WorldWideScience

Sample records for biggest physics experiment

  1. Smashing physics inside the world's biggest experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Butterworth, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working...

  2. The world's biggest experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Gregson, Liz

    2008-01-01

    According to CERN, our understanding of the Universe is about the change. Meet the Imperial alumni and staff who are involved in CERN's Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest experiment. (3 pages)

  3. Smashing physics. Inside the world's biggest experiment; Der Kosmos im Crashtest. So haben wir das Higgs gejagt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jon [University College, London (United Kingdom). Fachbereich Physik und Astronomie

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson made headlines around the world. Two scientists, Peter Higgs and Francois Englert, whose theories predicted its existence, shared a Nobel Prize. The discovery was the culmination of the largest experiment ever run, the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. But what really is a Higgs boson and what does it do? How was it found? And how has its discovery changed our understanding of the fundamental laws of nature? And what did it feel like to be part of it? Jon Butterworth is one of the leading physicists at CERN and this book is the first popular inside account of the hunt for the Higgs. It is a story of incredible scientific collaboration, inspiring technological innovation and ground-breaking science. It is also the story of what happens when the world's most expensive experiment blows up, of neutrinos that may or may not travel faster than light, and the reality of life in an underground bunker in Switzerland. This book will also leave you with a working knowledge of the new physics and what the discovery of the Higgs particle means for how we define the laws of nature. It will take you to the cutting edge of modern scientific thinking.

  4. Preparing for the biggest experiment on earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "An international team of over 2'000 scientists, led by Professor Tejinder Virdee from Imperial College London's Department of Physics is stepping up preparations for the world's largest ever physics experiment, starting next year at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland." (1 page)

  5. A giant takes on physics' biggest questions

    CERN Multimedia

    Overbye, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    "Physics, after all, is supposed to be a cerebral pursuit. But this cavern almost measureless to the eye, stuffed as it is with an Eiffet Tower's worth of metal, eight-story wheels of gold fan-shape boxes, thousands of miles of wire and fat ductlike coils, echoes with the shriek of power tools, the whine of pumps and cranes, beeps and clanks from wrenches, hammers, screwdrivers and the occasional falling bolt." (6 pages)

  6. Biggest bets in the universe unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    Jamieson, Valerie

    2004-01-01

    Betting on the greatest unsolved problems in the universe is no longer the preserve of academic superstars such as Stephen Hawking. From Thursday, anyone will be able to place bets on whether the biggest physics experiments in the world will come good before 2010

  7. Can the biggest experiment ever tell us how the universe works?

    CERN Multimedia

    Eddy, Ian

    2008-01-01

    10 September will be a massive day for science and mankind. On that day, the largest machine ever built will begin an experiment to recreate the conditions that existed close to the dawn of time. Scientists hope that it will vastly improve our knowledge of the universe. (1 page)

  8. Can the biggest experiment ever tell us how the universe works?

    CERN Multimedia

    Eddy, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Wednesday 10 September will be a massive day for science and mankind. On that day, the largest machine ever built will begin an experiment to recreate the conditions that existed close to the dawn of time. Scientists hope that it will vastly improve our knowledge of the universe. (2 pages)

  9. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  10. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  11. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  12. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  13. Experiments in physical chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, J M; Denaro, A R

    1968-01-01

    Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Second Edition provides a compilation of experiments concerning physical chemistry. This book illustrates the link between the theory and practice of physical chemistry. Organized into three parts, this edition begins with an overview of those experiments that generally have a simple theoretical background. Part II contains experiments that are associated with more advanced theory or more developed techniques, or which require a greater degree of experimental skill. Part III consists of experiments that are in the nature of investigations wherein these invest

  14. Particle physics experiments 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work carried out in 1982 on 52 experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel is described. Each experiment is listed under title, collaboration, technique, accelerator, year of running, status and spokesman. Unedited contributions are given from each experiment. (U.K.)

  15. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  16. Particle physics experiments 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research programs described here were carried out in 1992 at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The area covered in these experiments is particle physics. Unedited contributions from over forty experimental programs are included. Experiments are listed according to their current status, the accelerator used and its years of operation. (UK)

  17. Einstein's Real "biggest Blunder"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Homer G.

    2012-10-01

    Albert Einstein's real "biggest blunder" was not the 1917 introduction into his gravitational field equations of a cosmological constant term Λ, rather was his failure in 1916 to distinguish between the entirely different concepts of active gravitational mass and passive gravitational mass. Had he made the distinction, and followed David Hilbert's lead in deriving field equations from a variational principle, he might have discovered a true (not a cut and paste) Einstein-Rosen bridge and a cosmological model that would have allowed him to predict, long before such phenomena were imagined by others, inflation, a big bounce (not a big bang), an accelerating expansion of the universe, dark matter, and the existence of cosmic voids, walls, filaments and nodes.

  18. Biggest semiconductor installed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Scientists and technicians at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, commonly known by its French acronym CERN (Centre Europen pour la Recherche Nuclaire), have completed the installation of the largest semiconductor silicon detector.

  19. B Physics (Experiment)

    OpenAIRE

    Kreps, Michal

    2010-01-01

    In past few years the flavor physics made important transition from the work on confirmation the standard model of particle physics to the phase of search for effects of a new physics beyond standard model. In this paper we review current state of the physics of b-hadrons with emphasis on results with a sensitivity to new physics.

  20. Experiments in Fundamental Neutron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Nico, J. S.; Snow, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments using slow neutrons address a growing range of scientific issues spanning nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. The field of fundamental physics using neutrons has experienced a significant increase in activity over the last two decades. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in the field and outlines some of the prospects for future research.

  1. "Differences" are the Biggest Obstacle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常胜越

    2008-01-01

    China has the greatest numbers of both teachers and students worldwide ,who teach and learn English. Therefore ,to analyze the obstacles of learning English for Chinese is necessary. This article gives the idea of differences between Chinese and English mainly in languages and cultures fields. Through these we can see deafly that "differences" are the biggest obstacle in language learning.

  2. Reviews Book: Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air Equipment: Doppler Effect Unit Book: The Physics of Rugby Book: Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Equipment: Brunel Eyecam Equipment: 200x Digital Microscope Book: The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics Book: Physics 2 for OCR Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Sustainable Energy—Without the Hot Air This excellent book makes sense of energy facts and figures Doppler Effect Unit Another simple, effective piece of kit from SEP Plastic Fantastic: How the Biggest Fraud in Physics Shook the Scientific World Intriguing and unique write-up of an intellectual fraud case Brunel Eyecam An affordable digital eyepiece for your microscope 200x Digital Microscope An adjustable digital flexcam for classroom use The Atom and the Apple: Twelve Tales from Contemporary Physics A fascinating round-up of the recent history of physics WORTH A LOOK The Physics of Rugby Book uses sport analogy and context to teach physics concepts Physics 2 for OCR Essential textbook for the course but otherwise pointless WEB WATCH Some free teaching materials are better than those you'd pay for

  3. Particle physics experiments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data taking for this experiment was completed in December 1983. The samples include approximately 19,000 (ν) and 11,000 (ν-bar) charged current events. These constitute the largest data set of interactions on free protons. Work published to date includes studies of inclusive structure functions and final state properties, exclusive final states, neutral current cross sections and production of strange and charmed particles. During the past year results have been published on the production of f2 (1270) and ν0 (770) mesons in ρp and ρ-barp charged current interactions. In the case of the f2 this represents the first observation of such production. It is found that the multiplicities are 0.047±0.017 in ρp and 0.17±0.018 in ρ-barp. The f2 mesons are mostly produced at large hadronic invariant mass W and in the forward hemisphere. The production of ν0 mesons can be observed with high statistics in both ρp and ρ-barp interactions and the differential cross section studied. The observations are compared with LUND Monte Carlo predictions, which are generally found to be too high. However qualitative features of the data are reproduced. Work continues on a precise determination of the neutral current/charged current ratio, on the study of charged and neutral current structure functions and on the production of strange particles. (author)

  4. Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment, SSPX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B.

    1997-05-15

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment is proposed for experimental studies of spheromak confinement issues in a controlled way: in steady state relative to the confinement timescale and at low collisionality. Experiments in a flux - conserver will provide data on transport in the presence of resistive modes in shear-stabilized systems and establish operating regimes which pave the way for true steady-state experiments with the equilibrium field supplied by external coils. The proposal is based on analysis of past experiments, including the achievement of T{sub e} = 400 eV in a decaying spheromak in CTX. Electrostatic helicity injection from a coaxial ``gun`` into a shaped flux conserver will form and sustain the plasma for several milliseconds. The flux conserver minimizes fluxline intersection with the walls and provides MHD stability. Improvements from previous experiments include modem wall conditioning (especially boronization), a divertor for density and impurity control, and a bias magnetic flux for configurational flexibility. The bias flux will provide innovative experimental opportunities, including testing helicity drive on the large-radius plasma boundary. Diagnostics include Thomson scattering for T{sub e} measurements and ultra-short pulse reflectrometry to measure density and magnetic field profiles and turbulence. We expect to operate at T{sub e} of several hundred eV, allowing improved understanding of energy and current transport due to resistive MHD turbulence during sustained operation. This will provide an exciting advance in spheromak physics and a firm basis for future experiments in the fusion regime.

  5. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  6. Blindness Biggest Fear for Many Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160254.html Blindness Biggest Fear for Many Americans Losing vision would ... 4, 2016 THURSDAY, Aug. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Blindness is what many Americans fear most, a new ...

  7. Current experiments in particle physics, 1999

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Laboratory. Berkeley

    1999-01-01

    Contains more than 1,800 experiments in elementary particle physics from the Experience database. Search and browse by author; title; experiment number or prefix; institution; date approved, started or completed; accelerator or detector; polarization, reaction, final state or particle; or by papers produced. Maintained at SLAC for the Particle Data Group. Supplies the information for Current Experiments in Particle Physics (LBL-91). Print version updated every second year.

  8. Crucial Experiments in Quantum Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigg, George L.

    The six experiments included in this monography are titled Blackbody Radiation, Collision of Electrons with Atoms, The Photoelectric Effect, Magnetic Properties of Atoms, The Scattering of X-Rays, and Diffraction of Electrons by a Crystal Lattice. The discussion provides historical background by giving description of the original experiments and…

  9. Physics Potential of Solar Neutrino Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Balantekin, A. B.; Yuksel, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the physics potential of the solar neutrino experiments i) To explore the parameter space of neutrino mass and mixings; ii) To probe the physics of the Sun; iii) To explore nuclear physics of the neutrino-target interactions. Examples are given for these three classes.

  10. Classical Physics Experiments in the Amusement Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Sara; Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2002-01-01

    An amusement park is a large physics laboratory, full of rotating and accelerated coordinate systems. The forces are experienced throughout the body and can be studied with simple equipment or with electronics depending on age and experience. In this paper, we propose adaptations of classical physics experiments for use on traditional rides.…

  11. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  12. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  13. Here, the biggest fridge in the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Society "Air Liquide" has just finished, in CERN, the installation of the biggest and the most powerful cooling system in the world. This huge refrigerator will maintain the new particule accelerator at a temperature of 19, kelvin, thanks to liquide helium. (1 paragraphe

  14. Physics of the TALE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, G. B.

    The Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) Experiment consists of three detectors which will extend the sensitivity in energy of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment by two orders of magnitude, from 18.5experiment at all energies, and double it at the highest energies. The aim of the experiment is to study the second knee, the ankle, and the galactic/extragalactic transition. The three detectors start with a set of fluorescence detectors deployed in such a way that they are paired with TA fluorescence detectors at a separation of 6 km. These stereo pairs are designed to study the ankle of the cosmic ray spectrum in an optimal way. The second of the three is a "tower" detector, which is a fluorescence detector designed to have increased coverage in elevation angle, up to 71 degrees. This detector is designed to study the second knee of the spectrum. The third detector is an infill array to be added to TA within the aperture of the tower detector. This will make possible hybrid observation with the tower detector, and provide greatly improved reconstruction of lower energy events in purely surface detector mode.

  15. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  16. Landmark experiments in twentieth-century physics

    CERN Document Server

    Trigg, George L

    2011-01-01

    Physics is very much an experimental science, but too often, students at the undergraduate level are not exposed to the reality of experimental physics ― i.e., what was done in a given experiment, why it was done, the background of physics against which the experiment was carried out and the changes in theory and knowledge that resulted. In this hook, the author helps to remedy the situation by presenting a variety of ""landmark"" experiments that have brought about significant alterations in our ideas about some aspect of nature. Among these scientific milestones are discoveries about the wa

  17. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  18. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated

  19. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  20. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  1. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  2. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  3. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  4. Forward Physics at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Poster summarize forward physics at the ATLAS experiment. It aims to AFP project which is the project to install forward detectors at 220m (AFP220) and 420m (AFP420) around ATLAS for measurements at high luminosity.

  5. 241Pu in the biggest Polish rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara I. Strumińska-Parulska; Skwarzec, Bogdan

    2013-01-01

    In the paper the results of 241Pu activity concentration determination in the biggest Polish rivers are presented. The analysis of more than 100 river water samples showed the Vistula and the Odra as well as three Pomeranian Rivers are important sources of 241Pu in the southern Baltic Sea. There were differences in 241Pu activities depending on season and sampling site and the plutonium contamination came mainly from the global atmospheric fallout as well as the Chernobyl accident, which is c...

  6. Physical experiments of transpressional folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoff, Basil; Peterson, Karl

    1998-06-01

    In order to understand the process of folding in obliquely convergent settings, we formed folds within a shear box capable of creating homogeneous transpressional deformations. Folds were created in a single layer of stiff mixed plasticine and silicone that overlay a Newtonian silicone, for a variety of plate convergence angles. As small amplitude folds became visible, they were parallel to the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse. With increasing deformation, the fold hinges rotated parallel with the long axis of the horizontal finite strain ellipse for all angles of convergence. This parallelism indicates that fold hinges, once formed, rotate with the horizontal strain ellipse rather than as material lines. The experiments highlight several interesting effects of transpression dynamics. The fold hinges initiate parallel to either ṡ1 or ṡ2 and are parallel to either S1 or S2 with increasing deformation. Neither infinitesimal strain (stress) nor finite strain is resolvable solely from fold geometry. Further, the net amount of contraction determined by folding across the zone was overestimated in all cases except pure contraction. This effect is obvious for the case of wrenching, where folding implies that the zone contracts if elongation parallel to the fold hinge is not considered. Therefore, attempts to balance cross-sections in transpressional zones will tend to overestimate contraction unless the wrench component of deformation is addressed. This result is validated by applying the modeling results in folding in central California adjacent to the San Andreas fault, where cross-section balancing indicates higher amounts of contraction than predicted by plate motion.

  7. COMPILATION OF CURRENT HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.; Horne, C.P.; Hutchinson, M.S.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Addis, L.; Ward, C.E.W.; Baggett, N.; Goldschmidt-Clermong, Y.; Joos, P.; Gelfand, N.; Oyanagi, Y.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of our compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. We emphasize that only approved experiments are included.

  8. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  9. Advancing Successful Physics Majors - The Physics First Year Seminar Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibel, Jason; Petkie, Douglas

    In 2012, the Wright State University physics curriculum introduced a new year-long seminar course required for all new physics majors. The goal of this course is to improve student retention and success via building a community of physics majors and provide them with the skills, mindset, and advising necessary to successfully complete a degree and transition to the next part of their careers. This new course sequence assembles a new cohort of majors annually. To prepare each cohort, students engage in a variety of activities that span from student success skills to more specific physics content while building an entrepreneurial mindset. Students participate in activities including study skills, career night, course planning, campus services, and a department social function. More importantly, students gain exposure to programming, literature searches, data analysis, technical writing, elevator pitches, and experimental design via hands-on projects. This includes the students proposing, designing, and conducting their own experiments. Preliminary evidence indicates increased retention, student success, and an enhanced sense of community among physics undergraduate students, The overall number of majors and students eventually completing their physics degrees has nearly tripled. Associate Professor, Department of Physics.

  10. Manual for Experiments in Engineering Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, P

    2015-01-01

    Experiments performed in the Physics Laboratory play a significant role in understanding the concepts taught in the theory. A good accompanying laboratory manual serves as a concise guideline which students can use to complete the experiments without having to refer to several reference books on the subject. A thorough study of the manual prior to the experiment helps the student to immediately start with the performance in the laboratory. The general practice in several universities for the conduct of experimental laboratory class has been to enable students take observations and allow the submission in one week time. However, the observations do not complete the experiment and serve as only one part of learning in the measurement of the physical quantities in the laboratory. The calculations and the submission of the journal before the end of the experimental turn should be an integral part of the laboratory class. With this motivation a scheme is suggested for the conduct of the laboratory class.

  11. Physics Experiments at the UNEDLabs Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan pedro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UNEDLabs is a web portal based on a free, modern, open source, and well-known learning management system: Moodle. This portal joins two theme networks of virtual and remote laboratories (one for Control Engineering and another one for Physics, named AutomatL@bs and FisL@bs, respectively together. AutomatL@bs has been operative for five years now. Following AutomatL@bs’ scheme, FisL@bs was created as a network of remote and virtual laboratories for physics university education via the Internet to offer students the possibility of performing hands-on experiences in different fields of physics in two ways: simulation and real remote operation. Now, both FisL@bs and AutomatL@bs join together (while maintaining their independency into an unique new web portal called UNEDLabs. This work focuses on this new web environment and gives a detailed account of a novel way in Physics to let distance learning students gain practical experience autonomously. This paper explains how the new portal works and the software tools used for creating it. In addition, it also describes the physics experiments which are already operative.

  12. Physics Achievements from the Belle Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzicka, Jolanta; Chang, Paoti; Eidelman, Simon; Golob, Bostjan; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Hayashii, Hisaki; Iijima, Toru; Inami, Kenji; Kinoshita, Kay; Kwon, Youngjoon; Miyabayashi, Kenkichi; Mohanty, Gagan; Nakao, Mikihiko; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Olsen, Stephen; Sakai, Yoshihide; Schwanda, Christoph; Schwartz, Alan; Trabelsi, Karim; Uehara, Sadaharu; Uno, Shoji; Watanabe, Yasushi; Zupanc, Anze

    2012-01-01

    The Belle experiment, running at the KEKB e+e- asymmetric energy collider during the first decade of the century, achieved its original objective of measuring precisely differences between particles and anti-particles in the B system. After collecting 1000 fb-1 of data at various Upsilon resonances, Belle also obtained the many other physics results described in this article.

  13. Multichannel SQUID systems for particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, S. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.henryl@physics.ox.ac.uk; Divakar, U. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Kraus, H. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Majorovits, B. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    We have developed multichannel SQUID systems for two particle physics experiments: a 66-channel system for detector readout in the CRESST dark matter search, and a 12-channel magnetometry system for the CryoEDM neutron electric dipole moment experiment. These different applications have different requirements, for example in the CRESST system it is important to minimise crosstalk, while the CryoEDM system must be shielded from magnetic noise. Future experiments such as the EURECA dark matter project may require systems with a much higher number of channels.

  14. Nuclear physics experiments with low cost instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Bastos, Rodrigo; Adelar Boff, Cleber; Melquiades, Fábio Luiz

    2016-11-01

    One of the difficulties in modern physics teaching is the limited availability of experimental activities. This is particularly true for teaching nuclear physics in high school or college. The activities suggested in the literature generally symbolise real phenomenon, using simulations. It happens because the experimental practices mostly include some kind of expensive radiation detector and an ionising radiation source that requires special care for handling and storage, being subject to a highly bureaucratic regulation in some countries. This study overcomes these difficulties and proposes three nuclear physics experiments using a low-cost ion chamber which construction is explained: the measurement of 222Rn progeny collected from the indoor air; the measurement of the range of alpha particles emitted by the 232Th progeny, present in lantern mantles and in thoriated welding rods, and by the air filter containing 222Rn progeny; and the measurement of 220Rn half-life collected from the emanation of the lantern mantles. This paper presents the experimental procedures and the expected results, indicating that the experiments may provide support for nuclear physics classes. These practices may outreach wide access to either college or high-school didactic laboratories, and the apparatus has the potential for the development of new teaching activities for nuclear physics.

  15. Connecting High School Physics Experiences, Outcome Expectations, Physics Identity, and Physics Career Choice: A Gender Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how students' physics identities are shaped by their experiences in high school physics classes and by their career outcome expectations. The theoretical framework focuses on physics identity and includes the dimensions of student performance, competence, recognition by others, and interest. Drawing data from the Persistence…

  16. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche

  17. Underground Muon Physics with the MACRO experiment

    OpenAIRE

    M. SioliUniversity and INFN, Bologna; for the MACRO Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Underground muon events detected by the MACRO experiment at Gran Sasso have been studied for different purposes. The studies include the vertical muon intensity measurement, multiplicity distribution, lateral and angular muon distribution and searches for substructures inside muon bundles. These analyses have contributed to bring new insights in cosmic ray physics, in particular in the framework of primary cosmic ray composition studies. Moreover, this activity allows the testing and tuning o...

  18. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  19. Microprocessors in physics experiments at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochester, L.S.

    1981-04-01

    The increasing size and complexity of high energy physics experiments is changing the way data are collected. To implement a trigger or event filter requires complex logic which may have to be modified as the experiment proceeds. Simply to monitor a detector, large amounts of data must be processed on line. The use of microprocessors or other programmable devices can help to achieve these ends flexibly and economically. At SLAC, a number of microprocessor-based systems have been built and are in use in experimental setups, and others are now being developed. This talk is a review of existing systems and their use in experiments, and of developments in progress and future plans.

