backscatter, depolarization-ratio height profiles, cloud depth, optical thickness, and of the cirrus extinction-to-backscatter, or lidar, ratio describe the evolution of the cloud system. A two-wavelength lidar measurement was performed and indicates wavelength independence of ice-crystal scattering. The optical and geometrical depths of the cirrus were well correlated and varied between 0.01 and 0.5 and 100 m and 4.5 km, respectively. Although the evolution of the cloud deck was similar over the different observation sites, cirrus geometrical, scattering, and microphysical properties were found to vary considerably within the lidar network. A statistical analysis of ice-cloud properties is performed based on 38 different cirrus cases sampled during ICE '89. Cirrus formation was found to start at the tropopause in most cases. Ice clouds, measured at high midlatitudes (around 54 N), were thin with mean optical and geometrical depths mainly below 0.4 and 2 km, respectively. A good correlation between mean cloud optical and geometrical thickness, and a weak decrease of the mean optical depths with temperature was observed. (orig.)

  14. H2 cycling and microbial bioenergetics in anoxic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, the great majority of microbial redox processes involve H2 as a reactant, product, or potential by-product, and the thermodynamics of these processes are thus highly sensitive to fluctuations in environmental H2 concentrations. In turn, H2 concentrations are controlled by the activity of H2-consuming microorganisms, which efficiently utilize this substrate down to levels which correspond to their bioenergetic limitations. Consequently, any environmental change which impacts the thermodynamics of H2-consuming organisms is mirrored by a corresponding change in H2 concentrations. This phenomenon is illustrated in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA: H2 concentrations are controlled by a suite of environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, sulfate concentrations) in a fashion which can be quantitatively described by a simple thermodynamic model. These findings allow us to calculate the apparent minimum quantity of biologically useful energy in situ. We find that sulfate reducing bacteria are not active at energy yields below -18 kJ per mole sulfate, while methanogenic archaea exhibit a minimum close to -10 kJ per mole methane.

  15. Stratified coastal ocean interactions with tropical cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S. M.; Miles, T. N.; Seroka, G. N.; Xu, Y.; Forney, R. K.; Yu, F.; Roarty, H.; Schofield, O.; Kohut, J.

    2016-03-01

    Hurricane-intensity forecast improvements currently lag the progress achieved for hurricane tracks. Integrated ocean observations and simulations during hurricane Irene (2011) reveal that the wind-forced two-layer circulation of the stratified coastal ocean, and resultant shear-induced mixing, led to significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling (at least 6 °C and up to 11 °C) over a wide swath of the continental shelf. Atmospheric simulations establish this cooling as the missing contribution required to reproduce Irene's accelerated intensity reduction. Historical buoys from 1985 to 2015 show that ahead-of-eye-centre cooling occurred beneath all 11 tropical cyclones that traversed the Mid-Atlantic Bight continental shelf during stratified summer conditions. A Yellow Sea buoy similarly revealed significant and rapid ahead-of-eye-centre cooling during Typhoon Muifa (2011). These findings establish that including realistic coastal baroclinic processes in forecasts of storm intensity and impacts will be increasingly critical to mid-latitude population centres as sea levels rise and tropical cyclone maximum intensities migrate poleward.

  16. Relationship Between Mycorrhizal Associations and Tree Phyto-Sanitary Conditions of Urban Woodlands of Bogota D.C., Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spore number and root infection by Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were evaluated in Eugenia myrtifolia, Ficus soatensis and Croton bogotensis, in parks and green zones of urban woodlands of Bogota D.C, Colombia. The aim was to investigate relations between mycorrhizal associations and tree phyto-sanitary conditions, and effects of two distinct climatic zones. It was demonstrated that plant species and climate are significant sources of variations in the general mycorrhizal state. Eugenia myrtifolia showed the highest degree of root colonization but the lowest number of spores, while C. bogotensis had the opposite response. In general, dry environments favored the mycorrhizal infection levels. By considering overall data, there was a positive relation between the general phytosanitary status of the urban trees and the mycorrhizal colonization. The evaluation of the relationship with the incidence of specific foliar symptoms showed that chlorosis, bight and herbivory maintained a negative relation with the mycorrhization in E. myrtifolia and C. bogotensis. Results suggest that association with AM fungi helps in any way for reducing

  17. Heavy metals in the North Sea. Pt. 2. Results of the large-scale ZISCH survey from 28.1.-6.3.1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of ZISCH, a multidisciplinary research project examining the circulation and pollutant transfer in the North Sea, two cruises were undertaken to investigate the physical, chemical and biological parameters in the entire North Sea. The aim was to describe the dispersion and possible deposition of contaminants. ZISCH 2 took place from the end of January until March 1987. This paper presents the data set of the analyses of manganese, iron, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium, mercury and lead in unfiltered seawater. The distribution of metal concentrations are illustrated in distribution maps for different depth horizons. The corresponding data are available on disk. The results of a regional statistical evaluation are given in tables. The near-shore and offshore areas in the southeast North Sea including the German Bight are considered in greater detail. Samples were taken at 142 stations for the determination of trace heavy metals in unfiltered seawater; some samples were analysed on board. Trace heavy metal determination was mostly done by means of Total Reflection X-ray Analysis (TXRF), a very suitable multielemental trace metal analysis method for such high number of samples. (orig.)

  18. North Sea research projects ZISCH and PRISMA: application of total-reflection x-ray spectrometry in sea-water analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1986, the ''Bundesamt fur Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie'' (BSH), has participated in two interdisciplinary North Sea research projects involving trace heavy metal analysis in sea-water. The analysis of heavy metals (such as manganese, iron, nickel, copper, zinc and lead) in sea-water samples has been performed previously by application of total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF). Samples obtained on the first cruise of the following project ''Processes in the Pollutant Transfer between Sea and Atmosphere'' (PRISMA) in September and October 1990, covering parts of the northern North Sea and Atlantic Ocean, were also analysed by TXRF. Results from these two surveys and from the first PRISMA drift experiments in the German Bight in April 1991 show the concentration ranges and variabilities of some heavy metals and are presented here. The ability of TXRF, in connection with tested procedures for sampling, matrix separation and enrichment, to master large quantities of trace heavy metal analyses in sea-water with sufficient analytical quality is demonstrated. (author)

  19. Environmental genotoxicity and cytotoxicity levels in fish from the North Sea offshore region and Atlantic coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Geno-cytotoxicity effects assessed in fish from the North Sea and near the Iceland. ► Reference levels of nuclear abnormalities detected in fish from the Iceland area. ► Increased environmental geno-cytotoxicity detected in the North Sea study stations. ► Geno-cytotoxicity biomarkers in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus assessed for the first time. -- Abstract: In the framework of the ICON project, environmental genotoxicity and cytotoxicity levels were assessed in blood erythrocytes of dab (Limanda limanda) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) collected at 25 stations in the North Sea and near the coast of Iceland in August–October 2008. Micronuclei, nuclear buds and bi-nucleated cells with nucleoplasmic bridges were assessed as environmental genotoxicity biomarkers, and the frequency of fragmented-apoptotic and bi-nucleated erythrocytes were assessed as environmental cytotoxicity biomarkers. The lowest frequencies of genotoxic and cytotoxic abnormalities were detected in fish from the Icelandic study stations. The highest frequencies of abnormalities were recorded in dab from the Dogger Bank and the German Bight, in haddock from the Egersund Bank and from an area off the Firth of Forth (North Sea). In fish from the Icelandic reference area, frequencies of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity responses were significantly lower than in fish from most areas of the North Sea

  20. The 210Pb budget of the North Sea. Atmospheric input versus sediment flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric deposition is one of the main sources of 210Pb in the North Sea water. Annual variations of this flux are large in the Netherlands. Translated to the North Sea area the atmospheric deposition is 42 Bq.m-2.y-1. In the 210Pb budget of the North Sea, supply by rivers, as artificial supply by power plants and fertilizer plants, does not play a great role. Fishery activities is not a good scavenger in the total 210Pb budget. From measurements of 36 box-cores in the North Sea the average 210Pb flux to the sediment is estimated 150 Bq.m-2.y-1. Fluxes to the sediment smaller than 10% of the atmospheric flux, occur in the sandy areas of the Southern Bight and Dogger Bank. Large fluxes, up to 50 times the atmospheric deposition, occur mainly in the fine grained deposition areas of the Skagerrak and the Norwegian Trench. The net lateral flux accounts for 1/3 part of the flux to the sediment: the North Sea is a true sink for 210Pb. The radon flux from the sediment supplies 1/3 of the 210Pb flux to the sediment. Based on the 210Pb budget total mass accumulation in the North Sea is 1100 x 109 kg.y-1, this is an order of magnitude higher than figures obtained from transport of suspended matter and from 210Pb sedimentation rates. (author)

  1. Champacyclin, a new cyclic octapeptide from Streptomyces strain C42 isolated from the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Alexander; Baumann, Heike I; Kleinschmidt, Katrin; Ensle, Paul; Wiese, Jutta; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Imhoff, Johannes F

    2013-12-01

    New isolates of Streptomyces champavatii were isolated from marine sediments of the Gotland Deep (Baltic Sea), from the Urania Basin (Eastern Mediterranean), and from the Kiel Bight (Baltic Sea). The isolates produced several oligopeptidic secondary metabolites, including the new octapeptide champacyclin (1a) present in all three strains. Herein, we report on the isolation, structure elucidation and determination of the absolute stereochemistry of this isoleucine/leucine (Ile/Leu = Xle) rich cyclic octapeptide champacyclin (1a). As 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy could not fully resolve the structure of (1a), additional information on sequence and configuration of stereocenters were obtained by a combination of multi stage mass spectrometry (MSn) studies, amino acid analysis, partial hydrolysis and subsequent enantiomer analytics with gas chromatography positive chmical ionization/electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-PCI/EI-MS) supported by comparison to reference dipeptides. Proof of the head-to-tail cyclization of (1a) was accomplished by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) compared to an alternatively side chain cyclized derivative (2). Champacyclin (1a) is likely synthesized by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), because of its high content of (D)-amino acids. The compound (1a) showed antimicrobial activity against the phytopathogen Erwinia amylovora causing the fire blight disease of certain plants. PMID:24317473

  2. Mass balances on selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the New York-New Jersey Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenburg, Lisa A; Valle, Sandra N; Panero, Marta A; Muñoz, Gabriela R; Shor, Leslie M

    2010-01-01

    Mass balances on 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the New York-New Jersey Harbor (hereafter "the Harbor") were constructed using monitoring data from the water column, sediment, and atmosphere. Inputs considered included tributaries, atmospheric deposition, wastewater treatment plant discharges, combined sewer overflows (CSOs), and stormwater runoff. Removal processes examined included tidal exchange between the Harbor and the coastal Bight and Long Island Sound, volatilization, and accumulation or burial of sediment-bound PAHs in the Harbor. The PAHs investigated were fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, perylene, benzo[ghi]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene. The results show inputs and outputs are fairly well balanced for most compounds, a finding that suggests aerobic biodegradation may not be a key loss process in this Harbor, as has been assumed in other systems. The main pathway for inputs of all PAHs is stormwater runoff. Atmospheric deposition is an important conveyor of PAHs with molecular weights sustainable management of urban water resources. PMID:20176837

  3. Fishing and bottom water temperature as drivers of change in maximum shell length in Atlantic surfclams (Spisula solidissima)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, D. M.; Narváez, D. A.; Hennen, D.; Jacobson, L.; Mann, R.; Hofmann, E. E.; Powell, E. N.; Klinck, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Maximum shell length of Atlantic surfclams (Spisula solidissima) on the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) continental shelf, obtained from federal fishery survey data from 1982-present, has decreased by 15-20 mm. Two potential causes of this decreasing trend, fishery removal of large animals and stress due to warming bottom temperatures, were investigated using an individual-based model for post-settlement surfclams and a fifty-year hindcast of bottom water temperatures on the MAB. Simulations showed that fishing and/or warming bottom water temperature can cause decreases in maximum surfclam shell length (body size) equivalent to those observed in the fished stock. Independently, either localized fishing rates of 20% or sustained bottom temperatures that are 2 °C warmer than average conditions generate the observed decrease in maximum shell length. However, these independent conditions represent extremes and are not sustained in the MAB. The combined effects of fishing and warmer temperatures can generate simulated length decreases that are similar to observed decreases. Interannual variability in bottom water temperatures can also generate fluctuations in simulated shell length of up to 20 mm over a period of 10-15 years. If the change in maximum size is not genotypic, simulations also suggest that shell size composition of surfclam populations can recover if conditions change; however, that recovery could take a decade to become evident.

  4. Environmental impact assessment. Investigation of marine mammals in relation to the establishment of a marine wind farm on Horns Reef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-15

    Elsamproject has decided to carry out an environmental impact assessment with the aim to investigate whether the establishment of a marine wind farm on Horns Reef may impact on breeding and non-breeding marine mammals, particularly harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena and common seal Phoca vitulina. The marine mammals of the northern part of the German Bight can be characterised by a regular occurrence of harbour porpoise and common seal throughout the year, an irregular occurrence of grey seal Halichoerus grypus and white-beaked dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris and rare occurrences of white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus, long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas and killer whale Orcinus orca. The environment impact assessment therefore focuses on the evaluation of the possible effects on harbour porpoise and common seal. The investigation constitutes the first phase of a before-after-control-impact (BACI) analysis of the occurrence of harbour porpoise before, during and after the construction of the wind farm. (au)

  5. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (South Atlantic): Black sea bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, L.P.

    1989-07-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are designed to assist in environmental impact assessment. The black sea bass, Centropristis striata, is an abundant species associated with the inshore sponge-coral habitat in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). It is a protogynous hermaphrodite (each individual is first a female and then a male) that spawns from January to June on the Continental shelf. Juveniles utilize estuaries, as well as offshore areas, for nurseries. It is a slow growing species with a life span of about 10 years. Juveniles and adults are bottom-feeding carnivores. Adults have been collected at temperatures as low as 6 /degree/C but are most abundant at temperatures of 8 to 10 /degree/C and above. Juveniles tolerate lower temperatures and greater salinity ranges than adults. Black sea bass are primarily harvested by the recreational hook and line fishery and the commercial trap fishery. Yield-per-recruit analyses indicate that the harvest of black sea bass is less than the maximum possible due to a combination of high fishing pressure and harvest of small fish. 58 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana L Melcón

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  7. Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Yack, Tina M; Barlow, Jay; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-06-01

    Echolocation signals from Baird's beaked whales were recorded during visual and acoustic shipboard surveys of cetaceans in the California Current ecosystem and with autonomous, long-term recorders in the Southern California Bight. The preliminary measurement of the visually validated Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals from towed array data were used as a basis for identifying Baird's signals in the autonomous recorder data. Two distinct signal types were found, one being a beaked whale-like frequency modulated (FM) pulse, the other being a dolphin-like broadband click. The median FM inter-pulse interval was 230 ms. Both signal types showed a consistent multi-peak structure in their spectra with peaks at ~9, 16, 25, and 40 kHz. Depending on signal type, as well as recording aspect and distance to the hydrophone, these peaks varied in relative amplitude. The description of Baird's echolocation signals will allow for studies of their distribution and abundance using towed array data without associated visual sightings and from autonomous seafloor hydrophones. PMID:23742381

  8. Near-bottom suspended matter concentration on the Continental Shelf during storms: estimates based on in situ observations of light transmission and a particle size dependent transmissometer calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J.A.; Butman, B.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1987-01-01

    A laboratory calibration of Sea Tech and Montedoro-Whitney beam transmissometers shows a linear relation between light attenuation coefficient (cp) and suspended matter concentration (SMC) for natural sediments and for glass beads. However the proportionality constant between cp and SMC depends on the particle diameter and particle type. Thus, to measure SMC, observations of light attenuation must be used with a time-variable calibration when suspended particle characteristics change with time. Because of this variable calibration, time series of light attenuation alone may not directly reflect SMC and must be interpreted with care. The near-bottom concentration of suspended matter during winter storms on the U.S. East Coast Continental Shelf is estimated from light transmission measurements made 2 m above the bottom and from the size distribution of suspended material collected simultaneously in sediment traps 3 m above the bottom. The average concentrations during six storms between December 1979 and February 1980 in the Middle Atlantic Bight ranged from 2 to 4 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 7 mg l1) and 8 to 12 mg l1 (maximum concentration of 22 mg l1) on the south flank of Georges Bank. ?? 1987.

  9. Synoptically-induced variability in the microphysical properties of the South East Pacific stratocumulus deck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zuidema

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic variations associated with changes in satellite-derived cloud droplet number concentrations (Nd for the southeast Pacific stratocumulus deck were examined using a composite analysis applied to daily values from the five October months of 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. MAX and MIN Nd composites were defined by the top and bottom terciles of daily area-mean Nd values over the Arica Bight, the region with the largest mean oceanic Nd. Nd and ship-based accumulation mode aerosol concentrations (Na correlate well (r=0.65, with a best-fit aerosol activation value dln Nddln Na of 0.53 for pixels with Nd>50 cm−3. The adiabatically-derived MODIS cloud depths also correlate well with the ship-based cloud depths (r=0.7, though are consistently higher (mean bias of almost 60 m. The MAX-Nd composite is characterized by a weaker subtropical anticyclone and weaker winds both at the surface and the lower free troposphere than the MIN-Nd composite. The MAX-Nd composite clouds over the Arica Bight are thinner than the MIN-Nd composite clouds, have lower cloud tops, and occur within warmer, drier free tropospheres (as deduced from radiosondes that imply greater coastal subsidence. The cloud thinning compensates radiatively for increased reflectance from increases in Nd, most apparent near the coast. CloudSat radar reflectivities do not imply significant aerosol scavenging by precipitation near the coast, indicating that variability in wind transport contributes to the

  10. Microphysical variability in southeast Pacific Stratocumulus clouds: synoptic conditions and radiative response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Painemal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Synoptic and satellite-derived cloud property variations for the southeast Pacific stratocumulus region associated with changes in coastal satellite-derived cloud droplet number concentrations (Nd are explored. MAX and MIN Nd composites are defined by the top and bottom terciles of daily area-mean Nd values over the Arica Bight, the region with the largest mean oceanic Nd, for the five October months of 2001, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. The ability of the satellite retrievals to capture composite differences is assessed with ship-based data. Nd and ship-based accumulation mode aerosol concentrations (Na correlate well (r = 0.65, with a best-fit aerosol activation value dln Nddln Na of 0.56 for pixels with Nd>50 cm−3. The adiabatically-derived MODIS cloud depths also correlate well with the ship-based cloud depths (r=0.7, though are consistently higher (mean bias of almost 60 m. The MAX-Nd composite is characterized by a weaker subtropical anticyclone and weaker winds both at the surface and the lower free troposphere than the MIN-Nd composite. The MAX-Nd composite clouds over the Arica Bight are thinner than the MIN-Nd composite clouds, have lower cloud tops, lower near-coastal cloud albedos, and occur below warmer and drier free tropospheres (as deduced from radiosondes and NCEP Reanalysis. CloudSat radar reflectivities indicate little near-coastal precipitation. The co-occurrence of more boundary

  11. Geology and 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology of Akutan Volcano, Eastern Aleutian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, M. L.; Jicha, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    stages 4-2. Cascade Bight, an eruptive center 4.5 km southeast of the caldera, has apparently been active in the Holocene as two experiments on basaltic andesite lavas yielded no radiogenic argon. Holocene lavas are also exposed along the upper walls of the ~1,600 yr old summit caldera (Waythomas, 1999, Bull Volc, v. 61, p. 141-161), including dissected 1296 m-tall Akutan Peak (the current summit), as well as low on the north and west flanks of the Akutan edifice. Holocene lavas, including those from Cascade Bight as well as Lava Point satellite vent on the NW coast, all fall along a single tholeiitic, basalt-to-dacite evolutionary trend that has lower K than Pleistocene lavas. Our results show that the focus of volcanism has shifted within the western half of Akutan Island over the last ~600 ka, and that on occasion multiple volcanic centers have been active over the same time period, including within the Holocene.

