WorldWideScience

Sample records for bights

  1. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB...

  2. Modelling cyclonic eddies in the Delagoa Bight region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossa, O.; Pous, S.; Penven, P.; Capet, X.; Reason, C. J. C.

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study is to document and shed light on the circulation around the Delagoa Bight region in the southern Mozambique Channel using a realistic modelling approach. A simulation including mesoscale forcings at the boundaries of our regional configuration succeeds in reproducing the general circulation in the region as well as the existence of a semi-permanent cyclonic eddy, whose existence is attested by in situ measurements in the Bight. Characterised by a persistent local minimum in SSH located around 26°S-34°E, this cyclonic eddy termed herein the Delagoa Bight lee eddy occurs about 25% of the time with no clear seasonal preference. Poleward moving cyclones, mostly generated further north, occur another 25% of the time in the Bight area. A tracking method applied to eddies generated in Delagoa Bight using model outputs as well as AVISO data confirms the model realism and provides additional statistics. The diameter of the eddy core varies between 61 and 147 km and the average life time exceeds 20 days. Additional model analyses reveal the systematic presence of negative vorticity in the Bight that can organise and form a Delagoa Bight lee eddy depending on the intensity of an intermittent southward flow along the shore and the spatial distribution of surrounding mesoscale features. In addition, the model solution shows other cyclonic eddies generated near Inhambane and eventually travelling through the Bight. Their generation and pathways appears to be linked with large Mozambique Channel rings.

  3. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  4. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    Progress is reported on research conducted during 1979 on the biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. The presentation consists of a number of published articles and abstracts of oral presentations. (ACR)

  5. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  6. Temporal variations in lead concentrations and isotopic composition in the Southern California Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Flegal, A.R. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Lead concentrations in surface waters of the Southern California Bight appear to have decreased threefold (from >170 to <60 pM) since they were initially measured by Clair Patterson and his associates in the 1970s. The decrease parallels a threefold decline in anthropogenic inputs of industrial lead to the bight over the past two decades. Moreover, mass balance calculations indicate that the primary source of lead to the bight now is upwelling. This is evidenced by the isotopic compositions of surface waters in the bight, which are most characteristic of Asian industrial lead aerosols (0.4793 [le] [sup 206]Pb/[sup 208]Pb [le] 0.4833) deposited in oceanic waters of the North Pacific. While the decrease in surface water lead concentrations in the bight reflects the reduction in industrial lead emissions from the United States, the isotopic compositions of surface waters in the southern reach of the bight reflect a concurrent increase in industrial lead emissions from Mexico (0.4852 [le] [sup 206]Pb/[sup 208]Pb [le] 0.4877). The isotopic composition ([sup 208]Pb/[sup 207]Pb [approximately] 2.427) of elevated lead concentrations of surface waters in San Diego Bay indicate that lead is being remobilized from contaminated sediments within that bay.

  7. Middle Atlantic Bight Marine Ecosystem: A Regional Forecast Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Coles, V. J.; Garraffo, Z. D.

    2011-12-01

    Changes in basin scale climate patterns can drive changes in mesoscale physical oceanographic processes and subsequent alterations of ecosystem states. Climatic variability can be induced in the northeastern shelfbreak large marine ecosystem by climate oscillations, such as North Atlantic Oscillation, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation; and long-term trends, such as a warming pattern. Short term variability can be induced by changes in the water masses in the northern and southern boundaries, by Gulf Stream path and transport variations, and by local mesoscale and submesoscale features. A coupled bio-physical model (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) is being used to forecast the evolution of the frontal and current systems of the shelf and Gulf Stream, and subsequent changes in thermal conditions and ecosystem structure over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). This study aims to forecast the ocean state and nutrients in the MAB, and to investigate how cross-shelf exchanges of different water masses could affect nutrient budgets, primary and secondary production, and fish populations in coastal and shelf marine ecosystems. Preliminary results are shown for a regional MAB model nested to the global 1/12o HYCOM run at NOAA/NCEP/EMC using Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVO) daily initialization. Elements of this simulation are nutrient influx condition at the northern and southern boundaries through regression to ocean thermodynamic variables, and nutrient input at the river mouths.

  8. Numerical diagnostic of the circulation in the Santos Bight with COROAS hydrographic data

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Cirano; Edmo José Dias Campos

    1996-01-01

    This work represents part of the analyses of the data generated during the first two mesoscale hydrographic cruises of COROAS Project: one during the Summer and the other during the Winter of 1993. The area surveyed during these cruises is the region of the South Brazil Bight (or Santos Bight) limited at the coast by the cities of Ubatuba and Iguape, extending from the 50 m isobath to oceanic regions with depths greater than 2500 m. The main goal of this work consisted of the adaptation of th...

  9. Diseases and parasites of Baltic cod ( Gadus morhua ) from the Mecklenburg Bight to the Estonian coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellergaard, Stig; Lang, T.

    1999-01-01

    the Mecklenburg Bight in the southwest to the Estonian coast in the northeast of the Baltic Sea. Prevalences were highest in the western part, except for skeletal deformities, which were highest in the central part. The spatial distribution of pseudobranchial swellings, C. lingua and L. branchialis appeared...

  10. Significant habitats and habitat complexes of the New York Bight watershed from 1971 to 1996 (NODC Accession 0071981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report focuses on the identification and description of essential habitats of key species inhabiting the New York Bight watershed study area. The study area...

  11. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: South Carolina 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  12. The recirculation of the intermediate western boundary current at the Tubarão Bight - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vladimir S.; Mill, Guilherme N.; Gabioux, Mariela; Grossmann-Matheson, Guisela S.; Paiva, Afonso M.

    2017-02-01

    Lagrangian floats and current meter measurements from two moored arrays are analyzed, in combination with altimetry data, in order to investigate the recirculation of Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW), and of the Intermediate Western Boundary Current (IWBC) at the Tubarão Bight, in the vicinity of the Vitória-Trindade Ridge (VTR), Brazil. Results from a high-resolution numerical simulation provide a complementary view of the flow at intermediate and surface levels. The data depict a topographically-induced cyclonic recirculation at intermediate levels, and five Argo floats are successively trapped inside the bight for two-and-a-half years, performing a total of 10 closed clockwise gyres during this period of time. In situ measurements at the western side of the bight show an intense alongshore flow at intermediate levels, with averaged velocities at 800 m of 30 cm/s, and peak velocities exceeding 50 cm/s, magnitudes comparable to the Brazil Current (BC) flow at surface levels. The recirculation extends from at least 1000 m deep up to 370 m, reaching sometimes depths as shallow as 150 m, but is mostly uncoupled from the surface flow during the one-and-a-half year long current meter record. Three different flow patterns are observed, and simulated, at surface levels inside the bight during the time the recirculation is well established at intermediate levels: a shallow cyclonic circulation, somewhat akin to the Vitória Eddy; a recurrent anticyclonic flow that encompasses the entire bight; and a southwestward-oriented circulation, associated with the BC being reorganized in a coherent flow after negotiating its way through the VTR channels. A significant portion (about 50% according to the model) of the inflow of intermediate waters recirculates, enhancing the flow of the IWBC within the bight, and increasing the age of AAIW that will eventually cross the VTR on its way to lower latitudes. Although the data are not conclusive about a preferential pathway of the

  13. 3D Propagation and Geoacoustic Inversion Studies in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    bathymetric features and ocean fronts near the shelf break of the mid-Atlantic Bight, and use of various data for geoacoutic inversion studies . The results ...Island (using a propagation model with a genetic algorithm approach). WORK COMPLETED Numerical analysis of significance of 3D propagation influences ... influences of geoacoustic properties have been completed. RESULTS The numerical analysis showed that the dominant mechanism for 3-D azimuthal

  14. Data assimilation of ocean wind waves using Neural Networks. A case study for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, Kathrin; Staneva, Joanna; Guenther, Heinz

    2015-12-01

    A novel approach of data assimilation based on Neural Networks (NN's) is presented and applied to wave modeling in the German Bight. The method takes advantage from the ability of NN's to emulate models and to invert them. Combining forward and inverse model NN with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm provides boundary values or wind fields in agreement with measured wave integrated parameters. Synthesized HF-radar wave data are used to test the technique for two academic cases.

  15. Tritium in the German Bight 1980 to 1995. Trends of activity and balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, C. [Bundesamt fuer Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Full text: Since 1980 seawater samples have been taken yearly in the German Bight on 9 fixed stations for tritium analysis. The initial mean value of 1.9 Bq/l measured in 1980 changed to a concentration of 1.1 Bq/l in 1992 and is now increasing to 2.8 Bq/l in 1995. The accumulated effect to the German Bight derived from the tritium sources discharging into the adjacent seas is calculated by transfer factors. The calculations take into account the yearly liquid discharges from the nuclear reprocessing plants and power stations into the British and French coastal waters as well as the tritium concentration in the Atlantic and North Sea water, the rain water input and the freshwater tributaries to the southern North Sea. The activity values used are taken both from literature and own measurements. The results show that the nuclear weapons fallout was the predominant source in 1980. Nowadays the nuclear power industry is the main source of tritium concentration in the German Bight. The poster demonstrates the temporal development of the activity concentration measured in relation to the calculated contributions. The geographic locations of the sample stations and the sites of the sources are displayed. Moreover, the individual sources and their tritium discharges (in 1993, as an example) as well as the transfer factors used are listed

  16. Modeling Study of Cross-Shore Exchange Processes in the Southern California Bight Using QuikSCAT Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Liu, W.; Tang, W.

    2002-12-01

    The South California Bight (SCB) forms a complex bathymetric region (islands, shallow banks, basin, and channels) extending from the coast to about 200 km offshore and from Point Conception to the tip of Baja California. Geographically the region is sheltered from the strong upwelling-favorable winds characteristic of the region north of Point Conception. However, recent QuikSCAT winds, for the first time, clearly reveal a persistent cyclonic eddy centered at Catalina Island within the Bight (Liu et al. 2001). Using a costal circulation model, we have investigated the oceanic response to the newly observed sea-surface winds. Two experiments are carried out to explore the individual roles of wind forcing and topography. The first experiment uses the COADS winds to determine the general circulation of the Bight. The second experiment uses the QuikSCAT winds to examine how the space-time variability of atmospheric forcing affects the frontal structure, circulation pattern, and cross-shore exchange of water masses. Comparisons of these two experiments allow us to identify the combined effect of winds and topography on the cross-shore exchange processes between the Bight and its adjacent waters.

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  3. Data collected in the Southern California Bight in order to understand the coastal waters ecological systems, 1977 - 1999 (NODC Accession 0001162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemistry, fish species, atmospheric pollutants, and temperature profile were collected using CTD casts and other collection methods in the Southern California Bight...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  5. Occurrence and distribution of triclosan in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)], E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Floeser, Goetz; Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ruck, Wolfgang [Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The potential of triclosan (TCS) acting as an endocrine disruptor has led to growing concern about the presence of TCS in the environment. In this study, seawater samples were collected from the German Bight during sampling campaigns conducted with the German research ships Gauss and Ludwig Prandtl. TCS was determined both in the dissolved phase and in the suspended particulate matters with concentrations ranging 0.8-6870 pg L{sup -1} and <1-95 pg L{sup -1}, respectively. High concentrations of TCS were present in the estuaries of the Elbe and the Weser, indicating significant input of TCS by the river discharge. The correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) between the dissolved concentration and salinity was 0.79 for the data obtained from the Gauss cruise, showing an obvious declining trend from the coast to the open sea. - Investigation with coastal survey reveals distribution of triclosan in marine waters.

  6. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo Renato [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: dorneles@biof.ufrj.br; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Aguiar dos Santos, Roberta [Centro de Pesquisa e Gestao de Recursos Pesqueiros do Litoral Sudeste e Sul, IBAMA, 88301-700 Itajai, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: gibteuthis@yahoo.com.br; Silva da Costa, Paulo Alberto [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Populacoes Marinhas, UNIRIO, 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pauloascosta@uol.com.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br; Azevedo, Alexandre Freitas [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: azevedo.alex@uol.com.br; Machado Torres, Joao Paulo [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-07-15

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in {mu}g/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 {mu}g/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods.

  7. Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasiliensis spawning in the southeast Brazilian Bight over the period 1976-1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunobu Matsuura

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on sampling over the period 1976-1993 in the southeast Brazilian Bight, the distribution of spawning of the Brazilian sardine (Sardinella brasi/iensis is described in relation to environmental conditions. The area of intense spawning occurs in the southern part of the bight where coastal upwelling was less /Tequent. Spawning intensity showed high interannllal variation and the egg abundance in the survey area ranged /Tom 99 billion eggs in the January 1988 cruise to 4669 billion eggs in the January 1981 cruise. Peak spawning takes place one hour after midnight and eggs hatch . out within 19 hours with a water temperature of 24 °e.Baseado nos dados coletados durante nove cruzeiros oceanográficos realizados na região sudeste, as áreas de desova da sardinha-verdadeira (Sardinella brasiliensis foram apresentadas c discutidas em relação às condições oceanográficas. As áreas de desova intensiva foram localizadas na parte sul da área de investigação, onde a ressurgência costeira foi menos freqüente. A intensidade de desova demonstrou uma variação anual relativamente grande. A produção total de ovos da sardinha- ­verdadeira variou de 99 bilhões de ovos durante o cruzeiro de janeiro de 1988 para 4669 bilhões de ovos em janeiro de 1981. O pico de desova ocorre na camada de mistura de superfície uma hora após a meia noite e os ovos eclodem em 19 horas com a temperatura de água 24 °e.

  8. Consistency and complementarity of different coastal ocean observations: A neural network-based analysis for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, K.; Stanev, E. V.

    2011-05-01

    HF radar measurements in the German Bight and their consistency with other available observations were analyzed. First, an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the radial component of the surface current measured by one radar was performed. Afterwards, Neural Networks (NNs) were trained to now- and forecast the first five EOFs from tide gauge measurements. The inverse problem, i.e., to forecast a sea level from these EOFs was also solved using NNs. For both problems, the influence of wind measurements on the nowcast/forecast accuracy was quantified. The forecast improves if HF radar data are used in combination with wind data. Analysis of the upscaling potential of HF radar measurements demonstrated that information from one radar station in the German Bight is representative of an area larger than the observational domain and could contribute to correcting information from biased observations or numerical models.

  9. The sclerochronology of Donax gouldii and Chione undatella : environmental archives of the past and present Southern California Bight

    OpenAIRE

    Hatch, Marco B.A

    2012-01-01

    High resolution archives of environmental conditions determined from the chemistry and growth increments of bivalves provide a unique opportunity to examine relationships between climate-induced environmental change and biological productivity in the Southern California Bight. However, before bivalves can be used as high resolution biorecorders of environmental change, the record of interest (e.g. [delta]¹⁸O, [delta]¹³C, Sr/Ca, Ba /Ca or growth increments) must first be calibrated to known en...

  10. The Role of Intense Storms on Backbarrier Morphodynamics: Examples From the New York/New Jersey Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scileppi, E.; Donnelly, J. P.; Mahoney, M.

    2004-12-01

    Intense storms can significantly modify coastal landforms. Understanding the influence of these relatively rare, but potentially important, events on the evolution of coastal systems is important if we are to reliably forecast future changes. In the New York/New Jersey Bight the most intense storms are landfalling tropical cyclones that approach the region from the south. Since European settlement, four severe tropical cyclones, occurring in 1693, 1788, 1821, and 1893, have made landfall in the New York/New Jersey Bight. Each of these storms resulted in a rise in water level of over 2.5 meters above mean sea level (MSL) in New York City. Storm surges of this magnitude can overtop and breach barrier beaches creating inlets and depositing overwash deposits across the surface of backbarrier marshes. Severe winter storms, near miss, and minimal hurricanes impacting the region in the 20th century caused water levels to rise approximately 1.5-2 meters above MSL. Events of this magnitude likely caused erosion of the beach face, and limited overtopping and breaching restricted to areas with little or no dune development. Backbarrier sediments can preserve an archive of environmental changes. We collected a series of vibracores from four backbarrier marshes in the New York/New Jersey Bight. High-resolution grain-size and loss-on-ignition analyses were used to characterize the sediments and yield evidence of multiple storm-induced deposits. Heavy metal pollution horizons, pollen stratigraphic data, and C-14 ages were used to provide chronological control. In order to link the dynamics of the barriers with the sedimentary framework of the backbarrier estuary, we used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to map the subsurface character of the barrier sediments. Our results indicate that intense tropical cyclones are very important in shaping the barrier and backbarrier environments in the New York/New Jersey Bight. Backbarrier and barrier sediments reveal records of overwash

  11. Exploring German Bight coastal morphodynamics based on modelled bed shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösters, Frank; Winter, Christian

    2014-02-01

    The prediction of large-scale coastal and estuarine morphodynamics requires a sound understanding of the relevant driving processes and forcing factors. Data- and process-based methods and models suffer from limitations when applied individually to investigate these systems and, therefore, a combined approach is needed. The morphodynamics of coastal environments can be assessed in terms of a mean bed elevation range (BER), which is the difference of the lowest to highest seabed elevation occurring within a defined time interval. In this study of the coastal sector of the German Bight, North Sea, the highly variable distribution of observed BER for the period 1984-2006 is correlated to local bed shear stresses based on hindcast simulations with a well-validated high-resolution (typically 1,000 m in coastal settings) process-based numerical model of the North Sea. A significant correlation of the 95th percentile of bed shear stress and BER was found, explaining between 49 % and 60 % of the observed variance of the BER under realistic forcing conditions. The model then was applied to differentiate the effects of three main hydrodynamic drivers, i.e. tides, wind-induced currents, and waves. Large-scale mapping of these model results quantify previous qualitative suggestions: tides act as main drivers of the East Frisian coast, whereas waves are more relevant for the morphodynamics of the German west coast. Tidal currents are the main driver of the very high morphological activity of the tidal channels of the Ems, Weser and Elbe estuaries, the Jade Bay, and tidal inlets between the islands. This also holds for the backbarrier tidal flats of the North Frisian Wadden Sea. The morphodynamics of the foreshore areas of the barrier island systems are mainly wave-driven; in the deeper areas tides, waves and wind-driven currents have a combined effect. The open tidal flats (outer Ems, Neuwerker Watt, Dithmarschen Bight) are affected by a combination of tides, wind

  12. Development and validation of hydroacoustic monitoring concepts for the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander; Neumann, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reimers, Hans-Christian; Capperucci, Ruggero

    2016-04-01

    The joint research project WIMO (Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht/Scientific Monitoring Concepts for the German Bight, NE North Sea) aims at providing methods for detection and analysis of seabed habitats using modern remote sensing techniques. Our subproject focuses on hydroacoustic techniques in order to gain information about seafloor environments and sediment dynamics. In a timeframe of four years, several key areas in the German Bight were repeatedly observed using different hydroacoustic gear (i. e. sidescan sonars, single/multibeam echo sounders and sub-bottom profilers). In order to ground-truth the acoustic data, hundreds of grab samples and underwater videos were taken. With these techniques it is possible to distinguish between different seafloor habitats, which range from muddy to sandy seafloors (esp. near the barrier islands) to rugged or vegetated/populated reefs around Helgoland. The conducted monitoring program revealed seasonal changes regarding the abundance of the sand mason worm (Lanice conchilega) and the brittle star (Amphiora filiformis) as well as ongoing sedimentary processes driven by tidal currents and wind/storms. It was also possible to determine relationships between sediment characteristics and benthos in some key areas. An essential part of our project included a comparison between the datasets obtained with different hydroacoustic devices, configurations, and evaluation methods in the same study areas. The investigation reveals that there could be distinct differences in interpreting the data and hence in the determination of prevailing seafloor habitats, especially in very heterogeneous areas and at transition zones between the habitats. Therefore, it is recommended to employ more than one hydroacoustic system (preferably a singlebeam device combined with a wide-swath sonar system) synchronously during a survey in order to gain more reliable and detailed information about the seafloor environments. The

  13. Circulation in the Hudson Shelf Valley: MESA Physical Oceanographic Studies in New York Bight, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Dennis A.; Han, Gregory C.; Hansen, Donald V.

    1982-11-01

    Over 900 days of current velocity data were obtained at mainly two locations in the inner and outer Hudson Shelf Valley (HSV). The large cross-axis depth gradients in the HSV, together with the strong winter cyclones and the baroclinic density distribution over the shelf, are primarily responsible for the major circulation features observed in the valley. CSTD data from 12 cruises and meteorological data from JFK International Airport and an environmental buoy were collected concurrently with the current meter data. Although the mean cross-shelf pressure gradient is generally seaward in the Middle Atlantic Bight, it is shoreward in the HSV below the level of the adjacent continental shelf (shelf horizon), thus imposing a bias toward upvalley flow. The average velocity below the surrounding shelf horizon in the HSV is upvalley or shoreward (west-northwestward ≈ 290° T) in the range of 2-5 cm/s. The circulation in the HSV is seasonal and individual events can drastically alter the mean picture. The several day average upvalley flow can sometimes approach 20 cm/s when intense winter cyclones pass over the bight and can sometimes also be directed downvalley depending upon the path of the winter cyclone. A topographically controlled barotropic flow commonly opposes the dominant (southeast-ward) wind direction even near the surface in the winter. In the context of circulation on the open shelf, upvalley (downvalley) flow events generated by winter cyclones are associated with reduced (enhanced) southwestward flow or flow reversals that are northeastward in the lower half of the water column at LTM, a typical mid/shelf site (Mayer et al., 1979). Current meter data suggest that whether or not reversals occur on the open shelf depends upon the interannual variability of the winter wind regime. Upvalley flow events are not confined only to the winter (unstratified) season but are stronger in the winter and can last for several days and longer. During the summer

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns in oxygen and nutrient fluxes in sediment of German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2016-04-01

    The German Bight in the southern North Sea is affected by intensive anthropogenic exploitation. Over a century of intensive use by shipping, fishery, and input by polluted rivers has pushed the coastal ecosystem far from its pristine state. The nutrient load reached a maximum in the early 1990s (Amann et al. 2012), and implementation of environmental protection policies substantially decreased the riverine nutrient load. While the riverine input of pollutants has constantly reduced since then, new forms of sea exploitation emerge. The most noticeable example is the installation of more than 600 wind turbines over the past few years in the German EEZ, and additionally 1,200 are already planned. The impact of these installations on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles is largely unclear. In a series of monitoring cruises we repeatedly sampled the sediment at a set of monitoring stations, which represent all typical habitats of the German Bight. We deployed benthic landers for in-situ chamber incubations and performed ex-situ whole-core incubations to investigate the benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients, and their spatial and temporal variability. Our first results indicate that benthic nutrient recycling is more intense during summer than during winter, which suggests that biological processes contribute substantially to the recycling of nutrients. The fluxes of reactive nitrogen appear lower than observations from 1992 (Lohse et al. 1993), when riverine N loads were at their maximum (Amann et al. 2012). The comparison of our recent measurements with observations from the past decades will enable us to assess the effect of decreasing nutrient discharge into the coastal North Sea. Our results will further set a baseline for elucidating the impact of the massive installation of wind turbines in the near future. This study contributes to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats). References Amann T., A. Weiss, and J. Hartmann (2012): Carbon

  15. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  16. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  17. Food and feeding ecology of purple sandpipers Calidris maritima on rocky intertidal habitats (Helgoland, German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierschke, Volker

    On the island of Helgoland (German Bight) Purple Sandpipers Calidris maritima feed mainly in the intertidal of piers and rocky shores. The main prey species are Littorina saxatilis and Mytilus edulis, complemented by crustaceans, polychaetes, other molluscs and green algae. Beach habitats are used as alternative feeding sites during storms. Feeding sites seem to be selected according to rates of assimilated energy intake. The most profitable habitat (wrack beds on the high-tide line with kelp-fly larvae, 16.8 W) is used after arrival in October but is not available during winter. Because of high intake rates in rocky habitats (13.1 W on piers, 5.5 W on mussel beds), which allow short daily feeding times, and available alternative feeding sites during storms, Purple Sandpipers do not need to carry fat reserves in winter like other waders wintering in central and Western Europe. This, and the ever accessible food supply of epibenthic macrofauna on rocky shores, may enable Purple Sandpipers to winter further north than other wader species.

  18. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Phytoplankton response. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verity, P.G.; Yoder, J.A.

    1992-03-10

    This study addressed shelf-wide processes and nearshore (coastal boundary zone) processes occurring in the southeastern. Coastal boundary zone (CBZ) US continental shelf dynamics involve studies of circulation and of biological and chemical transformations. Continental shelf processes affect the removal of material from the coastal boundary zone into areas where the material no longer interacts with or influences concentrations in the CBZ. The two arbitrarily separate components are, in fact, unified. The CBZ typically extends about 300 km along-shore and about 20 km offshore from its center off Savannah, Georgia, where most runoff occurs. The rates of biological and chemical transformations are controlled by proximity to the bottom and the amounts of fine suspended organic matter originating from rivers and salt marshes. Once material is removed from this zone, either by a long-shelf or cross-shelf advection to regions where the materials are no longer in contact with the bottom, the suite of factors governing the rates of chemical and biological transformations changes. The determination of contrasting rates in these two environments was one of the central focuses of the South Atlantic Bight program.

  19. Toxicity of sediments and interstitial waters form the Southern California Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay, S.; Greenstein, D.; Brown, J.; Jirik, A. [Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of 72 sediment samples collected during the EMAP Southern California Bight Pilot Project (SCBPP) was measured. Sediments from the mainland shelf between Point Conception and the Mexican border were collected from various depths and tested for toxicity using two methods. The toxicity of bulk sediment was measured using a 10-day amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) survival test. Interstitial water was also extracted from the samples and tested for toxicity using a 72-hour sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) embryo development test. Amphipod survival was high (> 80%) at all stations tested, although several sites near large sewage outfalls had statistically significant reductions in survival. No interference related to grain size variation was observed with the amphipod test. Most of the interstitial water samples produced abnormal sea urchin embryo development. Effects were not related to the presumed level of sediment contamination, but rather to ammonia concentration in virtually all cases. The impacts of sample handling procedures and ammonia on sediment toxicity data interpretation will be discussed.

  20. Invertebrate communities associated with hard bottom habitats in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, E. L.; Knott, D. M.; Van Dolah, R. F.; Burrell, V. G.

    1983-08-01

    Epibenthic invertebrates associated with nine hard bottom areas in the South Atlantic Bight between South Carolina and northern Florida were collected with dredge, trawl, suction and grab samplers to evaluate species composition, biomass, abundance, diversity, spatial distributions, and seasonality (winter and summer). Species composition changed noticeably with depth and season. Inner and outer shelf stations were least similar in species composition. Middle shelf areas were transitional and contained taxa characteristic of both inner and outer sites. Bryozoa (88 taxa), Cnidaria (85 taxa), Porifera (67 taxa), Annelida (261 taxa) and Mollusca (203 taxa) represented the richest taxonomic groups of the 1175 taxa collected. Both diversity (1175 total taxa) and biomass (1995 kg total) of invertebrates from hard bottom areas exceeded those reported in the literature for sand bottom communities. Sponges accounted for >60% of the total invertebrate biomass collected by dredge and trawl during both seasons. High diversity values were attributed primarily to habitat complexity and did not exhibit any discernible pattern with depth or latitude.

  1. Analysis of the upscaling problem - A case study for the barotropic dynamics in the North Sea and the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.

    2016-04-01

    The upscaling problem is investigated using the barotropic dynamics of the North Sea and the German Bight as an example. The impact of small scale perturbations of bathymetry, bottom roughness, wind forcing, and boundary forcing is quantified using a two-dimensional linear barotropic model for the entire North Sea with 5 km resolution. The model is solved in the spectral domain for the dominant M2 tide. Comparisons with results from a fully nonlinear 3D circulation model show that the main circulation features are well captured by the spectral model. The impact of different types of perturbations is estimated by inversion of the model using the perturbation covariance matrix as input. Case studies with white noise and fully correlated noise are presented. It is shown that the German Bight area stands out in its sensitivity with respect to small scale uncertainties of bathymetry. Small scale changes of bottom roughness have a particularly strong effect in the English Channel. Small scale wind perturbations have a significant local effect only in very shallow near coastal areas. It is shown that uncorrelated noise introduced along an open boundary around the German Bight only has a very local effect. Perturbations with long correlation length are shown to lead to significant far field effects along the east coast of England. It is demonstrated that this effect is related to the boundary conditions used for the North Sea model. In a next step a German Bight grid with 1 km resolution is nested into the North Sea grid and the spectral model is solved in a two way nested configuration. It is shown that there are some significant local and far field effects caused by the change of resolution in this coastal area. Finally, the potential impact of observations taken in coastal areas is investigated by evaluating the Kalman a posteriori distribution of analysis vectors based on different assumptions about model errors. The area of influence of a single tide gauge is

  2. Analysis of one year of HF radar data acquired in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Stanev, E. V.; Seemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Surface current measurements are taken on a pre-operational basis by three HF radar stations in the German Bight. This area is very shallow and dominated by tides. The HF radar is part of the COSYNA system, which aims at the implementation of an integrated observing system for the North Sea. The radars provide meridional and zonal current components at intervals of 20 minutes in areas where at least two stations overlap and only radial components elswhere. An analysis of the radar observations is performed for a data set of one year. A tidal decompositions is carried out to identify dominating constituents for different areas. Furthermore, the two dimensional surface current dynamics is analysed using tidal ellipses parameters.The generation of overtides in the shallow water areas is demonstrated. Different factors driving this mechanism are discussed. A closer look at the neap/spring tide cycle provides insight into the relative role of bottom friction processes. The relation between the inclination of tidal ellipses and bathymetric features is studied in this context as well. Current, salinity and temperature profile measurements taken at the offshore platform FINO-3 are used in addition to study stratification effects. The impact of the meteo forcing is investigated based on several case studies such as storm events and rapid changes of wind direction. For this purpose residual currents are estimated from the radar data. Finally the divergence of the observed current fields is analysed and the relation to water level dynamics is discussed. The study is meant to support the ongoing work on data assimilation and quality control within COSYNA. The relevance of the presented analysis for this work is explained and illustrated. The work is of value for the optimisation of HF radar system setups in other regions as well.

  3. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérikas Ribeiro, Catherine; Lopes Dos Santos, Adriana; Marie, Dominique; Helena Pellizari, Vivian; Pereira Brandini, Frederico; Vaulot, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Water (CW), which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 10(6) cells mL(-1)) were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)). Synechococcus(up to 81 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)), as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) and 5 × 10(3) cells mL(-1), respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels.

  4. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Gérikas Ribeiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW, the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW and the Coastal Water (CW, which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 106 cells mL−1 were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 103 cells mL−1. Synechococcus(up to 81 × 103 cells mL−1, as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 103 cells mL−1 and 5 × 103 cells mL−1, respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels.

  5. Drifter Observations Of Wave-Current Evolution Through The San Francisco Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearman, D. W.; Herbers, T. H.; Janssen, T. T.; McIntyre, S.; Jessen, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean waves approaching the Golden Gate, the narrow strait connecting the San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean, are affected by refraction over the San Francisco Bar and the strong tidal currents in the area. During ebb tides, when currents through the Golden Gate can exceed 2.5 m/s, the approach to San Francisco Bay is characterized by focusing and steepening of the incident wave field on the opposing current jet. These dynamics are not uncommon in coastal inlets and are known to present hazardous navigation conditions. The strong inhomogeneity and enhanced nonlinearity of the waves can result in deviations from non-Gaussian statistics and changes in the likelihood of extreme waves. However, since observations of wave-current dynamics are so difficult to make with conventional instruments, these dynamics remain still poorly understood. In this work we present the development and testing of a compact, low-cost, Wave-Resolving Drifter (WRD), designed to resolve the wave orbital surface motions and surface drifts in high-energy areas. The WRDs consist of a 30cm buoy equipped with an off-the-shelf GPS receiver and a three-axis accelerometer. The combined GPS-accelerometer package is functionally equivalent to a conventional pitch-roll (or PUV) wave height and direction instrument, but at a fraction of the price. In our presentation we will discuss results from several WRD array deployments in the San Francisco Bight during high-energy conditions with strong ebb currents. The buoys are shown to resolve the surface waves and surface drift with remarkable accuracy and allow the analysis of the evolution of the wave group structure over the opposing current. To obtain statistical results for currents and waves, WRDs were released in clusters (ensemble) from which shoaling effects over the bar and wave-current interaction can be identified.

  6. Isolation of novel pelagic bacteria from the German bight and their seasonal contributions to surface picoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, H; Pernthaler, J; Peplies, J; Glöckner, F O; Gerdts, G; Amann, R

    2001-11-01

    We tested new strategies for the isolation of abundant bacteria from coastal North Sea surface waters, which included reducing by several orders of magnitude the concentrations of inorganic N and P compounds in a synthetic seawater medium. Agar plates were resampled over 37 days, and slowly growing colonies were allowed to develop by repeatedly removing all newly formed colonies. A fivefold increase of colonies was observed on plates with reduced nutrient levels, and the phylogenetic composition of the culture collection changed over time, towards members of the Roseobacter lineage and other alpha-proteobacteria. Novel gamma-proteobacteria from a previously uncultured but cosmopolitan lineage (NOR5) formed colonies only after 12 days of plate incubation. A time series of German Bight surface waters (January to December 1998) was screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with isolate-specific and general probes. During spring and early summer, a prominent fraction of FISH-detectable bacteria (mean, 51%) were affiliated with the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium group (CF) of the Bacteroidetes. One Cytophaga sp. lineage with cultured representatives formed almost 20% of the CF group. Members of the Roseobacter cluster constituted approximately 50% of alpha-proteobacteria, but none of the Roseobacter-related isolates formed populations of >1% in the environment. Thus, the readily culturable members of this clade are probably not representative of Roseobacter species that are common in the water column. In contrast, members of NOR5 were found at high abundances (>10(5) cells ml(-1)) in the summer plankton. Some abundant pelagic bacteria are apparently able to form colonies on solid media, but appropriate isolation techniques for different species need to be developed.

  7. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes dos Santos, Adriana; Marie, Dominique; Helena Pellizari, Vivian; Pereira Brandini, Frederico; Vaulot, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Water (CW), which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 106 cells mL−1) were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 103 cells mL−1). Synechococcus(up to 81 × 103 cells mL−1), as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 103 cells mL−1 and 5 × 103 cells mL−1, respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels. PMID:27867760

  8. Identification of storm surge events over the German Bight from atmospheric reanalysis and climate model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befort, D. J.; Fischer, M.; Leckebusch, G. C.; Ulbrich, U.; Ganske, A.; Rosenhagen, G.; Heinrich, H.

    2015-06-01

    A new procedure for the identification of storm surge situations for the German Bight is developed and applied to reanalysis and global climate model data. This method is based on the empirical approach for estimating storm surge heights using information about wind speed and wind direction. Here, we hypothesize that storm surge events are caused by high wind speeds from north-westerly direction in combination with a large-scale wind storm event affecting the North Sea region. The method is calibrated for ERA-40 data, using the data from the storm surge atlas for Cuxhaven. It is shown that using information of both wind speed and direction as well as large-scale wind storm events improves the identification of storm surge events. To estimate possible future changes of potential storm surge events, we apply the new identification approach to an ensemble of three transient climate change simulations performed with the ECHAM5/MPIOM model under A1B greenhouse gas scenario forcing. We find an increase in the total number of potential storm surge events of about 12 % [(2001-2100)-(1901-2000)], mainly based on changes of moderate events. Yearly numbers of storm surge relevant events show high interannual and decadal variability and only one of three simulations shows a statistical significant increase in the yearly number of potential storm surge events between 1900 and 2100. However, no changes in the maximum intensity and duration of all potential events is determined. Extreme value statistic analysis confirms no frequency change of the most severe events.

  9. Identification of storm surge events over the German Bight from atmospheric reanalysis and climate model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Befort

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the identification of storm surge situations for the German Bight is developed and applied to reanalysis and global climate model data. This method is based on the empirical approach for estimating storm surge heights using information about wind speed and wind direction. Here, we hypothesize that storm surge events are caused by high wind speeds from north-westerly direction in combination with a large-scale wind storm event affecting the North Sea region. The method is calibrated for ERA-40 data, using the data from the storm surge atlas for Cuxhaven. It is shown that using information of both wind speed and direction as well as large-scale wind storm events improves the identification of storm surge events. To estimate possible future changes of potential storm surge events, we apply the new identification approach to an ensemble of three transient climate change simulations performed with the ECHAM5/MPIOM model under A1B greenhouse gas scenario forcing. We find an increase in the total number of potential storm surge events of about 12 % [(2001–2100–(1901–2000], mainly based on changes of moderate events. Yearly numbers of storm surge relevant events show high interannual and decadal variability and only one of three simulations shows a statistical significant increase in the yearly number of potential storm surge events between 1900 and 2100. However, no changes in the maximum intensity and duration of all potential events is determined. Extreme value statistic analysis confirms no frequency change of the most severe events.

  10. Spatially-explicit bioenergetics of Pacific sardine in the Southern California Bight: are mesoscale eddies areas of exceptional prerecruit production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logerwell, Elizabeth A.; Lavaniegos, Bertha; Smith, Paul E.

    Previous research shows that offshore mesoscale eddies in the Southern California Bight region are areas where sardine larval abundance is significantly increased relative to inshore, slope and surrounding offshore waters. In order for mesoscale eddies to be a mechanism linking climate and sardine population variability they must be areas of exceptional prerecruit production. Temperature and prey data from various Southern California Bight (SCB) habitats, including offshore eddies, were applied to a spatially-explicit bioenergetic model which predicts sardine prerecruit growth potential. Growth potential was similar in inshore, slope, and eddy regions (11% and 12% day -1), and was lower in the offshore region, 9% day -1. To estimate production in eddy and non-eddy habitats, growth potential was multiplied by habitat-specific estimates of sardine larval biomass from at-sea surveys. A production index, a measure of potential production resulting from individual growth rate potential and local abundance, was greater in the model cyclonic eddy than in all other regions by more than an order of magnitude. In fact, the production index in the eddy was four times greater than in all other regions combined.

  11. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  12. Current, temperature, backscatter, and other data from bottom instrument packages deployed from the RV Oceanus and other platforms in support of sediment transport observation in the Middle Atlantic Bight from 11 December 1975 to 30 October 1980 (NODC Accession 0066005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A series of studies to assess environmental hazards to petroleum development in the Middle Atlantic Bight. Long-term observations of currents and near-bottom...

  13. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  14. Temperature and other data collected using visual observations and other instruments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and other Seas from GYRE from 01 August 1985 to 26 May 1990 (NODC Accession 9300074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and other data were collected using visual observations, bottle casts, and other instruments from GYRE and other platforms in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and...

  15. HYDROCARBONS - TOTAL RESOLVED, CAS (CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE) PARAMETER CODES and PCB, and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight on 1901-01-01 (NCEI Accession 8600271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This submission contains the master data set assembled in a study called "Contaminant Body Burdens, Variability and Monitoring Implications for the New York Bight"....

  16. Physical, taxonomic code, and other data from current meter and other instruments in New York Bight from DOLPHIN and other platforms; 14 March 1971 to 03 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using current meter and other instruments from DOLPHIN and other platforms in New York Bight. Data were...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2012-10-25 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0145723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider ru23 was deployed prior to the movement of Hurrican Sandy into the Mid-Atlantic Bight and was deployed to sample the sub-surface waters during the...

  18. Characterizing Wave- and Current-Induced Bottom Shear Stress: U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, S.; Butman, B.

    2011-12-01

    The combined action of waves and currents at the seabed creates bottom shear stress, impacting local geology, habitat, and anthropogenic use. In this study, a methodology is developed to characterize the magnitude of benthic disturbance based on spatially and seasonally-resolved statistics (mean, standard deviation, 95th percentile) of wave-current bottom shear stress. The frequency of stress forcing is used to distinguish regions dominated by storms (return interval longer than 33 hours) from those dominated by the tides (periods shorter than 33 hours). In addition, the relative magnitude of the contribution to stress from waves, tides, and storm-driven currents is investigated by comparing wave stress, tidal current stress, and stress from the residual current (currents with tides removed), as well as through cross-correlation of wave and current stress. The methodology is applied to numerical model time-series data for the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) off the U.S. East Coast for April 2010 to April 2011; currents are provided from the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) operational hydrodynamic forecast Experimental System for Predicting Shelf and Slope Optics (ESPreSSO) and waves are provided from a Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) hindcast developed for this project. Spatial resolution of the model is about 5 km and time-series wave and current data are at 1 and 2-hours respectively. Regions of the MAB delineated by stress characteristics include a tidally-dominated shallow region with relative high stress southeast of Massachusetts over Nantucket Shoals; a coastal band extending offshore to about 30 m water depth dominated by waves; a region dominated by waves and wind-driven currents offshore of the Outer Banks of North Carolina; and a low stress region southeast of Long Island, approximately coincident with an area of fine-grained sediments called the "Mud Patch". Comparison of the stress distribution with surface sediment texture data shows that

  19. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Stanev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  20. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Petersen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  1. Population ecology of nitrifying archaea and bacteria in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J Michael; Sachdeva, Rohan; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2010-05-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, and although relatively little is currently known about their biogeochemical roles in marine ecosystems, recognition that Crenarchaeota posses ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and may act as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) offers another means of probing the ecology of these microorganisms. Here we use a time series approach combining quantification of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers with bacterial community fingerprints and biogeochemistry, to explore the population and community ecology of nitrification. At multiple depths (150, 500 and 890 m) in the Southern California Bight sampled monthly from 2003 to 2006, AOA were enumerated via quantitative PCR of archaeal amoA and marine group 1 Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes. Based on amoA genes, AOA were highly variable in time - a consistent feature of marine Crenarchaeota- however, average values were similar at different depths and ranged from 2.20 to 2.76 x 10(4) amoA copies ml(-1). Archaeal amoA genes were correlated with Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes (r(2) = 0.79) and the slope of this relationship was 1.02, demonstrating that the majority of marine group 1 Crenarchaeota present over the dates and depths sampled possessed amoA. Two AOA clades were specifically quantified and compared with betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (beta-AOB) amoA genes at 150 m; these AOA groups were found to strongly co-vary in time (r(2) = 0.70, P < 0.001) whereas AOA : beta-AOB ratios ranged from 13 to 5630. Increases in the AOA : beta-AOB ratio correlated with the accumulation of nitrite (r(2) = 0.87, P < 0.001), and may be indicative of differences in substrate affinities and activities leading to periodic decoupling between ammonia and nitrite oxidation. These data capture a dynamic nitrogen cycle in which multiple microbial groups appear to be active participants.

  2. Atlantic surfclam connectivity within the Middle Atlantic Bight: Mechanisms underlying variation in larval transport and settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Munroe, Daphne; Haidvogel, Dale; Powell, Eric N.

    2016-05-01

    Larval transport and settlement have been shown in various studies to be essential in determining population abundance and connectivity for benthic invertebrates. This transport is influenced by both the physical environment and biological behavior. The Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, is a commercially important benthic invertebrate fishery species along the U.S northeastern coast. In this study, a physical circulation model is coupled to a surfclam larval model to investigate the dynamics of larval transport and settlement within the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf in 2006. The main physical mechanisms causing variability in larval transport and settlement are also examined. Model results show that surfclam larvae released from July to early October experience relatively larger settlement rates, due to higher average temperatures experienced by larvae. Larval along-shore transport exhibits a mean down-coast pattern following the coastal current from the northeast to the southwest, with most high-frequency (period of 2-10 days) variations caused by fluctuations in the along-shore surface wind stress, and with seasonal variations speculated to be driven mainly by changes in the across-shelf density gradient. Larval across-shelf movement is highly correlated with the along-shore surface wind stress mediated by coastal upwelling and downwelling episodes, but the correlation is further dependent on the vertical distribution of the larvae, particularly their position relative to the thermocline. Most surfclam larvae released from the Middle Atlantic shelf stay below the thermocline and experience a net onshore transport during the summer-stratified season when upwelling-favorable wind forcing dominates. A proposed critical value of water temperature at the thermocline successfully regulates the observed patterns of vertical distribution of surfclam larvae and their across-shelf movement off the New Jersey and South Virginia shelves; that is, when the water

  3. Ecological evaluation of proposed reference sites in the New York Bight, Great South Bay, and Ambrose Light, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The current reference site used in evaluations of dredged material proposed for open water disposal in the New York Bight is the Mud Dump Reference Site. The sediment at this reference site is predominantly sand. The US Army Corps of Engineers New York District is considering designation of a new reference site that (1) includes a fine-grained component, believed to be necessary for adequate amphipod survival in laboratory tests, (2) better reflects the physical characteristics of the fine-grained sediment dredged from the New York/New Jersey Harbor and (3) is further removed from the Mud Dump Site than the current Mud Dump Reference Site. The Battelle Marine Science Laboratory was requested to characterize sediment collected from seven candidate reference sites during two study phases. This report presents the results of physical, chemical, and toxicological characterizations of sediment from these sites in comparisons with those of the original Mud Dump Reference Site.

  4. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in situ in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O-2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period...... was followed by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic...... activity in late March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m(-2), reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross...

  5. Coastal flooding: impact of waves on storm surge during extremes - a case study for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Wahle, Kathrin; Koch, Wolfgang; Behrens, Arno; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Stanev, Emil V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the impact of wind, waves, tidal forcing and baroclinicity on the sea level of the German Bight during extreme storm events. The role of wave-induced processes, tides and baroclinicity is quantified, and the results are compared with in situ measurements and satellite data. A coupled high-resolution modelling system is used to simulate wind waves, the water level and the three-dimensional hydrodynamics. The models used are the wave model WAM and the circulation model GETM. The two-way coupling is performed via the OASIS3-MCT coupler. The effects of wind waves on sea level variability are studied, accounting for wave-dependent stress, wave-breaking parameterization and wave-induced effects on vertical mixing. The analyses of the coupled model results reveal a closer match with observations than for the stand-alone circulation model, especially during the extreme storm Xaver in December 2013. The predicted surge of the coupled model is significantly enhanced during extreme storm events when considering wave-current interaction processes. This wave-dependent approach yields a contribution of more than 30 % in some coastal areas during extreme storm events. The contribution of a fully three-dimensional model compared with a two-dimensional barotropic model showed up to 20 % differences in the water level of the coastal areas of the German Bight during Xaver. The improved skill resulting from the new developments justifies further use of the coupled-wave and three-dimensional circulation models in coastal flooding predictions.

  6. Transfer factors of contamination between the German Bight and its tributary waters derived from measured tritium and Cs-137 activity concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, C.; Fraemcke, G.

    1992-04-13

    Evaluation of the results of radioactivity monitoring in the southern North Sea between 1977 and 1987 has shown that in the water of the German Bight three areas stand out due to their different ratios between salinity and concentration of dissolved Cs-137 and tritium. While salinity steadily increases with greater distance from the coast, the Cs-137 concentration above 34 PSU (Practical Salinity Unit) increases sharply and shows how far water from the western and central North Sea, contaminated by nuclear reprocessing in Sellafield (Irish Sea), reaches into the German Bight. In the 34 to 32.5 PSU range, the influence can be seen of water contaminated by tritium originating in the rivers Rhein, Maas and Schelde, precipitation and the nuclear reprocessing plant at La Hague (Channel). Below 32.5 PSU, the influence of the influx from the rivers Elbe, Weser and Ems becomes apparent. These rivers are less contaminated with tritium. (orig.)