  20. Laser experiments for chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Compton, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are employed throughout science and technology, in fundamental research, the remote sensing of atmospheric gases or pollutants, communications, medical diagnostics and therapies, and the manufacturing of microelectronic devices. Understanding the principles of their operation, which underlie all of these areas, is essential for a modern scientific education. This text introduces the characteristics and operation of lasers through laboratory experiments designed for the undergraduate curricula in chemistry and physics. Introductory chapters describe the properties of light, the history of laser invention, the atomic, molecular, and optical principles behind how lasers work, and the kinds of lasers available today. Other chapters include the basic theory of spectroscopy and computational chemistry used to interpret laser experiments. Experiments range from simple in-class demonstrations to more elaborate configurations for advanced students. Each chapter has historical and theoretical background, as well...

  1. The Biggest Explosions in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jarrett L; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L; Heger, Alex; Smidt, Joseph; Chen, Ke-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Supermassive primordial stars are expected to form in a small fraction of massive protogalaxies in the early universe, and are generally conceived of as the progenitors of the seeds of supermassive black holes (BHs) at high redshift. Supermassive stars with masses of ~ 55,000 M_Sun, however, have been found to explode and completely disrupt in a supernova (SN) with an energy of up to ~ 10^55 erg, instead of collapsing to a BH. Such events, roughly 10,000 times more energetic than typical SNe today, would be among the biggest explosions in the history of the universe. We carry out a simulation of such a supermassive star SN in two stages. Using the RAGE radiation hydrodynamics code we first evolve the explosion from the earliest stages, through the breakout of the shock from the surface of the star until the blast wave has propagated out to several parsecs from the explosion site, which lies deep within an atomic cooling dark matter (DM) halo at z ~ 15. Then, using the GADGET cosmological hydrodynamics code we...

  2. THE BIGGEST EXPLOSIONS IN THE UNIVERSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supermassive primordial stars are expected to form in a small fraction of massive protogalaxies in the early universe, and are generally conceived of as the progenitors of the seeds of supermassive black holes (BHs). Supermassive stars with masses of ∼55, 000 M☉, however, have been found to explode and completely disrupt in a supernova (SN) with an energy of up to ∼1055 erg instead of collapsing to a BH. Such events, ∼10, 000 times more energetic than typical SNe today, would be among the biggest explosions in the history of the universe. Here we present a simulation of such a SN in two stages. Using the RAGE radiation hydrodynamics code, we first evolve the explosion from an early stage through the breakout of the shock from the surface of the star until the blast wave has propagated out to several parsecs from the explosion site, which lies deep within an atomic cooling dark matter (DM) halo at z ≅ 15. Then, using the GADGET cosmological hydrodynamics code, we evolve the explosion out to several kiloparsecs from the explosion site, far into the low-density intergalactic medium. The host DM halo, with a total mass of 4 × 107 M☉, much more massive than typical primordial star-forming halos, is completely evacuated of high-density gas after ∼☉ after ∼> 70 Myr. The chemical signature of supermassive star explosions may be found in such long-lived second-generation stars today

  3. Losing Weight on Reality TV: A Content Analysis of the Weight Loss Behaviors and Practices Portrayed on The Biggest Loser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Lori A; Greenleaf, Christy; Paly, Natalie; Kessler, Molly M; Shoemaker, Colby G; Suchla, Erika A

    2015-01-01

    A number of weight loss-related reality television programs chronicle the weight loss experience of obese individuals in a competitive context. Although highly popular, such shows may misrepresent the behavior change necessary to achieve substantial weight loss. A systematic, quantitative content analysis of Seasons 10-13 (n = 66 episodes) of The Biggest Loser was conducted to determine the amount of time and number of instances that diet, physical activity, or other weight management strategies were presented. The average episode was 78.8 ± 15.7 min in length. Approximately 33.3% of an episode, representing 1,121 segments, portrayed behavioral weight management-related content. Within the episode time devoted to weight management content, 85.2% was related to physical activity, 13.5% to diet, and 1.2% to other. Recent seasons of The Biggest Loser suggest that substantial weight loss is achieved primarily through physical activity, with little emphasis on modifying diet and eating behavior. Although physical activity can impart substantial metabolic health benefits, it may be difficult to create enough of an energy deficit to induce significant weight loss in the real world. Future studies should examine the weight loss attitudes and behaviors of obese individuals and health professionals after exposure to reality television shows focused on weight loss. PMID:25909247

  4. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  5. The laboratory experience in introductory physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Maria C.

    1997-03-01

    The last two decades or so have witnessed intense efforts to improve the teaching and learning of physics. Scholarly studies have provided the grounding for many projects which reform the structure of introductory courses. A number of these innovations, however, are resource intensive, or depend on the ability to introduce changes in areas which are beyond the control of the faculty (e.g., scheduling), thus inhibiting their implementation. An alternative strategy that overcomes these obstacles is to modify the nature of the laboratory experience (a component that practically nobody disputes is an essential part of the introductory course), to provide hands-on learning opportunities that differ from the traditional "follow-this-recipe-to-verify-this-law" approach. I have chosen to implement a variety of activities that support the overall objectives of the course: developing conceptual understanding and transferable skills, and providing practice in the ways scientists actually do science. Given the audience in this two-semester, algebra-based course, mostly biology majors and pre-professionals (health-related careers, such as medicine, physical therapy, and veterinary), these goals were identified as the most important and lasting contribution that a physics course can make to the students intellectual development. I offer here examples of the types of hands on activities that I have implemented, organized for the sake of this presentation in four rather loose categories, depending on which subset of the course objectives the activities mostly address: self-designed lab activities, discussion of demo-type activities, building concepts from simple to complex, and out-of-lab physical phenomena.

  6. International research work experience of young females in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Serene H -J; Roelofs, Susan H; Alvarez-Elizondo, Martha B; Nieminen, Timo A

    2011-01-01

    International research work for young people is common in physics. However, work experience and career plan of female workers in physics are little studied. We explore them by interviewing three international female workers in physics.

  7. Automatically processing physical data from LHD experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, M., E-mail: emoto.masahiko@nifs.ac.jp; Ida, K.; Suzuki, C.; Yoshida, M.; Akiyama, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Sakamoto, R.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.

    2014-05-15

    Physical data produced by large helical device (LHD) experiments is supplied by the Kaiseki server, and registers more than 200 types of diagnostic data. Dependencies exist amongst the data; i.e., in many cases, the calculation of one data requires other data. Therefore, to obtain unregistered data, one needs to calculate not only the diagnostic data itself but also the dependent data; however, because the data is registered by different scientists, each scientist must separately calculate and register their respective data. To simplify this complicated procedure, we have developed an automatic calculation system called AutoAna. The calculation programs of AutoAna are distributed on a network, and the number of such programs can be easily increased dynamically. Our system is therefore scalable and ready for substantial increases in the size of the target data.

  8. Hadron Physics at the COMPASS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interactions, in principle describes the interaction of quark and gluon fields. However, due to the self-coupling of the gluons, quarks and gluons are confined into hadrons and cannot exist as free particles. The quantitative understanding of this confinement phenomenon, which is responsible for about 98\\% of the mass of the visible universe, is one of the major open questions in particle physics. The measurement of the excitation spectrum of hadrons and of their properties gives valuable input to theory and phenomenology. In the Constituent Quark Model (CQM) two types of hadrons exist: mesons, made out of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which consist of three quarks. But more advanced QCD-inspired models and Lattice QCD calculations predict the existence of hadrons with exotic properties interpreted as excited glue (hybrids) or even pure gluonic bound states (glueballs). The COMPASS experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large da...

  9. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is the first major fusion project opportunity in many years for US industry. Both the TPX management and the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy are committed to creating industry roles that are integrated throughout the project and that appropriately use the capabilities they offer. To address industry roles in TPX it is first appropriate to describe the collaborative national approach taken for this program. The Director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) was asked by DOE to set up this national team structure, and the current senior management positions and delegated responsibilities reflect that approach. While reporting lines and delegated roles are clear in the organization chart for TPX, one way to view, it, different from that of the individuals responsible upward through this management structure for various elements of the project, is through institutional responsibilities to the senior management team. In this view the management team relies on several national laboratories, each using industry contracts for major sub-systems and components, to execute the project. These responsibilities for design and for contracting are listed, showing that all major contracts will come through three national laboratories, forming teams for their responsible activities

  10. Infrasound Generation from the Source Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, L. A.; Schramm, K. A.; Jones, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the acoustic and infrasound source generation mechanisms from underground explosions is of great importance for usage of this unique data type in non-proliferation activities. One of the purposes of the Source Physics Experiments (SPE), a series of underground explosive shots at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), is to gain an improved understanding of the generation and propagation of physical signals, such as seismic and infrasound, from the near to far field. Two of the SPE shots (SPE-1 and SPE-4') were designed to be small "Green's Function" sources with minimal spall or permanent surface deformation. We analyze infrasound data collected from these two shots at distances from ~300 m to ~1 km and frequencies up to 20 Hz. Using weather models based upon actual observations at the times of these sources, including 3-D variations in topography, temperatures, pressures, and winds, we synthesized full waveforms using Sandia's moving media acoustic propagation simulation suite. Several source mechanisms were simulated and compared and contrasted with observed waveforms using full waveform source inversion. We will discuss results of these source inversions including the relative roll of spall from these small explosions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Physics evaluation of compact tokamak ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, several approaches for compact, high-field tokamak ignition experiments are being considered. A comprehensive method for analyzing the potential physics operating regimes and plasma performance characteristics of such ignition experiments with O-D (analytic) and 1-1/2-D (WHIST) transport models is presented. The results from both calculations are in agreement and show that there are regimes in parameter space in which a class of small (R/sub o/ approx. 1-2 m), high-field (B/sub o/ approx. 8-13 T) tokamaks with aB/sub o/2/q/sub */ approx. 25 +- 5 and kappa = b/a approx. 1.6-2.0 appears ignitable for a reasonable range of transport assumptions. Considering both the density and beta limits, an evaluation of the performance is presented for various forms of chi/sub e/ and chi/sub i/, including degradation at high power and sawtooth activity. The prospects of ohmic ignition are also examined. 16 refs., 13 figs

  12. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments

  13. AGS experiments in nuclear/QCD physics at medium energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Presti, P.

    1998-07-01

    This report contains a diagram of the experimental setup for each experiment as well as giving a brief discussion of its purpose and list of collaborators for the experiment. Thirty-one experiments in the areas of nuclear physics and particle physics are covered. It concludes with a list of publications of the AGS experiments.

  14. Industry roles in the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several distinguishing features of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) to be found in the TPX program and in the organizations for constructing and operating the machine. Programmatically, TPX addresses several issues critical to the viability of magnetic fusion power plants. Organizationally, it is a multi-institutional partnership to construct and operate the machine and carry out its program mission. An important part of the construction partnership is the integrated industrial responsibility for design, R ampersand D, and construction. The TPX physics design takes advantage of recent research on advanced tokamak operating modes achieved for time scales of the order of seconds that are consistent with continuous operation. This synergism of high performance (higher power density) modes with plasma current driven mostly by internal pressure (boot-strap effect) points toward tokamak power plants that will be cost-competitive and operate continuously. A large fraction of the project is subcontracted to industry. By policy, these contracts are at a high level in the project breakdown of work, giving contractors much of the overall responsibility for a given major system. That responsibility often includes design and R ampersand D in addition to the fabrication of the system in question. Each contract is managed through one of three national laboratories: PPPL, LLNL, and ORNL. Separate contracts for system integration and construction management round out the industry involvement in the project. This integrated, major responsibility attracts high-level corporate attention within each company, which are major corporations with long-standing interest in fusion. Through the contracts already established on the TPX project, a new standard for industry involvement in fusion has been set, and these industries will be well prepared for future fusion projects

  15. Biggest superconducting solenoid magnet in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ At 8:00am, Sept. 19, the magnetic field of supercon ducting nagnet at the BESⅢ, an upgrade of Beijing Spectrometer, reached 1.0T. The current intensity reached 3,368A, and the energy stored by the solenoid reached 10MJ. Tests showed that the designed requirements had been fully met, which constitutes an important milestone for the BEPC Upgrade now underway at the CAS Institute of High Energy Physic (IHEP).

  16. Applying the Transtheoretical Model to Reality Television: The Biggest Loser Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E.; Piazza-Gardner, Anna K.

    2012-01-01

    This teaching idea presents a heuristic example using reality television as a tool for applying health behavior theory. It utilizes The Biggest Loser (TBL) to provide "real world" cases depicting how individuals progress through/experience the Transtheoretical Model (TTM). Observing TBL contestants provides students practice grounding…

  17. Using crocodile physics software to design virtual experiments in physics teaching at schools (Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thang N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physics is an experiment science, therefore, to uphold teaching quality of physics at schools, the quality of using experiments, first, need to be improved. However, with a limited time, such experiments have not always been carried and not always be as successful as expected. Hence, application of information technology and communication in teaching is of significance. In this article we introduction using crocodile physics software to design virtual experiments in physics teaching at schools.

  18. Using crocodile physics software to design virtual experiments in physics teaching at schools (Vietnam)

    OpenAIRE

    Le Thang N.

    2014-01-01

    Physics is an experiment science, therefore, to uphold teaching quality of physics at schools, the quality of using experiments, first, need to be improved. However, with a limited time, such experiments have not always been carried and not always be as successful as expected. Hence, application of information technology and communication in teaching is of significance. In this article we introduction using crocodile physics software to design virtual experiments in physics teaching at schools.

  19. A soft magnetic material for power supply systems of high energy physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghisolfi E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the high energy physics experiments require their detectors to be embedded in a high intensity magnetic field. In particular the biggest of them, ATLAS, running in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC particle accelerator, generates a field of 2 T by means of a gigantic toroidal magnet working in open air. Its future phase 2 upgrade plans to move the DC/DC power supplies from the present positions on the external balconies directly on the detectors, where the field is of the order of 1 T. This presentation describes the development of samples made of special magnetic material for inductor cores suitable to work in such an environment. Starting from iron-silicon powders, at FN plant a plastic forming process, based on powder extrusion, injection moulding and sintering, was developed. To get the best compromise between the forming process requirements (good coupling among the metallic powder and the organic components to assure the right mouldability and the debinding and sintering conditions, several mixtures (with different percentages and kind of organic additives were experimented. A proper mould was designed and realized to get torous-shaped prototypes. The preliminary results of the physical-microstructural characterization performed on the first prototypes made will be shown.

  20. Game Port Physics Introductory Experiments in Linear Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes physics experiments (including speed, acceleration, and acceleration due to gravity) in which students write programs to obtain and manipulate experimental data using the Atari microcomputer game port. The approach emphasizes the essential physics of the experiments while affording students useful experience of automatic data collection.…

  1. Physics design options for compact ignition experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers the following topics: (1) physics assessments-design and engineering impact, (2) zero-dimensional confinement studies relating to physics requirements and options for ignited plasmas, classes of devices with equivalent performance, and sensitivity to variations in confinement models, and (3) one and one-half dimensional confinement studies relating to dynamic simulations, critical physics issues, startup analyses, and volt-second consumption

  2. Heavy ion physics with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Zampolli, Chiara

    2007-01-01

    ALICE is the experiment at the LHC collider at CERN dedicated to heavy ion physics. In this report, the ALICE detector will be presented, together with its expected performance as far as some selected physics topics are concerned.

  3. Physics Experiments with Nintendo Wii Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Martyn D.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of the use of Nintendo Wii game controllers in physics demonstrations. The main features of the controller relevant to physics are outlined and the procedure for communicating with a PC is described. A piece of software written by the author is applied to gathering data from a controller suspended from…

  4. Methodology of physical recreation: problems, experience, recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytsev V.P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article contains methodical approaches in the process of conducting practical classes with the students on discipline «Physical recreation». The methodical reception is shown, also their definition, the importance of definitions during the life of the person, including the student. The essence of physical recreation in the understanding of students for passive and active recreation is uncover, as well as formulating the tasks in forming, recovering, strengthening and preserving the health of different age groups of the population. The methodological principles of physical recreation described in detail in the context of its performance by students. It uses traditional principal means for physical culture ((physical exercise, movement modes, natural factors, massage, occupational therapy, mechanotherapy. They are distinguished by various forms, methods, and activities, bearing recreational character.

  5. The Physics of Bird Flight: An Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihail, Michael D.; George, Thomas F.; Feldman, Bernard J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an experiment that measures the forces acting on a flying bird during takeoff. The experiment uses a minimum of equipment and only an elementary knowledge of kinematics and Newton's second law. The experiment involves first digitally videotaping a bird during takeoff, analyzing the video to determine the bird's position as a…

  6. Accelerator based atomic physics experiments: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Physics research with beams from accelerators has continued to expand and the number of papers and articles at meetings and in journals reflects a steadily increasing interest and an increasing support from various funding agencies. An attempt will be made to point out where interdisciplinary benefits have occurred, and where applications of the new results to engineering problems are expected. Drawing from material which will be discussed in the conference, a list of the most active areas of research is presented. Accelerator based atomic physics brings together techniques from many areas, including chemistry, astronomy and astrophysics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and engineering. An example is the use of crystal channeling to sort some of the phenomena of ordinary heavy ion stopping powers. This tool has helped us to reach a better understanding of stopping mechanisms with the result that now we have established a better base for predicting energy losses of heavy ions in various materials

  7. Physics launches first Virginia Tech signature experience

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    When Professor Nahum Arav joined the Department of Physics in the College of Science in January 2008, he says he had a dream: to introduce Virginia Tech students to the beauty and wonders of the universe.

  8. Forward physics at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ruzicka, Pavel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    This contribution describes forward physics measurements possible to make with current ATLAS forward detectors including the upgrade project AFP. The aim of AFP is to tag very forward going protons at high luminosities.

  9. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  10. Impact Crater Experiments for Introductory Physics and Astronomy Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Activity-based collisional analysis is developed for introductory physics and astronomy laboratory experiments. Crushable floral foam is used to investigate the physics of projectiles undergoing completely inelastic collisions with a low-density solid forming impact craters. Simple drop experiments enable determination of the average acceleration,…

  11. NTES laser facility for physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the following topics on the NTES laser facility: Mission Statement and Project Description; Experiment Area; High-Energy, Double-Pass Laser; Facilities; Laser Control and Data Acquisition; and Auxiliary Lasers

  12. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  13. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision 1-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of 551 approved experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1 January 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  14. Learning Physics by Creating Problems: An Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kolarkar, Ameya S

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of student-generated problems on exams. The process was gradual with some training throughout the semester. Initial results were highly positive with the students involved performing significantly better, and showing statistically significant improvement (t = 5.04) compared to the rest of the class, on average. Overall, performance improved when students generated problems. Motivation was a limiting factor. There is significant potential for improving student learning of physics and other problem-based topics.

  15. Dod physical security equipment application experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Department of Defense, the subject of physical security is very broad in scope. Its application ranges from countering the shoplifters in the post exchange facilities to the sophisticated terrorist who may attempt to obtain access to one of our nuclear weapons. This paper focuses on the area of specific interest to the members of INMM which is the protection of nuclear devices and the classified information associated with them

  16. Precision electroweak physics at future collider experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, U. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Demarteau, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1996-11-01

    We present an overview of the present status and prospects for progress in electroweak measurements at future collider experiments leading to precision tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions. Special attention is paid to the measurement of the {ital W} mass, the effective weak mixing angle, and the determination of the top quark mass. Their constraints on the Higgs boson mass are discussed.

  17. Solution Calorimetry Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizen, Deborah A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents two experiments: the first one measures the heat of an exothermic reaction by the reduction of permanganate by the ferris ion; the second one measures the heat of an endothermic process, the mixing of ethanol and cyclohexane. Lists tables to aid in the use of the solution calorimeter. (MVL)

  18. Using the Wiimote in Introductory Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Rooney, Frank G.; Somers, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The Wii is a very popular gaming console. An important component of its appeal is the ease of use of its remote controller, popularly known as a Wiimote. This simple-looking but powerful device has a three-axis accelerometer and communicates with the console via Bluetooth protocol. We present two experiments that demonstrate the feasibility of…

  19. Physics with photons at the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Réale, V

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector due to start operation next year at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC will collide pairs of protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, with a bunch-crossing frequency of 40 MHz, and luminosities up to L = 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. The identification of photons is crucial for the study of a number of physics channels, including the search for a Higgs boson decaying to photon pairs, and measurements of direct production of single photons and photon pairs. Events containing true high-p_T photons must be selected with high efficiency, while rejecting the bulk of high-p_T jet events produced with enormously larger rate through QCD processes. The photon--photon and photon--jet channels are interesting in their own right, allowing the study of QCD at high energy. It is also essential to understand these proceses as the dominant background in the search for certain new physics processes, notably the production and decay of Higgs bosons to photon pairs. There are large uncertaintin...

  20. Shifting standards experiments in particle physics in the twentieth century

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Allan

    2013-01-01

    In Shifting Standards, Allan Franklin provides an overview of notable experiments in particle physics. Using papers published in Physical Review, the journal of the American Physical Society, as his basis, Franklin details the experiments themselves, their data collection, the events witnessed, and the interpretation of results. From these papers, he distills the dramatic changes to particle physics experimentation from 1894 through 2009.Franklin develops a framework for his analysis, viewing each example according to exclusion and selection of data; possible experimenter bias; details of the experimental apparatus; size of the data set, apparatus, and number of authors; rates of data taking along with analysis and reduction; distinction between ideal and actual experiments; historical accounts of previous experiments; and personal comments and style.From Millikan’s tabletop oil-drop experiment to the Compact Muon Solenoid apparatus measuring approximately 4,000 cubic meters (not including accelerators) and...

  1. The SOX experiment in the neutrino physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noto, L.; Agostini, M.; Althenmüller, K.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo-Berguño, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; Cribier, M.; DAngelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Durero, M.; Empl, A.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Al.; Ianni, An.; Jonquères, N.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, T.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Meindl, Q.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Musenich, R.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Rossi, N.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2015-01-01

    SOX (Short distance neutrino Oscillations with BoreXino) is a new experiment that takes place at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and it exploits the Borexino detector to study the neutrino oscillations at short distance. In different phases, by using two artificial sources 51Cr and 144Ce-144Pr, neutrino and antineutrino fluxes of measured intensity will be detected by Borexino in order to observe possible neutrino oscillations in the sterile state. In this paper an overview of the experiment is given and one of the two calorimeters that will be used to measure the source activity is described. At the end the expected sensitivity to determine the neutrino sterile mass is shown.