  12. Condiciones oceanográficas en isla Gorgona, Pacífico oriental tropical de Colombia Oceanographic conditions off Gorgona Island, eastern tropical Pacific of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Giraldo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La zona de influencia costera de isla Gorgona es un área marina protegida localizada en el Pacífico Oriental Tropical (POT de Colombia. Aunque alberga uno de los arrecifes coralinos más desarrollados del POT, la caracterización de las condiciones oceanógraficas superficiales locales y su variabilidad temporal y espacial han sido escasamente abordadas. Para incrementar el conocimiento sobre la variabilidad de la temperatura y la salinidad en esta localidad se realizaron registros sistemáticos de estas variables durante cuatro periodos (septiembre 2005, diciembre 2005, marzo 2006 y junio 2006, se instalaron sensores de registro continuo de temperatura a f 5 m de profundidad en la zona oriental y occidental de la isla, y se realizó un monitoreo del patrón local de circulación superficial utilizando un perfilador de corrientes (AWAK-ADCP durante junio 2006 y febrero 2007. Se identificaron dos períodos contrastantes para las condiciones oceanógraficas en la capa superficial (0-50 m de la columna de agua: un período cálido y de baja salinidad superficial entre mayo y diciembre (profundidad termoclina 47 m y un período frío y salino entre enero y abril (profundidad termoclina 7,5 m. Se descartó la presencia de proceso local de surgencia y los resultados indicaron una fuerte influencia de procesos de mesoescala (surgencia en el Panamá Bight sobre la variabilidad temporal de las condiciones oceanógraficas en la zona de estudio. En este mismo sentido se sugiere que la variabilidad espacial estaría más asociada a procesos climáticos regionales (patrón de precipitación y la cercanía de la zona de estudio al complejo deltaico río Patía - río Sanquianga.The near shore zone of Gorgona Island is a protected marine area located in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP of Colombia. Although this is home to one of the most developed coral reefs in the ETP, the characteristics of the local oceanographic conditions at the surface and their

  13. Scientific concepts for hydroacoustic seafloor mapping in the coastal zone and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Bürk, Dietmar; Holler, Peter; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, Hans-Christian

    2013-04-01

    Hydroacoustic seafloor mapping is a reliable and cost-effective method to investigate and monitor the seafloor in high spatial and temporal resolution. The results are important for the evaluation of benthic habitats and help to identify vulnerable environments that require protection. Yet, how can we overcome the problems that occur when different gear produces different results, which are evaluated by people that have different points of view and different backgrounds? These aspects form an integer part of the project WIMO ("Scientific concepts for monitoring the German Bight, SE North Sea", Subproject 1.1: "Hydroacoustic Habitat Mapping"). It aims at comparing different hydroacoustic gear, methodologies and workflows in order to work out basic routines for universal use in marine benthic habitat mapping. The project investigates a number of target areas in the German Bight (North Sea) using different sidescan sonars (SSS), acoustic seafloor-classification systems (AGDS), multibeams, and different sampling and grain-size analytical methods as well as sea-floor imaging methods. We tested different gear on different ships, on the same ship but not synchronously, and as many instruments as possible measuring at the same time on the same ship. Our results suggest that guidelines and requirements for surveys can hardly be standardized as they depend largely on the water depth, the seabed, and on the vessel and the equipment available. All of these frame conditions usually differ from survey to survey. Taking this into account, we present a reasonable workflow for time and cost-effective benthic habitat mapping and monitoring. Transect-line distances as well as monitoring frequencies, number and positioning of ground-truth samples and seabed imaging are discussed. We recommend frequency combinations and appropriate swath widths and overlaps for SSS and show a way to ground-truth lower-frequency data using high-frequency data. Acoustic ground discrimination systems are

  14. On the origin of Laurentia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalziel, I.W.D. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Laurentia, the Precambrian core of the North American continent, is surrounded by late Precambrian rift systems and therefore constitutes a suspect terrane''. A geometric and geological fit can be achieved between the Atlantic margin of Laurentia and the Pacific margin of the Gondwana craton. The enigmatic Arequipa massif along the southern Peruvian coast, that yields ca. 2.0 Ga radiometric ages, is juxtaposed with the Makkovik-Ketilidian province of the same age range in Labrador and southern Greenland. The Greenville belt continues beneath the ensialic Andes of the present day to join up with the 1.3--1.0 Ga San Ignacio and Sonsas-Aguapei orogens of the Transamazonian craton. Together with the recent identification of possible continuations of the Greenville orogen in East Antarctica and of the Taconic Appalachians in southern South America, the fit supports suggestions that Laurentia originated between East Antarctica-Australia and embryonic South America prior to the opening of the Pacific Ocean basin and amalgamation of the Gondwana Cordilleran and Appalachian margins, this implies that there may have been two supercontinents during the Neoproterozoic, before and after opening of the Pacific Ocean. As Laurentia and Gondwana appear to have collided on at least two occasions during the Paleozoic, this scenario therefore calls to question the existence of so-called supercontinental cycles. The Arica bight of the present day may reflect a primary reentrant in the South American continental margin that controlled subduction processes along the Andean margin and eventually led to uplift of the Altiplano.

  15. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples and data from previous cruises were analyzed with a view to understanding those biological, chemical, and physical processes which affect energy-related pollutants in the marine environment of the continental margin. Two cruises designed to expand the sample base, measure the time variability of several transfer processes, and to test specific hypotheses on the mechanisms for processes which effect exchange of continental margin with open ocean waters were carried out. Progress was made in understanding the relative roles of nutrients and light in controlling the productivity of important primary biomass (and hence, particle) producers. Progress was also made in understanding the influences of phytoplankton populations on distribution of inorganic nutrients, dissolved oxygen and particulate organic matter. In addition, preliminary results from field work support the hypothesis that most diatom production on the shelf sinks to the bottom where it enters benthic food chains or provides seed populations for subsequent blooms. Radionuclides were studied in water columns and in sediments to develop an understanding of processes associated with suspended solids and with sediments as sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants. Major progress was made on the analysis of hydrographic data from all previous cruises and to evolve a comprehensive picture of the stratification of the waters of the New York Bight. The Co2-H20 equilibration system required for the preparation of samples for oxygen isotope analysis was completed. Work has continued in the use of radon as a tracer of small scale water motions and mixing in the definition of the source function needed for modelling the data, in actual modelling of the data, and in defining the range of variability of the radon distributions

  16. Composition and temporal patterns of larval fish communities in Chesapeake and Delaware Bays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Ribeiro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Comparing larval fish assemblages in different estuaries provides insights about the coastal distribution of larval populations, larval transport, and adult spawning locations (Ribeiro et al. 2015. We simultaneously compared the larval fish assemblages entering two Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB estuaries (Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay, USA through weekly sampling from 2007 to 2009. In total, 43 taxa (32 families and 36 taxa (24 families were collected in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, respectively. Mean taxonomic diversity, mean richness, and evenness were generally lower in Delaware Bay. Communities of both bays were dominated by Anchoa spp., Gobiosoma spp., Micropogonias undulatus, and Brevoortia tyrannus; Paralichthys spp. was more abundant in Delaware Bay and Microgobius thalassinus was more abundant in Chesapeake Bay. Inter-annual variation in the larval fish communities was low at both sites, with a relatively consistent composition across years, but strong seasonal (intra-annual variation in species composition occurred in both bays. Two groups were identified in Chesapeake Bay: a ‘winter’ group dominated by shelf-spawned species (e.g. M. undulatus and a ‘summer’ group comprising obligate estuarine species and coastal species (e.g. Gobiosoma spp. and Cynoscion regalis, respectively. In Delaware Bay, 4 groups were identified: a ‘summer’ group of mainly obligate estuarine fishes (e.g. Menidia sp. being replaced by a ‘fall’ group (e.g. Ctenogobius boleosoma and Gobionellus oceanicus; ‘winter’ and ‘spring’ groups were dominated by shelf-spawned (e.g. M. undulatus and Paralichthys spp. and obligate estuarine species (e.g. Leiostomus xanthurus and Pseudopleuronectes americanus, respectively. This study demonstrates that inexpensive and simultaneous sampling in different estuaries provides important insights into the variability in community structure of fish assemblages at large spatial scales.

  17. The marine macroalgae of Helgoland (North Sea): an annotated list of records between 1845 and 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Inka; Kuhlenkamp, Ralph

    2000-12-01

    The earliest known records of marine macroalgae from Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) date from the mid-19th century. Since then, 274 marine macroalgal species have been reported: 77 species of Chlorophycota, 100 species of Phaeophycota and 97 species of Rhodophycota. Additionally 11 species were only recorded as drift and 51 species as doubtful for Helgoland. The remains of the herbarium of Paul Kuckuck, the first curator for botany at the Helgoland Biological Station between 1892 and 1914, are still located there and consist of 173 macroalgal species from Helgoland. On comparing this 100-year-old herbarium and other old sources with recent macroalgal records, it became clear that changes in species composition have occurred. After World War II, several species such as Arthrocladia villosa, Corynophlaea crispa, Cutleria multifida, Eudesme virescens, Mesogloia vermiculata, Sporochnus pedunculatus, Antithamnion cruciatum, Apoglossum ruscifolium, Chondria dasyphylla, Helminthora divaricata, Jania rubens and Osmundea ramosissima were not found again. Other species such as Dictyota dichotoma, Leathesia difformis, Stictyosiphon soriferus, Helminthocladia calvadosii and Scinaia furcellata became very rare . Significantly, perhaps, most of these species have a heteromorphic life history with the appearance of the macroscopic phase restricted to (spring and) summer. Many new species of green algae were recorded for Helgoland after 1959, due to new substrata and the research activities of Peter Kornmann, curator for botany after 1959, and Paul-Heinz Sahling his technical assistant. Introductions of species during the considered time period were: Bonnemaisonia hamifera, Codium fragile, Mastocarpus stellatus and Sargassum muticum. Type material of the following species is located at the Marine Biological Station at Helgoland: Mikrosyphar porphyrae, Porphyra insolita and Ulva tenera.

  18. Experimental determination of the partition coefficient for Ba in Neogloboquadrina dutertrei suggests calcification occurs in a Ba-enriched microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, J. S.; Russell, A. D.; Davis, C. V.; Spero, H. J.; Chu, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Ba/Ca ratio in several spinose planktic foraminifer species varies as a function of the Ba/Ca concentration of seawater and is not affected by other parameters such as the seawater salinity, temperature and pH (Honisch et al., 2011). Since seawater Ba concentration is linearly related to Ba in nearshore environments, Ba/Ca ratios in spinose species shows promise as an indicator of past changes in monsoon strength and river runoff (e. g. Weldeab et al. 2007). In contrast, the non-spinose foraminifers often have intrashell variability in Ba/Ca, with Ba/Ca ratios much higher than expected for the range of Ba concentrations observed in the ocean. Furthermore, the Ba/Ca ratio can vary by over a factor of 10 within a single specimen. This suggests either 1) the partition coefficient for Ba in non-spinose species differs from that determined for spinose species, or 2) non-spinose species calcify in a micro-environment that is enriched in Ba. We conducted experiments on live specimens to determine the partition coefficient for Ba in the non-spinose foraminifer N. dutertrei. Specimens were collected via plankton net from the Southern California Bight and cultured at the Wrigley Marine Science Center, Santa Catalina Island during the summer of 2013-2015. We use isotopically labeled seawater (87Sr) to identify discrete portions of calcite that grew in culture. We use laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for trace element analyses and to identify ocean grown vs. culture grown calcite. We show that the partition coefficient is similar to the spinose species: N. dutertrei incorporates Ba as a function of seawater chemistry. We conclude from these observations that N. dutertrei forms its calcite from fluids enriched in Ba, and hypothesize that this process occurs via attachment to organic-rich particles such as marine snow.

  19. Phytoplankton carbon biomass and specific growth rates determined with the labeled chlorophyll a technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeled chlorophyll a technique, based on the incorporation of H14CO-3 into chlorophyll a (chl a) gives accurate determinations of both phytoplankton carbon biomass (Csub(p)) and specific growth rate (μ). Csub(P) and μ, derived from the labeled chl a method, exhibited a diel periodicity and the mean μ over 24 h compared well with the dilution rate for an oceanic microflagellate in NH+sub(4-) limited continuous culture. The specific activity of carbon in Csub(P) (Rsup(*)sub(CP)) and in chl a (Rsup(*)sub(chl) sub(a)) were equal after only 2 h and remained the same through 24 h. This supports the main assumption of the technique that within a useful time scale, the specific activities are equal. Values of Csub(P) and phytoplankton POC measured with a CHN analyser were the same for the microflagellate in continuous culture. Estimates of phytoplankton carbon derived from several indirect methods were either greater than (methods based on measurement of adenosine triphosphate and microscopic examination of cell counts and volumes) or less than (methods based on measurement of particulate organic carbon and chlorophyll a concentrations) values determined with the labeled chl a technique. Time course 14C incubations indicate that both Csub(P) and μ exhibit diel variability through 24 h in the fluorescence maximum layer and overlying water column in the Southern California Bight. Phytoplankton populations in the fluorescence maximum layer grew with generation times of 2 to 3 d, while generation times in the water column above averaged less than 1 d. (orig.)

  20. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, Patricia L.; Sherwood, Christopher R.

    2008-10-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the "effective" forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  1. Simulating oil droplet dispersal from the Deepwater Horizon spill with a Lagrangian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Elizabeth W.; Schlag, Zachary; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.; He, Ruoying; Hyun, Hoon; Socolofsky, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical multiphase plume model, combined with time-varying flow and hydrographic fields generated by the 3-D South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico model (SABGOM) hydrodynamic model, were used as input to a Lagrangian transport model (LTRANS), to simulate transport of oil droplets dispersed at depth from the recent Deepwater Horizon MC 252 oil spill. The plume model predicts a stratification-dominated near field, in which small oil droplets detrain from the central plume containing faster rising large oil droplets and gas bubbles and become trapped by density stratification. Simulated intrusion (trap) heights of ∼ 310–370 m agree well with the midrange of conductivity-temperature-depth observations, though the simulated variation in trap height was lower than observed, presumably in part due to unresolved variability in source composition (percentage oil versus gas) and location (multiple leaks during first half of spill). Simulated droplet trajectories by the SABGOM-LTRANS modeling system showed that droplets with diameters between 10 and 50 μm formed a distinct subsurface plume, which was transported horizontally and remained in the subsurface for >1 month. In contrast, droplets with diameters ≥90 μm rose rapidly to the surface. Simulated trajectories of droplets ≤50 μm in diameter were found to be consistent with field observations of a southwest-tending subsurface plume in late June 2010 reported by Camilli et al. [2010]. Model results suggest that the subsurface plume looped around to the east, with potential subsurface oil transport to the northeast and southeast. Ongoing work is focusing on adding degradation processes to the model to constrain droplet dispersal.

  2. Comparing microfossil shell weight from two locations on the California coast to understand controls on bottom water carbonate chemistry over the past 14 ka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, S. C.; Hill, T. M.; Flores, S. C.; Myhre, S.

    2009-12-01

    Foraminiferal shell weight has been utilized, primarily in planktonic foraminifera, to understand changes in seawater carbonate ion concentration in the geologic past. Such data can provide important insight into the natural and anthropogenic processes that induce variability in the pH and carbonate ion content of seawater. This study investigated shell weights of benthic foraminifera (E. hannai, U. peregrina and B. argentea) using sediment cores from two California sites: Tomales Bay (3 m water depth), a narrow estuary in Northern California, and Santa Barbara Basin (from 400 m) within the Southern California Bight. Based upon sedimentation rates derived from radiocarbon analyses and oxygen isotopic stratigraphy, the Tomales Bay core (2.95 mm/year) extends back ~1000 years b.p., and the Santa Barbara Basin record (~80 cm/ka) extends back to 16 ka b.p. In Tomales Bay, two decreases in shell weight of E. hannai correlate to historically-documented increases in rainfall (404 and 595 years b.p.). At the top of the core a decrease in shell weight and an overall decrease in E. hannai population may correlate to human impacts on the estuary, including land use changes that caused localized “acidification”. In Santa Barbara Basin, shell weight measurements of B. argentea do not exhibit significant variability; however, U. peregrina shell weights increase during the early Holocene, indicating a potential relationship between increased upwelling/productivity at the surface and optimal foraminiferal growth conditions at 400m. Both B. argentea and U. peregrina document a decrease in shell weight over the past 3ka making it difficult to ascertain any anthropogenic influence in the upper most sediments of the core. Further work is needed to understand the roles of carbonate ion content and foraminiferal growth conditions in forcing shell weight changes in benthic foraminifera.