  7. Long-term impact of bottom trawling on pelagic-benthic coupling in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine; Janssen, Felix; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Holtappels, Moritz; Schueckel, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    The southern North Sea, and the German Bight, has been systematically bottom-trawled at least since the late 19th century (Christiansen, 2009; Reiss et al., 2009; Kröncke 2011; Emeis et al., 2015, Neumann et al., 2016). As a result, benthic habitats and benthic biogenic structures created by bivalves, polychaetes and hydroids where destroyed or reduced. The parallel removal of hard substrate (gravel and boulders) avoids the resettlement of hard-substrate depended species. For example, the Oyster ground, a huge oyster bank a hundred years ago (Olsen, 1883), turned into a muddy depression today. In addition, shallow depth of max 40 m, strong tidal currents and frequent storms result in a high-energy environment with low sedimentation rates and recurrent sediment resuspension. The decrease in benthic filtering capacity by disturbance in epifauna and bottom roughness (Callaway et al., 2007) apparently influence pelagic-benthic coupling of biogeochemical fluxes. Heip et al. (1995) indicate that benthic respiration at depths prevailing in the German Bight accounts for 10-40% of total respiration, whereas pelagic respiration accounts for 60-90%. Previous estimates are in the middle of this range (Heip et al., 1995). To test these hypotheses and to assess the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes, and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization, we measured pelagic production and respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic fluxes using chamber landers, we did ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores and analysed still images from a towed benthic video sled. In addition, O2 fluxes in permeable sediments were estimated by integrating the volumetric rate measurements of the upper sediment layer over in-situ microsensor-measured O2 penetration depth. Our current results show significant seasonality in benthic respiration, with highest rates in summer and lowest rates in winter. No significant differences in total benthic respiration rates

  8. Impact of Lanice conchilega on seafloor microtopography off the island of Sylt (German Bight, SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönke, M.; Feldens, P.; Wilken, D.; Papenmeier, S.; Heinrich, C.; von Deimling, J. Schneider; Held, P.; Krastel, S.

    2016-12-01

    This study presents a new in situ method to explore the impact of macrofauna on seafloor microtopography and corresponding microroughness based on underwater laser line scanning. The local microtopography was determined with mm-level accuracy at three stations colonised by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega offshore of the island of Sylt in the German Bight (south-eastern North Sea), covering approximately 0.5 m2 each. Ground truthing was done using underwater video data. Two stations were populated by tubeworm colonies of different population densities, and one station had a hydrodynamically rippled seafloor. Tubeworms caused an increased skewness of the microtopography height distribution and an increased root mean square roughness at short spatial wavelengths compared with hydrodynamic bedforms. Spectral analysis of the 2D Fourier transformed microtopography showed that the roughness magnitude increased at spatial wavelengths between 0.020 and 0.003 m independently of the tubeworm density. This effect was not detected by commonly used 1D roughness profiles but required consideration of the complete spectrum. Overall, the results reveal that new indicator variables for benthic organisms may be developed based on microtopographic data. An example demonstrates the use of local slope and skewness to detect tubeworms in the measured digital elevation model.

  9. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  10. Seasonal and spatial patterns of Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Julie W.; Kumar, Ajoy; Moisan, Tiffany A.; Aulenbach, Donielle L.; Day, Melissa C.; Dix, Stephanie A.; Winsor, Michele A.

    2013-10-01

    The cladoceran Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species, Oikopleura dioica, Dolioletta gegenbauri and Thalia democratica, form a mesozooplankton group which ingests a wide range of particles from pico- to micro- plankton, grows rapidly due to asexual reproduction, and thus can have major impacts on phytoplankton populations. These four zooplankton species were the most abundant tunicate and cladoceran species in a study where zooplankton were sampled biweekly at five stations across the inner continental shelf in the Mid-Atlantic Bight in 2005, 2006 and 2007. Vertical tows were taken at shallow stations and depth stratified vertical tows at stations >10 m. P. avirostris and O. dioica had highly predictable seasonal cycles with peak abundances in July and August. D. gegenbauri also was present during this time period if upwelling favorable winds were present, which implies cross shelf transport from source populations in slope waters and the Gulf Stream. T. democratica only appeared in pulses when southerly winds were increasing in strength. The co-occurrence P. avirostris and the tunicate species with abundant Synechococcus and heterotrophic nanoflagellates during highly stratified summer conditions provide potential connections to microbial food webs as well as grazing opportunities on event scale blooms of dinoflagellate and diatoms species present in the area.

  11. Influence of El Niño Wind Stress Anomalies on South Brazil Bight Ocean Volume Transports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Paulo de Freitas Assad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of wind stress variability could represent an important contribution to understand the variability over upper layer ocean volume transports. The South Brazilian Bight (SBB circulation had been studied by numerous researchers who predominantly attempted to estimate its meridional volume transport. The main objective and contribution of this study is to identify and quantify possible interannual variability in the ocean volume transport in the SBB induced by the sea surface wind stress field. A low resolution ocean global circulation model was implemented to investigate the volume transport variability. The results obtained indicate the occurrence of interannual variability in meridional ocean volume transports along three different zonal sections. These results also indicate the influence of a wind driven large-scale atmospheric process that alters locally the SBB and near-offshore region wind stress field and consequently causes interannual variability in the upper layer ocean volume transports. A strengthening of the southward flow in 25°S and 30°S was observed. The deep layer ocean volume transport in the three monitored sections indicates a potential dominance of other remote ocean processes. A small time lag between the integrated meridional volume transports changes in each monitored zonal section was observed.

  12. Simulation analysis of moored fluorometer time series from the Mid-Atlantic Bight during 1987--1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the previous research during 1987-1990 within the DOE (Department of Energy) Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program in the Mid-Atlantic Bight was to understand the physical and biogeochemical processes effecting the diffusive exchange of the proxies of energy-related, by-products associated with particulate matter between estuarine, shelf, and slope waters on this continental margin. As originally envisioned in the SEEP program plan, SEEP-III would take place at Cape Hatteras to study the advective exchange of materials by a major boundary current. One problem of continuing interest is the determination of the local assimilative capacity of slope waters and sediments off the eastern seaboard of the US to lengthen the pathway between potentially harmful energy by-products and man. At basin scales, realistic specification of the lateral transport by western boundary currents of particulate matter is a necessary input to global models of carbon/nitrogen cycling. Finally, at these global scales, the generic role of continental margins in cycling greenhouse gases, e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O, is now of equal interest. This continuing research of model construction and evaluation within the SEEP program focuses on all three questions at local, regional, and basin scales. Results from SEEP-I and II are discussed as well as plans for SEEP-III. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Seafloor monitoring west of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea) using the acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Fiorentino, Dario; Papenmeier, Svenja; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Marine habitats of shelf seas are in constant dynamic change and therefore need regular assessment particularly in areas of special interest. In this study, the single-beam acoustic ground discrimination system RoxAnn served to assess seafloor hardness and roughness, and combine these parameters into one variable expressed as RGB (red green blue) color code followed by k-means fuzzy cluster analysis (FCA). The data were collected at a monitoring site west of the island of Helgoland (German Bight, SE North Sea) in the course of four surveys between September 2011 and November 2014. The study area has complex characteristics varying from outcropping bedrock to sandy and muddy sectors with mostly gradual transitions. RoxAnn data enabled to discriminate all seafloor types that were suggested by ground-truth information (seafloor samples, video). The area appears to be quite stable overall; sediment import (including fluid mud) was detected only from the NW. Although hard substrates (boulders, bedrock) are clearly identified, the signal can be modified by inclination and biocover. Manually, six RoxAnn zones were identified; for the FCA, only three classes are suggested. The latter classification based on `hard' boundaries would suffice for stakeholder issues, but the former classification based on `soft' boundaries is preferred to meet state-of-the-art scientific objectives.

  14. A study of sediment motions and bottom layer dynamics over the Middle Atlantic Bight shelf and upper slope. Final technical report, 1 June 1992--31 May 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    A study of sediment dynamics over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) in the vicinity of the Cape Hatteras Confluence (CHC), including the mouths of estuaries, the shelf and the slope, was carried out by investigators at North Carolina State University as part of the Department of Energy Ocean Margins Program. Studied were processes effecting sediment motion. In particular, the processes which determine rates of vertical transport of dissolved carbon dioxide and organic matter and particulates to and from the bottom by turbulent mixing resuspension and particulate sinking and vertical motions induced by BBL convergences; especially during periods of storm activity when both surface waves and currents are maxima.

  15. Strongly-sheared wind-forced currents in the nearshore regions of the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt; Robertson, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to many previous reports, winds do drive currents along the shelf in the central portion of the Southern California Bight (SCB). Winds off Huntington Beach CA are the dominant forcing for currents over the nearshore region of the shelf (water depths less than 20 m). Winds control about 50–70% of the energy in nearshore alongshelf surface currents. The wind-driven current amplitudes are also anomalously high. For a relatively weak 1 dyne/cm2 wind stress, the alongshelf surface current amplitudes in this region can reach 80 cm/s or more. Mid-depth current amplitudes for the same wind stress are around 30–40 cm/s. These wind-driven surface current amplitudes are much larger than previously measured over other nearshore shelf regions, perhaps because this program is one of the few that measured currents within a meter of the surface. The near-bed cross-shelf currents over the nearshore region of the Huntington Beach shelf have an Ekman response to winds in that they upwell (downwell) for down (up) coast winds. This response disappears further offshore. Hence, there is upwelling in the SCB, but it does not occur across the entire shelf. Subthermocline water in the nearshore region that may contain nutrients and plankton move onshore when winds are southeastward, but subthermocline water over the shelf break is not transported to the beach. The currents over the outer shelf are not predominately controlled by winds, consistent with previous reports. Instead, they are mainly driven by cross-shelf pressure gradients that are independent of local wind stress.

  16. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea) in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Codina, Juan Carlos Ugaz

    2015-01-01

    The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore) in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45’S; 47°33’W) and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) in the lower layer (>70 m); warm (>20°C) Tropical Water in the upper 40 m; and an intermediate thermocline with a deep chlorophyll-a maximum layer (0.3–0.6 mg m-3). Two distinct general patterns were observed, emphasizing the role of (i) physical and (ii) biological processes: (i) a strong influence of the vertical stratification, with most zooplankton absent or little abundant in the lower layer. The influence of the cold SACW on the bottom layer apparently restricted the vertical occupation of most species, which typically inhabit epipelagic warm waters. Even among migratory species, only a few (Aglaura hemistoma, Abylopsis tetragona eudoxids, Beroe sp., Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis) crossed the thermocline and reached the bottom layer. (ii) A general tendency of partial migrations, with variable intensity depending on the different species and developmental stages; populations tended to be more widely distributed through the water column during daylight, and to become more aggregated in the upper layer during the night, which can be explained based on the idea of the “hunger-satiation hypothesis”, maximizing feeding and minimizing the chances of being predated. PMID:26637179

  17. Coastal processes and hazards in the southern california bight: the use and requirements of multiple satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, B.; Digiacomo, P.; Washburn, L.; Jones, B. H.; Bosc, E.

    As part of an ongoing interdisciplinary study, we seek to provide a better understanding of the complex physical, ecological and biogeochemical processes in the coastal waters off southern California. At local and event-scales, this coastal area is characterized by phenomena such as eddies, internal waves and dust storms. At basin and climate scales, this region is impacted by the California Current (the eastern boundary current of the North Pacific) and remote forcing associated with ENSO events that strongly alter wind, current, water mass, and precipitation patterns. Furthermore, the Southern California Bight is adjacent to one of the largest industrialized urban populations in the world, which results in significant anthropogenic inputs to the coastal marine ecosystem, including such pollution hazard concerns as storm/waste-water runoff and oil spills. To address these diverse issues, we utilize a variety of satellite data including high-resolution ocean color observations (e.g., SeaWiFS, MODIS, and MERIS), sea surface temperature measurements (e.g., AVHRR, MODIS, and AATSR), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of surface features and derived wind fields (e.g., RADARSAT, ERS, and ASAR) that are complemented and validated by coincident field data (from moorings, drifters, ships, and shore-based HF radar). These synergistic data sets enable the detection, quantification and understanding of under-sampled and poorly described coastal ocean processes and pollution hazards of the type described above and an assessment of their ecological (e.g., harmful algal blooms), biogeochemical (carbon cycling), and human (pathogens) impact. We will present representative case studies on the observation of these processes and hazards that demonstrate the utility of multiple sensors, as well as assessments of where continuity in multi-sensor observations is required and identification of existing or foreseen observation gaps with recommendations on how these should be

  18. Response of the Bight of Benin (Gulf of Guinea, West Africa) coastline to anthropogenic and natural forcing, Part1: Wave climate variability and impacts on the longshore sediment transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almar, R.; Kestenare, E.; Reyns, J.; Jouanno, J; Anthony, E.; Laibi, R.; Hemer, M.; Du Penhoat, Y.; Ranasinghe, R.W.M.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    The short, medium and long-term evolution of the sandy coastline of the Bight of Benin in the Gulf of Guinea, West Africa, has become a major regional focal point due to the rapid socio-economic development that is occurring in the region, including rapid urbanization and a sharp increase in harbor-

  19. 228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra and 223Ra in potential sources and sinks of land-derived material in the German Bight of the North Sea: implications for the use of radium as a tracer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, C.; Hanfland, C.; Regnier, P.; Van Cappellen, P.; Schlüter, M.; Knauthe, U.; Stimac, I.; Geibert, W.

    2011-01-01

    Activities of the naturally occurring radium nuclides 228Ra, 226Ra, 224Ra and 223Ra were determined in waters of the open German Bight and adjacent nearshore areas in the North Sea, in order to explore the potential use of radium isotopes as natural tracers of land–ocean interaction in an environmen

  20. The barred grunt Conodon nobilis (Perciformes: Haemulidae) in shallow areas of a tropical bight: spatial and temporal distribution, body growth and diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Maíra; Denadai, Márcia Regina; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flávia Borges; de Faria, Vanessa Hermann; Turra, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the population biology of Conodon nobilis (Perciformes, Haemulidae) in Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. Monthly trawls were performed from October 2003 through October 2004 in two areas of the bight that are similar to but distant from each other, South and North. For all specimens, the size was measured and the sex and reproductive stage identified. Abundance and size were compared over areas and months. Body growth parameters were parameterized according to the Von Bertalanffy growth function. The stomach contents were identified and quantified. C. nobilis occurred mainly in the North area and showed an erratic pattern of abundance over time. Several cohorts entered in different periods, but very few large and mature individuals were observed. The results indicate a preference for shallow, ocean-influenced habitats and some degree of segregation between young and older individuals. The species showed a distribution consistent with an r-strategist species, with high abundance and a high growth constant ( K = 0.68 year-1 and L max = 34.2 cm). Both the relative length of the digestive tube and the prey items indicated a carnivorous feeding habit; mysids were the main item of the diet throughout the study period, indicating that this grunt is a specialist feeder. Other frequently observed items were amphipods and fish fragments. Ingestion of scales is possibly intentional.

  1. The winter distribution of nutrients in the Southern Bight of the North Sea (1961-1978) and in the estuaries of the scheldt and the rhine/meuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bennekom, A. J.; Wetsteijn, F. J.

    In many years the winter distribution of nutrients in the eastern part of the Southern Bight is influenced by phytoplankton growth, always in February, sometimes in January but not in January 1961 and 1978, months with a relatively low insolation and high wind strength. The Scheldt river has higher nutrient concentrations than the rivers Rhine and Seine. The waters of the Scheldt river plume are distinguished from those of the Seine and the Rhine/Meuse with dissolved silica as a tracer. The extension of the Scheldt river plume is related to wind direction. The increase of inorganic nutrients from January 1961 to January 1978 in the northern part of the Southern Bight is related to the increase in the river Rhine. The increase in the Strait of Dover is related to discharges from the river Seine and the English coast. Only data outside the Scheldt river plume were selected for the comparison. An increase of nutrient concentrations is measurable over the entire salinity range and is largest for phosphate (up to 3 times at low salinities), less for nitrate (about 1.5 times for all salinities) and hardly noticeable for silicic acid. Nitrate extrapolation to low salinity agrees with upstream river values, but phosphate extrapolation gives higher concentrations, probably due to discharges of phosphogypsum in estuaries.

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from 1998-02-28 to 1998-04-01 (NODC Accession 0115154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115154 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean and others from 1992-10-19 to 2001-12-12 (NODC Accession 0115153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115153 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Great Australian Bight, Indian...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the FRANKLIN in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from 1994-11-12 to 1994-12-05 (NODC Accession 0116716)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116716 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from FRANKLIN in the Great Australian Bight and Indian Ocean from...

  5. Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks and barrier island response to disturbance: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolner, Catherine W. V.; Moore, Laura J.; Young, Donald R.; Brantley, Steven T.; Bissett, Spencer N.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2013-10-01

    Ecomorphodynamic feedbacks play an important role in the susceptibility and response of barrier islands to disturbance by overwash. Dune-building grasses, like Ammophila breviligulata, can help to restore areas of high relief after overwash events (i.e., resist disturbance). If overwash recurs before dunes have reestablished, however, overwash-adapted "maintainer" species, like Spartina patens (upright variety), may preferentially survive. Maintainer species help to preserve low, flat topography, thereby increasing the likelihood of future overwash (i.e., reinforcing disturbance). Under frequent disturbance conditions, this positive feedback may lead to overwash persistence. We explore the potential influence of the maintainer feedback on two morphologically distinct barrier islands in the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR), located in the Mid-Atlantic Bight of the U.S. East Coast. Combined topographic and vegetation surveys show that on Hog Island (high-relief, rotating), where dunes dominated by A. breviligulata are ubiquitous, overwash zones are currently limited in extent and related to beach width rather than dominance by S. patens. Historical aerial photos and stratigraphic evidence (ground-penetrating radar, cores) indicate that gradual recovery has taken place following overwash events on Hog Island, except where the beach is narrow and eroding. Conversely, on Metompkin Island (low-relief, transgressing), overwash is widespread and dominated by S. patens, particularly along the rapidly migrating northern half of the island, where shell armoring is also common. Overwash has generally been more prevalent and persistent here than on Hog Island. We present a new conceptual model of the response of barrier islands to disturbance incorporating ecological and physical processes. Our findings suggest that in barrier systems where both dune-building grasses and overwash-adapted maintainer species are common (like the VCR), the maintainer feedback is likely to be a more

  6. Temporal and spatial patterns in wind stress and wind stress curl over the central Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Rosenfeld, Leslie K.; Robertson, George L.

    2012-01-01

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, together with several other federal and municipal agencies, began a series of field programs to determine along and cross-shelf transport patterns over the continental shelves in the central Southern California Bight. As a part of these programs, moorings that monitor winds were deployed off the Palos Verdes peninsula and within San Pedro Bay for six 3–4 month summer and winter periods between 2001 and 2008. In addition, nearly continuous records of winds for this 7-year period were obtained from a terrestrial site at the coast and from a basin site offshore of the long-term coastal site. The mean annual winds are downcoast at all sites. The alongshelf components of wind stress, which are the largest part of the low-frequency wind stress fields, are well correlated between basin, shelf and coastal sites. On average, the amplitude of alongshelf fluctuations in wind stress are 3–4 times larger over the offshore basin, compared to the coastal site, irrespective of whether the fluctuations represent the total, or just the correlated portion of the wind stress field. The curl in the large-scale wind stress tends to be positive, especially in the winter season when the mean wind stress is downcoast and larger at the offshore basin site than at the beach. However, since the fluctuation in wind stress amplitudes are usually larger than the mean, periods of weak negative curl do occur, especially in the summer season when the largest normalized differences in the amplitude of wind stress fluctuations are found in the nearshore region of the coastal ocean. Even though the low-frequency wind stress field is well-correlated over the continental shelf and offshore basins, out to distances of 35 km or more from the coast, winds even 10 km inshore of the beach do not represent the coastal wind field, at least in the summer months. The seasonal changes in the spatial structures in wind stress amplitudes suggest that an assessment of the

  7. Variabilidad mensual de la velocidad de surgencia y clorofila a en la región del Panama Bight (Monthly rate variation upwelling and chlorophyll a in the region of Panama Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Villegas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Las zonas de surgencia y la presencia de clorofila a en la región del Panamá Bight (golfo de Panamá fueron comparadas en una escala mensual. Las variables utilizadas fueron la velocidad vertical de surgencia estimada mediante el software EVA. V.2.0 y la concentración de clorofila a obtenida de imágenes satelitales SeaWifs. El estudio fue realizado para el área costera entre 6° 30’ y 2° N y en los tres principales focos de ascenso de agua, el primero ubicado entre 83-84° W y 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, el segundo entre 81-82° W y 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, y el tercero entre 82-83° W y 2° 30’-3° 30’ N. Los resultados muestran la asociación directa entre la concentración de clorofila a y la surgencia durante todo el año. El estudio también resalta que el desplazamiento de la zona de convergencia intertropical ZCIT determina la variabilidad estacional del proceso de ascenso, atenuándolo cuando pasa sobre el área de estudio y reforzándolo mientras se aleja. El análisis de correlación entre las variables bajo estudio dio como resultado coeficientes estadísticamente significativos entre 0.5 y 0.9 en los tres focos principales y valores no significativos en la zona costera. (Abstract. The influence of the migration of the ITCZ on the climatic variability of the upwelling vertical velocity (Vz and the spatial-temporal behavior of upwelling spots over the CPO was determined. This influence was corroborated by the presence of chlorophyll a in the upwelling zones. Vz values were calculated with EVA . V.2.0 software. The chlorophyll a content was extracted from satellite images for 1997-2000. A comparison between the upwelling zones distribution, the migration of ITCZ and chlorophyll a was made. This comparison was based on the correlation between variables of three upwelling focuses and a coastal upwelling. The first focus was located between 83-84° W and 1° 30’-2° 30’ N, the second one between 81-82° W and 1° 30’- 2° 30

  8. Priceless prices and marine food webs: Long-term patterns of change and fishing impacts in the South Brazil Bight as reflected by the seafood market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincinato, R. B. M.; Gasalla, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    The lack of market variables in fishery systems (i.e., prices and quantities) has often been cited as one reason for the particular difficulty of understanding whole marine ecosystem change and its management under a broader ecosystem perspective. This paper shows the results of efforts to tackle this problem in the South Brazil Bight by compiling and analyzing in-depth an unprecedented 40-year database from the region’s largest wholesale seafood market, based in the megacity of São Paulo. Fishery landings and market values for the period 1968-2007 were analyzed primarily by updated trophic level classes and multispecies indicators including the (1) marine trophic index (MTI), (2) weighted price, and (3) log relative price index (LRPI) which relates prices and trophic levels. Moreover, an inferential analysis of major seafood category statistical trends in market prices and quantities and their positive and negative correlations was undertaken. In general, these market trends contributed substantially to identifying and clarifying the changes that occurred. Considerations of the behavior of demand, supply and markets are included. In particular, while the MTI did not support a “fishing down the marine food web” hypothesis, other indicators did show the continued scarcity of major high trophic level categories and fisheries target species. Overall, the results indicate that the analysis of fishery landings, or of certain other indicators alone, can mask real changes. Rather, a joint ecological-econometric analysis provides better evidence of the direction of ecosystem pressures and stock health. This method for detecting market changes across the food web may be particularly helpful for systems considered data-poor but where fish market data have been archived. This study further elucidates historical changes and fishing impacts in the South Brazil Bight ecosystem.

  9. Response patterns of phytoplankton growth to variations in resuspension in the German Bight revealed by daily MERIS data in 2003 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (chl a concentration in coastal seas exhibits variability on various spatial and temporal scales. Resuspension of particulate matter can somewhat limit algal growth, but can also enhance productivity because of the intrusion of nutrient-rich pore water from sediments or bottom water layers into the whole water column. This study investigates whether characteristic changes in net phytoplankton growth can be directly linked to resuspension events within the German Bight. Satellite-derived chl a were used to derive spatial patterns of net rates of chl a increase/decrease (NR in 2003 and 2004. Spatial correlations between NR and mean water column irradiance were analysed. High correlations in space and time were found in most areas of the German Bight (R2 > 0.4, suggesting a tight coupling between light availability and algal growth during spring. These correlations were reduced within a distinct zone in the transition between shallow coastal areas and deeper offshore waters. In summer and autumn, a mismatch was found between phytoplankton blooms (chl a > 6 mg m−3 and spring-tidal induced resuspension events as indicated by bottom velocity, suggesting that there is no phytoplankton resuspension during spring tides. It is instead proposed here that frequent and recurrent spring-tidal resuspension events enhance algal growth by supplying remineralized nutrients. This hypothesis is corroborated by a lag correlation analysis between resuspension events and in-situ measured nutrient concentrations. This study outlines seasonally different patterns in phytoplankton productivity in response to variations in resuspension, which can serve as a reference for modelling coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  10. Mobile demersal megafauna at common offshore wind turbine foundations in the German Bight (North Sea) two years after deployment - increased production rate of Cancer pagurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, R; Dederer, G; Kanstinger, P; Krämer, P; Schneider, C; Schmalenbach, I

    2017-02-01

    Within the next decades the construction of thousands of different types of large wind turbine foundations in the North Sea will substantially increase the amount of habitat available to reef fauna. To gain first insights which effect these substantial changes in habitat structure and diversity might have on faunal stocks settling on hard substrata, we compared the mobile demersal megafauna associated with the common types of wind turbine foundations ('jacket', 'tripod' and 'monopile with scour protections of natural rock') in the southern German Bight, North Sea. Monopiles with scour protection were mostly colonized by typical reef fauna. They were inhabited by an average of about 5000 edible crabs Cancer pagurus (per foundation), which is more than twice as much as found at the foundation types without scour protection. Strong evidence was found that all three foundation types not only function as aggregation sites, but also as nursery grounds for C. pagurus. Assuming equal shares of the three foundation types in future wind farms, we project that about 27% of the local stock of C. pagurus might be produced on site. When, for example, comparing the existing fauna at 1000 ship wrecks and on the autochthonous soft substrate with those which probably will establish at the foundations of 5000 hypothetically realized wind turbines, it becomes clear that the German Bight in the future will provide new artificial reef habitats for another 320% crabs (C. pagurus) and 50% wrasse (Ctenolabrus rupestris) representing substrata-limited mobile demersal hard bottom species. Further research is urgently required in order to evaluate this overspill as it would be an important ecological effect of the recent offshore wind power development.

  11. Seismo-acoustic imaging of marine hard substrate habitats: a case study from the German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenmeier, Svenja; Hass, H. Christian

    2016-04-01

    comparably small foot print which results in high spatial resolution (decimeter in the xyz directions) and hence allows a more precise demarcation of hard substrate areas. Data for this study were recorded in the "Sylt Outer Reef" (German Bight, North Sea) in May 2013 and March 2015. The investigated area is characterized by heterogeneously distributed moraine deposits and rippled coarse sediments partly draped with Holocene fine sands. The relict sediments and the rippled coarse sediments indicate both high backscatter intensities but can be distinguished by means of the hyperbola locations. The northeast of the study area is dominated by rippled coarse sediments (without hyperbolas) and the southwestern part by relict sediments with a high amount of stones represented by hyperbolas which is also proven by extensive ground-truthing (grab sampling and high quality underwater videos). An automated procedure to identify and export the hyperbola positions makes the demarcation of hard substrate grounds (here: relict sediments) reproducible, faster and less complex in comparison to the visual-manual identification on the basis of sidescan sonar data.

  12. Biological interactions and their role in community structure in the rocky intertidal of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Klaus

    1990-06-01

    Over 3 successive seasonal cycles (April 1986 to October 1988), field experiments were established within 3 intertidal levels in the sheltered rocky intertidal of Helgoland (North Sea, German Bight). Competitors for space ( Mytilus edulis, macroalgae), herbivores ( Littorina spp.) and predators ( Carcinus maenas) were either excluded from areas (0.25 m2) covered by undisturbed communities or enclosed at natural densities on areas that were cleared before of animals and plants. All the experimental fields (each 0.25 m2) were covered by cages with 4 mm gauze at the sides and a plexiglas top. The results of the experiments in the upper intertidal (occupied by Littorina spp. and Enteromorpha) showed that a natural density of herbivores could not prevent algal settlement and had only little influence on algal growth. Instead abiotic factors (storms, algae washed ashore) decreased the stock of the green algae. Experiments in the mid intertidal, dominated by Mytilus (50% cover), Fucus spp. (20%) and grazing L. littorea (100 ind. m-2) showed that community structure was directly changed both by grazing periwinkles and by competition for space between mussels and macroalgae. Whenever Littorina was excluded, the canopy of Fucus spp. increased continuously and reached total cover within two years. In addition to the increase of Fucus spp., the rock surface and the mussel shells were overgrown by Ulva pseudocurvata, which covered the experimental fields during parts of the summer in the absence of herbivores. As soon as perennial species (fucoids) covered most of the experimental areas, the seasonal growth of Ulva decreased drastically. Presence and growth of macroalgae were also controlled by serious competition for space with mussels. Established Mytilus prevented the growth of all perennial and ephemeral algae on the rocks. However, the shells of the mussels provided free space for a new settlement of Fucus and Ulva. In the lower intertidal (dominated by total algal cover

  13. Numerical simulations for the area of the German Bight in spring 1995; Numerische Simulationsrechnungen fuer das Gebiet der Deutschen Bucht am Beispiel des Fruehjahrs 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, C.J. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    1998-01-01

    The paper reports results of the mesoscale transport, chemism and flow model METRAS for the period from 22 April to 11 May 1995. During this period, a measurement campaign was carried out in the area of the German Bight under the ``KUSTOS`` springtime scheme (``Coastal mass and energy transport processes - The transition from land to sea in the south-eastern North Sea``). In order to take instationary and inhomogeneous weather situations into account, the modellings used data provided by the German weather service, which form part of its Germany model (DM), both to initialize and drive the METRAS data. The modelling results of METRAS are compared with routine readings taken by the German weather service in some selected measuring sites. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] In diesem Beitrag werden Ergebnisse des mesoskaligen Transport-, Chemie- und Stroemungsmodells METRAS fuer den Zeitraum vom 22. April bis zum 11. Mai 1995 vorgestellt, in dem die Messkampagne des KUSTOS-Fruehjahrsexperimentes (Kuestennahe Stoff- und Energietransporte - der Uebergang Land - Meer in der suedoestlichen Nordsee) im Bereich der Deutschen Bucht stattfand. Zur Beruecksichtigung instationaerer und inhomogener Wetterlagen bei den Modellrechnungen wurden sowohl zur Initialisierung als auch zum Antrieb von METRAS Daten des Deutschland-Modells (DM) des Deutschen Wetterdienstes verwendet. Die Modellergebnisse von METRAS werden mit Routinemessungen des Deutschen Wetterdienstes an einigen ausgewaehlten Messstationen verglichen. (orig./KW)

  14. Observations of Gulf Stream-induced and wind-driven upwelling in the Georgia Bight using ocean color and infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Pietrafesa, L. J.; Yoder, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Ocean color and infrared imagery from U2 aircraft and satellite sensors are used to study upwelling interaction between Gulf Stream and continental shelf waters in the Georgia Bight. The photographic data are combined with in situ measurements of currents, chlorophyll, temperature, salinity, coastal winds, and sea-level in observations of five different upwelling events including a near-short wind-driven upwelling caused by topographic effects, three filament-induced upwellings in the Gulf Stream, and a possible meander-induced upwelling event in the Gulf Stream. Chlorophyll distributions are used to trace the circulation and propagation of filaments along the advective routes by which the water moves offshore. Photographic and mooring array measurements of temperature time series are found to provide nearly identical results for the phase speeds of each event. Field measurements of surface pigments, and Nimbus/7 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates are found to agree well over the range of concentrations 0.1 to 0.7 mg/m to the third. Examples of U2/Ocean Color Scanner and Nimbus 7 CZCS photographs are provided.

  15. Seasonal and interannual variability of physical and biological dynamics at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight: nutrient supply mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. He

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution, 3-dimensional coupled biophysical model is used to simulate ocean circulation and ecosystem variations at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB. Favorable comparisons between satellite observations and model hindcast solutions from January 2004 to November 2007 indicate the model has intrinsic skills in resolving fundamental physical and biological dynamics at the MAB shelfbreak. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean physical and biological states and their driving mechanisms are further analyzed. The domain-wide upper water column nutrient content is found to peak in late winter-early spring. Phytoplankton spring bloom starts 1–2 months later, followed by zooplankton bloom in early summer. Our analysis shows the variability of shelfbreak nutrient supply is controlled by local mixing that deepens the mixed layer and injects deep ocean nutrients into the upper water column and alongshore nutrient transport by the shelfbreak jet and associated currents. Nutrient vertical advection associated with the shelfbreak bottom boundary layer convergence is another significant contributor. Spring mean nutrient budget diagnostics along the Nantucket transect are compared between nutrient rich 2004 and nutrient poor 2007. Physical advection and diffusion play the major role in determining strong interannual variations in shelfbreak nutrient content. The biological (source minus sink term is very similar between these two years.

  16. Heavy metals in four fish species from the French coast of the Eastern English Channel and Southern Bight of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F; Amara, R; Courcot, L; Lacouture, D; Bertho, M-L

    2004-07-01

    Shallow coastal waters act as nurseries for various fish species and have been recognized as essential fish habitat. We studied heavy metal concentrations in four fish species (plaice, dab, flounder and cod) as an indicator of large-scale habitat quality. The study took place along the French coasts between the Eastern English Channel and the Southern Bight of the North Sea. All species show different concentrations of measured metals (e.g., Cd, Cu, Mn and Pb) in liver but not in muscle. The highest concentrations are found for the flounder and the lowest for cod which is consistent with their habitat and diet. Although our results do not highlight levels of appreciable pollution within the study area, inter-site differences are mainly observed in the muscle tissues and are generally in agreement with the known environmental data (e.g., anthropogenic pressure). However, in the Bay of Seine, one of the most contaminated estuaries in Europe, metal concentrations are in the same range or even lower than those found in fish collected from areas distant from any anthropogenic pressures. At one site, the comparisons of the Cd, Cu and Pb concentrations between healthy and diseased dabs have been carried out on the muscle and liver tissues. The results of this preliminary study show a relationship between metal concentrations and the pathological status of the fish. The use of fish health as indicator of habitat quality is discussed.

  17. Population dynamics and diet of the madamango Sea catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 (Siluriformes: Ariidae in a tropical bight in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Denadai

    Full Text Available The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae, is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16 corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z was 1.01 yr(-1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

  18. A numerical investigation of the interannual-to-interpentadal variability of the along-shelf transport in the Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Luo, Yiyong; Rothstein, Lewis M.; Gao, Kun

    2016-07-01

    A numerical simulation using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) indicates that there was significant interannual-to-interpentadal variability of along-shelf transport and water properties over the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) from 2004 to 2013. To examine the relative contribution from local atmospheric forcing versus remote oceanic open boundary forcing to such low-frequency variability, we implement a suite of process oriented numerical experiments. Results show that the interannual variability is dominated by remote forcing from the open boundaries of the region rather than by local atmospheric forcing. The penetration of the Labrador Current into the region contributes to a significant increase of along-shelf transport in the winters of 2009 and 2010. By contrast, the anti-cyclonic mesoscale eddies associated with the Gulf Stream decrease the background along-shelf jet and, in certain cases, even reverse the along-shelf transport. In addition, the along-shelf transport appears to possess an interpentadal variation, i.e., weaker during 2004-2008 but stronger during 2009-2013, which is found caused by the migration of the Gulf Stream.

  19. Population Dynamics and Diet of the Madamango Sea Catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a Tropical Bight in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Márcia; Pombo, Maíra; Santos, Flávia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr−1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet. PMID:24282575

  20. Applying the basin model: Assessing habitat suitability of young-of-the-year demersal fishes on the New York Bight continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Mark C.; Cowen, Robert K.; Able, Kenneth W.; Fahay, Michael P.

    2006-09-01

    The extent to which young-of-the-year (YOY) fish habitats become saturated with new recruits has remained relatively unevaluated for temperate, demersal, continental shelf fishes. MacCall's [1990. Dynamic Geography of Marine Fish Populations. Washington Sea Grant Program, University of Washington Press, Seattle, Washington] basin model was used as a framework for examining the dynamics of an assemblage of recently settled fishes in relation to available microhabitat on the New York Bight continental shelf (USA). For four abundant species (three flatfish, one merlucciid hake), density-specific patterns of microhabitat selection, spatial dispersion and overall cross-shelf habitat use were investigated using a research submersible over three cross-shelf transects during the late summer settlement season. Typically, recruits that saturated YOY habitats (>1 ind/m 2) were randomly distributed within underwater transects and formed weak associations with specific microhabitats. At lower densities (ecologically important substrates (i.e. Limanda ferruginea, sand wave crests/low shell hash). For Citharichthys arctifrons, clumping appeared to increase with complexity of the habitat. Several less-abundant species (i.e. Urophycis chuss, Tautogolabrus adspersus) formed tight associations with rare habitat features and may consequently encounter the greatest bottleneck for space during the benthic/pelagic transition. Although restricted by the scale of observation, these results begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which habitat quality and quantity moderate recruitment on the continental shelf.

  1. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, Christian; Becker, Marius; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-05-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world's coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal channels in these inlets are characterized by high flow velocities and, accordingly, the channel beds are typically sandy and covered with bedforms. The bedform fields in nature are often complex systems with larger primary-bedforms superimposed by smaller secondary-bedforms (cf. Bartholdy et al., 2002). There is a considerable amount of detailed field investigations on the dynamics of primary-bedforms at various temporal scales, ranging from short- to long-term tide-related cycles to flood hydrographs to seasonality. However, Julien et al. (2002) stated that a composite analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms is recommended for future studies on resistance to flow. Such knowledge on the behaviour of compound bedforms is still deficient. In this study, we combine the findings on the dynamics of primary- and secondary-bedform height from detailed field investigations carried out in two high-energy tidal channels during 2007 and 2008: the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea and the Innenjade tidal channel in the Jade Bay, German Bight (both survey areas being ebb-dominated). We provide process-based explanations of the bedform behaviour and present a conceptual model of compound bedform dynamics. The conducted field investigations comprised repetitive, simultaneous measurements of high-resolution swath bathymetry (using a multibeam echosounder system) and flow velocity (using an acoustic Doppler current profiler) in combination with detailed spatial mapping of bed material characteristics (from grab sampling of bed material). For an objective and discrete analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms a modified version of the bedform tracking tool

  2. Remote Sensing of the Absorption Coefficients and Chlorophyll a Concentration in the U.S. Southern Middle Atlantic Bight from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoju; Mannino, Antonio; Russ, Mary E.; Hooker, Stanford B.

    2008-01-01

    At present, satellite remote sensing of coastal water quality and constituent concentration is subject to large errors as compared to the capability of satellite sensors in oceanic waters. In this study, field measurements collected on a series of cruises within U.S. southern Middle Atlantic Bight (SMAB) were applied to improve retrievals of satellite ocean color products in order to examine the factors that regulate the bio-optical properties within the continental shelf waters of the SMAB. The first objective was to develop improvements in satellite retrievals of absorption coefficients of phytoplankton (a(sub ph)), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (a(sub g)), non-pigmented particles (a(sub d)), and non-pigmented particles plus CDOM (a(sub dg)), and chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl_a]). Several algorithms were compared to derive constituent absorption coefficients from remote sensing reflectance (R(sub rs)) ratios. The validation match-ups showed that the mean absolute percent differences (MAPD) were typically less than 35%, although higher errors were found for a(sub d) retrievals. Seasonal and spatial variability of satellite-derived absorption coefficients and [Chl_a] was apparent and consistent with field data. CDOM is a major contributor to the bio-optical properties of the SMAB, accounting for 35-70% of total light absorption by particles plus CDOM at 443 nm, as compared to 30-45% for phytoplankton and 0-20% for non-pigmented particles. The overestimation of [Chl_a] from the operational satellite algorithms may be attributed to the strong CDOM absorption in this region. River discharge is important in controlling the bio-optical environment, but cannot explain all of the regional and seasonal variability of biogeochemical constituents in the SMAB.

  3. A numerical analysis of shipboard and coastal zone color scanner time series of new production within Gulf Stream cyclonic eddies in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribble, J. Raymond; Walsh, John J.; Dieterle, Dwight A.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Eddy-induced upwelling occurs along the western edge of the Gulf Stream between Cape Canaveral, Florida, and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). Coastal zone color scanner images of 1-km resolution spanning the period April 13-21, 1979, were processed to examine these eddy features in relation to concurrent shipboard and current/temperature measurements at moored arrays. A quasi-one-dimensional (z), time dependent biological model, using only nitrate as a nutrient source, has been combined with a three-dimensional physical model in an attempt to replicate the observed phytoplankton field at the northward edge of an eddy. The model is applicable only to the SAB south of the Charleston Bump, at approximately 31.5 deg N, since no feature analogous to the bump exists in the model bathymetry. The modeled chlorophyll, nitrate, and primary production fields of the euphotic zone are very similar to those obtained from the satellite and shipboard data at the leading edges of the observed eddies south of the Charleston Bump. The horizontal and vertical simulated fluxes of nitrate and chlorophyll show that only approximately 10% of the upwelled nitrate is utilized by the phytoplankton of the modeled grid box on the northern edge of the cyclone, while approximately 75% is lost horizontally, with the remainder still in the euphotic zone after the 10-day period of the model. Loss of chlorophyll due to sinking is very small in this strong upwelling region of the cyclone. The model is relatively insensitive to variations in the sinking parameterization and the external nitrate and chlorophyll fields but is very sensitive to a reduction of the maximum potential growth rate to half that measured. Given the success of this model in simulating the new production of the selcted upwelling region, other upwelling regions for which measurements or successful models of physical and biological quantities and rates exist could be modeled similarly.

  4. Tools to evaluate seafloor integrity: comparison of multi-device acoustic seafloor classifications for benthic macrofauna-driven patterns in the German Bight, southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Peter; Markert, Edith; Bartholomä, Alexander; Capperucci, Ruggero; Hass, H. Christian; Kröncke, Ingrid; Mielck, Finn; Reimers, H. Christian

    2016-12-01

    To determine the spatial resolution of sediment properties and benthic macrofauna communities in acoustic backscatter, the suitability of four acoustic seafloor classification devices (single-beam echosounder with RoxAnn and QTC 5.5 seafloor classification system, sidescan sonar with QTC Swathview seafloor classification, and multi-beam echosounder with QTC Swathview seafloor classification) was compared in a study area of approx. 6 km2 northwest of the island of Helgoland in the German Bight, southern North Sea. This was based on a simple similarity index between simultaneous sidescan sonar, single-beam echosounder and multi-beam echosounder profiling spanning the period 2011-2014. The results show a high similarity between seafloor classifications based on sidescan sonar and RoxAnn single-beam systems, in turn associated with a lower similarity for the multi-beam echosounder system. Analyses of surface sediment samples at 39 locations along four transects (0.1 m2 Van Veen grab) revealed the presence of sandy mud (southern and western parts), coarse sand, gravel and cobbles. Rock outcrops were identified in the north-eastern and eastern parts. A typical Nucula nitidosa-Abra alba community was found in sandy muds to muddy sands in the northern part, whereas the southern part is characterised by widespread occurrence of the ophiuroid brittle star Amphiura filiformis. A transitional N. nitidosa-A. filiformis community was detected in the central part. Moreover, the southern part is characterised by a high abundance of A. filiformis and its commensal bivalve Kurtiella bidentata. The high number of A. filiformis feeding arms (up to ca. 6,800 per m2) can largely explain the gentle change of backscatter intensity along the tracks, because sediment composition and/or seafloor structures showed no significant variability.

  5. Body growth and reproduction of individuals of the sciaenid fish Stellifer rastrifer in a shallow tropical bight: A cautionary tale for assumptions regarding population parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Maíra; Denadai, Márcia Regina; Turra, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge of population parameters and the ability to predict their responses to environmental changes are useful tools to aid in the appropriate management and conservation of natural resources. Samples of the sciaenid fish Stellifer rastrifer were taken from August 2003 through October 2004 in shallow areas of Caraguatatuba Bight, southeastern Brazil. The results showed a consistent presence of length-frequency classes throughout the year and low values of the gonadosomatic index of this species, indicating that the area is not used for spawning or residence of adults, but rather shelters individuals in late stages of development. The results may serve as a caveat for assessments of transitional areas such as the present one, the nursery function of which is neglected compared to estuaries and mangroves. The danger of mismanaging these areas by not considering their peculiarities is emphasized by using these data as a study case for the development of some broadly used population-parameter analyses. The individuals' body growth parameters from the von Bertalanffy model were estimated based on the most common approaches, and the best values obtained from traditional quantification methods of selection were very prone to bias. The low gonadosomatic index (GSI) estimated during the period was an important factor in stimulating us to select more reliable parameters of body growth (L∞ = 20.9, K = 0.37 and Z = 2.81), which were estimated based on assuming the existence of spatial segregation by size. The data obtained suggest that the estimated mortality rate included a high rate of migration of older individuals to deeper areas, where we assume that they completed their development.

  6. Highly dynamic biological seabed alterations revealed by side scan sonar tracking of Lanice conchilega beds offshore the island of Sylt (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, C.; Feldens, P.; Schwarzer, K.

    2016-10-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys are common tools for habitat investigation and monitoring that aid in the realisation of the aims of the EU Marine Directives. However, the creation of habitat maps is difficult, especially when benthic organisms densely populate the seafloor. This study assesses the sensitivity of entropy and homogeneity image texture parameters derived from backscatter strength data to benthic habitats dominated by the tubeworm Lanice conchilega. Side scan sonar backscatter surveys were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in the German Bight (southern North Sea) at two sites approx. 20 km offshore of the island of Sylt. Abiotic and biotic seabed facies, such as sorted bedforms, areas of fine to medium sand and L. conchilega beds with different tube densities, were identified and characterised based on manual expert analysis and image texture analysis. Ground truthing was performed by grab sampling and underwater video observations. Compared to the manual expert analysis, the k-means classification of image textures proves to be a semi-automated method to investigate small-scale differences in a biologically altered seabed from backscatter data. The texture parameters entropy and homogeneity appear linearly interrelated with tube density, the former positively and the latter negatively. Reinvestigation of one site after 1 year showed an extensive change in the distribution of the L. conchilega-altered seabed. Such marked annual fluctuations in L. conchilega tube cover demonstrate the need for dense time series and high spatial coverage to meaningfully monitor ecological patterns on the seafloor with acoustic backscatter methods in the study region and similar settings worldwide, particularly because the sand mason plays a pivotal role in promoting biodiversity. In this context, image texture analysis provides a cost-effective and reproducible method to track biologically altered seabeds from side scan sonar backscatter signatures.

  7. Sources, fate, and pathways of Leeuwin Current water in the Indian Ocean and Great Australian Bight: A Lagrangian study in an eddy-resolving ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yit Sen Bull, Christopher; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The Leeuwin Current is the dominant circulation feature in the eastern Indian Ocean, transporting tropical and subtropical water southward. While it is known that the Leeuwin Current draws its water from a multitude of sources, existing Indian Ocean circulation schematics have never quantified the fluxes of tropical and subtropical source water flowing into the Leeuwin Current. This paper uses virtual Lagrangian particles to quantify the transport of these sources along the Leeuwin Current's mean pathway. Here the pathways and exchange of Leeuwin Current source waters across six coastally bound sectors on the south-west Australian coast are analyzed. This constitutes the first quantitative assessment of Leeuwin Current pathways within an offline, 50 year integration time, eddy-resolving global ocean model simulation. Along the Leeuwin Current's pathway, we find a mean poleward transport of 3.7 Sv in which the tropical sources account for 60-78% of the transport. While the net transport is small, we see large transports flowing in and out of all the offshore boundaries of the Leeuwin Current sectors. Along the Leeuwin Current's pathway, we find that water from the Indonesian Throughflow contributes 50-66% of the seasonal signal. By applying conditions on the routes particles take entering the Leeuwin Current, we find particles are more likely to travel offshore north of 30°S, while south of 30°S, particles are more likely to continue downstream. We find a 0.2 Sv pathway of water from the Leeuwin Current's source regions, flowing through the entire Leeuwin Current pathway into the Great Australian Bight.