  2. Organizing a Community "Biggest Loser" Weight Loss Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kirstin D.

    2013-01-01

    The program described here shows how Extension can be a strong collaborative partner in a rural setting in improving the overall health of the community by organizing a three month "Biggest Loser" Weight Loss Challenge. A pre-and post-fitness assessment and bi-weekly weigh-ins were administered. Three healthy lifestyle educational…

  3. Teaching the Sociological Imagination: Learning from the Biggest Loser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymire, Darcy C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how to use popular culture as a method of teaching scientific concepts. Specifically, the reality-television program The Biggest Loser is used as an example for teaching the concept of the sociological imagination by illustrating the disconnect between personal solutions for weight loss and the demands of…

  4. "Differences"are the Biggest Obstacle for Chinese Learning English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董力

    2004-01-01

    China has the greatest numbers of both teachers and students worldwide,who teach and learn English.Therefore,to analyze the obstacles of learning English for Chinese is necessary.This article gives the idea of differences between Chinese and English mainly in languages and cultures fields. Through these we can see clearly that "differances" are the biggest obstacle in language learning.

  5. The biggest conversion project ever; Die groesste Umruestung aller Zeiten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seltmann, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    During the weeks to come, the biggest conversion project ever in the history of photovoltaic conversion is to start in an attempt to solve the 50.2 Hz problem. More than 300,000 photovoltaic plants and more than one million inverters are concerned. Fitters will have to answer critical questions and may also find new business areas.

  6. Hadron physics at the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krinner Fabian

    2015-01-01

    The Compass experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has acquired large data sets, which allow to study light-quark meson and baryon spectra in unprecedented detail. The presented overview of the first results from this data set focuses in particular on the light meson sector and presents a detailed analysis of three-pion final states. A new JPC = 1++ state, the a1(1420, is observed with a mass and width in the ranges m = 1412 − 1422MeV/c2 and Γ = 130 − 150MeV/c2.

  7. Top quark physics with the CMS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuevas Javier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An overview of recent top quark measurements in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in data collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample collected during the years 2011 and 2012 is presented. Measurements of top quark pair production cross sections in several top quark final states are reported, as well as electroweak production of single top quarks in both t-and tW-channels. The mass of the top quark is estimated by different methods.

  8. Data acquisition for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general scope of Data Acquisition Systems range from the feedthroughs on the actual detectors to the storage racks for the data recording media. The systems are concerned with the conversion of interesting, volatile signals usually to a stable, digitized format. The problems involved are interesting because of the boundary conditions: engineering, economics, required resolution and range, rates, radiation damage, and physical size available for the components. Systems that will be considered here are limited to those for e+e- and hadronic colliding beam problems. Component tasks of a Data Acquisition System are preamplification and signal conditioning, digitization, sparsification, data correction, data reduction, and data recording. Implementation of these tasks require considerations for buffering of the data, multiplexing of the data paths, and triggering systems to control the Data Acquisition System. These lecture develop a conceptual understanding of the building blocks required for these systems and their relationships to each other in real systems. The approach is pedagogic and a variety of data acquisition issues are introduced. An SLD is used for illustration an SSC detector is briefly considered

  9. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics - March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated. (WHK)

  10. A "Medical Physics" Course Based Upon Hospital Field Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onn, David G.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a noncalculus, medical physics'' course with a basic element of direct hospital field experience. The course is intended primarily for premedical students but may be taken by nonscience majors. (Author/PR)

  11. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  12. Specifications for reactor physics experiments on CANFLEX-RU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is to describe reactor physics experiments to be performed in the ZED-2 reactor to study CANFLEX-RU fuel bundles in CANDU-type fuel channels. The experiments are to provide benchmark quality validation data for the computer codes and associated nuclear databases used for physics calculations, in particular WIMS-AECL. Such validation data is likely to be a requirement by the regulator as condition for licensing a CANDU reactor based on an enriched fuel cycle

  13. Nucleation Characteristics in Physical Experiments/explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale vapor explosion experiments have shown that intimate contact between hot and cold liquids, and a temperature upon contact that is greater than the spontaneous nucleation temperature of the system, are two necessary conditions for the onset of large scale vapor explosions. A model, based on spontaneous nucleation of the homogeneous type, has been proposed to describe the relevant processes and the resulting energetics for explosive boiling systems. The model considers that spontaneous nucleation cannot occur either during the relief time for constant volume heating or until the thermal boundary layer is sufficiently thick to support a vapor cavity of the critical size. After nucleation, bubble growth does not occur until an acoustic wave establishes a pressure gradient in the cold liquid. These considerations lead to the prediction that, for a given temperature, drops greater than a critical size will remain in film boiling due to coalescence of vapor nuclei and drops smaller than this value will wet and be captured by the hot liquid surface. These results are compared to small drop data for well-wetted systems and excellent agreement is obtained between the observed behavior and the model predictions. In conclusion: A model, based on spontaneous nucleation, has been proposed to describe vaporization potential and behavior upon contact in a liquid/liquid system. This behavior is determined by the size of the liquid mass, single-phase pressurization and acoustic relief, nucleation frequency due to random density fluctuations, the initiation of unstable growth and acoustic relief, and the development of the thermal boundary layer in the cold liquid. The proposed model predicts that the stability of a given size drop upon intimate contact with another liquid is extremely dependent upon the interface temperature. For low interface temperatures, large masses will be captured by the hot liquid and the resulting vaporization rates will be extremely low because

  14. Autonomy and the Student Experience in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicholas Ron

    2013-01-01

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a Self-Determination Theory perspective with two studies. Study I, a correlational study, investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (vs. controlling) students…

  15. Bicycle Freewheeling with Air Drag as a Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Paul; Janssens, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    To familiarize first-year students with the important ingredients of a physics experiment, we offer them a project close to their daily life: measuring the effect of air resistance on a bicycle. Experiments are done with a bicycle freewheeling on a downhill slope. The data are compared with equations of motions corresponding to different models…

  16. Experiments in atomic and applied physics using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diverse program in atomic and applied physics using x rays produced at the X-26 beam line at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source is in progress. The atomic physics program studies the properties of multiply-ionized atoms using the x rays for photo-excitation and ionization of neutral atoms and ion beams. The applied physics program builds on the techniques and results of the atomic physics work to develop new analytical techniques for elemental and chemical characterization of materials. The results are then used for a general experimental program in biomedical sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, and materials sciences. The present status of the program is illustrated by describing selected experiments. Prospects for development of new experimental capabilities are discussed in terms of a heavy ion storage ring for atomic physics experiments and the feasibility of photoelectron microscopy for high spatial resolution analytical work. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Current status and improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the current status of the nuclear physics experiment course for speciality of nuclear physics and nuclear technology in higher education and expresses author's views on the future improvement of the nuclear physics experiment course

  18. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included

  19. Compilation of current high-energy physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1981-05-01

    This is the fourth edition of the compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about April 1981, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1977. Only approved experiments are included.

  20. Laboratory Experiments in College Physics, 7th Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Cicero H.; Epp, Chirold D.

    1994-07-01

    Provides a large selection of classical physics laboratory experiments whose subject matter coincides with most first-year college physics texts. All experiments can be performed with a wide variety of appartus and multiple procedures are given to accommodate several popular approaches. A number of experiments contain special error analysis procedures. Questions are designed to aid students in making more careful observations and to train them to analyze these observations as well as interpret their results. Forms to record the data and results are also included.

  1. Speculative Physics: the Ontology of Theory and Experiment in High Energy Particle Physics and Science Fiction

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Clarissa Ai Ling

    2014-01-01

    The dissertation brings together approaches across the fields of physics, critical theory, literary studies, philosophy of physics, sociology of science, and history of science to synthesize a hybrid approach for instigating more rigorous and intense cross-disciplinary interrogations between the sciences and the humanities. There are two levels of conversations going on in the dissertation; at the first level, the discussion is centered on a critical historiography and philosophical implications of the discovery Higgs boson in relation to its position at the intersection of old (current) and the potential for new possibilities in quantum physics; I then position my findings on the Higgs boson in connection to the double-slit experiment that represents foundational inquiries into quantum physics, to demonstrate the bridge between fundamental physics and high energy particle physics. The conceptualization of the variants of the double-slit experiment informs the aforementioned critical comparisons. At the secon...

  2. Becoming physics people: Development of integrated physics identity through the Learning Assistant experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-06-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Preparing and Supporting University Physics Educators.] In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of community of practice and physics identity, and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation. Regression models from physics identity studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics. The goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger "physics student" identity and stronger "physics instructor" identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. Increased comfort in interactions with peers, near peers, and faculty seems to be an important component of this identity development and reconciliation, suggesting that a focus on supporting community membership is useful for effective program design.

  3. Becoming Physics People: Development of Integrated Physics Identity through the Learning Assistant Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Conn, Jessica; Close, Hunter G.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the experience of students in the Physics Learning Assistant (LA) program at Texas State University in terms of the existing theoretical frameworks of "community of practice" and "physics identity," and explore the implications suggested by these theories for LA program adoption and adaptation.…

  4. The Belle II experiment: fundamental physics at the flavor frontier

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz, Ivan Heredia

    2016-01-01

    After the major success of B-factories to establish the CKM mechanism and its proven potential to search for new physics, the Belle II experiment will continue exploring the physics at the flavor frontier over the next years. Belle II will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor, Belle, and allow for various precision measurements and searches of rare decays and particles. This paper introduces the B-factory concept and the flavor frontier approach to search for new physics. It then describes the SuperKEKB accelerator and the Belle II detector, as well as some of the physics that will be analyzed in Belle II, concluding with the experiment status and schedule.

  5. Physics in your pocket: experimenting and learning with your smartphone

    OpenAIRE

    González, Manuel Á.; González Rebollo, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Along the last years the use of mobile devices in education has increased hugely. This increase includes not only the use of ICTs as learning facilitators. Mobile devices have also become useful tools in experimental physics thanks to their rich sets of built-in sensors. The use of smartphones as measurement devices in physics experiments requires careful attention to ensure good learning outcomes. Some aspects that must be considered are the reliability and accuracy of the smartphone sensors...

  6. Home experiment by physics education at basic schools

    OpenAIRE

    ČERVENKA, Petr

    2012-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with increase of motivation of primary school pupils for school subject ? physics, focusing on preparation for lessons of physics by means of experiments carried out at home. The target of this thesis is to produce a set of worksheets and supportive educational material as an instrument which might increase the interest of primary school pupils in this subject and which might become an important motivating element. In the process of production of the worksheets theor...

  7. The physics of musical scales: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Dallin S.; Colton, John S.

    2015-10-01

    The theory of musical scales involves mathematical ratios, harmonic resonators, beats, and human perception and provides an interesting application of the physics of waves and sound. We first review the history and physics of musical scales, with an emphasis on four historically important scales: twelve-tone equal temperament, Pythagorean, quarter-comma meantone, and Ptolemaic just intonation. We then present an easy way for students and teachers to directly experience the qualities of different scales using MIDI synthesis.

  8. The BTeV experiment: Physics and detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exploring the large number of heavy quarks produced at Fermilab's Tevatron collider, the BTeV experiment is designed to make precision measurements of Standard Model parameters and to perform an exhaustive search for physics beyond the Standard Model. In my presentation at LHC2003 I presented some highlights of the BTeV physics program and discussed a few of the many technological challenges the BTeV collaboration faces designing and building the detector. (orig.)

  9. Physics Experiments Planned for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Charles P.

    1998-11-01

    This talk will review the current status and plans for high energy density physics experiments to be conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF a multi-laboratory effort, presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a 192 beam solid state glass laser system designed to deliver 1.8MJ (at 351nm) in temporal shaped pulses. This review will begin by introducing the NIF in the context of its role in the overall United States Stockpile Stewardship Program. The major focus of this talk will be to describe the physics experiments planned for the NIF. By way of introduction to the experiments a short review of the NIF facility design and projected capabilities will be presented. In addition the current plans and time line for the activation of the laser and experimental facilities will also be reviewed. The majority of this talk will focus on describing the national inertial confinement fusion integrated theory and experimental target ignition plan. This national plan details the theory and experimental program required for achieving ignition and modest thermonuclear gain on the NIF. This section of the presentation will include a status of the current physics basis, ignition target designs, and target fabrication issues associated with the indirect-drive and direct-drive approaches to ignition. The NIF design provides the capabilities to support experiments for both approaches to ignition. Other uses for the NIF, including non ignition physics relevant to the national security mission, studies relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy, and basic science applications, will also be described. The NIF offers the potential to generate new basic scientific understanding about matter under extreme conditions by making available a unique facility for research into: astrophysics and space physics, hydrodynamics, condensed matter physics, material properties, plasma physics and radiation sources, and radiative properties. Examples of

  10. Advanced detection techniques for educational experiments in cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe several detection techniques that can be employed to study cosmic ray properties and carry out training activities at high school and undergraduate level. Some of the proposed devices and instrumentation are inherited from professional research experiments, while others were especially developed and marketed for educational cosmic ray experiments. The educational impact of experiments in cosmic ray physics in high-school or undergraduate curricula will be exploited through various examples, going from simple experiments carried out with small Geiger counters or scintillation devices to more advanced detection instrumentation which can offer starting points for not trivial research work. (authors)

  11. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  12. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  13. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976

  14. Great experiments in physics firsthand accounts from Galileo to Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    1959-01-01

    From Galileo's famous experiments in accelerated motion to Einstein's revolutionary theory of relativity, the experiments recorded here trace the evolution of modern physics from its beginnings to the mid-20th century. Brought together for the first time in one volume are important source readings on 25 epochal discoveries that changed man's understanding of the physical world. The accounts, written by the physicists who made them, include:Issac Newton: The Laws of MotionHenry Cavendish: The Law of GravitationAugustin Fresnel: The Diffraction of LightHans Christian Oersted: ElecromagnetismH

  15. Compilation of current high-energy-physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Kelly, R.L.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    This is the third edition of a compilation of current high energy physics experiments. It is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and ten participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), the Institute for Nuclear Study, Tokyo (INS), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. The compilation includes summaries of all high energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that (1) were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about January 1980, and (2) had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1976.

  16. Simulation of Physical Experiments in Immersive Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Wasfy, Tamer M.

    2001-01-01

    An object-oriented event-driven immersive Virtual environment is described for the creation of virtual labs (VLs) for simulating physical experiments. Discussion focuses on a number of aspects of the VLs, including interface devices, software objects, and various applications. The VLs interface with output devices, including immersive stereoscopic screed(s) and stereo speakers; and a variety of input devices, including body tracking (head and hands), haptic gloves, wand, joystick, mouse, microphone, and keyboard. The VL incorporates the following types of primitive software objects: interface objects, support objects, geometric entities, and finite elements. Each object encapsulates a set of properties, methods, and events that define its behavior, appearance, and functions. A container object allows grouping of several objects. Applications of the VLs include viewing the results of the physical experiment, viewing a computer simulation of the physical experiment, simulation of the experiments procedure, computational steering, and remote control of the physical experiment. In addition, the VL can be used as a risk-free (safe) environment for training. The implementation of virtual structures testing machines, virtual wind tunnels, and a virtual acoustic testing facility is described.

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Incandela

    There have been numerous developments in the physics area since the September CMS week. The biggest single event was the Physics/Trigger week in the end of Octo¬ber, whereas in terms of ongoing activities the “2007 analyses” went into high gear. This was in parallel with participation in CSA07 by the physics groups. On the or¬ganizational side, the new conveners of the physics groups have been selected, and a new database for man¬aging physics analyses has been deployed. Physics/Trigger week The second Physics-Trigger week of 2007 took place during the week of October 22-26. The first half of the week was dedicated to working group meetings. The ple¬nary Joint Physics-Trigger meeting took place on Wednesday afternoon and focused on the activities of the new Trigger Studies Group (TSG) and trigger monitoring. Both the Physics and Trigger organizations are now focused on readiness for early data-taking. Thus, early trigger tables and preparations for calibr...

  18. High Energy Physics Experiments In Grid Computing Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Olszewski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand for computing resources used for detector simulations and data analysis in HighEnergy Physics (HEP experiments is constantly increasing due to the development of studiesof rare physics processes in particle interactions. The latest generation of experiments at thenewly built LHC accelerator at CERN in Geneva is planning to use computing networks fortheir data processing needs. A Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG organization hasbeen created to develop a Grid with properties matching the needs of these experiments. Inthis paper we present the use of Grid computing by HEP experiments and describe activitiesat the participating computing centers with the case of Academic Computing Center, ACKCyfronet AGH, Kraków, Poland.

  19. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Cerdeño, David G.; Fairbairn, Malcolm; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A. N.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Bœhm, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle sin2θWto date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neu...

  20. Statistical physics of human beings in games: Controlled experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to know whether the laws or phenomena in statistical physics for natural systems with non-adaptive agents still hold for social human systems with adaptive agents, because this implies whether it is possible to study or understand social human systems by using statistical physics originating from natural systems. For this purpose, we review the role of human adaptability in four kinds of specific human behaviors, namely, normal behavior, herd behavior, contrarian behavior, and hedge behavior. The approach is based on controlled experiments in the framework of market-directed resource-allocation games. The role of the controlled experiments could be at least two-fold: adopting the real human decision-making process so that the system under consideration could reflect the performance of genuine human beings; making it possible to obtain macroscopic physical properties of a human system by tuning a particular factor of the system, thus directly revealing cause and effect. As a result, both computer simulations and theoretical analyses help to show a few counterparts of some laws or phenomena in statistical physics for social human systems: two-phase phenomena or phase transitions, entropy-related phenomena, and a non-equilibrium steady state. This review highlights the role of human adaptability in these counterparts, and makes it possible to study or understand some particular social human systems by means of statistical physics coming from natural systems. (topical review - statistical physics and complex systems)

  1. The physics analysis environment of the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ZEUS Experiment has over the last three years developed its own model of the central computing environment for physics analysis. This model has been designed to provide ZEUS physicists with powerful and user friendly tools for data analysis as well as to be truly scalable and open. (orig.)

  2. Data acquisition systems for high energy Physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe here the Data Acquisition Systems most frequently used in High Energy Physics experiments. This report begins with a brief description of the main elements of a typical signal processing chain, following with a detailed exposition of the four most popular instrumentation standards used in this kind of experimental: NIM, CAMAC, FASTBUS and VME. (Author) 9 refs

  3. Chladni Patterns on Drumheads: A "Physics of Music" Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worland, Randy

    2011-01-01

    In our "Physics of Music" class for non-science majors, we have developed a laboratory exercise in which students experiment with Chladni sand patterns on drumheads. Chladni patterns provide a kinesthetic, visual, and entertaining way to illustrate standing waves on flat surfaces and are very helpful when making the transition from one-dimensional…

  4. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  5. A Physical Chemistry Experiment in Polymer Crystallization Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singfield, Kathy L.; Chisholm, Roderick A.; King, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment currently used in an undergraduate physical chemistry lab to investigate the rates of crystallization of a polymer is described. Specifically, the radial growth rates of typical disc-shaped crystals, called spherulites, growing between microscope glass slides are measured and the data are treated according to polymer…

  6. The HERA-B experiment: physics programme and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HERA-B experiment aims to measure CP-violation in the B system, by exploiting the interaction of the proton beam of the HERA accelerator at DESY with a wire fixed target.0 Besides the main goal of measuring the β angle of the CKM unitarity triangle, a wide experimental program on B physics will be pursued. (orig.)

  7. Physical Activity Experiences of Boys with and without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, William J.; Reid, Greg; Bloom, Gordon A.; Staples, Kerri; Grizenko, Natalie; Mbekou, Valentin; Ter-Stepanian, Marina; Joober, Ridha

    2009-01-01

    Physical activity experiences of 12 age-matched boys with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were explored by converging information from Test of Gross Motor Development-2 assessments and semistructured interviews. The knowledge-based approach and the inhibitory model of executive functions, a combined theoretical lens,…

  8. A pilot experience in physics laboratory for a professional school

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera; Di Renzone, Simone; Frati, Serena

    2013-01-01

    The reform of the upper secondary school in Italy has recently introduced physics in the curricula of professional schools, in realities where it was previously absent. Many teachers, often with a temporary position, are obliged to teaching physics in schools where the absence of the laboratory is added to the lack of interest of students who feel this matter as very far from their personal interests and from the preparation for the work which could expect from a professional school. We report a leaning path for introducing students to the measurement of simple physical quantities, which continued with the study of some properties of matter (volume, mass, density) and ending with some elements of thermodynamics. Educational materials designed in order to involve students in an active learning, actions performed for improving the quality of laboratory experience and difficulties encountered are presented. Finally, we compare the active engagement of these students with a similar experience performed in a very ...