  3. Comparison of fishes taken by a sportfishing party vessel around oil platforms and adjacent natural reefs near Santa Barbara, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1958, 29 oil platforms have been sited in the southern California Bight of which 28 still remain in place. However, little is known of the fish populations surrounding these structures, particularly those sited in water deeper than 30 m. In the course of research on the Santa Barbara, California, party vessel sport fishery, it was noted that the platforms off Santa Barbara supported considerable sportfishing activity. Those platforms, located to the southeast of Santa Barbara in depths of 48-62 m, were particularly important and were fished intensively for various rockfishes (genus Sebastes). When fishing a platform, the vessel pulled up to within 5-10 m of a platform and drifts along one side, with the vessel operator using intermittent power to keep it near the structure. Most of the desirable species, particularly rockfishes, remained close to the platforms, rarely venturing more than perhaps 20 m from the structure. The party vessels also spent considerable time fishing over nearby natural reefs. In this survey, it was noted that there appeared to be differences in species catch composition and fish size between oil platforms and these natural reefs. Increased offshore oil drilling off California has raised interest in the role platforms play in marine systems. Questions have been raised regarding what fish live around platforms, how these structures influence populations over surrounding reefs, and whether the platforms act as fish enhancers (promoting recruitment) or only as aggregators. These questions are particularly relevant when the platforms are to be decommissioned and the possibility of allowing them to remain as artificial reefs is raised. This paper describes the results of the study on the fish populations around oil platforms and nearby natural reefs off Santa Barbara

  4. Mean and extreme sea level changes in the southwestern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jessica; Patzke, Justus; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen; Fröhle, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution an overview over the BMBF project AMSeL_Ostsee (2015-2018) for the assessment of mean and extreme sea level changes over the past 150 years in the southwestern Baltic Sea is presented. We compile several high resolution tide gauge records provided by the Water and Shipping Administration (WSV) along the German Baltic Sea coastline and merge them in internationally available data bases (UHSLC, PSMSL, and data officially available at national authorities). In addition, we make efforts in digitizing historical records to expand the number of available data sets in this complex and vulnerable coastal region. To separate absolute from relative long-term changes in sea level the vertical land motion (VLM) at specific sites is assessed. Possible sources of VLM are independently assessed by using different state-of-the-art approaches, that is: Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelled by viscoelastic Earth models, GPS derived VLM, and the difference between tide gauge and nearby satellite altimetry. The VLM corrected tide gauge records are further assessed for linear and non-linear trends as well as possible acceleration/deceleration patterns by applying advanced time series models such as Singular System Analysis (SSA) combined with a Monte-Carlo-Autoregressive-Padding approach (Wahl et al., 2010). These trend assessments are applied to mean and extreme sea levels independently to prove whether observed changes in extremes are either due to an underlying trend on mean sea levels or changes in storminess. References: Wahl, T., Jensen, J., Frank, T. (2011): On analysing sea level rise in the German Bight since 1844, NHESS, 10, 171-179.

  5. Including high-frequency variability in coastal ocean acidification projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Y.; Frieder, C. A.; Martz, T. R.; Ballard, J. R.; Feely, R. A.; Kram, S.; Nam, S.; Navarro, M. O.; Price, N. N.; Smith, J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the impacts of anthropogenic ocean acidification requires knowledge of present-day and future environmental conditions. Here, we present a simple model for upwelling margins that projects anthropogenic acidification trajectories by combining high-temporal-resolution sensor data, hydrographic surveys for source water characterization, empirical relationships of the CO2 system, and the atmospheric CO2 record. This model characterizes CO2 variability on timescales ranging from hours (e.g., tidal) to months (e.g., seasonal), bridging a critical knowledge gap in ocean acidification research. The amount of anthropogenic carbon in a given water mass is dependent on the age; therefore a density-age relationship was derived for the study region and then combined with the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change CO2 emission scenarios to add density-dependent anthropogenic carbon to the sensor time series. The model was applied to time series from autonomous pH sensors deployed in the surf zone, kelp forest, submarine canyon edge, and shelf break in the upper 100 m of the Southern California Bight. All habitats were within 5 km of one another, and exhibited unique, habitat-specific CO2 variability signatures and acidification trajectories, demonstrating the importance of making projections in the context of habitat-specific CO2 signatures. In general, both the mean and range of pCO2 increase in the future, with the greatest increase in both magnitude and range occurring in the deeper habitats due to reduced buffering capacity. On the other hand, the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr) decreased in both magnitude and range. This approach can be applied to the entire California Current System, and upwelling margins in general, where sensor and complementary hydrographic data are available.

  6. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from reedy grass leaves by chemical activation with H3PO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbons were produced from reedy grass leaves by activation with phosphoric acid. • The activated carbons have a large number of oxygen- and phosphorus-containing surface groups. • The structure of activated carbons was bight fibers features on the surface and the external surface of the activated carbons was slightly corrugated and abundant pores. - Abstract: Activated carbons were produced from reedy grass leaves by chemical activation with H3PO4 in N2 atmosphere and their characteristics were investigated. The effects of activation temperature and time were examined. Adsorption capacity was demonstrated with BET and iodine number. Micropore volume and pore size distribution of activated carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms. The surface area and iodine number of the activated carbons produced at 500 °C for 2 h were 1474 m2/g and 1128 mg/g, respectively. Thermal decomposition of pure reedy grass leaves and H3PO4-impregnated reedy grass leaves have been investigated with thermogravimetric/mass spectroscopy (TG–MS) technique. It was found that the temperature and intensity of maximum evolution of H2O and CO2 of H3PO4-impregnated reedy grass leaves were lower than that of pure reedy grass leaves. This implies that H3PO4 as an activating reagent changed the thermal degradation of the reedy grass leaves, stabilized the cellulose structure, leading to a subsequent change in the evolution of porosity. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-infrared spectroscopy analysis indicate that the produced activated carbons have rich functional groups on surface

  7. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Connie [College of Medicine, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Rountree, Carl B. [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Bon Secour St. Mary' s Hospital, 5801 Bremo Rd, Richmond, VA 23226 (United States); Methratta, Sosamma [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Radiology, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); LaRusso, Salvatore [Department of Radiology, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Kunselman, Allen R. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Spanier, Adam J., E-mail: aspanier@hmc.psu.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed the ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor.

  8. Evaluating Sediment Stability at Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. A.; Magalen, J.; Roberts, J.; Chang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Development of offshore alternative energy production methods through the deployment of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices (e.g. wave, tidal, and wind generators) in the United States continues at a rapid pace, with significant public and private investment in recent years. The installation of offshore MHK systems includes cabling to the shoreline and some combination of bottom foundation (e.g., piles, gravity bases, suction buckets) or anchored floating structure. Installation of any of this infrastructure at the seabed may affect coastal sediment dynamics. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the interrelationships between hydrodynamics and seabed dynamics and the effects of MHK foundations and cables on sediment transport. If sufficient information is known about the physical processes and sediment characteristics of a region, hydrodynamic and sediment transport models may be developed to evaluate near and far-field sediment transport. The ultimate goal of these models and methods is to quantitatively evaluate changes to the baseline seabed stability due to the installation of MHK farms in the water. The objective of the present study is to evaluate and validate wave, current, and sediment transport models (i.e., a site analysis) that may be used to estimate risk of sediment mobilization and transport. While the methodology and examples have been presented in a draft guidance document (Roberts et al., 2013), the current report presents an overall strategy for model validation, specifically for a case study in the Santa Cruz Bight, Monterey Bay, CA. Innovative techniques to quantify the risk of sediment mobility has been developed to support these investigations. Public domain numerical models are utilized to estimate the near-shore wave climate (SWAN: Simulating Waves Near-shore) and circulation and sediment transport (EFDC: Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) regimes. The models were validated with field hydrodynamic data. Sediment size information was

  9. Mean circulation in the coastal ocean off northeastern North America from a regional-scale ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; He, R.

    2015-07-01

    A regional-scale ocean model was used to hindcast the coastal circulation over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and Gulf of Maine (GOM) from 2004 to 2013. The model was nested inside a data assimilative global ocean model that provided initial and open boundary conditions. Realistic atmospheric forcing, tides and observed river runoff were also used to drive the model. Hindcast solutions were compared against observations, which included coastal sea levels, satellite altimetry sea surface height, in situ temperature and salinity measurements in the GOM, and observed mean depth-averaged velocities. Good agreements with observations suggest that the hindcast model is capable of capturing the major circulation variability in the MAB and GOM. Time- and space-continuous hindcast fields were used to depict the mean circulation, along- and cross-shelf transport and the associated momentum balances. The hindcast confirms the presence of the equatorward mean shelf circulation, which varies from 2.33 Sv over the Scotian Shelf to 0.22 Sv near Cape Hatteras. Using the 200 m isobath as the shelf/slope boundary, the mean cross-shelf transport calculations indicate that the shelfbreak segments off the Gulf of Maine (including the southern flank of Georges Bank and the Northeast Channel) and Cape Hatteras are the major sites for shelf water export. The momentum analysis reveals that the along-shelf sea level difference from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras is about 0.36 m. The nonlinear advection, stress, and horizontal viscosity terms all contribute to the ageostrophic circulation in the along-isobath direction, whereas the nonlinear advection plays a dominant role in determining the ageostrophic current in the cross-isobath direction.

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticides in sediments of the baltic and coastal waters of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberger, Dirk; Lerz, Astrid

    1996-03-01

    The distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticides, e.g. the isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), p,p’-dichiorodiphenyitrichloroethane (DDT) and its primary metabolites DDE and DDD was investigated in surface sediments (0 2 cm) and sediment cores (0 45 cm) from the western Baltic Sea and the coastal waters of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. Sediment sampling was carried out in the Belt Sea, the Arkona Basin, the Pomeranian Bight and in almost all Bodden and Haff areas of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in autumn 1993 and 1994. The highest concentrations of PCB and DDT compounds, measured in the innercoastal waters, reached 214 ng g-1 dry weight (d. w.). The values of HCH isomers ranged between 0.01 and 2.9 ng g-1 d.w., the highest levels being those of Β-HCH. Levels of chlorinated hydrocarbons, which varied depending on the sediment properties, indicated increased riverine inputs (Oder, Peene, and Uecker). Elevated levels in the Oderhaff and Peenestrom characterize that area as a sink and, due to remobilization of the upper sediment layer (fluffy layer) into the pelagic, also as a source of organic contaminants. Input from agriculture and industrial point sources (shipyards, shipbuilding) was observed in the coastal waters. The homogeneous PCB and DDT distribution (TOC standardization) observed in the surface sediments of some areas in the western Baltic indicates high sediment dynamics. This is supported by the results of sediment core analyses which showed a constant PCB and DDT distribution down to a depth of 15 to 20 cm.

  11. Historical trace element distribution in sediments from the Mississippi River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Baskaran, M.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Orem, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Five sediment cores were collected on the shelf of the inner Mississippi Bight in June 2003 for a suite of radionuclides to establish geochronologies and trace elements to examine patterns of contaminant deposition and accumulation. Core sites were chosen to reflect a matrix of variable water depths, proximity to the Mississippi River mouth as the primary source for terrigenous particles, and extent and duration of summertime water column hypoxia. The vertical distribution of 239,240Pu and 210Pbxs (= 210Pbtotal - 226Ra) provided reliable geochronological age constraints to develop models for mass accumulation rates and historic trace element inputs and variations. Mass accumulation rates ranged from 0.27 to 0.87 g cm-2 yr-1 and were internally consistent using either 210Pbxs or 239,240Pu. Measured inventories of 137Cs, 239,240Pu, and 210Pbxs were compared to atmospheric deposition rates to quantify potential sediment focusing or winnowing. Observed variability in calculated mass accumulation rates may be attributed foremost to site-specific proximity to the river mouth (i.e., sediment source), variability in water depth, and enhanced sediment focusing at the Mississippi River canyon site. Trace element concentrations were first normalized to Al, and then Al-normalized enrichment factors (ANEF) were calculated based on preanthropogenic and crustal trace element abundances. These ANEFs were typically > 1 for V and Ba, while for most other elements studied, either no enrichment or depletion was observed. The enrichment of Ba may be related, in part, to the seasonal occurrence of oxygen-depleted subsurface waters off the Mississippi River delta, as well as being an ubiquitous by-product of the petroleum industry. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

  12. Crude costs: a framework for a full-cost accounting analysis of oil and gas exploration off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defined as the total quantity of all goods and services produced and the total money earned and spent, the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a measure used to determine how well an economy is doing. For its part, the Genuine Progress Index (GPI) measures 26 variables and was first developed in 1995. In Nova Scotia, a set of 20 social, economic and environmental indicators are examined to obtain a better picture of the well-being of the region and determine if the development is sustainable over time. The authors explained their approach based on the use of GPI analysis to assist decision makers in identifying the real costs and benefits of different options applied to the oil and gas exploration situation off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The document is divided into five parts as follows: (1) Part 1: introduction, (2) Part 2: natural capital and the impacts of oil and gas development, (3) Part 3: social capital and the economic value of fishing and tourism, (4) Part 4: the real cost of oil and gas, and (5) Part 5: recommendations. Some of the recommendations call for the further study of cumulative and sub-lethal effects from petroleum development, the establishment of Marine Protected Areas preceded by a moratorium on oil and gas exploration in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and Sydney Bight areas until the establishment of the Areas is made, and that future environmental assessments concerning oil and gas development to address the impacts on species and ecosystems as a whole. 209 refs., 11 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Habitat-specific size structure variations in periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) caused by biotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Molis, Markus; Buschbaum, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Shell size distribution patterns of marine gastropod populations may vary considerably across different environments. We investigated the size and density structure of genetically continuous periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) on an exposed rocky and a sheltered sedimentary environment on two nearby islands in the south-eastern North Sea (German Bight). On the sedimentary shore, periwinkle density (917 ± 722 individuals m-2) was about three times higher than on the rocky shore (296 ± 168 individuals m-2). Mean (9.8 ± 3.9 mm) and maximum (22 mm) shell size of L. littorea on the sedimentary shore were smaller than on the rocky shore (21.5 ± 4.2 and 32 mm, respectively), where only few small snails were found. Additionally, periwinkle shells were thicker and stronger on the rocky than on the sedimentary shore. To ascertain mechanisms responsible for differences in population structures, we examined periwinkles in both environments for growth rate, predation pressure, infection with a shell boring polychaete ( Polydora ciliata) and parasitic infestation by trematodes. A crosswise transplantation experiment revealed better growth conditions on the sedimentary than on the rocky shore. However, crab abundance and prevalence of parasites and P. ciliata in adult snails were higher on the sedimentary shore. Previous investigations showed that crabs prefer large periwinkles infested with P. ciliata. Thus, we suggest that parasites and shell boring P. ciliata in conjunction with an increased crab predation pressure are responsible for low abundances of large periwinkles on the sedimentary shore while high wave exposure may explain low densities of juvenile L. littorea on the rocky shore. We conclude that biotic factors may strongly contribute to observed differences in size structure of the L. littorea populations studied on rocky and sedimentary shores.

  14. Suspended matter concentrations in coastal waters: Methodological improvements to quantify individual measurement uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttgers, Rüdiger; Heymann, Kerstin; Krasemann, Hajo

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of total suspended matter (TSM) concentration and the discrimination of the particulate inorganic (PIM) and organic matter fraction by the loss on ignition methods are susceptible to significant and contradictory bias errors by: (a) retention of sea salt in the filter (despite washing with deionized water), and (b) filter material loss during washing and combustion procedures. Several methodological procedures are described to avoid or correct errors associated with these biases but no analysis of the final uncertainty for the overall mass concentration determination has yet been performed. Typically, the exact values of these errors are unknown and can only be estimated. Measurements were performed in coastal and estuarine waters of the German Bight that allowed the individual error for each sample to be determined with respect to a systematic mass offset. This was achieved by using different volumes of the sample and analyzing the mass over volume relationship by linear regression. The results showed that the variation in the mass offset is much larger than expected (mean mass offset: 0.85 ± 0.84 mg, range: -2.4 - 7.5 mg) and that it often leads to rather large relative errors even when TSM concentrations were high. Similarly large variations were found for the mass offset for PIM measurements. Correction with a mean offset determined with procedural control filters reduced the maximum error to estuarine waters. It should be possible to use the approach in oceanic or fresh water environments as well. The possibility of individual quality control will allow mass-specific optical properties to be determined with better resolved uncertainties and, hence, lower statistical variability, greatly improving our capability to model inherent optical properties of natural particles and its natural variability, e.g. dependence on particle size and the complex refractive index.

  15. Assessing bio-physical effects of Offshore Wind Farms on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem using a TRIAXUS ROTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeter, Jens; Callies, Ulrich; Dudeck, Tim; Eckhardt, André; Gloe, Dominik; Hufnagl, Marc; Ludewig, Elke; Möller, Klas O.; North, Ryan P.; Pohlmann, Thomas; Riethmüller, Rolf; Temming, Axel; van Beusekom, Justus; Walter, Bettina; Möllmann, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of Offshore Wind Farms (OWFs) on marine ecosystem functioning are largely unknown. OWF foundations may lead to locally increased turbulence levels in the pelagic zone, and as turbines deflect the wind field, the extraction of energy may induce up- and downwelling dipoles in the water column. As a consequence, upwelling cells and locally increased vertical mixing will likely transport nutrients and phytoplankton into the nutrient-depleted surface layer of the stratified water column in summer. Subsequently, locally enhanced primary production could potentially be channelled to higher trophic levels and may lead to an increased habitat quality for demersal & pelagic fish. Here, we present field measurements that allow us to assess the bio-physical effects of OWFs on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem. Data were obtained using a TRIAXUS (a remotely operated towed vehicle, ROTV) during a survey in summer 2014, which included three OWFs located in water depths between 20m and 40m. TRIAXUS is designed to record high-frequency synoptic measurements of biological and physical oceanographic properties. The instrument is equipped with CTD, oxygen, light and fluorescence sensors as well as a Laser Optical Plankton Counter (LOPC) and a Video Plankton Recorder (VPR). Fisheries hydroacoustic and ADCP data were recorded in parallel. Hydrodynamic modelling supported the analysis by backtracking the drift routes of water bodies from which nutrient contents were analysed. To isolate the OWF effects from natural variability in the bio-physical properties of the German Bight, we also analysed spatially and seasonally similar SCANFISH transect data from pre-OWF years (2010, 2011). The survey provided first insights into the potential bio-physical effects of OWFs on the North Sea pelagic ecosystem, e.g., small scale areas of increased mixing, local upwelling and changes in the magnitude of the surface layer with distinct phytoplankton discontinuities.

  16. Are extracted materials truly representative of original samples? Impact of C18 extraction on CDOM optical and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO. Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4.C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission and quantum yield of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  17. Surface and bottom temperature and salinity climatology along the continental shelf off the Canadian and U.S. East Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richaud, Benjamin; Kwon, Young-Oh; Joyce, Terrence M.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    A new hydrographic climatology has been created for the continental shelf region, extending from the Labrador shelf to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The 0.2-degree climatology combines all available observations of surface and bottom temperature and salinity collected between 1950 and 2010 along with the location, depth and date of these measurements. While climatological studies of surface and bottom temperature and salinity have been presented previously for various regions along the Canadian and U.S. shelves, studies also suggest that all these regions are part of one coherent system. This study focuses on the coherent structure of the mean seasonal cycle of surface and bottom temperature and salinity and its variation along the shelf and upper slope. The seasonal cycle of surface temperature is mainly driven by the surface heat flux and exhibits strong dependency on latitude (r≈-0.9). The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of bottom temperature is rather dependent on the depth, while the spatial distribution of bottom temperature is correlated with latitude. The seasonal cycle of surface salinity is influenced by several components, such as sea-ice on the northern shelves and river discharge in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The bottom salinity exhibits no clear seasonal cycle, but its spatial distribution is highly correlated with bathymetry, thus Slope Water and its intrusion on the shelf can be identified by its relatively high salinity compared to shallow, fresher shelf water. Two different regimes can be identified, especially on the shelf, separated by the Laurentian Channel: advection influences the phasing of the seasonal cycle of surface salinity and bottom temperature to the north, while in the southern region, river runoff and air-sea heat flux forcing are dominant, especially over the shallower bathymetry.