  8. In Situ Measurements of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Coastal Waters of the Southern California Bight with a Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME)-Based Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, E. Y.; Tsukada, D.; Diehl, D.; Noblet, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Global distribution and fate of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have become an increasingly significant topic in environmental research, as POPs are potential agents of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity to both humans and non-human species. One of the important transport mechanisms for POPs is advection and dispersion from point sources via oceanic currents. Therefore, measurements of POPs in open coastal waters can provide key information about the global geochemical cycling of POPs. However, because concentrations of POPs in ocean waters are typically in sub-ppt (ng/L) levels or lower, accurate measurement of ambient concentrations is challenging. To obtain sufficient mass that can be detected by current analytical instrumentation, extremely large water volumes (e.g., thousands of liters) have to be processed. Such large sample volumes represent a practical impediment for regional-scale sampling efforts. In an attempt to improve our ability to study the fate of POPs in oceanic environments, we have developed an in-situ sampling approach based on the technique of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and tested it at several coastal locations within the Southern California Bight. A custom-made SPME sampler consists of a polydimethylsioxane-coated (100-μm thickness) fiber supported on a stainless steel needle and a copper cage shielding the SPME assembly (to slow bacterial growth). We were able to deploy a large number of the samplers simultaneously at different locations and water depths known to contain varying concentrations of DDTs. The SPME samplers were retrieved after about 15 to 30 days of deployment, and the organics partitioned on the SPME fibers were analyzed with GC/MS under optimized chromatographic conditions suitable for SPME analysis. The concentrations of p,p'-DDE (the most dominant component of all DDTs) measured by the in situ SPME approach were very similar as a function of water depth and spatial location as concentrations previously measured

  9. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  10. The complex influences of back-barrier deposition, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in barrier island response to sea-level rise: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Owen T.; Moore, Laura J.; Murray, A. Brad

    2015-10-01

    To understand the relative importance of back barrier environment, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in determining barrier island response to RSLR (relative sea-level rise), we use a morphological-behavior model (GEOMBEST) to conduct a series of sensitivity experiments, based on late-Holocene hindcast simulations of an island in the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (Metompkin Island, VA) having both salt marsh and lagoonal back-barrier environments, and we draw comparisons between these results and future simulations (2000-2100 AD) of island response to RSLR. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, as a whole, the island is highly sensitive to factors that reduce overall sand availability (i.e., high sand-loss rates and substrates containing little sand). Results also indicate that for all predicted future RSLR scenarios tested, islands having high substrate sand proportions (if allowed to migrate freely) will likely remain subaerial for centuries because of sufficient substrate sand supply and elevation to assist in keeping islands above sea level. Simulation results also lead to basic insights regarding the interactions among substrate slope, back-barrier deposition and island migration rates. In contrast to previous studies, which suggest that changes in substrate slope directly affect the island migration trajectory, we find that-in the presence of back-barrier deposition-the connection between substrate slope and island behavior is modulated (i.e., variability in migration rates is dampened) by changes in back-barrier width. These interactions-which tend to produce changes in shoreface sand content-lead to a negative feedback when the back-barrier deposit contains less sand than the underlying layer, resulting in a stable back-barrier width. Alternatively, a positive feedback arises when the back-barrier deposit contains more sand than the underlying layer, resulting in either back-barrier disappearance or perpetual widening.

  11. A new 0.9 Ma oxygen isotope stratigraphy for a shallow-water sedimentary transect across three IODP 317 sites in the Canterbury Bight of southwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuan; Wu, YingYing

    2016-04-01

    Sedimentary records in shallow-water environment provide unique opportunity to further our understanding on the regional relative sea level changes in relation to global climate change. Here we present a new 0.9 Ma oxygen isotope stratigraphy for a shallow-water sedimentary transect across three IODP 317 sites in the Canterbury Bight of southwest Pacific Ocean. The three sites are located on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand, including a continental slope site, IODP317-U1352 and two continental shelf sites, IODP317-U1354 and IODP317-U1351. We first generated high resolution benthic foraminifers (Nonionella flemingi) δ18O records for the three sites and a planktonic (Globigerina bulloides) record for the U1352B. An initial chronological framework for the benthic δ18O record of the U1352B was constructed using 8 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dates and 4 biostratigraphic events. Then a refined age model was established by correlating the U1352B benthic δ18O record with the EDC δD record on the AICC2012 time-scale, and the LR04 benthic δ18O stack. Although the U1354B and U1351B have lower sedimentation rates, their benthic δ18O records correlate well with that of U1352B. In order to ensure the accuracy of the chronostratigraphic framework established, we also analyzed the characteristics of sedimentary grain size and the planktonic and benthic δ18O values. In accord with the adjacent sites, the results show that the melt of Southern Alps glaciers due to the warming climate during MIS 11 and 5.5 led to the increased fresh water delivery, with massive terrigenous deposit; and the warm SST during the MIS7 is related with the STF migration, which led to strong current activity, with coarser grain size. Meanwhile, records of benthic δ18O, sedimentation rate and content of >63μm coarse fraction of site U1352 all indicate the MIS 20 was indeed a colder interval compared to subsequent glacial times.

  12. Isotopic evidence for dead fish maintenance of Florida red tides, with implications for coastal fisheries over both source regions of the West Florida shelf and within downstream waters of the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. J.; Weisberg, R. H.; Lenes, J. M.; Chen, F. R.; Dieterle, D. A.; Zheng, L.; Carder, K. L.; Vargo, G. A.; Havens, J. A.; Peebles, E.; Hollander, D. J.; He, R.; Heil, C. A.; Mahmoudi, B.; Landsberg, J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Toxic Florida red tides of the dinoflagellate Kareniabrevis have downstream consequences of 500-1000 km spatial extent. Fish stocks, shellfish beds, and harmful algal blooms of similar species occupy the same continental shelf waters of the southeastern United States, amounting to economic losses of more than 25 million dollars in some years. Under the aegis of the Center for Prediction of Red tides, we are now developing coupled biophysical models of the conditions that lead to red tides and impacted coastal fisheries, from the Florida Panhandle to Cape Hatteras. Here, a nitrogen isotope budget of the coastal food web of the West Florida shelf (WFS) and the downstream South Atlantic Bight (SAB) reaffirms that diazotrophs are the initial nutrient source for onset of red tides and now identifies clupeid fish as the major recycled nutrient source for their maintenance. The recent isotope budget of WFS and SAB coastal waters during 1998-2001 indicates that since prehistoric times of Timacua Indian settlements along the Georgia coast during 1075, ∼50% of the nutrients required for large red tides of >1 μg chl l -1 of K.brevis have been derived from nitrogen-fixers, with the other half from decomposing dead sardines and herrings. During 2001, >90% of the harvest of WFS clupeids was by large ichthyotoxic red tides of >10 μg chl l -1 of K.brevis, rather than by fishermen. After onset of the usual red tides in summer of 2006 and 2007, the simulated subsequent fall exports of Florida red tides in September 2007 to North Carolina shelf waters replicate observations of just ∼1 μg chl l -1 on the WFS that year. In contrast, the earlier red tides of >10 μg chl l -1 left behind off West Florida during 2006, with less physical export, are instead 10-fold larger than those of 2007. Earlier, 55 fish kills were associated with these coastal red tides during September 2006, between Tampa and Naples. Yet, only six fish kills were reported there in September 2007. With little

  13. New York Bight Study: Report 5, NY Bight Biological Review Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Chapter 3 Step 2: Examining Potential Impacts with Existing Databases and Models 65 material in the Gulf of Mexico . Using trawl and hydroacoustic surveys...48.7 11.3 Pogonophora 2.9 4.7 2.1 Sipunculda 0.6 2.5 1.9 1.9 0.8 Echiura 1.3 0.4 0.3 Mollusca -Gastropoda 0.4 8.3 25.7 39.2 13.4 2.4 Mollusca -Bivalvia...types of information should be integrated into management deci- sions. Over 80 sample stations were located in offshore waters between the Gulf of

  14. New York Bight sub-estuaries Study following Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs,...

  15. "Work Hard, Fly Bight"——Today's Continental Airlines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ On June16, 2006, Continental Airlines celebrated the first anniversary of its daily nonstop flight from Beifing to New York. China's Foreign Trade exclusively interviewed Kwok Hing-Cheong, Chief Representative & Country Director-Continental Airlines, China. He talked about the developments, challenges and benefits of Continental Airlines in China.

  16. A high resolution water level forecast for the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal regions worldwide are potentially endangered by storm surges which can cause disastrous damages and loss of life. Due to climate change induced sea level rise, an accumulation of such events is expected by the end of the 21th century. Therefore, advanced storm surge warnings are needed to be prepared when another storm surge hits the coast. In the shallow southeastern North Sea these storm surge warnings are nowadays routinely provided for selected tide gauge locations along a coastline through state-of-the-art forecast systems, which are based on a coupled system of empirical tidal predictions and numerical storm surge forecasts. Along the German North Sea coastline, the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency in cooperation with the German Weather Service is responsible for the storm surge warnings. They provide accurate, high frequency and real-time water level forecasts for up to six days ahead at selected tide gauge sites via internet, telephone and broadcast. Since water levels along the German North Sea coastline are dominated by shallow water effects and a very complex bathymetric structure of the seabed, the pointwise forecast is not necessarily transferable to un-gauged areas between the tide gauges. Here we aim to close this existing gap and develop water level forecasts with a high spatial (continuously with a resolution of at least 1 kilometer) as well as a high temporal (at least 15-minute values) resolution along the entire German North Sea coastline. We introduce a new methodology for water level forecasts which combines empirical or statistical and numerical models. While the tidal forecast is performed by non-parametric interpolation techniques between un-gauged and gauged sites, storm surges are estimated on the basis of statistical/empirical storm surge formulas taken from a numerical model hindcast. The procedure will be implemented in the operational mode forced with numerical weather forecasts.

  17. Canyon and channel networks of Peru-Chile fore arc at Arica Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulbourn, W.T. (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Canyons and channels of the Peru-Chile fore arc between 17{degree}30'S to 19{degree}30'S form a complex, integrated network revealed in SeaMARC II side-scan mosaics. The largest canyon, incised 200-600 m, is bordered by a series of sidewall slumps, producing a sinuosity that mimics subaerial meanders. The canyon courses across the Arequipa fore-arc basin floor, across a structural high and onto the middle trench slope to about 4,000 m where it disappears into a background of complex small-scale structures, From 500-2,500 m depth the canyon strikes north-south oblique to the regional slope. At 2,500 m, it abruptly turns to the southwest toward the trench axis. At this elbow, a second canyon heads on the midslope and also trends north-south until 3,500 m, where it too abruptly changes to a southwest course. A history of stream piracy analogous to subaerial systems is implied in this geometry. Tributaries join this main canyon from the landward side, forming a dendritic pattern. These channels have levees which are linked by submarine crevasse splays to sediment waves on the Arequipa basin floor. The orientation of the waves is reminiscent of bow waves from a passing ship, oblique to channel and pointing downslope, and may provide an indication of the vertical extent of passing turbidity currents. Sediments are dominantly olive gray, hemipelagic silts with sands present only immediately adjacent to the canyons. Boulders of mudstone line portions of the canyon floor. Sands are absent from the lowermost slope and trench axis, as are any indications of submarine fans. Sands may be rare in this system, with those that are present kneaded into the active margin system along the lower trench slope.

  18. Enigmatic sediment ridges in the German Bight - glacial vs post-glacial morphologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Vikram; Pio Rossi, Angelo; Praeg, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The German Wadden Sea extends over 1000 km from the Dutch coast to that of Sweden and consists of a long chain of barrier islands and ephemeral sand banks punctuated by estuaries and rivers. The sedimentary environment is currently shaped and characterised by storm surges, high tidal and wave energy levels. However, this part of the North Sea has been repeatedly covered by continental ice sheets, and it remains unclear how glacial to interglacial sedimentary processes may have influenced seabed morphology in the region. The study area is situated approximately 70 km north of Cuxhaven, and 5 km due east of the islands of Helgoland and Dune. It covers an approximate area of 5 km square with water depths ranging from 50 m in the south to about 20 m in the north. High resolution multibeam (Simrad EM710) and parametric echosounder (Innomar SES2000) data were acquired during graduate and undergraduate teaching excursions on the RV Heincke in Spring 2010 (HE-324) and 2011 (HE-349). The seabed swath bathymetric data reveal distinctive linear seabed ridges. The ridges trend NNW-SSE, are 1-5 m in height, have wavelengths on the order of 100 m and crest lengths ranging from 100-2500 m. The ridge crests are broadly anastomosing. They bifurcate towards the north to form more subdued structures, while they converge and disappear to the south. Profiles across the ridges show an asymmetric structure, with steeper slopes trending west in the western part of the study area but trending east in the eastern part. These enigmatic sedimentary structures have not been previously mapped in the Wadden Sea, and their origin remains uncertain. Possible interpretations to be tested include sub-crop structural control on seabed morphology, relict glacial or glaciofluvial landforms and post-glacial marine bedforms linked to processes of sediment redistribution.

  19. NY_GOME_CONTOURS: New York Bight and Gulf of Maine bathymetric contours

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This bathymetric shapefile contains 10 m contours for the continental shelf and 100 m beyond the 200 m shelf edge. The contours have been derived from the National...

  20. Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Delagoa Bight Mozambique: Application of remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kyewalyanga, M.S.; Naik, R.; Hegde, S.; Raman, M.; Barlow, R.; Roberts, M.

    @rediffmail.com (R. Naik), hegdesahana@rediffmail. com (S. Hegde), mraman@sac.isro.gov.in (M. Raman), rgbarlow@deat.gov. za (R. Barlow), squid@metroweb.co.za (M. Roberts). 0272-7714/$ - see front matter C211 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j...

  1. The exceptional influence of storm ‘Xaver’ on design water levels in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Ludwig, Patrick; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Design water levels for coastal structures are usually estimated based on extreme value statistics. Since their robustness depends heavily on the sample size of observations, regular statistical updates are needed, especially after extreme events. Here, we demonstrate the exceptional influence of such an event based on storm ‘Xaver’, which caused record breaking water levels for large parts of the southwestern German North Sea coastline on 6 December 2013. We show that the water level estimates for a 1 in 200 years event increased by up to 40 cm due to the update after ‘Xaver’, a value twice as large as the estimated regional sea level rise for the entire 20th century. However, a thorough analysis of different independent meteorological (winds and pressure) and oceanographic components (tides, surges, mean sea level (MSL) anomalies) driving the event reveals that their observed combination does not yet represent the physically possible worst case scenario. Neither tides, nor surges nor MSL anomalies were at their observational maximum, suggesting that there is a realistic risk of a storm like ‘Xaver’ to cause even higher extreme water levels by a few decimetres under current climate conditions. Our results question purely statistical design approaches of coastal structures, which neglect the physical boundary conditions of individual extreme events.

  2. The exceptional influence of storm Xaver on design water levels in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangendorf, S.

    2015-12-01

    Design water levels for coastal structures are usually estimated on the basis of extreme value statistics. Since their robustness heavily depends on the sample size of heuristic observations there is an urgent need of regular statistical updates especially after the occurrence of record high extreme events. Here we demonstrate the exceptional influence of such an event based on storm Xaver which brought record high extremes for large parts of the southwestern German North Sea coastline on December 6th 2013. We show that the estimates of an event occurring once in 200 years increased by roughly 30 cm due to the update after Xaver, a value 1.5 times larger than the entire 20th century sea level rise in the region. However, a thorough analysis of different independent meteorological (winds and pressure) and oceanographic components (tides, surges, mean sea level anomalies) driving the event also indicates that their observed combination still does not represent the physically possible worst case scenario. Neither tides nor surges and mean sea level anomalies were at their observational maximum, suggesting that there is a realistic risk of storms bringing even up to a few decimeter higher extremes just under present day conditions without any influence of future global warming. The results question purely statistical design approaches neglecting the physical boundary conditions of individual extreme events.

  3. EPXMA survey of shelf sediments (Southern Bight, North Sea): A glance beyond the XRD-invisible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Maeyer-Worobiec, A.; Dekov, V.M.; Laane, R.W.P.M.; van Grieken, R.

    2009-01-01

    Shelf sediments of the southern North Sea, were studied with a microanalytical [electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPXMA)] and two bulk [X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF)] techniques. The investigation proved that the promptness of the microanalytical method is combined with a re

  4. Seasonal cycling of phosphorus in the southern bight of the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chou

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the seasonal cycle of nutrients and the phosphorus speciation, i.e. dissolved inorganic and organic phosphorus (DIP and DOP and particulate inorganic and organic phosphorus (PIP and POP, for 10 stations in the Belgian coastal zone. The Belgian part of the southern North Sea is strongly influenced by the river plumes of the Rhine, Meuse and Scheldt. In winter, high nutrient concentrations are observed, whereas in April-May these have all been consumed during the spring bloom and silica or phosphorus limitation develops. The phosphate concentrations increase rapidly again in summer-fall, whereas nitrate and silicate return to their winter values much later. This shows the efficient phosphorus recycling that takes place in the water column. The DOP concentration exhibits two peaks during a seasonal cycle: one in April-May when the phosphate concentration is at its lowest and a second one in fall when the POP content decreases. This indicates two periods of increased phosphorus recycling activity. The seasonal cycle of the DOP is different from that of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON.

  5. Modelling physical-biological interactions in the Southeast Brazil Bight: transport patterns of Brazilian Sardine larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggiani Dias, D.; Gherardi, D. F.; Pezzi, L. P.

    2013-05-01

    The advection of Brazilian Sardine (Sardinella brasiliensis) eggs and larvae in the SBB was modeled using an individual-based model (Ichthyop) and a hydrodynamic model (Regional Ocean Modeling System, ROMS) to test for differences in larval retention for five spawning areas with high probability of egg occurrence: i) two areas north of the domain - Cape Frio and Rio de Janeiro, ii) one in the middle in Sao Sebastiao, and iii) two in the South in Paranagua. According to previous studies, this encompasses the known spawning habitat. Advective processes and physical characteristics, such as water temperature and salinity, were considered to determine larvae transport and survival. The hydrodynamic model grid has a horizontal resolution of 1/12o. Results of monthly mean Sea Surface Temperature (MSST) and Sea Surface Height (MSSH) indicate there isn't warming or cooling trend over the years, and the seasonal cycle well represented. These results were compared with satellite-derived data from the AVHRR sensor and AVISO project. Model results accurately represent the position and shape of the main surface structures observed in the satellite data. Monthly MSST maps for the experiment period indicate that the model tends to underestimate temperatures in upwelling areas and overestimate in the Brazil Current region, with differences mostly around ±1oC. For MSSH, although the model represents well the main surface ocean structures, it tends to underestimate along the domain. Temperature-salinity diagrams plotted in a coastal area for December of four years (1985, 1986, 1987 and 1988), near Ubatuba region, are consistent with field collected data, suggesting that the main water masses in SBB are reliably represented. The IBM experiments were carried out during the summer of six years (1980, 1981, 1988, 1991, 1992 and 1993). For each year, 20000 eggs were released, distributed in the five areas, and tracked for 45 days. At the end of simulation, the mortality due to temperature and advection, the coastal retention and the larvae survival were calculated. These variables were tested with a non-parametric variance (Kruskall-Wallis) analysis (95%) for differences among the five spawning areas. For the advection variable, the offshore area was the only one considered that significantly segregated the different areas, with 99% of the larvae advected out of domain. On the other hand, the other four areas weren't considered significantly different for the tested variables. Nevertheless, the largest survival rate was found in Cape Frio, where typical summer upwelling can contribute to larvae survival. The intrusion of the South Atlantic Coastal Water in the shelf generates a stable thermocline and supplies nutrients input, providing a more suitable area for larvae development. Besides, in this area, the Brazil Current is closer to the coast with the occurrence of a subsurface density front. These physical processes can also contribute to larvae survival as they increase larval retention near the coast, avoiding unfavorable environments. This is a pioneering study using physical-biological models in SBB and it helps understand the Brazilian Sardine spawning dynamics in a more realistic way.

  6. Delft3D-Modelling of Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Processes in San Diego Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Terrill (SIO Scripps), Dr. Lyle Hibler ( PNL ) and Mark Moline (CalPoly) who are funded separately. LONG-TERM GOALS The long-term goal of this effort is...October 3, 2002. RELATED PROJECTS This work is a cooperation with Dr. Eric Terrill (SIO Scripps), Dr. Lyle Hibler ( PNL ) and Mark Moline (CalPoly) who are funded separately. 5

  7. A Note on Coastally Trapped Waves Generated by the Wind at the Northern Bight of Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, USA Received June 1, 2007; accepted December 4, 2007 RESUMEN Con el prop6sito de estudiar la formaci6n de una onda ...modelo Navy Layered Ocean Model. Los resultados indican que despu6s de su generaci6n la onda se propaga mAs de 1200 km a lo largo de la costa...incrementando el nivel del mar en mis de 10 cm y generando, a su paso, corrientes costeras superficiales de mAs de 50 cm/s. La ocurrencia de la onda atrapada a

  8. Coastal SAR and PLRM Altimetry in German Bight and West Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinardo, Salvatore; Fenoglio-Marc, Luciana; Buchhaupt, Christopher; Scharroo, Remko; Fernandes, M. Joana; Benveniste, Jerome; Becker, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    The CryoSat-2 altimeter (SIRAL) features a novel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode that allows higher resolution and more accurate altimeter-derived parameters in the coastal zone, thanks to the reduced along-track footprint.This study is a regional analysis and validation of CryoSat-2 SAR altimeter products along the German coasts at distance to shore smaller than 10 km. The validation in performed against regional models and an in-situ network of tide gauges and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) stations. The goal is an assessment of the geophysical altimeter parameters sea surface height above the ellipsoid (SSH), significant sea wave height (SWH) and wind speed (U10), all estimated at 20 Hz over the time interval from October 2010 to July 2015.We have carried out from FBR (L1a) data a Delay- Doppler processing and waveform retracking tailored to coastal zone by a dedicated SAMOSA-based coastal retracker (SAMOSA+). SAMOSA+ accepts mean square slope as free parameter and the epoch's first guess fitting value is decided according to the peak in correlation between 20 consecutive waveforms to reduce land off-ranging effects.Since the remaining uncertainty in the altimeter products for coastal shallow waters arises mainly from residual errors in the applied corrections, we use the regional model TPXO8 for tides, EGM 2008 for geoid and DTU13 for mean sea surface and the regionally improved wet tropospheric correction GNSS-based Path Delay Plus (GPD+) computed at University of Porto.To quantify the improvement with respect to pulse- limited altimetry, we build 20 Hz PLRM (pseudo-LRM) data from FBR as a proxy for real pulse-limited products (LRM). They are retracked with a numerical Brown-based retracker. The L2 SAR ocean data products are generated and extracted from ESA-ESRIN GPOD service (named SARvatore) while the PLRM data are built and retracked by Technical University of Darmstadt (TUDa).The validation shows that the accuracy of sea level in coastal zone is higher in SAR than in PLRM and that is comparable to the accuracy of SAR in open sea until 3km from coast. The standard deviations of sea level difference with in-situ data in open ocean and coastal zone are 4.1 cm and 5.1 cm respectively.

  9. Annual cyclicity in export efficiency in the inner Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William Z.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Sandwith, Zoe O.

    2017-02-01

    The balance of marine autotrophy and heterotrophy regulates the ocean's ability to serve as a CO2 sink, as organic material produced by autotrophs sinks into the ocean interior to drive the biological pump. Marine ecosystems over the continental margins, especially coastal upwelling regions, account for a disproportionate amount of carbon export; thus, even small fluctuations in export in these regions can have a large impact on the global carbon cycle. In this study, we estimated the rate of gross oxygen production (GOP), stoichiometrically related to gross primary production, by combining measurements of the triple isotope composition of dissolved oxygen with estimates of vertical advection, eddy diffusion, and air-sea gas exchange in a one-dimensional two-box nonsteady state model of the euphotic zone. Net oxygen production (NOP) estimates based on O2/Ar were then combined with GOP to estimate the NOP/GOP ratio, or potential export efficiency, out of the euphotic zone at the San Pedro Ocean Time-series during an 18 month period between January 2013 and June 2014. GOP estimates ranged from 161 ± 44 to 477 ± 155 mmol m-2 d-1 during this period, peaking in May each year, and NOP/GOP ratios ranged from 0.05 ± 0.10 to 0.65 ± 0.28. The highest export efficiency occurred in late February/early March, following the onset of spring upwelling, declining as the upwelling season continued. This study demonstrates that export efficiency changes through time in this temperate coastal upwelling region on a repeated annual cycle, and the magnitude of export efficiency suggests efficient photosynthetic energy conversion by phytoplankton in spring.

  10. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  11. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  12. Estimation of The Physico-Chemical Parameters in Marine Environment (Yumurtalik Bight- Iskenderun Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Tamer Kayaalp

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate the temperature, light intensity, salinity, Dissolved O2 (DO, pH values and the biotic parameter chlorophyll- a in the water column related with the depth. Because, the physico-chemical parameters affect greatly both primary and secondary producers in marine life. For this purpose the physico-chemical properties were determined day and night for 40 meter depth during the eight days. The means were compared by using the analysis of variance method and Duncan’s Multiple Comparison Test. Also physico-chemical parameters were estimated by using the analysis of regression and correlation. The effect of temperature and salinity were found significant according to the result of the analysis of variance during the day. Also the similar results were found for the night. While the effect of the depth on the chloropyll-a a was significant in the night, the effect of the depth on the DO was not significant in the day and night. The correlations among the depth and the parameters were defined. It was found the negative correlation between the depth and the temperature and light intensity. Determination coefficient of the model for salinity was also found different for day time. The correlation values among the depth and the temperature, salinity and pH were found different for the night.

  13. Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of Beaked Whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. FINAL REPORT Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of...whale distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter-specific differences. We investigated spatio-temporal patterns for Cuvier’s beaked whale...distribution and foraging behavior and to describe inter-specific differences. Knowledge about foraging behavior and habitat preference and

  14. Developing a Pilot Maritime Spatial Plan for the Pomeranian Bight and Arkona Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käppeler, Bettina; Toben, Susan; Chmura, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    , ice conditions, wind conditions, as well as natural assets such as sea birds, fish and harbour porpoise. This was complemented by a description of demographic trends, the economic situation in the respective coastal regions, international legislation affecting the pilot area, and the existing spatial...... identifying relevant stakeholders, contacting them with a short questionnaire on current uses and conflicts experienced, and stakeholder meetings at various stages of the project. The second stage was to carry out a comprehensive stocktake of current uses together with a brief overview of the trends...... planners), insufficient time for the last planning steps, and differences in planning cultures and ‘philosophies’. Recommendations are offered for similar projects in terms of the planning process (how to work across different planning cultures effectively) and in terms of the resources required (partners...

  15. Seals at sea: modelling seal distribution in the German bight based on aerial survey data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herr, H.; Scheidat, M.; Lehnert, K.; Siebert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an important habitat for harbour seals and grey seals. They regularly haul-out on sandbanks and islands along the coast. Comparably little is known about the time seals spend at sea and how they use the remainder of the North Sea. Yet, human activity in offshore waters is increasin

  16. Modeling of Habitat and Foraging Behavior of Beaked Whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    solid black line to highlight the similarity with the example encounter. Middle panel: Histograms of peak frequency (left, pfr ) and inter-pulse interval...right, ipi) with median values for pfr , center frequency (cfr), duration (dur), and IPI. Bottom panel: Mean spectra of encounter (left, solid line

  17. Blue Whale Visual and Acoustic Encounter Rates in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    encounter rates. Dual-mode shipboard surveys of blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and humpback ( Megaptera novaeangliae ) whales reported higher acoustic than...2003. Acoustic and visual survey of humpback whale ( Megaptera novaeangliae ) distribution in the eastern and southern Caribbean Sea. Caribbean Journal...Comparison between visual and pas- sive acoustic detection of finless porpoises in the Yangtze River . Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

  18. 4 meter composite sidescan sonar mosaic of the New York Bight Apex (APEX_OF.TIF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, began a program designed to generate reconnaissance maps of the sea...

  19. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads;

    2010-01-01

    on the Galathea 3 expedition in 2006, allowing description of the morphology and internal architecture of the sediment waves in unprecedented detail, leading to an alternative interpretation of their formation. Most sediment waves were initiated by preferential deposition on the landward side of irregular erosion...... surfaces. Sediment wave accretion took place under the influence of density driven currents, which decelerated up the landward-dipping flanks and accelerated down the seaward-dipping flanks of the sediment waves. The currents are interpreted as dense water cascades formed by summer evaporation and strong...

  20. OSL dating of mixed coastal sediment (Sylt, German Bight, North Sea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Tony; Lindhorst, Sebastian; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov;

    2012-01-01

    and aeolian sediments because of the sampling method employed. To obtain reliable burial ages for these swash-bar sediments, single-grain and small aliquot measurements were used together with the Finite Mixture Model (FMM) proposed by Roberts et al. (2000) to identify the grain population containing...... the largest doses (from the deepest part of the core). Before the FMM was applied to dating, the parameters and performance of the FMM were first investigated by systematically comparing small aliquot (∼20 grains) and single-grain measurements of an undisturbed aeolian and swash-bar sample and a laboratory...... aliquots can be regarded as a reliable proxy for single-grain dose distribution if the sediment contains only a small proportion of quartz grains emitting a luminescence signal and that the FMM results are relatively insensitive to changes of the over-dispersion parameter between 5–40% for small aliquots...

  1. Analysis of High Spatial, Temporal, and Directional Resolution Recordings of Biological Sounds in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    map. To the northwest of the array deployment area is Santa Catalina Island . The array number is listed next to each push-pin location. The data...very shallow- water shelf just offshore in Fig. 1. A few conclusions from the analysis of this chorus are: • The spatial distribution of the...received levels and the directionality of the received sounds indicate the primary region of chorusing occurs in the very shallow water region just offshore

  2. Surface Current and Wave Validation of a Nested Regional HF Radar Network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-22

    56 from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of...be inverted to give 204 Authorized licensed use limited to: Rutgers University. Downloaded on April 22, 2009 at 09:56 from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions...Hatteras, NC in the 206 Authorized licensed use limited to: Rutgers University. Downloaded on April 22, 2009 at 09:56 from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions

  3. South Atlantic Bight Habitat Mapping on NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in North Atlantic Ocean between 20070626 and 20070702

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This expedition on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster used the recently-developed National Undersea Research Center for the North Atlantic and Great Lakes (NURC-NAGL) ROV...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Sun Illuminated Bathymetry for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Sun Illuminated Bathymetry GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  5. Archive of Water Gun Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 95007 New York Bight, 7-25 May, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field water gun subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 7-25 May, 1995. The coverage is in...

  6. The sedimentary architecture of a Holocene barrier spit (Sylt, German Bight): Swash-bar accretion and storm erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhorst, Sebastian; Betzler, Christian; Hass, H. Christian

    2008-04-01

    The southern German North Sea coast was shaped by the last post-glacial sea-level rise that caused a significant retreat of the coastline. Approximately 5 ka BP, the rate of sea-level rise decreased, providing space for the formation of the Frisian Islands which line the coast. This study is focused on the island of Sylt, located at the German North Sea coast close to the Danish border. Here, two sandy spit systems developed during the Holocene. Combining ground-penetrating radar studies and sedimentological investigations based on shallow cores, new aspects on the sedimentary history of this Holocene spit system have been revealed. The data indicate that strong erosional events alternated with phases of progradation and growth. The welding of swash bars is shown to be the predominant process during progradational phases of the spit system. During these periods, progradation was not restricted to linear growth along the spit axis, but also included a seaward-directed component. Major erosion surfaces, which delimit progradational sediment packages, are interpreted to reflect exceptionally severe storms. The fossilization potential of this sedimentary record was controlled by a positive net long-term sediment balance and the position of the ground-water table which controlled eolian deflation. Only with a stable or rising sea level and associated ground-water table position are sediments protected from deflation. The proposed sedimentary model may serve as a template for interpretation of comparable settings in the geological record.

  7. Environmental survey of two interim dumpsites, Middle Atlantic Bight from 05 November 1973 to 10 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7501280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A second oceanographic survey cruise was made to an interim municipal sludge dumpsite and initially to an interim dumpsite for the disposal of industrial acid waste...

  8. Utilizing geological and geotechnical parameters to constrain optimal siting of Mid-Atlantic Bight offshore wind projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, Alia

    As the offshore wind energy sector expands due to government mandates, a thorough understanding of the geologic setting of potential project sites becomes an essential component in the design process. Geophysical and geotechnical parameters yield vital information on the sediments and/or rocks that are present. The variable distribution of sediments, with concomitant variations in geotechnical properties, has significant implications for the selection (e.g., monopile, suction caisson, gravity base, jacket), design, location, installation, and subsequent scouring in the vicinity of wind turbine foundations. Identifying suitable sites based on sediment types allow for optimized engineering design solutions. Because foundations represent approximately 25% of total offshore wind project expenditures, reducing foundation costs with geologic suitability in mind could significantly decrease required initial investments, thereby expediting project and industry advancement. To illustrate how geological and geotechnical data can be used to inform site selection for foundations, geophysical data were analyzed and interpreted (chirp sub-bottom profiling, side-scan sonar, and multibeam bathymetry) from the Maryland Wind Energy Area (WEA). Side-scan sonar data from the WEA show three distinct acoustic intensities; each is correlated to a general bottom sediment grain size classification (muds, muddy and/or shelly sand, and sand with some gravel). Chirp sub-bottom profiles reveal the continuity and thicknesses of various depositional layers including paleochannel systems. Paleochannels consist of heterogeneous infill; creating undesirable conditions for foundation placement. This "desktop" study provides a suitability model for how the interpretation of geophysical and geotechnical data can be used to provide constraints on, and reduce uncertainties associated with, foundation location and type selection. Results from this study revealed 5 distinct subsurface units. The oldest (Unit 5) originated from Middle Pleistocene during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5 & 6. The youngest (Unit 1) consists of the modern surficial sand sheet sediments which have been eroded and reworked during recent Holocene transgression. Several distinct paleochannel systems incise the study area. Though data beyond the boundaries of the study area are scarce a southeasterly channel direction along with results from previous studies suggest these systems originated from Maryland coastal bays. An integrated marine spatial planning approach identified the southernmost portions of the study area as the most unsuitable for wind energy development. Conversely, the same analysis determined that the central-eastern section of the WEA is most suitable. Correlating these data with parameters governing foundation selection revealed that piled-type foundations (either lattice or monopile) are most appropriate for the study area, although suction bucket caisson foundations cannot be definitely ruled out as a possible design solution.

  9. Seismic tracking of geological hazards related to clay tectonics in the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    A joint seismic exploration programme, carried out in recent years by Belgian, British, French and Danish university laboratories in the southern North Sea and Schelde estuary, has revealed various styles of clay tectonics in Eocene and Oligocene deposits. In this paper particular attention is drawn on the remarkable deformation features observed in the Ieper or London clay, which forms the subsoil of the major part of the Thames estuary and the Belgian shelf sector. Those clay structures hav...

  10. The macrofauna and macroflora associated with Laminaria digitata and L. hyperborea at the island of Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, Kirstin; Janke, Klaus; Krüß, Andreas; Weidemann, Wolfgang

    1990-03-01

    This paper describes the macroflora and macrofauna associated with two bull kelp species, Laminaria hyperborea and L. digitata, at the island of Helgoland, North Sea. During a study period of seven months (March September 1987), 29 macroflora species and 125 macrofauna species were found. The dominant taxonomic groups were Polychaeta (25 species), Bryozoa (17), Amphipoda (14), Hydrozoa (10) and Ascidiae (8). The species maximum was in July. In general, L. hyperborea was preferred as a substrate for settlement to L. digitata. Composition of the communities associated with kelp changed during the season according to exposure to wave action, and according to location on the kelp thallus. The rhizoid community of both kelps bore more species at exposed locations. Wave-exposed L. digitata lacked obvious faunal settlement on both phylloid and cauloid. Phylloid and cauloid of L. hyperborea were chosen as an attractive substrate at both sheltered and wave-exposed locations, showing an association of encrusting bryozoan and hydrozoan colonies.

  11. Simulation analysis of moored fluorometer time series from the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Progress report, FY 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.; Dieterle, D.A.; Gregg, W.W.; Pribble, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A two-layered baroclinic circulation model and a 21-layered biochemical model are used to explore the consequences of Loop Current-induced upwelling and terrestrial eutrophication on ''new''production within the Gulf of Mexico. During a quasi-annual penetration and eddy-shedding cycle of the Loop Current, the simulated seasonal changes of incident radiation, wind stress, and surface mixed layer depth induce an annual cycle of algal biomass that corresponds to in situ and satellite time series of chlorophyll. The simulated nitrate fields match those of shipboard surveys, while fallout of particulate matter approximates that caught in sediment traps and accumulating in bottom sediments. Assuming an f ratio of 0.06--0.12, the total primary production of the Gulf of Mexico might be 105--210 g C m /sup /minus//2 yr/sup /minus//1 in the absence of anthropogenic nutrient loadings, i.e., 2--3 fold that of oligotrophic regions not impacted by western boundary currents. Less than 25% of the nitrogen effluent of the Mississippi River may be stored in bottom sediments, with most of this input dispersed in dissolved form beneath the pycnocline, after remineralization of particulate detritus within several production cycles derived from riverine loading. At a sinking rate of 3 m day /sup /minus//1, however, sufficient phytodetritus survives oxidation in the water column to balance estimates of bottom metabolism and burial at the margins.

  12. Archive of Water Gun Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  13. Tidal-controlled variations of primary- and secondary bedform height: Innenjade tidal channel (Jade Bay, German Bight)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, C.; Becker, M.

    2010-01-01

    and deposition of sediments that generate a variety of landscapes and seascapes over time. Morphodynamics allows for a better understanding and interpretation of self adjustments in drainage basins, longitudinal river profiles and shorelines shapes, as well as characteristic features such as beach cusps, bed...

  14. Archive of Boomer Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise.The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  15. Numerical Investigation of the Middle Atlantic Bight Shelfbreak Frontal Circulation Using a High-Resolution Ocean Hindcast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    N. Flagg, 1976: The water structure, mean currents, and shelf/slope water front on the New England continental shelf. Mem Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege , 6...C06003, doi:10.1029/ 2005JC003116. Flather, R. A., 1976: A tidal model of the northwest European continental shelf. Mem. Soc. Roy. Sci. Liege , 6

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  17. Southern California Hook and Line Survey - Annual So. CA Bight hook and line data collection/survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an annual, fishery-independent survey aimed at collecting abundance and biological data for use in the stock assessments of several key rockfish species...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Profile Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Profile Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off...

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth Range of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth Range GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Mean Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Mean Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Rugosity of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Rugosity GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Plan Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Plan Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of the multibeam bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the...

  8. Arsenic and mercury contamination of sediments of geothermal springs, mangrove lagoon and the Santispac bight, Bahía Concepción, Baja California peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Acosta, María Luisa; Shumilin, Evgueni; Mirlean, Nicolai; Sapozhnikov, Dmitry; Gordeev, Vyacheslav

    2010-12-01

    In order to find out the environmental impact on the coastal zone, the composition of sediments of the intertidal geothermal hot spring zone and adjacent area of Playa Santispac in the pristine Bahía Concepción (Baja California peninsula) was studied. High concentrations of As (13-111 mg kg⁻¹) and Hg (0.55-25.2 mg kg⁻¹) were found in the sediments of the geothermal sources. Arsenic and Hg concentrations decrease rapidly in the adjacent small mangrove lagoon sediments and reach background levels (0.7-2.6 mg kg⁻¹ and 6-60 μg kg⁻¹ respectively) in the marine sediments collected in front of Playa Santispac.

  9. Net phytoplankton and zooplankton in the New York Bight, January 1976 to February 1978, with comments on the effects of wind, Gulf Stream eddies, and slope water intrusions

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Daniel E.; Jossi, Jack W.

    1984-01-01

    Results are given of monthly net phytoplankton and zooplankton sampling from a 10 m depth in shelf, slope, and Gulf Stream eddy water along a transect running southeastward from Ambrose Light, New York, in 1976, 1977, and early 1978. Plankton abundance and temperature at 10 m and sea surface salinity at each station are listed. The effects of atmospheric forcing and Gulf Stream eddies on plankton distribution and abundance arc discussed. The frequency of Gulf Stream eddy passage through the N...

  10. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB_mobile_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  11. Whole-body concentrations of elements in three fish species from offshore oil platforms and natural areas in the Southern California Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Milton S.; Saiki, Michael K.; May, Thomas W.; Yee, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    There is concern that offshore oil platforms off Southern California may be contributing to environmental contaminants accumulated by marine fishes. To examine this possibility, 18 kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus Girard, 1854), 80 kelp rockfish (Sebastes atrovirens Jordan and Gilbert, 1880), and 98 Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus Girard, 1854) were collected from five offshore oil platforms and 10 natural areas during 2005–2006 for whole-body analysis of 63

  12. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB_mobile_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  13. 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_95th_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  14. Median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_median.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  15. Median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_median.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  16. Thematic mapper research in the earth sciences: Small scale patches of suspended matter and phytoplankton in the Elbe River Estuary, German Bight and Tidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, H.; Doerffer, R.; Fischer, J.; Brockmann, C.; Stoessel, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Thematic Mapper (TM) field experiment was followed by a data analysis to determine TM capabilities for analysis of suspended matter and phytoplankton. Factor analysis showed that suspended matter concentration, atmospheric scattering, and sea surface temperature can be retrieved as independent factors which determine the variation in the TM data over water areas. Spectral channels in the near infrared open the possibility of determining the Angstrom exponent better than for the coastal zone color scanner. The suspended matter distribution may then be calculated by the absolute radiance of channel 2 or 3 or the ratio of both. There is no indication of whether separation of chlorophyll is possible. The distribution of suspended matter and sea surface temperature can be observed with the expected fine structure. A good correlation between water depth and suspended matter distribution as found from ship data can now be analyzed for an entire area by the synoptic view of the TM scenes.

  17. Benthic and biological data in the New York Bight from 2010-06-01 to 2012-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0128996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets show the distribution of key species and habitats, such as seabirds, bathymetry, surficial sediments, deep sea corals, and oceanographic habitats....

  18. Blue and Fin Whale Habitat Modeling from Long-Term Year-Round Passive Acoustic Data from the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    developing models that look at the seasonal impacts on the distribution of blue and fin whales . By the end of the project, we will have developed separate...the development of habitat models. • Completed building single-site models for calling blue and fin whales . • Started building models for...blue whale call detections, with highest levels in the basin just to the west of San Clemente Island. Overall, the developed GAMs were better at

  19. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Miami, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the continental shelf off of Jacksonville, FL in the South Atlantic...

  20. 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_95th_perc.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  1. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner; Christian, Winter; Becker, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world’s coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal...

  2. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004 New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996 Series Information:

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 1 May - 9 June, 1996. The coverage is...

  3. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 95007 New York Bight, 7-25 May, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains copies of the navigation and field chirp subbottom data collected aboard the R/V Seaward Explorer, from 7-25 May, 1995. The coverage is in the...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 5m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 5x5 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetry Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry (depth) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  6. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Evaluation of the 1980 Capping Operations at the Experimental Mud Dump Site, New York Bight Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    Report to U.S. Army Engineers. Neo York Distract. "’-’-" .’ 31. Fulk, R., D. Gruber and R. Wullschleger. 1975. Laboratory Study • "-" of the Release...Aug. 27, 1980 I. 1. al. d" v of Drndge *mateal Dup 730 52,w site W2215 25.? Ag. 27, 980 130 5o,,j 1. WPpIg at. WO002211 29.3 Jon . 2, 3981 To 3 m1...25 18.0 30.1 6.45 10/3 17.5 28.7 4.5 o -" 2l/6 12.o 27.52 73 92/6 -1.0 29.02 10.5 .3110 3.0 27.57 5.5 . /8 12.5 27.31 6.6 7/9 20.0 - - ( Jon s Be,&* C

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - USNS Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of the 2003 multibeam bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric PCA GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  10. Photosynthesis, respiration, and carbon turnover in sinking marine snow from surface waters of Southern California Bight: implications for the carbon cycle in the ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Grossart, HP; Azam, F.

    1999-01-01

    aggregate in darkness, which yielded a turnover time of 8 to 9 d for the total organic carbon in aggregates. Thus, marine snow is not only a vehicle for vertical flux of organic matter; the aggregates are also hotspots of microbial respiration which cause a fast and efficient respiratory turnover...... of particulate organic carbon in the sea....

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-22 (NCEI Accession 0156659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-07-14 to 2016-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0156658)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-08-18 to 2015-09-09 (NCEI Accession 0145710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru32 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-10 to 2016-08-19 (NCEI Accession 0156390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-09-17 to 2015-10-07 (NCEI Accession 0145711)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment of a Slocum glider to perform surveys of dissolved oxygen concentrations in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. This dataset currently provides only...

  17. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_mobile_freq_v1_1.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  18. Carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity, and barometric pressure collected via surface underway survey onboard Cape Hatteras in the South Atlantic Bight from January 6, 2005 to May 27, 2006 (NODC Accession 0051983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The survey was carried out on six cruises: 5-16 January 2005, 19-30 March 2005, 27 July - 5 August 2005, 7-17 October 2005, 16-21 December 2005, and 17-27 May 2006....

  19. The median of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_median.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  20. The half interpercentile range of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_hIPR, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  1. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (GMAINE_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  2. U.S. Geological Survey calculated median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_median, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  3. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_mobile_freq_v1_1.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  4. U.S. Geological Survey calculated percentage of time sediment is mobile for May 2010 to May 2011 at select points in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB_mobile_perc, point shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  5. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_95th_perc.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  6. U.S. Geological Survey calculated recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru30 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-09-01 to 2016-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0156681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider dataset gathered as part of the TEMPESTS (The Experiment to Measure and Predict East coast STorm Strength), funded by NOAA through CINAR (Cooperative...

  8. Recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (GMAINE_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  9. U.S. Geological Survey calculated recurrence interval of sediment mobility at select points in the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_mobile_freq, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  10. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight (GMAINE_mobile_perc.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  11. The 95th percentile of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_95th_perc.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  12. Half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_hIPR.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  13. U.S. Geological Survey calculated 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress for the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_95th_perc, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  14. U.S. Geological Survey calculated percentage of time sediment is mobile for May 2010 to May 2011 at select points in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB_mobile_perc, point shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  15. The half interpercentile range of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_hIPR, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  16. The median of bottom shear stress for the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight, May 2010 to May 2011 (GMAINE_median.shp, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  17. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 30 November 1976 to 25 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 30 November 1976 to 25 April 1977. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  18. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 15 December 1977 to 19 March 1978 (NODC Accession 7900293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 15 December 1977 to 19 March 1978. Data were collected by Dames and Moore, Inc. -...

  19. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 25 September 1978 to 11 July 1979 (NODC Accession 7900330)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 25 September 1978 to 11 July 1979. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  20. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 03 April 1979 to 11 July 1979 (NODC Accession 8000011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 03 April 1979 to 11 July 1979. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service...

  1. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 27 October 1975 to 14 August 1976 (NODC Accession 7700083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 27 October 1975 to 14 August 1976. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  2. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 25 July 1978 to 16 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900246)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 25 July 1978 to 16 October 1978. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service...

  3. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 03 November 1977 to 31 January 1978 (NODC Accession 7800572)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 03 November 1977 to 31 January 1978. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  4. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 30 January 1978 to 27 July 1978 (NODC Accession 7900077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 30 January 1978 to 27 July 1978. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service...

  5. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 01 April 1974 to 25 September 1974 (NODC Accession 7700207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 01 April 1974 to 25 September 1974. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  6. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 13 August 1976 to 01 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7700640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 13 August 1976 to 01 December 1976. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  7. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 24 February 1975 to 01 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7700554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 24 February 1975 to 01 May 1975. Data were collected by the National Ocean Service...

  8. Chemical data from moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 18 May 1978 - 19 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical data were collected using moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 18, 1978 to October 19,...