  9. From Talk to Experience: Transforming the Preservice Physics Methods Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Russell

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This report of a collaborative self-study describes and interprets our pedagogical approach at the beginning of a preservice physics methods course and outlines the strategy that we used to create a context for productive learning. We focus on our attempt to engage teacher candidates in dialogue about learning physics and learning to teach physics by engaging them in brief teaching experiences in the first month of a preservice teacher education program, before the first practicum placement. Self-study methodologies are used to frame and reframe our perceptions of teaching and learning as we enacted a pedagogy of teacher education that was unfamiliar both to us and to our teacher candidates.Keywords: self-study of teacher education practices, lesson study, teacher education, physics, curriculum methods

  10. Observation, experiment and hypothesis in modern physical science

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaway, Owen

    1985-01-01

    These original contributions by philosophers and historians of science discuss a range of issues pertaining to the testing of hypotheses in modern physics by observation and experiment. Chapters by Lawrence Sklar, Dudley Shapere, Richard Boyd, R. C. Jeffrey, Peter Achinstein, and Ronald Laymon explore general philosophical themes with applications to modern physics and astrophysics. The themes include the nature of the hypothetico-deductive method, the concept of observation and the validity of the theoretical-observation distinction, the probabilistic basis of confirmation, and the testing of idealizations and approximations.The remaining four chapters focus on the history of particular twentieth-century experiments, the instruments and techniques utilized, and the hypotheses they were designed to test. Peter Galison reviews the development of the bubble chamber; Roger Stuewer recounts a sharp dispute between physicists in Cambridge and Vienna over the interpretation of artificial disintegration experiments;...

  11. What do solar neutrino experiments teach us about physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predictions of the standard model (solar and electroweak) for solar neutrino experiments will be described, with special emphasis on quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in the predictions. An argument--which uses detailed Monte Carlo studies of the solar-model-predictions--will be presented which demonstrates that the existing solar neutrino experiments cannot be reconciled unless new weak interaction physics changes the shape of the 8Be neutrino energy spectrum. Additional arguments that suggest that new physics is required will be summarized. The predictions for next-generation experiments that are independent of details of solar models will be highlighted. An urgent appeal will be made for performing a measurement of the p(7Be, γ)8B reaction using a radioactive beam of 7Be

  12. Geneva University: Experiments in Physics: Hands-on Creative Processes

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 3 octobre 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg «Experiments in Physics : Hands-on Creative Processes» Prof. Manfred Euler Leibniz-Institute for Mathematics and Science Education (IPN) University of Kiel, Deutschland Experiments play a variety of different roles in knowledge generation. The lecture will focus on the function of experiments as engines of intuition that foster insights into complex processes. The experimental presentations consider self-organization phenomena in various domains that range from the nanomechanics of biomolecules to perception and cognition. The inherent universality contributes to elucidating the enigmatic phenomenon of creativity. Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.       &...

  13. Industrial metrology as applied to large physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A physics experiment is a large complex 3-D object (typ. 1200 m3, 35000 tonnes), with sub-millimetric alignment requirements. Two generic survey alignment tasks can be identified; first, an iterative positioning of the apparatus subsystems in space and, second, a quantification of as-built parameters. The most convenient measurement technique is industrial triangulation but the complexity of the measured object and measurement environment constraints frequently requires a more sophisticated approach. To enlarge the ''survey alignment toolbox'' measurement techniques commonly associated with other disciplines such as geodesy, applied geodesy for accelerator alignment, and mechanical engineering are also used. Disparate observables require a heavy reliance on least squares programs for campaign pre-analysis and calculation. This paper will offer an introduction to the alignment of physics experiments and will identify trends for the next generation of SSC experiments

  14. Fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F. T.; Abramson, H. N.; Angrist, S. W.; Catton, I.; Churchill, S. W.; Mannheimer, R. J.; Otrach, S.; Schwartz, S. H.; Sengers, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    An overstudy committee was formed to study and recommend fundamental experiments in fluid physics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer for experimentation in orbit, using the space shuttle system and a space laboratory. The space environment, particularly the low-gravity condition, is an indispensable requirement for all the recommended experiments. The experiments fell broadly into five groups: critical-point thermophysical phenomena, fluid surface dynamics and capillarity, convection at reduced gravity, non-heated multiphase mixtures, and multiphase heat transfer. The Committee attempted to assess the effects of g-jitter and other perturbations of the gravitational field on the conduct of the experiments. A series of ground-based experiments are recommended to define some of the phenomena and to develop reliable instrumentation.

  15. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  16. Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina M.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.; Moll, R.; McPhee, K.; Nashon, S.

    2006-12-01

    We describe Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which build on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro combined with the digital video technology. This data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student learning is assessed in the following lecture using conceptual questions (clickers). The goal of this project is to use ILE to make large lectures more interactive and promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. We report on the systematic study conducted using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey, Force Concept Inventory, open-ended physics problems and focus group interviews to determine the impact of ILE on student academic achievement, motivation and attitudes towards physics. Three sections of students (750 students) experienced four ILE experiments. The surveys were administered twice and academic results for students who experienced the ILE for a particular topic were compared to the students, from a different section, who did not complete the ILE for that topic. Additional qualitative data on students’ attitudes was collected using open ended survey questions and interviews. We will present preliminary conclusions about the role of ILEs as an effective pedagogy in large introductory physics courses. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, J.Wiley & Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  17. Elementary Particle Physics Experiment at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, Benjamin; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Willocq, Stephane

    2013-07-30

    In this progress report we summarize the activities of the University of Massachusetts- Amherst group for the three years of this research project. We are fully engaged in research at the energy frontier with the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We have made leading contributions in software development and performance studies for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, as well as on physics analysis with an emphasis on Standard Model measurements and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. In addition, we have increased our contributions to the Muon Spectrometer New Small Wheel upgrade project.

  18. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boca Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1–2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region; secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons; a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  19. Large hadron collider physics program: Compact muon solenoid experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J B Singh

    2000-04-01

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric model and well adapted to searches for SUSY particles, new massive vector bosons, CP-violation in -system, search for substructure of quarks and leptons, etc. In the LHC heavy ion collisions the energy density would be well above the threshold for the possible formation of quark–gluon plasma.

  20. Symmetry and aesthetics in introductory physics: An experiment in interdisciplinary physics and fine arts education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Janet Krause

    In a recent editorial in Physics Today (July, 2006, p. 10) the ability of physicists to "imagine new realities" was correlated with what have been traditionally considered non-scientific qualities of imagination and creativity, which are usually associated with fine arts. In view of the current developments in physics of the 21st Century, including the searches for cosmic dark energy and evidence from the Large Hadron Collider which, it is hoped, will verify or refute the proposals of String Theory, the importance of developing creativity and imagination through education is gaining recognition. Two questions are addressed by this study: First, How can we bring the sense of aesthetics and creativity, which are important in the practice of physics, into the teaching and learning of physics at the introductory college level, without sacrificing the mathematical rigor which is necessary for proper understanding of physics? Second, How can we provide access to physics for a diverse population of students which includes physics majors, arts majors, and future teachers? An interdisciplinary curriculum which begins with teaching math as a language of nature, and utilizes arts to help visualize the connections between mathematics and the physical universe, may provide answers to these questions. In this dissertation I describe in detail the case study of the eleven students - seven physics majors and four arts majors - who participated in an experimental course, Symmetry and Aesthetics in Introductory Physics, in Winter Quarter, 2007, at UCSB's College of Creative Studies. The very positive results of this experiment suggest that this model deserves further testing, and could provide an entry into the study of physics for physics majors, liberal arts majors, future teachers, and as a foundation for media arts and technology programs.

  1. BIGGEST CZECH BANKS IN THE MIRROR OF ANNUAL REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav PAVLAT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the Paper is to characterise and analyse the biggest Czech banks Annual reports (ARs. Since 2004, the behaviour of Czech banks has been changing, as can be seen – inter alia - from the big banks´ financial statements and annual reports. During the period of 2007 – 2013 the implementation of IFRS continued and its impact on the institutional structure of banking is visible. From the point of view of banks, annual reports present not only the financial results, but they serve as an important instrument of competition and marketing as well. Comparative analysis of the three Czech leading banks gives a picture of their specific features as reflected in their annual statements.

  2. Understanding the learning assistant experience with physics identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor W.; Close, Hunter G.; Donnelly, David

    2013-01-01

    Learning Assistants (LAs) have been shown to have better conceptual understanding and more favorable beliefs about science than non-LAs, and are more likely to choose a career in K-12 science teaching [1]. We propose that connections between elements of identity, persistence, and participation in an LA program can be explained using the concept of the community of practice and its intimate relationship to identity [2]. In separate work, Hazari et al. found that physics identity was highly correlated to expressed career plans in physics [3]. We hypothesize that a thriving LA program has many features of a well-functioning community of practice and contributes to all four elements of physics identity: personal interest, student performance, competence, and recognition by others. We explore how this analysis of the LA experience might shape decisions and influence outcomes of adoption and adaptations of the LA model.

  3. Health physics practices and experience at Duke Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and development of the health physics and as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) program at Duke Power Company's Oconee Nuclear Station is described as are the fundamental elements of the program and how the program works. The benefits of this health physics/ALARA program have been determined to be (a) improved quality of manpower planning and scheduling, (b) increased efficiency of shutdown activities, (c) reduced cost of shutdown, (d) immediate awareness of adverse job exposure trends, (e) better management information on exposure-related problems, (f) improved accuracy of personnel and job dose records, and (g) in general, improved outage performance and subsequent plant operation. Experience with the health physics/ALARA program is discussed in terms of (a) savings of critical path time, (b) maintaining ALARA personnel doses, and (c) record capacity factors

  4. Compendium of quantum physics concepts, experiments, history and philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Hentschel, Klaus; Weinert, Friedel

    2009-01-01

    With contributions by many of today's leading quantum physicists, philosophers and historians, including three Nobel laureates, this comprehensive A to Z of quantum physics provides a lucid understanding of the key concepts of quantum theory and experiment. It covers technical and interpretational aspects alike, and includes both traditional topics and newer areas such as quantum information and its relatives. The central concepts that have shaped contemporary understanding of the quantum world are clearly defined, with illustrations where helpful, and discussed at a level suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, history of science, and philosophy of physics. All articles share three main aims: (1) to provide a clear definition and understanding of the term concerned; (2) where possible, to trace the historical origins of the concept; and (3) to provide a small but optimal selection of references to the most relevant literature, including pertinent historical studies. Also discussed are th...

  5. General transmission method based on PXI platform for physical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a general method of data transmission system design on PXI platform is proposed. It can be used in readout system design for physical experiments. It aims at providing reusable and general interfaces for customized design of PXI while maintaining the transmission performance. It has three main features: (1) universal logic hardware interface, (2) ethernet based socket software interface, and (3) specific and simple data transmission protocol. Data transmission on PXI bus can be realized with the said two universal interfaces coordinated by this specific protocol. Test shows that this method is feasible and stable. This method can be easily reused in readout system designs for different experiments. (authors)

  6. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  7. An EPR Experiment for the Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, R. A.; Waldeck, D. H.

    2000-11-01

    An experiment that illustrates the principles of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described. Students measure the value of g for DPPH and use it to determine the value of g for two inorganic complexes, Cu(acac)2 and VO(acac)2. The students use two instruments: an instructional device that illustrates the principles of EPR and a commercial Varian E4 spectrometer. This approach allows an elucidation of the principles of the method and provides experience with a more sophisticated research-grade instrument.

  8. The Relation between Experiment and Theory in Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end-product of theoretical and experimental reactor physics work is a detailed knowledge of the neutron physics behaviour of a power reactor, including the reactivity, power distribution and control characteristics. The problem may be divided into two parts. First, the properties of simple geometric configurations of homogeneous or uniform lattice structure and secondly the effects of departures from the idealized system, including the effects of control rods and other absorbers. Alternative approaches to the first problem are possible. For instance, an approximate physical model can be used and experiments carried out covering a range of all the variables. The experiments are then correlated using the simple model and adjusting the nuclear data to give agreement. This approach has been used successfully for natural uranium- fuelled graphite- moderated reactors but is difficult to apply to enriched thermal reactors particularly if more than one fissile material is to be considered. Similarly, for fast reactors good agreement, at least for the smaller systems with relatively hard spectra, can be obtained by ''one group'' calculations in which all neutrons are assumed to have an energy which is associated with a single effective cross-section. The other extreme is to use basic nuclear data and the best physical model which can be conceived with present-day knowledge. Such an approach is made possible by the increased capacity of digital computing machines and by our improved knowledge of nuclear data. The calculations are required to predict the precise physical quantities measured in the experiments. This approach has been used in the liquid moderated reactor field where the experiments are compared with the most elaborate theory and with a theoretical model sufficiently detailed to account for the physical processes involved using basic data, yet adequately rapid in application to be a useful method for design survey purposes. Similar approaches are possible

  9. Compilation of current high energy physics experiments - Sept. 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addis, L.; Odian, A.; Row, G. M.; Ward, C. E. W.; Wanderer, P.; Armenteros, R.; Joos, P.; Groves, T. H.; Oyanagi, Y.; Arnison, G. T. J.; Antipov, Yu; Barinov, N.

    1978-09-01

    This compilation of current high-energy physics experiments is a collaborative effort of the Berkeley Particle Data Group, the SLAC library, and the nine participating laboratories: Argonne (ANL), Brookhaven (BNL), CERN, DESY, Fermilab (FNAL), KEK, Rutherford (RHEL), Serpukhov (SERP), and SLAC. Nominally, the compilation includes summaries of all high-energy physics experiments at the above laboratories that were approved (and not subsequently withdrawn) before about June 1978, and had not completed taking of data by 1 January 1975. The experimental summaries are supplemented with three indexes to the compilation, several vocabulary lists giving names or abbreviations used, and a short summary of the beams at each of the laboratories (except Rutherford). The summaries themselves are included on microfiche. (RWR)

  10. Forward Physics with the CMS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sunar Cerci, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Forward physics measurements with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, one of the two large multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, cover a wide range of physics subjects. The forward calorimeters of CMS, HF and CASTOR, are used to collect data up to a pseudo-rapidity of 6.6. These detectors provide sensitivity to a large part of the total inelastic cross section, including diffractive events that produce particles only at forward rapidity, with the exception of very low mass diffraction. The results obtained with a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are presented. The measurements are compared to model predictions and provide valuable input for tuning of Monte Carlo models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions.

  11. Experience, gender, and performance: Connecting high school physics experience and gender differences to introductory college physics performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Robert H.

    Current science educational practice is coming under heavy criticism based on the dismaying results of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study of 1998, the latest in a series of large scale surveys; and from research showing the appallingly low representation of females in science-related fields. These critical evaluations serve to draw attention to science literacy in general and lack of persistence among females in particular, two issues that relate closely to the "preparation for future study" goal held by many high school science teachers. In other words, these teachers often seek to promote future success and to prevent future failure in their students' academic careers. This thesis studies the connection between the teaching practices recommended by reformers and researchers for high school teachers, and their students' subsequent college physics performance. The teaching practices studied were: laboratory experiences, class discussion experiences, content coverage, and reliance on textbooks. This study analyzed a survey of 1500 students from 16 different lecture-format college physics courses at 14 different universities. Using hierarchical linear modeling, this study accounted for course-level variables (Calculus-based/Non-calculus course type, professor's gender, and university selectivity). This study controlled for the student's parents education, high school science/mathematics achievement, high school calculus background, and racial background. In addition, the interactions between gender and both pedagogical/curricular and course-level variables were analyzed. The results indicated that teaching fewer topics in greater depth in high school physics appeared to be helpful to college physics students. An interaction between college course type and content coverage showed that students in Calculus-based physics reaped even greater benefits from a depth-oriented curriculum. Also students with fewer labs per month in high school physics

  12. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    OpenAIRE

    Kluge, H.-J.; Quint, W; Winters, D. F. A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying...

  13. Pattern Recognition and Event Reconstruction in Particle Physics Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Mankel, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    This report reviews methods of pattern recognition and event reconstruction used in modern high energy physics experiments. After a brief introduction into general concepts of particle detectors and statistical evaluation, different approaches in global and local methods of track pattern recognition are reviewed with their typical strengths and shortcomings. The emphasis is then moved to methods which estimate the particle properties from the signals which pattern recognition has associated. ...

  14. Experience and representation in modern physics : the reshaping of space

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, A; Renn, J.; Schemmel, M.

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the interplay of experience and representation in disciplinarily structured science using the example of the fundamental changes in the concepts of space and time brought about by the advanced formalism of twentieth-century physics, which enabled the integration of a growing corpus of experiential knowledge. In particular the question of why certain parts of experiential knowledge had an impact on concepts of space and time, while other parts did not have such an impact, i...

  15. Physics Results from the Argo-YBJ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2008-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking since November 2007 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet, P.R. China, 4300 m a.s.l.). In this paper we report a few selected results in Gamma-Ray Astronomy (Crab Nebula and Mrk421 observations, search for high energy tails of GRBs) and Cosmic Ray Physics (Moon and Sun shadow observations, proton-air cross section and antiproton/proton preliminary measurements).

  16. Micro Pattern Gas Detectors for Nuclear Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanvo, Kondo

    2015-10-01

    Gaseous detectors have played a pivotal role as tracking devices in the field of particle physics experiments for the last fifty years. Nowadays, advances in photolithography and micro processing techniques have enabled the transition from the old generation of multi wire gaseous chamber (MWPCs) to a new family commonly refer to as Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs). MPGD technologies combine the basic gas amplification principle with micro-structure printed circuits to provide detectors with excellent spatial and time resolution, high rate capability, low material budget and high radiation tolerance. Several technical breakthroughs over the past decade have allowed the possibility for large area MPGDs, making them cost effective and high performance detector candidates for future nuclear physics (NP) and high energy physics (HEP) experiments. We give in the present talk, an overview of the state of the art of the MPGDs. We will then briefly present the CERN-based RD51 collaboration established in 2008 with the goal of further advancing technological developments and applications of MPGDs and associated electronic-readout systems. Finally we report on the rich and diverse R&D activities on MPGDs to prepare for the detector challenges of the next generation of accelerators and for the frontiers of physics research.

  17. Experience in teaching intensive course of thermal physics for undergraduate physics students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Farkhad

    2009-03-01

    This talk of non-technical nature describes experience of the author in teaching the intensive course of thermal physics for the undergraduate physics students at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain. After brief introduction to the program, description of the WEB support of the course, I shall describe practical classes ( home-works, visits to the Laboratories, experimental demonstrations, typical problems and typical topics for presentations on the advanced thermodynamics, etc. ). I shall further discuss different possible actions to wake up an interest of the students to the thermal physics and ways to simulate their active participation in the class discussions. I also describe different schemes employed in the last few years to evaluate effectively and clearly the students work and knowledge. Finally, I will analyze the efficiency of our methodic in improving teaching of thermal physics at University level.

  18. Autonomy and the Student Experience in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Nicholas Ron

    The role of autonomy in the student experience in a large-enrollment undergraduate introductory physics course was studied from a Self-Determination Theory perspective with two studies. Study I, a correlational study, investigated whether certain aspects of the student experience correlated with how autonomy supportive (vs. controlling) students perceived their instructors to be. An autonomy supportive instructor acknowledges students' perspectives, feelings, and perceptions and provides students with information and opportunities for choice, while minimizing external pressures. It was found that the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was positively correlated with student interest and enjoyment in learning physics (beta=0.31***) and negatively correlated with student anxiety about taking physics (beta=-0.23**). It was also positively correlated with how autonomous (vs. controlled) students' reasons for studying physics became over the duration of the course (i.e., studying physics more because they wanted to vs. had to; beta=0.24***). This change in autonomous reasons for studying physics was in turn positively correlated with student performance in the course (beta=0.17*). Additionally, the degree to which students perceived their instructors as autonomy supportive was directly correlated with performance for those students entering the course with relatively autonomous reasons for studying physics (beta=0.25**). In summary, students who perceived their instructors as more autonomy supportive tended to have a more favorable experience in the course. If greater autonomy support was in fact the cause of a more favorable student experience, as suggested by Self-determination Theory and experimental studies in other contexts, these results would have implications for instruction and instructor professional development in similar contexts. I discuss these implications. Study II, an experimental study, investigated the effect

  19. Physical basis of coastal productivity: The SEEP and MASAR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanady, G. T.

    Two major cooperative experiments, code-named Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) I and II, were carried out on the northeast U.S. continental shelf and slope by an interdisciplinary group of scientists in the past decade. The work, supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research, had the broad aim of determining whether or to what extent energy-related human activities interfere with the high biological productivity of coastal waters. Much of SEEP I work was reported in a dedicated issue of Continental Shelf Research, including a summary article on the experiment as a whole [Walsh et al., 1988[. A parallel experiment, supported by the Minerals Management Service and code-named Mid Atlantic Slope and Rise (MASAR), had the objective of exploring physical processes over the continental slope and rise, including especially currents in the upper part of the water column. A good deal of MASAR work was also reported in the SEEP issue just mentioned, mainly in an article by Csanady and Hamilton (1988). There have been other papers and publications on these experiments, and more are forthcoming. While many questions remain, our horizons have broadened considerably after a decade of work on this problem, as if our aeroplane had just emerged from clouds to expose an interesting landscape. In this article I shall try to describe the physical (-oceanographic) features of that landscape, not in the chronological order in which we have espied them, but as the logic of the subject dictates.

  20. Physics from solar neutrinos in dark matter direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeño, David G; Jubb, Thomas; Machado, Pedro A N; Vincent, Aaron C; hm, Céline Bøe

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of dark matter direct detection experiments will be sensitive to both coherent neutrino-nucleus and neutrino-electron scattering. This will enable them to explore aspects of solar physics, perform the lowest energy measurement of the weak angle to date, and probe contributions from new theories with light mediators. In this article, we compute the projected nuclear and electron recoil rates expected in several dark matter direct detection experiments due to solar neutrinos, and use these estimates to infer errors on future measurements of the neutrino fluxes, weak mixing angle and solar observables, as well as to constrain new physics in the neutrino sector. The combined rates of solar neutrino events in second generation experiments (SuperCDMS and LZ) can yield a measurement of the pp flux to 2.5% accuracy via electron recoil, and slightly improve the boron-8 flux determination. Assuming a low-mass argon phase, projected tonne-scale experiments like DARWIN can reduce the uncertainty on bo...