  18. Optical complexity in Long Island Sound and implications for coastal ocean color remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurin, D. A.; Dierssen, H. M.; Twardowski, M. S.; Roesler, C. S.

    2010-07-01

    The optical properties of estuaries can vary considerably with the delivery of pigmented materials from surrounding watersheds and marine waters. In this study, optical properties sampled at 158 stations throughout the Long Island Sound (LIS) estuary between 2004 and 2007 show significant regional variability. Chlorophyll, total suspended matter, light absorption, and scattering are exceptionally high compared to other coastal data. Inherent optical properties and sea surface reflectances revealed at least two optical domains: a phytoplankton-dominated regime in western LIS and New York Bight and a sediment-dominated regime in central and eastern LIS. Multivariate ordination analysis identified clusters of stations conforming to these optical domains, as well as stations near the Hudson and Connecticut rivers representing optical end-members in LIS characterized by high chromophoric dissolved material (CDM) and biomass (Hudson River) and high sediment loads (Connecticut River). However, winds, tides, and subtidal estuarine circulation redistribute optical constituents throughout the major basins of LIS and homogenize riverine influence. Ocean color parameters, used to define the spectral quality of optical constituents, such as the spectral slopes of particulate backscattering and CDM absorption, and the chlorophyll-specific phytoplankton absorption did not cluster and are relatively constant throughout the region at all times of year. Therefore, variability in spectral reflectance in LIS is principally controlled by the relative magnitudes of the optical properties at each station rather than by significant differences in spectral quality of optically significant constituents. Consistency in these ocean color parameters minimizes the necessity for subregional or seasonal "tuning" of ocean color algorithms.

  19. Eddies in the southern Mozambique Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartly, G. D.; Srokosz, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Agulhas Current system contains one of the world's strongest western boundary currents, and plays an important part in the warm water path of the global thermohaline circulation. However, there have been few surveys of the source regions of the Agulhas Current, and thus little in situ measurement of their variability. Utilizing the more than 5-year record of SeaWiFS data, we examine the eddy activity present in the southern portion of the Mozambique Channel. The two sources of Agulhas input from the central Indian Ocean (southward flow through the Mozambique Channel and westward flow around the southern limit of Madagascar) both show great temporal variability, with no clear seasonal signal. A number of large (˜200 km diameter) anticyclonic rings intermittently propagate poleward along the western edge of the channel, sweeping coastal waters into mid-channel. Their passage past Maputo appears to affect the circulation of the lee eddy in the Delagoa Bight. The eastern side of the channel is mainly characterized by cyclonic eddies. These are made manifest in the lee of the southern tip of Madagascar, although it is not clear whether many form there or just develop a visible presence due to entrainment of high-chlorophyll coastal waters. Several of these cyclonic eddies then appear to move in west-southwesterly direction. The chlorophyll data do reveal the apparent East Madagascar Retroflection on occasions, but do not show clear examples of the pinching off of anticyclonic eddies. However, surface waters from the East Madagascar Current may reach the African mainland on occasions when no retroflection is present.

  20. The western transverse ranges microplate as a native terrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.D.; Reed, W.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01

    Palocurrent measurements from the entire Cretaceous section of the western Transverse Ranges microplate (WTRM) yield a northerly flow direction. Point count data indicate a mixed provenance for both conglomerates and associated sandstones. The dominant provenance was mixed magmatic arc/recycled orogen and disected/transitional arc terranes. Petrographic, quantitative SEM and microprobe analysis also indicate the presence of diagnostic Franciscan mineralogy in these sediments, including glaucophane, riebeckite, lawsonite, and serpentine, suggesting derivation from a subduction complex. Olistoclasts of chert, jadeitic graywacke, serpentine and blueschist are found intermixed within the arc-derived sediments. Olistoclasts range in size from sub-millimeter to centimeter scale and olistoliths range up to 150 m. Well preserved internal bedding in some of the olistoliths suggest emplacement by landsliding indicating very short transport distance. This Franciscan material represents the oldest melange-derived material reported from this part of California and documents uplift and erosion of the subduction complex earlier than previously suggested. These data are consistent with deposition in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin located west or south of the San Diego area. The allochthonous WTRM of southern California can be reconstructed to an originally north-south oriented fore-arc basin. After deposition of the Sespe Formation (22 Ma [+-]) the microplate was slivered by strike-slip faults and rotated clockwise approximately 90[degrees], after which, the block again accreted against the continental margin. Our reconstruction suggest that depositional and structural trends for Eocene and Cretaceous sediments is likely to be different from that in the Miocene Monterey pay zones in the Santa Barbara channel region. If our reconstruction is correct, exploration strategy for Eocene and Cretaceous petroleum in the southern California Bight should take this tectonic model into account.

  1. South Arne field development: an environmental impact assessment of oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South Arne field being developed by Amerada Hess A/S is located in 60 m water depth approximately 200 km from the Danish mainland, in block 5604/29 of the Danish sector of the North Sea. As part of the development of the field, a comprehensive environmental impact assessment has been carried out, including the assessment of the impact from oil spills. The Danish authorities required that a 'worst case' oil spill be chosen as the basis for the assessment on birds and aquatic organisms including plankton, fish eggs and larvae and benthos. A well blow-out at the surface was chosen as the worst case for the impact on birds, and a seabed blow-out for aquatic organisms. The oil spill modelling was carried out with the DEEPBLOW, SLIKMAP and OSCAR models from SINTEF. The modelling identified environmentally sensitive areas which could potentially be influenced by an oil spill. These included the Dogger Bank, western Skagerrak, south-western Norwegian Trench, the eastern German Bight and the Wadden Sea. Historical meteorological and hydrodynamic scenarios were chosen from a long period of records to ensure that the plume passed through the environmentally sensitive resource areas. For birds, a scan of the literature and available databases was made to determine the numbers and species of birds in the areas swept by the surface slick, the number of fatalities was estimated and finally the recovery time for each species population was estimated. The impact on aquatic organisms was estimated using the predicted environmental concentration/predicted no effect concentration (PEC/PNEC) method of the CHARM model. This method is normally applied to continuous discharges, but here has been used to estimate the impact of a transient pollution cloud resulting from an oil spill. (Author)

  2. Satellite Remote Sensing Detection of Wastewater Plumes in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, R. C.; Holt, B.; Pan, B. J.; Rains, C.; Gierach, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wastewater discharged through ocean outfalls can surface near coastlines and beaches, posing a threat to the marine environment and human health. Coastal waters of the Southern California Bight (SCB) are an ecologically important marine habitat and a valuable resource in terms of commercial fishing and recreation. Two of the largest wastewater treatment plants along the U.S. West Coast discharge into the SCB, including the Hyperion Wastewater Treatment Plant (HWTP) and the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD). In 2006, HWTP conducted an internal inspection of its primary 8 km outfall pipe (60 m depth), diverting treated effluent to a shorter 1.2 km pipe (18 m depth) from Nov. 28 to Nov. 30. From Sep. 11 - Oct. 4, 2012, OCSD conducted a similar diversion, diverting effluent from their 7 km outfall pipe to a shallower 2.2 km pipe, both with similar depths to HWTP. Prevailing oceanographic conditions in the SCB, such as temporally reduced stratification and surface circulation patterns, increased the risk of effluent being discharged from these shorter and shallower pipes surfacing and moving onshore. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of satellite remote sensing data (i.e., sea surface roughness from SAR, sea surface temperature from MODIS-Aqua and ASTER-Terra, chlorophyll-a and water leaving radiance from MODIS-Aqua) in the identification and tracking of wastewater plumes during the 2006 HWTP and 2012 OCSD diversion events. Satellite observations were combined with in situ, wind, and current data taken during the diversion events, to validate remote sensing techniques and gain surface to subsurface context of the nearshore diversion events. Overall, it was found that satellite remote sensing data were able to detect surfaced wastewater plumes along the coast, providing key spatial information that could inform in situ field sampling during future diversion events, such as the planned 2015 HWTP diversion, and thereby constrain costs.

  3. Alteration of Oceanic Nitrification Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J.; Chow, C. E.; Popp, B. N.; Fuhrman, J. A.; Feng, Y.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing exponentially and expected to double by the year 2100. Dissolution of excess CO2 in the upper ocean reduces pH, alters carbonate chemistry, and also represents a potential resource for autotrophic organisms that convert inorganic carbon into biomass--including a broad spectrum of marine microbes. These bacteria and archaea drive global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen and constitute the vast majority of biomass in the sea, yet their responses to reduced pH and increased pCO2 remain largely undocumented. Here we show that elevated pCO2 may sharply reduce nitrification rates and populations of nitrifying microorganisms in the ocean. Multiple experiments were performed in the Sargasso Sea and the Southern California Bight under glacial maximum (193 ppm), present day (390 ppm), and projected (750 ppm) pCO2 concentrations, over time scales from hours to multiple days, and at depths of 45 m to 240 m. Measurement of nitrification rates using isotopically-labeled nitrogen showed 2-5 fold reduction under elevated pCO2--as well as an increase under glacial maximum pCO2. Marine Crenarchaeota are likely involved in nitrification as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, yet this group decreased by 40-80% under increased pCO2, based on quantification of both 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene copies. Crenarchaeota also steadily declined over the course of multiple days under elevated pCO2, whereas ammonia-oxidizing (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more variable in their responses or were not detected. These findings suggest that projected increases in pCO2 and subsequent decreases in pH may strongly influence marine biogeochemistry and microbial community structure in the sea.

  4. Deciding Where to Burn: Stakeholder Priorities for Prescribed Burning of a Fire-Dependent Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Moody

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiagency partnerships increasingly work cooperatively to plan and implement fire management. The stakeholders that comprise such partnerships differ in their perceptions of the benefits and risks of fire use or nonuse. These differences inform how different stakeholders prioritize sites for burning, constrain prescribed burning, and how they rationalize these priorities and constraints. Using a survey of individuals involved in the planning and implementation of prescribed fire in the Onslow Bight region of North Carolina, we examined how the constraints and priorities for burning in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystem differed among three stakeholder groups: prescribed burn practitioners from agencies, practitioners from private companies, and nonpractitioners. Stakeholder groups did not differ in their perceptions of constraints to burning, and development near potentially burned sites was the most important constraint identified. The top criteria used by stakeholders to decide where to burn were the time since a site was last burned, and a site's ecosystem health, with preference given to recently burned sites in good health. Differences among stakeholder groups almost always pertained to perceptions of the nonecological impacts of burning. Prescribed burning priorities of the two groups of practitioners, and particularly practitioners from private companies, tended to be most influenced by nonecological impacts, especially through deprioritization of sites that have not been burned recently or are in the wildland-urban interface (WUI. Our results highlight the difficulty of burning these sites, despite widespread laws in the southeast U.S. that limit liability of prescribed burn practitioners. To avoid ecosystem degradation on sites that are challenging to burn, particularly those in the WUI, conservation partnerships can facilitate demonstration projects involving public and private burn practitioners on those sites. In summary

  5. Delta lobe degradation and hurricane impacts governing large-scale coastal behavior, South-central Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, M.D.; Kulp, M.A.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Flocks, J.G.; Weathers, H.D.

    2009-01-01

    A large deficit in the coastal sediment budget, high rates of relative sea-level rise (???0.9 cm/year), and storm-induced current and wave erosion are forcing barrier shoreface retreat along the periphery of the Mississippi River delta plain. Additionally, conversion of interior wetlands to open water has increased the bay tidal prism, resulting in degradation of barrier islands due to inlet widening, formation of new inlets, and sediment sequestration at ebb-tidal deltas. Single-beam bathymetric surveys along a 165-km stretch of south-central Louisiana barrier coast, from Raccoon Point in Terrebonne Parish to Sandy Point in Plaquemines Parish, were conducted in 2006. These data, combined with historical bathymetry from three time periods (dating to the 1880s), provide a series of digital elevation models that were used to calculate sediment volumetric changes and determine long-term erosional-depositional trends. Dominant patterns during the 125-year period include (1) erosion of ???1.6????????109 m3 from the shoreface, forcing up to 3 km of shoreface retreat, (2) sediment deposition in coastal bights and at ebb-tidal deltas, and (3) a combined increase in tidal inlet cross-sectional area from ???41,400 m2 to ???139,500 m 2. Bathymetric and shoreline change datasets separated by shorter time periods (sub-annual) demonstrate that these long-term trends are driven by processes associated with major hurricane impacts, and that rates of shoreface erosion are an order of magnitude greater during active hurricane seasons compared to long-term trends. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Mean circulation in the coastal ocean off northeastern North America from a regional-scale ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A regional-scale ocean model was used to hindcast the coastal circulation over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and Gulf of Maine (GOM from 2004 to 2013. The model was nested inside a data assimilative global ocean model that provided initial and open boundary conditions. Realistic atmospheric forcing, tides and observed river runoff were also used to drive the model. Hindcast solutions were compared against observations, which included coastal sea levels, satellite altimetry sea surface height, temperature and salinity time series in the GOM, glider transects in the MAB, and observed mean depth-averaged velocities by Lentz (2008a. Good agreements with observations suggest that the hindcast model is capable of capturing the major circulation variability in the MAB and GOM. Time- and space-continuous hindcast fields were used to depict the mean circulation, along- and cross-shelf transport and the associated momentum balances. The hindcast confirms the presence of the equatorward mean shelf circulation, which varies from 2.33 Sv at Scotian Shelf to 0.22 Sv near Cape Hatteras. Using the 200 m isobath as the shelf/slope boundary, the mean cross-shelf transport calculations indicate that the shelfbreak segments off the Gulf of Maine (including the southern flank of Georges Bank and the Northeast Channel and Cape Hatteras are the major sites for shelf water export. The momentum analysis reveals that the along-shelf sea level difference from Nova Scotia to Cape Hatteras is about 0.36 m. The nonlinear advection, stress, and horizontal viscosity terms all contribute to the ageostrophic circulation in the along-isobath direction, whereas the nonlinear advection plays a dominant role in determining the ageostrophic current in the cross-isobath direction.

  7. Impact of spatial resolution of ocean models in depicting climate change patterns of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nikesh; Klein, Birgit; Mathis, Moritz; Klein, Holger; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The impact of enhanced spatial resolution of models in simulating large scale climate change has been of interest for the modeling community for quite some time. It has been noticed in previous studies that the pattern of Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are better captured by higher resolution models. Significant changes in simulating sea-ice loss associated with global warming was also noticed when the spatial resolution of climate models were enhanced. Spatial resolution is a particular important issue in climate change scenarios of shelf seas such as the North Sea. The North Sea is strongly influenced by its water mass exchanges with North Atlantic to the west and north and Baltic Sea to east. Furthermore, local forcing and changes in advected water masses significantly affect the thermodynamics and stratification patterns in the North Sea, making it a challenging area to study. Under the newly started RACE2 project we are looking at global simulations of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 4.5 and 8.5 at lower and higher resolutions, performed using the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPIESM). The model resolution is non uniform and achieves the highest resolution over the European Seas by shifting the model poles over Chicago and Central Europe. In the high resolution run, the grid reaches up to a spatial resolution of up to 4 km in part of the German Bight and close to 20 km in the Northern part of North Sea. The placement of model poles at specific locations enables the global model to obtain higher resolution at regional scales (North Sea), without the inherent complications of open boundary conditions. High and low resolution simulations will be compared to determine differences in spatial and temporal pattern of temperature anomalies, fresh water intrusion from the Baltic Sea to North Sea etc. Also taken into consideration will be the changes in simulating local sea level change and response to basin scale oscillations like NAO.

  8. Temperature-derived potential for the establishment of phlebotomine sandflies and visceral leishmaniasis in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Fischer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to manifest in the shift of organisms to regions where they were not present in the past, potentially entailing previously unseen biological risks. However, studies evaluating these future trends are scarce. Here, an important group of vectors (sandflies and the pathogen transmitted (Leishmania infantum complex causing the infectious disease visceral leishmaniasis is investigated, focussing on potential establishment in Germany during the 21st century. As the most important habitat factor, temperature requirements of pathogen and vector were derived from the literature and compared with recent climate records - provided by worldclim - and climate change scenarios. Climate data from the Regional Climate Model REMO were obtained and averaged over the time periods 2011- 2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100. Projected temperature changes (based on the A1B and A2 scenarios were correlated with the constraints of vector and pathogen. Simulated potentially suitable habitat areas for vector and pathogen were merged to generate a temperature-derived risk map of visceral leishmaniasis. Temperature conditions seem to become suitable for the vector across large swaths of Germany. Nevertheless, temperature constraints for the pathogen may defer the establishment of the parasitic disease, particularly during the first half of the 21st century. Long-lasting epidemics of visceral leishmaniasis are therefore not expected in Germany during the next few decades, although during extremely warm years an increase in autochthonous cases of leishmaniasis may occur. The southwest (Upper Rhine Valley and west (Cologne Bight of Germany are identified as risk areas. The time of potential establishment and corresponding rise in biological risk varies between scenarios, due to differences in the predicted rate of temperature increase.

  9. Meteo-marine parameters from the TS-X satellite on a near-real time basis and wave model forecast validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Claus; Susanne, Lehner; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Jacobsen, Sven; Rosenthal, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Peter; Kieser, Jens; Bruns, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The TerraSAR-X satellite (TS-X), which was launched in 2007, hosts a state-of-the-art X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). As a result of its relatively low orbit (ca. 500 km), it has improved properties against SAR-specific image distortion of the ocean surface. Being a SAR sensor, its observations are independent off sun light and cloud conditions. Meteo-marine parameters are provided on a near real time basis. Both sea state and wind conditions are derived from the radar images. This is accomplished by empirical retrieval algorithms. For the wind retrieval, the backscatter coefficients of radar scatterometers for different wind speeds and directions are utilised (XMOD2). For the wave retrieval, the empirical algorithm XWAVE has been developed as transformation of the radar images into two dimensional wave spectra. Spectral properties like the peak wavelength, peak period, and significant wave height are derived from the wave spectra. In our presentation, we give an overview on the TS-X wave and wind retrieval algorithms (XWAVE and XMOD2). The quality of the sea state results from TS-X is demonstrated by comparisons to collocated buoy measurements. In the German Bight, the forecast quality of the high-resolution coastal wave model CWAM of the German Meteorological Service (DWD) is validated using TS-X results. The comparison of the numerical model hindcasts with TS-X satellite data complements and extends the conventional validation by in-situ data. This is because of the large areal coverage and in-situ sensors cannot be easily deployed in certain regions, e.g. in locations with strong ship traffic.