  9. Percentage of time sediment is mobile for May, 2010 - May, 2011 at select points in the Gulf of Maine south into the Middle Atlantic Bight (GMAINE_mobile_perc.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  10. U.S. Geological Survey calculated 95th percentile of wave-current bottom shear stress for the South Atlantic Bight for May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_95th_perc, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  11. Half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the Middle Atlantic Bight for May, 2010 - May, 2011 (MAB_hIPR.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider blue deployed by University of Massachusetts; University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-05-18 to 2016-06-06 (NCEI Accession 0153544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) glider deployment. This is the first of a series of yearly seasonal deployments...

  13. The Roles of Advection and In Situ Growth in Determining the Dynamics of Continental Shelf Zooplankton: High Frequency Measurements of Zooplankton Biomass Coupled with Measurements of Secondary Productivity in the Middle Atlantic Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sharon L.

    1999-03-26

    Evaluation of the role of continental margins in planetary carbon cycles can be approached in various ways, with the extremes being knowledge generated either by large-scale studies of a few basic characteristics of the carbon cycle of shelves worldwide (comparative approach) or by temporally intensive studies of a few sites selected to typify contrasting processes. Mechanisms of cross-shelf transfer, for example, are presently of great interest and within the US there are at least four differing continental shelf environments in which cross-shelf processes are driven by storms (southern Bering Sea, northeastern US), by jets and eddies (northern California coast), by freshwater runoff (Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico), and by frontal meanders and filaments of the Gulf Stream (southeastern US). Because the type and magnitude of the physical forcing, and its variability on an annual scale, are fundamental to the response of the carbon cycle, investigation of each of these shelves would offer insight useful to predictive global understanding of the carbon cycle on continental shelves.

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ud_134 deployed by University of Delaware in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-30 to 2016-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0156682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The scales of the sensing and prediction of bioluminescence represent a significant research challenge. Relevant scales range from 10s-1000s of meters and time...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-08-15 to 2014-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0145663)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-10-08 to 2015-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0153545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  17. U.S. Geological Survey calculated median of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_median, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  18. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 05 November 1973 to 06 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from November 5, 1973 to June 6,...

  19. Nutrients, chlorophyll, and other data from Northeast Water Column Monitoring cruises in the Mid-Atlantic Bight for the Northeast Monitoring Program (NEMP), 21 April 1980 to 24 April 1984 (NODC Accession 8800171)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multiple cruise reports for the Northeast Monitoring Program (NEMP) describe the data collection activities, analyses and tabular data from multiple NEMP cruises in...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-08-16 to 2013-08-27 (NCEI Accession 0145660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-12 to 2013-10-24 (NCEI Accession 0145661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-10-17 to 2013-11-06 (NCEI Accession 0137966)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-10 to 2013-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0137965)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-08-14 to 2014-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0137967)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-24 to 2013-10-17 (NCEI Accession 0138013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-09-16 to 2014-09-29 (NCEI Accession 0137968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-03-05 to 2013-03-23 (NCEI Accession 0137964)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  8. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight and Long Island Sound from 1972-08-01 to 1973-09-20 (NCEI Accession 9000039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession consists of nutrient data from Long Island Sound provided by Mr. Robert N. Reid from NOAA/NMFS Sandy Hook Laboratory. The data were collected from...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-07-17 to 2013-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0137972)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru28 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-07-17 to 2014-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0145662)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Deployment to measure dissolved oxygen levels in the shallow coastal waters of New Jersey. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) received the...

  11. Multibeam Collection for Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continential Shelf on the R/V Cape Fear in the North Atlantic Ocean between June 13, 2005 and July 7, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Library Catalog may include: Data Management Plans, Cruise Plans, Cruise Summary Reports, Scientific "Quick Look Reports", Video Annotation Logs, Image Collections,...

  12. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 27 August 1973 - 27 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7600777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from August 27, 1973 to November 7,...

  13. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 21 May 1963 - 08 July 1975 (NODC Accession 7601561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 21, 1963 to July 8, 1975....

  14. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 08 March 1974 - 13 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7501210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from March 8, 1974 to May 13, 1974....

  15. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 10 April 1978 - 09 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 10, 1978 to August 9,...

  16. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project from 12 April 1976 - 13 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 12, 1976 to September 13,...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 09 April 1979 - 23 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 9, 1979 to August 23,...

  18. Current meter - direction and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the MESA New York Bight (MESA-NYB) project from 17 October 1974 to 20 November 1975 (NODC Accession 7700291)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter - direction and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 17 October 1974 to 20 November 1975. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  19. Delayed XBT data collected by the Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from September 15 2009 to October 25 2010 (NODC Accession 0085726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Great Australian Bight, Gulf of Thailand, Indian ocean, South China Sea, and Tasman Sea. Data were...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - R/V Maurice Ewing - (1997), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Nancy Foster - (2006), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  2. Primary Productivity (PP_Master)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included primary production for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came...

  3. Wind_Speeds_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included wind speeds for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came from...

  4. Chlorophyll_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set included chlorophyll for each subregion in the study (Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine, Southern New England, Middle Atlantic Bight) . The data came from...

  5. EX1305: Summer Ecosystem Monitoring Survey on NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer between 20130821 and 20130901

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The survey consists of 120 random stratified stations in the Middle Atlantic Bight, Southern New England, Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine. Depending on the...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  7. Current direction, bathythermograph (xbt), CTD, and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico during the Gulf of Mexico Physical Oceanography (GMPO) project, 1985-06-11 to 1986-09-03 (NCEI Accession 8700196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, bathythermograph (xbt), CTD, and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and NW...

  8. Analyses of otoliths from juvenile black sea bass collected from estuaries in SC, FL, NJ, and NY: 2008-2009.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — Snappers/Groupers have traditionally been some of the most desired demersal fishes in the South Atlantic Bight and are the most abundant and diverse group of large...

  9. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, and other measurements collected using bottle from G.B. KELEZ and NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North Atlantic from 1975 to 1979 (NCEI Accession 0014331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Ecosystem Analysis Program's series presenting oceanographic data from the New York Bight collected using bottle and CTD during 1975 -1979 years

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Little Hales - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  11. Delayed XBT data collected by Royal Australian Navy and submitted to NODC for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP), dates range from 2009-2011 (NODC Accession 0089585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts in the Arafura Sea, Bass Strait, Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight, Indian Ocean, Molukka Sea, North Pacific...

  12. NYHOPS Forecast Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 3D Marine Nowcast/Forecast System for the New York Bight NYHOPS subdomain. Currents, waves, surface meteorology, and water conditions.

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Nancy Foster - (2006), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the 2006 multibeam bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  15. Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, M.; Mohan, R.; Meloth, T.; Naik, S.S.; Sudhakar, M.

    Basin, Southern California Bight. Paleoceanography, 1991, 6, 307–334. 24. Mortyn, G. P. and Charles, C. D., Planktonic foraminiferal depth habitat and δ 18 O calibrations: plankton tow results from the Atlan- tic sector of the Southern Ocean...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 50m Multibeam Bathymetry, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Whiting - (2001), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 50x50 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight, derived from...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Slope, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - R/V Maurice Ewing - (1997), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - R/V Maurice Ewing - (1997), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. PRESSURE - WATER and Other Data from EASTWARD and Other Platforms From Gulf of Mexico from 19750311 to 19770509 (NODC Accession 8000017)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Microfiche publication of the Mississippi Delta Bight Studies, Offshore Primary Production (R/E-5), Louisiana Sea Grant Program, was submitted by R.E. Turner and...

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, Charleston Bump - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the backscatter intensity of the Charleston Bump off of the South Atlantic Bight,...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the USS CURTS and other platforms from the North Atlantic Ocean and other locations as part of the South Atlantic Bight project from 1980-04-30 to 1986-04-24 (NCEI Accession 8600175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the USS CURTS and other platforms from 30 April 1980 to 24 April 1986. Data were submitted by the Woods Hole...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, nutrients, and other variables collected from surface discrete observations using flow-through pump and other instruments from NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow on the Northeast U.S. Shelf (Gulf of Maine and Mid-Atlantic Bight) from 2013-03-17 to 2013-05-09 (NCEI Accession 0154386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbon chemistry. Through the SOOP program we...

  3. U.S. Geological Survey calculated half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_hIPR.shp, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors. The...

  4. U.S. Geological Survey calculated half interpercentile range (half of the difference between the 16th and 84th percentiles) of wave-current bottom shear stress in the South Atlantic Bight from May 2010 to May 2011 (SAB_hIPR.shp, polygon shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has been characterizing the regional variation in shear stress on the sea floor and sediment mobility through statistical descriptors....

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from underway - surface observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from the SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Great Australian Bight and others from 2011-04-06 to 2011-11-26 (NODC Accession 0115708)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115708 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and underway - surface data collected from SOUTHERN SURVEYOR in the Coral Sea, Great Australian...

  6. Oil pollution dangers on the German coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vauk, G.

    1984-03-01

    Helgoland waters in the German Bight are a vital wintering area for seabirds. As long as the discharge of waste oil and oily water is not completely avoided, large amounts of oil will continuously get into the sea. Therefore, the danger to the marine life, especially seabirds, increases. Helgoland presents the possibility of determining the extent and the effect of the oil pollution of the North Sea, since it is placed in the point of intersection of important steamship routes and also oil slicks drifted by the north-west winds along the German Bight. Seabirds are indicators for the quantity, the type and the temporal distribution of oil.

  7. Ammonia, silicate, phosphate, dissolved oxygen, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, nutrient autoanalyzer, and other instruments from NOAA Ship Delaware II, NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter, NOAA Ship Henry B. Bigelow, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, and NOAA Ship Pisces in the Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank, and Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2009-11-03 to 2014-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0127524)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains nutrient concentrations, temperature, salinity, density and dissolved oxygen values measured by CTD profiles on the U.S. Northeast Continental...

  8. Copepoda (Crustacea) associated with commercial and non-commercial Bivalvia in the East Scheldt, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stock, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Six species of Copepoda Poecilostomatoida of the families Myicolidae, Sabelliphilidae, Lichomolgidae, and Mytilicolidae are recorded from six different species of intertidal bivalves in the East Scheldt (The Netherlands), a branch of the southern bight of the North Sea. One bivalve species may harbo

  9. The phytoplankton spring bloom in Dutch coaqtal waters of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, W.W.C.; Kraay, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    In the eastern part of the Southern Bight of the North Sea several sub areas could be distinguished, each with a characteristic spring bloom and species succession pattern. Regional differences in spring bloom timing were in accord with theoretical considerations in which (on the assumption of a ver

  10. Microzooplankton grazing in Phaeocystis and diatom-dominated waters in the southern North Sea in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelfox-Widdicombe, CE; Archer, SD; Burkill, PH; Stefels, J

    2004-01-01

    The impact of microzooplankton grazing upon phytoplankton production was quantified in surface waters of the Southern Bight of the North Sea, during April 1998. Two sites were studied in order to examine the impact of microzooplankton grazing on phytoplankton communities dominated by either Phaeocys

  11. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bühring, S.I.; Ehrenhauss, S.; Kamp, A.; Moodley, L.; Prof. Witte, U.

    2006-01-01

    In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we

  12. MIZEX, A Program for Mesoscale Air-Ice-Ocean Interaction Experiments in Arctic Marginal Ice Zones. VI. MIZEX-WEST,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    tamed. SUMMARY The winter 1983 temperature and salinity data S % gmO -t 25 .... 26 from the Bering Sea MIZ provided the most de- Toc -2 .. tailed...are defined as fol- lows: our data: o. Okubo’s data: *-North Sea; A-Cape Kennedy; + - Banana River; x -Manokin River; *-New York Bight; [-South- ern

  13. Competitive interactions between two fishing fleets in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sys, Klaas; Poos, Jan Jaap; Meensel, van Jef; Polet, Hans; Buysse, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    We examine whether the landing rates of Belgian beam trawlers in the Southern Bight of the North Sea were affected through competitive interactions with the Dutch beam trawler fleet and whether the development of a pulse trawler fleet has altered competitive interactions between both fleets. Effe

  14. Vanadium in marine mussels and algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperling, K.R.; Bahr, B. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Ott, J. [Fachhochschule Hamburg (Germany). Fachbereich Naturwissenschaftliche Technik, Studiengang Biotechnologie

    2000-01-01

    A method is presented which is sensitive enough for the determination of vanadium (V) in marine organisms such as mussels and algae. It was sufficiently checked by a reference material and it was applied to V determination in blue mussels and brown algae from the German Bight. (orig.)

  15. Automatic Detection of Beaked Whales from Acoustic Seagliders & Passive Autonomous Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammals with Seagliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    the Southern California Bight: bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ), short- and long-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis and D. capensis...architectures used in the PAM boards of each instrument. 8 REFERENCES Haykin, S. 2002. Adaptive Filter Theory. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River

  16. A freshwater species wintering in a brackish environment: Habitat selection and diet of Slavonian grebes in the southern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Nicole; Garthe, Stefan; Adler, Sven

    2009-09-01

    After the breeding season, Slavonian grebes ( Podiceps auritus) leave their freshwater breeding habitats and migrate to wintering grounds in marine or brackish waters. The most important wintering area in northwestern Europe is located in the southern Baltic Sea, with the largest concentrations in the offshore area of the Pommeranian Bight. Analysis of ship-based surveys revealed that the habitat selection of Slavonian grebes in this brackish area is significantly influenced by water depth and bottom sediment type. The grebes prefer shallow waters of 4-14 m depth and occur only over sandy sediments. While the diving depths of endothermic animals is limited due to energetic constraints and thermoregulation, sediment type is regarded to be a proxy for food choice. The diet of Slavonian grebes in the Pomeranian Bight consists mainly of demersal gobies (Gobiidae) that frequently occur over sandy bottom substrates.

  17. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of autotrophic and heterotrophic activities of Arctic sea ice (Malene Bight, SW Greenland) as measured by 2 different approaches: (1) standard incubation techniques (H14CO3– and [3H]thymidine incubation) on sea ice cores brought to the laboratory and (2) cores incubated in situ...... in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...... March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m– 2, reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross primary production...

  18. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  19. Documentation of the larval settlement processes upon artificial hard substrates in the North Sea; Dokumentation der Ansiedlungsprozesse an kuenstlichen Hartsubstraten in der Nordsee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joschko, T.; Orejas, C.; Schroeder, A.; Knust, R. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    The study of the recruitment of the zoobenthos in the German Bight is part of the ecological monitoring BeoFINO programme, which examines potential effects of future offshore-windfarms on the marine environment. The implementation of the piles of the wind-generators will change the hydrodynamic regime and the sedimentary environment and thus will affect the larval settlement and recruitment on the soft bottom. Furthermore the piles represent an artificial hard substrate, which consequences for the benthic community and the entire ecological system cannot be predicted yet. The study is mainly accomplished in the German Bight from the research platform FINO1, situated at the 30 m depth contour 45 km north of Borkum. The documentation at the platform pile is done using a newly developed underwater photo/video system remotely controlled online from the AWI in Bremerhaven. (orig.)

  20. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Florida). Southern, Gulf, and Summer Flounders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-01

    juvenile summer flounder occur to 290C (84.40F) in July and August. in eelgrass (Zostera marina ) beds during daylight hours, ei-ter to take Stokes (1977...Structure components of 1978. Development of fishes of eelgrass (Zostera marina ) meadows the mid-Atlantic Bight. Vol. VI. in the lower Chesapeake...on the River, North Carolina. U.S. Natl. growth of Paralichthys lethostga Mar. Fish. Serv. Fish. Bull. 78(2): postlarvae reared under aquaculture 419

  1. One year of continuous measurements constraining methane emissions from the Baltic Sea to the atmosphere using a ship of opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gülzow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane and carbon dioxide were measured with an autonomous and continuous running system on a ferry line crossing the Baltic Sea on a 2–3 day interval from the Mecklenburg Bight to the Gulf of Finland in 2010. Surface methane saturations show great seasonal differences in shallow regions like the Mecklenburg Bight (103–507% compared to deeper regions like the Gotland Basin (96–161%. The influence of controlling parameters like temperature, wind, mixing depth and processes like upwelling, mixing of the water column and sedimentary methane emissions on methane oversaturation and emission to the atmosphere are investigated. Upwelling was found to influence methane surface concentrations in the area of Gotland significantly during the summer period. In February 2010, an event of elevated methane concentrations in the surface water and water column of the Arkona Basin was observed, which could be linked to a wind-derived water level change as a potential triggering mechanism. The Baltic Sea is a source of methane to the atmosphere throughout the year, with highest fluxes occurring during the winter season. Stratification was found to promote the formation of a methane reservoir in deeper regions like Gulf of Finland or Bornholm Basin, which leads to long lasting elevated methane concentrations and enhanced methane fluxes, when mixed to the surface during mixed layer deepening in autumn and winter. Methane concentrations and fluxes from shallow regions like the Mecklenburg Bight are predominantly controlled by sedimentary production and consumption of methane, wind events and the change in temperature-dependent solubility of methane in the surface water. Methane fluxes vary significantly in shallow regions (e.g. Mecklenburg Bight and regions with a temporal stratification (e.g. Bornholm Basin, Gulf of Finland. On the contrary, areas with a permanent stratification like the Gotland Basin show only small seasonal fluctuations in methane fluxes.

  2. One year of continuous measurements constraining methane emissions from the Baltic Sea to the atmosphere using a ship of opportunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Gülzow

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Methane and carbon dioxide were measured with an autonomous and continuous running system on a ferry line crossing the Baltic Sea on a 2–3 day interval from the Mecklenburg Bight to the Gulf of Finland in 2010. Surface methane saturations show great seasonal differences in shallow regions like the Mecklenburg Bight (103–507% compared to deeper regions like the Gotland Basin (96–161%. The influence of controlling parameters like temperature, wind, mixing depth and processes like upwelling, mixing of the water column and sedimentary methane emissions on methane oversaturation and emission to the atmosphere are investigated. Upwelling was found to influence methane surface concentrations in the area of Gotland significantly during the summer period. In February 2010, an event of elevated methane concentrations in the surface water and water column of the Arkona Basin was observed, which could be linked to a wind-derived water level change as a potential triggering mechanism. The Baltic Sea is a source of methane to the atmosphere throughout the year, with highest fluxes during the winter season. Stratification was found to intensify the formation of a methane reservoir in deeper regions like Gulf of Finland or Bornholm Basin, which leads to long lasting elevated methane concentrations and enhanced methane fluxes, when mixed to the surface during mixed layer deepening in autumn and winter. Methane concentrations and fluxes from shallow regions like the Mecklenburg Bight are rather controlled by sedimentary production and consumption of methane, wind events and the change in temperature-dependent solubility of methane in the surface water. Methane fluxes vary significantly in shallow regions (e.g. Mecklenburg Bight and regions with a temporal stratification (e.g. Bornholm Basin, Gulf of Finland. On the contrary, areas with a permanent stratification like the Gotland Basin show only small seasonal fluctuations in methane fluxes.

  3. SAR Product Improvements and Enhancements - SARprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    paper on current fields at Orkney, Scotland, was accepted for publication in IEEE - TGARS and is currently in press (available on IEEE Xplore as Early...Sea surface velocity vector retrieval using dual-beam interferometry: First demonstration, IEEE TGARS, 43, 2494- 2502, 2005. [2] Chapron, B., F...Bight by airborne along-track interferometric SAR, Proc. IGARSS 2002, 1822-1824, IEEE , 2002. [4] Bjerklie, D.M., S.L. Dingman, C.J. Vorosmarty, C.H

  4. Distribution and Demographics of Marine Mammals in SOCAL Through Photo-Identification, Genetics, and Satellite Telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    species of cetacean occur in the region. Some are present year-round, while others are seasonal migrants , passing through or present in larger...Table 7). From 1992-2012, 338 individuals have been identified between Point Conception and the US- Mexico border, at distances up to 356 km from the...California Bight 1992 2012 1090 692 338 2.05 Mexico -Eastern Tropical Pacific 2003 2011 41 29 21 1.38 19 the whales using the inner and outer

  5. Bibliography on Tidal Hydraulics. Supplementary Material Compiled from June 1983 to June 1986. Tidal Flows in Rivers and Harbors. Supplement Number 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    the German Bight which look rather sim- entering the sheltered waters on the South ila r. The reference values of the corre- East Queensland coast...points in the investigated sea region, ment of Geology , University of South so as to examine the circulation mechanism Florida, Tampa. of the bay water...compilation of " Geology and Geotechnical Characteristics beach profiles (showing both the maximum of Sediments in East Bay Area, Mississippi and minimum

  6. Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K. (eds)

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.

  7. Development of Adaptive Management Tools to Guide Habitat Allocations for At-Risk Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    RCWs as those thought to historically contain Longleaf or mixed pine sa- vannah. We estimate 479,083 hectares of the Onslow Bight (48%) likely...Kicklighter, and R. A. Thum. 2001. Ecosystem management and the niche gestalt of the red-cockaded woodpecker in longleaf pine forests. Ecological...The best fit for the habitat model included vegetation data from 2008 and 2009 (Table C2), but because vegetation density in the longleaf pine

  8. Water type quantification in the Skagerrak, the Kattegat and off the Jutland west coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond Kristiansen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An extensive data series of salinity, nutrients and coloured dissolved organic material (CDOM was collected in the Skagerrak, the northern part of the Kattegat and off the Jutland west coast in April each year during the period 1996–2000, by the Institute of Marine Research in Norway. In this month, after the spring bloom, German Bight Water differs from its surrounding waters by a higher nitrate content and higher nitrate/phosphate and nitrate/silicate ratios. The spreading of this water type into the Skagerrak is of special interest with regard to toxic algal blooms. The quantification of the spatial distributions of the different water types required the development of a new algorithm for the area containing the Norwegian Coastal Current, while an earlier Danish algorithm was applied for the rest of the area. From the upper 50 m a total of 2227 observations of salinity and CDOM content have been used to calculate the mean concentration of water from the German Bight, the North Sea (Atlantic water, the Baltic Sea and Norwegian rivers. The Atlantic Water was the dominant water type, with a mean concentration of 79%, German Bight Water constituted 11%, Baltic Water 8%, and Norwegian River Water 2%. At the surface the mean percentages of these water types were found to be 68%, 15%, 15%, and 3%, respectively. Within the northern part of the Skagerrak, closer to the Norwegian coast, the surface waters were estimated to consist of 74% Atlantic Water, 20% Baltic Water, and 7% Norwegian River Water. The analysis indicates that the content of German Bight Water in this part is less than 5%.

  9. Wave Evolution in River Mouths and Tidal Inlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Bank and the South Shoal. This region, known as the San Francisco Bight, is open to the predominantly west-northwest swell conditions that can pose...field study called the Mega -Transect Experiment (MGT) that was conducted by the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in collaboration with the...with coupled Delft3D FLOW and SWAN simulations. It was shown that refraction over the bifurcated shoal system of the Four Fathom Bank and the South

  10. Environmental Assessment for Airborne Laser Debris Management Vandenberg AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    zooplankton in the Southern California Bight has been determined to depend on the nutritive value (i.e., nitrogen content) of phytoplankton on which they...May and September surveys. On coastal transects, California gulls (Larus californicus), western grebes, western gulls, and surf scoters (Melanitta...perspicillata) were most abundant during January; western grebes, western gulls, surf scoters, and brown pelicans were most abundant during May

  11. Passive Autonomous Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammals with Seagliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    odontocetes recorded in the Southern California Bight: bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ), short- and long-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis...Bell, Julie Rivers ) about deploying this acoustically-equipped Seaglider for marine mammal monitoring at sites of interest to the Navy, particularly...Haykin, S. 2002. Adaptive Filter Theory. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River . Hu, Y. and Loizou, P. 2002. A subspace approach for enhancing speech

  12. Automatic Detection of Beaked Whales from Acoustic Seagliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    the Southern California Bight: bottlenose dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ), short- and long-beaked common dolphins (Delphinus delphis and D. capensis...behavioral observation, and other applications that we have not yet anticipated. We are in contact with Navy personnel (Sean Hanser, Joel Bell, Julie Rivers ...REFERENCES Haykin, S. 2002. Adaptive Filter Theory. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River . Hu, Y. and Loizou, P. 2002. A subspace approach for enhancing

  13. Improving the Navy’s Passive Underwater Acoustic Monitoring of Marine Mammal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    bioacoustic sounds in the SoCal Bight with man- made underwater sounds, with physical properties of the environment, and with fields relevant to the...off fringing 3 Kauai. The sediments in this region are a composite of coarse-grained carbonate and fine- grained volcanic sediments (Fig. 1b) that...correlations with man-made underwater sounds, with physical properties of the environment, and with fields relevant to the biological productivity of

  14. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, L.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Barrows, E.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  15. Spatial distribution of PAHs and associated laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosman, L.B. [Army Corps of Engineers, New York, NY (United States); Barrows, E.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Sediment core samples from New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Sediment was also collected from a reference site in the New York Bight as a comparison. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for PAHs, sediment grain size, and total organic carbon. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples, as well as for lipid content. The results highlight the range and magnitude of PAH concentrations in sediments of NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from undetected to 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations as much as 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated compounds, along with benthic toxicity data, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  16. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Camille; Lebreton, Benoit; Siebert, Ursula; Guillou, Gael; Das, Krishna; Asmus, Ragnhild; Asmus, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight. PMID:27176227

  17. Acoustic Telemetry, Cape Hatteras, and ocean Migratory Corridors: Defining Critical Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Rulifson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available North Carolina continental shelf waters are being targeted for development for wind farms and for oil and gas exploration. The main site for the latter is only 38 miles from Cape Hatteras, a major topographic feature that changes the dynamics of near-shore large ocean currents including the Labrador Current and Gulf Stream. The Cape constricts shelf habitat and restricts the migratory corridors of highly migratory species. The Hatteras Acoustic Array just south of the Cape indicates that this area is heavily used by species of concern year-around. Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrhynchus migrate southward through Hatteras Bight in the fall and northward in the spring; some remain in the area throughout the winter months. Sandbar Sharks, Sand Tiger Sharks, and some Atlantic Sturgeon seem to migrate to Hatteras Bight and remain in the area throughout the winter, while other Atlantic sturgeon and White Sharks tend to migrate through Hatteras Bight on the way to other overwintering grounds. The period November through April seems to be the most critical period for these four species. Agencies need to expand the area of focus for these studies, as well as gather new information about resident species and marine mammals, before science-based environmental assessment can be made.

  18. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille de la Vega

    Full Text Available The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight.

  19. The imprint of the Slave Trade in an African American population: mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome and HTLV-1 analysis in the Noir Marron of French Guiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larrouy Georges

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retracing the genetic histories of the descendant populations of the Slave Trade (16th-19th centuries is particularly challenging due to the diversity of African ethnic groups involved and the different hybridisation processes with Europeans and Amerindians, which have blurred their original genetic inheritances. The Noir Marron in French Guiana are the direct descendants of maroons who escaped from Dutch plantations in the current day Surinam. They represent an original ethnic group with a highly blended culture. Uniparental markers (mtDNA and NRY coupled with HTLV-1 sequences (env and LTR were studied to establish the genetic relationships linking them to African American and African populations. Results All genetic systems presented a high conservation of the African gene pool (African ancestry: mtDNA = 99.3%; NRY = 97.6%; HTLV-1 env = 20/23; HTLV-1 LTR = 6/8. Neither founder effect nor genetic drift was detected and the genetic diversity is within a range commonly observed in Africa. Higher genetic similarities were observed with the populations inhabiting the Bight of Benin (from Ivory Coast to Benin. Other ancestries were identified but they presented an interesting sex-bias. Whilst male origins spread throughout the north of the bight (from Benin to Senegal, female origins were spread throughout the south (from the Ivory Coast to Angola. Conclusions The Noir Marron are unique in having conserved their African genetic ancestry, despite major cultural exchanges with Amerindians and Europeans through inhabiting the same region for four centuries. Their maroon identity and the important number of slaves deported in this region have maintained the original African diversity. All these characteristics permit to identify a major origin located in the former region of the Gold Coast and the Bight of Benin; regions highly impacted by slavery, from which goes a sex-biased longitudinal gradient of ancestry.

  20. Invasion of Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798, in the western north Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam L.; Knott, David M.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Morris, James A.; Buckel, Christine A.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Hartman, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    After going unreported in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean for 18 years (1988 to 2006), the Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, has recently reappeared in the South Atlantic Bight and, for the first time ever, in the Gulf of Mexico. Potential vectors and sources of this recent invader include: 1) discharged ballast water from its native range in Asia or other areas where it has become established; 2) transport of larvae from established non-native populations in the Caribbean or South America via ocean currents; or 3) escape and subsequent migration from active aquaculture facilities in the western Atlantic. This paper documents recent collections of P. monodon from the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico, reporting demographic and preliminary phylogenetic information for specimens collected between North Carolina and Texas from 2006 through 2012. The increased number of reports in 2011 and 2012, ranging from 102 mm to 298 mm total length, indicates that an adult population is present in densities sufficient for breeding, which is indicative of incipient establishment. Based on these reports of P. monodon, its successful invasion elsewhere, and its life history, we believe that this species will become common in the South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico in less than 10 years. Penaeus monodon is an aggressive predator in its native range and, if established, may prey on native shrimps, crabs, and bivalves. The impacts of an established P. monodon population are potentially widespread (e.g., alterations in local commercial fisheries, direct and indirect pressures on native shrimp, crab and bivalve populations, and subsequent impacts on the populations of other predators of those organisms) and should be considered by resource managers. The impacts of P. monodon on native fauna and the source(s) or vector(s) of the invasion, however, remain unknown at this time.

  1. Modelling the fate of the Tijuana River discharge plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ormondt, M.; Terrill, E.; Hibler, L. F.; van Dongeren, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    After rainfall events, the Tijuana River discharges excess runoff into the ocean in a highly turbid plume. The runoff waters contain large suspended solids concentrations, as well as high levels of toxic contaminants, bacteria, and hepatitis and enteroviruses. Public health hazards posed by the effluent often result in beach closures for several kilometers northward along the U.S. shoreline. A Delft3D model has been set up to predict the fate of the Tijuana River plume. The model takes into account the effects of tides, wind, waves, salinity, and temperature stratification. Heat exchange with the atmosphere is also included. The model consists of a relatively coarse outer domain and a high-resolution surf zone domain that are coupled with Domain Decomposition. The offshore boundary conditions are obtained from the larger NCOM SoCal model (operated by the US Navy) that spans the entire Southern California Bight. A number of discharge events are investigated, in which model results are validated against a wide range of field measurements in the San Diego Bight. These include HF Radar surface currents, REMUS tracks, drifter deployments, satellite imagery, as well as current and temperature profile measurements at a number of locations. The model is able to reproduce the observed current and temperature patterns reasonably well. Under calm conditions, the model results suggest that the hydrodynamics in the San Diego Bight are largely governed by internal waves. During rainfall events, which are typically accompanied by strong winds and high waves, wind and wave driven currents become dominant. An analysis will be made of what conditions determine the trapping and mixing of the plume inside the surfzone and/or the propagation of the plume through the breakers and onto the coastal shelf. The model is now also running in operational mode. Three day forecasts are made every 24 hours. This study was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  2. Abundance of dissolved polysaccharides in the oxygen minimum layer of the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Bhaskar, P.V.; Ramachandran, S.

    surface concentrations of dissolved MCHO reported from other marine environments. For exam- . ple, Pakulski and Benner 1994 reported concentra- tions of 0.13 to 1.33 mM xs0.74"0.38 mM MCHO from waters of the equatorial Pacific, North Pacific, Gulf...- tions of TCHO were always accompanied by low . dissolved oxygen in the Sargasso sea. Harvey 1983 while studying dissolved TCHO in the California Bight stressed the importance of dissolved sugars in depleting oxygen concentrations off New Jersey...

  3. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  4. Direct interaction between the Gulf Stream and the shelfbreak south of New England

    OpenAIRE

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.; Todd, Robert E.; Albert J. Plueddemann; Magdalena Andres; Manning, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature imagery, satellite altimetry, and a surface drifter track reveal an unusual tilt in the Gulf Stream path that brought the Gulf Stream to 39.9°N near the Middle Atlantic Bight shelfbreak—200 km north of its mean position—in October 2011, while a large meander brought Gulf Stream water within 12 km of the shelfbreak in December 2011. Near-bottom temperature measurements from lobster traps on the outer continental shelf south of New England show distinct warming events (t...

  5. Radioecological model calculations for natural radionuclides released into the environment by disposal of phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, H W; Leenhouts, H P; van Weers, A W; Frissel, M J

    1985-10-01

    The Dutch phosphogypsum, 2 Tg.y-1, is disposed of into the Rhine. This leads to an increase of the U-238 chain radionuclides along the Dutch coast off Rotterdam, decreasing in northerly direction into the German Bight. The calculated increase of activity concentrations in sea food causes an increase of the individual radiation dose of maximal 150 muSv.y-1 and of the collective dose of the Dutch of 170 manSv.y-1. Increase of the radiation dose from stacking phosphogypsum is one order of magnitude lower.

  6. Coastal Ocean State Estimates and Forecasts based on HF Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, E. V.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Staneva, J.; Seemann, J.

    2012-04-01

    Coastal Observing System for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) collects near real-time HF radar data, which are used in parallel with numerical models to provide continuously state estimates and coastal ocean forecasts. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in data-assimilation mode, which are forced with an up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews a new method focussed on intra-tidal time scales combining radial surface currents measurements from three HF radars in the German Bight with a priori information from the hydrodynamic model. The example provided in this study is considered as a step towards developing new coastal ocean products.

  7. Tight coupling between enrichment of iron and manganese in North Sea suspended matter and sedimentary redox processes: evidence for seasonal variability

    OpenAIRE

    Dehairs, F.A.; Baeyens, W.F.J.; Van Gansbeke, D.

    1989-01-01

    Suspended matter and sediments from the North Sea were analysed for Al, Fe and Mn. A seasonal variation of Mn and Fe over Al ratios is observed. For most of the year suspended matter is enriched in Mn and Fe relative to average soil composition. No enrichment, and even depletion, occurs during a short period of the year (April-May) coinciding with the occurrence of the spring phytoplankton bloom. Surface sediments from the Southern Bight show the inverse image, with Mn and Fe enrichment occur...

  8. Coral reefs of Gorgona Island, Colombia, with special reference to corallivores and their influence on community structure and reef development

    OpenAIRE

    Glynn, P.W.; Prahl, H. von; Guhl, F.

    1982-01-01

    Este estudio presenta un breve resumen de la estructura y distribución de los arrecifes coralinos de la Isla de Gorgona. Se investigaron los organismos coralivoros, comparándolos con los de otras localidades del Pacifico Americano; de esta forma se establece un criterio, para conocer las diferencias regionales y las interacciones bióticas sobre las diferentes comunidades coralinas. La Isla de Gorgona se localiza hacia el excremo sur de la provincia de Panamá panamá Bight), distante un...

  9. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collected...... in the North Atlantic as part of the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series program as well as data collected off Southern California as part of the Southern California Bight Study program. The observed maximum particulate organic carbon and volumetric particle concentrations are consistent with the predictions...

  10. Coastal Meteorological Phenomena in CalNex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal meteorology plays an important role in air quality and climate in California. During the 2010 CalNex experiment, several phenomena affected the campaign observations. Among these were coastal eddies and outflow in Santa Monica Bay and the Los Angeles Bight; marine stratus and stratocumulus; and the land-sea breeze cycle on a variety of spatial scales, including transport from the San Francisco Bay Area into the Central Valley. In this presentation, we will describe these phenomena as they were seen in model forecasts and hindcast simulations, and compare those simulations to the relevant meteorological observations.

  11. Evolution of extreme high waters along the east coast of India and at the head of the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, C.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Woodworth, P.L.

    Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, pp. 1137-1216. Dangendorf, S., Mudersbach, C., Jensen, J., Anette, G., Heinrich, H., 2013. Seasonal to decadal forcing of high water level percentiles in the German Bight throughout the last... reanalysis project. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 77(3), pp. 437-471. DOI: 10.1175 / 1520-0477(1996)077<0437:TNYRP>2.0.CO;2. Kay, S., Caesar, J., Wolf, J., Bricheno, L., Nicholls, R. J., Islam, A. S., Lowe, J. A., 2015. Modelling...

  12. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Jonathan P Zehr; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  13. ROMS and SUNTANS Continued Development and Support of AESOP And NLIWI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-30

    International Conference on the Humboldt Current System, Lima/Peru, Dec. 2006. Deutsch, C. N. Gruber, H. Frenzel , T. Nagai, G.-K. Plattner, J.C. McWilliams, A...Stolzenbach, 2007: Circulation in the Southern California Bight. Eastern Pacific Ocean Conference, Leavenworth, WA, Sept. 2007. Frenzel , H., C. Dong, N. Gruber...Sept. 2006. Gruber, N., H. Frenzel , P. Marchesiello, J.C. McWilliams, T. Nagai, and G.-K. Plattner, 2007: On the Role of Eddies for Coastal Productivity

  14. Species Profiles. Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    1978. Development of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (May fishes in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. 1985). M.S. Thesis. Texas A&M Vol. IV. Carangidae through... Laguna Madre , a hypersaline estuary. Pages 383-389 Joseph, E.B. 1972. The status of in G. H. Lauff, ed. Estuaries, the sciaenid stocks of the Middle...Fisheries, other commercial sciaenids of the Morehead City, N.C. 80 pp. Texas Gulf. Bull. U.S. Bur. Fish . 44:129-214. Stickney, R.R., and M.L. Cuenco

  15. Circulation and exchange at the continental shelf and slope, SEEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, R.W.; Ou, Hsien-Wang.

    1990-01-01

    This project is a component of the SEEP-2 program to study shelf-slope exchange in the southern Middle Atlantic bight (MBA). It represents the physical oceanographic portion of the SEEP-2 research at Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory (L-DGO). Since the work consists of two parts: data analysis and theoretical modeling, this report will be divided into two parts to describe the progress of each activity. It covers work performed during the time interval March to December 1990 and is a sequel to the report submitted in February 1990. 25 figs.

  16. Trace metal fluxes to ferromanganese nodules from the western Baltic Sea as a record for long-term environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hlawatsch, S.; Garbe-Schonberg, C.D.; Lechtenberg, F.; Manceau, A.; Tamura, N.; Kulik, D.A.; Suess, E.; Kersten, M.

    2002-03-12

    Trace element profiles in ferromanganese nodules from the western Baltic Sea were analyzed with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray radiation techniques (fluorescence: mSXRF, and diffraction: mXRD) at high spatial resolution in growth direction. Of the trace elements studied (Zn, Cu, Cd, Ni, Co, Mo, Ba), Zn showed the most significant enrichment, with values in the outermost surface layers of up to six-fold higher than those found in older core parts. The high-resolution Zn profiles provide the necessary temporal resolution for a dating method analogous to dendrochronology. Profiles in various samples collected during two decades were matched and the overlapping sections used for estimation of the accretion rates. Assuming a continuous accretion of these relatively fast growing nodules (on average 20 mm a-1) over the last century, the Zn enrichment was thus assessed to have commenced around 1860/70 in nodules from the Kiel Bight and in 1880/90 from Mecklenburg Bight, reflecting the enhanced heavy metal emissions with rising industrialization in Europe. Apart from the obvious success with Zn, only As and Co show significant but only 1.5-fold enrichments in the most recent growth layers of the nodules. Other anthropogenic trace metals like Cu and Cd are not at all enriched, which, together with the distinct early-diagenetic Fe/Mn banding, weakens the potential of the nodules for retrospective monitoring.

  17. Nocturnal Fish Use of New Jersey Marsh Creek and Adjacent Bay Shoal Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, R. A.; Able, K. W.

    1997-06-01

    Night-time sampling with gill nets in the Little Egg Harbor estuary revealed a component of the estuarine fish fauna, hitherto poorly documented, which is comprised of relatively large size classes of juvenile and adult life history stages. The fishesMustelus canis, Pomatomus saltatrix, Paralichthys dentatus, Brevoortia tyrannus, Prionotus evolansandAlosa mediocriswere the most abundant fishes captured. These observations suggest that Mid-Atlantic Bight estuaries are important nurseries for juvenile stages beyond the first year, as well as for the young of the year (YOY). Although many other studies emphasise the importance of estuaries as nurseries for YOY stages, the importance of estuaries to later juvenile life stages has been largely overlooked. This component of estuarine fish fauna has been poorly represented in previous North American studies because of probable gear avoidance, and because most studies are conducted primarily during the day. The authors hypothesise that these later juvenile stages are likely to be important estuarine faunal components in other geographic regions, as well as in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. A descriptive comparison of catches between ebb and flood tide stages, and between bay shoal and tidal marsh creek habitats, suggests that later juvenile and adult stages of several species make tidal migrations into shallow estuarine habitats, such as shoals and marsh creeks, during the night hours.

  18. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  19. Tar pollution of beaches in the Indian Ocean, the south China Sea and the South Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostdam, B.L.

    1984-07-01

    During 1978, a comparative survey was made of the degree of pollution of 265 beaches in the Indian Ocean, the South China Sea, the South Pacific and along the Southern California Bight, the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the Dutch North Sea. Part of the results were published recently and elicited a number of requests for the full data set, which is, therefore, summarized in this note. Generalized observations on tar pollution are: (1) strandings from individual spills could rarely be correlated over distances longer than a few km; (2) tar is concentrated in distinct bands parallel to the water line; (3) there is a pronounced trend of vertical zonation of tar from smaller, well-rounded and soft particles near the water line to larger, flattened and hardened lumps landward; (4) buried tar is relatively uncommon, suggesting a residence time of around 30-90 days in the tropics; (5) tar concentrations display high variability indicating the need for large numbers of samples; (6) prevailing wind regimes are the main cause for seasonal variations in tar strandings. The highest beach tar concentrations were found in areas of oil production or near tanker routes, especially in enclosed seas; Persian Gulf, Red Sea and South China Sea.

  20. A novel adaptive biogeochemical model, and its 3-D application for a decadal hindcast simulation of the biogeochemistry of the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimoglu, Onur; Hofmeister, Richard; Wirtz, Kai

    2016-04-01

    Adaptation and acclimation processes are often ignored in ecosystem-scale model implementations, despite the long-standing recognition of their importance. Here we present a novel adaptive phytoplankton growth model where acclimation of the community to the changes in external resource ratios is accounted for, using optimality principles and dynamic physiological traits. We show that the model can reproduce the internal stoichiometries obtained at marginal supply ratios in chemostat experiments. The model is applied in a decadal hindcast simulation of the southern North Sea, where it is coupled to a 2-D benthic model and a 3-D hydrodynamic model in an approximately 1.5km horizontal resolution at the German Bight coast. The model is shown to have good skill in capturing the steep, coastal gradients in the German Bight, suggested by the match between the estimated and observed dissolved nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations. We then analyze the differential sensitivity of the coastal and off-shore zones to major drivers of the system, such as riverine nutrient loads. We demonstrate that the relevance of phytoplankton acclimation varies across coastal gradients and can become particularly significant in terms of summer nutrient depletion.

  1. Interdisciplinary approach to the demography of Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The trans-Atlantic slave trade dramatically changed the demographic makeup of the New World, with varying regions of the African coast exploited differently over roughly a 400 year period. When compared to the discrete mitochondrial haplotype distribution of historically appropriate source populations, the unique distribution within a specific source population can prove insightful in estimating the contribution of each population. Here, we analyzed the first hypervariable region of mitochondrial DNA in a sample from the Caribbean island of Jamaica and compared it to aggregated populations in Africa divided according to historiographically defined segments of the continent's coastline. The results from these admixture procedures were then compared to the wealth of historic knowledge surrounding the disembarkation of Africans on the island. Results In line with previous findings, the matriline of Jamaica is almost entirely of West African descent. Results from the admixture analyses suggest modern Jamaicans share a closer affinity with groups from the Gold Coast and Bight of Benin despite high mortality, low fecundity, and waning regional importation. The slaves from the Bight of Biafra and West-central Africa were imported in great numbers; however, the results suggest a deficit in expected maternal contribution from those regions. Conclusions When considering the demographic pressures imposed by chattel slavery on Jamaica during the slave era, the results seem incongruous. Ethnolinguistic and ethnographic evidence, however, may explain the apparent non-random levels of genetic perseverance. The application of genetics may prove useful in answering difficult demographic questions left by historically voiceless groups. PMID:22360861

  2. Gulf stream separation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, Joseph

    Climate models currently struggle with the more traditional, coarse ( O(100 km) ) representation of the ocean. In these coarse ocean simulations, western boundary currents are notoriously difficult to model accurately. The modeled Gulf Stream is typically seen exhibiting a mean pathway that is north of observations, and is linked to a warm sea-surface temperature bias in the Mid-Atlantic Bight. Although increased resolution ( O(10 km) ) improves the modeled Gulf Stream position, there is no clean recipe for obtaining the proper pathway. The 70 year history of literature on the Gulf Stream separation suggests that we have not reached a resolution on the dynamics that control the current's pathway just south of the Mid-Atlantic Bight. Without a concrete knowledge on the separation dynamics, we cannot provide a clean recipe for accurately modeling the Gulf Stream at increased resolutions. Further, any reliable parameterization that yields a realistic Gulf Stream path must express the proper physics of separation. The goal of this dissertation is to determine what controls the Gulf Stream separation. To do so, we examine the results of a model intercomparison study and a set of numerical regional terraforming experiments. It is argued that the separation is governed by local dynamics that are most sensitive to the steepening of the continental shelf, consistent with the topographic wave arrest hypothesis of Stern (1998). A linear extension of Stern's theory is provided, which illustrates that wave arrest is possible for a continuously stratified fluid.

  3. Dynamics of the Cold Water Event off the Southeast Coast of the United States in the Summer of 2003: An Application of NASA's Remote Sensing Data to Coastal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dongliang; Savtchenko, Andrey; Li, Chunyan,

    2004-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard of Terra and Aqua satellites provide, for the first time, concurrent measurements of sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean color, which are suitable for coastal upwelling studies. The accuracy, the 1-km spatial resolution, and the almost complete daily coverage of the MODIS data compared with historical measurements make it advantageous for resolving important coastal fronts of chlorophyll concentration and temperature. The cold SST anomaly during summer 2003 off the coast of the South Atlantic Bight is an event that is comprehensively covered by NASA's MODIS and SeaWinds satellite observations. These data combined with in situ tide gauge, mooring, and ship measurements can be used to identify important dynamics responsible for the anomalous cold water event. The analysis of the data suggests that coastal upwelling occurs in the climatological summer forced by the climatological southerlies over the South Atlantic Bight area in summer. However, the strong buoyancy barrier in summer prevents the cold water below the thermocline from reaching the ocean surface. In summer 2003, the southwesterlies in July through August were extraordinarily strong and persistent, which generated the upwelling currents strong enough to overcome the buoyancy resistance. The results of this analysis demonstrate the possibility of monitoring and forecasting the event using combination of the satellite and in situ observations. The MODIS data are archived and distributed by the NASA's Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data can be accessed via the URL http://wwv.daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/MODIS.

  4. Meteo-marine parameters for highly variable environment in coastal regions from satellite radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskachevsky, A. L.; Rosenthal, W.; Lehner, S.