  1. The experiment PANDA: physics with antiprotons at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boca, Gianluigi

    2015-05-01

    PANDA is an experiment that will run at the future facility FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. A high intensity and cooled antiproton beam will collide on a fixed hydrogen or nuclear target covering center-of-mass energies between 2.2 and 5.5 GeV. PANDA addresses various physics aspects from the low energy non-perturbative region towards the perturbative regime of QCD. With the impressive theoretical developments in this field, e.g. lattice QCD, the predictions are becoming more accurate in the course of time. The data harvest with PANDA will, therefore, be an ideal test bench with the aim to provide a deeper understanding of hadronic phenomena such as confinement and the generation of hadron masses. A variety of physics topics will be covered with PANDA, for example: the formation or production of exotic non-qqbar charm meson states connected to the recently observed XYZ spectrum; the study of gluon-rich matter, such as glueballs and hybrids; the spectroscopy of the excited states of strange and charm baryons, their production cross section and their spin correlations; the behaviour of hadrons in nuclear matter; the hypernuclear physics; the electromagnetic proton form factors in the timelike region. The PANDA experiment is designed to achieve the above mentioned physics goals with a setup with the following characteristics: an almost full solid angle acceptance; excellent tracking capabilities with high resolution (1-2 % at 1 GeV/c in the central region); secondary vertex detection with resolution ≈ 100 microns or better; electromagnetic calorimetry for detections of gammas and electrons up to 10 GeV; good particle identification of charge tracks (electrons, muons, pions, kaons, protons); a dedicated interchangeable central apparatus for the hypernuclear physics; detector and data acquisition system capable of working at 20 MHz interaction rate with an intelligent software trigger that can provide maximum flexibility.

  2. Introductory Physics Experiments Using the Wii Balance Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Julian; Sobczak, Robert; Iqbal, Zohaib; Ochoa, Romulo

    2010-02-01

    The Wii, a video game console by Nintendo, utilizes several different controllers, such as the Wii remote (Wiimote) and the balance board, for game-playing. The balance board was introduced in early 2008. It contains four strain gauges and has Bluetooth connectivity at a relatively low price. Thanks to available open source code, such as GlovePie, any PC with Bluetooth capability can detect the information sent out by the balance board. Based on the ease with which the forces measured by each strain gauge can be obtained, we have designed several experiments for introductory physics courses that make use of this device. We present experiments to measure the forces generated when students lift their arms with and without added weights, distribution of forces on an extended object when weights are repositioned, and other normal forces cases. The results of our experiments are compared with those predicted by Newtonian mechanics. )

  3. Experiences of Psychological and Physical Aggression in Adolescent Romantic Relationships: Links to Psychological Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; Garrido, Edward; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This research examined links between adolescents' experiences of psychological and physical relationship aggression and their psychological distress. Experiences of psychological and physical aggression were expected to correlate positively with symptoms of psychological distress, but experiences of psychological aggression were…

  4. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL

  5. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how work-site health promotion intervention, by involving group-based physical coordination training, may increase participants’ social awareness of new ways to use the body. Purpose: We investigated cleaners’ experiences with a one-year health promotion intervention...... involving group-based physical coordination training (PCT) during working hours. Design: We conducted a qualitative evaluation using method triangulation; continuous unfocused participant observation during the whole intervention, semi-structured focus group interview, and individual written evaluations one...... month post-intervention. We analyzed interview data using Systematic Text Condensation. Findings: Participants learned to use their bodies in new ways. Group training permitted social breaks from work, enforcing colleague unity. Participants did not perceive training as stressful, although working...

  6. Unpacking Gender Differences in Students' Perceived Experiences in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Lauren E.; Pollock, Steven J.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2009-11-01

    Prior research has shown, at our institution: 1) males outperform females on conceptual assessments (a gender gap), 2) the gender gap persists despite the use of research-based reforms, and 3) the gender gap is correlated with students' physics and mathematics background and prior attitudes and beliefs [Kost, et al. PRST-PER, 5, 010101]. Our follow-up work begins to explore how males and females experience the introductory course differently and how these differences relate to the gender gap. We gave a survey to students in the introductory course in which we investigated students' physics identity and self-efficacy. We find there are significant gender differences in each of these three areas, and further find that these measures are weakly correlated with student conceptual performance, and moderately correlated with course grade.

  7. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future. PMID:22253243

  8. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  9. Dancing with physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Richard; Popalisky, David

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges when teaching physics is to bridge the perceived chasm between the abstract “scientific” world and the “real” world of experience. Newton's first law of motion, for example, states that an object remains in motion in a straight line unless acted on by an external force. However, our experience tells us that most objects keep moving only as long as something pushes them. The key to mastering physics lies in the ability to abstract the “law” from a reality that includes friction and other effects.

  10. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  11. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration. (fusion engineering)

  12. A Reconfigurable Instrument System for Nuclear and Particle Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ziru; Li, Feng; Jiang, Xiao; Jin, Ge

    2014-04-01

    We developed a reconfigurable nuclear instrument system (RNIS) that could satisfy the requirements of diverse nuclear and particle physics experiments, and the inertial confinement fusion diagnostic. Benefiting from the reconfigurable hardware structure and digital pulse processing technology, RNIS shakes off the restrictions of cumbersome crates and miscellaneous modules. It retains all the advantages of conventional nuclear instruments and is more flexible and portable. RNIS is primarily composed of a field programmable hardware board and relevant PC software. Separate analog channels are designed to provide different functions, such as amplifiers, ADC, fast discriminators and Schmitt discriminators for diverse experimental purposes. The high-performance field programmable gate array could complete high-precision time interval measurement, histogram accumulation, counting, and coincidence anticoincidence measurement. To illustrate the prospects of RNIS, a series of applications to the experiments are described in this paper. The first, for which RNIS was originally developed, involves nuclear energy spectrum measurement with a scintillation detector and photomultiplier. The second experiment applies RNIS to a G-M tube counting experiment, and in the third, it is applied to a quantum communication experiment through reconfiguration.

  13. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of

  14. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Enrico Sartori; Lori Scott

    2006-09-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined.

  15. Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University

    2014-05-19

    The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

  16. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodr'iguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; S'anchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shaker, F; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-01-01

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  17. The lived experiences of being physically active when morbidly obese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Bente Skovsby; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    lead to long-term changes in activity level, if facilitators and barriers are approached in a holistic way by professionals. To develop lifestyle interventions, the perspective and experiences of this group of patients are essential for success. The methodology of the systematic review followed......The aim is to identify facilitators and barriers for physical activity (PA) experienced by morbidly obese adults in the Western world. Inactivity and a sedentary lifestyle have become a major challenge for health and well-being, particularly among persons with morbid obesity. Lifestyle changes may...

  18. Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) operating experience and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) is a small, unmoderated fast pulse reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HPRR is the principle research tool of ORNL's Dosimetry Applications Research Group. The reactor is described, and its operating experience is presented. The HPRR is used by dosimeter vendors, government laboratories, nuclear power utilities, the military, and universities as well as by the ORNL staff for a wide variety of applications. These applications have been divided into six categories as follows: (1) biological effects studies, (2) criticality alarm testing, (3) dosimetry intercomparison studies, (4) neutron and gamma dose equivalent dosimeter development, (5) simulation of nuclear weapon spectra, and (6) training

  19. Chladni Patterns on Drumheads: A ``Physics of Music'' Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worland, Randy

    2011-01-01

    In our "Physics of Music" class for non-science majors, we have developed a laboratory exercise in which students experiment with Chladni sand patterns on drumheads. Chladni patterns provide a kinesthetic, visual, and entertaining way to illustrate standing waves on flat surfaces and are very helpful when making the transition from one-dimensional systems, such as string and wind instruments, to the two-dimensional membranes and plates of the percussion family. Although the sand patterns attributed to Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827) are often demonstrated for this purpose using metal plates,2-4 the use of drumheads offers several pedagogical and practical advantages in the lab.

  20. Minimum-bias physics with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Volyanskyy, Dmytro

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Its pseudorapidity coverage, which extends over 2<$\\eta$<5 region, allows to explore particle production in an unique kinematic range. In particular, the detector is able to carry out measurements of low-p$_{T}$ interactions at large pseudorapidity and thus, has great potential to study soft QCD processes. In this paper, a brief overview of the first minimum bias physics results from LHCb is given. In addition, prospects for measuring diffractive processes are discussed.

  1. Physics Analysis Tools for the CMS experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fabozzi, Francesco; Hegner, Benedikt; Lista, Luca

    2008-01-01

    The CMS experiment is expected to start data taking during 2008, and large data samples, of the Peta-bytes scale, will be produced each year. The CMS Physics Tools package provides the CMS physicist with a powerful and flexible software layer for analysis of these huge datasets that is well integrated in the CMS experiment software. A core part of this package is the Candidate Model providing a coherent interface to different types of data. Standard tasks such as combinatorial analyses, generic cuts, MC truth matching and constrained fitting are supported. Advanced template techniques enable the user to add missing features easily. We explain the underlying model, certain details of the implementation and present some use cases showing how the tools are currently used in generator and full simulation studies as preparation for analysis of real data.

  2. The Meaning of Patient Experiences of Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornelsen, Jude; Atkins, Chloe; Brownell, Keith; Woollard, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Current diagnostic models in medical practice do not adequately account for patient symptoms that cannot be classified. At the moment, when all known diagnostic possibilities have been excluded, physicians-and patients-confront uncertainty in diagnosis, which gives rise to the label of Medically Unexplained Physical Symptoms (MUPS). This phenomenological study, conducted by two research teams in two geographic locations, sought to explore patients' experiences of prolonged uncertainty in diagnosis. Participants in this study described their experiences with and consequences of MUPS primarily in relation to levels of acuity and acceptance of uncertainty, the latter loosely correlated to length of time since onset of symptoms (the longer the time, the more forbearance participants expressed). We identified three experiential periods including the active search for a diagnosis, living with MUPS, and, finally, acceptance/resignation of their condition. Findings point to the heightened importance of the therapeutic relationship when dealing with uncertainty. PMID:25583957

  3. Atomic physics experiments with trapped and cooled highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H -J; Winters, D F A

    2007-01-01

    Trapping and cooling techniques have become very important for many fundamental experiments in atomic physics. When applied to highly charged ions confined in Penning traps, these procedures are very effective for testing quantum electrodynamics in extreme electromagnetic fields produced by heavy highly charged ions such as uranium U$^{91+}$. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear ground state properties can be determined with high accuracy in these simple systems. Finally, by studying a single trapped radioactive ion, its nuclear decay can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Such experiments on highly charged ions at extremely low energy will become possible by the HITRAP facility which is currently being built up at GSI. Also the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) will be briefly described which is expected to be operational by 2014.

  4. Maximizing the DUNE early physics output with current experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Monojit; Goswami, Srubabati [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); Raut, Sushant K. [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad (India); School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology-AlbaNova University Center, Department of Theoretical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-15

    The deep underground neutrino experiment (DUNE) is a proposed next generation superbeam experiment at Fermilab. Its aims include measuring the unknown neutrino oscillation parameters - the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the mixing angle θ{sub 23}, and the CP-violating phase δ{sub CP}. The current and upcoming experiments T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN will also be collecting data for the same measurements. In this paper, we explore the sensitivity reach of DUNE in combination with these other experiments. We evaluate the least exposure required by DUNE to determine the above three unknown parameters with reasonable confidence.We find that for each case, the inclusion of data from T2K, NOνA, and ICAL rate at IN help to achieve the same sensitivity with a reduced exposure from DUNE thereby helping to economize the configuration. Further, we quantify the effect of the proposed near detector on systematic errors and study the consequent improvement in sensitivity. We also examine the role played by the second oscillation cycle in furthering the physics reach of DUNE. Finally, we present an optimization study of the neutrino-antineutrino running of DUNE. (orig.)

  5. Physics prospects of future neutrino oscillation experiments in Asia

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K

    2004-01-01

    The three neutrino model has 9 physical parameters, 3 neutrino masses, 3 mixing angles and 3 CP violating phases. Among them, neutrino oscillation experiments can probe 6 parameters: 2 mass squared differences, 3 mixing angles, and 1 CP phase. The experiments performed so far determined the magnitudes of the two mass squared differences, the sign of the smaller mass squared difference, the magnitudes of two of the three mixing angles, and the upper bound on the third mixing angle. The sign of the larger mass squared difference (the neutrino mass hierarchy pattern), the magnitude of the third mixing angle and the CP violating phase, and a two-fold ambiguity in the mixing angle that dictates the atmospheric neutrino oscillation should be determined by future oscillation experiments. In this talk, I introduce a few ideas of future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments which make use of the super neutrino beams from J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) in Tokai village. We examine the poten...

  6. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  7. Early Physics with the LHCf Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tricomi, A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Castellini, G; D’Alessandro, R; Fukui, K; Hagenauer, M; Itow, Y; Kasahara, K; Kawade, K; Macina, D; Mase, T; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Menjo, H; Mitsuka, G; Mizuishi, M; Muraki, Y; Nakai, M; Papini, P; Perrot, A L; Ricciarini, S; Sako, T; Shimizu, Y; Taki, K; Tamura, T; Torii, S; Turner, W C; Viciani, A; Yoshida, K

    2009-01-01

    LHCf, the smallest of the LHC experiment, has been designed to study the forward production of neutral particles in proton-proton collisions at LHC. The aim of the experiment is to provide valuable information for the calibration of the nuclear interaction models used in the Monte Carlo codes developed for high and ultra-high energy cosmic ray Physics. These data are of extreme importance for the extraction of primary cosmic ray properties. In particular, since LHCf will take data already in the rst phase of operation of the LHC at 3.5+3.5 TeV up to the ultimate energy of 7+7 TeV, it will be able to span the most interesting energy range for high energy cosmic rays, above the “knee” region. To accomplish these precision measurements, LHCf is made of two double arm high precision calorimeters placed on both side of ATLAS interaction point. In this paper the performance of the LHCf detector will be discussed with particular emphasis to the early physics program.

  8. High school student physics research experience yields positive results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a small scale research project while in high school gives them the hands on experience and ultimately prepares them more for the college experience. SUNY Plattsburgh’s Physics department started a five-week summer program for high school students in 2012. This program has proved not only beneficial for students while in the program, but also as they continue on in their development as scientists/engineers. Independent research, such as that offered by SUNY Plattsburgh’s five-week summer program, offers students a feel and taste of the culture of doing research, and life as a scientist. It is a short-term, risk free way to investigate whether a career in research or a particular scientific field is a good fit.

  9. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  10. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  11. The LHCf experiment at the LHC: Physics Goals and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tricomi, A. [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INFN Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D' Alessandro, R. [Universita degli Studi di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Faus, A. [IFIC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Fukui, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Haguenauer, M. [Ecole-Polytechnique, Paris (France); Itow, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kasahara, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Macina, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Menjo, H. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Mizuishi, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Muraki, Y. [Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Papini, P. [Universita degli Studi di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Perrot, A.L. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-12-15

    The LHCf experiment is the smallest of the six experiments installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). While the general purpose detectors have been mainly designed to answer the open questions of Elementary Particle Physics, LHCf has been designed as a fully devoted Astroparticle experiment at the LHC. Indeed, thanks to the excellent performances of its double arm calorimeters, LHCf will be able to measure the flux of neutral particles produced in p-p collisions at LHC in the very forward region, thus providing an invaluable help in the calibration of air-shower Monte Carlo codes currently used for modeling cosmic rays interactions in the Earth atmosphere. Depending on the LHC machine schedule, LHCf will take data in an energy range from 900 GeV up to 14 TeV in the centre of mass system (equivalent to 10{sup 17} eV in the laboratory frame), thus covering one of the most interesting and debated region of the Cosmic Ray spectrum, the region around and beyond the 'knee'.

  12. Results From the Physics of Colloids Experiment on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, David; Bailey, Arthur; Manley, Suliana; Prasad, Vikram; Christianson, Rebecca; Sankaran, Subramanian; Doherty, Michael; Jankovsky, Amy; Lorik, Tibor; Shiley, William

    2002-12-01

    The Physics of Colloids in Space (PCS) experiment was accommodated within International Space Station (ISS) EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments to Space Station (EXPRESS) Rack 2 and was remotely operated from early June 2001 until February 2002 from NASA Glenn Research Center's Telescience Support Center (TSC) in Cleveland, Ohio, and from the remote site at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. PCS was launched on 4/19/2001 on Space Shuttle STS-100. The experiment was activated on 5/31/2001. The entire experimental setup performed remarkably well, and accomplished 2400 hours of science operations on-orbit. The sophisticated instrumentation in PCS is capable of dynamic and static light scattering from 11 to 169 degrees, Bragg scattering over the range from 10 to 60 degrees, dynamic and static light scattering at low angles from 0.3 to 6.0 degrees, and color imaging. The long duration microgravity environment on the ISS facilitated extended studies on the growth and coarsening characteristics of binary crystals. The de-mixing of the colloid-polymer critical-point sample was also studied as it phase-separated into two phases. Further, aging studies on a col-pol gel, gelation rate studies in extremely low concentration fractal gels over several days, and studies on a glass sample, all provided valuable information. Several exciting and unique aspects of these results are discussed here.

  13. Benchmark physics experiment of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A benchmark physics experiment of a metallic-fueled LMFBR was performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) in order to examine availability of data and method for a design of metallic-fueled core. The nuclear data and the calculation methods used for a LMFBR core design have been improved based on the oxide fuel core experiments. A metallic-fueled core has a harder neutron spectrum than an oxide-fueled core and has typical nuclear characteristics affected by the neutron spectrum. In this study, availability of the conventional calculation method for the design of the metallic-fueled core was examined by comparing the calculation values of the nuclear characteristics with the measured values. The experimental core (FCA assembly XVI-1) was selected by referring to the conceptual design of Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry. The calculated-to-experiment (C/E) value for keff of assembly XVI-1 was 1.001. From this, as far as the criticality the prediction accuracy of the conventional calculation for the metallic-fueled core was concluded to be similar to that of an oxide-fueled core. (author)

  14. A Data Transmission Method Based on Ethernet Physical Layer for Particle Physics Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Xi-Ru, Huang; Jia-Jun, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Due to the advantages of universality, flexibility and high performance, fast Ethernet is widely used in readout system design of modern particle physics experiments. However, Ethernet is usually used together with TCP/IP protocol stack, which makes it difficult to be implemented because designers have to use operating system to process this protocol. Furthermore, TCP/IP protocol degrades the transmission efficiency and real-time performance. To maximize the performance of Ethernet in physics experiment applications, a data readout method based on physical layer (PHY) is proposed in this paper. In this method, TCP/IP protocol is forsaken and replaced with a customized and simple protocol, which make it easier to be implemented. On each readout module, data from front-end electronics is first fed into an FPGA for protocol processing and then sent out to a PHY chip controlled by this FPGA for transmission. This kind of data path is fully implemented by hardware. While from the side of data acquisition system (D...

  15. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3 - 1600 Angstrom), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.) copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  16. Atom interferometers and optical atomic clocks: New quantum sensors for fundamental physics experiments in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present projects for future space missions using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms. They will enable fundamental physics experiments testing quantum physics, physics beyond the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity

  17. Task A, High energy physics program experiment and theory: Task B, High energy physics program numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses progress in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Fixed target experiments, collider experiments, computing, networking, VAX upgrade, SSC preparation, detector development, and particle theory are some of the areas covered

  18. Marine rock physical flume experiment: The method of seafloor shallow sediment recognition by ultrasonic physical attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Yun; Hu, Xiaoya; Zhang, Jianli; Guo, Shiguang

    2015-04-01

    It's a key problem to recognize the kinds of sediments in the ocean bottom during an acoustic survey or seismic exploration. In this paper, an ultrasonic rock physics experiment was introduced in the flume, which simulated different sedimentary types of ocean bottom, such as stone, fine sand, coarse sand, silt and cement. After processing the simulated acoustic data, some physical attributes, which are sensitive to different types of sediment, was found. In which, the weighted average frequency attribute can distinguish the coarse sand, silt and stone substrate if combined with sweetness attribute. The instantaneous quality factor (Q) attribute highlights the cement restrained with the weighted average frequency attribute. Through analyzing the relationships between porosity, density and these sensitive acoustic attributes, the types of sediment in the flume can be deduced and inversed by artificial neural network method.

  19. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G. [Sao Paulo State U.; Apostolakis, J. [CERN; Bandieramonte, M. [Catania Astrophys. Observ.; Bianchini, C. [Mackenzie Presbiteriana U.; Bitzes, G. [CERN; Brun, R. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab; Carminati, F. [CERN; Licht, J.de Fine [U. Copenhagen (main); Duhem, L. [Intel, Santa Clara; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Gheata, A. [CERN; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Lima, G. [Fermilab; Novak, M. [CERN; Presbyterian, M. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Shadura, O. [CERN; Seghal, R. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Wenzel, S. [CERN

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  20. A multi-chip module for physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Benso, A; Giovannetti, S; Mariani, R; Motto, S; Prinetto, P

    1999-01-01

    MCMs are widely adopted as assembly solutions for multi-die based systems, where area, performance, and costs are critical constraints. This paper describes both the project strategies and production flow that are to be adopted to realize an MCM-D for data acquisition in high-energy physics experiments. The activity starts from the results of RD/16 CERN project, and is part of the LAP Esprit project. The paper details the most critical issues faced in the production phase, and analyzes how they influenced system partitioning and component design. Moreover, it presents the design-for-testability methodologies adopted at both chip and MCM levels to achieve low defect levels and high production yields, minimizing the overhead in terms of system performance and area occupation. This work should demonstrate the feasibility of the MCM technology in such high speed data processing systems, where both size and cost constraints are important. (10 refs).