  10. Extreme waves at FINO 1 research platform caused by storm ''Tilo'' on 9 November 2007; FINO 1: Bericht zur Wetterlage und Seegangssituation waehrend des Orkans TILO am 9. November 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outzen, O.; Herklotz, K.; Heinrich, H. [BSH (Germany); Lefebvre, C. [DWD (Germany)

    2008-08-15

    On 8 and 9 November 2007, the low-pressure system ''Tilo'', with maximum wind speeds of 120 km/h (12 Bft), crossed the German Bight. In the afternoon of 9 November, the low caused waves with significant wave heights in excess of 10 m, corresponding to a maximum wave height of 17 - 18 m, wave periods of about 15 s and wave lengths of more than 220 m, which constitute extreme values in this sea area. On the FINO 1 research platform, the working platform was damaged at a height of 15 m above chart datum, repeating the occurrence of 1 November 2006 when the low-pressure system ''Britta'' had caused damage. Also this time, the highest wave crests reached nearly 45 m above ground, which is about 1.5 m above the level of the working platform. A storm and wave event of this magnitude in two consecutive years is an exceptional occurrence. The research platform FINO 1 is located at position N 54 0.86'E 6 35.26', about 45 km north of Borkum. FINO 1 is used to make comprehensive physical, hydrological, chemical and biological measurements in preparation for the erection of offshore wind farms. Storm ''Tilo'' of 9 November 2007 again caused damage to the working platform of FINO 1, only a short time after the damage caused by storm ''Britta'' on 1 November 2006 had been repaired. Among other damage, solid wooden planks several centimetres thick were broken loose from their mountings 15 m above chart datum and destroyed by wash of the sea (Fig. 1). Exactly one year earlier the tempest ''Britta'' had caused severe damage, e.g. metal railings were bent and broken, and screw-fastened floor gratings were torn from their mountings. (orig.)

  11. Temporal dynamics in a shallow coastal benthic food web: Insights from fatty acid biomarkers and their stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Sabbe, Koen; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the temporal variation of pelagic and benthic food sources in the diet of benthic taxa at a depositional site in the Southern Bight of the North Sea by means of fatty acid (FA) biomarkers and compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA). The taxa were the non-selective deposit feeding nematodes (Sabatieria spp. and 'other nematodes'), and three dominant macrobenthic species: two true suspension-deposit feeders (the bivalve Abra alba and the tube dwelling polychaete Owenia fusiformis) and the suspected predatory mud-dwelling anemone Sagartia sp. These species make up on average 16% (Abra alba), 17% (Sagartia sp.) and 20% (Owenia fusiformis) of the biomass in the Abra alba-Kurtiella bidentata community in this area. Phytoplankton dynamics in the suspended particulate matter of the water column as inferred from cell counts, chlorophyll-a and organic carbon content were clearly visible in sediment and animal FA abundance as well, whereas phytodetritus dynamics in the sediment FA composition were less clear, probably due to patchy distribution or stripping of FA by macrofauna. Nematodes appeared to assimilate mainly Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) from their sedimentary environment and were further non-selectively accumulating more (Sabatieria spp.) or less ('other nematodes') FA from the deposited phytodetritus. In contrast, Abra alba FA composition was consistent with a diatom-dominated diet and consumption of Phaeocystis was observed in Owenia fusiformis, whereas Sagartia sp. showed evidence of a predatory behaviour. While the total FA content in Owenia fusiformis remained constant throughout the year, Sagartia sp. doubled and Abra alba increased its FA level more than 10-fold in response to the organic matter deposition from the phytoplankton bloom. This leads to the conclusion that there is no resource partitioning between non-selective deposit feeding nematodes and the suspension-deposit feeding macrobenthic organisms, suggesting they

  12. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey R; Merckelbach, Lucas; Callies, Ulrich; Clark, Suzanna; Gaslikova, Lidia; Baschek, Burkard

    2016-01-01

    Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF) technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i) a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii) an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions-both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios. PMID:27513754

  13. Biogeochemistry of southern Australian continental slope sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment cores from the middle to lower slope of the southern continental margin of Australia between the Great Australian Bight and western Tasmania are compared in terms of marine and terrigenous input signals during the Holocene. The mass accumulation rates of carbonate, organic carbon, biogenic Ba. and Al are corrected for lateral sediment input (focusing), using the inventory of excess 230Th in the sediment normalised to its known production rate in the water column above each site. The biogenic signal is generally higher in the eastern part of the southern margin probably due to enhanced productivity associated with seasonal upwelling off southeastern South Australia and the proximity of the Subtropical Front, which passes just south of Tasmania. The input of Al, representing the terrigenous signal, is also higher in this region reflecting the close proximity of river runoff from the mountainous catchment of southeastern Australia. The distribution pattern of Mn and authigenic U, together with pore-water profiles of Mn++, indicate diagenetic reactions driven by the oxidation of buried organic carbon in an oxic to suboxic environment. Whereas Mn is reduced at depth and diffuses upwards to become immobilised in a Mn-rich surface layer. U is derived from seawater and diffuses downward into the sediment, driven by reduction and precipitation at a depth below the reduction zone of Mn. The estimated removal rate of U from seawater by this process is within the range of U removal measured in hemipelagic sediments from other areas, and supports the proposition that hemipelagic sediments are a major sink of U in the global ocean. Unlike Mn, the depth profile of sedimentary Fe appears to be little affected by diagenesis, suggesting that little of the total Fe inventory in the sediment is remobilised and redistributed as soluble Fe. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of (epsilon)CO2 production in a methanogenic marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Susan E.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between sigma(CO2) delta(C-13) values and rates of the dominant remineralization processes at the organic-rich field site of Cape Lookout Bight, NC, the isotopic composition of porewater sigma(CO2) was measured on a seasonal basis. The sigma(CO2) delta(C-13) values varies seasonally in response to changes in rates of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis, the dominant remineralization processes at this site. A tube incubation experiment was also performed to determine the isotopic signature of the sigma(CO2) produced by sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. The delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) produced in the sulfate reduction zone determined from the tube incubation was -14.3 plus or minus 1.9, a value enriched in C-13 relative to the labile organic fraction. The C-13-enrichment may be caused by low rates of methanogenesis occurring in the sulfate reduction zone. The delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) produced in the methanogenic zone was estimated to be +44 per mil, whereas the co-produced methane was -65 per mil. The fractionation factor for CO2 reduction was calculated to be 1.055, a value in agreement with previous estimates at this site. The measured concentration and delta(C-13) of the sigma(CO2) at Cape Lookout was closely reproduced by a diagenetic model using the measured rates of sulfate reduction and sigma(CO2) production, and the isotopic signature of the sigma(CO2) production in the two biogeochemical zones.

  15. A modeling study of the physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf: Circulation and stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Justić, Dubravko

    2009-06-01

    The physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the Louisiana-Texas shelf were examined using a high-resolution, three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was forced with the observed freshwater fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, surface winds, heat fluxes, tides and offshore conditions. The simulations were carried out over a six-month period, from April to September 2002, and the model performance was evaluated against several independent series of observations that included tidal gauge data, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, shipboard measurements of temperature and salinity, vertical salinity and sigma-t profiles, and satellite imagery. The model accurately described the offshore circulation mode generated over the Louisiana-Texas shelf by the westerly winds during summer months, as well as the prevalent westward flow along the coast caused by the easterly winds during the rest of the study period. The seasonal cycle of stratification also was well represented by the model. During 2002, the stratification was initiated in early spring and subsequently enhanced by the intensity and phasing of riverine freshwater discharges. Strong stratification persisted throughout the summer and was finally broken down in September by tropical storms. The model simulations also revealed a quasi-permanent anticyclonic gyre in the Louisiana Bight region formed by the rotational transformation of the Mississippi River plume, whose existence during 2002 was supported by the satellite imagery and ADCP current measurements. Model simulations support the conclusion that local wind forcing and buoyancy flux resulting from riverine freshwater discharges were the dominant mechanisms affecting the circulation and stratification over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf.

  16. Inertial Lévy Flight with Nonlinear Friction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yan; BAO Jing-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Lévy Bight with nonlinear friction is studied. Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Levy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass. However, by introducing nonlinear friction, we show that the stochastic process subject to Levy noise exhibits finite variance, leading to a well-defined .kinetic energy. In the force-free fiIeld, normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Levy index μ. Furthermore, we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γo determines whether resonance occurs or not.%Lévy flight with nonlinear friction is studied.Due to the occurrence of extremely long jumps Lévy flights often possess infinite variance and are physically problematic if describing the dynamics of a particle of finite mass.However,by introducing nonlinear friction,we show that the stochastic process subject to Lévy noise exhibits finite variance,leading to a well-defined kinetic energy.In the force-free field,normal diffusion behavior is observed and the diffusion coefficient decreases with Lévy index μ.Furthermore,we find a kinetic resonance of the particle in the harmonic potential to the external oscillating field in the generally underdamped region and the value of the linear friction γ0 determines whether resonance occurs or not.The stable Lévy process,often called the Lévy flight,is used to model various phenomena such as self-diffusion in micelle systems,[1] special problems in reaction dynamics,[2] and even the flight of an albatross.

  17. Hydrodynamics and light climate structure alongshore phytoplankton blooms in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brandt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are a recurring phenomenon that have significant impact on annual biogeochemistry and food-web dynamics in many aquatic ecosystems. The causes for their variability, which is high especially in coastal seas, remain poorly understood. We present an example for distinct differences in the spatio-temporal chlorophyll-a (CHL-a distribution on an interannual scale, integrating high-frequency data from an autonomous measuring device (FerryBox, which operated on an alongshore route in the coastal North Sea. While in one year CHL-a was spatially homogeneous (2004, a bloom only developed in one part of the transect in the following spring period (2005. In this study, we use a one-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model, which operates along the mean current direction, combined with a NPZ-model to identify the mechanisms controlling interannual bloom variability on an alongshore transect. The model results clearly indicate that in 2004, the local light climate triggered phytoplankton growth, whereas in the following year, advective transport determined the spatial structure of the spring bloom. A pronounced eastward inflow event in 2005 imported a high CHL-a patch into the western half of the study area from the adjacent Southern Bight. It did, however, not last long enough to also spread the bloom into the eastern part, where high turbidity prevented local phytoplankton growth. The model identified two interacting mechanisms, light climate and hydrodynamics that control the alongshore dynamics. Especially the occurrence of a pronounced spring bloom despite unfavourable light conditions in 2005 underlines the need to carefully consider hydrodynamics to understand ecosystem functioning in coastal environments.

  18. Upslope transport of near-bed zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Cheryl Ann

    2009-09-01

    Zooplankton residing just above the deep-sea floor is an important component of the benthic/benthopelagic food chain. Consuming planktonic particulates and organisms, holoplankton and meroplankton are prey for fish and large invertebrates. Mechanisms controlling their abundances have been explored over relatively long time scales (months to years). Here, zooplankton were sampled every 2 h for 2.2 d using a moored, automated, serial zooplankton pump. The physical regime (currents and temperature) 1-100 m above bottom was measured during an inclusive 24-d period. The study site was located on the upper continental slope (750 m) of the Mid-Atlantic Bight, between the productive shelf and more impoverished rise and abyss. The coupled biological and physical records indicated tidally driven, net upslope transport of the holoplankton. The copepod (74.5% of collections) time series showed marked periodicity with a peak frequency of ˜13 h, approximately the diurnal tide (Fourier analysis). Local maxima corresponded with minimal water temperatures. Moreover, tidal cross-slope flow was highly coherent and 90° out of phase with temperature. Thus, maximal copepod concentrations, originating in colder deeper water, would be transported up the slope by the tide. Estimated net displacement of ˜1 km/d would deliver the animals to continental-shelf depths within a couple weeks. Time series of the much less abundant larvaceans (urochordates) (15.3%) and polychaete larvae (8.9%) showed periodicities with peak frequencies of 8-9 h. Statistical significance of the periodic signals could not be determined due to low numbers. Revealing holoplankton dynamics on scales of hours, this study may contribute to understanding of, for example, copepod feeding and aggregation near the deep-sea floor.

  19. Hydrodynamics and light climate structure alongshore phytoplankton blooms in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, G.; Wirtz, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are a recurring phenomenon that have significant impact on annual biogeochemistry and food-web dynamics in many aquatic ecosystems. The causes for their variability, which is high especially in coastal seas, remain poorly understood. We present an example for distinct differences in the spatio-temporal chlorophyll-a (CHL-a) distribution on an interannual scale, integrating high-frequency data from an autonomous measuring device (FerryBox), which operated on an alongshore route in the coastal North Sea. While in one year CHL-a was spatially homogeneous (2004), a bloom only developed in one part of the transect in the following spring period (2005). In this study, we use a one-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model, which operates along the mean current direction, combined with a NPZ-model to identify the mechanisms controlling interannual bloom variability on an alongshore transect. The model results clearly indicate that in 2004, the local light climate triggered phytoplankton growth, whereas in the following year, advective transport determined the spatial structure of the spring bloom. A pronounced eastward inflow event in 2005 imported a high CHL-a patch into the western half of the study area from the adjacent Southern Bight. It did, however, not last long enough to also spread the bloom into the eastern part, where high turbidity prevented local phytoplankton growth. The model identified two interacting mechanisms, light climate and hydrodynamics that control the alongshore dynamics. Especially the occurrence of a pronounced spring bloom despite unfavourable light conditions in 2005 underlines the need to carefully consider hydrodynamics to understand ecosystem functioning in coastal environments.

  20. Constrained body shape among highly genetically divergent allopatric lineages of the supralittoral isopod Ligia occidentalis (Oniscidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Carlos A; Mateos, Mariana; DeWitt, Thomas J; Hurtado, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple highly divergent lineages have been identified within Ligia occidentalis sensu lato, a rocky supralittoral isopod distributed along a ~3000 km latitudinal gradient that encompasses several proposed marine biogeographic provinces and ecoregions in the eastern Pacific. Highly divergent lineages have nonoverlapping geographic distributions, with distributional limits that generally correspond with sharp environmental changes. Crossbreeding experiments suggest postmating reproductive barriers exist among some of them, and surveys of mitochondrial and nuclear gene markers do not show evidence of hybridization. Populations are highly isolated, some of which appear to be very small; thus, the effects of drift are expected to reduce the efficiency of selection. Large genetic divergences among lineages, marked environmental differences in their ranges, reproductive isolation, and/or high isolation of populations may have resulted in morphological differences in L. occidentalis, not detected yet by traditional taxonomy. We used landmark-based geometric morphometric analyses to test for differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages of L. occidentalis, and among populations within these lineages. We analyzed a total of 492 individuals from 53 coastal localities from the southern California Bight to Central Mexico, including the Gulf of California. We conducted discriminant function analyses (DFAs) on body shape morphometrics to assess morphological variation among genetically differentiated lineages and their populations. We also tested for associations between phylogeny and morphological variation, and whether genetic divergence is correlated to multivariate morphological divergence. We detected significant differences in body shape among highly divergent lineages, and among populations within these lineages. Nonetheless, neither lineages nor populations can be discriminated on the basis of body shape, because correct classification rates of cross

  1. Sediment ages and flux variations from depth profiles of 210Pb: lake and marine examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediment accumulation rates are redetermined for several freshwater and marine settings to demonstrate the application of a new methodology for interpreting sediment core profiles of radioisotope activity versus depth. Depositional histories were reconstructed using the sediment isotope tomography (SIT) methodology, which abandons the stringent requirement of current methods that sediment accumulation rates and isotopic fluxes may not both vary with time. Using inverse numerical analysis techniques in conjunction with a predictive model, the SIT method is able to separate the effects of sediment accumulation from flux variations to determine age-to-depth relationships. Cumulative probability procedures provide a framework for interpreting the sensitivity and accuracy of the model-determined age-to-depth relationships. Restrictions applied to previous methods on interpreting sediment profiles affected by mixing must also be adhered to when using the SIT method. Previously published data from two Estonian lakes, Kurtna and Nommejaerv, from Rockwell Reservoir in Northeastern Ohio and from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, are examined to demonstrate the broad applicability of the methodology. With the exception of one location, the resultant age-to-depth relationships determined by the model agree with earlier interpretations. In the Estonian Lake Nommejaerv, previous use of the Constant Flux model overestimates sediment ages for two known time horizons, giving ages of 43 yr at 22 cm and 111 yr at 45 cm. The age-to-depth relationship determined by the SIT method reproduces satisfactorily the time horizons of 16±1 yr at 22 cm and 35±2 yr at 45 cm, in agreement with the onset of industrial activities in the region. These examples illustrate the suitability of this new methodology for application in a variety of complex depositional environments

  2. Mercury-cycling in surface waters and in the atmosphere - species analysis for the investigation of transformation and transport properties of mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The river Elbe has been one of the most contaminated rivers with regard to mercury for many years. In 1991 a length-profile has been measured for mercury and methylmercury (CH3Hg+) from Obristvi, Czech Republic, to the German bight. Total mercury has been measured by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The organo mercury compounds have been separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) connected on-line to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) by a continuous flow-system. Total mercury up to 120 mg Hg+/kg and CH3Hg+ concentrations up to 130 μg CH3Hg+/kg could be detected in special sites. The formation of CH3Hg+ in sediments can be caused besides the methylation of mercury, by sulphate reducing or methanogenic bacteria and transmethylation reactions with organometals. Atmospheric mercury concentrations have been measured at three different European sites. Samples have been collected on gold-coated glass balls or on quartz wool, respectively. After thermal desorption mercury has been determined using the two step amalgamation technique with AFS detection. Compared to natural background concentrations of total gaseous mercury (TGM), slightly increased levels could be detected at a rural site in Germany. This increase can probably be explained by long-range transport processes. Within the vicinity of a inactivated mercury production plant high concentrations of up to 13.5 ng/m3 particle associated mercury (Hgpart) have been detected. Consequently, dry deposition of mercury in the particulate form can intensify the total deposition flux close to Hg-emitting sources. (orig.)