    2016-09-01

    The German Bight of the North Sea is the area with highly variable sea state conditions, intensive ship traffic and with a high density of offshore installations, e.g. wind farms in use and under construction. Ship navigation and the docking on offshore constructions is impeded by significant wave heights HS > 1.3 m. For these reasons, improvements are required in recognition and forecasting of sea state HS in the range 0-3 m. Thus, this necessitates the development of new methods to determine the distribution of meteo-marine parameters from remote sensing data with an accuracy of decimetres for HS. The operationalization of these methods then allows the robust automatic processing in near real time (NRT) to support forecast agencies by providing validations for model results. A new empirical algorithm XWAVE_C (C = coastal) for estimation of significant wave height from X-band satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been developed, adopted for coastal applications using TerraSAR-X (TS-X) and Tandem-X (TD-X) satellites in the German Bight and implemented into the Sea Sate Processor (SSP) for fully automatic processing for NRT services. The algorithm is based on the spectral analysis of subscenes and the model function uses integrated image spectra parameters as well as local wind information from the analyzed subscene. The algorithm is able to recognize and remove the influence of non-sea state produced signals in the Wadden Sea areas such as dry sandbars as well as nonlinear SAR image distortions produced by e.g. short wind waves and breaking waves. Also parameters of very short waves, which are not visible in SAR images and produce only unsystematic clutter, can be accurately estimated. The SSP includes XWAVE_C, a pre-filtering procedure for removing artefacts such as ships, seamarks, buoys, offshore constructions and slicks, and an additional procedure performing a check of results based on the statistics of the whole scene. The SSP allows an

  5. The Colombia Current: An Eastern Tropical Pacific Coastal Current, Early Oceanographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rubio, E.

    2007-05-01

    Newly gathered hydrographic data from the Colombia Pacific Ocean is combined with remote sensing data to reassess the properties of the costal current named Colombian Current by Wooster (1959). The Colombian Pacific Ocean is located between 84°-76°W and 1°30'-5°N (oceanic zone), 1°30'- 7°N (coastal zone): This area is well-known also like Panama Bight. New hydrographic data were occupied along the Colombian Pacific coast during March of 2006, making 41 stations with measurements of CTD until a maximum depth of 1200 m, depending on the depth of the marine bottom. On the other hand, sea surface temperatures (SST) were obtained from the MODIS-AQUA satellite and sea surface wind speed and wind direction stem from QuickScat, both averaged for March 2006. Hydrographic grid layers necessary to obtain dynamic topography variable were made with objective mapping calculating is not total dynamic height, but the dynamic height between consecutive levels or "thickness". The purpose of this methodology is that in very coastal campaigns it can have a substantial number of stations that do not arrive at the reference level. Finally geostrophic velocity was computed for the Colombian Current area at several layers. The coast was characterized by low salinities due to river runoff in the North zone. The sea surface temperature during the month of March of 2006 was especially low in the oceanic zone, reaching temperatures between 19°C and 24°C.The dynamic topography indicated the presence of a surface coastal current flowing towards the north and a crosscurrent to 400 m of depth never before described. The wind corresponded to the pattern of the wind jet of Panama. During March the ITCZ moves south, drawing the Panama jet across the Isthmus and over the Pacific. Upwelling curl associated with the left (southeast) flank of this jet generates a cyclonic eddy in the Panama Bight and SST cooling in its center. In the Panama Bight, the curl dipole produces a cyclonic circulation

  6. Polyfluorinated compounds in ambient air from ship- and land-based measurements in northern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Annekatrin; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    Neutral volatile and semi-volatile polyfluorinated organic compounds (PFC) and ionic perfluorinated compounds were determined in air samples collected at two sites in the vicinity of Hamburg, Germany, and onboard the German research vessel Atair during a cruise in the German Bight, North Sea, in early November 2007. PUF/XAD-2/PUF cartridges and glass fiber filters as sampling media were applied to collect several fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOH), fluorotelomer acrylates (FTA), perfluoroalkyl sulfonamides (FASA), and perfluoroalkyl sulfonamido ethanols (FASE) in the gas- and particle-phase as well as a set of perfluorinated carboxylates (PFCA) and sulfonates (PFSA) in the particle-phase. This study presents the distribution of PFC in ambient air of the German North Sea and in the vicinity of Hamburg for the first time. Average total PFC concentrations in and around Hamburg (180 pg m -3) were higher than those observed in the German Bight (80 pg m -3). In the German Bight, minimum-maximum gas-phase concentrations of 17-82 pg m -3 for ΣFTOH, 2.6-10 pg m -3 for ΣFTA, 10-15 pg m -3 for ΣFASA, and 2-4.4 pg m -3 for ΣFASE were determined. In the vicinity of Hamburg, minimum-maximum gas-phase concentrations of 32-204 pg m -3 for ΣFTOH, 3-26 pg m -3 for ΣFTA, 3-18 pg m -3 for ΣFASA, and 2-15 pg m -3 for ΣFASE were detected. Concentrations of perfluorinated acids were in the range of 1-11 pg m -3. FTOH clearly dominated the substance spectrum; 8:2 FTOH occurred in maximum proportions. Air mass back trajectories, cluster, and correlation analyses revealed that the air mass origin and thus medium to long range atmospheric transport was the governing parameter for the amount of PFC in ambient air. Southwesterly located source regions seemed to be responsible for elevated PFC concentrations, local sources appeared to be of minor importance.

  7. Coastal pollution limits pelagic larval dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puritz, Jonathan B; Toonen, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The ecological impact of large coastal human populations on marine ecosystems remains relatively unknown. Here, we examine the population structure of Patiria miniata, the bat star, and correlate genetic distances with a model based on flow rates and proximity to P. miniata populations for the four major stormwater runoff and wastewater effluent sources of the Southern California Bight. We show that overall genetic connectivity is high (F(ST)~0.005); however, multivariate analyses show that genetic structure is highly correlated with anthropogenic inputs. The best models included both stormwater and wastewater variables and explained between 26.55 and 93.69% of the observed structure. Additionally, regressions between allelic richness and distance to sources show that populations near anthropogenic pollution have reduced genetic diversity. Our results indicate that anthropogenic runoff and effluent are acting as barriers to larval dispersal, effectively isolating a high gene flow species that is virtually free of direct human impact.

  8. Die Biomasse mariner Makrobenthos-Gesellschaften im Einflußbereich der Klärschlammverklappung vor der Elbemündung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlenhardt-Siegel, U.

    1981-12-01

    The macrofauna of a dumping area in the eastern part of the German Bight (North Sea) was investigated in July, August and November, 1978 at five stations situated on a transect including central and peripheral areas of the dumping region. Abundance and biomass (ash free dry weight) of the macrofauna and its variation from July to November were analysed as well as the biomass of different taxa. Molluscs dominated over polychaetes, crustaceans and echinoderms. A positive correlation seemed to exist between mud content and biomass at the peripherally situated stations. In the central sewage sludge area, however, the biomass values were reduced. In late autumn the biomass decreased in the entire area due to the death of Diastylis rathkei, Abra alba and Pectinaria koreni. These species were replaced by the mollusc Nucula turgida and polychaete Nephtys hombergii. In autumn the biomass values also showed a distinct minimum at the central stations.

  9. Historical polycyclic aromatic and petrogenic hydrocarbon loading in Northern Central Gulf of Mexico shelf sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overton, E.B.; Ashton, B.M.; Miles, M.S. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Studies

    2005-10-01

    The distribution of selected hydrocarbons within ten dated sediment cores taken from the Mississippi River Bight off coastal Louisiana suggests a chronic contaminant loading from several sources including the river itself, oil and gas exploration in the central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) shelf area, and natural geologic hydrocarbon seeps. Data were grouped as either total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), which were indicative of pyrogenic PAH's; or estimated total hopanes (indicative of petrogenic hydrocarbons). The total PAH concentrations and estimated total hopanes begin increasing above background levels (approximately 200 ng g{sup -1}) after the 1950s. The distribution of these hydrocarbons and hopanes within the dated sediment cores suggests that the Mississippi River is a regional source of pyrogenic PAH's, and that the hopanes are from natural geologic hydrocarbon seeps, oil and gas exploration in the GOM, or both. (author)

  10. Mussel Watch update: long-term trends in selected contaminants from coastal California, 1977-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melwani, Aroon R; Gregorio, Dominic; Jin, Yujie; Stephenson, Mark; Ichikawa, Gary; Siegel, Emily; Crane, Dave; Lauenstein, Gunnar; Davis, Jay A

    2014-04-30

    This study examined trends in contaminants measured during three decades of "Mussel Watch" monitoring on the California coast. Chlorinated organic contaminants and butyltins declined the most rapidly, with tissue concentrations in 2010 that were up to 75% lower than during the 1980s. Silver and lead declined at about half of the stations statewide, but generally exhibited slower rates of decline relative to the organic compounds. In contrast, copper increased at many stations, and PAHs showed little evidence for declines. Mussels from San Francisco Bay and the Southern California Bight were historically the most contaminated and have had the steepest declines. Overall, these data show that the "Mussel Watch" approach to monitoring contaminants in California has provided some of the best evidence of the effectiveness of actions to improve water quality over the past 30 years. These datasets also highlight challenges that remain in managing PAHs and copper.

  11. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil spill drift paths in the German Bight—probabilistic assessment based on numerical ensemble simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; Groll, Nikolaus; Maßmann, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Oil dispersed in the water column remains sheltered from wind forcing, so that an altered drift path is a key consequence of using chemical dispersants. In this study, ensemble simulations were conducted based on 7 years of simulated atmospheric and marine conditions, evaluating 2,190 hypothetical spills from each of 636 cells of a regular grid covering the inner German Bight (SE North Sea). Each simulation compares two idealized setups assuming either undispersed or fully dispersed oil. Differences are summarized in a spatial map of probabilities that chemical dispersant applications would help prevent oil pollution from entering intertidal coastal areas of the Wadden Sea. High probabilities of success overlap strongly with coastal regions between 10 m and 20 m water depth, where the use of chemical dispersants for oil spill response is a particularly contentious topic. The present study prepares the ground for a more detailed net environmental benefit analysis (NEBA) accounting also for toxic effects.

  12. CZCS view of an oceanic acid waste dump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Jane A.

    1988-01-01

    Plumes from the acid waste dump in the New York Bight were visible in all nine cloud-free Coastal Zone Color Scanner images from April and May 1981. The CZCS subsurface radiance channels displayed consistent spectral characteristics, which consisted of a strong increase in the 550 nm channel and a moderate increase in the 520 nm channel relative to the surrounding coastal waters. The 443 nm channel showed no change or a slight decrease in radiance within the plumes. These anomalous radiances preclude the calculation of pigment in the dump plumes using existing algorithms. However, the high radiances of the 550 nm channel can be used to examine the flow patterns of surface water in the vicinity of the dump.

  13. The impact of temperature change on the activity and community composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria in arctic versus temperate marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2009-01-01

    that was weaker after prolonged incubations, which could imply an acclimatization response rather than a selection process of the SRB community. The microbial community composition was analysed by targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA using catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD...... composition of sulfate-reducing bacteria were studied in the permanently cold sediment of north-western Svalbard (Arctic Ocean) and compared with a temperate habitat with seasonally varying temperature (German Bight, North Sea). Short-term 35S-sulfate tracer incubations in a temperature-gradient block......-FISH). The results showed the decline of specific groups of SRB and confirmed a strong impact of increasing temperatures on the microbial community composition of arctic sediment. Conversely, in seasonally changing sediment sulfate reduction rates and sulfate-reducing bacterial abundance changed little in response...

  14. Antarctic atmospheric infrasound. Final technical report, 1 July 1981-30 September 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.R.; McKibben, B.N.

    1986-11-01

    In order to monitor atmospheric infrasonic waves in the passband from 0.1 to 0.01 Hz a digital infrasonic detection system was installed in Antarctica on the Ross Ice shelf near McMurdo Station on McMurdo Sound. An array of seven infrasonic microphones subtending an area of about 35 sg km was operated in Windless Bight. The analog microphone data were telemetered to McMurdo station where the infrasonic date were digitized and subjected to on-line real-time analysis to detect traveling infrasonic waves with periods from 10 to 100 seconds. During the period of operation of the Antartic infrasonic observatory, hundreds of infrasonic signals were detected in association with many natural sources such as the aurora australis, marine storm sea-air interactions, volcanic eruptions, mountain generated lee-wave effects, large meteors and auroral electrojet supersonic motions.

  15. The effects of environmental parameters on zooplankton assemblages in tropical coastal estuary, South-west, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waidi O. Abdul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to examine the distribution and assemblage structure of zooplankton in relation to environmental parameters of tropical coastal estuarine ecosystem impounding Bight of Benin, Nigeria. The estuarine water samples were collected between January and December, 2014 from three sampling zones (Brushpark, Open water and Wetland then were fixed in 4% formalin. A total of twenty-eight (28 species belonging to four (4 groups were recorded in this study. These groups were rotifera, copepoda, cladocerans and ostracodas, and were all widely distributed in the three investigated zones. Higher richness, dominance and abundance indices were recorded in Zone I when compared to both Zones II and III. Cluster analysis showed five distinct species communities. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA showed a distinct smattering positive and negative correlation on the distribution of zooplankton indicating that the relative abundance of any species was dependent on specific environmental variables.

  16. Detecting relationships between the interannual variability in climate records and ecological time series using a multivariate statistical approach - four case studies for the North Sea region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyen, H. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Gewaesserphysik

    1998-12-31

    A multivariate statistical approach is presented that allows a systematic search for relationships between the interannual variability in climate records and ecological time series. Statistical models are built between climatological predictor fields and the variables of interest. Relationships are sought on different temporal scales and for different seasons and time lags. The possibilities and limitations of this approach are discussed in four case studies dealing with salinity in the German Bight, abundance of zooplankton at Helgoland Roads, macrofauna communities off Norderney and the arrival of migratory birds on Helgoland. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein statistisches, multivariates Modell wird vorgestellt, das eine systematische Suche nach potentiellen Zusammenhaengen zwischen Variabilitaet in Klima- und oekologischen Zeitserien erlaubt. Anhand von vier Anwendungsbeispielen wird der Klimaeinfluss auf den Salzgehalt in der Deutschen Bucht, Zooplankton vor Helgoland, Makrofauna vor Norderney, und die Ankunft von Zugvoegeln auf Helgoland untersucht. (orig.)

  17. Increase in dimethylsulfide (DMS emissions due to eutrophication of coastal waters offsets their reduction due to ocean acidification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eGypens

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Available information from manipulative experiments suggested that the emission of dimethylsulfide (DMS would decrease in response to the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean (ocean acidification. However, in coastal environments, the carbonate chemistry of surface waters was also strongly modified by eutrophication and related changes in biological activity (increased primary production and change in phytoplankton dominance during the last 50 years. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DMS emissions in marine coastal environments also strongly responded to eutrophication in addition to ocean acidification at decadal timescales. We used the R-MIRO-BIOGAS model in the eutrophied Southern Bight of the North Sea characterized by intense blooms of Phaeocystis that are high producers of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, the precursor of DMS. We showed that, for the period from 1951 to 2007, eutrophication actually led to an increase of DMS emissions much stronger than the response of DMS emissions to ocean acidification.

  18. Contesting "Le corps militaire": Antimilitarism, Pacificism, Anarcho-Communism and 'Le Douanier' Rousseau's La Guerre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brauer, Fae

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When the 1889 Military Law was passed, it established three-year universal conscription and a greater army of citizens to boost military preparedness for war in French colonies and against Germany.Far from its ramifications being of no concern to neo-impressionists, it was the subject of bightingly bitter antimilitarist cartoons by Maximilien Luce and antimilitarist paintings by the neo-impressionist outsider, 'Le douanier' Rousseau. Far from picturing the patriotic honor of becoming a soldier and the victories of war, as did Edouard Detaille, Rousseau did the opposite. In the heat of military slaughter of families at Fourmies, Rousseau revealed how conscription would transform French citizens into le corps militaire to fight not just against their arch-enemy with machine-like precision but against their very own people.

  19. On the "hidden" phytoplankton blooms on Australia's southern shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Jochen; Kavi, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    Phytoplankton blooms on Australia's southern shelves are revisited using satellite-derived monthly data of chlorophyll a concentrations for the period 2003-2015. It is known that the region hosts a seasonal coastal upwelling system that develops in austral summer (January-March) with chlorophyll a concentrations of >2 mg/m3. While this summer upwelling is spatially limited to a few hot spots, here we show that widespread phytoplankton blooms of moderate ( 1 mg/m3) chlorophyll a concentrations develop during autumn and early winter on most of Australia's extensive southern shelves—from the vast shelves of the Great Australian Bight (GAB) in the west to Bass Strait in the east. This surprising finding disproves the widespread belief that shelf waters of the GAB are generally oligotrophic and may explain the relatively high abundance of both forage fish (sardines) and upper trophic-level predators (e.g., tuna and whales) in the region.

  20. Southeast continental shelf studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, D.W.

    1979-02-12

    Research efforts on the southeast continental shelf currently describe the manner in which fluctuations in Gulf Stream motion influence biological and chemical processes. Current meter arrays are maintained in the Georgia Bight and in Onslow Bay to describe general circulation patterns and to identify forcing functions. biological studies describe processes affecting temporal and spatial variations on the shelf and have attempted to track the biological history of intruded Gulf Stream water masses. Chemical studies examine the influence of both physical and biological variables on the distribution and fate of trace elements. The current state of knowledge is reviewed, the hypotheses developed and are described, a rationale for testing these hypotheses is given. 1 figure, 1 table.

  1. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2015-04-01

    An observational study was performed in the central Southern California Bight in Spring 2010 to understand the relationship between seasonal spring phytoplankton blooms and coastal processes that included nutrient input from upwelling, wastewater effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development and evolution of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Results from the glider and ESP observations demonstrated that blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. A significant outbreak and surface manifestation of the blooms coincided with periods of upwelling, or other processes that caused shallowing of the pycnocline and subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Our results indicate that subsurface populations can be an important source for “seeding” surface Pseudo-nitzschia HAB events in southern California.

  2. Highlights of the First 15 Months of Aquarius Salinity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Kao, Hsun-Ying; Wentz, Frank; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius satellite salinity measurements are resolving the major global and regional spatial patterns, and temporal variations, since the start of routine data collection on 25 August 2011. This description includes the principal seasonal variations over the first annual cycle as observed by the mission. In particular, we identify the evolution of low salinity anomalies associated with the Atlantic and Pacific intertropical convergence zones (ITCZ), major river outflows such as the Amazon, a seasonal low salinity anomaly in the Panama bight, and other features. We also explore the links that the salinity variations have with precipitation and surface currents. We then will describe the variations related to the presently evolving 2012 El Nino, now evident, as it progresses through the summer and fall 2012. We conclude with a brief summary of the Aquarius data products and validation

  3. Global detection and analysis of coastline associated rainfall using objective pattern recognition techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Bergemann, Martin; Lane, Todd P

    2015-01-01

    Coastally induced rainfall is a common feature especially in tropical and subtropical regions. However, it has been difficult to quantify the contribution of coastal rainfall features to the overall local rainfall. We develop a novel technique to objectively identify precipitation associated with land-sea interaction and apply it to satellite based rainfall estimates. The Maritime Continent, the Bight of Panama, Madagascar and the Mediterranean are found to be regions where land-sea interactions plays a crucial role in the formation of precipitation. In these regions $\\approx$ 40\\% to 60\\% of the total rainfall can be related to coastline effects. Due to its importance for the climate system, the Maritime Continent is a particular region of interest with high overall amounts of rainfall and large fractions resulting from land-sea interactions throughout the year. To demonstrate the utility of our identification method we investigate the influence of several modes of variability, such as the Madden-Julian-Osci...

  4. Vertical activity distribution of dissimilatory nitrate reduction in coastal marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, A.; de Beer, D.; Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    The relative importance of two dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways, denitrification (DEN) and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), was investigated in intact sediment cores from five different coastal marine field sites (Dorum, Aarhus Bight, Mississippi Delta, Limfjord...... reduction was clearly dominated by DEN (59-131% of the total NO3- reduced) rather than by DNRA, irrespective of the sedimentary inventories of electron donors such as organic carbon, sulfide, and iron. Highest ammonium production via DNRA, accounting for up to 8.9% of the total NO3- reduced, was found...... at a site with very high concentrations of total sulfide and NH4+ within and below the layer in which NO3- reduction occurred. Sediment from two field sites, one with low and one with high DNRA activity in the core incubations, was also used for slurry incubations. Now, in both sediments high DNRA activity...

  5. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period was followed...... by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic activity in late...... March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m– 2, reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross primary production...

  6. Large CO2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent storage in energy end-uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempton, Willett; Archer, Cristina L.; Dhanju, Amardeep; Garvine, Richard W.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2007-01-01

    We develop methods for assessing offshore wind resources, using a model of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over water and a wind-electric technology analysis linking turbine and tower limitations to bathymetry and continental shelf geology. These methods are tested by matching the winds of the Middle-Atlantic Bight (MAB) to energy demand in the adjacent states (Massachusetts through North Carolina, U.S.A.). We find that the MAB wind resource can produce 330 GW average electrical power, a resource exceeding the region's current summed demand for 73 GW of electricity, 29 GW of light vehicle fuels (now gasoline), and 83 GW of building fuels (now distillate fuel oil and natural gas). Supplying these end-uses with MAB wind power would reduce by 68% the region's CO2 emissions, and reduce by 57% its greenhouse gas forcing. These percentages are in the range of the global reductions needed to stabilize climate.

  7. Oceanography of the Southeastern Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    This volume, the second in the Coastal and Estuarine Sciences series, provides a synthesis of the physical, chemical, and biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The results presented derive from a decade-long multidisciplinary investigation of the SAB continental shelf regime.The SAB extends from West Palm Beach, Fla., where the narrow south Florida shelf begins to broaden, to Cape Hatteras, N.C., where the shelf again narrows. This broad and shallow area is distinguished by the proximity of the Gulf Stream to the shelf break. Large contrasts in the distribution of properties, the strength of oceanic and atmospheric forces, and the high frequency (4-12 days) at which these forces vary have created a unique natural laboratory in which a variety of oceanic processes may be studied.

  8. Genetic by environmental variation but no local adaptation in oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, A Randall; Hanley, Torrance C; Byers, James E; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Malek, Jennafer C; Piehler, Michael F; Kimbro, David L

    2017-01-01

    Functional trait variation within and across populations can strongly influence population, community, and ecosystem processes, but the relative contributions of genetic vs. environmental factors to this variation are often not clear, potentially complicating conservation and restoration efforts. For example, local adaptation, a particular type of genetic by environmental (G*E) interaction in which the fitness of a population in its own habitat is greater than in other habitats, is often invoked in management practices, even in the absence of supporting evidence. Despite increasing attention to the potential for G*E interactions, few studies have tested multiple populations and environments simultaneously, limiting our understanding of the spatial consistency in patterns of adaptive genetic variation. In addition, few studies explicitly differentiate adaptation in response to predation from other biological and environmental factors. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment of first-generation eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) juveniles from six populations across three field sites spanning 1000 km in the southeastern Atlantic Bight in both the presence and absence of predation to test for G*E variation in this economically valuable and ecologically important species. We documented significant G*E variation in survival and growth, yet there was no evidence for local adaptation. Condition varied across oyster cohorts: Offspring of northern populations had better condition than offspring from the center of our region. Oyster populations in the southeastern Atlantic Bight differ in juvenile survival, growth, and condition, yet offspring from local broodstock do not have higher survival or growth than those from farther away. In the absence of population-specific performance information, oyster restoration and aquaculture may benefit from incorporating multiple populations into their practices.

  9. Development of an ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves in a coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Arno

    2015-04-01

    An ensemble prediction system for ocean surface waves has been developed and applied on a local scale to the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. U10-wind fields generated by the COSMO-DE-EPS upstream forecast chain of the German Met Service (DWD: Deutscher Wetterdienst) have been used as the driving force for the third-generation spectral wave model WAM. The atmospheric chain includes four different global models that provide boundary values for four regional COSMO-EU realisations. Each of those drive five COSMO-DE members, respectively, with different sets of physical parameterisations, so that finally 20 members are available to run 20 corresponding wave ensemble members of the coastal wave model CWAM (Coastal WAve Model) for the German Bight and the western Baltic Sea. It is the first time that in an ensemble prediction system for ocean waves, an atmospheric model of such a fine spatial resolution of 2.8 km has been combined with a wave model running on a model grid with a mesh size of 900 m only. Test runs with the wave ensemble prediction system have been executed for two entire months (April 2013 and June 2014) and for an 8-day storm case (Xaver) in December 2013 in order to check whether such a system could be a reasonable step to improve the future operational wave forecasts of the DWD. The results computed by the different wave model members agree fairly well with available buoy data. The differences between the results for the integrated wave parameters of the individual members are small only, but more pronounced in extreme storm situations. Finally, the statistical analysis of the comparisons with measurements show without exception slightly improved values for the ensemble mean of the wave ensemble members compared with the usual deterministic routine control run.

  10. Impact of climate change on freshwater resources in a heterogeneous coastal aquifer of Bremerhaven, Germany: A three-dimensional modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Ptak, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to induce sea level rise in the German Bight, which is part of the North Sea, Germany. Climate change may also modify river discharge of the river Weser flowing into the German Bight, which will alter both pressure and salinity distributions in the river Weser estuary. To study the long-term interaction between sea level rise, discharge variations, a storm surge and coastal aquifer flow dynamics, a 3D seawater intrusion model was designed using the fully coupled surface-subsurface numerical model HydroGeoSphere. The model simulates the coastal aquifer as an integral system considering complexities such as variable-density flow, variably saturated flow, irregular boundary conditions, irregular land surface and anthropogenic structures (e.g., dyke, drainage canals, water gates). The simulated steady-state groundwater flow of the year 2009 is calibrated using PEST. In addition, four climate change scenarios are simulated based on the calibrated model: (i) sea level rise of 1m, (ii) the salinity of the seaside boundary increases by 4 PSU (Practical Salinity Units), (iii) the salinity of the seaside boundary decreases by 12 PSU, and (iv) a storm surge with partial dyke failure. Under scenarios (i) and (iv), the salinized area expands several kilometers further inland during several years. Natural remediation can take up to 20 years. However, sudden short-term salinity changes in the river Weser estuary do not influence the salinized area in the coastal aquifer. The obtained results are useful for coastal engineering practices and drinking water resource management.

  11. Surface Ocean pCO2 Seasonality and Sea-Air CO2 Flux Estimates for the North American East Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G., Jr.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Salisbury, Joe; Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Underway and in situ observations of surface ocean pCO2, combined with satellite data, were used to develop pCO2 regional algorithms to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of surface ocean pCO2 and sea-air CO2 flux for five physically and biologically distinct regions of the eastern North American continental shelf: the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), the Gulf of Maine (GoM), Nantucket Shoals and Georges Bank (NS+GB), and the Scotian Shelf (SS). Temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon variability are the most influential factors driving the seasonality of pCO2. Estimates of the sea-air CO2 flux were derived from the available pCO2 data, as well as from the pCO2 reconstructed by the algorithm. Two different gas exchange parameterizations were used. The SS, GB+NS, MAB, and SAB regions are net sinks of atmospheric CO2 while the GoM is a weak source. The estimates vary depending on the use of surface ocean pCO2 from the data or algorithm, as well as with the use of the two different gas exchange parameterizations. Most of the regional estimates are in general agreement with previous studies when the range of uncertainty and interannual variability are taken into account. According to the algorithm, the average annual uptake of atmospheric CO2 by eastern North American continental shelf waters is found to be between 3.4 and 5.4 Tg C/yr (areal average of 0.7 to 1.0 mol CO2 /sq m/yr) over the period 2003-2010.

  12. Submission to the Public Review Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, E. [Sierra Club of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2002-01-11

    The Sierra Club of Canada is concerned about the impacts from oil and gas exploration within license areas 2364, 2365, and 2368. These concerns apply to each of the four programmes of the Sierra Club of Canada, namely: health and the environment, energy and atmosphere, protection of biological diversity, and the transition to a sustainable economy. The Sierra Club of Canada finds it unacceptable that the above-mentioned licenses were issued, despite full review with regard to environmental impacts. The author mentioned the significant risks resulting from seismic testing and exploratory drilling in Sydney Bight and off the coast of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The economic sustainability of the local communities dependent on fishery and tourism is in jeopardy. Both commercial and non-commercial species of fish, reptiles, invertebrates and marine mammals are at risk from the impacts on the marine ecosystem. In addition, there is a risk to public health in the coastal communities. The author reviewed both the economic, ecological and health impacts associated with exploration activities in the region. Although the Sierra Club of Canada recognizes te need for Cape Breton to benefit from an economic stimulus and new investment, it is of the opinion that the oil and gas activity at Sable Island could bring economic activity to Cape Breton by using either Sydney Harbour or Port Hawkesbury as supply centres. The Sierra Club recommended that the commission reject exploration and development activities in the inshore, coastal areas of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Sydney Bight. A fundamental review of the current licensing and approval process is required. 8 refs.

  13. A participatory approach for Integrated River Basin Management in the Elbe catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunneri, C.; Hofmann, J.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a qualitative analysis of a series of in-depth interviews with governmental and non-governmental institutions (NGOs). Within the EUROCAT 1 project this methodology of participatory approach, aiming to scope the present perceptions about environmental issues and possible strategies for environmental improvement, is applied to the study of the Elbe catchment for the first time. In this frame, an Advisory Board (AB) was created, with the aim of giving insights into conflicting interests in the river catchment and guidelines for river basin management. Focus of the Elbe case study is the issue of nutrient enrichment (from the catchment) and the induced eutrophication of the coastal waters (the German Bight). Specifically, regarding this topic, the possible reduction of eutrophication in the German Bight by a (policy driven) decrease in nutrient inputs from the catchment area is analysed. Different measures for reducing the input of nutrients from the catchment, and ultimately preventing eutrophication of the coastal waters are considered. In this context, the members of the AB were asked about the efficiency and feasibility of different measures and the criteria for choosing 'better' management solutions among the possible ones. Although there is a general agreement about the necessity of reducing nutrient emissions, some members of the AB perceive other environmental issues (e.g. altered morphodynamics) as more relevant than nutrient enrichment. Voluntary cooperation, eco-efficiency and 'trans-sectoral' communication are the key concepts mentioned as being indispensable for integrated management. The (public) acceptance of measures for nutrient reduction have to find its way through compromises and social equity, allowing for win-win solutions among different groups of interests and balanced spatial division of costs and benefits. EUROpean CATchments, Project N° EVK1-CT-2000-00044 ( http://www.iia-cnr.unical.it/EUROCAT/project.htm).

  14. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  15. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  16. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally

  17. Pollutant transport among California regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angevine, Wayne M.; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart; Holloway, John S.; Lerner, Brian M.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Guha, Abhinav; Andrews, Arlyn; Nowak, John B.; Evan, Stephanie; Fischer, Marc L.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Bon, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Several regions within California have significant air quality issues. Transport of pollutants emitted in one region to another region may add to the impact of local emissions. In this work, Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations show the amounts of tracers that are transported within and among four regions, Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, and the rest of the state. The simulations cover May and June of 2010, the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change experiment period. Tracers of automobile emissions and one type of agricultural emission are used. Tracer mixing ratios are compared to airborne and ground-based measurements. The age of tracers in each location is also presented. Vertical profiles and diurnal cycles help to clarify the transport process. As is well known, Southern California emissions are transported to the east and affect the desert areas, and Bay Area automobile emissions are an important source of pollutants in the San Joaquin Valley. A novel result is that the Southern California Bight is filled with a mixture of well-aged carbon monoxide tracer from Southern California and the Bay Area. Air over the Bight is also affected by the agricultural emissions represented by the agricultural tracer, dominantly from the Central Valley where its sources are largest. There is no indication of transport from Southern California to the Central Valley. Emissions from the Central Valley do make their way to Southern California, as shown by the agricultural tracer, but automobile emissions from the Valley are insignificant in Southern California.

  18. Persistent organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in air of the North Sea region and air-sea exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Carolin; Theobald, Norbert; Hühnerfuss, Heinrich; Lammel, Gerhard

    2016-12-01

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were studied to determine occurrence, levels and spatial distribution in the marine atmosphere and surface seawater during cruises in the German Bight and the wider North Sea in spring and summer 2009-2010. In general, the concentrations found in air are similar to, or below, the levels at coastal or near-coastal sites in Europe. Hexachlorobenzene and α-hexachlorocyclohexane (α-HCH) were close to phase equilibrium, whereas net atmospheric deposition was observed for γ-HCH. The results suggest that declining trends of HCH in seawater have been continuing for γ-HCH but have somewhat levelled off for α-HCH. Dieldrin displayed a close to phase equilibrium in nearly all the sampling sites, except in the central southwestern part of the North Sea. Here atmospheric deposition dominates the air-sea exchange. This region, close to the English coast, showed remarkably increased surface seawater concentrations. This observation depended neither on riverine input nor on the elevated abundances of dieldrin in the air masses of central England. A net depositional flux of p,p'-DDE into the North Sea was indicated by both its abundance in the marine atmosphere and the changes in metabolite pattern observed in the surface water from the coast towards the open sea. The long-term trends show that the atmospheric concentrations of DDT and its metabolites are not declining. Riverine input is a major source of PCBs in the German Bight and the wider North Sea. Atmospheric deposition of the lower molecular weight PCBs (PCB28 and PCB52) was indicated as a major source for surface seawater pollution.

  19. Distribution of N2O in the Baltic Sea during transition from anoxic to oxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Walter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2003, a major inflow of cold and oxygen-rich North Sea Water terminated an ongoing stagnation period in parts of the central Baltic Sea. In order to investigate the role of North Sea Water inflow in the production of nitrous oxide (N2O, we measured dissolved and atmospheric N2O at 26 stations in the southern and central Baltic Sea in October 2003. At the time of our cruise, water renewal had proceeded to the eastern Gotland Basin, whereas the western Gotland Basin was still unaffected by the inflow. The deep water renewal was detectable in the distributions of temperature, salinity, and oxygen concentrations as well as in the distribution of the N2O concentrations: Shallow stations in the Kiel Bight and Pomeranian Bight were well-ventilated with uniform N2O concentrations near equilibrium throughout the water column. In contrast, stations in the deep basins, such as the Bornholm and the Gotland Deep, showed a clear stratification with deep water affected by North Sea Water. Inflowing North Sea Water led to changed environmental conditions, especially enhanced oxygen (O2 or declining hydrogen sulphide (H2S concentrations, thus, affecting the conditions for the production of N2O. Pattern of N2O profiles and correlations with parameters like oxygen and nitrate differed between the basins. Because of the positive correlation between ΔN2O and AOU in oxic waters the dominant production pathway seems to be nitrification rather than denitrification. Advection of N2O by North Sea Water was found to be of minor importance. A rough budget revealed a significant surplus of in situ produced N2O after the inflow. However, due to the permanent halocline, it can be assumed that the N2O produced does not reach the atmosphere. Hydrographic aspects therefore are decisive factors determining the final release of N2O produced to the atmosphere.

  20. Spatially-Resolved Influence of Temperature and Salinity on Stock and Recruitment Variability of Commercially Important Fishes in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimova, Anna; Núñez-Riboni, Ismael; Kempf, Alexander; Taylor, Marc H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the processes affecting recruitment of commercially important fish species is one of the major challenges in fisheries science. Towards this aim, we investigated the relation between North Sea hydrography (temperature and salinity) and fish stock variables (recruitment, spawning stock biomass and pre-recruitment survival index) for 9 commercially important fishes using spatially-resolved cross-correlation analysis. We used high-resolution (0.2° × 0.2°) hydrographic data fields matching the maximal temporal extent of the fish population assessments (1948-2013). Our approach allowed for the identification of regions in the North Sea where environmental variables seem to be more influential on the fish stocks, as well as the regions of a lesser or nil influence. Our results confirmed previously demonstrated negative correlations between temperature and recruitment of cod and plaice and identified regions of the strongest correlations (German Bight for plaice and north-western North Sea for cod). We also revealed a positive correlation between herring spawning stock biomass and temperature in the Orkney-Shetland area, as well as a negative correlation between sole pre-recruitment survival index and temperature in the German Bight. A strong positive correlation between sprat stock variables and salinity in the central North Sea was also found. To our knowledge the results concerning correlations between North Sea hydrography and stocks' dynamics of herring, sole and sprat are novel. The new information about spatial distribution of the correlation provides an additional help to identify mechanisms underlying these correlations. As an illustration of the utility of these results for fishery management, an example is provided that incorporates the identified environmental covariates in stock-recruitment models.

  1. Seasonal variation of assemblage and feeding guild structure of fish species in a boreal tidal basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellnreitner, Florian; Pockberger, Moritz; Asmus, Harald

    2012-08-01

    Species composition, abundance, feeding relationships and guild structure of the fish assemblage in the Sylt-Rømø bight, a tidal basin in the northern Wadden Sea, were investigated to show seasonal differences and the importance of functional groups in this area. The tidal flats and in shallow subtidal areas were sampled using a beach seine and a bottom trawl net was used for deeper subtidal areas and tidal gullies. Species richness of fish was highest in summer where 26 species were caught, while the lowest richness was recorded in winter (17 species). Clear differences in species richness and abundance were found between shallow areas and deeper parts of the bight. Clupea harengus and Ammodytes tobianus were the most abundant species in deeper areas, while Pomatoschistus microps and Pomatoschistus minutus dominated shallower waters. Gut contents of 27 fish species were identified and the guild structure analyzed by UPGMA clustering of niche overlaps. Calanoid copepods (19.9%), Crangon crangon (18.2%) and mysid shrimps (8.4%) were the most abundant prey items of all fish species combined. Seven feeding guilds were present in the fall and winter, and eight and six in spring and summer, respectively. Fish feeding on calanoid copepods and C. crangon were present year round, whereas the occurrence of other guilds varied between seasons. Species composition of prey changed through seasons and, for some fish species, even the feeding mode itself varied with season. Most noticeable, 11 fish species changed guilds between seasons. We found a convergence in summer towards abundant prey items, whereas in winter diet overlap was lower. This is the first investigation of guild structure of almost all fish species present in a Wadden Sea area, and shows that consideration of seasonal differences is essential when determining feeding relationships of fish in temperate areas.

  2. Comparison of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenylethers, and organochlorine pesticides in Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) from offshore oil platforms and natural reefs along the California coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert W.; Tanner, Michael J.; Love, Milton S.; Nishimoto, Mary M.; Schroeder, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the relative exposure of Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at oil-production platforms was reported, indicating negligible exposure to PAHs and no discernible differences between exposures at platforms and nearby natural areas sites. In this report, the potential for chronic PAH exposure in fish is reported, by measurement of recalcitrant, higher molecular weight PAHs in tissues of fish previously investigated for PAH metabolites in bile. A total of 34 PAHs (20 PAHs, 11 alkylated PAHs, and 3 polycyclic aromatic thiophenes) were targeted. In addition, legacy contaminants—polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs),—and current contaminants, polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs) linked to endocrine disruption, were measured by gas chromatography with electron-capture or mass spectrometric detection, to form a more complete picture of the contaminant-related status of fishes at oil production platforms in the Southern California Bight. No hydrocarbon profiles or unresolved complex hydrocarbon background were found in fish from platforms and from natural areas, and concentrations of aliphatics were low less than 100 nanograms per gram (ng/g) per component]. Total-PAH concentrations in fish ranged from 15 to 37 ng/g at natural areas and from 8.7 to 22 ng/g at platforms. Profiles of PAHs were similar at all natural and platform sites, consisting mainly of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Total-PCB concentrations (excluding non-ortho-chloro-substituted congeners) in fish were low, ranging from 7 to 22 ng/g at natural areas and from 10 to 35 ng/g at platforms. About 50 percent of the total-PCBs at all sites consisted of 11 congeners: 153 > 138/163/164 > 110 > 118 > 15 > 99 > 187 > 149 > 180. Most OCPs, except dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)-related compounds, were not detectable or were at concentrations of less than 1 ng/g in fish. p

  3. Analysis of lipophilic organic pollutants in the Baltic and North Sea (ALOSON). Final report; Analyse lipophiler organischer Schadstoffe in Ost- und Nordsee (ALOSON). Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huehnerfuss, H.; Giger, W.; Schroeder, H.

    1999-10-01

    During the ALOSON-F+E-project emphasis has been placed upon non-target investigations of seawater, marine sediments and marine biota from the Baltic and North Sea. Sampling procedures as well as extraction, clean-up and fractionation methods were developed for these three environmental compartments and applied to three stations in the German Bight. In these water samples 20 compounds were verified thus far not included in actual monitoring programmes, while in the respective sediment samples 12 compounds were verified. It is worth mentioning that in the seawater samples some new compounds were found which are essential components of drugs or other active substances like coffein. Furthermore, halogenated pyridine derivatives may be of interest. In the sediment samples dominating pollutants turned out to comprise musk compounds and several sulfur and nitrogen containing substances which may justify subsequent investigations. In biota samples (mussels and Wittling gonades/liver/muscle) 11 compounds were verified. Again, the polycyclic musks HHCB and AHTN dominated, but also several 'classical' pollutants like chlordane, HCH and DDT isomers and/or metabolites were found. In addition, comparison with the MS library suggested many brominated compounds which may be of particular interest with regard to subsequent studies. In parallel, some target investigations were carried out in 13 marinas at the Baltic and North Sea coast and for 5 stations in the German Bight. Orienting quantifications in seawater (German Bight) were carried out for benzothiazole, methylthiobenzothiazole, thiocyanatobenzothiazole, HHCB, AHTN, 2,5-dichloroaniline, 1-chloro-2-nitrobenzene, 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene and LAS, while extensive quantifications in marine sediments as well as in marina sediments were performed for Irgarol 1051, TBT, DBT, MBT, TPT, DPT, MPT, nonylphenol, nonylphenol-monoethoxylate, nonylphenolpolyethoxylate, LAS and the optical whiteners DAS 1, DSBP, BLS, LAS. (orig

  4. Salinity variability along the eastern continental shelf of Canada and the United States, 1973-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagni, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Continental shelf waters located off the east coast of Canada and the United States are part of a long shelf current system that is partly comprised of colder, less-saline waters originating from high latitudes, including waters from the North Atlantic sub-polar gyre, along with ice-melt and freshwater input from local rivers. A 41-year analysis (1973-2013) of near-surface salinity (NSS) using three hydrographic datasets (Bedford Institute of Oceanography "Climate", NOAA/ESDIM, and Canadian Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS)) allowed an examination of NSS variability within 11 continental shelf sub-regions, extending from the southern Newfoundland Shelf of eastern Canada to the DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf of the United States. Although the periods of record containing sufficient data vary between sub-regions, regional mean NSS values are lowest within the Gulf of St. Lawrence and highest on the DelMarVa/Hatteras shelf, with largest annual variability within the Gulf of St. Lawrence. After removal of outliers, long-term linear trends computed from annual mean NSS were detected along the Newfoundland Shelf (+0.011 y-1), Western Scotian Shelf (-0.007 y-1), Gulf of Maine (-0.014 y-1), Georges Bank (-0.011 y-1), and DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf (+0.024 y-1). A long-term quadratic fit to annual mean NSS from the Eastern Scotian Shelf displays a salinity increase through 1992 of +0.026 y-1, decreasing thereafter until 2013 by -0.028 y-1. A quadratic fit for the Western Grand Banks displays a NSS increase through 2007 of +0.022 y-1, decreasing thereafter through 2013 by -0.006 y-1. Annual mean NSS from the Eastern Grand Banks, Tail of the Grand Banks, Gulf of St. Lawrence, and Middle Atlantic Bight display no long-term trends. Inter-annual variability (IAV) of NSS residuals shows similar small mean squared error (mse) of 0.02-0.04 for the four northern-most sub-regions (Newfoundland Shelf, Eastern, Tail and Western Grand Banks) and are correlated at 0-year lag. IAV of NSS

  5. Gulf Stream marine hydrokinetic energy resource characterization off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, M.; He, R.; Lowcher, C.; Bane, J.; Gong, Y.; Taylor, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf Stream off North Carolina has current velocities that approach 3 m/s and an average volume transport of 90 Sv (1 Sv= 106 m3/s) off of Cape Hatteras, making it the most abundant MHK (Marine Hydrokinetic Energy) resource for the state. Resource availability at a specific location depends primarily on the variability in Gulf Stream position, which is least offshore of Cape Hatteras after the stream exits the Florida Straits. Proximity to land and high current velocities in relatively shallow waters on the shelf slope make this an optimal location to quantify the MHK energy resource for NC. 3.5 years of current measurements beginning in August of 2013 from a moored 150 kHz ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) at an optimal location for energy extraction quantify the available energy resource and its variability, and establish the skill of a Mid-Atlantic Bight and South Atlantic Bight Regional Ocean Model in predicting the MHK energy resource. The model agrees well with long-term observed current averages and with weekly to monthly fluctuations in the current speeds. Model and observations over the first 9 months of the ADCP deployment period both averaged 1.15 m/s thirty meters below the surface. The model under estimates observed current speeds for the higher frequency current fluctuations of days to weeks. Comparisons between the model and ADCP observed currents, and velocity derived power density over the entire 3.5 years of observations demonstrate the significant inter-annual variability in power density. Shipboard 300 kHz ADCP cross-stream transects and hourly surface currents measurements off Cape Hatteras from a network of land based HF (high frequency) radars further quantify available MHK energy and assess model skill. Cross-stream transects were made with a vessel-mounted 300 kHz ADCP on a line from the 100-1000m isobaths, and measured currents in the top 100m. These measurements demonstrate the variability in the resource with water depth, and

  6. The importance of gobies (Gobiidae, Teleostei) as hosts and transmitters of parasites in the SW Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. D.; Strohbach, U.; Groenewold, S.