  1. Physics of leptoquarks in precision experiments and at particle colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Doršner, I; Greljo, A; Kamenik, J F; Košnik, N

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive review of physics effects generated by leptoquarks (LQs), i.e., hypothetical particles that can turn quarks into leptons and vice versa, of either scalar or vector nature. These considerations include discussion of possible completions of the Standard Model that contain LQ fields. The main focus of the review is on those LQ scenarios that are not problematic with regard to proton stability. We accordingly concentrate on the phenomenology of light leptoquarks that is relevant for precision experiments and particle colliders. Important constraints on LQ interactions with matter are derived from precision low energy observables such as electric dipole moments, (g-2) of charged leptons, atomic parity violation, neutral meson mixing, Kaon, B, and D meson decays, etc. We provide a general analysis of indirect constraints on LQ Yukawa interactions to make statements that are as model independent as possible. We address complementary constraints that originate from electroweak precision mea...

  2. The Entangled Cosmos: an experiment in physical theopoetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    As an experiment in constructive transdisciplinary relationality, a theology of nonseparable difference here engages a physics of quantum entanglement. The metaphoric potential of "spooky action at a distance" to intensify a cosmology resistant to the dominant individualism and conducive to ethical ecologies of interdependence has only begun to develop across multiple discourses. This essay contemplates the specific unfolding of a theory of nonlocal superpositions by physicists such as Stapp, Bohm and Barad. It does not literalize any God-trope, but rather entangles theology in the mysterious uncertainty of our widest interdependencies. This essay, first presented as a lecture at the American Academy of Religion "Science, Technology and Religion" Group, San Francisco, November 2011, forms the core of a chapter in a book I am currently completing, The Cloud of the Impossible: Theological Entanglements.

  3. World's biggest 'virtual supercomputer' given the go-ahead

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council has today announced GBP 16 million to create a massive computing Grid, equivalent to the world's second largest supercomputer after Japan's Earth Simulator computer" (1 page).

  4. Creating a Before-School Physical Activity Program: Pre-Service Physical Educators' Experiences and Implications for PETE

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jaimie; van der Mars, Hans; Jahn, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences of physical education teacher education (PETE) majors enrolled in an internship course that provided them with authentic experiences promoting and facilitating a before-school physical activity (PA) program and to examine the associated implications for PETE programs within the Comprehensive…

  5. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C; Merritt, E C; Adams, C S; Dunn, J P; Brockington, S; Case, A; Gilmore, M; Lynn, A G; Messer, S J; Witherspoon, F D

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$, sonic Mach number $M_s\\equiv V_{\\rm jet}/C_s>10$, jet diameter $=5$ cm, and jet length $\\approx 20$ cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  6. CALET: a high energy astroparticle physics experiment on the ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone

    2015-01-01

    CALET (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) is a high energy astroparticle physics experiment planned for a long exposure mission aboard the International Space Station (ISS) by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA. The main science goal is high precision measurements of the inclusive electron (+positron) spectrum below 1 TeV and the exploration of the energy region above 1 TeV, where the shape of the high end of the spectrum might unveil the presence of nearby sources of acceleration. CALET has been designed to achieve a large proton rejection capability (>10$^5$) with a fine grained imaging calorimeter (IMC) followed by a total absorption calorimeter (TASC), for a total thickness of 30 X$_{0}$ and 1.3 proton interaction length. With an excellent energy resolution and a lower background contamination with respect to previous experiments, CALET will search for possible spectral signatures of dark matter with both electrons and gamma rays. CALET w...

  7. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ∼1016 cm-3, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean charge Z¯ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper

  8. Studies on implementation of pellet tracking in hadron physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyszniak A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system for optical tracking of frozen hydrogen microsphere targets (pellets has been designed. It is intended for the upcoming hadron physics experiment PANDA at FAIR, Darmstadt, Germany. With such a tracking system one can reconstruct the positions of the individual pellets at the time of a hadronic interaction in the offline event analysis. This gives information on the position of the primary interaction vertex with an accuracy of a few 100 µm, which is very useful e.g. for reconstruction of charged particle tracks and secondary vertices and for background suppression. A study has been done at the WASA detector setup (Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany to check the possibility of classification of hadronic events as originating in pellets or in background. The study has been done based on the instantaneous rate a Long Range TDC which was used to determine if a pellet was present in the accelerator beam region. It was clearly shown that it is possible to distinguish the two event classes. Also, an experience was gained with operation of two synchronized systems operating in different time scales, as it will also be the case with the optical pellet tracking.

  9. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  10. Gender, Experience, and Self-Efficacy in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence of persistent gender achievement gaps in university physics instruction, not only for learning physics content, but also for developing productive attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. These gaps occur in both traditional and interactive-engagement (IE) styles of physics instruction. We investigated one gender gap…

  11. Benchmarking atomic physics models for magnetically confined fusion plasma physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, M. J.; Finkenthal, M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Moos, H. W.; Pacella, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Fournier, K.; Goldstein, W.; Gregory, B.

    1999-01-01

    In present magnetically confined fusion devices, high and intermediate Z impurities are either puffed into the plasma for divertor radiative cooling experiments or are sputtered from the high Z plasma facing armor. The beneficial cooling of the edge as well as the detrimental radiative losses from the core of these impurities can be properly understood only if the atomic physics used in the modeling of the cooling curves is very accurate. To this end, a comprehensive experimental and theoretical analysis of some relevant impurities is undertaken. Gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are puffed and nongases are introduced through laser ablation into the FTU tokamak plasma. The charge state distributions and total density of these impurities are determined from spatial scans of several photometrically calibrated vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrographs (3-1600 Å), the multiple ionization state transport code transport code (MIST) and a collisional radiative model. The radiative power losses are measured with bolometery, and the emissivity profiles were measured by a visible bremsstrahlung array. The ionization balance, excitation physics, and the radiative cooling curves are computed from the Hebrew University Lawrence Livermore atomic code (HULLAC) and are benchmarked by these experiments. (Supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER53214 at JHU and Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 at LLNL.)

  12. A data transmission method for particle physics experiments based on Ethernet physical layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi-Ru; Cao, Ping; Zheng, Jia-Jun

    2015-11-01

    Due to its advantages of universality, flexibility and high performance, fast Ethernet is widely used in readout system design for modern particle physics experiments. However, Ethernet is usually used together with the TCP/IP protocol stack, which makes it difficult to implement readout systems because designers have to use the operating system to process this protocol. Furthermore, TCP/IP degrades the transmission efficiency and real-time performance. To maximize the performance of Ethernet in physics experiment applications, a data readout method based on the physical layer (PHY) is proposed. In this method, TCP/IP is replaced with a customized and simple protocol, which makes it easier to implement. On each readout module, data from the front-end electronics is first fed into an FPGA for protocol processing and then sent out to a PHY chip controlled by this FPGA for transmission. This kind of data path is fully implemented by hardware. From the side of the data acquisition system (DAQ), however, the absence of a standard protocol causes problems for the network related applications. To solve this problem, in the operating system kernel space, data received by the network interface card is redirected from the traditional flow to a specified memory space by a customized program. This memory space can easily be accessed by applications in user space. For the purpose of verification, a prototype system has been designed and implemented. Preliminary test results show that this method can meet the requirements of data transmission from the readout module to the DAQ with an efficient and simple manner. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11005107) and Independent Projects of State Key Laboratory of Particle Detection and Electronics (201301)

  13. IRPhE - International Reactor Physics Experiments database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists and has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. It is a significant saving results from disseminating a standard benchmark set to be used worldwide. A framework for professionals that use the standard benchmark set to validate and verify modeling codes and data for radiation transport, criticality safety and reactor physics applications guarantees a comparative set of analyses. It represents also a good basis for pinpointing important gaps and where efforts should be concentrated and ensures knowledge and competence preservation, management and transfer in nuclear science and engineering. A large number of experimentalists, physicists, evaluators, modelers have devoted large amounts of their efforts and competencies to produce the data on which the methods we are using today are based. These data are far from having been exploited fully for the different nuclear and radiation technologies. This wealth of information needs to be preserved in a form more easily exploitable by modern information technology and for use in connection with novel and refined computational models with limitations of the past removed. These data will form the basis for the studies of more advanced nuclear technology, will be instrumental in identifying areas where there is a lack of knowledge and thus provide support to justifying new experiments that would reduce design uncertainties and consequently costs. Improvement of

  14. PPARC: World's biggest 'virtual supercomputer' given the go-ahead

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council has today announced a grant of 16 million pounds to create a massive computing Grid. This Grid, known as GridPP2, will eventually form part of a larger European Grid, to be used to process the data deluge from CERN, when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), comes online in 2007 (1 page).

  15. Atlas Pulsed Power Facility for High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.B.; Ballard, E.O.; Barr, G.W.; Bowman, D.W.; Chochrane, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Elizondo, J.M.; Gribble, R.F.; Griego, J.R.; Hicks, R.D.; Hinckley, W.B.; Hosack, K.W.; Nielsen, K.E.; Parker, J.V.; Parsons, M.O.; Rickets, R.L.; Salazar, H.R.; Sanchez, P.G.; Scudder, D.W.; Shapiro, C.; Thompson, M.C.; Trainor, R.J.; Valdez, G.A.; Vigil, B.N.; Watt, R.G.; Wysock, F.J.

    1999-06-07

    The Atlas facility, now under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), will provide a unique capability for performing high-energy-density experiments in support of weapon-physics and basic-research programs. It is intended to be an international user facility, providing opportunities for researchers from national laboratories and academic institutions around the world. Emphasizing institutions around the world. Emphasizing hydrodynamic experiments, Atlas will provide the capability for achieving steady shock pressures exceeding 10-Mbar in a volume of several cubic centimeters. In addition, the kinetic energy associated with solid liner implosion velocities exceeding 12 km/s is sufficient to drive dense, hydrodynamic targets into the ionized regime, permitting the study of complex issues associated with strongly-coupled plasmas. The primary element of Atlas is a 23-MJ capacitor bank, comprised of 96 separate Marx generators housed in 12 separate oil-filled tanks, surrounding a central target chamber. Each tank will house two, independently-removable maintenance units, with each maintenance unit consisting of four Marx modules. Each Marx module has four capacitors that can each be charged to a maximum of 60 kilovolts. When railgap switches are triggered, the marx modules erect to a maximum of 240 kV. The parallel discharge of these 96 Marx modules will deliver a 30-MA current pulse with a 4-5-{micro}s risetime to a cylindrical, imploding liner via 24 vertical, tri-plate, oil-insulated transmission lines. An experimental program for testing and certifying all Marx and transmission line components has been completed. A complete maintenance module and its associated transmission line (the First Article) are now under construction and testing. The current Atlas schedule calls for construction of the machine to be complete by August, 2000. Acceptance testing is scheduled to begin in November, 2000, leading to initial operations in January, 2001.

  16. The design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Goldston, R.J.; Sinnis, J.C.; Bernabei, S.; Bialek, J.M.; Bronner, G.; Chen, S.J.; Chrzanowski, J.; Citrolo, J.; Dahlgren, F.

    1993-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is designed to develop the scientific basis for a compact and continuously operating tokamak fusion reactor. It is based on an emerging class of tokamak operating modes, characterized by beta limits well in excess of the Troyon limit, confinement scaling well in excess of H-mode, and bootstrap current fractions approaching unity. Such modes are attainable through the use of advanced, steady state plasma controls including strong shaping, current profile control, and active particle recycling control. Key design features of the TPX are superconducting toroidal and poloidal field coils; actively-cooled plasma-facing components; a flexible heating and current drive system; and a spacious divertor for flexibility. Substantial deuterium plasma operation is made possible with an in-vessel remote maintenance system, a low-activation titanium vacuum vessel, and shielding of ex-vessel components. The facility will be constructed as a national project with substantial participation of US industry. Operation will begin with first plasma in the year 2000.

  17. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budge, K.G.; Peery, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA`s success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm.

  18. Experiences developing ALEGRA: A C++ coupled physics framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALEGRA is a coupled physics framework originally written to simulate inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments being conducted at the PBFA-II facility at Sandia National Laboratories. It has since grown into a large software development project supporting a number of computational programs at Sandia. As the project has grown, so has the development team, from the original two authors to a group of over fifteen programmers crossing several departments. In addition, ALEGRA now runs on a wide variety of platforms, from large PCs to the ASCI Teraflops massively parallel supercomputer. The authors discuss the reasons for ALEGRA's success, which include the intelligent use of object-oriented techniques and the choice of C++ as the programming language. They argue that the intelligent use of development tools, such as build tools (e.g. make), compiler, debugging environment (e.g. dbx), version control system (e.g. cvs), and bug management software (e.g. ClearDDTS), is nearly as important as the choice of language and paradigm

  19. Space, body, time and relationship experiences of recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Andersen, Henriette Bondo; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increasing recess physical activity has been the aim of several interventions, as this setting can provide numerous physical activity opportunities. However, it is unclear if these interventions are equally effective for all children, or if they only appeal to children who are already...... the classroom as a space for physical activity, designing schoolyards with smaller secluded spaces and varied facilities, improving children's self-esteem and body image, e.g., during physical education, and creating teacher organised play activities during recess....

  20. Forward physics with the LHCf experiment: a LHC contribution to cosmic-ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonechi L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available LHCf is a small detector installed at LHC accelerator to measure neutral particle flow in the forward direction of proton -proton (p - p and proton -nucleus (p - A interactions. Thanks to the optimal performance that has characterized the last years’ running of the LHC collider, several measurements have been taken since 2009 in different running conditions. After data taking for p - p interactions at √s = 900 GeV, 2.76 TeV and 7 TeV and proton - Lead nucleus (p -Pb at √sNN = 5.02 TeV (energy of a couple of projectile and target nucleons in their center of mass reference frame, LHCf is now going to complete its physics program with the 13 TeV p - p run foreseen in 2015. The complete set of results will become a reference data set of forward physics for the calibration and tuning of the hadronic interaction models currently used for the simulation of the atmospheric showers induced by very high energy cosmic rays. For this reason we think that LHCf is giving an important contribution for the study of cosmic rays at the highest energies. In this paper the experiment, the published results and the current status are reviewed.

  1. Crystal assisted experiments for multi-disciplinary physics with heavy ion beams at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvergne, Denis

    2015-07-01

    We present a review of the channeling and blocking experiments that have been performed at GANIL during the 30 years of stable beam operation, with the strong support of the multi-disciplinary CIRIL-CIMAP laboratory. These experiments combine atomic physics, solid state physics and nuclear physics.

  2. Crveno jezero - the biggest sinkhole in Dinaric Karst (Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Crveno jezero is a karst phenomenon known throughout the world for its size and specific features. In the course of the 1950's, some hydrological measurements were made on the surface of the lake, including depth measurement at 39 points (academician M. Petrik and his associates). The information about the maximum depth of 254 meters actually originates from that research (PETRIK, 1960). This depth has been "attracting" geologists, hydrogeologists and speleologists for many years now. On numerous occasions, people descended to the surface of the lake but, in the period prior to speleohydrogeological research conducted in 1998, no attempt had been made to dive underwater and document the lake depth, nor to investigate by other methods the interior of the lake and give a scientifically documented representation of this karst phenomenon from the speleohydrogeological aspect (GARAŠIĆ, 2000; 2001). The Red Lake, located one kilometer to the west of Imotski, is the biggest of all lakes situated in the area (featuring 18 big or small dry or water-filled depressions) and this by both its visible (superficial) and invisible (submerged) portions. Its name originates from red rocks perched on cliffs extending to more than 250 meters in height. The lake color is dark blue, and it measures about 150 x 180 meters, depending on water level, i.e. on the time of the year. The easiest way to reach the lake (belay, descend and ascend with ropes) is to approach it from the east side. Here we have a vertical cliff about 60 meters in height, followed by 300 meters of a very steep soil creep zone, after which there is yet another vertical cliff of at least ten meters in height (depending on lake water level). In other words, a special descending technique must be used to access any point along the lake perimeter in summer months. Vertical and overhanging cliffs rising above the surface of the lake range from 160 to 250 meters in height. However, the depth of the lake is even more

  3. The Use of Cylindrical Lenses in Easy Experiments for Physics Education and the Magic Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Stanislaw; Krysiak, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the properties of cylindrical lenses and provide some examples of their use in easy school physics experiments. Such experiments could be successfully conducted in the context of science education, in fun experiments that teach physics and in science fair projects, or used to entertain an audience by…

  4. Early Childhood Educators' Experience of an Alternative Physical Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaridou, Niki; Genethliou, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Alternative instructional and curricular models are regarded as more comprehensive and suitable approaches to providing quality physical education (Kulinna 2008; Lund and Tannehill 2010; McKenzie and Kahan 2008; Metzler 2011; Quay and Peters 2008). The purpose of this study was to describe the impact of the Early Steps Physical Education…

  5. 'Exhibitions and experiments', in celebration of nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2008 was awarded to Professors Yoichiro Nambu, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa. At this opportunity, we held an exhibition to introduce the achievements of the laureates for 10 days at the Omiya campus in May 2009. With the explanations of elementary particle physics, we prepared several experimental instruments with which visitors could play and learn the spontaneous symmetry breaking, cosmic rays, a circle path of an electron in a magnetic field and so on. Our main purpose of the exhibition was, however, not just to explain the contents of the Nobel Prize in Physics, but also to attract students' interests to physics. More than 800 individual students attended during the period, and the survey of questionnaires shows positive contributions to raise the students' awareness of the excitement of physics. (author)

  6. Accelerator Preparations for Muon Physics Experiments at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The use of existing Fermilab facilities to provide beams for two muon experiments - the Muon to Electron Conversion Experiment (Mu2e) and the New g-2 Experiment - is under consideration. Plans are being pursued to perform these experiments following the completion of the Tevatron Collider Run II, utilizing the beam lines and storage rings used today for antiproton accumulation without considerable reconfiguration. Operating scenarios being investigated and anticipated accelerator improvements or reconfigurations will be presented.

  7. Physics of Laser Materials Processing Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gladush, Gennady G

    2011-01-01

    This book describes the basic mechanisms, theory, simulations and technological aspects of Laser processing techniques. It covers the principles of laser quenching, welding, cutting, alloying, selective sintering, ablation, etc. The main attention is paid to the quantitative description. The diversity and complexity of technological and physical processes is discussed using a unitary approach. The book aims on understanding the cause-and-effect relations in physical processes in Laser technologies. It will help researchers and engineers to improve the existing and develop new Laser machining techniques. The book addresses readers with a certain background in general physics and mathematical analysis: graduate students, researchers and engineers practicing laser applications.