  3. CDOM-DOC relationship in contrasted coastal waters: implication for DOC retrieval from ocean color remote sensing observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantrepotte, Vincent; Danhiez, François-Pierre; Loisel, Hubert; Ouillon, Sylvain; Mériaux, Xavier; Cauvin, Arnaud; Dessailly, David

    2015-01-12

    Increasing our knowledge on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) spatio-temporal distribution in the coastal ocean represents a crucial challenge for better understanding the role of these ecosystems in the global oceanic carbon cycle. The assessment of DOC concentration from the absorption properties of the colored part of the dissolved organic matter (a(cdom)) was investigated from an extensive data set covering a variety of coastal environments. Our results confirmed that variation in the a(cdom)(412) to DOC ratio (a*(cdom)(412)) can be depicted from the CDOM spectral slope in the UV domain (S(275-295)). They also evidenced that regional first order variation in both a*(cdom)(412) and S(275-295) are highly correlated to variation in a(cdom)(412). From these observations, generalized relationships for estimating a*(cdom)(412) from S(275-295) or a(cdom)(412) were parameterized from our development sites (N = 158; English Channel, French Guiana, Hai Phong Bay) and tested against an independent data set covering others coastal regions (N = 223; French Polynesia, Rhone River estuary, Gulf of Maine, Chesapeake Bay, Southern Middle Atlantic Bight) demonstrating the possibility to derive DOC estimates from in situ CDOM optical properties with an average accuracy of ~16% over very contrasted coastal environments (with DOC ranging from 50 to 250 µmol.L(-1)). The applicability of these generalized approaches was evaluated in the context of ocean color remote sensing observation emphasizing the limits of S(275-295)-based formulations and the potential for a(cdom)-based approaches to represent a compelling alternative for assessing synoptic DOC distribution. PMID:25835652

  4. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed the ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor

  5. Stormwater plume detection by MODIS imagery in the southern California coastal ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezlin, Nikolay P.; DiGiacomo, Paul M.; Diehl, Dario W.; Jones, Burton H.; Johnson, Scott C.; Mengel, Michael J.; Reifel, Kristen M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Wang, Menghua

    2008-10-01

    Stormwater plumes in the southern California coastal ocean were detected by MODIS-Aqua satellite imagery and compared to ship-based data on surface salinity and fecal indicator bacterial (FIB) counts collected during the Bight'03 Regional Water Quality Program surveys in February-March of 2004 and 2005. MODIS imagery was processed using a combined near-infrared/shortwave-infrared (NIR-SWIR) atmospheric correction method, which substantially improved normalized water-leaving radiation (nLw) optical spectra in coastal waters with high turbidity. Plumes were detected using a minimum-distance supervised classification method based on nLw spectra averaged within the training areas, defined as circular zones of 1.5-5.0-km radii around field stations with a surface salinity of S 33.0 ("ocean"). The plume optical signatures (i.e., the nLw differences between "plume" and "ocean") were most evident during the first 2 days after the rainstorms. To assess the accuracy of plume detection, stations were classified into "plume" and "ocean" using two criteria: (1) "plume" included the stations with salinity below a certain threshold estimated from the maximum accuracy of plume detection; and (2) FIB counts in "plume" exceeded the California State Water Board standards. The salinity threshold between "plume" and "ocean" was estimated as 32.2. The total accuracy of plume detection in terms of surface salinity was not high (68% on average), seemingly because of imperfect correlation between plume salinity and ocean color. The accuracy of plume detection in terms of FIB exceedances was even lower (64% on average), resulting from low correlation between ocean color and bacterial contamination. Nevertheless, satellite imagery was shown to be a useful tool for the estimation of the extent of potentially polluted plumes, which was hardly achievable by direct sampling methods (in particular, because the grids of ship-based stations covered only small parts of the plumes detected via

  6. RuCool Operational Oceanography: Using a Fleet of Autonomous Ocean Gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graver, J.; Jones, C.; Glenn, S.; Kohut, J.; Schofield, O.; Roarty, H.; Aragon, D.; Kerfoot, J.; Haldeman, C.; Yan, A.

    2007-05-01

    At the Rutgers University Coastal Ocean Observation Lab (RU-COOL), we have constructed a shelf-wide ocean observatory to characterize the physical forcing of continental shelf primary productivity in the New York Bight (NYB). The system is anchored by four enabling technologies, which include the international constellation of ocean color satellites, multi-static high frequency long-range surface current radar, real-time telemetry moorings, and long duration autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Operation of the observatory is through a centralized computer network dedicated to receiving, processing and visualizing the real-time data and then disseminating results to both field scientists and ocean forecasters over the World Wide Web. The system was designed to conduct cutting edge research requiring the addition of rapidly evolving technologies, and to serve society by providing sustained data delivered in real-time. Rutgers COOL continues to work closely with Webb Research Corporation (WRC) in testing and development of the Slocum underwater gliders and continues to apply Slocum gliders in field operations spanning the globe. The continued strong collaboration between WRC and Rutgers has led to advances in glider operations and applications. These include deployment/recovery techniques, improvements in durability and reliability, integrated sensors suites, salinity spike removal, and adaptive controls utilized to optimize mission goals and data return. The gliders have gathered numerous data sets including salt intrusions as seen off of New Jersey, plume tracking, biological water sample matching, and operation through Hurricane Ernesto in 2006. This talk will detail recent oceanographic experiments in which the fleet has been deployed and improvements in the operation of these novel robotic vehicles. These experiments, in locations around the world, have resulted in significant new work in operation of underwater gliders and have gathered new and unique data

  7. Diversity of assimilatory nitrate reductase genes from plankton and epiphytes associated with a seagrass bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhitya, Anita; Thomas, Florence I M; Ward, Bess B

    2007-11-01

    Assimilatory nitrate reductase gene fragments were isolated from epiphytes and plankton associated with seagrass blades collected from Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Nitrate reductase genes from diatoms (NR) and heterotrophic bacteria (nasA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using two sets of degenerate primers. A total of 129 NR and 75 nasA clones from four clone libraries, two from each of epiphytic and planktonic components, were sequenced and aligned. In addition, genomic DNA sequences for the NR fragment were obtained from Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii diatom cultures. Rarefaction analysis with an operational taxonomic unit cut-off of 6% indicated that diversity of the NR and nasA clone libraries were similar, and that sequencing of the clone libraries was not yet saturated. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 121 of the 129 NR clones sequenced were similar to diatom sequences. Of the eight non-diatom sequences, four were most closely related to the sequence of Chlorella vulgaris. Introns were found in 8% of the Tampa Bay NR sequences; introns were also observed in S. costatum, but not T. weissflogii. Introns from within the same clone library exhibited close similarity in nucleotide sequence, position and length; the corresponding exon sequences were unique. Introns from within the same component were similar in position and length, but not in nucleotide sequence. These findings raise questions about the function of introns, and mechanisms or time evolution of intron formation. A large cluster of 14 of the 75 nasA sequences was similar to sequences from Vibrio species; other sequences were closely related to sequences from Alteromonas, alpha-proteobacteria and Marinomonas-like species. Biogeographically consistent patterns were observed for the nasA Tampa Bay sequences compared with sequences from other locations: for example, Tampa Bay sequences were similar to those from the South Atlantic Bight, but not the Barents Sea. The

  8. Anguilliform larvae collected off North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S.W.; Casazza, T.L.; Quattrini, A.M.; Sulak, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    distributions were less clear partly due to low catches and lower Tucker trawl sampling effort. While net avoidance may account for some of the low daytime catches, an alternative explanation is that many species of larval eels occur during the day at depths > 350 m. Larvae of 21 taxa of typically shallow water eels were collected at depths > 350 m, but additional discrete depth diel sampling is needed to resolve leptocephalus vertical distributions. The North Carolina adult eel fauna (estuary to at least 2,000 m) consists of 51 species, 41% of which were represented in these collections. Many species of leptocephali collected are not yet known to have juveniles or adults established in the South Atlantic Bight or north of Cape Hatteras. Despite Gulf Stream transport and a prolonged larval stage, many of these eel leptocephali may not contribute to their respective populations. ?? 2006 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Car battery model study%车用电池模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李多晴

    2015-01-01

    As the requirement of society and environment,the scale of electronic vehicle market increase,and so does the research of battery.The research of battery model plays a key roel role among this ,because it has a strong relationship with the accuracy of the description of SOC,SOH and running parameter bight.Forthermore,it relates to the execution of relative control strategy and vehicle parameter and function .This passage introduces 3 battery model——simplied electrochemical model , equivalent circuit model and NNs model. Simplied electrochemical model describes reaction in the battery using math tools, equivalent circuit model simulates dynamic model by electric circuit and NNs model sumulates work of battery using artificial intelligence. Unlinear,multiply-inputed ,multiply-outputed and generalized NNs is specially fit for describing quite unlinear system—battery,so it is a key point for researching and applying.%由于社会和环境的需求,电动汽车市场规模不断扩大,对车用电池的研究也在不断加深。其中,电池模型的研究起着十分关键的作用,它关系到电池系统对 SOC、SOH、工作参数曲线等信息的描述准确与否,进而关系到相关控制策略的执行,影响整车的参数和性能。文章介绍了三类电池模型——简化电化学模型、等效电路模型和神经网络模型。简化电化学模型采用数学方法描述电池内部的反应过程,等效电路模型使用电路网络模拟电池动态模型,神经网络模型是利用人工智能的方法模拟电池的运行。神经网络非线性、多输入多输出、泛化能力强的特点,尤为有利于描述电池这一高度非线性系统,是研究和应用的重点。

  10. Vertical suspsended sediment fluxes observed from ocean gliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckelbach, Lucas; Carpenter, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Many studies trying to understand a coastal system in terms of sediment transport paths resort to numerical modelling - combining circulation models with sediment transport models. Two aspects herein are crucial: sediment fluxes across the sea bed-water column interface, and the subsequent vertical mixing by turbulence. Both aspects are highly complex and have relatively short time scales, so that the processes involved are implemented in numerical models as parameterisations. Due to the effort required to obtain field observations of suspended sediment concentrations (and other parameters), measurements are scarce, which makes the development and tuning of parameterisations a difficult task. Ocean gliders (autonomous underwater vehicles propelled by a buoyancy engine) provide a platform complementing more traditional methods of sampling. In this work we present observations of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and dissipation rate taken by two gliders, each equipped with optical sensors and a microstructure sensor, along with current observations from a bottom mounted ADCP, all operated in the German Bight sector of the North Sea in Summer 2014. For about two weeks of a four-week experiment, the gliders were programmed to fly in a novel way as Lagrangian profilers to water depths of about 40 m. The benefit of this approach is that the rate of change of SSC - and other parameters - is local to the water column, as opposed to an unknown composition of temporal and spatial variability when gliders are operated in the usual way. Therefore, vertical sediment fluxes can be calculated without the need of the - often dubious - assumption that spatial variability can be neglected. During the experiment the water column was initially thermally stratified, with a cross-pycnocline diffusion coefficient estimated at 7\\cdot10-5 m2 s-1. Halfway through the experiment the remnants of tropical storm Bertha arrived at the study site and caused a complete mixing of the water

  11. Internal waves and surf zone water quality at Huntington Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H.; Santoro, A.; Nidzieko, N. J.; Hench, J. L.; Boehm, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    diurnal and high frequency bands also contained a substantial fraction of total variance. The bottom cross-shore baroclinic current served as a proxy for shoreward internal wave propagation and was positively correlated with phosphate concentration in both years, silicate in 2005, and fecal indicator bacteria measurements in 2006. The results suggest internal waves are an important transport mechanism of nutrient-rich sub-thermocline water to the very near shore in the Southern California Bight, and may facilitate the transport of FIB into the surf zone or enhance persistence of land-derived FIB.

  12. Quantifying Atmospheric Mercury Emissions Sources in coastal California from Shipboard Measurements During CalNex 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Bates, T. S.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    these impacts from combustion sources, mean concentrations of GEM in the bight of the Los Angeles were 1.38 ± 0.19 ng m-3, which is less than recognized hemispheric mean of 1.5-1.7 ng m-3, indicating minimal impact from anthropogenic sources overall. In fact, a slight positive correlation was observed between GEM and DMS in seawater suggesting that the ocean productivity may be associated with a source of mercury in this region.

  13. Covariation of viral parameters with bacterial assemblage richness and diversity in the water column and sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Ian; Fuhrman, Jed A.

    2007-05-01

    Viruses are hypothesized to maintain diversity in microbial assemblages by regulating the abundance of dominant competitors and thereby allowing less-dominant competitors to persist in assemblages; however, there have been few empirical data sets to support this idea. In this study, we examined the relationship between the ratio of viral abundance to bacterial abundance, viral production, and the relative richness and diversity of bacterial assemblage fingerprints, in samples taken from geographically widespread locations (North Pacific gyre, the Amazon River plume and adjacent North Atlantic gyre, Gulf of Mexico, Southern California Bight and Arafura—Coral Seas) which are oligo- to mesotrophic. Bacterial assemblage richness and diversity as measured by automated rRNA intergenic spacer (ARISA) fingerprinting were significantly and positively correlated with the ratio of virus abundance to bacteria abundance (VBR) and to the rate of virus production only in the oligotrophic North Pacific gyre. ARISA fingerprint richness/diversity were not significantly correlated to viral parameters when assessed across all samples in surface waters, suggesting there is not a singular global quantitative relationship between viral pressure and host diversity within well evolved host/virus systems in different geographic locations in plankton. In sediments off Southern California, viral parameters significantly and negatively correlated with ARISA diversity, suggesting strong viral interactions in this habitat. To examine covariation of viral parameters and the relative abundance and diversity of rarer bacterial taxa (i.e., less-dominant competitor), the richness and diversity of diazotroph communities was measured using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) of a portion ( nifH) of the nitrogenase gene. The richness and diversity of diazotrophic communities were significantly and negatively correlated with viral parameters across all locations. Since diazotrophs

  14. Detecting sinks and sources of CO2 and CH4 by ferrybox-based measurements in the Baltic Sea: Three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bernd; Gülzow, Wanda; Sadkowiak, Bernd; Rehder, Gregor

    2014-12-01

    A fully automated measurement system for recording of the surface water CO2 partial pressure, pCO2, was deployed on VOS (voluntary observation ship) "Finnpartner/Finnmaid" in 2003. Since 2009, an amendment of the system also allows for the continuous detection of the surface water partial pressure of methane, pCH4. The ship commutes regularly at 2-3 day intervals between the Gulf of Finland (Helsinki) and the Mecklenburg Bight (Lübeck) in the southwest of the Baltic Sea. The pCO2 data in the central Gotland Sea showed a pronounced seasonality that was mainly controlled by the biological production and decomposition of organic matter in combination with stratification/mixing of the water column. CO2 consumption in spring/summer caused pCO2 that were by up to 300 μatm below the atmospheric level. In contrast, the pCO2 exceeded the atmospheric values during autumn/winter when deep mixing transports CO2-enriched water to the surface. To identify the central Baltic Sea as a sink or source for atmospheric CO2, an air-sea CO2 gas exchange balance was established for three selected years (2005, 2008 and 2009). During each year the surface water acted as a net sink for atmospheric CO2 with uptake rates ranging between 0.60 and 0.89 mol m- 2 yr- 1. The rates correspond approximately to the enhanced carbon burial in sediments during the last century and suggest a link between eutrophication and CO2 uptake. The data of the surface methane concentration are used to focus on situations were extraordinarily high methane concentrations were observed. Temporary methane peaks were observed south of the Island of Gotland, which could clearly be attributed to frequent upwelling events. Between spring 2012 and 2013, Finnmaid went at a few occasions to St. Petersburg in the east of the Gulf of Finland. Methane concentration of up to 130 nmol L- 1 where found close to the River Neva mouth but decreased rapidly to the west. The plume of methane-enriched waters was observed farthest to

  15. The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS): Developing A Coastal Observation System To Enable Both Science Based Decision Making And Scientific Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, E.; John, O.

    2005-05-01

    The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (SCCOOS) is a consortium that extends from Northern Baja CA in Mexico to Morro Bay at the southern edge of central California, and aims to streamline, coordinate, and further develop individual institutional efforts by creating an integrated, multidisciplinary coastal observatory in the Bight of Southern California for the benefit of society. By leveraging existing infrastructure, partnerships, and private, local, state, and federal resources, SCCOOS is developing a fully operational coastal observation system to address issues related to coastal water quality, marine life resources, and coastal hazards for end user communities spanning local, state, and federal interests. However, to establish a sensible observational approach to address these societal drivers, sound scientific approaches are required in both the system design and the transformation of data to useful products. Since IOOS and coastal components of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) are not mutually exclusive within this framework, the SCCOOS consortium of observatory implementers have created an organizational structure that encourages dovetailing of OOI into the routine observations provided by the operational components of a regional IOOS. To begin the development, SCCOOS has grant funding from the California Coastal Conservancy as part of a $21M, statewide initiative to establish a Coastal Ocean Currents Monitoring Program, and funding from NOAA's Coastal Observing Technology System (COTS). In addition, SCCOOS is leveraging IT development that has been supported by the NSF Information Technology Research program Real-time observatories, Applications,and Data Manageemnt Network (ROADNET), and anticipates using developments which will result from the NSF Laboratory for Ocean Observatory Knowledge Integration Grid (LOOKING) program. The observational components now funded at SCCOOS include surface current mapping by HF radar; high

  16. Evaluating bio-optical models to determine chlorophyll a from hyper spectral data in the turbid coastal waters of South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, J. B.; Ali, K.

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people visit the beaches of South Carolina every year and the increasing utilization of the coastal waters is leading to the deterioration of water quality and the marine ecosystem. Ecological stress on these environments is reflected by the increase in the frequency and severity of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). This was evident during recent summer seasons particularly in the shallow nearshore waters of Long Bay, South Carolina, an open coast embayment on the South Atlantic Bight. These aspects threaten human and marine life. The early detection of HABs in the coastal waters requires more efficient and accurate monitoring tools. Remote sensing provides synoptic view of the entire Long Bay waters at high temporal coverage and allows resource managers to effectively map and monitor algal bloom development, near real time. Various remote sensing (RS) algorithms have been developed but were mostly calibrated to low resolution global data and or other specific sites. In the summer of 2013, a suite of measurements and water samples were collected from 15 locations along the nearshore waters of Long Bay using the Grice Laboratory R/V. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of 10 bio-optical blue-green and NIR-red based RS models applied to GER 1500 hyper spectral reflectance data to predict chlorophyll a, a proxy for phytoplankton density, in the Long Bay waters of SC. Efficiency of the algorithms performance in the study site were tested through a least squares regression and residual analysis. Results show that among the selected suite of algorithms the blue green models by Darecki and Stramski (2004) produced R2 of 0.68 with RMSE=0.39μg/l, Oc4v4 model by O'Reilly et al. (2000) gave R2 of 0.62 with RMSE=0.73ug/l, and the Oc2v4 also by O'Reilly et al (2000) gave R2 of 0.69 with RMSE=0.65. Among the NIR-red models, Moses et al (2009) two-band algorithm produced R2 of 0.75 and RMSE=1.79, and the three-band version generated R2 of 0.81 and RMSE=2.25ug

  17. The contribution of the mud shrimp Callianassa subterranea (Decapoda: Thallassinidea) to sediment metabolism during oxygen deficiency in southern North Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powilleit, Martin; Graf, Gerhard

    1996-12-01

    Long-term experiments with single isolated specimens of C. subterranea (Montagu) in closed systems under anoxic conditions were conducted to measure CO 2 release and heat production as parameters for anaerobic metabolism. For small C. subterranea (48.3 - 97.6 mg dw) the rate of CO 2 release was estimated to be 1.69 to 3.63 μmol CO 2·g dw -1·h -1 and for large specimens (330.9 - 543.0 mg dw) 0.28 to 1.52 μmol CO 2·g dw -1·h -1 during the incubation period of 5 days (6°C). The rate of CO 2 release increased by a factor of up to 2 during the first three days and increased more rapidly later in this incubation period. Direct calorimetry revealed a decrease in the rate of heat production from 0.39 to 0.25 J·g dw -1·h -1 ( i.e. 64% of initial value) during long-term anoxia (110 h). Compared to normoxic values recalculated from literature data our results indicate a decrease in the heat production rate to 33% under prolonged anoxia. For a natural Callianassa population on station 'Schlicksandgrund' in the German Bight the rate of CO 2 release was calculated to be 8.0 μmol·m -2·h -1 under anoxic conditions. ∑CO 2 pore-water profiles on station 'Schlicksandgrund' were used to calculate a CO 2 flux from the sediment to the near-bottom water of 110 μmol CO 2·m -2·h -1 under normoxic and 338 μmol CO 2·m -2·h -1 under hypoxic conditions. The anaerobic metabolic activity of the Callianassa population could account for about 7.3 (oxic conditions) to 2.4% (hypoxic conditions) of the above CO 2 fluxes.