    1993-02-01

    The parasite fauna of five goby species (Gobiidae, Teleostei) was investigated in the Baltic Sea during the period 1987 to 1990. 13 parasite species were found in samples from the Lübeck Bight: Bothriocephalus scorpii, Schistocephalus sp. (Cestoda); Cryptocotyle concavum, Cryptocotyle lingua, Podocotyle atomon, Derogenes varicus (Digenea); Hysterothylacium sp. (cf. auctum), Contracaecum sp., Anisakis simplex (Nematoda); Corynosoma sp., Echinorhynchus gadi, Neoechinorhynchus rutili, Pomphorhynchus laevis (Acanthocephala). The number of parasite species were: 10 in the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus, 8 in the black goby Gobius niger, 7 in the two-spotted goby Gobiusculus flavescens, 6 in the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, and 5 in the painted goby Pomatoschistus pictus. Neoechinorhynchus rutili occurred only in P. minutus, and Corynosoma sp. only in G. niger. The extent to which the gobies were parasitized clearly depended on the respective ways of life and, moreover, on the kind of prey ingested by the hosts. Additionally, the age of the hosts might be important. The highest rate of parasitism, more than 60%, was reached by Hysterothylacium sp. in G. niger and by Cryptocotyle concavum in P. microps. Infestation incidence lay mostly below 40% which means a satellite species status (Holmes, 1991). The number of parasite species was highest in summer; the highest intensities of single parasites occurred in spring ( Podocotyle atomon) or autumn ( Crytocotyle concavum). Bothriocephalus scorpii, Hysterothylacium sp. and Podocotyle infested their juvenile hosts very early, but only Hysterothylacium was accumulated by G. niger during its whole life span, whereas Bothriocephalus persisted also in older gobies in low intensities. The cercariae of Cryptocotyle spp. penetrate actively into their hosts; all the other parasites named were transmitted in larval form by prey organisms which consisted mainly of planktonic and benthic crustaceans. The gobies were final hosts

  7. Epifauna dynamics at an offshore foundation--implications of future wind power farming in the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone, Roland; Gutow, Lars; Joschko, Tanja J; Schröder, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In the light of the introduction of thousands of large offshore wind power foundations into the North Sea within the next decades, this manuscript focuses on the biofouling processes and likely reef effects. The study explores the macrozoobenthos (biofouling) colonization at an offshore platform which is comparable to offshore wind turbine foundations. A total of 183 single samples were taken and the parameters water depth and time were considered comparing biofouling masses and communities. The blue mussel Mytilus edulis, Anthozoa and the Amphipoda Jassa spp. were the dominant species. The community from the 1 m zone and those from the 5 and 20-28 m zones can clearly be differentiated. The 10 m zone community represents the transition between the M. edulis dominated 1 m and 5 m zones and the Anthozoa dominated 20-28 m zone. In the future offshore wind farms, thousands of wind turbine foundations will provide habitat for a hard bottom fauna which is otherwise restricted to the sparse rocky habitats scattered within extensive sedimentary soft bottoms of the German Bight. However, offshore wind power foundations cannot be considered natural rock equivalents as they selectively increase certain natural hard bottom species. The surface of the construction (1280 m²) was covered by an average of 4300 kg biomass. This foundation concentrates on its footprint area (1024 m²) 35 times more macrozoobenthos biomass than the same area of soft bottom in the German exclusive economic zone (0.12 kg m(-2)), functioning as a biomass hotspot. Concerning the temporal biomass variation, we assume that at least 2700 kg biomass was exported on a yearly basis. 345 × 10(4) single mussel shells of different sizes were produced during the study period. It is anticipated that the M. edulis abundance will increase in the North Sea due to the expansion of the offshore wind farm development. This will result in the enhanced production of secondary hard substrate (mussel shells

  8. Marine habitat mapping, classification and monitoring in the coastal North Sea: Scientific vs. stakeholder interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, H. Christian; Mielck, Finn; Papenmeier, Svenja; Fiorentino, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Producing detailed maps of the seafloor that include both, water depth and simple textural characteristics has always been a challenge to scientists. In this context, marine habitat maps are an essential tool to comprehend the complexity, the spatial distribution and the ecological status of different seafloor types. The increasing need for more detail demands additional information on the texture of the sediment, bedforms and information on benthic sessile life. For long time, taking samples and videos/photographs followed by interpolation over larger distances was the only feasible way to gain information about sedimentary features such as grain-size distribution and bedforms. While ground truthing is still necessary, swath systems such as multibeam echo sounders (MBES) and sidescan sonars (SSS), as well as single beam acoustic ground discrimination systems (AGDS) became available to map the seafloor area-wide (MBES, SSS), fast and in great detail. Where area-wide measurements are impossible or unavailable point measurements are interpolated, classified and modeled. To keep pace with environmental change in the highly dynamic coastal areas of the North Sea (here: German Bight) monitoring that utilizes all of the mentioned techniques is a necessity. Since monitoring of larger areas is quite expensive, concepts for monitoring strategies were developed in scientific projects such as "WIMO" ("Scientific monitoring concepts for the German Bight, SE North Sea"). While instrumentation becomes better and better and interdisciplinary methods are being developed, the gap between basic scientific interests and stakeholder needs often seem to move in opposite directions. There are two main tendencies: the need to better understand nature systems (for theoretical purposes) and the one to simplify nature (for applied purposes). Science trends to resolve the most detail in highest precision employing soft gradients and/or fuzzy borders instead of crisp demarcations and

  9. Mercury species in dab (Limanda limanda) from the North Sea, Baltic Sea and Icelandic waters in relation to host-specific variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Thomas; Kruse, Reinhard; Haarich, Michael; Wosniok, Werner

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of the ICON project (Integrated Assessment of Contaminant Impacts on the North Sea), muscle tissue from a total of 135 common dab (Limanda limanda) (20-28 cm total length) was collected in seven offshore sampling areas in the North Sea, at Iceland and in the Baltic Sea during Aug/Sept and December 2008 for a chemical mercury speciation analysis by means of gas chromatography and detection by cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (GC-CVAFS). There was a highly significant correlation between concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in individual fish, and the mean ratio of MeHg(+) compared to Σ Hg (MeHg(+) + Hg(2+)) was 94.0%. The results revealed statistically significant differences in concentrations of MeHg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively, between sampling areas. Mean concentrations in the German Bight (North Sea), in Icelandic waters and in Mecklenburg Bight (Baltic Sea) were low (MeHg(+): 0.023-0.036; Hg(2+): 0.001-0.002 mg/kg wet weight), while concentrations in dab from the Dogger Bank, Firth of Forth and the vicinity of the Ekofisk oil field (all North Sea) were significantly higher (MeHg(+): 0.059-0.101; Hg(2+): 0.003-0.004 mg/kg wet weight). Statistical correlation analysis on effects of host-specific factors revealed that neither length, weight, age, sex nor condition factor showed a significant relationship with Hg concentrations. However, Hg concentrations were significantly correlated with the Fish Disease Index (FDI), indicating a relationship between Hg concentrations and the health status of dab. Multiple linear regression analysis aiming to find factors affecting Hg concentrations revealed that only the sampling area had a highly significant main effect on Hg concentrations, and in some cases, additionally the condition factor contributed significantly to the final model. From the results, it cannot be excluded that elevated Hg concentration recorded in dab were linked to discharges from

  10. Inner-shelf ocean dynamics and seafloor morphologic changes during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Schwab, William C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Safak, Ilgar; Liste, Maria; Baldwin, Wayne

    2017-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most destructive hurricanes in US history, making landfall on the New Jersey coast on October 30, 2012. Storm impacts included several barrier island breaches, massive coastal erosion, and flooding. While changes to the subaerial landscape are relatively easily observed, storm-induced changes to the adjacent shoreface and inner continental shelf are more difficult to evaluate. These regions provide a framework for the coastal zone, are important for navigation, aggregate resources, marine ecosystems, and coastal evolution. Here we provide unprecedented perspective regarding regional inner continental shelf sediment dynamics based on both observations and numerical modeling over time scales associated with these types of large storm events. Oceanographic conditions and seafloor morphologic changes are evaluated using both a coupled atmospheric-ocean-wave-sediment numerical modeling system that covered spatial scales ranging from the entire US east coast (1000 s of km) to local domains (10 s of km). Additionally, the modeled response for the region offshore of Fire Island, NY was compared to observational analysis from a series of geologic surveys from that location. The geologic investigations conducted in 2011 and 2014 revealed lateral movement of sedimentary structures of distances up to 450 m and in water depths up to 30 m, and vertical changes in sediment thickness greater than 1 m in some locations. The modeling investigations utilize a system with grid refinement designed to simulate oceanographic conditions with progressively increasing resolutions for the entire US East Coast (5-km grid), the New York Bight (700-m grid), and offshore of Fire Island, NY (100-m grid), allowing larger scale dynamics to drive smaller scale coastal changes. Model results in the New York Bight identify maximum storm surge of up to 3 m, surface currents on the order of 2 ms-1 along the New Jersey coast, waves up to 8 m in height, and bottom stresses

  11. The use of innate immune responses as biomarkers in a programme of integrated biological effects monitoring on flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouras, Andreas; Broeg, Katja; Dizer, Halim; von Westernhagen, Hein; Hansen, Peter-Diedrich; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2003-10-01

    Immunological biomarkers that reflect the effects of exposure to environmental contaminants in coastal marine habitats were sought in European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from five locations in the German Bight with different anthropogenic impacts. During a 2-year period of sampling, innate immune responses were monitored from a total of 331 individual flounder of a body length of 18 to 25 cm. From the fish, plasma lysozyme, phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of head kidney leucocytes were analysed and implemented as part of an integrated biological effects monitoring programme. As the measurements of the parameters applied here varied within wide ranges at some locations, spatial differences could not always be established, but some general trends could be drawn: plasma lysozyme activity was decreased in flounder contaminated with DDT adducts and some PCBs, while cellular functions such as phagocytosis and respiratory burst were stimulated by some chlorinated hydrocarbons. Correlation analysis also revealed connections not only between the parameters applied here and some contaminants but also with some biochemical parameters used as biomarkers in pollution monitoring: in flounder with decreased integrity of hepatocyte lysosomal membranes, immune functions also were impaired, and plasma lysozyme as well as phagocytosis activity of head kidney cells were impaired when the activity of cytochrome P450 1A was induced. The data presented here indicate that innate immune responses may be useful parameters to monitor cellular functions in a battery of biomarkers of different levels of biological organisation.

  12. Apparent Minimum Free Energy Requirements for Methanogenic Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in an Anoxic Marine Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the most fundamental constraints governing the distribution of microorganisms in the environment is the availability of chemical energy at biologically useful levels. To assess the minimum free energy yield that can support microbial metabolism in situ, we examined the thermodynamics of H2-consuming processes in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA. Depth distributions of H2 partial pressure, along with a suite of relevant concentration data, were determined in sediment cores collected in November (at 14.5 C) and August (at 27 C) and used to calculate free energy yields for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. At both times of year, and for both processes, free energy yields gradually decreased (became less negative) with depth before reaching an apparent asymptote. Sulfate reducing bacteria exhibited an asymptote of -19.1 +/- 1.7 kj(mol SO4(2-)(sup -1) while methanogenic archaea were apparently supported by energy yields as small as -10.6 +/- 0.7 kj(mol CH4)(sup -1).

  13. Climate projections of spatial variations in coastal storm surges along the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. east coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhigang; Xue, Zuo; He, Ruoying; Bao, Xianwen; Xie, Jun; Ge, Qian

    2017-02-01

    Using statistically downscaled atmospheric forcing, we performed a numerical investigation to evaluate future climate's impact on storm surges along the Gulf of Mexico and U.S. east coast. The focus is on the impact of climatic changes in wind pattern and surface pressure while neglecting sea level rise and other factors. We adapted the regional ocean model system (ROMS) to the study region with a mesh grid size of 7-10 km in horizontal and 18 vertical layers. The model was validated by a hindcast of the coastal sea levels in the winter of 2008. Model's robustness was confirmed by the good agreement between model-simulated and observed sea levels at 37 tidal gages. Two 10-year forecasts, one for the IPCC Pre-Industry (PI) and the other for the A1FI scenario, were conducted. The differences in model-simulated surge heights under the two climate scenarios were analyzed. We identified three types of responses in extreme surge heights to future climate: a clear decrease in Middle Atlantic Bight, an increase in the western Gulf of Mexico, and non-significant response for the remaining area. Such spatial pattern is also consistent with previous projections of sea surface winds and ocean wave heights.

  14. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana L Melcón

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  15. Regional monitoring programs in the United States: Synthesis of four case studies from Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf Coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Peter J.; Schiff, K.; Trowbridge, P.R.; Sherwood, E.T.; Batiuk, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Water quality monitoring is a cornerstone of environmental protection and ambient monitoring provides managers with the critical data they need to take informed action. Unlike site-specific monitoring that is at the heart of regulatory permit compliance, regional monitoring can provide an integrated, holistic view of the environment, allowing managers to obtain a more complete picture of natural variability and cumulative impacts, and more effectively prioritize management actions. By reviewing four long-standing regional monitoring programs that cover portions of all three coasts in the United States – Chesapeake Bay, Tampa Bay, Southern California Bight, and San Francisco Bay – important insights can be gleaned about the benefits that regional monitoring provides to managers. These insights include the underlying reasons that make regional monitoring programs successful, the challenges to maintain relevance and viability in the face of ever-changing technology, competing demands and shifting management priorities. The lessons learned can help other managers achieve similar successes as they seek to establish and reinvigorate their own monitoring programs.

  16. Physical processes around a cuspate foreland:. implications to the evolution and long-term maintenance of a cape-associated shoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNinch, Jesse E.; Luettich, Richard A.

    2000-12-01

    Understanding across-margin transport has long been recognized as crucial for wise management of our coastline and shelf waters. Issues related to sewage outfalls, nutrient and pollutant dispersal, carbon export, and shoreline sediment budgets all require an understanding of these processes. Across-margin transport of water and sediment at cuspate foreland headlands has been largely unrecognized, and the processes responsible for this export unappreciated. We examined physical process on Cape Lookout Shoal, a cape-associated shoal on the North Carolina continental shelf, through numerical modeling and field observations of near-bottom currents. The cuspate foreland setting of the northern South Atlantic Bight has been previously characterized as wave-dominated with a principal alongshore directed sediment transport and physical circulation forced by wave and wind-driven currents along the inner and mid-shelf. Our findings instead suggest that a seaward-directed, tidal-driven headland flow many play a significant role in the direction of net sediment transport on the shoal and ultimately its location and long-term maintenance. The shoal's location relative to the promontory-induced residual eddies and the region of active deposition differs from traditionally held ideas on sedimentary processes at headland-related sand banks. In addition, the headland flows may also serve as a first-order mechanism for rapidly exporting nearshore and estuarine waters to the outer-shelf.

  17. Direct interaction between the Gulf Stream and the shelfbreak south of New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen G; Todd, Robert E; Plueddemann, Albert J; Andres, Magdalena; Manning, James P

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature imagery, satellite altimetry, and a surface drifter track reveal an unusual tilt in the Gulf Stream path that brought the Gulf Stream to 39.9°N near the Middle Atlantic Bight shelfbreak--200 km north of its mean position--in October 2011, while a large meander brought Gulf Stream water within 12 km of the shelfbreak in December 2011. Near-bottom temperature measurements from lobster traps on the outer continental shelf south of New England show distinct warming events (temperature increases exceeding 6°C) in November and December 2011. Moored profiler measurements over the continental slope show high salinities and temperatures, suggesting that the warm water on the continental shelf originated in the Gulf Stream. The combination of unusual water properties over the shelf and slope in late fall and the subsequent mild winter may affect seasonal stratification and habitat selection for marine life over the continental shelf in 2012.

  18. Champacyclin, a New Cyclic Octapeptide from Streptomyces Strain C42 Isolated from the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pesic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available New isolates of Streptomyces champavatii were isolated from marine sediments of the Gotland Deep (Baltic Sea, from the Urania Basin (Eastern Mediterranean, and from the Kiel Bight (Baltic Sea. The isolates produced several oligopeptidic secondary metabolites, including the new octapeptide champacyclin (1a present in all three strains. Herein, we report on the isolation, structure elucidation and determination of the absolute stereochemistry of this isoleucine/leucine (Ile/Leu = Xle rich cyclic octapeptide champacyclin (1a. As 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy could not fully resolve the structure of (1a, additional information on sequence and configuration of stereocenters were obtained by a combination of multi stage mass spectrometry (MSn studies, amino acid analysis, partial hydrolysis and subsequent enantiomer analytics with gas chromatography positive chmical ionization/electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-PCI/EI-MS supported by comparison to reference dipeptides. Proof of the head-to-tail cyclization of (1a was accomplished by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS compared to an alternatively side chain cyclized derivative (2. Champacyclin (1a is likely synthesized by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS, because of its high content of (d-amino acids. The compound (1a showed antimicrobial activity against the phytopathogen Erwinia amylovora causing the fire blight disease of certain plants.

  19. A Model For The Use Of Satellite Remote Sensing For The Measurement Of Primary Production In The Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Donald J.; Kiefer, Dale A.; SooHoo, Janice B.; Stallings, Casson; Yang, Wei-Liang

    1986-08-01

    The estimation of oceanic primary production on a global scale is the focus of efforts in remote sensing using the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). The goal of this research is to provide a measure of the primary production using only satellite data for the estimate. This estimate requires the measurement of surface pigments (chlorophyll a + phaeophytin a) using the CZCS, an estimate of the sea-surface temperature using the AVHRR and determination of the incident solar irradiance using GOES imagery. In this paper, we describe a model of primary production based upon the responses of phytoplankton to differing light and nutrient fields. This model includes the effects on production of variations in surface pigment concentration, the mixed layer depth and the dependence on the incident solar irradiance. The model has been tested using in situ data provided by the Southern California Bight Studies (Eppley, et al., 1979), California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI), Organization of Persistent Upwelling Structures (J.B. Soolloo in OPUS Data Report) and other data sets. A synoptic measure of the distribution of surface pigments is derived from the West Coast Chlorophyll and Temperature Time Series (West Coast Time Series Advisory Group, 1985). The features and behavior of the model will be presented together with the results of the model verification.

  20. A standardised abundance index from commercial spotting data of southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii: random effects to the rescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinelle Basson

    Full Text Available Commercial aerial spotting of surface schools of juvenile southern bluefin tuna (SBT, Thunnus maccoyii, is conducted as part of fishing operations in the Great Australian Bight in summer. This provides the opportunity to efficiently collect large amounts of data on sightings of SBT. The data can potentially be used to construct a time-series index of relative abundance by standardising the data for issues such as weather, spotter ability and ocean conditions. Unlike a statistically designed survey, the commercial spotting is governed by business considerations and fishing operations. The SBT dataset is therefore highly unbalanced with regard to spotters operating in each season. This complicates the standardisation of the data, particularly with regard to interactions between covariates. We show how a generalized additive model with random effects can simplify both the fitting of the model and the construction of an index, while also avoiding the need to leave out strata or interaction terms that are important. The approach is applicable to standardisation of more traditional catch and effort data.

  1. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood.

  2. Satellite-Derived Distributions, Inventories and Fluxes of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matter Along the Northeastern U.S. Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, A.; Hooker, S. B.; Hyde, K.; Novak, M. G.; Pan, X.; Friedrichs, M.; Cahill, B.; Wilkin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Estuaries and the coastal ocean experience a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a consequence of riverine and estuarine fluxes of terrigenous DOM, sediments, detritus and nutrients into coastal waters and associated phytoplankton blooms. Our approach integrates biogeochemical measurements, optical properties and remote sensing to examine the distributions and inventories of organic carbon in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine. Algorithms developed to retrieve colored DOM (CDOM), Dissolved (DOC) and Particulate Organic Carbon (POC) from NASA's MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS satellite sensors are applied to quantify the distributions and inventories of DOC and POC. Horizontal fluxes of DOC and POC from the continental margin to the open ocean are estimated from SeaWiFS and MODIS-Aqua distributions of DOC and POC and horizontal divergence fluxes obtained from the Northeastern North Atlantic ROMS model. SeaWiFS and MODIS imagery reveal the importance of estuarine outflow to the export of CDOM and DOC to the coastal ocean and a net community production of DOC on the shelf.

  3. Prey selection of the shallow water fish Pomatoschistus minutus (Gobiidae, Teleostei) in the SW Baltic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, C. Dieter

    1990-06-01

    The aim of this investigation is to demonstrate the reasons of an opportunist feeder to select some components of the available food supply and to avoid others. Object of this test is the eurytopic and euryhaline sand goby, Pomatoschistus minutus (Pallas), from the Luebeck Bight. It inhabits both sand habitats as well as bottoms mixed with pebbles or continuous hard substrates. Therefore, it is often in close contact with Mytilus-belts which present a very rich food supply of small crustaceans. The selectivity behaviour of sand gobies from a sand/clay ecotone was compared with that of populations from a stony pier and a sand bottom during the reproduction period. Regarding the numbers of prey organisms, crustaceans of the periphyton were generally preferred at the pier but avoided in the ecotone. The same is valid for prey organisms of the psammal which were preferred by gobies of the sand bottom but mostly avoided by populations of mixed bottoms. Analyses of size selections revealed that the preferred gammarids or Jaera isopods were between 2 and 5 mm length. A balanced relation of goby biomass and utilizable food supply (predatory impact index) seems to effect positive selectivity of gammarids in the Mytilus-belts or of harpacticoids in the sand bottom.

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in silver contamination and toxicity in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, A.R.; Brown, C.L.; Squire, S.; Ross, J.R.M.; Scelfo, G.M.; Hibdon, S.

    2007-01-01

    Although San Francisco Bay has a "Golden Gate", it may be argued that it is the "Silver Estuary". For at one time the Bay was reported to have the highest levels of silver in its sediments and biota, along with the only accurately measured values of silver in solution, of any estuarine system. Since then others have argued that silver contamination is higher elsewhere (e.g., New York Bight, Florida Bay, Galveston Bay) in a peculiar form of pollution machismo, while silver contamination has measurably declined in sediments, biota, and surface waters of the Bay over the past two to three decades. Documentation of those systemic temporal declines has been possible because of long-term, ongoing monitoring programs, using rigorous trace metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, of the United States Geological Survey and San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program that are summarized in this report. However, recent toxicity studies with macro-invertebrates in the Bay have indicated that silver may still be adversely affecting the health of the estuarine system, and other studies have indicated that silver concentrations in the Bay may be increasing due to new industrial inputs and/or the diagenetic remobilization of silver from historically contaminated sediments being re-exposed to overlying surface waters and benthos. Consequently, the Bay may not be ready to relinquish its title as the "Silver Estuary". ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wave heave spectra from radar Doppler velocities at extreme low grazing angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flampouris, Stylianos; Seemann, Joerg; Ziemer, Friedwart

    2013-04-01

    The ground based microwaves radar systems are used for the measurement of the sea surface phenomena for more than three decades. By calibrating the radar cross section, the extraction of the wave spectral characteristics is a well established empirical methodology (Ziemer et al. 1993) with theoretical background (Alpers et al. 1978) and commercial applications (Nieto et al. 2004), which provides comparable measurements with wave buoys. The transfer function is necessary mainly due to the imaging mechanisms, like shadowing and or tilt modulation (Seemann 1997). To avoid the obligatory use of a transfer function, instead of the radar cross section, the Doppler velocity, which is a direct measurement of the sea surface, could be used. In this poster, a methodology for the determination of heave spectra based on time series of Doppler velocity acquired under extreme low grazing angle conditions, is presented. We prove that for the determination of the peak frequency the analysis of the binary shadow mask is sufficient, but for the calculation of the spectral density, a transfer function is necessary because of the gaps of the time series due to the shadowing. The physical and technical limitations are discussed and the algorithm is tested with in situ measurements from the coastal area of German Bight. Both properties, peak frequency and significant wave height from radar, have significant correlation with buoy measurements.

  6. Dispersal routes and habitat utilization of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, tracked with mini PSAT and archival tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Galuardi

    Full Text Available Between 2005 and 2009, we deployed 58 miniature pop-up satellite archival tags (PSAT and 132 implanted archival tags on juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna (age 2-5 in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data returned from these efforts (n = 26 PSATs, 1 archival tag revealed their dispersal routes, horizontal and vertical movements and habitat utilization. All of the tagged bluefin tuna remained in the northwest Atlantic for the duration observed, and in summer months exhibited core-use of coastal seas extending from Maryland to Cape Cod, MA, (USA out to the shelf break. Their winter distributions were more spatially disaggregated, ranging south to the South Atlantic Bight, northern Bahamas and Gulf Stream. Vertical habitat patterns showed that juvenile bluefin tuna mainly occupied shallow depths (mean= 5-12 m, sd = 15-23.7 m and relatively warm water masses in summer (mean= 17.9-20.9°C, sd= 4.2-2.6°C and had deeper and more variable depth patterns in winter (mean= 41-58 m, sd= 48.9-62.2 m. Our tagging results reveal annual dispersal patterns, behavior and oceanographic associations of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna that were only surmised in earlier studies. Fishery independent profiling from electronic tagging also provide spatially and temporally explicit information for evaluating dispersals rates, population structure and fisheries catch patterns.

  7. Variation of the drag coefficient and its dependence on sea state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geernaert, Gerald L.; Katsaros, Kristina B.; Richter, Karl

    1986-06-01

    Using a Gill propeller vane anemometer and resistance wave wires over a water column depth of 15 m, simultaneous measurements of the momentum flux and sea surface wave spectra were acquired from the Pisa mast, 28 km offshore in the German Bight during autumn and winter 1979. These data were analyzed to identify the relationship between wind stress and surface waves. It was found that wind stresses for wind speeds above 15 m/s were regularly higher than open ocean wind stresses as reported by Smith (1980) and by Large and Pond (1981) for the same mean wind speed. These results, when described in terms of the drag coefficient, compared closely with the results of Sheppard et al. (1972), who collected surface layer statistics over Lough Neagh, Northern Ireland. After modeling the surface waves of the North Sea as a function of wave saturation (or wave age), it became evident that variations in the magnitude of the drag coefficient could be explained by coincident variations in the surface wave energy spectrum. By applying the wave dependent roughness length model described by Kitaigorodskii (1973), the North Sea drag coefficient was predicted to be larger than drag coefficients reported from the open sea.

  8. Acid phosphatase activity in liver macrophage aggregates as a marker for pollution-induced immunomodulation of the non-specific immune response in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeg, Katja

    2003-10-01

    The activity of acid phosphatase in liver macrophage aggregates (MA-AP) of different fish species was used as a marker for a pollution-induced modulation of the digestive capacity of phagocytes, since functions of the non-specific immune response play a central role in the maintenance of animals' health. Based upon the investigation of more than 900 individual flounders (Platichthys flesus) and mullets (Liza aurata), natural variations, gender-specific differences and pollution-induced alterations in AP activity are demonstrated in this study. MA-AP activity was dependent on temperature and season but, nevertheless, distinctions between differently polluted areas were visible in all sampling campaigns with lowest MA-AP activity in fish from the polluted areas of the German Bight and the Israeli coast of the Mediterranean Sea. For organochlorine contaminants, as well as for mercury and copper, a significant correlation could be observed between residue concentrations in fish tissues and MA-AP activity. In all cases, except mercury which showed a positive correlation, AP activity was suppressed in animals with a high contaminant burden. MA-AP activity turned out to give reliable and consistent results for a quantification of immunomodulation in both fish species.

  9. Modeling the Dynamics and Export of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northeastern U.S. Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druon, J.N.; Mannino, A.; Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Friedrichs, M.; Wilkin, J.; Fennel, K.

    2009-01-01

    Continental shelves are believed to play a major role in carbon cycling due to their high productivity. Particulate organic carbon (POC) burial has been included in models as a carbon sink, but we show here that seasonally produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the shelf can be exported to the open ocean by horizontal transport at similar rates (1-2 mol C/sq m/yr) in the southern U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). The dissolved organic matter (DOM) model imbedded in a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model reveals a double dynamics: the progressive release of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in the upper layer during summer increases the regenerated primary production by 30 to 300%, which, in turns ; enhances the DOC production mainly from phytoplankton exudation in the upper layer and solubilization of particulate organic matter (POM) deeper in the water column. This analysis suggests that DOM is a key element for better representing the ecosystem functioning and organic fluxes in models because DOM (1) is a major organic pool directly related to primary production, (2) decouples partially the carbon and nitrogen cycles (through carbon excess uptake, POM solubilization and DOM mineralization) and (3) is intimately linked to the residence time of water masses for its distribution and export.

  10. Application of ERTS-1-data to the protection and management of New Jersey's coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunghans, R. S.; Feinberg, E. B.; Mairs, R. L. (Principal Investigator); Woodward, D.; Thibault, D. A.; Macomber, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. New Jersey's planned, regionalized network of sewage disposal facilities has been plotted on an ERTS-1 mosaic and circulation parameters for each of the planned outfall locations have been analyzed using the ERTS-1 imagery and comparative aircraft photography. Work is continuing on the circulation and dispersion of barge-dumped wastes in the New York Bight area. One of the largest remote sensing experiments ever attempted in this country was completed on April 7, 1973 during the ERTS-1 overpass. The test area included the northern portion of New Jersey and the Raritan Bay - New York Harbor area. Three NASA aircraft, two helicopters, nine surface vessels, 40 ground team personnel, and numerous oceanographic, radiometric, and meteorological equipment were deployed in an effort to characterize the surface and near-surface circulation dynamics in this 600 square mile area, during an entire tidal cycle. The analyses of these data in concert with all previous ERTS-1 overpasses will provide information that can lead to a better and more rational use of the nearshore marine environment. The data will be utilized to plan future outfall locations, regulating offshore disposal of wastes, etc.

  11. Application of ERTS-A data to the protection and management of New Jersey's coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunghans, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Feinberg, E. B.; Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Apparent sewage sludge disposal by barge has been detected approximately 12 miles offshore in an area with an approximate radius of 2.5 nautical miles. Verification is underway to determine whether this dumping is within one of the approved dump sites in the Bight. Analysis of all available historical and routine meteorological data in correlation with the observed phenomenon is necessary before final conclusions can be reached with respect to the effects of currents on the disposal of dumped wastes. Four effluent plumes emanating from the shoreline just south of Sandy Hook were observed and are moving in a southerly direction. Another plume is evident north of Barnegat Inlet and is moving almost directly offshore. This suggests that the more northerly plumes are under the influence of the tidal regime around New York Harbor much more than are the plumes further south along the New Jersey coast. Of further interest are what appear to be an internal wave phenomena approximately 75 miles east of the New Jersey coast. This same sort of phenomena has been observed repetitively off the coast of Oregon.

  12. Birds migration research onboard of the research-platform FINO I; Vogelzugforschung auf der Forschungsplattform FINO I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierschke, J. [Institut fuer Vogelforschung, Vogelwarte Helgoland (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    According to current plans for the German parts of the North Sea, offshore windfarms may become the most extensive technical intervention in the marine environment in the near future. Beside the international importance for seabirds, tens of millions of birds annually cross the German Bight during their migration, therefore the Institute of Avian Research ''Vogelwarte Helgoland'' was commissioned by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) to study the bird migration over the North Sea to assess the potential risk of offshore windfarms on migrating birds and bats. On the research platform FINO1 (ca 45 km north of the island of Borkum) birds and bats are tracked automatically by radar, video, infrared camera and microphones. The data enable for the first time to show a representative picture of the flight altitudes of migrant birds flying over sea. 227 bird strikes recorded so far (October 2003 - June 2004) on FINO1 indicate that collisions of birds with offshore windfarms will occur; it will be the task of the future to minimize these bird strikes. (orig.)

  13. Impact of the Extreme Warming of 2012 on Shelfbreak Frontal Structure North of Cape Hatteras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawarkiewickz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Continental shelf circulation north of Cape Hatteras is complex, with southward flowing Middle Atlantic Bight shelf water intersecting the Gulf Stream and subducting offshore into the Gulf Stream. In May, 2012, a cruise was conducted in order to study the shelf circulation and acoustic propagation through fish schools in the area. An important aspect of the study was to use Autonomous Underwater Vehicles to map fish schools with a sidescan sonar. High-resolution hydrographic surveys to map the continental shelf water masses and shelfbreak frontal structure were sampled to relate oceanographic conditions to the fish school distributions. The cold pool water mass over the continental shelf in May 2012 was extremely warm, with temperature anomalies of up to 5 Degrees C relative to observations from the same area in May, 1996. The normal cross-shelf temperature gradients within the shelfbreak front were not present because of the warming. As a result, the shelf density field was much more buoyant than usual, which led to an accelerated shelfbreak jet. Moored velocity measurements at the 60 m isobath recorded alongshelf flow of as much as 0.6 m/s. The anticipated fish species were not observed over the continental shelf. Some comments on the forcing leading to the large scale warming will be presented, along with a brief discussion of the impact of the warming on the marine ecosystem in the northeast U.S.

  14. Age-dependent zonation of the periwinkle Littorina littorea (L.) in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Bettina

    2000-12-01

    On sedimentary tidal flats near the island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea) abundance and size distribution of periwinkles, Littorina littorea L., were studied in low intertidal and in shallow and deep subtidal mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.). In low intertidal mussel beds, surveys revealed that high densities (1,369±571 m-2) of juvenile snails (≤13 mm) were positively correlated with strong barnacle epigrowth ( Semibalanus balanoides L. and Balanus crenatus Bruguière) on mussels. A subsequent field experiment showed that recruitment of L. littorea was restricted to the intertidal zone. Abundances of periwinkles (213±114 m-2) and barnacles abruptly decreased in the adjacent shallow subtidal zone, which served as a habitat for older snails (>13 mm). L. littorea was completely absent from disjunct deep (5 m) subtidal mussel beds. Snail abundance varied seasonally with maxima of >4,000 m-2 in low intertidal mussel beds in October and minima in July, just before the onset of new recruitment. I suggest that the presence of cracks and crevices among the dense barnacle overgrowth in intertidal mussel beds favoured recruitment and survival of juvenile snails. Larger (older) specimens are assumed to actively migrate to the less favourable adjacent subtidal. Therefore, intertidal mussel beds are considered as nurseries for the population of L. littorea in the Wadden Sea.

  15. Seasonal, annual, and spatial variation in the development of hard bottom communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, J.; Anger, K.

    1983-06-01

    The development of hard bottom communities has been studied on test panels in Helgoland Harbour (German Bight) since 1977. Settlement and growth of epibenthic species was examined monthly. Natural variation in different seasons, years, and at three stations (the latter, only in 1981 and 1982) was investigated. At Station A (Binnenhafen), barnacles (Balanus crenatus) and polychaetes (Polydora ciliata) were always among the first settlers in spring. They were followed by other barnacles (Elminius modestus, Balanus improvisus) and by colonial ascidians (Botryllus schlosseri). The latter species often dominated from August to October, and tended to overgrow the barnacle populations. E. modestus showed strong annual variation, probably due to extremely low winter temperatures: after the cold winter of 1978/79, its populations were less dense than in previous years. In 1981 they recovered, and settlement increased again, but the cold winter 1981/82 damaged the population again. At Station B (Nordosthafen), mussels (Mytilus edulis) soon covered barnacles and empty space. By October they had monopolized the fouling community. At Station C (Südhafen), barnacle settlement in spring was followed by an overgrowth of hydrozoans ( Laomedea spec.). In summer, ascidians ( Ciona intestinalis and Ascidiella aspersa) settled and began to dominate. Barnacles were weaker in the competition for space as opposed to later colonizers at all three stations.

  16. Bacterial community in the tunic matrix of a colonial ascidian Diplosoma migrans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groepler, Wolfgang; Schuett, Christian

    2003-06-01

    This paper provides the first information on the morphology of different morphotypes of bacteria in the tunic matrix of the colonial ascidian Diplosoma migrans. Ascidians were collected from waters near Helgoland (German Bight, North Sea). The dominant type is represented by extremely high numbers of long, needle-like rods (length 10-30 µm, width 0.5 µm). The bacteria are motile by means of bipolar monotrichous flagella, generating swift sigmoidal movement. Bacteria are already present during different embryonic stages. It is assumed that they are transferred during sexual propagation from the parental colony to its offspring. As a second morphotype, the tunic harbors screw-like bacteria in low numbers (length 4-10 µm, width 0.5 µm). Besides these conspicuous morphotypes, occasionally motile rods with spore-like globules at one end and additional coccoid forms in large quantities of unknown meaning (possibly spores) were found. The taxonomic status and ecological functions of these differently shaped bacterial groups are unclear.

  17. Macrobenthos of the subtidal Wadden Sea: revisited after 55 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, W.; Reise, K.

    1982-12-01

    During the years 1923 1926 Hagmeier & Kändler (1927) sampled the macrofauna of subtidal shallows and channels of the Wadden Sea close to the Island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea). Reinvestigating this study area in 1980, a substantially altered faunal composition was recorded. An approach is made to quantify the comparison in terms of abundance, species richness and diversity of invertebrate taxa. Human interference is assumed to be responsible for the major changes. Natural oyster beds have been overexploited and the local population of Ostrea edulis has been driven to extinction. Subsequently, mussels (Mytilus edulis) spread in the entire region, promoted by shell fishery. Particularly barnacles and many polychaetes took advantage of the expansion of mussel banks which is substantiated by correlation analysis. Reefs of the colonial polychaete Sabellaria spinulosa stood in the way of shrimp trawling and became destroyed together with the associated fauna. A subtidal Zostera marina bed was wiped out in 1934 by a natural epidemic disease but never succeeded in reestablishing itself. The associated fauna disappeared. Large epibenthic predators and scavengers (crabs, snails and starfish) survived all these changes. The total number of species remained approximately at the same level but molluscs experienced losses and polychaetes diversified. Overall abundance increased with a disproportionately large share of a few species (Mytilus edulis, Balanus crenatus, Cerastoderma edule, Scoloplos armiger). The subtidal fauna of the Wadden Sea proved to be vulnerable to human disturbance; thus, the present community can no longer be viewed as the outcome of entirely natural processes.

  18. Eddy Surface properties and propagation at Southern Hemisphere western boundary current systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Pilo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic eddies occur in all world oceans, but are more energetic when associated to western boundary currents (WBC systems. In these regions, eddies play an important role on mixing and energy exchange. Therefore, it is important to quantify and qualify eddies occurring within these systems. Previous studies performed eddy censuses in Southern Hemisphere WBC systems. However, important aspects of local eddy population are still unknown. Main questions to be answered relate to eddies' spatial distribution, propagation and lifetime within each system. Here, we use a global eddy dataset to qualify eddies based on their surface characteristics at the Agulhas Current (AC, the Brazil Current (BC and the East Australian Current (EAC Systems. We show that eddy propagation within each system is highly forced by the local mean flow and bathymetry. In the AC System, eddy polarity dictates its propagation distance. BC system eddies do not propagate beyond the Argentine Basin, and are advected by the local ocean circulation. EAC System eddies from both polarities cross south of Tasmania, but only anticyclonics reach the Great Australian Bight. Eddies in all systems and from both polarities presented a geographical segregation according to size. Large eddies occur along the Agulhas Retroflection, the Agulhas Return Current, the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence and the Coral Sea. Small eddies occur in the systems southernmost domains. Understanding eddies' propagation helps to establish monitoring programs, and to better understand how these features would affect local mixing.

  19. Search for Ozone Plumes over Western Long Island Sound, NY, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, D. E.; Austin, S.; Johnson, L. P.; Johnson, R.; Marchese, P.; Guerrero, J.; Reid, J.; Cotten, C. D.; Cotten, G. D.

    2007-12-01

    A search has been conducted for near-surface ozone plumes extending roughly northeastward from New York City, by employing ozonesondes carried by a boat on western Long Island Sound. This water-borne search pattern avoids the local sources densely distributed on land in the suburban counties and small cities in Westchester, Long Island, and Connecticut. The observations are done using ECC 2Z ozonesondes and Vaisala 80-15 radiosondes normally used for ozone profiles in the troposphere and stratosphere. The sensors were placed forward on the boat, to avoid ozone produced by the boat's own engine. Several straight traverses were made between the north and south shores. These were extended into bays and harbors where it was possible without much bending of the trajectory, in order to lengthen the runs and carry them close to shore. These runs proceeded (somewhat diagonally, zig-zagging) from west to east, followed by a straight 30 mile direct radial transit approaching New York City southwestward. The data has been examined to look for aligned peaks on the transverse runs at the various radial distances from New York City, which would indicate the existence of ozone plumes transported northeastward from the city. Concentration variation in the radial direction was also examined. The study is expected to be extended to eastern Long Island Sound and the New York bight, south of Long Island

  20. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the Continental Shelf. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biscaye, P.E.

    1978-07-01

    The present contract year has been one of transition from an emphasis on field work and sample gathering to the predominance of sample and data analysis and the formulation of testable hypotheses concerning specific processes in the New York Bight. We have begun to understand the seasonal transition in the role of phytoplankton vs. grazing zooplankton in forming the particles on which some reactive pollutants are removed. Using natural radioactive tracers we have estimated the removal rates of reactive metals from the surface waters and these range over an order of magnitude from most rapid nearshore to least rapid over the upper continental slope. Once removed nearshore, however, these tracers, and the pollutants for which they proxy, do not remain permanently in the sediments but appear to be remobilized (probably by oxidation) during the winter and are reintroduced into the water column. Work on transport and mixing processes of pollutants which are or behave like those in solution has continued along several fronts. Hydrographic data on the structure of the water column continues to give a description of the system that is crucial to understanding geochemical and biological processes which affect pollutants. Hydrographic characterization of water masses from the data sets of cruises has resulted in hypotheses concerning the renewal of shelf water by direct exchange between shelf and upper slope water.

  1. Wind relaxation and a coastal buoyant plume north of Pt. Conception, CA: Observations, simulations, and scalings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanda, Sutara H.; Kumar, Nirnimesh; Miller, Arthur J.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Haas, Kevin; Cai, Donghua; Edwards, Christopher A.; Washburn, Libe; Fewings, Melanie R.; Torres, Rachel; Feddersen, Falk

    2016-10-01

    In upwelling regions, wind relaxations lead to poleward propagating warm water plumes that are important to coastal ecosystems. The coastal ocean response to wind relaxation around Pt. Conception, CA is simulated with a Regional Ocean Model (ROMS) forced by realistic surface and lateral boundary conditions including tidal processes. The model reproduces well the statistics of observed subtidal water column temperature and velocity at both outer and inner-shelf mooring locations throughout the study. A poleward-propagating plume of Southern California Bight water that increases shelf water temperatures by ≈ 5°C is also reproduced. Modeled plume propagation speed, spatial scales, and flow structure are consistent with a theoretical scaling for coastal buoyant plumes with both surface-trapped and slope-controlled dynamics. Plume momentum balances are distinct between the offshore (>30 m depth) region where the plume is surface-trapped, and onshore of the 30 m isobath (within 5 km from shore) where the plume water mass extends to the bottom and is slope controlled. In the onshore region, bottom stress is important in the alongshore momentum equation and generates vertical vorticity that is an order of magnitude larger than the vorticity in the plume core. Numerical experiments without tidal forcing show that modeled surface temperatures are biased 0.5°C high, potentially affecting plume propagation distance and persistence.

  2. Passive acoustic monitoring using a towed hydrophone array results in identification of a previously unknown beaked whale habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yack, Tina M; Barlow, Jay; Calambokidis, John; Southall, Brandon; Coates, Shannon

    2013-09-01

    Beaked whales are diverse and species rich taxa. They spend the vast majority of their time submerged, regularly diving to depths of hundreds to thousands of meters, typically occur in small groups, and behave inconspicuously at the surface. These factors make them extremely difficult to detect using standard visual survey methods. However, recent advancements in acoustic detection capabilities have made passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) a viable alternative. Beaked whales can be discriminated from other odontocetes by the unique characteristics of their echolocation clicks. In 2009 and 2010, PAM methods using towed hydrophone arrays were tested. These methods proved highly effective for real-time detection of beaked whales in the Southern California Bight (SCB) and were subsequently implemented in 2011 to successfully detect and track beaked whales during the ongoing Southern California Behavioral Response Study. The three year field effort has resulted in (1) the successful classification and tracking of Cuvier's (Ziphius cavirostris), Baird's (Berardius bairdii), and unidentified Mesoplodon beaked whale species and (2) the identification of areas of previously unknown beaked whale habitat use. Identification of habitat use areas will contribute to a better understanding of the complex relationship between beaked whale distribution, occurrence, and preferred habitat characteristics on a relatively small spatial scale. These findings will also provide information that can be used to promote more effective management and conservation of beaked whales in the SCB, a heavily used Naval operation and training region.

  3. Three-dimensional tracking of Cuvier's beaked whales' echolocation sounds using nested hydrophone arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2015-10-01

    Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris) were tracked using two volumetric small-aperture (∼1 m element spacing) hydrophone arrays, embedded into a large-aperture (∼1 km element spacing) seafloor hydrophone array of five nodes. This array design can reduce the minimum number of nodes that are needed to record the arrival of a strongly directional echolocation sound from 5 to 2, while providing enough time-differences of arrivals for a three-dimensional localization without depending on any additional information such as multipath arrivals. To illustrate the capabilities of this technique, six encounters of up to three Cuvier's beaked whales were tracked over a two-month recording period within an area of 20 km(2) in the Southern California Bight. Encounter periods ranged from 11 min to 33 min. Cuvier's beaked whales were found to reduce the time interval between echolocation clicks while alternating between two inter-click-interval regimes during their descent towards the seafloor. Maximum peak-to-peak source levels of 179 and 224 dB re 1 μPa @ 1 m were estimated for buzz sounds and on-axis echolocation clicks (directivity index = 30 dB), respectively. Source energy spectra of the on-axis clicks show significant frequency components between 70 and 90 kHz, in addition to their typically noted FM upsweep at 40-60 kHz.

  4. Assessment of pollution aerosols sources above the Straits of Dover using lead isotope geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboudt, K; Flament, P; Weis, D; Mennessier, J P; Maquinghen, P

    1999-09-15

    We assess the capability of lead isotopes to study the transport of pollution aerosols above the Straits of Dover by collecting atmospheric aerosols above the Eastern Channel and the Southern Bight of the North Sea. During the same period, we characterized the lead isotopic signature of the main industrial sources on the French coast near the Straits of Dover. Urban and automobile-derived aerosols were also collected. Due to the phasing out of lead in gasoline, the urban isotopic composition (206Pb/207Pb = 1.158 +/- 0.003) has become more radiogenic, although it is highly variable. On a regional scale, major industrial emissions have a well-defined isotopic composition (1.13 isotopic compositions, it can be shown that lead aerosols originating from eastern Europe have an isotopic signature (1.145 isotopic composition of west-European lead aerosols (1.111 < 206Pb/207Pb < 1.142). The influence of remote North American sources is suggested, with caution, due to uncertainties in meteorological calculations.

  5. Dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP) and proline from the surface of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus inhibit bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, M; Rempt, M; Gebser, B; Grueneberg, J; Pohnert, G; Weinberger, F

    2012-01-01

    It was demonstrated previously that polar and non-polar surface extracts of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus collected during winter from the Kiel Bight (Germany) inhibited bacterial attachment at natural concentrations. The present study describes the bioassay-guided identification of the active metabolites from the polar fraction. Chromatographic separation on a size-exclusion liquid chromatography column and bioassays identified an active fraction that was further investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This fraction contained the metabolites dimethylsulphopropionate (DMSP), proline and alanine. DMSP and proline caused the anti-attachment activity. The metabolites were further quantified on the algal surface together with its associated boundary layer. DMSP and proline were detected in the range 0.12-1.08 ng cm(-2) and 0.09-0.59 ng cm(-2), respectively. These metabolites were tested in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 ng cm(-2) against the attachment of five bacterial strains isolated from algae and sediment co-occurring with F. vesiculosus. The surface concentrations for 50% inhibition of attachment of these strains were always vesiculosus were also tested, but proved to be the least sensitive. This study shows that DMSP and proline have an ecologically relevant role as surface inhibitors against bacterial attachment on F. vesiculosus.

  6. Tracer Modeling with the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (hycom)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Kim, H.; Li, B.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Spindler, T.; Tolman, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    A series of tracer simulations have been started at NCEP/NWS aiming to a variety of applications, from dispersion of contaminants in estimations motivated by the Japanese nuclear accident near Fukushima, to nutrient estimations. The tracer capabilities of HYCOM are used, in regional domains, nested to daily nowcast/forecast fields from 1/12 HYCOM (RTOFS-Global) model output. A Fukushima Cs-137 simulation is now run in operational mode (RTOFS_ET). The simulation was initialized at the time of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and includes atmospheric deposition of Cs-137 and coastal discharge from a high resolution coastal model (ROMS done at NOAA/NOS). Almost all tracer moved offshore before the end of the first year after the accident. The tracer initially deposited in the Pacific ocean through the atmosphere slowly moves eastward and to deeper waters following the 3D ocean circulation. A series of simulations were started for nutrient estimations in the Gulf Stream and Mid Atlantic Bight region. Initially the capabilities implemented in HYCOM are used. The work aims to monitoring nutrients in the chosen region. Work is done in collaboration with Victoria Coles of U. Maryland.

  7. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well.

  8. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Southall, Brandon L; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S; Hazen, Elliott L; Falcone, Erin A; Schorr, Gregory S; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-22

    Mid-frequency military (1-10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health.

  9. Mapping the spawning grounds of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) by direct and indirect means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Clive J; Taylor, Martin; Dickey-Collas, Mark; Fossum, Petter; Kraus, Gerd; Rohlf, Norbert; Munk, Peter; van Damme, Cindy J G; Bolle, Loes J; Maxwell, David L; Wright, Peter J

    2008-07-07

    Despite recent evidence for sub-stock structuring, North Sea cod are assessed as a single unit. As a consequence, knowledge of sub-stock trends is poor. In particular, there are no recent evaluations of which spawning grounds are active. Here we report results from the first ichthyoplankton survey to cover the whole North Sea. Also, this survey, conducted in 2004, was the first to make extensive use of DNA-based molecular methods to unambiguously identify early developmental stage cod eggs. We compare the findings from the plankton survey with estimated egg production inferred from the distribution of mature cod in contemporaneous trawl surveys. Results from both approaches were in general agreement and showed hot spots of egg production around the southern and eastern edges of the Dogger Bank, in the German Bight, the Moray Firth and to the east of the Shetlands. These areas broadly coincide with known spawning locations from the period 1940 to 1970. We were, however, unable to directly detect significant numbers of cod eggs at the historic spawning ground off Flamborough (northeast coast of England). The results demonstrate that most of the major spawning grounds of cod in the North Sea are still active but that some localized populations may have been reduced to the point where it is now difficult to detect the presence of eggs in the plankton.