  8. Expected performance of the ATLAS experiment detector, trigger and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adorisio, C; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahmed, H; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Alam, M A; Alam, S M; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, J; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Anders, C F; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M L; Anduaga, X S; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonelli, S; Antunovic, B; Anulli, F A; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Archambault, J P; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J F; Argyropoulos, T; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Arutinov, D; Asai, M; Asai, S; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Asner, D; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Atkinson, T; Atoian, G; Auerbach, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M A; Austin, N; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, A; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, S; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Baranov, S P; Baranov, S; Barashkou, A; Barber, T B; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M B; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N B; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baron, S; Baroncelli, A; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimãres da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Barros, N; Bartoldus, R; Bartsch, D; Bastos, J; Bates, R L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bazalova, M; Beare, B; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R B; Becerici, N; Bechtle, P; Beck, G A; Beck, H P; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Bedajanek, I; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednár, P; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C; Begel, M; BeharHarpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Ben Ami, S; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Benedict, B H; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benincasa, G P; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernardet, K; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertin, A; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bischofberger, M; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchot, G; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Boaretto, C; Bobbink, G J; Bocci, A; Bodine, B; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Böser, S; Bogaerts, J A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, C N; Booth, P S L; Booth, J R A; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borroni, S; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Bosteels, M; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boulahouache, C; Bourdarios, C; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Breton, D; Brett, N D; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brubaker, E; Bruckmande Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Bucci, F B; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bujor, F; Bulekov, O; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Byatt, T; Caballero-Bejar, J; CabreraUrbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Campabadal Segura, F; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Cantero, J; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Caracinha, D; Caramarcu, C; Cardarelli, R; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, B; Caron, S; Carron Montero, S; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Cascella, M; Caso, C; Castaneda Hernadez, A M; Castaneda Miranda, E; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N; Castro Nunes Fiolhais, M; Cataldi, G; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Cattani, G C; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavalleri, P; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cetin, S A; Cevenini, F; Chafaq, A C; Chakraborty, D; Chapman, J D; Chapman, J W; Charlton, D G; Chatterjii, S C; Cheatham, S; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chen, H; Chen, S; Chen, T; Chen, X; Cheng, S; Cheng, T L; Cheplakov, A; Chepurnov, V F; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Tcherniatine, V; Chesneanu, D; Cheu, E; Cheung, S L; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chiarella, V; Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chouridou, S; Chren, D; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cindro, V; Ciobotaru, M D; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clément, C; Clements, D; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coelli, S; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocaru, C D; Colas, J; Cole, B; Colijn, A P; Collard, C; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Coluccia, R; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cooper-Smith, N J; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F C; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Coura Torres, R; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cranshaw, J; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; Crupi, R C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuciuc, C M; Cuenca Almenar, C; Curatolo, M; Curtis, C J; Cwetanski, P; Czyczula, Z; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; D'Orazio, A; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A; Da Silva, P V M; Da Via, C V; Dabrowski, W; Dai, T; Dallapiccola, C; Dallison, S J; Daly, C H; Dam, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Dao, V; Darbo, G; Davey, W D; Davidek, T; Davidson, N; Davidson, R; Davison, A R; Dawson, I; Dawson, J W; Daya, R K; De, K; de Asmundis, R; De Castro, S; De Castro Faria Salgado, P E; De Cecco, S; De Groot, N; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De La Taille, C; De Mora, L; De Oliveira Branco, M; De Pedis, D; De Salvo, A; De Sanctis, U; De Santo, A; De Vivie De Regie, J B; De Zorzi, G; Dean, S; Deberg, H; Dedes, G; Dedovich, D V; Defay, P O; Degenhardt, J; Dehchar, M; Del Papa, C; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Dell'Acqua, A; Dell'Asta, L; Della Pietra, M; della Volpe, D; Delmastro, M; Delruelle, N; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demichev, M; Demirköz, B; Deng, W; Denisov, S P; Dennis, C; Derue, F; Dervan, P; Desch, K K; Deviveiros, P O; Dewhurst, A; Dhaliwal, S D; Dhullipudi, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Domenico, A; Di Girolamo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Di Luise, S; Di Mattia, A; Di Nardo, R; Di Simone, A; Di Sipio, R; Diaz, M A; Diehl, E B; Dietrich, J; Diglio, S; Dindar Yagci, K; Dingfelder, D J; Dionisi, C; Dita, P; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djilkibaev, R; Djobava, T; do Vale, M A B; Dobbs, M; Dobinson, R; Dobos, D; Dobson, E; Dobson, M; Dogan, O B; Doherty, T; Doi, Y; Dolejsi, J; Dolenc, I; Dolezal, Z; Dolgoshein, B A; Donega, M; Donini, J; Donszelmann, T; Dopke, J; Dorfan, D E; Doria, A; DosAnjos, A; Dosil, M; Dotti, A; Dova, M T; Doxiadis, A; Doyle, A T; Dragic, J D; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouichi, C; Dris, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Dudarev, A; Dührssen, M; Duerdoth, I P; Duflot, L; Dufour, M A; Dunford, M; Duperrin, A; Duran Yildiz, H; Dushkin, A; Duxfield, R; Dwuznik, M; Düren, M; Ebenstein, W L; Ebke, J; Eckert, S; Eckweiler, S; Edmonds, K; Eerola, P; Ehrenfeld, W; Ehrich, T; Eifert, T; Eigen, G; Einsweiler, K; Eisenhandler, E; Ekelof, T; ElKacimi, M; Ellert, M; Elles, S; Ellis, K; Ellis, N; Elmsheuser, J; Elsing, M; Ely, R; Emeliyanov, D; Engelmann, R; Engl, A; Epp, B; Eppig, A; Epshteyn, V S; Erdmann, J; Ereditato, A; Eriksson, D; Ermoline, I; Ernst, J; Ernst, E; Ernwein, J; Errede, D; Errede, S; Escalier, M; Escobar, C; Espinal Curull, X; Esposito, B; Etienne, F; Etienvre, A I; Etzion, E; Evans, H; Fabbri, L; Fabre, C; Faccioli, P; Facius, K; Fakhrutdinov, R M; Falciano, S; Falou, A C; Fang, Y; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farilla, A; Farley, J; Farooque, T; Farrington, S M; Farthouat, P; Fassi, F; Fassnacht, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fatholahzadeh, B; Fayard, L; Fayette, F; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fedorko, I; Feligioni, L; Feng, C; Feng, E J; Fenyuk, A B; Ferencei, J; Ferland, J; Fernando, W; Ferrag, S; Ferrari, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferrer, A; Ferrer, M L; Ferrere, D; Ferretti, C; Fiascaris, M; Fiedler, F; Filipcic, A; Filippas, A; Filthaut, F; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fiorini, L; Firan, A; Fischer, G; Fisher, M J; Flacher, H F; Flechl, M; Fleck, I; Fleckner, J; Fleischmann, P; Fleischmann, S; Fleta Corral, C M; Flick, T; Flores Castillo, L R; Flowerdew, M J; Föhlisch, F; Fokitis, M; Fonseca Martin, T M; Forbush, D A; Formica, A; Forti, A; Foster, J M; Fournier, D; Foussat, A; Fowler, A J; Fowler, K F; Fox, H; Francavilla, P; Franchino, S; Francis, D; Franz, S; Fraternali, M; Fratina, S; Freestone, J; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Frost, J A; Fukunaga, C; Fullana Torregrosa, E; Fuster, J; Gabaldon, C; Gabizon, O G; Gadfort, T; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, E J; Gallas, M V; Gallop, B J; Galyaev, E; Gan, K K; Gao, Y S; Gaponenko, A; Garcia-Sciveres, M; García, C; Garcí­a Navarro, J E; Gardner, R W; Garelli, N; Garitaonandia, H; Garonne, V G; Gatti, C; Gaudio, G; Gaumer, O; Gauzzi, P; Gavrilenko, I L; Gay, C; Gaycken, G G; Gayde, J C; Gazis, E N; Gee, C N P; Geich-Gimbel, Ch; Gellerstedt, K; Gemme, C; Genest, M H; Gentile, S; George, S; Gerlach, P; Geweniger, C; Ghazlane, H; Ghez, P; Ghodbane, N; Giacobbe, B; Giagu, S; Giangiobbe, V; Gianotti, F; Gibbard, B; Gibson, A; Gibson, S M; Gilbert, L M; Gilchriese, M; Gilewsky, V; Gillman, A R; Gingrich, D M; Ginzburg, J; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M P; Giovannini, P; Giraud, P F; Girtler, P; Giugni, D; Giusti, P; Gjelsten, B K; Gladilin, L K; Glasman, C; Glazov, A; Glitza, K W; Glonti, G L; Gnanvo, K G; Godfrey, J G; Godlewski, J; Göpfert, T; Goeringer, C; Gössling, C; Göttfert, T; Goggi, V G; Goldfarb, S; Goldin, D; Golling, T; Gollub, N P; Gomes, A; Gonçalo, R; Gong, C; González de la Hoz, S; Gonzalez Silva, M L; González-Sevilla, S; Goodson, J J; Goossens, L; Gorbounov, P A; Gordon, H; Gorelov, I; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Gorini, E; Gorisek, A; Gornicki, E; Gorokhov, S A; Goryachev, S V; Goryachev, V N; Gosdzik, B; Gosselink, M; Gostkin, M I; Gough Eschrich, I; Gouighri, M; Goujdami, D; Goulette, M; Goussiou, A G; Gowdy, S; Goy, C; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grafström, P; Grahn, K J; Granado Cardoso, L; Grancagnolo, F; Grancagnolo, S; Grassi, V; Gratchev, V; Gray, H M; Gray, J A; Graziani, E; Green, B; Greenshaw, T; Greenwood, Z D; Gregor, I M; Griesmayer, E; Grigalashvili, N; Grillo, A A; Grimm, K; Grishkevich, Y V; Groer, L S; Grognuz, J; Groh, M; Groll, M; Gross, E; Grosse-Knetter, J; Groth-Jensen, J; Grudzinski, J; Gruse, C; Grybel, K; Guarino, V J; Guicheney, C; Guida, A G; Guillemin, T; Gunther, J; Guo, B; Gupta, A; Gusakov, Y; Gutierrez, A; Gutierrez, P; Guttman, N G; Gutzwiller, O; Guyot, C; Gwenlan, C; Gwilliam, C B; Haas, A; Haas, S; Haber, C; Hackenburg, R; Hadavand, H K; Hadley, D R; Härtel, R; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hakobyan, R H; Haller, J; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, A; Han, H; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hance, M; Handel, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J R; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hansl-Kozanecka, T; Hansson, P; Hara, K; Hare, G A; Harenberg, T; Harrington, R D; Harris, O B; Harris, O H; Hart, J C; Hartert, J; Hartjes, F; Haruyama, T; Harvey, A; Hasegawa, S; Hasegawa, Y; Hashemi, K; Hassani, S; Hatch, M; Haug, F; Haug, S; Hauschild, M; Hauser, R; Havranek, M; Hawkings, R J; Hawkins, D; Hayakawa, T; Hayward, H S; Haywood, S J; He, M; Head, S J; Hedberg, V; Heelan, L; Heinemann, B; Heinemann, F E W; Heldmann, M; Hellman, S; Helsens, C; Henderson, R C W; Henke, M; Henriques Correia, A M; Henrot-Versille, S; Hensel, C; Henß, T; Hershenhorn, A D; Herten, G; Hertenberger, R; Hervas, L; Hessey, N P; Hidvegi, A; Higón-Rodriguez, E; Hill, D; Hill, J C; Hiller, K H; Hillier, S J; Hinchliffe, I; Hirsch, F; Hobbs, J; Hod, N H; Hodgkinson, M C; Hodgson, P; Hoecker, A; Hoeferkamp, M R; Hoffman, J; Hoffmann, D; Hohlfeld, M H; Holmgren, S O; Holy, T; Homma, Y; Homola, P; Horazdovsky, T; Hori, T; Horn, C; Horner, S; Horvat, S; Hostachy, J Y; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Hoummada, A; Hrivnac, J; Hruska, I; Hryn'ova, T; Hsu, P J; Huang, G S; Huang, J; Hubacek, Z; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hughes, E W; Hughes, G; Hughes-Jones, R E; Hurst, P; Hurwitz, M; Huse, T; Huseynov, N; Huston, J; Huth, J; Iacobucci, G; Ibbotson, M; Ibragimov, I; Ichimiya, R; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Idarraga, J; Iengo, P; Igonkina, O; Ikegami, Y; Ikeno, M; Ilchenko, Y; Illiadis, D I; Ilyushenka, Y; Imori, M; Ince, T; Ioannou, P; Iodice, M; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ishmukhametov, R; Isobe, T; Issakov, V; Issever, C; Istin, S; Ivashin, A V; Iwanski, W; Iwasaki, H; Izen, J M; Izzo, V; Jackson, J N; Jaekel, M; Jahoda, M; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jakubek, J; Jana, D; Jansen, E; Jantsch, A; Janus, M; Jared, R C; Jarlskog, G; Jarron, P; Jelen, K; Jen-La Plante, I; Jenni, P; Jez, P; Jézéquel, S; Ji, W; Jia, J; Jiang, Y; Jin, G; Jin, S; Jinnouchi, O; Joffe, D; Johansen, L G; Johansen, M; Johansson, K E; Johansson, P; Johns, K A; Jon-And, K; Jones, A; Jones, G; Jones, R W L; Jones, T W; Jones, T J; Jonsson, O; Joos, D; Joram, C; Jorge, P M; Jorgensen, S; Jovanovic, P; Juranek, V; Jussel, P; Kabachenko, V V; Kabana, S; Kaci, M; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Kagan, H; Kagan, M; Kaiser, S; Kajomovitz, E; Kalinovskaya, L V; Kalinowski, A; Kama, S; Kanaya, N; Kaneda, M; Kantserov, V A; Kanzaki, J; Kaplan, B; Kapliy, A; Kaplon, J; Karagounis, M; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartvelishvili, V; Karyukhin, A N; Kashif, L; Kasmi, A; Kass, R D; Kastoryano, M; Kataoka, M; Kataoka, Y; Katsoufis, E; Katzy, J; Kaushik, V; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayl, M S; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V A; Kazarinov, M Y; Kazi, S I; Keates, J R; Keeler, R; Keener, P T; Kehoe, R; Keil, M; Kekelidze, G D; Kelly, M; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, M; Kepka, O; Kerschen, N; Kersevan, B P; Kersten, S; Khakzad, M; Khalilzade, F; Khandanyan, H; Khanov, A; Kharchenko, D; Khodinov, A; Kholodenko, A G; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khovanskiy, N; Khovanskiy, V; Khramov, E; Khubua, J; Kilvington, G; Kim, H; Kim, M S; Kim, S H; Kind, O; Kind, P; King, B T; 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Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M W; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F W; Winton, L; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wright, C; Wright, D; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Xella, S; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, G; Xu, N; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, K; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yao, W M; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Youssef, S P; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, M; Yu, X; Yuan, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zarzhitsky, P; Zaytsev, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zema, P F; Zendler, C; Zenin, A V; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zhan, Z; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Zheng, W; Zhang, X; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhelezko, A; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, S; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X A; Zhuravlov, V; Zilka, B; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zinna, M; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivkovic, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; zur Nedden, M; Zychacek, V

    2009-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector. The reconstruction of tracks, leptons, photons, missing energy and jets is investigated, together with the performance of b-tagging and the trigger. The physics potential for a variety of interesting physics processes, within the Standard Model and beyond, is examined. The study comprises a series of notes based on simulations of the detector and physics processes, with particular emphasis given to the data expected from the first years of operation of the LHC at CERN.

  9. Probing Pre- and In-service Physics Teachers' Knowledge Using the Double-Slit Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2014-09-01

    This study describes the use of the double-slit thought experiment as a diagnostic tool for probing physics teachers' understanding. A total of 9 pre-service teachers and 18 in-service teachers with a variety of different experience in modern physics teaching at the upper secondary level responded in a paper-and-pencil test and three of these teachers were interviewed. The results showed that the physics teachers' thought experiments with classical particles, light, and electrons were often partial. Many teachers also suffered a lack of the basic ideas and principles of physics, which probably hindered thought experimenting. In particular, understanding the ontological nature of classical particles, light and electrons seemed to be essential in performing the double-slit experiment in an appropriate way. However, the in-service physics teachers who had teaching experience in modern physics were more prepared for the double-slit thought experiment than the pre-service teachers. The results suggest that both thought experiments and the double-slit experiment should be given more weight in physics teacher education, even if experience in modern physics teaching at upper secondary school seems to some extent to develop teachers' abilities.

  10. JUNO: a General Purpose Experiment for Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Grassi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    JUNO is a 20 kt Liquid Scintillator Antineutrino Detector currently under construction in the south of China. This report reviews JUNO's physics programme related to all neutrino sources but reactor antineutrinos, namely neutrinos from supernova burst, solar neutrinos and geoneutrinos.

  11. Microgravity experiments in the field of physical chemistry in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan has been operating 'KIBO' ('hope' in Japanese) as Japanese experimental module on ISS (International Space Station) to perform researches on physical, life, medical, space sciences in space. Several research racks and facilities have already been accommodated in the pressurized module of 'KIBO' and some researches have already been carried out. Japan currently has 17 ISS flight projects (including 4 candidates) in the field of physical sciences and also incubates new projects through are search support program named as 'research WG (Working Group)', where 25 research WGs are active in the field of physical sciences. Those include 1 flight candidate and 2 research WGs in the field of physical chemistry. The article introduces those to promote international collaborations.

  12. Physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences in patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Lene; Moeller, Marianne K; Vestergaard, Claus H;

    2016-01-01

    : Both physical activity and aerobic fitness were measured. Anomalous bodily experiences were measured by selected items from the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience and The Body Awareness Scale. Psychopathological data comprising negative and positive symptoms and data on psychotropic medication....... AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare physical activity in patients with FES with healthy controls; to investigate changes in physical activity over 1 year of follow-up; and to explore the correlations of physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences reported by patients with FES. METHODS...... anomalous bodily experiences had significantly lower physical activity compared with patients with fewer such experiences (p = 0.030). In linear regression analyses only negative symptoms were significantly correlated with low physical activity (β = -0.88; 95% confidence interval = -1.48 to -0.29; p < 0...

  13. Experiences in automatic keywording of particle physics literature

    CERN Document Server

    Montejo Ráez, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Attributing keywords can assist in the classification and retrieval of documents in the particle physics literature. As information services face a future with less available manpower and more and more documents being written, the possibility of keyword attribution being assisted by automatic classification software is explored. A project being carried out at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics) for the development and integration of automatic keywording is described.

  14. Inequality in Experiences of Physics Education: Secondary School Girls' and Boys' Perceptions of their Physics Education and Intentions to Continue with Physics After the Age of 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Reiss, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper explores the factors that are associated in England with 15-year-old students' intentions to study physics after the age of 16, when it is no longer compulsory. Survey responses were collated from 5,034 year 10 students as learners of physics during the academic year 2008-2009 from 137 England secondary schools. Our analysis uses individual items from the survey rather than constructs (aggregates of items) to explore what it is about physics teachers, physics lessons and physics itself that is most correlated with intended participation in physics after the age of 16. Our findings indicate that extrinsic material gain motivation in physics was the most important factor associated with intended participation. In addition, an item-level analysis helped to uncover issues around gender inequality in physics educational experiences which were masked by the use of construct-based analyses. Girls' perceptions of their physics teachers were similar to those of boys on many fronts. However, despite the encouragement individual students receive from their teachers being a key factor associated with aspirations to continue with physics, girls were statistically significantly less likely to receive such encouragement. We also found that girls had less positive experiences of their physics lessons and physics education than did boys.

  15. The World's Biggest Movie Theater: Promoting the Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, Arthur; Day-Pallone, Jacque

    A great celestial story is only as effective as the teller of the tale. With passion and knowledge at the helm, we must search for ways to pass on that enthusiasm to others while conveying sound science. At the core, our common link is an age-old awe of the sky. From the scientist to the elementary school student, we ask remarkably similar questions. What's out there? When will some object slam into the Earth? Are we alone? In our view as advocates for astronomy at the community level, the public will emerge to discover answers to their questions, if given the forum. It's our responsibility as astronomy advocates to help one another provide those forums. While some regions, perhaps through a school or by a turn of good fortune, offer public observatories with sophisticated telescopes, we also know that an observing event can take place in an open field or a parking lot, and be fully palpable as seen through a pair of binoculars, or by the naked eye. Based on our experience, we present an integrated approach--one that borrows elements from education, entertainment, advertising, and public relations-to help choose an event, hook and keep the public's attention while making them want more, and provide some tips for increasing media presence.

  16. Dynamics of physical and functional status of students in the experiment on approvals personality oriented physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belykh S.I.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of the testing of personality-oriented physical education. In the experiment involved 640 students. Found that the greatest increase in indicators of physical fitness in young men in the experimental group revealed a flexibility test (6.67% and flexion extension Hand-ups (5.75. The girls showed improvement in the flexibility test (7.09% flexion and extension of hand-ups (6.14%. Clarified the nature and content of the personal-oriented physical education, especially its use in physical education students. Pedagogical conditions of effective application of personal-oriented physical education students in self-movement towards a healthy lifestyle. The data on the importance of physical culture for the prevention of self destructive behavior (drug addiction, alcoholism, smoking.

  17. Computations, Complexity, Experiments, and the World Outside Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer Models in the Sciences and Social Sciences. 1. Simulation and Prediction in Complex Systems: the Good the Bad and the Awful. This lecture deals with the history of large-scale computer modeling mostly in the context of the U.S. Department of Energy's sponsorship of modeling for weapons development and innovation in energy sources. 2. Complexity: Making a Splash-Breaking a Neck - The Making of Complexity in Physical System. For ages thinkers have been asking how complexity arise. The laws of physics are very simple. How come we are so complex? This lecture tries to approach this question by asking how complexity arises in physical fluids. 3. Forrester, et. al. Social and Biological Model-Making The partial collapse of the world's economy has raised the question of whether we could improve the performance of economic and social systems by a major effort on creating understanding via large-scale computer models. (author)

  18. ANL-E Health Physics experience with D and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S.I.; Mosho, G.D.; Munyon, W.J.; Murdoch, B.T.; Sholeen, C.M.; Shuman, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory--East (ANL-E) Health Physics Section provides direct and/or oversight support to various D&D projects at ANL-E. The health physics problems encountered have been challenging, primarily because they involved the potential for high internal exposures as well as actual high external exposures. The lessons learned are applicable to other radiological facilities. A number of D&D projects being conducted concurrently at ANL-E are described. The problems encountered are then categorized, and lessons learned and recommendations are provided. The main focus will be limited to the support and technical assistance provided by personnel from the ANL Health Physics Section during the course of the work activities.

  19. DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENTS OF LIGHT POLARIZATION IN PHYSICS COURSE

    OpenAIRE

    Brazhkin, Y.; Kalenkov, S.; Nizhegorodov, V.

    2008-01-01

    The article presents layout of experiments for observatiion of polarizing effects on light passage through crossed polarizers. Addition of the third polarizer leads to appearance of light on the screen. Experiment is for cases with a laser light source, reflection of light under the Brewster's angle. Photos of the installations realizing the given effects are resulted.

  20. Fostering Inclusion and Positive Physical Education Experiences for Overweight and Obese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Paul B.; Doolittle, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obese students are often socially and instructionally excluded from physical education and school physical activity opportunities. This article describes teaching strategies from a study of middle school physical education teachers who are committed to providing effective teaching and positive experiences for overweight and obese…

  1. 20 CFR 220.127 - When the only work experience is arduous unskilled physical labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... only work experience is arduous unskilled physical labor. (a) Arduous work. Arduous work is primarily physical work requiring a high level of strength or endurance. The Board will consider the claimant unable... unskilled physical labor. 220.127 Section 220.127 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD...

  2. Guided-Inquiry Experiments for Physical Chemistry: The POGIL-PCL Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Sally S.; Grushow, Alexander; Whitnell, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The POGIL-PCL project implements the principles of process-oriented, guided-inquiry learning (POGIL) in order to improve student learning in the physical chemistry laboratory (PCL) course. The inquiry-based physical chemistry experiments being developed emphasize modeling of chemical phenomena. In each experiment, students work through at least…

  3. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment program definition and preliminary laboratory concept studies on the zero G cloud physics laboratory are reported. This program involves the definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineations of a set of candidate experiments that must utilize the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity.