  18. The physical oceanographic environment during the CCE-LTER Years: Changes in climate and concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Arthur J.; Song, Hajoon; Subramanian, Aneesh C.

    2015-02-01

    The California Current System (CCS) has been studied by the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations program for many decades. Since 2004, the Southern California Bight (SCB) and the oceanic region offshore has also been the site for the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, which has established long-term observational time series and executed several Process Cruises to better understand physical-biological variations, fluxes and interactions. Since the inception of the CCE-LTER, many new ideas have emerged about what physical processes are the key controls on CCS dynamics. These new perspectives include obtaining a better understanding of what climate patterns exert influences on CCS physical variations and what physical controls are most important in driving CCE ecological changes. Physical oceanographic and climatological conditions in the CCS varied widely since the inception of the CCE-LTER observational time series, including unusual climate events and persistently anomalous states. Although the CCE-LTER project commenced in 2004 in the midst of normal ocean conditions near the climatological means, over the following decade, El Nino/Southern Oscillation conditions flickered weakly from warm to cold, with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) generally tracking that behavior, while the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) evolved to persistent and strong positive conditions after 2007, indicative of enhanced upwelling from 2007 to 2012. Together the combined impact of the negative PDO state (La Nina conditions) and positive NPGO state (increased upwelling conditions) yielded remarkably persistent cool conditions in the CCS from late 2007 to early 2009 and from mid-2010 through 2012. The broad-scale climate variations that occurred over the North Pacific and CCS during this time period are discussed here to provide physical context for the CCE-LTER time series observations and the CCE-LTER Process

  19. The Northeast U.S. continental shelf Energy Modeling and Analysis exercise (EMAX): Ecological network model development and basic ecosystem metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jason; Overholtz, William; O'Reilly, John; Green, Jack; Dow, David; Palka, Debra; Legault, Chris; Vitaliano, Joseph; Guida, Vincent; Fogarty, Michael; Brodziak, Jon; Methratta, Lisa; Stockhausen, William; Griswold, Laurel and Carolyn, Col

    2008-11-01

    During the past half-century notable changes have occurred in the Northeast U.S. (NEUS) Continental Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (LME). To understand how the system functions as a whole, to evaluate the potential responses of this ecosystem to numerous human-induced perturbations, and to elucidate the relative magnitude of key biota and processes, the Northeast Fisheries Science Center instituted the Energy Modeling and Analysis eXercise (EMAX). The primary goal of EMAX was to establish an ecological network model (i.e., a more nuanced energy budget) of the entire Northeast U.S. food web. The EMAX work focused on the interdisciplinary development of a network model which reflected contemporary conditions (1996-2000) in four major regions of the ecosystem:, Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank, Southern New England and Middle Atlantic Bight. The model had 36 network "nodes" or biomass state variables across a broad range of the biological hierarchy within each trophic level and incorporated a wide range of key rate processes. Because this ecosystem has been relatively well studied many of the biomass estimates were based on field measurements and biomass estimates from the scientific literature were required only for a relatively small number of nodes. The emphasis of EMAX was to explore the particular role of small pelagic fishes in the ecosystem. Our results show that small pelagic fishes are indeed keystone species in the ecosystem. We examined a suite of novel ecosystem metrics as we compared the four regions and provided a general, system-level description of the NEUS ecosystem. The general patterns of the network properties in the four regions were similar; however the network indices and metrics did reveal some noteworthy differences among regions reflecting their different oceanographic and faunal characteristics. The process of compiling and evaluating available data required by an ecosystem network model identified important gaps in our understanding which should

  20. Colloidal size spectra, composition and estuarine mixing behavior of DOM in river and estuarine waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengzhen; Stolpe, Björn; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.

    2016-05-01

    Flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled on-line with UV absorbance and fluorescence detectors was used to examine the colloidal composition and size distribution of optically active dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the lower Mississippi River (MR), the East Pearl River (EPR), the St. Louis Bay (SLB) estuary, and coastal waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. In addition to field studies, laboratory mixing experiments using river and seawater end-members were carried out to study the processes controlling the estuarine mixing behavior and size partitioning of colloids with different sizes and composition. The colloidal size spectra of chromophoric DOM and humic-like DOM showed one dominant peak in the 0.5-4 nm size range, representing >75% of the total FlFFF-recoverable colloids. In contrast, protein-like DOM showed a bi-modal distribution with peaks at 0.5-4 nm and 4-8 nm, as well as a major portion (from ∼41% in the EPR to ∼72% in the Mississippi Bight) partitioned to the >20 nm size fraction. Bulk DOM was lower in abundance and molecular-weight in the MR compared with the EPR, while the proportion of colloidal protein-like DOM in the >20 nm size range was slightly larger in the MR compared with the EPR. These features are consistent with differences in land use, hydrological conditions, and water residence time between the two river basins, with more autochthonous DOM in MR waters. In the SLB estuary, different DOM components demonstrated different mixing behaviors. The abundance of colloidal chromophoric DOM decreased with increasing salinity and showed evident removal during estuarine mixing even though the bulk DOM appeared to be conservative. In contrast, colloidal humic-like DOM behaved conservatively inside SLB and during laboratory mixing experiments. The ratio of colloidal protein-like to humic-like DOM generally increased with increasing salinity, consistent with increasing autochthonous protein-like DOM and removal of terrestrially

  1. Investigation of coastal wave field variations with TerraSAR-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Sven; Lehner, Susanne; Bruck, Miguel; Gies, Tobias; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Rosenthal, Wolfgang; Bruns, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    spectral parameters and thus needs to be accounted for. We present an updated XWAVE algorithm which was improved for coastal applications. The study was carried out for the German Bight and we compare our results with collocated buoy data as well as with the coastal wave model CWAM of the German Weatherservice (DWD).

  2. Small scale morphodynamics of shoreface-connected ridges and their impact on benthic macrofauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Edith; Kröncke, Ingrid; Kubicki, Adam

    2015-05-01

    The first interdisciplinary analysis (biological and sedimentological) of macrofauna communities influenced by long-term morphodynamics of shoreface-connected ridges in the German Bight on a small scale is presented in this study. The study area covering 4 km2 was located off the island of Spiekeroog, in an area known as a Tellina fabula community. Sediment samples taken at 27 sample sites were coupled with side-scan sonar data to draw a precise sediment map of the area, as well as with high-resolution multi-beam bathymetry data to understand the morphodynamic changes of the seabed between 2003 and 2010. The macrofauna data acquired at the same 27 sites were analysed for community structure using non-metric multidimensional scaling, the ANOSIM and PERMANOVA tests. Correlations between biological and environmental variables were examined with the BIOENV procedure. The study revealed a shore-parallel sediment zonation with clear and sharp borders induced by local morphodynamics, which together with specific local bathymetry affected the formation of three different macrofauna affinity groups. One group was located on the shoreface and in the troughs (dominant species: Scoloplos armiger, Lanice conchilega, Notomastus latericeus), one on the landward flanks of the ridges (dominant species: Aonides paucibranchiata, Goniadella bobretzkii), and one on the ridge crests (dominant species: Ophelia spp. juv., Spio goniocephala). The spatial distribution of the affinity groups, their taxa number and abundance of species was dependent on a surface sediment pattern resulting from local hydrodynamics, which in turn is known to influence the food availability. A seaward steepening of ridges took place and was an effect of erosion up to 0.34 m on landward flanks in and accumulation up to 0.29 m on seaward flanks in seven years. The studied shoreface-connected ridges migrated seawards with a pace of 5 m/year for the large ridge and 20 m/year for the small ridge. Elongated mud

  3. Satellite tracking of harbour seals on Horns Reef - Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea island Roemoe were equipped with satellite linked time depth recorders. The animals were caught on three separate occasions (Jan. 4th, Feb. 18th and May 6th, 2002). The transmitters worked between 49 and 100 days, relaying positional and dive information back via the ARGOS satellite service until beginning of July. Background for the studies is the construction of the Worlds largest off shore wind farm on Horns Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF-transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend considerable time on Horns Reef. The VHF-telemetry studies showed that the preferred direction for seals leaving the Danish Wadden Sea is NW from Graedyb tidal area outside Esbjerg, the direction directly towards the wind farm area. The previously used VHF-transmitters had a limited detection range and it was decided to equip a number of seals from the same area as before with satellite transmitters. This allows for positioning of the seals in the entire North Sea as well as providing dive summary information, as a transmitter with a depth transducer was chosen for the study. Positional information revealed that animals move about more extensively than previously believed. Substantial variation between animals was observed and each seal seemed to have adopted its own foraging strategy. Some animals travelled to the centre of the North Sea on foraging trips and spent considerable time close to the bottom at 30-70 meters depth. Other seals remained in the German Bight and yet others spent considerable time on and around Horns Reef. The area of Horns reef wind farm constitutes a negligible fraction of the total area visited by the tagged seals. The reef as a whole however, appears to be important to the seals both for foraging and as transit area to other feeding grounds further off shore. The resolution in positional information is not sufficiently high to allow for a detailed study of the effects

  4. EMSEAC. Electromagnetic seafloor profiler for environmental magnetic research in coastal and shelf seas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. A marine electromagnetic profiler was developed to survey the magnetic and electric signatures of marine near-surface sediments (0-50 cm). The system is devised for coastal and shelf operations of 5 to 500 m water depth, to resolve subtle and gradual variations in silt and clay content, porosity and diagenesis state at sub-meter resolution. A commercial electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor was modified for submarine operations and mounted into a bottom-towed sledge enabling synchronous in-situ mapping of magnetic susceptibility and electrical conductivity. Magnetic susceptibility is used as a proxy for fine-grained terrigenous clay/silt content, diagenetically forced magnetite depletion, anthropogenic metallic contaminants as well as proneness to trace metal accumulation. Electric conductivity is primarily considered as a measure of porosity and grain-size distribution. The sensor is used to investigate patterns of sediment transport and deposition and to detect fluid seepage and pollution effects. The 3.2 m long non-magnetic and non-conductive sledge, named GEM-SHARK, is towed by small to large size research vessels at a typical speed of 2 to 4 knots. Onboard control and co-registration of seafloor measurements is provided via an up to 10 km long armored coax cable, supported by an autonomous registration, navigation and control system in the bottom-towed sledge. A complementary CTD tracks bathymetry and identifies bottom water characteristics. During deployments at the Baltic Sea Eckernfoerde Bight, NW Iberian Shelf and estuaries, and recently at the Argentine Shelf and the Rio de la Plata mouth, the system has successfully covered more than 800 km with sub-meter resolution susceptibility and conductivity profiles. We will present data examples depicting cold seeps, sediment waves, mud belts and glauconite deposits and discuss the scopes and controls of combined electromagnetic in-situ profiling and sampling strategies

  5. Relating Productivity Events to Holocene Bivalve Shell Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J. W.; Krause, R. A.; Kowalewski, M.; Romanek, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Simoes, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth rate of a bivalve can be influenced by many environmental factors that can change during the life of the organism. In this contribution we present initial data from a millennium scale chronology to assess the relationship between ontogenetic growth in the bivalve Semele casali and paleoenvironmental conditions preserved in the shell using growth increment analysis, radiocarbon-calibrated amino acid racemization dating techniques, stable isotopes (C and O) and high spatial resolution (125-150 samples per cm of shell profile) trace element (Ba, Mn) analysis (LA-ICPMS). Time-averaged specimens of S. casali were dredged from two sites at 10 meters and 30 meters depth along the inner continental shelf at Ubatuba Bay in the Southeast Brazilian Bight, an area influenced by productivity pulses triggered by coastal runoff events and coastal upwelling. Seventy-five individual valves were dated using amino acid racemization (aspartic acid). Dates were calculated using an expanded version of a previously published relationship (Barbour Wood et al., 2006 Quaternary Research 323- 331) between aspartic acid ratios and AMS radiocarbon dates of twelve S. casali individuals from the same sampling locations. The resulting time series has complete coverage for the past three thousand years at centennial resolution. From this time series, a sub-sample of dated valves was selected for more detailed growth increment, stable isotope and high-resolution trace element (Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca) analyses. Oceanic productivity is expressed differentially in the trace element profiles of S. casali with elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios capturing nutrient input through coastal runoff events while elevated Ba/Ca and depressed Mn/Ca ratios represent input through coastal upwelling. Fluctuations in Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca are not correlated to fluctuations in relative growth throughout the ontogeny of an individual bivalve, nor are they expected to be as periods of increased productivity are transient

  6. La puerta del alma: el color de ojos y de cabello como forma discursiva de dominación (The doors of soul: the color hairs and eyes as a discursive instrument of domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korstanje, Maximiliano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El nacimiento de un hijo es un evento único e irremplazable para todos aquellos que han tenido la experiencia. Para otros, es una oportunidad de asenso social sobre todo sí por ese juego de los genes la criatura se asemeja al estereotipo indoeuropeo nórdico. Por ese motivo, los padres parecen interesados en que sus hijos tengan ojos claros y cabellos rubios tomando esa característica como cualitativamente positiva. Por ese motivo, no resulta extraño que las diferentes imágenes en publicidades de artículos para bebes enfatice en los “ojos azules y los cabellos rubios” como tipos ideales a seguir. La presente investigación ha demostrado que no sólo que los estereotipos dominantes se multiplican sino también se interiorizan generando un diálogo que tiende a reforzar la hegemonía. Por lo demás, se ha observado que discursivamente la claridad es simbolizada como sinónimo de felicidad, armonía, afecto, bondad y seguridad entre otros mientras la oscuridad adquiere categorías semánticas opuestas. Para los padres, que sus hijos tengan ojos “claros” o cabellos “rubios” significa un verdadero asenso social abstracto. Por lo pronto, no cobrarán un canon adicional por traer a la vida a un hijo rubio, pero los acerca notablemente más a las características de los grupos dominantes reforzando así el auto-desprecio por sí mismos.Abstract: Even a memorable moment as the birth of a son can be subject to a much broader pervasive experience. For some people, this event become in an opportunity to social upward wherein convergence genetic and eugenicist thoughts with concentration in Norse phenotype. For that reason, parents are concerned in their sons have bight eyes and blondes hairs. This is based on the postmodern advertising and marketing efforts to emphasize on these features. Under this context, this present research showed not only that dominant phenotypes are divulged thanks to the advertising but also create a

  7. Radar imaging mechanism of marine sand waves at very low grazing angle illumination caused by unique hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Ingo; Herbers, Dagmar

    2006-10-01

    The investigations carried out between 2002 and 2004 during six field experiments within the Operational Radar and Optical Mapping in monitoring hydrodynamic, morphodynamic and environmental parameters for coastal management (OROMA) project aimed to improve the effectiveness of new remote sensing monitoring technologies such as shipborne imaging radars in coastal waters. The coastal monitoring radar of the GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht, Germany, is based on a Kelvin Hughes RSR 1000 X band (9.42 GHz) vertical (VV) polarized river radar and was mounted on board the research vessel Ludwig Prandtl during the experiments in the Lister Tief, a tidal inlet of the German Bight in the North Sea. The important progress realized in this investigation is the availability of calibrated X band radar data. Another central point of the study is to demonstrate the applicability of the quasi-specular scattering theory in combination with the weak hydrodynamic interaction theory for the radar imaging mechanism of the seabed. Radar data have been taken at very low grazing angles ≤2.6° of flood and ebb tide-oriented sand wave signatures at the sea surface during ebb tidal current phases. Current speeds perpendicular to the sand wave crest ≤0.6 m s-1 have been measured at wind speeds ≤4.5 m s-1 and water depths ≤25 m. The difference between the maximum measured and simulated normalized radar cross section (NRCS) modulation of the ebb tide-oriented sand wave is 27%. For the flood tide-oriented sand wave, a difference of 21% has been calculated. The difference between the minimum measured and simulated NRCS modulation of the ebb tide-oriented sand wave is 10%, and for the flood tide-oriented sand wave, a value of 43% has been derived. Phases of measured and simulated NRCS modulations correspond to asymmetric sand wave slopes. The results of the simulated NRCS modulation show the qualitative trend but do not always quantitatively match the measured NRCS modulation profiles

  8. Photochemical free radical production rates in the eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dister, Brian; Zafiriou, Oliver C.

    1993-02-01

    than waters of the Gulf of Maine and North Atlantic Bight, despite large inputs of colored waters from two large tropical rivers with substantial "black water" tributaries. Other sources of reactive COM, such as grazing, sedimentary diagenesis, and "marine humus" may increase temperate waters' photoreactivity; alternatively, northern waters may be chromophore-rich because they are light-poor and photobleaching is a major sink of photoreactive COM.