  10. Mapping the Sea Floor of the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS) Offshore of New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford

    2002-01-01

    The area offshore of New York City has been used for the disposal of dredged material for over a century. The area has also been used for the disposal of other materials such as acid waste, industrial waste, municipal sewage sludge, cellar dirt, and wood. Between 1976 and 1995, the New York Bight Dredged Material Disposal Site, also known as the Mud Dump Site (MDS), received on average about 6 million cubic yards of dredged material annually. In September 1997 the MDS was closed as a disposal site, and it and the surrounding area were designated as the Historic Area Remediation Site (HARS). The sea floor of the HARS, approximately 9 square nautical miles in area, currently is being remediated by placing a minimum 1-m-thick cap of clean dredged material on top of the surficial sediments that are contaminated from previous disposal of dredged and other materials. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is working cooperatively with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to map the sea floor geology of the HARS and changes in the characteristics of the surficial sediments over time.

  11. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  12. Spatial and temporal variations in silver contamination and toxicity in San Francisco Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegal, A R; Brown, C L; Squire, S; Ross, J R M; Scelfo, G M; Hibdon, S

    2007-09-01

    Although San Francisco Bay has a "Golden Gate", it may be argued that it is the "Silver Estuary". For at one time the Bay was reported to have the highest levels of silver in its sediments and biota, along with the only accurately measured values of silver in solution, of any estuarine system. Since then others have argued that silver contamination is higher elsewhere (e.g., New York Bight, Florida Bay, Galveston Bay) in a peculiar form of pollution machismo, while silver contamination has measurably declined in sediments, biota, and surface waters of the Bay over the past two to three decades. Documentation of those systemic temporal declines has been possible because of long-term, ongoing monitoring programs, using rigorous trace metal clean sampling and analytical techniques, of the United States Geological Survey and San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program that are summarized in this report. However, recent toxicity studies with macro-invertebrates in the Bay have indicated that silver may still be adversely affecting the health of the estuarine system, and other studies have indicated that silver concentrations in the Bay may be increasing due to new industrial inputs and/or the diagenetic remobilization of silver from historically contaminated sediments being re-exposed to overlying surface waters and benthos. Consequently, the Bay may not be ready to relinquish its title as the "Silver Estuary".

  13. Trophic look at soft-bottom communities - Short-term effects of trawling cessation on benthos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannheim, Jennifer; Brey, Thomas; Schröder, Alexander; Mintenbeck, Katja; Knust, Rainer; Arntz, Wolf E.

    2014-01-01

    The trophic structure of the German Bight soft-bottom benthic community was evaluated for potential changes after cessation of bottom trawling. Species were collected with van-Veen grabs and beam trawls. Trophic position (i.e. nitrogen stable isotope ratios, δ15N) and energy flow (i.e. species metabolism approximated by body mass scaled abundance) of dominant species were compared in trawled areas and an area protected from fisheries for 14 months in order to detect trawling cessation effects by trophic characteristics. At the community level, energy flow was lower in the protected area, but we were unable to detect significant changes in trophic position. At the species level energy flow in the protected area was lower for predating/scavenging species but higher for interface feeders. Species trophic positions of small predators/scavengers were lower and of deposit feeders higher in the protected area. Major reasons for trophic changes after trawling cessation may be the absence of artificial and additional food sources from trawling likely to attract predators and scavengers, and the absence of physical sediment disturbance impacting settlement/survival of less mobile species and causing a gradual shift in food availability and quality. Our results provide evidence that species or community energy flow is a good indicator to detect trawling induced energy-flow alterations in the benthic system, and that in particular species trophic properties are suitable to capture subtle and short-term changes in the benthos following trawling cessation.

  14. Stability of bubbles in a linear elastic medium: Implications for bubble growth in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algar, C. K.; Boudreau, B. P.

    2010-09-01

    Methane bubbles in muddy fine-grained sediments grow initially through a process of elastic expansion, punctuated by discrete fracture events (LEFM-growth). The ability of the surrounding sediments to support a stress and actively resist expansion can, under conditions of low gas production or high sediment toughness, result in the cessation of growth and the presence of stable bubbles. Thus, it is possible for a bubble to stop growing despite the presence of a source in the sediments that continues to produce gas. This contrasts with growth of bubbles in a fluid medium, which cannot support a stress and so will continue to grow as long as a surrounding source provides gas. This "no-growth" condition is the result of the coupling between gas supply (methane production or supersaturation) and the sediment mechanics. Here we quantify this condition and present a criterion for the switch between no-growth and the LEFM growth regimes. We apply this theory to the sediments of Eckernförde Bay, in the Kiel Bight, Germany, and despite the absence of measurements for the key sediment mechanical properties, we can provide a qualitative explanation for the sizes and shapes of the observed bubble population with depth in the sediment. We also show how the release of hydrostatic pressure can stimulate growth, by pushing otherwise stable bubbles into the LEFM growth regime. This could provide a mechanism for the release of bubbles during periods of low water, such as during low tide or wave events.

  15. Analytical models for the groundwater tidal prism and associated benthic water flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey N.; Mehta, Ashish J.; Dean, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    The groundwater tidal prism is defined as the volume of water that inundates a porous medium, forced by one tidal oscillation in surface water. The pressure gradient that generates the prism acts on the subterranean estuary. Analytical models for the groundwater tidal prism and associated benthic flux are presented. The prism and flux are shown to be directly proportional to porosity, tidal amplitude, and the length of the groundwater wave; flux is inversely proportional to tidal period. The duration of discharge flux exceeds the duration of recharge flux over one tidal period; and discharge flux continues for some time following low tide. Models compare favorably with laboratory observations and are applied to a South Atlantic Bight study area, where tide generates an 11-m3 groundwater tidal prism per m of shoreline, and drives 81 m3 s −1 to the study area, which describes 23% of an observational estimate. In a marine water body, the discharge component of any oscillatory benthic water flux is submarine groundwater discharge. Benthic flux transports constituents between groundwater and surface water, and is a process by which pollutant loading and saltwater intrusion may occur in coastal areas.

  16. New method for rapid solid-phase extraction of large-volume water samples and its application to non-target screening of North Sea water for organic contaminants by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, S; Bester, K; Hühnerfuss, H

    2001-03-30

    A method has been developed that allows the solid-phase extraction of microorganic compounds from large volumes of water (10 l) for non-target analysis of filtered seawater. The filtration-extraction system is operated with glass fibre filter candles and the polymeric styrene-divinylbenzene sorbent SDB-1 at flow-rates as high as 500 ml/min. Recovery studies carried out for a couple of model substances covering a wide range of polarity and chemical classes revealed a good performance of the method. Especially for polar compounds (log Kow 3.3-0.7) quantitative recovery was achieved. Limits of detection were between 0.1 and 0.7 ng/l in the full scan mode of the MS. The suitability of the method for the analysis of marine water samples is demonstrated by the non-target screening of water from the German Bight for the presence of organic contaminants. In the course of this screening a large variety of substances was identified including pesticides, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. For some of the identified compounds their occurrence in marine ecosystems has not been reported before, such as dichloropyridines, carbamazepine, propyphenazone and caffeine.

  17. H2 cycling and microbial bioenergetics in anoxic sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of H2 is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, the great majority of microbial redox processes involve H2 as a reactant, product, or potential by-product, and the thermodynamics of these processes are thus highly sensitive to fluctuations in environmental H2 concentrations. In turn, H2 concentrations are controlled by the activity of H2-consuming microorganisms, which efficiently utilize this substrate down to levels which correspond to their bioenergetic limitations. Consequently, any environmental change which impacts the thermodynamics of H2-consuming organisms is mirrored by a corresponding change in H2 concentrations. This phenomenon is illustrated in anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, USA: H2 concentrations are controlled by a suite of environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, sulfate concentrations) in a fashion which can be quantitatively described by a simple thermodynamic model. These findings allow us to calculate the apparent minimum quantity of biologically useful energy in situ. We find that sulfate reducing bacteria are not active at energy yields below -18 kJ per mole sulfate, while methanogenic archaea exhibit a minimum close to -10 kJ per mole methane.

  18. High frequency normal mode statistics in a shallow water waveguide: the effect of random linear internal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghukumar, Kaustubha; Colosi, John A

    2014-07-01

    Using transport theory and Monte Carlo numerical simulation, the statistical properties of mode propagation at a frequency of 1 kHz are studied in a shallow water environment with random sound-speed perturbations from linear internal waves. The environment is typical of summer conditions in the mid-Atlantic bight during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment. Observables of interest include the second and fourth moments of the mode amplitudes, which are relevant to full-field mean intensity and scintillation index. It is found that mode phase randomization has a strong adiabatic component while at the same time mode coupling rates are significant. As a consequence, a computationally efficient transport theory is presented, which models cross-mode correlation adiabatically, but accounts for mode coupling using the mode energy equations of Creamer [(1996). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 2825-2838]. The theory also has closed-form expressions for the internal wave scattering matrix and a correction for an edge effect. The hybrid transport theory is shown to accurately reproduce many statistical quantities from the Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Distribution of vibrio species in shellfish and water samples collected from the atlantic coastline of south-east Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyisi, Onyedikachukwu A L; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iroegbu, Christian U

    2013-09-01

    Crayfish, lobster, and sea-water samples collected from five fishing islands on the Atlantic coast-Bight of Biafra (Bonny)-belonging to Ibaka Local Government Area of Akwa-Ibom State of Nigeria were bacteriologically evaluated on thiosulphate citrate bile-salt sucrose (TCBS) agar for Vibrio load and pathotypes. Mean log10 Vibrio counts of 7.64+/-2.78 cfu/g (in crayfish), 5.07+/-3.21 cfu/g (in lobster), and 3.06+/-2.27 cfu/mL (in sea-water) were obtained in rainy season (June-July) while counts in the dry season (November-December) were 6.25+/-1.93 cfu/g, 5.99+/-1.54 cfu/g, and 3.84+/-1.78 cfu/mL respectively. The physicochemical measurements (temperature, pH, and total dissolved solutes) of the sea-water did not vary significantly in the two seasons across all five islands. Vibrio species isolated were Vibrio cholerae (both O1 and non-O1 serotypes), V parahaemolyticus, V vulnificus, V mimicus, and V fluvialis. Both Ogawa and Inaba subtypes of V cholerae O1 serotype were found. In addition, the Hikojima subtype, which had not been previously reported in the region, was isolated in two samples. The results show that these Vibrio species are endemic in the area.

  20. Environmental impact assessment. Investigation of marine mammals in relation to the establishment of a marine wind farm on Horns Reef

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-15

    Elsamproject has decided to carry out an environmental impact assessment with the aim to investigate whether the establishment of a marine wind farm on Horns Reef may impact on breeding and non-breeding marine mammals, particularly harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena and common seal Phoca vitulina. The marine mammals of the northern part of the German Bight can be characterised by a regular occurrence of harbour porpoise and common seal throughout the year, an irregular occurrence of grey seal Halichoerus grypus and white-beaked dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris and rare occurrences of white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus, minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata, sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus, long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas and killer whale Orcinus orca. The environment impact assessment therefore focuses on the evaluation of the possible effects on harbour porpoise and common seal. The investigation constitutes the first phase of a before-after-control-impact (BACI) analysis of the occurrence of harbour porpoise before, during and after the construction of the wind farm. (au)

  1. Validation of genetic algorithm-based optimal sampling for ocean data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Kevin D.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Duda, Timothy F.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2016-08-01

    Regional ocean models are capable of forecasting conditions for usefully long intervals of time (days) provided that initial and ongoing conditions can be measured. In resource-limited circumstances, the placement of sensors in optimal locations is essential. Here, a nonlinear optimization approach to determine optimal adaptive sampling that uses the genetic algorithm (GA) method is presented. The method determines sampling strategies that minimize a user-defined physics-based cost function. The method is evaluated using identical twin experiments, comparing hindcasts from an ensemble of simulations that assimilate data selected using the GA adaptive sampling and other methods. For skill metrics, we employ the reduction of the ensemble root mean square error (RMSE) between the "true" data-assimilative ocean simulation and the different ensembles of data-assimilative hindcasts. A five-glider optimal sampling study is set up for a 400 km × 400 km domain in the Middle Atlantic Bight region, along the New Jersey shelf-break. Results are compared for several ocean and atmospheric forcing conditions.

  2. The relationship among spawning period, length at first maturity and depth distribution of Mullus barbatus and Upeneus moluccensis inhabiting the Northeastern Mediterranean coast of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Enver Özyurt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the spawning characteristics and distribution of Mullus barbatus and Upeneus moluccensis in Babadillimani Bight, in the northeastern Mediterranean (near Mersin, Turkey between of May 1999 and April 2000. Sampling was carried out monthly at depths of 0-50 m, 50-100 m and >100 m using commercial trawl net mesh size 22 mm knot to knot. The results showed no difference between the length at first maturity of males and females (t-test, P>0.001 in either M. barbatus or U. moluccensis. This length for the combined sexes was calculated to be 11.7 cm and 10.9 cm in M. barbatus and U. moluccensis, respectively. When monthly changes in the Gonadosomatic Index (GSI values were evaluated, the spawning period was determined as July-November for M. barbatus and May-August for U. moluccensis. The mean total lengths from the individuals belonging to M. barbatus from depth layers of 0-50 m, 50-100 m and >100 m were calculated as 8.65 cm, 8.70 cm and 12.70 cm, respectively. Total lengths for U. moluccensis were calculated as 8.40 cm, 11.66 cm and 13.32 cm, respectively. The mean total length of M. barbatus and U. moluccensis increased from coastal areas to deeper waters. Therefore bottom trawl fishing must be conducted in waters deeper than 100 m for both M. barbatus and U. moluccensis.

  3. Age constraints on the origin and growth history of a deep-water coral mound in the northeast Atlantic drilled during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Akihiro; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Williams, Trevor; Henriet, Jean-Pierre; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Kawagoe, Noriko; Takashima, Chiduru; Kakizaki, Yoshihiro; Abe, Kohei; Sakai, Saburo; Browning, Emily L.; Li, Xianghui; Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 307 Scientists

    2007-11-01

    Sr isotope stratigraphy provides a new age model for the first complete section drilled through a deep-water coral mound. The 155-m-long section from Challenger Mound in the Porcupine Sea-bight, southwest of Ireland, is on Miocene siliciclastics and consists entirely of sediments bearing well-preserved cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa. The 87Sr/86Sr values of 28 coral specimens from the mound show an upward-increasing trend, correspond to ages from 2.6 to 0.5 Ma, and identify a significant hiatus from ca. 1.7 to 1.0 Ma at 23.6 m below seafloor. The age of the basal mound sediments coincides with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciations that set up the modern stratification of the northeast Atlantic and enabled coral growth. Mound growth persisted throughout glacial-interglacial fluctuations, reached a maximum rate (24 cm/k.y.) ca. 2.0 Ma, and ceased at 1.7 Ma. Unlike other buried mounds in Porcupine Seabight, Challenger Mound was only partly covered during its growth interruption, and growth restarted ca. 1.0 Ma.

  4. Cross-shelf subtidal variability in San Pedro Bay during summer, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, P.; Noble, M.A.; Largier, J.; Rosenfeld, L.K.; Robertson, G.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 16 moorings were deployed across the San Pedro shelf, one of the two wider embayments in the Southern California Bight, from near the surfzone to the upper-slope. On the middle and outer shelf in the summer of 2001, the currents flowed strongly equatorward at the surface and had large vertical shears through the well-stratified water column. This equatorward flow differs from predominantly poleward flow found in previous studies of the coastal margin further west. In deeper water, near the shelf break, the shears were such that near-bottom flows were poleward and incorporated into the upper parts of the Southern California Undercurrent over the slope. Mid-shelf current fluctuations, with periods of 10-25 days, along with upwelling over the shelf, were not related to local winds, but were significantly correlated with the large-scale alongshore pressure gradient. Shorter period (???7-10 days) inner shelf alongshore currents, however, were significantly correlated with the alongshore wind at the shelf break. A CEOF analysis gives two significant modes, with the first mode dominant over the outer and middle shelf. The wind-forced second mode connects the inner shelf to the poleward undercurrent over the slope such that increases in the poleward flow over the slope are correlated with increases in the equatorward current inshore of the 15 m isobath.

  5. The Elbe flood 2002--toxic effects of transported contaminants in flatfish and mussels of the Wadden Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsporn, S; Broeg, K; Koehler, A

    2005-04-01

    Cellular changes in livers from flounder (Platichthys flesus L.) and digestive glands of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were studied to analyze whether the Elbe flood catastrophe in August 2002 had any deleterious effects on animal health. Flatfish and mussels were sampled at different locations in the Elbe estuary and the Wadden Sea after the flood wave had reached the German Bight. Internationally used core biomarkers (lysosomal membrane stability, biotransformation enzymes) were applied to assess the toxic effects of putatively increased pollution levels. In comparison to earlier data from long-term studies at the same stations, we found a significant impairment in the function of cell organelles (lysosomes) involved in the detoxification and elimination of pollutants in fish liver. Concentrations of relevant contaminants (organochlorines, polychlorinated biphenyls) were analyzed in parallel with cellular biomarkers, and conspicuously raised concentrations of insecticides metabolites were detected. Cell recovery and a clear reduction in contaminant concentrations were observed in fish livers five months after the flood at all sampling sites except the Helgolander Tiefe Rinne.

  6. Xenoestrogens in the River Elbe and its tributaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Burkhard; Ehrhorn, Ute; Heemken, Olaf Peter; Lepom, Peter; Reincke, Heinrich; Sawal, Georg; Theobald, Norbert

    2003-01-01

    4-Alkylphenols, 4-alkylphenol ethoxylates, 4-alkylphenoxy carboxylates, bisphenol A, bisphenol F, 4-hydroxyacetophenon, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and steroid hormones were analyzed in water samples of the River Elbe and its tributaries Schwarze Elster, Mulde, Saale, Havel and Schwinge. Additionally, freshly deposited sediments (FDS, composite samples) of the River Elbe and its tributaries were analyzed. The concentrations in water samples ranged from (in ng/l): bisphenol A 4 to 92, branched nonylphenol 13 to 87, branched nonylphenol ethoxylates Elbe Estuary and the German Bight, the River Elbe must be considered as a major source of pollution for the North Sea in respect of the compounds analyzed. A comparison of bisphenol A concentrations, 4-alkylphenols and the corresponding ethoxylates analyzed in the River Elbe and its tributaries with those found in other German surface waters indicated a low level of contamination. The evaluation of the data based on LOEC-values indicated that the concentrations were well below the effectivity threshold for some 4-alkylphenols. According to recent ecotoxicological investigations, for example, with prosobranch snails, bisphenol A concentrations found in water samples of the River Elbe and its tributaries may well be detrimental to aquatic organisms. On the basis of the monitoring data and its implications for estrogenic potency the inclusion of bisphenol A in the list of priority substances (European Union Directive 2000/60/EC, Annex X) should be considered.

  7. Mitochondrial Genetic Structure and Matrilineal Origin of White Sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, in the Northeastern Pacific: Implications for Their Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oñate-González, Erick C; Rocha-Olivares, Axayácatl; Saavedra-Sotelo, Nancy C; Sosa-Nishizaki, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    White sharks (Carcharodon carcharias, WS henceforth) are globally and regionally threatened. Understanding their patterns of abundance and connectivity, as they relate to habitat use, is central for delineating conservation units and identifying priority areas for conservation. We analyzed mitochondrial data to test the congruence between patterns of genetic connectivity and of individual movements in the Northeastern Pacific (NEP) and to trace the matrilineal origin of immature WS from coastal California and Baja California to adult aggregation areas. We analyzed 186 mitochondrial control region sequences from sharks sampled in Central California (CC; n = 61), Southern California Bight (SCB; n = 25), Baja California Pacific coast (BCPC; n = 9), Bahía Vizcaíno (BV; n = 39), Guadalupe Island (GI; n = 45), and the Gulf of California (GC; n = 7). Significant mitochondrial differentiation between adult aggregation areas (CC, GI) revealed two reproductive populations in the NEP. We found general concordance between movement patterns of young and adult WS with genetic results. Young sharks from coastal California and Baja California were more likely born from females from GI. Mitochondrial differentiation of young-of-the-year from SCB and BV suggests philopatry to nursery areas in females from GI. These results provide a genetic basis of female reproductive behavior at a regional scale and point to a preponderance of sharks from GI in the use of the sampled coastal region as pupping habitat. These findings should be considered in Mexican and US management and conservation strategies of the WS NEP population.

  8. Number One Reef: An overstepped segmented lagoon complex on the KwaZulu-Natal continental shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Vella

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study of the bathymetry of the mid-shelf of the Durban Bight, KwaZulu-Natal revealed a series of previously undocumented seafloor features. These features were mapped using a high-resolution multibeam bathymetric echosounder and a detailed map of the seafloor topography was produced. We recognised several features that closely resemble features of contemporary segmented lagoon and lake systems: semicircular seafloor depressions, arcuate ridges, cuspate spits and prograding submerged barriers. Based on the striking similarity in morphology to Kosi Bay – a segmented lagoon system from the sandy northern KwaZulu-Natal coastal plain – a similar evolutionary model is proposed. This model is of an incised valley formed following a sea level lowering to the Last Glacial Maximum at about 18 000 BP. Thereafter, continued transgressive infilling occurred to a point where an extensive lagoon and back-barrier system was established. At this point, sea levels remained static, causing the net segmentation of the system and the slow closure of the tidal basins or circular depressions. This type of seafloor topography is rarely preserved and is the result of fortuitous cementation after deposition and the later removal of sediment that would ordinarily bury such features.

  9. Evaluating VIIRS ocean color products for west coast and Hawaiian waters

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, Curtiss O.

    2013-06-03

    Automated match ups allow us to maintain and improve the ocean color products of current satellite instruments MODIS, and since February 2012 the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). As part of the VIIRS mission Ocean Calibration and Validation Team, we have created a web-based automated match up tool that provides access to searchable fields for date, site, and products, and creates matchups between satellites (MODIS, VIIRS), and in-situ measurements (HyperPRO and SeaPRISM). The goal is to evaluate the standard VIIRS ocean color products produced by the IDPS and available through NOAA’s CLASS data system. Comparisons are made with MODIS data for the same location, and VIIRS data processed using the NRL Automated Processing System (APS) used to produce operational products for the Navy. Results are shown for the first year of VIIRS data matching the satellite data with the data from Platform Eureka SeaPRISM off L. A. Harbor in the Southern California Bight, and HyperPRO data from Station ALOHA near Hawaii. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  10. Optical properties of algal blooms in an eutrophicated coastal area and its relevance to remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astoreca, Rosa; Rousseau, Veronique; Ruddick, Kevin; Van Mol, Barbara; Parent, Jean-Yves; Lancelot, Christiane

    2005-08-01

    The Southern Bight of the North Sea is characterised by a large influence of river inputs, which results in eutrophication of the area. High concentrations of plankton biomass and suspended matter have been reported for this area, in relation with blooms of different species and resuspension of bottom sediments. In spring the haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa blooms throughout the area reaching up to 30 mg Chlorophyll m-3 or more nearshore. This event is followed in June by red tides of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans. These blooms are concurrent with different species of diatoms. The strong optical signature of these blooms is clear to human observers making them potentially detectable in satellite imagery. As a first step in this direction, sampling has been carried out in the area, during Phaeocystis and Noctiluca blooms in 2003 and 2004. Phytoplankton pigments and inherent optical properties (particle, detrital and phytoplankton absorption) have been measured spectrophotometrically, and in situ using an ac-9 for total absorption and particle scattering. Field data were compared with optical properties of pure species obtained in laboratory. In parallel, water-leaving reflectance has been also measured. In this paper we characterise the optical signatures of diatoms, Phaeocystis and Noctiluca and their contribution to total absorption. The impact on water-leaving reflectance spectra is evaluated; in order to assess the conditions in which remote sensing can provide information for monitoring the timing, extent and magnitude of blooms in this coastal area.

  11. The influence of Pacific Equatorial Water on fish diversity in the southern California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchie, Sam; Thompson, Andrew R.; Alin, Simone R.; Siedlecki, Samantha; Watson, William; Bograd, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    The California Undercurrent transports Pacific Equatorial Water (PEW) into the Southern California Bight from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. PEW is characterized by higher temperatures and salinities, with lower pH, representing a source of potentially corrosive (aragonite,Ωfish diversity. We use hydrographic data to characterize the interannual and seasonal variability of estimated pH and aragonite saturation with depth. Although there is substantial variability in PEW presence as measured by spice on the 26.25-26.75 isopycnal layer, as well as in pH and aragonite saturation, we found fish diversity to be stable over the decades 1985-1996 and 1999-2011. We detected significant difference in species structure during the 1998 La Niña period, due to reduced species evenness. Species richness due to rare species was higher during the 1997/1998 El Niño compared to the La Niña but the effect on species structure was undetectable. Lack of difference in the species abundance structure in the decade before and after the 1997/1999 ENSO event showed that the assemblage reverted to its former structure following the ENSO perturbation, indicating resilience. While the interdecadal species structure remained stable, the long tail of the distributions shows that species richness increased between the decades consistent with intrusion of warm water with more diverse assemblages into the southern California region.

  12. Comparison of the effects of two bongo net mesh sizes on the estimation of abundance and size of Engraulidae eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies of ichthyoplankton retention by nets of different mesh sizes are important because they help in choosing a sampler when planning collection and the establishment of correction factors. These factors make it possible to compare studies performed with nets of different mesh sizes. In most studies of mesh retention of fish eggs, the taxonomic identification is done at the family level, resulting in the loss of detailed information. We separated Engraulidae eggs, obtained with 0.333 mm and 0.505 mm mesh bongo nets at 172 oceanographic stations in the southeastern Brazilian Bight, into four groups based on their morphometric characteristics. The difference in the abundance of eggs caught by the two nets was not significant for those groups with highest volume, types A and B, but in type C (Engraulis anchoita, the most eccentric, and in type D, of the smallest volume, the difference was significant. However, no significant difference was observed in the egg size sampled with each net for E. anchoita and type D, which exhibited higher abundance in the 0.333 mm mesh net and minor axis varying from 0.45-0.71 mm, smaller than the 0.505 mm mesh aperture and the mesh diagonal.

  13. Condiciones oceanográficas en isla Gorgona, Pacífico oriental tropical de Colombia Oceanographic conditions off Gorgona Island, eastern tropical Pacific of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Giraldo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La zona de influencia costera de isla Gorgona es un área marina protegida localizada en el Pacífico Oriental Tropical (POT de Colombia. Aunque alberga uno de los arrecifes coralinos más desarrollados del POT, la caracterización de las condiciones oceanógraficas superficiales locales y su variabilidad temporal y espacial han sido escasamente abordadas. Para incrementar el conocimiento sobre la variabilidad de la temperatura y la salinidad en esta localidad se realizaron registros sistemáticos de estas variables durante cuatro periodos (septiembre 2005, diciembre 2005, marzo 2006 y junio 2006, se instalaron sensores de registro continuo de temperatura a f 5 m de profundidad en la zona oriental y occidental de la isla, y se realizó un monitoreo del patrón local de circulación superficial utilizando un perfilador de corrientes (AWAK-ADCP durante junio 2006 y febrero 2007. Se identificaron dos períodos contrastantes para las condiciones oceanógraficas en la capa superficial (0-50 m de la columna de agua: un período cálido y de baja salinidad superficial entre mayo y diciembre (profundidad termoclina 47 m y un período frío y salino entre enero y abril (profundidad termoclina 7,5 m. Se descartó la presencia de proceso local de surgencia y los resultados indicaron una fuerte influencia de procesos de mesoescala (surgencia en el Panamá Bight sobre la variabilidad temporal de las condiciones oceanógraficas en la zona de estudio. En este mismo sentido se sugiere que la variabilidad espacial estaría más asociada a procesos climáticos regionales (patrón de precipitación y la cercanía de la zona de estudio al complejo deltaico río Patía - río Sanquianga.The near shore zone of Gorgona Island is a protected marine area located in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP of Colombia. Although this is home to one of the most developed coral reefs in the ETP, the characteristics of the local oceanographic conditions at the surface and their

  14. Methodology for Estimating Tsunami Induced Hazard for Ports Along California Coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Burak; Titov, Vasily V.; Eble, Marie C.; Kanoglu, Utku

    2010-05-01

    Los Angeles County hosts two of the busiest container ports in the United States. The ports are adjacent to one another in San Pedro Bay but are operated separately by the cities of Long Beach and Los Angeles. Due to their importance to United States commerce, the hazard posed by tsunami is of great concern as the potential devastation and impact would likely interrupt commerce and marine activities. Furthermore, a tsunami would be hazardous to both the resident coastal population and the tourist trade for which these cities rely on for income. The Maritime Museum, Aquarium of the Pacific, and Queen Mary would all potentially be impacted by a tsunami. The seismic history of the Southern California Bight is well documented and confirms the tsunami generating potential of the region. A comprehensive study of the threat from near-field generation was conducted by Borrero et al. (2001, 2004). Dykstra and Jin (2006) and Moffatt and Nichol (2007) expanded these near-field studies by inclusion of tsunamis generated in the far-field along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Prior to the Kuril Islands event in November 2006, most studies focused on wave heights as the dominant measure of hazard. However, the impact of Kuril Islands tsunami at Crescent City, CA demonstrated that distant sources have the potential of inducing strong currents in harbors. To investigate the hazard posed by currents, a sensitivity study is performed for 322 tsunami sources for Mw 9.3 earthquakes along Pacific Rim subduction zones using the Method of Splitting Tsunamis model (Titov and Synolakis, 1998). Of the scenarios investigated, eleven sources in Alaska, Chile, Philippines, Manu, New Zealand and Vanuatu are identified as potentially hazardous to Ports in Southern California. Initial study results suggest that a Mw 9.3 earthquake can potentially trigger a tsunami with wave amplitudes reaching up to 2 m and currents exceeding 8 knots in Los Angeles Harbor. This study also suggests that Pacific Basin

  15. Optimal design criteria - prediction vs. parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldl, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    G-optimality is a popular design criterion for optimal prediction, it tries to minimize the kriging variance over the whole design region. A G-optimal design minimizes the maximum variance of all predicted values. If we use kriging methods for prediction it is self-evident to use the kriging variance as a measure of uncertainty for the estimates. Though the computation of the kriging variance and even more the computation of the empirical kriging variance is computationally very costly and finding the maximum kriging variance in high-dimensional regions can be time demanding such that we cannot really find the G-optimal design with nowadays available computer equipment in practice. We cannot always avoid this problem by using space-filling designs because small designs that minimize the empirical kriging variance are often non-space-filling. D-optimality is the design criterion related to parameter estimation. A D-optimal design maximizes the determinant of the information matrix of the estimates. D-optimality in terms of trend parameter estimation and D-optimality in terms of covariance parameter estimation yield basically different designs. The Pareto frontier of these two competing determinant criteria corresponds with designs that perform well under both criteria. Under certain conditions searching the G-optimal design on the above Pareto frontier yields almost as good results as searching the G-optimal design in the whole design region. In doing so the maximum of the empirical kriging variance has to be computed only a few times though. The method is demonstrated by means of a computer simulation experiment based on data provided by the Belgian institute Management Unit of the North Sea Mathematical Models (MUMM) that describe the evolution of inorganic and organic carbon and nutrients, phytoplankton, bacteria and zooplankton in the Southern Bight of the North Sea.

  16. On the origin of Laurentia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalziel, I.W.D. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Laurentia, the Precambrian core of the North American continent, is surrounded by late Precambrian rift systems and therefore constitutes a suspect terrane''. A geometric and geological fit can be achieved between the Atlantic margin of Laurentia and the Pacific margin of the Gondwana craton. The enigmatic Arequipa massif along the southern Peruvian coast, that yields ca. 2.0 Ga radiometric ages, is juxtaposed with the Makkovik-Ketilidian province of the same age range in Labrador and southern Greenland. The Greenville belt continues beneath the ensialic Andes of the present day to join up with the 1.3--1.0 Ga San Ignacio and Sonsas-Aguapei orogens of the Transamazonian craton. Together with the recent identification of possible continuations of the Greenville orogen in East Antarctica and of the Taconic Appalachians in southern South America, the fit supports suggestions that Laurentia originated between East Antarctica-Australia and embryonic South America prior to the opening of the Pacific Ocean basin and amalgamation of the Gondwana Cordilleran and Appalachian margins, this implies that there may have been two supercontinents during the Neoproterozoic, before and after opening of the Pacific Ocean. As Laurentia and Gondwana appear to have collided on at least two occasions during the Paleozoic, this scenario therefore calls to question the existence of so-called supercontinental cycles. The Arica bight of the present day may reflect a primary reentrant in the South American continental margin that controlled subduction processes along the Andean margin and eventually led to uplift of the Altiplano.

  17. Mean and extreme sea level changes in the southwestern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jessica; Patzke, Justus; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen; Fröhle, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution an overview over the BMBF project AMSeL_Ostsee (2015-2018) for the assessment of mean and extreme sea level changes over the past 150 years in the southwestern Baltic Sea is presented. We compile several high resolution tide gauge records provided by the Water and Shipping Administration (WSV) along the German Baltic Sea coastline and merge them in internationally available data bases (UHSLC, PSMSL, and data officially available at national authorities). In addition, we make efforts in digitizing historical records to expand the number of available data sets in this complex and vulnerable coastal region. To separate absolute from relative long-term changes in sea level the vertical land motion (VLM) at specific sites is assessed. Possible sources of VLM are independently assessed by using different state-of-the-art approaches, that is: Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) modelled by viscoelastic Earth models, GPS derived VLM, and the difference between tide gauge and nearby satellite altimetry. The VLM corrected tide gauge records are further assessed for linear and non-linear trends as well as possible acceleration/deceleration patterns by applying advanced time series models such as Singular System Analysis (SSA) combined with a Monte-Carlo-Autoregressive-Padding approach (Wahl et al., 2010). These trend assessments are applied to mean and extreme sea levels independently to prove whether observed changes in extremes are either due to an underlying trend on mean sea levels or changes in storminess. References: Wahl, T., Jensen, J., Frank, T. (2011): On analysing sea level rise in the German Bight since 1844, NHESS, 10, 171-179.

  18. Laboratory determined mortality, fecundity and growth rates of Thalia democratica Forskal and Dolioletta gegenbauri Uljanin (Tunicata, Thaliacea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibel, D.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory experiments are reported which provide information on culture conditions, mortality, fecundity and growth of Thalia democratica and Dolioletta gegenbauri in relation to simulated environmental conditions. Thaliacenas were maintained in laboratory culture at 20/sup 0/C. Culture vessels were 2.5 l glass bottles. Diets consisted of Isochrysis galbana and Peridinium trochoideum, offered alone or together at total concentrations of 0.25 to 0.70 mm/sup 3/ x 1/sup -/2exclamation. Laboratory released aggregate stages of Thalia were maintained for one week and gonozooid, phorozooid and oozooid stages of Dolioletta were reared for up to three weeks with daily mortality rates of 5-10%. There was no effect of diet on mortality rate. Thalia did not reproduce sexually but Dolioletta did routinely. Each Thalia solitary relased a mean (+/- SE) of 54 +/- 8 aggregates of 1.1-2.1 mm length. Each Dolioletta gonozooid produced 2-6 larvae 0.6-1.2 mm long, and each phorozooid released a mean of 31 +/- 11 gonozooids. Aggregate growth was exponential for 7 days, with daily exponential growth coefficients (k) ranging from 0.03-0.36. Gonozooids grew exponentially for 17 days with a range of k from 0.08-0.25, and phorozooids grew exponentially for 5 days with k ranging from 0.17-0.69. There was no effect of food concentration on k. Generation times of Thalia and Dolioletta were estimated to be from 3-6 weeks. These are probably maximum generation times for these two species in the Georgia Bight.

  19. Laboratory-measured grazing and ingestion rates of the salp, Thalia democratica Forskal, and the doliolid, Dolioletta gegenbauri Uljanin (Tunicata, Thaliacea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibel, D.

    1982-01-01

    Grazing and ingestion rates of laboratory-born Thalia democratica aggregates and Dolioletta gegenbauri gonozooids, phorozooids and oozooids were determined while fed Isochrysis galbana (4-5 ..mu..m diameter) alone or in combination with Peridinium trochoideum (16-18 ..mu..m diameter) at concentrations of 0.15-0.70 mm/sup 3/ x 1/sup -1/. Grazing rates (ml x zooid/sup -1/ x 24 h/sup -1/) ranged from 10 to 355, and at zooid weights greater than 5..mu..g carbon were in order oozooid > gonozooid > aggregate. Grazing rates increased exponentially with increasing zooid weight. Weight-specific grazing rates (ml x ..mu..gC/sup -1/ x 24 h/sup -1/) were independent of the four-fold initial food concentration. Mean weight-specific grazing rates increased linearly with increasing zooid weight for the aggregates and oozooids, but gonozooid mean rates were independent of zooid weight. Aggregate and gonozooid ingestion rates (10/sup 6/..mu..m/sup 3/ x zooid/sup -1/ x 24 h/sup -1/) ranged from 4 to 134 while oozooid rates ranged from 3 to 67. All ingestion rates were independent of the initial food concentration but increased linearly with increasing zooid weight at similar rates. All mean weight-specific ingestion rates (ml x ..mu..gC/sup -1/ x 24 h/sup -1/) were independent of zooid weight. The mean aggregate daily ration (..mu..gC ingested x ..mu..g body C/sup -1/) was 59% and the mean doliolid ration was 132%. Field studies indicate that normal concentrations of D. gegenbauri in the Georgia Bight clear their resident water volume (1 m/sup 3/) in about 4 months, but that highly concentrated, swarm populations which occur along thermohaline fronts clear their resident water volume in less than 1 day.

  20. An organic carbon budget for coastal Southern California determined by estimates of vertical nutrient flux, net community production and export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, William Z.; Prokopenko, Maria G.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Stanley, Rachel H. R.; Berelson, William M.; Baronas, J. Jotautas; Fleming, John C.; Aluwihare, Lihini

    2016-10-01

    Organic carbon export and burial in coastal upwelling regions is an important mechanism for oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2. In order to understand how these complex systems will respond to future climate forcing, further studies of nutrient input, biological production and export are needed. Using a 7Be-based approach, we produced an 18-month record of upwelling velocity estimates at the San Pedro Ocean Time-series (SPOT), Southern California Bight. These upwelling rates and vertical nutrient distributions have been combined to make estimates of potential new production (PNP), which are compared to estimates of net community oxygen production (NOP) made using a one-dimensional, two-box non-steady state model of euphotic zone biological oxygen supersaturation. NOP agrees within uncertainty with PNP, suggesting that upwelling is the dominant mechanism for supplying the ecosystem with new nutrients in the spring season, but negligible in the fall and winter. Combining this data set with estimates of sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) flux from water column 234Th:238U disequilibrium and sediment trap deployments, and an estimate of the ratio of dissolved organic carbon (DOC):POC consumption rates, we construct a simple box model of organic carbon in the upper 200 m of our study site. This box model (with uncertainties of ±50%) suggests that in spring, 28% of net production leaves the euphotic zone as DOC, of this, 12% as horizontal export and 16% via downward mixing. The remaining 72% of net organic carbon export exits as sinking POC, with only 10% of euphotic zone export reaching 200 m. We find the metabolic requirement for the local heterotrophic community below the euphotic zone, but above 200 m, is 105±50 mmol C m-2 d-1, or 80% of net euphotic zone production in spring.

  1. Bridging the gap between observational oceanography and users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenbach, Christiane A.

    2017-02-01

    In order to ensure relevance and societal impact of research and to meet the various requirements of different target groups, the Coastal Observing System for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) developed and pursued a broad range of activities for knowledge transfer and stakeholder interaction. Potential user groups of data and data products include (but are not limited to) science, administration, renewable energies, engineering, tourism, and nature conservation. COSYNA data and data products are publicly accessible and available free of charge via the Internet (data portal; www.cosyna.de). The stakeholder interaction is integrated into the COSYNA product life cycle outlined here and the steps undertaken are exemplified for the product Surface Current Fields in the German Bight. Initial surveys revealed COSYNA's potential relevance in the national and international context. After the technological and mathematical realization of high-quality parameter fields, external experts evaluated the scientific value, informational value, innovative leap, cost/benefit aspects, operability, etc., of the data products. In order to improve products and their usability and to pave the way for future co-operation, interviews and workshops with potential users from the offshore wind energy industry were conducted. The stakeholder interaction process was successful, revealing relevant insights into user demands and usability of (possible) products. Analysis of data download provided some evidence for impact beyond academia. Other criteria for the increasingly demanded evaluation of the impact of coastal research are discussed. By sharing first-hand experiences, this study contributes to the emerging knowledge on integration of science and end users.

  2. Real-time detection of eye position for stereoscopic display%用于立体显示的人眼位置快速检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨友林; 王元庆; 范科峰

    2012-01-01

    Eye detection is a very important technology for automatic face recognition and gaze tracking. It is applied to intelligent human-computer interaction, fatigue driving detection, security and biology system. An accurate eye detection algorithm based on the bright pupil effect is presented in this paper. The active infrared for illumination is adopted to produce the bight pupil effect and generate the candidate point, and then a novel feature-based method, Real Adaboost, will be used to verify the location of the eyes. Experimental results demonstrate that it takes less than 16 ms to confirm the position of the eyes in the frame for a video stream with a resolution of 640 * 480 and the detection rate is also satisfactory.%人眼检测实自动人脸检测以及视线跟踪中非常重要的一项技术,它被用于智能人机交互、疲劳驾驶检测、安保以及诸多领域.在此提出了一种基于亮瞳效应的精确人眼实时检测算法.该方法使用主动红外光结构照明来产生亮瞳效应并产生候选点,然后利用连续Adaboost算法来对人眼进行确认,实验结果表明,对于640×480分辨率的连续视频,系统每帧的检测时间小于10 ms,检测准确率较高.

  3. Tectonic Evolution of the Jurassic Pacific Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, M.; Ishihara, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present the tectonic evolution of the Jurassic Pacific plate based on magnetic anomly lineations and abyssal hills. The Pacific plate is the largest oceanic plate on Earth. It was born as a microplate aroud the Izanagi-Farallon-Phoenix triple junction about 192 Ma, Early Jurassic [Nakanishi et al., 1992]. The size of the Pacific plate at 190 Ma was nearly half that of the present Easter or Juan Fernandez microplates in the East Pacific Rise [Martinez et at, 1991; Larson et al., 1992]. The plate boundary surrounding the Pacific plate from Early Jurassic to Early Cretaceous involved the four triple junctions among Pacific, Izanagi, Farallon, and Phoenix plates. The major tectonic events as the formation of oceanic plateaus and microplates during the period occurred in the vicinity of the triple junctions [e.g., Nakanishi and Winterer, 1998; Nakanishi et al., 1999], implying that the study of the triple junctions is indispensable for understanding the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate. Previous studies indicate instability of the configuration of the triple junctions from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (155-125 Ma). On the other hand, the age of the birth of the Pacific plate was determined assuming that all triple junctions had kept their configurations for about 30 m.y. [Nakanishi et al., 1992] because of insufficient information of the tectonic history of the Pacific plate before Late Jurassic.Increase in the bathymetric and geomagnetic data over the past two decades enables us to reveal the tectonic evolution of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction before Late Jurassic. Our detailed identication of magnetic anomaly lineations exposes magnetic bights before anomaly M25. We found the curved abyssal hills originated near the triple junction, which trend is parallel to magnetic anomaly lineations. These results imply that the configuration of the Pacific-Izanagi-Farallon triple junction had been RRR before Late Jurassic.

  4. Sub-mesoscale Eddies and Their Propagation Paths in Long Bay, SC Observed in HF Radar Surface Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahl, D.; Voulgaris, G.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-mesoscale eddies on the shoreward front of the Gulf Stream (GS) are thought to play a critical role in controlling cross-shelf transport and momentum flux in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) but cannot be observed continuously from satellites due to cloud cover. Non-linear eddies have the ability to trap and transport water as they propagate, which make them a potential source of cross-shelf transport. Long Bay, SC, just downstream of the Charleston Bump is the area of highest eddy activity in the SAB. Surface currents in Long Bay have been observed since 2012 using HF radars. The accuracy of three eddy detection methods (Okubo-Weiss, Vector-geometry, Winding-angle) are compared in this area of high shear on the shoreward front of the GS. The Okubo-Weiss parameter does not perform well in this area due to the high shear environment where eddies propagate. The Vector-Geometry method has good successful detection rates but suffers in shape analysis from inaccurate Stream Function contours in this area due to divergent surface currents. The Winding-Angle method performs well and was used to detect eddies and their propagation paths in Long Bay for years 2013 and 2014. Detected eddies propagate predominantly along-shelf, with cyclonic (anticyclonic) eddies propagating downstream (upstream) with respect the GS. Few eddies with the ability to trap and transport water propagating in the across-shelf direction were observed, leading to the conclusion that most of the influence of these eddies is confined to the shoreward front of the GS, near the shelf break.

  5. Decadal changes in zooplankton of the Northeast U.S. continental shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Bi

    Full Text Available The abundance of the subarctic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, and temperate, shelf copepod, Centropages typicus, was estimated from samples collected bi-monthly over the Northeast U.S. continental shelf (NEUS from 1977-2010. Latitudinal variation in long term trends and seasonal patterns for the two copepod species were examined for four sub-regions: the Gulf of Maine (GOM, Georges Bank (GB, Southern New England (SNE, and Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB. Results suggested that there was significant difference in long term variation between northern region (GOM and GB, and the MAB for both species. C. finmarchicus generally peaked in May - June throughout the entire study region and Cen. typicus had a more complex seasonal pattern. Time series analysis revealed that the peak time for Cen. typicus switched from November - December to January - March after 1985 in the MAB. The long term abundance of C. finmarchicus showed more fluctuation in the MAB than the GOM and GB, whereas the long term abundance of Cen. typicus was more variable in the GB than other sub-regions. Alongshore transport was significantly correlated with the abundance of C. finmarchicus, i.e., more water from north, higher abundance for C. finmarchicus. The abundance of Cen. typicus showed positive relationship with the Gulf Stream north wall index (GSNWI in the GOM and GB, but the GSNWI only explained 12-15% of variation in Cen. typicus abundance. In general, the alongshore current was negatively correlated with the GSNWI, suggesting that Cen. typicus is more abundant when advection from the north is less. However, the relationship between Cen. typicus and alongshore transport was not significant. The present study highlights the importance of spatial scales in the study of marine populations: observed long term changes in the northern region were different from the south for both species.

  6. Pn anisotropy in Mesozoic western Pacific lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Natsumi; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hajewski, Christina J.; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2014-04-01

    Pn is the high-frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within the old oceanic lithosphere. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (150-160 Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment. We use Pn phases from 403 earthquakes during the 1 year of deployment to measure apparent velocities across the arrays. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed near a fast-spreading, ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. Using high-frequency waves (5-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of azimuth. In the western array, we find Pn anisotropy with velocities ranging from ~8.7 km/s in the back azimuth (θ) direction of 310° to ~7.7 km/s at ~350°. In the eastern array, the velocity ranges from ~8.5 km/s in back azimuth direction of ~210° to ~7.7 km/s at 260° and ~310°. We observe rapid velocity changes with azimuth in the both arrays requiring sinusoidal variations of roughly equal amplitude as a function of both 2θ and 4θ, which is not expected for the orthorhombic symmetry of olivine or orthopyroxene. The fastest directions on the two limbs are roughly orthogonal to each other suggesting the dominance of fossil anisotropy, but the fast directions of the 2θ components are skewed counterclockwise from the spreading directions. We speculate that the rapid azimuthal variations may be caused by vertical stratification with changing anisotropy with depth in the oceanic lithosphere.

  7. Pn Anisotropy in Old Pacific Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, N.; Forsyth, D. W.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Pn is the high frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within old oceanic lithosphere, which is also known as Po. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (~150-160Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the PLATE experiment (Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment). More than 5 or 6 Pn phases per day are recorded on these ocean bottom seismometers generated by earthquakes in western Pacific subduction zones during one year of deployment; we used 512 Pn phases from earthquakes with locations reported in routine bulletins. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed at a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. The spreading rates on both limbs were ~ 70mm/yr, and the current plate motion direction in the hotspot coordinate frame is WNW. Our overall goal is to identify the pattern of fossil anisotropy in the old oceanic lithosphere, and dynamically generated anisotropy in underlying asthenosphere using both body waves and surface waves. Using high frequency waves (3-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of backazimuth. In the western array, where the spreading direction is parallel to the absolute plate motion direction, we find clear Pn anisotropy with velocities varying from ~8.5 km/s in the spreading direction to ~ 8.0 km/s perpendicular to the spreading direction. However, in the eastern array where the fossil spreading direction is perpendicular to the current plate motion, the velocity variations as a function of backazimuth are much less obvious. This may be due to heterogeneity of anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere, with the fast direction changing from the fossil direction at shallow levels to the absolute direction at greater depth.

  8. Field and laboratory studies of methane oxidation in an anoxic marine sediment: Evidence for a methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies of anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation is mediated by a consortium of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A seasonal survey of methane oxidation and CO2 reduction rates indicates that methane production was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments at all times of year, while methane oxidation occurred in two modes. In the summer, methane oxidation was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments and occurred at rates lower than those of CO2 reduction. In the winter, net methane oxidation occurred in an interval at the base of the sulfate-containing zone. Sediment incubation experiments suggest both methanogens and sulfate reducers were responsible for the observed methane oxidation. In one incubation experiment both modes of oxidation were partially inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (a specific inhibitor of methanogens). This evidence, along with the apparent confinement of methane oxidation to sulfate-depleted sediments in the summer, indicates that methanogenic bacteria are involved in methane oxidation. In a second incubation experiment, net methane oxidation was induced by adding sulfate to homogenized methanogenic sediments, suggesting that sulfate reducers also play a role in the process. We hypothesize that methanogens oxidize methane and produce hydrogen via a reversal of CO2 reduction. The hydrogen is efficiently removed and maintained at low concentrations by sulfate reducers. Pore water H2 concentrations in the sediment incubation experiments (while net methane oxidation was occurring) were low enough that methanogenic bacteria could derive sufficient energy for growth from the oxidation of methane. The methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium is consistent not only with the results of this study, but may also be a feasible mechanism for previously documented anaerobic methane oxidation in both freshwater and marine environments.

  9. Dynamics of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, seasonal migrations based on ultrasonic telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Dana K.; Able, Kenneth W.; Grothues, Thomas M.

    2007-08-01

    Migrations of summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, to and from estuaries to the continental shelf in the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) occur seasonally but their dynamics are poorly understood. Ultrasonic telemetry, both passive and active, was used during 2003-2005 to determine timing and rate of juvenile and adult summer flounder (268-535 mm TL) migrating to and from the Mullica River-Great Bay estuary in southern New Jersey. Additionally, 7 years of inner continental shelf surveys off New Jersey were used to assess complementary seasonal movements. Most tagged fish emigrated from the estuary between July and September, though emigration lasted into December and appeared to be influenced by a number of factors. In July 2004, more tagged fish emigrated, at increased rates of movement, at low barometric pressure during a storm event. Trawl collections on the inner shelf demonstrated the same approximate immigration times as seen with telemetry. Later in the fall, increased numbers of tagged summer flounder emigrated from the estuary when dissolved oxygen was decreasing. Fall trawl surveys showed increased numbers of fish on the inner shelf when dissolved oxygen was decreasing in the Mullica River-Great Bay estuary, supporting the telemetry results. Fish emigrated from the estuary during the day and night but nighttime movements were in deeper water at slightly slower rates of movement. Exit and re-entry also occurred during the fall emigration. Ultrasonically tagged individuals demonstrated homing by returning to the same estuary, in March through June, in the second and third year of the study (39-6%, respectively). In summary, immigration may result from homing for a large proportion of summer flounder. Emigration may be associated with storms on an episodic scale, and dissolved oxygen and temperature on a seasonal scale.

  10. Larval Transport on the Atlantic Continental Shelf of North America: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanio, C. E.; Garvine, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review considers transport of larval fish and crustaceans on the continental shelf. Previous reviews have contained only limited treatments of the physical processes involved. The present paper provides a physical background that is considerably more comprehensive. It includes a discussion of three principal forcing agents: (1) wind stress; (2) tides propagating from the deep ocean; and (3) differences in density associated with the buoyant outflow of estuaries, surface heat flux, or the interaction of coastal and oceanic water masses at the seaward margin of the shelf. The authors discuss the effects of these forcing agents on transport of larvae in the Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic Bights along the east coast of North America. The discussion concentrates on three species (blue crab, menhaden, bluefish) that have been the subject of a very recent multi-disciplinary study. Taken as a whole, the reproductive activities of these three species span the entire year and utilize the entire shelf, from the most seaward margin to the estuarine nursery. The blue crab is representative of species affected by physical processes occurring during summer and early autumn on the inner and mid-shelf. Menhaden are impacted by processes occurring in winter on the outer and mid-shelf. Bluefish are influenced primarily by processes occurring during early spring at the outer shelf margin near the western boundary current. The authors conclude that alongshore wind stress and density differences, i.e. buoyancy-driven flow, are the primary agents of larval transport in the region. Circulation associated with the western boundary current is only important at the shelf margin and tidally driven processes are generally inconsequential.

  11. Report of the Cape Breton Public Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacNeil, T.

    2002-04-02

    The Canada-Nova Scotia Offshore Petroleum Board (CNSOPB) conducted a public review to determine the effects of potential offshore oil and gas exploration and drilling activities in Sydney Bight and the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence regions where Corridor Resources Inc. and Hunt Oil Company of Canada are proposing to conduct seismic surveys. In particular, activities within exploration licences 2364, 2365, and 2368 were reviewed to determine their socio-economic impact, the effects on the ecosystem, and the mitigation of impacts. The Commissioner of this public review was not mandated to advise on whether the exploratory programs should proceed or whether a moratorium should be placed on exploration of the license areas. Recommendations, however, were proposed in several areas. The first phase of the inquiry included a series of public meetings to allow groups and individuals to identify concerns and exchange views about the process. The second phase involved a series of public hearings where interested parties presented submissions. In particular, 130 formal submissions were received from the petroleum industry, commercial fisheries, environmental groups, tourism industry, aboriginal leaders, and other organizations. The report describes in some detail, the companies' proposals regarding seismic surveys and exploratory drilling. The effects that these activities will have on marine mammals and birds as well as their habitat was examined. Both Hunt and Corridor provided their assessment of the potential environmental and socio-economic effects of their seismic activities and both concluded that the seismic activity would have no significant effect on the marine environment and its uses. They also concluded that the socio-economic benefits to Cape Breton would be small. The issues that dominated the proceedings were the protection of the marine environment and the coexistence between the fishing and petroleum industry. The Commissioner suggests there is need for

  12. Crude costs: a framework for a full-cost accounting analysis of oil and gas exploration off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landon, L.; Pannozzo, L.

    2001-12-01

    Defined as the total quantity of all goods and services produced and the total money earned and spent, the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is a measure used to determine how well an economy is doing. For its part, the Genuine Progress Index (GPI) measures 26 variables and was first developed in 1995. In Nova Scotia, a set of 20 social, economic and environmental indicators are examined to obtain a better picture of the well-being of the region and determine if the development is sustainable over time. The authors explained their approach based on the use of GPI analysis to assist decision makers in identifying the real costs and benefits of different options applied to the oil and gas exploration situation off Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. The document is divided into five parts as follows: (1) Part 1: introduction, (2) Part 2: natural capital and the impacts of oil and gas development, (3) Part 3: social capital and the economic value of fishing and tourism, (4) Part 4: the real cost of oil and gas, and (5) Part 5: recommendations. Some of the recommendations call for the further study of cumulative and sub-lethal effects from petroleum development, the establishment of Marine Protected Areas preceded by a moratorium on oil and gas exploration in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and Sydney Bight areas until the establishment of the Areas is made, and that future environmental assessments concerning oil and gas development to address the impacts on species and ecosystems as a whole. 209 refs., 11 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. A comparative multi-fleet analysis of socio-economic indicators for fishery management in SE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasalla, Maria A.; Rodrigues, Amanda R.; Duarte, Luis F. A.; Rashid Sumaila, U.

    2010-10-01

    Brazil Bight, for ecosystem modeling policy optimization routines, and for a pragmatic ecosystem approach to fisheries management.

  14. Origin of Atlantic Sturgeon collected off the Delaware coast during spring months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirgin, Isaac; Breece, Matthew W.; Fox, Dewayne A.; Maceda, Lorraine; Wark, Kevin W.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus was federally listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act as five distinct population segments (DPS). Currently, at least 18 estuaries coastwide host spawning populations and the viability of these vary, requiring differing levels of protection. Subadults emigrate from their natal estuaries to marine waters where they are vulnerable to bycatch; one of the major threats to the rebuilding of populations. As a result, identifying the population origin of Atlantic Sturgeon in coastal waters is critical to development of management plans intended to minimize interactions of the most imperiled populations with damaging fisheries. We used mitochondrial DNA control region sequencing and microsatellite DNA analyses to determine the origin of 261 Atlantic Sturgeon collected off the Delaware coast during the spring months. Using individual-based assignment (IBA) testing and mixed stock analysis, we found that specimens originated from all nine of our reference populations and the five DPSs used in the listing determination. Using IBA, we found that the Hudson River population was the largest contributor (38.3%) to our coastal collection. The James (19.9%) and Delaware (13.8%) river populations, at one time thought to be extirpated or nearly so, were the next largest contributors. The three populations combined in the South Atlantic DPS contributed 21% of specimens; the Altamaha River, the largest population in the South Atlantic DPS, only contributed a single specimen to the collection. While the origin of specimens collected on the Delaware coast was most likely within rivers of the New York Bight DPS (52.1%), specimens that originated elsewhere were also well represented. Genetic analyses provide a robust tool to identify the population origin of individual sturgeon outside of their natal estuaries and to determine the quantitative contributions of individual populations to coastal aggregations that are vulnerable to

  15. GIS-based analysis of the fate of waste-related pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli in a tropical canal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Mamadou B C; Anceno, Alfredo J; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tripathi, Nitin K; Wangsuphachart, Voranuch; Shipin, Oleg V

    2009-03-01

    Urban canals play a major socio-economic role in many tropical countries and, particularly, Thailand. One of the overlooked functions that they perform is a significant attenuation of waste-related pathogens posing considerable health risk, as well as pollution attenuation in general. The study dealt with a comparison of three canals receiving: (i) municipal, (ii) mainly industrial and (iii) mainly agricultural wastewater, listed in order of progressively decreasing organic loading. The occurrence and fate of waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli were monitored in the canals by both real-time PCR and conventionally for 12 months. The pathogens are etiological agents of an estimated 38% and 47% of diarrhea cases worldwide and in Thailand, respectively. The geographic information system (GIS) was used to evaluate and map point and, particularly, non-point pollution sources which allowed differentiating the canal sections in terms of predominant pathogen sources. The flowthrough canals, which can be viewed as waste stabilization ponds, were found to be efficiently removing the pathogens at the following generalized specific rates: 0.3 (C. parvum), 1.2 (G. lamblia), 1.8 (E. coli) log10/km.d in the dry season. The rates decreased in the rainy season for E. coli and G. lamblia, but increased for C. parvum which indicated different removal mechanisms. Data suggest that E. coli and G. lamblia were mainly removed through sedimentation and sunlight (UV) irradiation, while the likely mechanism for C. parvum was predation. Overall, the specific pathogen removal rates positively correlated with the canal organic loading rates in the rainy season. As an important result, an estimate of the municipal pollution mitigation by over 2280 km canals in the Greater Bangkok suggests that concomitant to the pathogens at least 36-95 tons of BOD5 is being removed daily, thereby saving the receiving Chao Phraya River and Bight of Bangkok, by far exceeding

  16. A comparative study of historical droughts over Texas, USA and Murray-Darling Basin, Australia: Factors influencing initialization and cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Scanlon, Bridget R.; Ren, Tong; Fernando, D. Nelun

    2017-02-01

    Water availability and food security are tightly coupled on a global scale. The occurrence of drought puts this balance at risk due to reductions in dryland farming production and water allocations to irrigated agriculture. Improved understanding of drought initiation and cessation would therefore be beneficial for drought planning and management. The study objective was to determine factors affecting drought initiation and cessation over the past century in two climatologically similar regions that represent net agricultural exporters; south central U.S. (Texas) and southeast Australia (Murray Darling Basin, MDB). Drought indices included the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI, 1900-2014) for meteorological drought, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, 1981-2014) for agricultural drought, and the Streamflow Drought Index (SDI, 1930-2014) for hydrological drought. Results show that meteorological drought tends to develop gradually over a period of up to six months, with agricultural drought developing shortly thereafter (within one month) in both regions. Evidence of hydrological drought was observed within one month (Texas) and within four months (MDB) on average after meteorological drought was established. Further, droughts appear to cease more quickly than they initiate over Texas, whereas rates of drought initiation and cessation are similar over the MDB. Drought breaking rainfall in Texas is generally a result of a southward shift in the Polar Jet Stream or a low-pressure trough over central North America, whereas drought cessation in the MDB is typically associated with a monsoon trough or low-pressure system in the Tasman Sea/Great Australian Bight. Improved knowledge of the climate mechanisms controlling the onset and termination of drought periods should enhance drought forecasts and improve drought management practices, particularly in regions where water security is a primary objective.

  17. Evaluating Sediment Stability at Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. A.; Magalen, J.; Roberts, J.; Chang, G.

    2014-12-01

    Development of offshore alternative energy production methods through the deployment of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices (e.g. wave, tidal, and wind generators) in the United States continues at a rapid pace, with significant public and private investment in recent years. The installation of offshore MHK systems includes cabling to the shoreline and some combination of bottom foundation (e.g., piles, gravity bases, suction buckets) or anchored floating structure. Installation of any of this infrastructure at the seabed may affect coastal sediment dynamics. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the interrelationships between hydrodynamics and seabed dynamics and the effects of MHK foundations and cables on sediment transport. If sufficient information is known about the physical processes and sediment characteristics of a region, hydrodynamic and sediment transport models may be developed to evaluate near and far-field sediment transport. The ultimate goal of these models and methods is to quantitatively evaluate changes to the baseline seabed stability due to the installation of MHK farms in the water. The objective of the present study is to evaluate and validate wave, current, and sediment transport models (i.e., a site analysis) that may be used to estimate risk of sediment mobilization and transport. While the methodology and examples have been presented in a draft guidance document (Roberts et al., 2013), the current report presents an overall strategy for model validation, specifically for a case study in the Santa Cruz Bight, Monterey Bay, CA. Innovative techniques to quantify the risk of sediment mobility has been developed to support these investigations. Public domain numerical models are utilized to estimate the near-shore wave climate (SWAN: Simulating Waves Near-shore) and circulation and sediment transport (EFDC: Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) regimes. The models were validated with field hydrodynamic data. Sediment size information was

  18. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  19. Investigation to avoid and reduce possible impacts of wind energy parks on the marine environment in the offshore areas of North and Baltic Sea. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Vermeidung und Verminderung von Belastungen der Meeresumwelt durch Offshore-Windenergieanlagen im kuestenfernen Bereich der Nord- und Ostsee - Offshore WEA. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knust, R.; Dahlhoff, P.; Gabriel, J.; Heuers, J.; Hueppop, O.; Wendeln, H.

    2003-06-30

    The potential impact of offshore wind energy parks on the marine environment in the North and Baltic seas was investigated by combining literature surveys, analysis of available data, consultation of experts and a few complementary field studies. Potential mechanisms of prevention and reduction of detrimental effects were documented. An additional aspect of the project was to identify possible research requirements, the following biological system compartments were identified: Benthos and fish communities, resting and migratory birds and marine mammals. The potential impact of the construction and running of such a plant, the electro magnetic fields caused by cables and energy shunting systems, the servicing and maintenance of the plants, the danger of ship collisions as well as the subsequent dismantling of the plant were also considered. Various operating agencies determined potential sites for the construction of wind energy plants within the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) in the German Bight and the Baltic Sea. The sizes of the parks range between 80 and over 200 single towers per park. Large offshore parks such as those envisaged and located in deep water do not exist anywhere else in the world. No information is therefore available on their impact on marine mammals, birds, the endo and epi benthos or fish. Permission to build a park consisting of 12 single plants north of Borkum has currently been granted by the BSH. The present state of knowledge is based primarily on discussions with experts, literature surveys, workshops and talks such as the one on Ecological Impacts due to Technical Interference in the Marine Environment held on the island Vilm in Autumn 1999 (summarized by Kube, 2000). (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of bedform predictors in tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferret, Y.; Ernstsen, V.; Lefebvre, A.; Winter, C.

    2012-04-01

    The seabed of coastal environments commonly exhibits a large range of complex mobile bedforms due to the interaction between hydrodynamics and sediment transport. Yet, no fundamental law has been identified which describes the initiation and development of these ubiquitous, flow and wave driven features. Thus, the prediction of bedform dimensions and dynamics is carried out using empirical relationships. In this study we evaluate some of these equations, based on a large data set consisting of high resolution multi-beam bathymetry, modelled hydrodynamics and sediment characteristics collected in the Jade Bay, and the Weser and the Elbe estuaries (German Bight, North Sea). More than 2000 individual bedforms were identified; they display a wide range of dimensions with heights ranging from 0.1 to 5 m and wavelengths between 10 and 300 m. They were used to test the classical relationships of Flemming (1988) and Francken et al. (2004) for the interdependency of length and height of individual bedforms. Taking into account all the data resulted in a large scatter, with weak correlations of averaged measured and predicted parameters (bedform height and length). However, applying a generalized extreme value method (which weights the Gaussian distribution of bedform height with the maximum frequency for every measured bedform length) in order to get the maximum density of bedform height, a strong dependency was identified (r2 = 0.76). Furthermore predictor equations that relate equilibrium flow and sediment characteristics to bedform dimensions and hydraulic roughness were tested (e.g. Yalin, 1964; Van Rijn, 1984). Results showed a significant scatter and limited reliability. Statistical analyses were used to accurately quantify the influence of the physical environment (depth, current velocity, grain size) on bedform morphologies in order to enhance the bedform predictors.

  1. Foraminifera And Coccolithophorid Assemblage Changes In The Panama Basin During The Last Deglaciation: Response To Sea-Surface Productivity Induced By A Transient Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, I.; Rincon, D.; Yokoyama, Y.; Barrows, T.

    2004-12-01

    The response of community assemblages of planktonic and benthonic foraminifera and coccolithophorids to transient climate change are explored for the uppermost 2m of cores ODP677B (1.2°N; 83.74°W, 3461m) and TR163-38 (1.34°S; 81.58°W, 2200m), for the last ~40ka. Results suggest that the deglaciation interval was a time of increased productivity and a major reorganization of planktonic trophic webs. The succession in dominance of planktonic foraminifera species Globorotalia inflata, Globigerina bulloides, and Neogloboquadrina pachyderma denote four periods of oceanographic change: (1) advection (24 to 20ka), (2) strong upwelling (20 to 15ka), (3) weak upwelling (14 to 8ka) and (4) oligotrophy (8ka to Present). Strong upwelling for the deglaciation interval is supported by the low Florisphaera profunda / other coccolithophorids ratio and the high percentage abundance of Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Benthonic foraminifera assemblage changes are different in both cores and suggest significant regional variations in surface productivity and/or oxygen content at the seafloor, and a decoupling between surface productivity and export production to the seafloor. This decoupling is evidenced by the inverse relationship between the percentage abundance of infaunal benthonic foraminifera and the percentage abundance of N. pachyderma. The terrigenous input of the Colombian Pacific rivers, particularly the San Juan River, is suggested as a possible mechanism. Finally, the Globorotalia cultrata /Neogloboquadrina dutertrei ratio, is used to reconstruct the past influence of the Costa Rica Dome - Panama Bight and cold tongue upwelling systems in the Panama Basin. A northern influence is suggested for the late Holocene (after 5ka), and the last glacial (before 20ka), whereas a southern influence is suggested for the 20 to 5ka interval. There is a correspondence between our reconstructed northern and southern influences and previously proposed positions of the Intertropical Convergence

  2. Secondhand tobacco exposure is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Connie [College of Medicine, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Rountree, Carl B. [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Bon Secour St. Mary' s Hospital, 5801 Bremo Rd, Richmond, VA 23226 (United States); Methratta, Sosamma [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Radiology, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); LaRusso, Salvatore [Department of Radiology, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Kunselman, Allen R. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Spanier, Adam J., E-mail: aspanier@hmc.psu.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Hershey, PA 17033-0850 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of liver disease in children in the United States, and prevalence rates are rising. Smoking is associated with NAFLD, but the association of secondhand smoke exposure with NAFLD is unknown. Aims: To investigate the association of secondhand tobacco exposure with NAFLD in children. Methods: We surveyed parents/guardians of 304 children aged 3–12 years who had received an abdominal ultrasound at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. The survey addressed demographics, medical history, secondhand tobacco exposure, activity level, screen viewing time and other environmental exposures. A pediatric radiologist and sonographer reviewed the ultrasounds to grade the presence of bight liver compatible with NAFLD. We conducted logistic regression analysis to assess the association of secondhand tobacco exposure and NAFLD. Results: 54% of eligible potential participants responded to the survey. Fatty liver was present in 3% of the children. Increasing child age was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.1, 2.4). Reported child obesity was associated with increased odds of NAFLD (OR 44.5 95% CI 5.3, 371.7). The rate of NAFLD was higher in the smoke exposed group (6.7% vs. 1.7%). For every extra pack per day smoked at home, the odds of a child having NAFLD increased 1.8 times (AOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8), and any exposure increased a child's odds of NAFLD four-fold (AOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.02, 15.8). Conclusion: We found an association of secondhand smoke exposure and NAFLD in children. This may represent an area for future prevention efforts. - Highlights: • We evaluated the relation of tobacco exposure with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. • Tobacco smoke exposure may be an addressable risk factor.

  3. Habitat-specific size structure variations in periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) caused by biotic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Molis, Markus; Buschbaum, Christian

    2009-06-01

    Shell size distribution patterns of marine gastropod populations may vary considerably across different environments. We investigated the size and density structure of genetically continuous periwinkle populations ( Littorina littorea) on an exposed rocky and a sheltered sedimentary environment on two nearby islands in the south-eastern North Sea (German Bight). On the sedimentary shore, periwinkle density (917 ± 722 individuals m-2) was about three times higher than on the rocky shore (296 ± 168 individuals m-2). Mean (9.8 ± 3.9 mm) and maximum (22 mm) shell size of L. littorea on the sedimentary shore were smaller than on the rocky shore (21.5 ± 4.2 and 32 mm, respectively), where only few small snails were found. Additionally, periwinkle shells were thicker and stronger on the rocky than on the sedimentary shore. To ascertain mechanisms responsible for differences in population structures, we examined periwinkles in both environments for growth rate, predation pressure, infection with a shell boring polychaete ( Polydora ciliata) and parasitic infestation by trematodes. A crosswise transplantation experiment revealed better growth conditions on the sedimentary than on the rocky shore. However, crab abundance and prevalence of parasites and P. ciliata in adult snails were higher on the sedimentary shore. Previous investigations showed that crabs prefer large periwinkles infested with P. ciliata. Thus, we suggest that parasites and shell boring P. ciliata in conjunction with an increased crab predation pressure are responsible for low abundances of large periwinkles on the sedimentary shore while high wave exposure may explain low densities of juvenile L. littorea on the rocky shore. We conclude that biotic factors may strongly contribute to observed differences in size structure of the L. littorea populations studied on rocky and sedimentary shores.

  4. Impact of spatial resolution of ocean models in depicting climate change patterns of the North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Nikesh; Klein, Birgit; Mathis, Moritz; Klein, Holger; Mikolajewicz, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The impact of enhanced spatial resolution of models in simulating large scale climate change has been of interest for the modeling community for quite some time. It has been noticed in previous studies that the pattern of Sea Surface Temperature anomalies are better captured by higher resolution models. Significant changes in simulating sea-ice loss associated with global warming was also noticed when the spatial resolution of climate models were enhanced. Spatial resolution is a particular important issue in climate change scenarios of shelf seas such as the North Sea. The North Sea is strongly influenced by its water mass exchanges with North Atlantic to the west and north and Baltic Sea to east. Furthermore, local forcing and changes in advected water masses significantly affect the thermodynamics and stratification patterns in the North Sea, making it a challenging area to study. Under the newly started RACE2 project we are looking at global simulations of Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios 4.5 and 8.5 at lower and higher resolutions, performed using the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPIESM). The model resolution is non uniform and achieves the highest resolution over the European Seas by shifting the model poles over Chicago and Central Europe. In the high resolution run, the grid reaches up to a spatial resolution of up to 4 km in part of the German Bight and close to 20 km in the Northern part of North Sea. The placement of model poles at specific locations enables the global model to obtain higher resolution at regional scales (North Sea), without the inherent complications of open boundary conditions. High and low resolution simulations will be compared to determine differences in spatial and temporal pattern of temperature anomalies, fresh water intrusion from the Baltic Sea to North Sea etc. Also taken into consideration will be the changes in simulating local sea level change and response to basin scale oscillations like NAO.

  5. Aminostratigraphy of Middle and Late Pleistocene deposits in The Netherlands and the southern part of the North Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, T.; Cleveringa, P.

    2009-09-01

    A review of all available amino acid racemization D (alloisoleucine)/L (isoleucine) data from the whole shell of four molluscan species from Late and late Middle Pleistocene deposits of the Netherlands is presented. The data allow the distinction of 5 aminostratigraphical units, NAZ (Netherlands Amino Zone) A-E, each representing a temperate stage. The zones are correlated with marine isotope stages 1, 5e, 7, 9, and 11 respectively. Apart from NAZ-D (MIS 9), in all aminozones the marine transgression reached the present-day onshore area of the Netherlands. The transgression during NAZ-C (Oostermeer Interglacial: MIS 7) seems to be at least as widespread as its counterpart during NAZ-B (Eemian: MIS 5e) in the southern bight of the North Sea Basin. The stratigraphic position of the Oostermeer Interglacial is just below deposits of the Drente phase of the Saalian and because of this position the interglacial marine deposits have formerly erroneously considered to be of Holsteinian age. Neede, the 'classic' Dutch Holsteinian site, is dated in NAZ-E (MIS 11), like Noordbergum. Although the validity of these zones has been checked with independent data, some overlap between succeeding zones may occur. The relation between amino acid data from elsewhere in the North Sea Basin and the Netherlands amino zonation is discussed. The deposits at the Holsteinian stratotype Hummelsbüttel in North West Germany are dated in NAZ-D. This interglacial correlates with MIS 9. The Belvédère Interglacial, which is of importance for its archaeology, is in NAZ-D (MIS 9) and therefore of Holsteinian age as well. The lacustroglacial 'pottery clays' in the Noordbergum area are deposits from two glacial stages, which can be correlated with MIS 8 and 10 (the Elsterian). The pottery clay that is considered equivalent to the German 'Lauenburger Ton' correlates with MIS 10.

  6. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  7. A modeling study of the physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf: Circulation and stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Justić, Dubravko

    2009-06-01

    The physical processes affecting the development of seasonal hypoxia over the Louisiana-Texas shelf were examined using a high-resolution, three-dimensional, unstructured-grid, Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The model was forced with the observed freshwater fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, surface winds, heat fluxes, tides and offshore conditions. The simulations were carried out over a six-month period, from April to September 2002, and the model performance was evaluated against several independent series of observations that included tidal gauge data, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, shipboard measurements of temperature and salinity, vertical salinity and sigma-t profiles, and satellite imagery. The model accurately described the offshore circulation mode generated over the Louisiana-Texas shelf by the westerly winds during summer months, as well as the prevalent westward flow along the coast caused by the easterly winds during the rest of the study period. The seasonal cycle of stratification also was well represented by the model. During 2002, the stratification was initiated in early spring and subsequently enhanced by the intensity and phasing of riverine freshwater discharges. Strong stratification persisted throughout the summer and was finally broken down in September by tropical storms. The model simulations also revealed a quasi-permanent anticyclonic gyre in the Louisiana Bight region formed by the rotational transformation of the Mississippi River plume, whose existence during 2002 was supported by the satellite imagery and ADCP current measurements. Model simulations support the conclusion that local wind forcing and buoyancy flux resulting from riverine freshwater discharges were the dominant mechanisms affecting the circulation and stratification over the inner Louisiana-Texas shelf.

  8. Australia's southern margin: a product of oblique extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, J. B.; Stagg, H. M. J.

    1990-02-01

    Recently developed detachment models of continental margin formation interpret the southern margin of Australia to have formed when the lower-plate Australian margin was pulled out from beneath the upper-plate Antarctic margin. Data now available and summarised in this paper, point very strongly to a generally NW-SE direction of initial continental extension for the southern margin, in contrast to the widely held picture of simple N-S rifting. The evidence for this extension direction comes from the analysis of deep Seismic data acquired by the Bureau of Mineral Resources in 1986 in the central Great Australian Bight (GAB), the gravity field of the GAB, Seismic and magnetic basement structures in the Eyre Sub-basin, Polda Trough, Ceduna Depocentre and Duntroon Basin and from the analysis of the magnetic seafloor spreading anomalies produced during the slow first phase of drifting between Australia and Antarctica. Further, it is now believed that the formation of the southern margin of Australia can be described in terms of three phases of continental extension (El to E3) and two phases of drifting (D1 and D2). In summary, these phases were as follows. E1: approximately 300 km of Late Jurassic (?or older) to Early Cretaceous NW-SE-oriented extension in the GAB, with strike-slip motion in the nascent Otway Basin and along the Tasmanian margin. E2: 120 km of Early Cretaceous NNE-SSW-oriented extension which formed the basins of southeastern Australia (Otway, Bass, Gippsland) and which probably produced a structural overprinting in the GAB Basin. E3/D1: minor continental extension and the first 500 km of slow drift between Australia and Antarctica on an azimuth of 165°; wrenching on the Tasmanian margin. D2: 2600 km of fast drifting between Australia and Antarctica on a N-S azimuth.

  9. Temperature-derived potential for the establishment of phlebotomine sandflies and visceral leishmaniasis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dominik; Thomas, Stephanie M; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2010-11-01

    Climate change is expected to manifest in the shift of organisms to regions where they were not present in the past, potentially entailing previously unseen biological risks. However, studies evaluating these future trends are scarce. Here, an important group of vectors (sandflies) and the pathogen transmitted (Leishmania infantum complex) causing the infectious disease visceral leishmaniasis is investigated, focussing on potential establishment in Germany during the 21st century. As the most important habitat factor, temperature requirements of pathogen and vector were derived from the literature and compared with recent climate records - provided by worldclim - and climate change scenarios. Climate data from the Regional Climate Model REMO were obtained and averaged over the time periods 2011- 2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100. Projected temperature changes (based on the A1B and A2 scenarios) were correlated with the constraints of vector and pathogen. Simulated potentially suitable habitat areas for vector and pathogen were merged to generate a temperature-derived risk map of visceral leishmaniasis. Temperature conditions seem to become suitable for the vector across large swaths of Germany. Nevertheless, temperature constraints for the pathogen may defer the establishment of the parasitic disease, particularly during the first half of the 21st century. Long-lasting epidemics of visceral leishmaniasis are therefore not expected in Germany during the next few decades, although during extremely warm years an increase in autochthonous cases of leishmaniasis may occur. The southwest (Upper Rhine Valley) and west (Cologne Bight) of Germany are identified as risk areas. The time of potential establishment and corresponding rise in biological risk varies between scenarios, due to differences in the predicted rate of temperature increase.

  10. Potential Impacts of Offshore Wind Farms on North Sea Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jeffrey R; Merckelbach, Lucas; Callies, Ulrich; Clark, Suzanna; Gaslikova, Lidia; Baschek, Burkard

    2016-01-01

    Advances in offshore wind farm (OWF) technology have recently led to their construction in coastal waters that are deep enough to be seasonally stratified. As tidal currents move past the OWF foundation structures they generate a turbulent wake that will contribute to a mixing of the stratified water column. In this study we show that the mixing generated in this way may have a significant impact on the large-scale stratification of the German Bight region of the North Sea. This region is chosen as the focus of this study since the planning of OWFs is particularly widespread. Using a combination of idealised modelling and in situ measurements, we provide order-of-magnitude estimates of two important time scales that are key to understanding the impacts of OWFs: (i) a mixing time scale, describing how long a complete mixing of the stratification takes, and (ii) an advective time scale, quantifying for how long a water parcel is expected to undergo enhanced wind farm mixing. The results are especially sensitive to both the drag coefficient and type of foundation structure, as well as the evolution of the pycnocline under enhanced mixing conditions-both of which are not well known. With these limitations in mind, the results show that OWFs could impact the large-scale stratification, but only when they occupy extensive shelf regions. They are expected to have very little impact on large-scale stratification at the current capacity in the North Sea, but the impact could be significant in future large-scale development scenarios.

  11. Are extracted materials truly representative of original samples? Impact of C18 extraction on CDOM optical and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Some properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM can be easily measured directly on whole waters, while others require sample concentration and removal of natural salts. To increase CDOM content and eliminate salts, solid phase extraction is often employed. Biases following extraction and elution are inevitable, thus raising the question of how truly representative the extracted material is of the original. In this context, we investigated the wavelength dependence of extraction efficiency for C18 cartridges with respect to CDOM optical properties using samples obtained from the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB and the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean (EAO. Further, we compared the optical changes of C18 extracts and the corresponding whole water following chemical reduction with sodium borohydride (NaBH4.C18 cartridges preferentially extracted long-wavelength absorbing/emitting material for samples impacted by riverine input. Extraction efficiency overall decreased with offshore distance away from riverine input. Spectral slopes of C18-OM samples were also almost always lower than those of their corresponding CDOM samples supporting the preferential extraction of higher molecular weight absorbing material. The wavelength dependence of the optical properties (absorption, fluorescence emission and quantum yield of the original water samples and their corresponding extracted material were very similar. C18 extracts and corresponding water samples further exhibited comparable optical changes following NaBH4 reduction, thus suggesting a similarity in nature (structure of the optically active extracted material, independent of geographical locale. Altogether, these data suggested a strong similarity between C18 extracts and corresponding whole waters, thus indicating that extracts are representative of the CDOM content of original waters.

  12. Effects of wave-induced forcing on a circulation model of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Alari, Victor; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of wind waves on water level and currents during two storms in the North Sea is investigated using a high-resolution Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) model forced with fluxes and fields from a high-resolution wave model. The additional terms accounting for wave-current interaction that are considered in this study are the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state-dependent energy and momentum fluxes. The individual and collective role of these processes is quantified and the results are compared with a control run without wave effects as well as against current and water-level measurements from coastal stations. We find a better agreement with observations when the circulation model is forced by sea-state-dependent fluxes, especially in extreme events. The two extreme events, the storm Christian (25-27 October 2013), and about a month later, the storm Xaver (5-7 December 2013), induce different wave and surge conditions over the North Sea. Including the wave effects in the circulation model for the storm Xaver raises the modelled surge by more than 40 cm compared with the control run in the German Bight area. For the storm Christian, a difference of 20-30 cm in the surge level between the wave-forced and the stand-alone ocean model is found over the whole southern part of the North Sea. Moreover, the modelled vertical velocity profile fits the observations very well when the wave forcing is accounted for. The contribution of wave-induced forcing has been quantified indicating that this represents an important mechanism for improving water-level and current predictions.

  13. Delta lobe degradation and hurricane impacts governing large-scale coastal behavior, South-central Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, M.D.; Kulp, M.A.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Flocks, J.G.; Weathers, H.D.

    2009-01-01

    A large deficit in the coastal sediment budget, high rates of relative sea-level rise (???0.9 cm/year), and storm-induced current and wave erosion are forcing barrier shoreface retreat along the periphery of the Mississippi River delta plain. Additionally, conversion of interior wetlands to open water has increased the bay tidal prism, resulting in degradation of barrier islands due to inlet widening, formation of new inlets, and sediment sequestration at ebb-tidal deltas. Single-beam bathymetric surveys along a 165-km stretch of south-central Louisiana barrier coast, from Raccoon Point in Terrebonne Parish to Sandy Point in Plaquemines Parish, were conducted in 2006. These data, combined with historical bathymetry from three time periods (dating to the 1880s), provide a series of digital elevation models that were used to calculate sediment volumetric changes and determine long-term erosional-depositional trends. Dominant patterns during the 125-year period include (1) erosion of ???1.6????????109 m3 from the shoreface, forcing up to 3 km of shoreface retreat, (2) sediment deposition in coastal bights and at ebb-tidal deltas, and (3) a combined increase in tidal inlet cross-sectional area from ???41,400 m2 to ???139,500 m 2. Bathymetric and shoreline change datasets separated by shorter time periods (sub-annual) demonstrate that these long-term trends are driven by processes associated with major hurricane impacts, and that rates of shoreface erosion are an order of magnitude greater during active hurricane seasons compared to long-term trends. ?? 2009 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Interpreting the spatio-temporal patterns of sea turtle strandings: Going with the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, K.M.; Mooreside, P.; Crowder, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of specific mortality sources is crucial for management of species that are vulnerable to human interactions. Beachcast carcasses represent an unknown fraction of at-sea mortalities. While a variety of physical (e.g., water temperature) and biological (e.g., decomposition) factors as well as the distribution of animals and their mortality sources likely affect the probability of carcass stranding, physical oceanography plays a major role in where and when carcasses strand. Here, we evaluate the influence of nearshore physical oceanographic and wind regimes on sea turtle strandings to decipher seasonal trends and make qualitative predictions about stranding patterns along oceanfront beaches. We use results from oceanic drift-bottle experiments to check our predictions and provide an upper limit on stranding proportions. We compare predicted current regimes from a 3D physical oceanographic model to spatial and temporal locations of both sea turtle carcass strandings and drift bottle landfalls. Drift bottle return rates suggest an upper limit for the proportion of sea turtle carcasses that strand (about 20%). In the South Atlantic Bight, seasonal development of along-shelf flow coincides with increased numbers of strandings of both turtles and drift bottles in late spring and early summer. The model also predicts net offshore flow of surface waters during winter - the season with the fewest relative strandings. The drift bottle data provide a reasonable upper bound on how likely carcasses are to reach land from points offshore and bound the general timeframe for stranding post-mortem (strandings follow a seasonal regime predictable from physical oceanography and mimicked by drift bottle experiments. Managers can use these findings to reevaluate incidental strandings limits and fishery takes for both nearshore and offshore mortality sources. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethogram analysis reveals new body patterning behavior of the tropical arrow squid Doryteuthis plei off the São Paulo Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postuma, Felippe A; Gasalla, Maria A

    2015-10-01

    Squids can express several body patterns, aided by a variety of visual signals that are produced by chromatophore organs. However, for several squid species, body patterning behavior during reproductive activity is still not completely understood. For example, what are the specific patterning changes and other visual signals, how do they appear, and how long do they last? To test the hypothesis that distinct chromatic components appear at different durations on the skin of the tropical arrow squid Doryteuthis plei in the Southern Hemisphere, we identified and described its body patterning behavior. Specimen squids were obtained from off the South Brazil Bight, near the coast of the São Paulo shelf. Animals were maintained and monitored in circular tanks for 62 d over six observation periods, from 2011 through 2013. An ethogram was constructed showing 19 chromatic, 5 locomotor, and 12 postural components, or body patterns, associated with reproductive behavior. New chromatic components (i.e., those not yet reported in the North Atlantic D. plei species), particularly those linked to female sexual maturity, were observed. A postural component, the "J-Posture," linked to defenses and alarm, also was noted. The average time spent for "light" components was 32 s. The corresponding "dark" components had an average duration of 28 s. Females displayed the chromatic components related to calm behavior longer than males. However, males appeared to be more dedicated to disputes over resources, and used rapid, miscellaneous visual signaling. In conclusion, new basic types of body patterns are described for D. plei. The repertoire of chromatic components reported in the ethogram is, to our knowledge, the first record for D. plei of the Southern Hemisphere.

  16. Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence studies on sediments from the methanic zone of the Helgoland mud area, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, B. F. O.; Blumers, M.; Shylin, S. I.; Ksenofontov, V.; Oni, O.; Kasten, S.; Fischer, D.; Wagenknecht, L.; Kulkarni, A.; Friedrich, M. W.; Klingelhöfer, G.

    2016-12-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) were used to determine the identity of iron(III) oxides in surface (top 30 cm ) and subsurface (> 30 cm - 500 cm)sediments from the Helgoland mud area in the German Bight of the North Sea. A 500 cm-long sediment core was cut in 25cm sections while only the top 10 cm of a 30 cm-long sediment core was sampled. Using a MIMOS spectrometer, MS spectra were recorded at 293K (RT) in backscattering geometry. At 80K and 5.5K, MS analysis was carried out in transmission geometry. At RT and 80K only illite was observed, but at 5.5K lepidocrocite was revealed in the MS spectra. The relation between Fe(III) and Fe(II) doublets of illite did not significantly vary with depth, but the relative amount of lepidocrocite increased with depth reaching about 24 % of iron phases, as revealed by MS. XRF measurements showed that the amount of Fe in the sediments varied with depth but was always less than 4 % of total elemental composition. The main component of the sediment was silica and its depth profile alternated with those of other elements, especially aluminium and iron. It was observed that elevated concentrations of dissolved iron in the subsurface sediment of the Helgoland mud area correlated with the depth-wise distribution of distinct microbial populations presumably due to microbial reduction of excess bioavailable iron minerals such as lepidocrocite. These results are thus, important in the context of microbe-mineral interactions in marine sediments as iron oxides are an electron acceptor for microbial anaerobic respiration.

  17. Research on Equivalent Circuit Model of CSRR Microstrip Line%CSRR微带线的等效电路模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙荣辉; 高卫东; 刘汉; 沈旭

    2012-01-01

    首先借助三维全波电磁仿真软件HFSS对CSRR微带线进行了仿真,并引入慢波因子(SWF)分析了其慢波特性.然后根据CSRR微带线幅频曲线的单极点低通特性,以一阶巴特沃斯低通滤波器为原型,建立了CSRR微带线的等效电路模型,通过高频电磁仿真结果和电路仿真结果的对比,二者吻合较好,从而验证了该等效电路模型的正确性和有效性.最后,基于该等效电路模型研究了CSRR的结构变化对其电路特性的影响.CSRR微带线必将在未来微带电路设计中具有广泛的应用前景.%Firstly, the CSRR microstrip line is simulated with the help of the three-dimensional full-wave EM simulation software HFSS. Then, on the basis of single pole low-pass characteristic of CSRR microstrip line amplitude-frequency bight, the equivalent circuit model of the CSRR microstrip line is established according to the Butterworth low-pass filter model. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed equivalent circuit model is verified through comparison of the high frequency EM simulation result and the circuit simulation result, both in good agreement. Ultimately, the influence of the circuit characteristic caused by the structure changes of the CSRR is researched based on the proposed equivalent circuit model. The CSRR microstrip line should have a comprehensive application prospect in the future microstrip circuit design.

  18. Deciding Where to Burn: Stakeholder Priorities for Prescribed Burning of a Fire-Dependent Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Costanza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiagency partnerships increasingly work cooperatively to plan and implement fire management. The stakeholders that comprise such partnerships differ in their perceptions of the benefits and risks of fire use or nonuse. These differences inform how different stakeholders prioritize sites for burning, constrain prescribed burning, and how they rationalize these priorities and constraints. Using a survey of individuals involved in the planning and implementation of prescribed fire in the Onslow Bight region of North Carolina, we examined how the constraints and priorities for burning in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystem differed among three stakeholder groups: prescribed burn practitioners from agencies, practitioners from private companies, and nonpractitioners. Stakeholder groups did not differ in their perceptions of constraints to burning, and development near potentially burned sites was the most important constraint identified. The top criteria used by stakeholders to decide where to burn were the time since a site was last burned, and a site's ecosystem health, with preference given to recently burned sites in good health. Differences among stakeholder groups almost always pertained to perceptions of the nonecological impacts of burning. Prescribed burning priorities of the two groups of practitioners, and particularly practitioners from private companies, tended to be most influenced by nonecological impacts, especially through deprioritization of sites that have not been burned recently or are in the wildland-urban interface (WUI. Our results highlight the difficulty of burning these sites, despite widespread laws in the southeast U.S. that limit liability of prescribed burn practitioners. To avoid ecosystem degradation on sites that are challenging to burn, particularly those in the WUI, conservation partnerships can facilitate demonstration projects involving public and private burn practitioners on those sites. In summary

  19. Simulating oil droplet dispersal from the Deepwater Horizon spill with a Lagrangian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Elizabeth W.; Schlag, Zachary; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.; He, Ruoying; Hyun, Hoon; Socolofsky, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical multiphase plume model, combined with time-varying flow and hydrographic fields generated by the 3-D South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico model (SABGOM) hydrodynamic model, were used as input to a Lagrangian transport model (LTRANS), to simulate transport of oil droplets dispersed at depth from the recent Deepwater Horizon MC 252 oil spill. The plume model predicts a stratification-dominated near field, in which small oil droplets detrain from the central plume containing faster rising large oil droplets and gas bubbles and become trapped by density stratification. Simulated intrusion (trap) heights of ∼ 310–370 m agree well with the midrange of conductivity-temperature-depth observations, though the simulated variation in trap height was lower than observed, presumably in part due to unresolved variability in source composition (percentage oil versus gas) and location (multiple leaks during first half of spill). Simulated droplet trajectories by the SABGOM-LTRANS modeling system showed that droplets with diameters between 10 and 50 μm formed a distinct subsurface plume, which was transported horizontally and remained in the subsurface for >1 month. In contrast, droplets with diameters ≥90 μm rose rapidly to the surface. Simulated trajectories of droplets ≤50 μm in diameter were found to be consistent with field observations of a southwest-tending subsurface plume in late June 2010 reported by Camilli et al. [2010]. Model results suggest that the subsurface plume looped around to the east, with potential subsurface oil transport to the northeast and southeast. Ongoing work is focusing on adding degradation processes to the model to constrain droplet dispersal.

  20. Modelling tidal influence on sea breezes with models of different complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Fischereit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tides influence both the formation and development of sea breezes. The aim of this study is to investigate the tidal influence to decide which model complexity is needed to reproduce the main influence of tides in a numerical model of coastal meteorology. Two processes are considered: (a the influence of tides on sea breezes through the effect of tidal currents on the surface wind and (b the thermal influence through the flooding and drying of mudflats in the intertidal area. The processes are considered separately by representing the ocean in the non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmosphere model METRAS with different complexity, ranging from a homogeneous stationary surface to a shallow-water model coupled to METRAS with a two-way exchange of momentum. The model system is applied in a case study to the German Bight, where large mudflats exist at low tide.The results show that the main influence of tides originates from a change in the mudflat heat budget through flooding and drying. The influence of tidal currents on the surface wind is small. Therefore, we conclude that no coupled atmosphere-ocean model is needed to reproduce the main influence of tides on sea breezes in a numerical model. Instead, we suggest to use an atmosphere model which simulates the change of surface cover in the intertidal area and includes a realistic spatial sea surface temperature distribution. For this it is essential to simulate the change in surface cover with the correct timing because the results show that the atmosphere reacts very sensitively to that change.