  9. Satellite tracking of harbour seals on Horns Reef - Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, J.; Tougaard, S.; Jensen, Thyge [Fisheries and Maritime Museum Esbjerg (Denmark); Ebbesen, I. [Univ. of Sourthern Denmark, Inst. of Biology, Odense (Denmark); Teilmann, J. [NationL Environmental Res. Inst., Roskidle (Denmark)

    2003-03-15

    Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea island Roemoe were equipped with satellite linked time depth recorders. The animals were caught on three separate occasions (Jan. 4th, Feb. 18th and May 6th, 2002). The transmitters worked between 49 and 100 days, relaying positional and dive information back via the ARGOS satellite service until beginning of July. Background for the studies is the construction of the Worlds largest off shore wind farm on Horns Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF-transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend considerable time on Horns Reef. The VHF-telemetry studies showed that the preferred direction for seals leaving the Danish Wadden Sea is NW from Graedyb tidal area outside Esbjerg, the direction directly towards the wind farm area. The previously used VHF-transmitters had a limited detection range and it was decided to equip a number of seals from the same area as before with satellite transmitters. This allows for positioning of the seals in the entire North Sea as well as providing dive summary information, as a transmitter with a depth transducer was chosen for the study. Positional information revealed that animals move about more extensively than previously believed. Substantial variation between animals was observed and each seal seemed to have adopted its own foraging strategy. Some animals travelled to the centre of the North Sea on foraging trips and spent considerable time close to the bottom at 30-70 meters depth. Other seals remained in the German Bight and yet others spent considerable time on and around Horns Reef. The area of Horns reef wind farm constitutes a negligible fraction of the total area visited by the tagged seals. The reef as a whole however, appears to be important to the seals both for foraging and as transit area to other feeding grounds further off shore. The resolution in positional information is not sufficiently high to allow for a detailed study of the effects

  10. Stable isotope signals of eutrophication in Baltic Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Maren; Larsen, Birger; Leivuori, Mirja; Vallius, Henry

    2000-07-01

    Increasing δ15N and δ13C values in coastal Baltic marine sediments are evaluated as indicator of changes in the trophic status of the ecosystem. The influence of eutrophication on the δ15N values was found to be so dominant that it even overprints the usually observed mixing gradient from terrestrial (low isotope values) to the marine environment (high isotope values). A distinct gradient in stable nitrogen isotope values from eutrophic coastal areas to open more oligotrophic waters in the central Baltic Sea and Gulf of Bothnia was found. Our data show high δ15N values in surface sediments: 13‰ in the Oder Lagoon and the Pomeranian Bight, over 9‰ in the Gulf of Riga (Daugava River), 7‰ in the inner Gulf of Finland (Neva River), 6.5‰ in the Curonian Lagoon (Nemunas River), and 5.7‰ in the Gdansk Deep (Vistula River). In the Baltic Sea Proper, significantly lower δ15N values of 3-5‰ are found. A decrease in δ15N values with depth/age of the sediment was indicated in some cores that were analyzed down to 15-40 cm depth in 1-cm steps. There is a great overall difference between pre-industrial δ15N values in coastal sediments and recent ones of 2.3-10‰. As explanations for this increase are suggested, elevated nutrient δ15N values of waste water in combination with fractionation processes like nutrient uptake by phytoplankton and denitrification and nitrification processes in rivers discharging into the coastal water. Delta 13C values in sediment surfaces off the river estuaries primarily indicate differences between the inorganic carbon signatures of the rivers. However, since the δ13C values also decrease downcore, we contribute this change to increased primary production caused by the enhanced nutrient load. Since both stable isotope values in sediments ( δ13C and δ15N) correlate downcore, this strongly suggests that the anthropogenic nutrient loads in the rivers might be the reason for the changes of stable isotope values.

  11. Tracking marine mammals and ships with small and large-aperture hydrophone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Martin

    Techniques for passive acoustic tracking in all three spatial dimensions of marine mammals and ships were developed for long-term acoustic datasets recorded continuously over months using custom-designed arrays of underwater microphones (hydrophones) with spacing ranging from meters to kilometers. From the three-dimensional tracks, the acoustical properties of toothed whales and ships, such as sound intensity and directionality, were estimated as they are needed for the passive acoustic abundance estimation of toothed whales and for a quantitative description of the contribution of ships to the underwater soundscape. In addition, the tracks of the toothed whales reveal their underwater movements and demonstrate the potential of the developed tracking techniques to investigate their natural behavior and responses to sound generated by human activity, such as from ships or military SONAR. To track the periodically emitted echolocation sounds of toothed whales in an acoustically refractive environment in the upper ocean, a propagation-model based technique was developed for a hydrophone array consisting of one vertical and two L-shaped subarrays deployed from the floating instrument platform R/P FLIP. The technique is illustrated by tracking a group of five shallow-diving killer whales showing coordinated behavior. The challenge of tracking the highly directional echolocation sounds of deep-diving (small-aperture (≈ 1 m element spacing) arrays into a large-aperture (≈ 1 km element spacing) seafloor array to reduce the minimum number of required receivers from five to two. The capabilities of this technique are illustrated by tracking several groups of up to three individuals over time periods from 10 min to 33 min within an area of 20 km2 in the Southern California Bight. To track and measure the underwater radiated sound of ships, a frequency domain beamformer was implemented for a volumetric hydrophone array (< 2 m element spacing) that was coupled to an

  12. 2500 years of changing shoreline accretion rates at the mouths of the Mekong River delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besset, Manon; Tamura, Toru; Anthony, Edward; Brunier, Guillaume; Saito, Yoshiki; Dussouillez, Philippe; Lap Nguyen, Van; Ta, Oahn

    2016-04-01

    The Mekong River delta prograded rapidly in a relatively sheltered bight in the South China Sea under the influence of high fluvial sediment supply 5300 to 3500 years ago, developing from an estuary into a delta. This >200 km seaward growth resulted in increasing exposure of the delta to ocean waves that led to a more wave-influenced mode of progradation characterized by the construction of numerous sets of beach ridges in the eastern sector of the delta, which shows a system of multiple distributary mouths. The growth pattern of this river-mouth sector over the last 2500 years has been determined from OSL dating of these beach-ridge deposits, while the most up-to-date trends (1950-2014) have been highlighted from the analysis of maps and satellite images. The OSL ages show that the area of the delta in the mouths sector remained nearly constant till about 500 yr BP, following which significant accretion occurred, possibly in response to changes in catchment land-use and monsoon rainfall and attendant river water and sediment discharge. A fine-tuned analysis of changes since 1950 shows dominant but fluctuating accretion, with two periods of erosion. The first (1965-1973) occurred in the course of the second Indochina war, and the second more recently from 2003 to 2011, followed by mild recovery between 2011 and 2014. These fluctuations most likely reflect changes in sediment supply caused by the vicissitudes of war and its effect on vegetation cover, as well as variations in monsoon rainfall and discharge, and, for the most recent period, massive sand mining in the river and deltaic channels. Accretion of the mouths sector has gone apace, over the same recent multi-decadal period, with large-scale erosion of the muddy shores of the delta in the western South China Sea and the Gulf of Thailand, thus suggesting that the mouths sector may be increasingly sequestering sediment to the detriment of the rest of the delta shoreline. The accretion in the mouths sector is

  13. The nitrogen fate beyond the current nutrient mitigation measures: sustainability of an integrated agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieu, V.; Billen, G. F.; Garnier, J.; Lancelot, C.; Gypens, N.

    2010-12-01

    Located in the North-Western Europe the terrestrial continuum that includes the Seine, Somme, and Scheldt River basins offers an interesting example of a transborder territory (France, Belgium, and Netherlands) with high-intensity anthropogenic pressures. It well-illustrates the rapid development of modern agriculture in industrialised countries and the resulting severe alteration of water resources and jeopardising the capacity of rural territories to produce drinking water. The corresponding nutrient loads delivered then into the Southern Bight of the North Sea, strongly affect the ecological functioning of the coastal zone. An integrated ‘river-ocean’ assessment, coupling two deterministic models - the SENEQUE RIVESTRAHLER model simulating nutrient dynamic in the drainage network and the MIRO model describing the ecological functioning coastal ecosystem - points out the relevance of current policy based measures (improvement of waste water treatment) to mitigate phosphorous emissions, while the nitrogen pollution related to agriculture will remain critical despite the implementation of classical management measure (good agricultural practices). Therefore and irrespectively of the current political agenda, a more radical alternative is established, consisting of a generalised shift to an integrated agriculture of all agricultural areas in the three basins, excluding the use of synthetically compounded fertilisers and the importation of livestock feed. Such scenario aims at evaluating whether agriculture, by essence, can conciliate (i) the demand for food and feed by local populations, (ii) a good ecological functioning of aquatic ecosystems and (iii) a balanced nutrient status for the adjacent coastal area. This scenario involves an increased livestock density in the Seine and Somme and a decrease in livestock in the Scheldt basin. It leads to a significant reduction of agricultural production that finally brings the three basins closer to autotrophy

  14. Characteristics of Extreme Summer Convection over equatorial America and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, M. D.; Houze, R.

    2013-12-01

    Fourteen years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) version 7 data for June-August show the temporal and spatial characteristics of extreme convection over equatorial regions of the American and African continents. We identify three types of extreme systems: storms with deep convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes extending ≥10 km in height), storms with wide convective cores (contiguous convective 40 dBZ echoes with areas >1,000 km2) and storms with broad stratiform regions (stratiform echo >50,000 km2). European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis is used to describe the environmental conditions around these forms of extreme convection. Storms with deep convective cores occur mainly over land: in the equatorial Americas, maximum occurrence is in western Mexico, Northern Colombia and Venezuela; in Africa, the region of maximum occurrence is a broad zone enclosing the central and west Sudanian Savanna, south of the Sahel region. Storms with wide convective radar echoes occur in these same general locations. In the American sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation regions (typifying robust mesoscale convective systems) occur mainly over the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean and the Colombia-Panama bight. In the African sector, storms with broad stratiform precipitation areas occur primarily over the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean near the coast of West Africa. ECMWF reanalyses show how the regions of extreme deep convection associated with both continents are located mainly in regions affected by diurnal heating and influenced by atmospheric jets in regions with strong humidity gradients. Composite analysis of the synoptic conditions leading to the three forms of extreme convection provides insights into the forcing mechanisms in which these systems occur. These analyses show how the monsoonal flow directed towards the Andes slopes is mainly what concentrates the occurrence of extreme

  15. Coupling alongshore variations in wave energy to beach morphologic change using the SWAN wave model at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Jodi L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    conditions to help isolate the effects of offshore wave direction and period on nearshore wave predictions. Alongshore varying average beach change statistics are computed at specific profile locations from topographic beach surveys and lidar data. The study area is located in the San Francisco Bight in central California. Ocean Beach is a seven kilometer long north-south trending sandy coastline located just south of the entrance to the San Francisco Bay Estuary (Figure 1). It contains an erosion hotspot in the southern part of the beach which has resulted in damage to local infrastructure and is the cause of continued concern. A wide range of field data collection and numerical modeling efforts have been focused here as part of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) San Francisco Bight Coastal Processes Study, which began in October 2003 and represents the first comprehensive study of coastal processes at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. Ocean Beach is exposed to very strong tidal flows, with measured currents often in excess of 1 m/s at the north end of the beach. Current profiler measurements indicate that current magnitudes are greater in the northern portion of the beach, while wave energy is greater in the southern portion where erosion problems are greatest (Barnard et al., 2007). The sub-aerial beach volume fluctuates seasonally over a maximum envelope of 400,000 m3 for the seven kilometer stretch (Barnard et al, 2007). The wave climate in the region is dominated by an abundance of low frequency energy (greater than 20 s period) and prevailing northwest incident wave angles. The application of a wave model to the region is further complicated by the presence of the Farallon Islands 40 kilometers west, and a massive ebb tidal delta at the mouth of San Francisco Bay (~150 km2), which creates complicated refraction patterns as wave energy moves from offshore Ocean Beach; however the cost and threat of the energetic nearshore environment have limited the temporal

  16. Equivalent magnetization over the World Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, J.; Hamoudi, M.; Choi, Y.; Thebault, E.; Quesnel, Y.; Roest, W. R.; Lesur, V.

    2012-12-01

    , the Mid-Atlantic Ridge displays a more uniform signature, although off-axis variations seem associated to the Tristan and St Helena hotspots. In the Indian Ocean, a strong equivalent magnetization characterizes areas of hotspot-ridge interaction such as the Gulf of Aden, the Central Indian Ridge near Rodrigues Island, the Southwest Indian Ridge near Marion Island, and the Southeast Indian Ridge near St Paul and Amsterdam Islands. A weaker one is observed in colder area, at the Australian-Antarctic Discordance and around the Rodrigues Triple Junction. The Pacific Ocean is characterized by a generally stronger equivalent magnetization, both near ridges and in abyssal plains. Time variations, i.e. along seafloor spreading flowlines, are apparent across the Mid-Atlantic and Pacific-Antarctic ridges, with highs near the ridge axis (younger than 10 Ma) and between ~83 and 60 Ma, just after the Cretaceous Normal Superchron and lows between ~60 and 10 Ma. The Mesozoic basins of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans show a weaker equivalent magnetization before ~155 Ma and a stronger one after. Basins covered by thick sediments such as the Bengal Bay, Great Australian Bight, Nova Scotia Basin, and Western Somali Basin show a very weak equivalent magnetization, reflecting both a deeper basement and a possible thermal demagnetization. Some of these variations coincide with satellite magnetic anomalies.

  17. Holocene ITCZ and ENSO-driven climate variability from the Panama isthmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, D. H.; Aronson, R. B.; Bush, M. B.

    2009-12-01

    , and the effects of trade-wind-driven moisture exchanges between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans on the position of the ITCZ. A finely laminated sediment core from La Yeguada represents one of the most detailed Holocene climatic archives for the Isthmus. The pollen and charcoal records from La Yeguada were previously published (5) but detailed paleolimnological analyses were not conducted. Results from high-resolution x-ray fluorescence analyses of conspicuous changes in lamination patterns appear to correlate with mid-Holocene changes in ITCZ and ENSO systems recorded in the Cariaco Basin (2) and the eastern Pacific (3). A third climatic forcing associated with changes in upwelling in the Panama Bight was also observed. We conclude that mid-Holocene changes in ITCZ and ENSO systems had significant effects in both terrestrial and marine communities, as evidenced in the pollen record of La Yeguada and unpublished coral reef records from the Panama Bay. References: (1) Hodell, DA et al (1991) Nature, 352, 790-793; (2) Haug, GH et al (2001) Science, 293, 1304-1308; (3) Moy, CM et al (2002) Nature 420: 162-165; (4) Riedinger, MA et al (2002) Journal of Paleolimnology 27: 1-7; (5) Bush, MB et al (1990) Journal of Vegetation Science 1:105-118.

  18. Contamination of North Sea and Baltic Sea with long-living iodine-129 and other anthropogenic radionuclides; Kontamination von Nord- und Ostsee mit langlebigem Iod-129 und anderen anthropogenen Radionukliden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosch, Luebbert

    2010-10-12

    a {sup 129}I contamination from both La Hague and Sellafield. The global fallout and emissions from Chernobyl do not contribute significantly to the situation in Western Europe. Water samples from the Baltic Sea show lower iodine-127 concentrations (10-25 ng/g) than other seawater samples. The {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I-isotopic ratios in the Baltic Sea range between 7.4 . 10{sup -8} and 2.8 . 10{sup -7}. The {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I-isotopic ratios and iodine-127 concentrations increase with a shorter distance to the North Sea, as the Baltic Sea exchanges water with the contaminated North Sea. A sediment core taken from the German Bight shows that iodine-129 expands rapidly into deep layers. Prenuclear sediments have been contaminated during their long storage. Iodine-127 was determined by ICP-MS at Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, iodine-129 was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry at ETH Zurich.

  19. Extreme 13Ccarb enrichment in ca. 2.0 Ga magnesite-stromatolite-dolomite-`red beds' association in a global context: a case for the world-wide signal enhanced by a local environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Victor A.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Medvedev, Pavel V.; Makarikhin, Vladimir V.

    1999-12-01

    The Palaeoproterozoic positive excursion of δ 13Ccarb is now considered as three positive shifts of δ 13Ccarb separated by returns to 0‰, which all occurred between 2.40 and 2.06 Ma. This isotopic event is unique in terms of both duration (>300 Ma) and 13C enrichment (up to +18‰). The mechanism responsible for one of the most significant carbon isotopic shifts in Earth history remains highly debatable. To date, δ 13C of +10‰ to +15‰ cannot be balanced by organic carbon burial ( forg) as there is no geological evidence for an enhanced C org accumulation prior to or synchronous with the excursion. Instead, termination of these excursions is followed by formation of a vast reservoir of 13C-depleted organic material (-45‰ at Shunga) and by one of the earliest known oil-generation episodes at 2.0 Ga. None of the three positive excursions of δ 13Ccarb is followed by a negative isotopic shift significantly below 0‰, as has always been observed in younger isotopic events, reflecting an overturn of a major marine carbon reservoirs. This may indicate that forg was constant: implying that the mechanism involved in the production of C org was different. Onset of intensive methane cycling resulting in Δc change is another possibility. The majority of sampled 13Ccarb-rich localities represents shallow-water stromatolitic dolostones, `red beds' and evaporites formed in restricted intracratonic basins, and may not reflect global δ 13Ccarb values. Closely spaced drill core samples ( n=73) of stromatolitic dolostones from the >1980±27 Ma Tulomozerskaya Formation in the Onega palaeobasin, Russian Karelia, have been analysed for δ 13Ccarb and δ 18Ocarb in order to demonstrate that different processes were involved in the formation of 13Ccarb-rich carbonates. The 800 m-thick magnesite-stromatolite-dolomite-`red beds' succession formed in a complex combination of environments on the Karelian craton: peritidal shallow marine, low-energy protected bights, barred

  20. Genesis and geometry of the Meiklejohn Peak lime mud-mound, Bare Mountain Quadrangle, Nevada, USA: Ordovician limestone with submarine frost heave structures—a possible response to gas clathrate hydrate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Federico F.

    2001-12-01

    . Zebra banded rocks are also accompanied by snout and socket structures and, in some instances, are folded and sheared by curving kink bands. Zebra and stromatactis limestone structures found throughout the mud-mound resemble frost heave and cryoturbation structures identified in both Holocene and Pleistocene cryosols, and in laboratory experiments with advancing freezing fronts in clay-size sediment. Significantly, modern occurrences of methane clathrate hydrate (methane-charged ice) display parallel and digitate layering similar in depositional appearance to that of zebra and stromatactis limestone from Meiklejohn Peak. Early carbonate cements are also commonly associated with these modern clathrate hydrate deposits. Consequently, gas clathrate hydrates may have been the propping agent for zebra and stromatactis structures observed in the mud-mound. In this scenario, carbonate cements would have precipitated and stabilized these structures, both with the consolidation and dissociation of gas clathrate hydrates, and with the oxidation and reduction of associated gases. Stable δ13C and δ18O isotope ratios collected from mudstone and spar of zebra and stromatactis structures indicate that they were lithified in equilibrium with Ordovician seawater. The δ13C isotope ratios recorded at Meiklejohn Peak are similar to δ13C isotopic ratios obtained from ∑CO 2 evolving from modern seafloor. These isotopic ratios may indicate that frost heave structures in the Meiklejohn Peak mud-mound are the result of consolidation and dissociation of carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates. Even though the bulk of gas clathrate hydrates identified to date in modern ocean floors are composed of methane, carbon dioxide clathrate hydrates are known from the modern seafloor of the Okinawa Trough. They may also be common in areas of abundant carbonate sediment accumulation, as suggested by recent observations from the Great Australian Bight.