  4. World's Biggest Astronomy Event on the World-Wide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    `Astronomy On-Line' will connect students all over Europe Astronomy On-Line is a major, all-European project that will take place in conjunction with the 4th European Week for Scientific and Technological Culture later this year. It is based on intensive use of the World-Wide-Web (WWW) and represents the first large-scale attempt in the world to bring together pupils and their teachers all over one continent to explore challenging scientific questions, using modern communication tools, both for obtaining and for communicating information. The programme will be carried out in a collaboration between the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) [1] and the European Southern Observatory, and together with the European Commission (EC). The active phase of Astronomy On-Line will start on October 1 and reach a climax on November 18 - 22, 1996 . What is `Astronomy On-Line'? In this project, a large number of students and their teachers at schools all over Europe, together with professional and amateur astronomers and others interested in astronomy, will become associated in a unique experience that makes intensive use of the vast possibilities of the World-Wide-Web (WWW). Although the exact number of participants will not be known until the beginning of October, it is expected to run into thousands, possibly many more. The unusual size and scope of Astronomy On-Line will contribute to make it an important all-European media event. The central idea is that the participants, through the WWW, will `meet' in a `marketplace' where a number of different `shops' will be available, each of which will tempt them with a number of exciting and educational `events', carefully prepared to cater for different age groups, from 12 years upwards. The events will cover a wide spectrum of activities, some of which will be timed to ensure the proper progression of this very complex project through its main phases. The benefits In fact, Astronomy On-Line will be the first

  5. "What's (the) Matter?", A Show on Elementary Particle Physics with 28 Demonstration Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Dreiner, Herbi K; Borzyszkowski, Mikolaj; Braun, Maxim; Faßbender, Alexander; Hampel, Julia; Hansen, Maike; Hebecker, Dustin; Heepenstrick, Timo; Heinz, Sascha; Hortmanns, Katharina; Jost, Christian; Kortmann, Michael; Kruckow, Matthias U; Leuteritz, Till; Lütz, Claudia; Mahlberg, Philip; Müllers, Johannes; Opferkuch, Toby; Paul, Ewald; Pauli, Peter; Rossbach, Merlin; Schaepe, Steffen; Schiffer, Tobias; Schmidt, Jan F; Schüller-Ruhl, Jana; Schürmann, Christoph; Ubaldi, Lorenzo; Wagner-Carena, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We present the screenplay of a physics show on particle physics, by the Physikshow of Bonn University. The show is addressed at non-physicists aged 14+ and communicates basic concepts of elementary particle physics including the discovery of the Higgs boson in an entertaining fashion. It is also demonstrates a successful outreach activity heavily relying on the university physics students. This paper is addressed at anybody interested in particle physics and/or show physics. This paper is also addressed at fellow physicists working in outreach, maybe the experiments and our choice of simple explanations will be helpful. Furthermore, we are very interested in related activities elsewhere, in particular also demonstration experiments relevant to particle physics, as often little of this work is published. Our show involves 28 live demonstration experiments. These are presented in an extensive appendix, including photos and technical details. The show is set up as a quest, where 2 students from Bonn with the aid...

  6. Elementary Physical Education Teachers' Experiences in Teaching English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to describe and explain the views on teaching English Language Learners (ELLs) held by six elementary physical education (PE) teachers in the Midwest region of the United States. Situated in positioning theory, the research approach was descriptive-qualitative. The primary sources of data were face-to-face…

  7. The CMS experiment puts physics onto the menu

    CERN Document Server

    Leonidopoulos, Christos

    2011-01-01

    CMS has addressed the challenge of identifying in real time different kinds of 
physics at the LHC – from the "bread and butter" of Standard Model processes to 
signals of new particles – with triggers served up according to a carefully designed menu.

  8. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  9. The effects of computer assisted physics experiment simulations on students' learning

    OpenAIRE

    Turhan Civelek; Erdem Uçar; Orhan Gökçöl; Hakan Üstünel; İlhan Umut

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to present the significant difference between utilization of simulations of physics experiment during lectures and traditional physics lecture. Two groups of 115 students were selected for the purpose of the study. The same subjects have been taught to both groups, while a group of 115 had their lectures in science and technology class supported by physics experiment simulations for a month, the other group of115 had their lectures ina traditional way. The resea...

  10. The Heat Capacity of Metals: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeishi, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Presented here are improvements in the original design of an introductory statistical thermodynamics experiment with the result that heat capacities of metals are routinely obtained within ten percent of literature values. (BB)

  11. Precision Cosmic Ray physics with space-born experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incagli, Marco

    2016-07-01

    More than 100 years after their discoveries, cosmic rays have been extensively studied, both with balloon experiments and with ground observatories. More recently, the possibility of mounting detectors on satellites or on the International Space Station has allowed for a long duration (several years) continuous observation of primary cosmic rays, i.e. before their interaction with the earth atmosphere, thus opening a new regime of precision measurements. In this review, recent results from major space experiments, as Pamela, AMS02 and Fermi, as well as next generation experiments proposed for the International Space Station, for standalone satellites or for the yet to come Chinese Space Station, will be presented. The impact of these experiment on the knowledge of Cosmic Ray propagation will also be discussed.

  12. Stern-Gerlach Experiments and Complex Numbers in Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    It is often stated that complex numbers are essential in quantum theory. In this article, the need for complex numbers in quantum theory is motivated using the results of tandem Stern-Gerlach experiments

  13. Analytical study of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The design specifications of the research laboratory as a Spacelab facility are discussed along with the types of planned experiments. These include cloud formation, freezing and scavenging, and electrical phenomena. A summary of the program conferences is included.

  14. Interpretation of laboratory experiments of interest to space physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The merits and limitations of experiments designed for studies of: 1) solar wind interaction with magnetospheres (terrella experiments) and non-magnetized bodies, 2) neutral lines and sheets, 3) wave-particle interactions, 4) anomalous resistivity, 5) double layers, 6) magnetically field-aligned electric fields in strong magnetic mirrors, and 7) the critical ionization velocity of a plasma moving through natural gas, are discussed. (Auth.)

  15. George Gamow and Albert Einstein: Did Einstein say the cosmological constant was the "biggest blunder" he ever made in his life?

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Galina

    2013-01-01

    In 1956/1970 Gamow wrote that much later, when he was discussing cosmological problems with Einstein, he remarked that the introduction of the cosmological term was the "biggest blunder" he ever made in his life. But the cosmological constant rears its ugly head again and again and again. Apparently, Einstein himself has never used the apercu "biggest blunder"; nevertheless a vast literature grew up around this notion and associated it with Einstein. The present work is prompted by questions put by Mario Livio in his latest book "Brilliant Blunders" as to the phrase "biggest blunder": Did Einstein actually say, "biggest blunder"? I show that in 1947 Einstein wrote Lemaitre that he found it "very ugly" that the field law of gravitation should be composed of two logically independent terms. Earlier, in 1922 Einstein wrote Max Born that he committed "a monumental blunder some time ago". In 1965 Born commented: "Here Einstein admits that the considerations which led him to the positive-ray experiments were wrong:...

  16. Physics Accomplishments and Future Prospects of the BES Experiments at the BEPC Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Briere, Roy A; Mitchell, Ryan E

    2016-01-01

    The cornerstone of the Chinese experimental particle physics program consists of a series of experiments performed in the tau-charm energy region. China began building e+e- colliders at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Beijing more than three decades ago. Beijing Electron Spectrometer, BES, is the common root name for the particle physics detectors operated at these machines. The development of the BES program is summarized and highlights of the physics results across several topical areas are presented.

  17. The PANDA Experiment at FAIR - Subatomic Physics with Antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Messchendorp, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The non-perturbative nature of the strong interaction leads to spectacular phenomena, such as the formation of hadronic matter, color confinement, and the generation of the mass of visible matter. To get deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms remains one of the most challenging tasks within the field of subatomic physics. The antiProton ANnihilations at DArmstadt (PANDA) collaboration has the ambition to address key questions in this field by exploiting a cooled beam of antiprotons at the High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) combined with a state-of-the-art and versatile detector. This contribution will address some of the unique features of PANDA that give rise to a promising physics program together with state-of-the-art technological developments.

  18. Applications of closed cycle refrigerator for some physical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is known that CCRs give a good possibility to conduct various experiments in a wide range of temperatures from 2.5 K up to 500 deg. C. These do not need nor liquid helium, nor liquid nitrogen and create a quick, precise and stable conditions for researchers. Some applications of such CCRs from Lake Shore corporation will be consider ed in this communication. The first one is a measurement of temperature dependence of the viscosity by drop-falling method of some special liquids which can be used in ultra cold neutron investigations. The second one is an experiment for receiving the perfect solid crystals of methane which are need in producing ultra cold neutrons in medium power reactors. For these experiments some special arrangements were installed on the cold head of refrigerator with long vertical or small round windows on the screens through which the processes studied were visually observed and measured. (authors)

  19. HIGH PT PHYSICS WITH THE STAR EXPERIMENT AT RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is a TPC-based, general purpose detector designed to obtain charged particle spectra, with an emphasis on hadrons over a large phase space. An electromagnetic calorimeter provides measurement of e's, γ's, π0's and jets. Data-taking with Au + Au collisions at √5 = 200 GeV/c2 begins in Fall 1999. The STAR experiment's investigation of techniques and signals using hard probes to study the high energy-density matter at RHIC and to search for quark-gluon plasma formation will be described

  20. Becoming physics people: Development of physics identity in self-concept and practice through the Learning Assistant experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Eleanor

    2016-03-01

    The physics department at Texas State University has implemented a Learning Assistant (LA) program with reform-based instructional changes in our introductory course sequences. We are interested in how participation in the LA program influences LAs' identity both as physics students and as physics teachers; in particular, how being part of the LA community changes participants' self-concepts and their day-to-day practice. We analyze video of weekly LA preparation sessions and interviews with LAs as well as written artifacts from program applications, pedagogy course reflections, and evaluations. Our analysis of self-concepts is informed by the identity framework developed by Hazari et al., and our analysis of practice is informed by Lave and Wenger's theory of Communities of Practice. Regression models from quantitative studies show that the physics identity construct strongly predicts intended choice of a career in physics; the goal of our current project is to understand the details of the impacts of participation in the LA experience on participants' practice and self-concept, in order to identify critical elements of LA program structure that positively influence physics identity and physics career intentions for students. Our analysis suggests that participation in the LA program impacts LAs in ways that support both stronger ``physics student'' identity and stronger ``physics instructor'' identity, and that these identities are reconciled into a coherent integrated physics identity. In addition to becoming more confident and competent in physics, LAs perceive themselves to have increased competence in communication and a stronger sense of belonging to a supportive and collaborative community; participation in the LA program also changes their ways of learning and of being students, both within and beyond physics. This research and the TXST LA program are supported by NSF DUE-1240036, NSF DUE-1431578, and the Halliburton Foundation.

  1. Cation Hydration Constants by Proton NMR: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Studies the polarization effect on water by cations and anions. Describes an experiment to illustrate the polarization effect of sodium, lithium, calcium, and strontium ions on the water molecule in the hydration spheres of the ions. Analysis is performed by proton NMR. (MVL)

  2. Experimenting with the virtual environment Moodle in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Ines; Dickman, Adriana

    2008-03-01

    The master's program in Physics Education of the Catholic University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, includes the discipline ``Digital technologies in Physics education.'' The main goal of this discipline is to discuss the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the process of learning-teaching science. We introduce our students to several virtual platforms, both free and commercial, discussing their functionality and features. We encourage our students to get in touch with computer tools and resources by planning their own computer based course using the Moodle platform. We discuss different patterns of virtual environment courses, whose proposals are centered mainly in the students, or teacher-centered or even system-centered. The student is free to choose between only one topic and a year course to work with, since their interests vary from learning something more about a specific subject to a complete e-learning course covering the entire school year. (The courses are available online in the address sitesinf01.pucmg.br/moodle. Participation only requires filling out an application form.) After three editions of this discipline, we have several courses available. We realize that students tend to focus on traditional methods, always preserving their role as knowledge-givers. In conclusion, we can say that, in spite of exhaustive discussion about autonomy involved with ICTs abilities, most of the students used the new virtual medium to organize traditional teacher-centered courses.

  3. Physics of the tumor vasculature: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Heiko; Fredrich, Thierry; Welter, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Growing solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth and gain of metastatic potential. Consequently the tumor vasculature has been a major target of anti cancer therapies since four decades. The main underlying strategic concepts range from "starving a tumor to death" over "blood vessel normalization" to "blood vessel growth promotion" for improved drug delivery and oxygenation for increased success rates of radiation therapy. A mechanistic understanding of the these strategies is often elusive and call for a quantitative analysis of the underlying physics. Oxygen supply as well as drug delivery is determined by blood and interstitial fluid flow, for which reason such an analysis must focus on the relation between the intra- and extra-vascular transport characteristics and the tumor vasculature morphology. Here we review the current status of theoretical concepts and computational analysis of physical determinants of the tumor vasculature and the emerging predictions for blood flow, oxygen distribution, interstitial fluid pressure and efficiency of drug delivery.

  4. Experimenting with Impacts in a Conceptual Physics or Descriptive Astronomy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    What follows is a description of the procedure for and results of a simple experiment on the formation of impact craters designed for the laboratory portions of lower mathematical-level general education science courses such as conceptual physics or descriptive astronomy. The experiment provides necessary experience with data collection and…

  5. Strange hadronic physics in electroproduction experiments at the Mainz Microtron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achenbach, P., E-mail: patrick@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Esser, A., E-mail: aesser@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ayerbe Gayoso, C.; Boehm, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Borodina, O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bosnar, D. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Bozkurt, V. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bydzovsky, P. [Nuclear Physics Institute, 25068 Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Debenjak, L. [University of Ljubljana and Institut ' Jozef Stefan' , 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Distler, M.O. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Friscic, I. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Fujii, Y.; Gogami, T. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8571 (Japan); Gomez Rodriguez, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Hashimoto, O.; Hirose, S. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8571 (Japan); Kim, E. [GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Present and future research into the electroproduction of strangeness plays an important role at Mainz Microtron MAMI. With the KAOS spectrometer for kaon detection operated in the multi-spectrometer facility first cross section measurements of the exclusive p(e,e{sup Prime}K{sup +}){Lambda},{Sigma}{sup 0} reactions at low-momentum transfers have been performed. These measurements have clearly discriminated between effective Lagrangian models for photo- and electroproduction of strangeness. Recently, the KAOS spectrometer was upgraded to a double-arm spectrometer for the measurement of elementary cross sections at very forward scattering angles and for the missing mass spectroscopy of hypernuclear states. In parallel, pioneering experiments on decay-pion spectroscopy of electroproduced hypernuclei were carried out at MAMI. Future experiments will on the one side address the cross section of the elementary process with polarized beam and on the other side continue the hypernuclear spectroscopy with different light nuclear targets.

  6. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Two classic experiments in superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meĭlikhov, E. Z.

    1988-05-01

    Two experiments of I. K. Kikoin—the correlation between superconductivity and the galvanomagnetic properties of metals (1933), and the gyromagnetic effect in superconductors (1938)—which were carried out long before the appearance of the microscopic theory of superconductivity, anticipated two of its principal conclusions. Established were: 1) the determining role of electron-phonon interaction; 2) the orbital nature of diamagnetism in superconductors.

  7. Developments in remote participation in plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent growth in the size of plasma experiments and developments in network based software have contributed to a high level of interest in remote participation. Highlights of the recent conferences on this subject, and the ensuing 'white paper' are presented, with demonstrations of various Data Server/Web/Java based remote access techniques. These not only allow AINSE/AFRG users convenient access to H-1NF data from their home laboratory, but are (or soon will be) available to and from many overseas laboratories with similar systems. Many large plasma laboratories predict a large increase in remote access in the next two years. Several demonstrations of remote experiment control have been performed over medium speed networks, and several new experiments are planning on remote access from the beginning. In this paper we consider data access rights and security, access to common documents, and access to processed and raw data. The full version of this document can be viewed on the ANU's H-1NF web page at: http://rsphysse.anu.edu.au/

  8. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig

  9. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  10. About spectrometer technical function for nuclear physical experiments on cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During energy spectra of second particles of nuclear reaction unfolding the problem of peak distinctive separation of nuclei energetically unsolved states and also separate impurity atom contribution in the target. Owing to this the research of experimental tabular technical function of spectrometer charged particle reverberation is actual. The use of approximation formulas existing in the literary source to the ETAFO spectrometer will help, under experiments specific conditions, to stabilize some parameters and get rid of cumbersome calculations under computer processing of large number of experimental spectra

  11. CNOOC in China's Biggest Overseas Acquisition to Tap North American Market%CNOOC in China's Biggest Overseas Acquisition to Tap North American Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Chi

    2012-01-01

    CNOOC Ltd. has recently agreed to pay USS15.1 billion in cash to acquire Nexen Inc, the Calgary-based oil and gas producer, in the biggest overseas acquisition by a Chinese company. Nexen's board has recommended the deal to its shareholders. Nexen, whose assets include conventional oil and gas, oil sands and shale gas, will give CNOOC assets in Canada, the United Kingdom, West Africa and the Gulf of Mexico that produced 207,000 barrels a day in the second quarter, boosting the Chinese buyer's output by about 20 percent.

  12. Neutrino physics with the SHiP experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)759942

    2015-01-01

    Despite the Standard Model (SM) has been strongly confirmed by the Higgs discovery, several experimental facts are still not explained. The SHiP experiment (Search for Hidden Particles), a beam dump experiment at CERN, aims at the observation of long lived particles very weakly coupled with ordinary matter. These particles of the GeV mass scale, foreseen in many extensions of the SM, might come from the decay of charmed hadrons produced in the collision of a 400 GeV proton beam on a target. High rates of all the three active neutrinos are also expected. For the first time the properties and the cross section of the ντ will be studied thanks to a detector based on nuclear emulsions, with the micrometric resolution needed to identify the tau lepton produced in neutrino interactions. Measuring the charge of the tau daughters, will enable the first observation of the ν ̄τ and the study of its cross section.

  13. Physics reach of the XENON1T dark matter experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, E; Agostini, F; Alfonsi, M; Amaro, F D; Anthony, M; Arazi, L; Arneodo, F; Balan, C; Barrow, P; Baudis, L; Bauermeister, B; Berger, T; Breur, P; Breskin, A; Brown, A; Brown, E; Bruenner, S; Bruno, G; Budnik, R; Bütikofer, L; Cardoso, J M R; Cervantes, M; Cichon, D; Coderre, D; Colijn, A P; Conrad, J; Contreras, H; Cussonneau, J P; Decowski, M P; de Perio, P; Di Gangi, P; Di Giovanni, A; Duchovni, E; Fattori, S; Ferella, A D; Fieguth, A; Franco, D; Fulgione, W; Galloway, M; Garbini, M; Geis, C; Goetzke, L W; Greene, Z; Grignon, C; Gross, E; Hampel, W; Hasterok, C; Itay, R; Kaether, F; Kaminsky, B; Kessler, G; Kish, A; Landsman, H; Lang, R F; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Calloch, M Le; Levy, C; Lindemann, S; Lindner, M; Lopes, J A M; Lyashenko, A; Macmullin, S; Manfredini, A; Undagoitia, T Marrodán; Masbou, J; Massoli, F V; Mayani, D; Fernandez, A J Melgarejo; Meng, Y; Messina, M; Micheneau, K; Miguez, B; Molinario, A; Murra, M; Naganoma, J; Oberlack, U; Orrigo, S E A; Pakarha, P; Pelssers, B; Persiani, R; Piastra, F; Pienaar, J; Plante, G; Priel, N; Rauch, L; Reichard, S; Reuter, C; Rizzo, A; Rosendahl, S; Rupp, N; Santos, J M F dos; Sartorelli, G; Scheibelhut, M; Schindler, S; Schreiner, J; Schumann, M; Lavina, L Scotto; Selvi, M; Shagin, P; Simgen, H; Stein, A; Thers, D; Tiseni, A; Trinchero, G; Tunnell, C; von Sivers, M; Wall, R; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wei, Y; Weinheimer, C; Wulf, J; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The XENON1T experiment is currently in the commissioning phase at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. In this article we study the experiment's expected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section, based on Monte Carlo predictions of the electronic and nuclear recoil backgrounds. The total electronic recoil background in $1$ tonne fiducial volume and ($1$, $12$) keV electronic recoil equivalent energy region, before applying any selection to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils, is $(1.80 \\pm 0.15) \\cdot 10^{-4}$ ($\\rm{kg} \\cdot day \\cdot keV)^{-1}$, mainly due to the decay of $^{222}\\rm{Rn}$ daughters inside the xenon target. The nuclear recoil background in the corresponding nuclear recoil equivalent energy region ($4$, $50$) keV, is composed of $(0.6 \\pm 0.1)$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from radiogenic neutrons, $(1.8 \\pm 0.3) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from coherent scattering of neutrinos, and less than $0.01$ ($\\rm{t} \\cdot y)^{-1}$ from...

  14. The effects of reality television on weight bias: an examination of The Biggest Loser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoff, Sarah E; Hinman, Nova G; Koball, Afton M; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Carhart, Victoria L; Baik, Kyoung D; Carels, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Weight-loss reality shows, a popular form of television programming, portray obese individuals and their struggles to lose weight. While the media is believed to reinforce obesity stereotypes and contribute to weight stigma, it is not yet known whether weight-loss reality shows have any effect on weight bias. The goal of this investigation was to examine how exposure to 40-min of The Biggest Loser impacted participants' levels of weight bias. Fifty-nine participants (majority of whom were white females) were randomly assigned to either an experimental (one episode of The Biggest Loser) or control (one episode of a nature reality show) condition. Levels of weight bias were measured by the Implicit Associations Test (IAT), the Obese Person Trait Survey (OPTS), and the Anti-fat Attitudes scale (AFA) at baseline and following the episode viewing (1 week later). Participants in The Biggest Loser condition had significantly higher levels of dislike of overweight individuals and more strongly believed that weight is controllable after the exposure. No significant condition effects were found for implicit bias or traits associated with obese persons. Exploratory analyses examining moderation of the condition effect by BMI and intention to lose weight indicated that participants who had lower BMIs and were not trying to lose weight had significantly higher levels of dislike of overweight individuals following exposure to The Biggest Loser compared to similar participants in the control condition. These results indicate that anti-fat attitudes increase after brief exposure to weight-loss reality television. PMID:22240725

  15. No clear winner: effects of The Biggest Loser on the stigmatization of obese persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jina H

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has largely ignored the question of whether watching reality weight-loss TV shows influences viewers to form a negative obesity stereotype. This study examines antecedents and outcomes of watching The Biggest Loser with the Orientation1-Stimulus-Orientation2-Response (O-S-O-R) model. The study found that individuals who are more concerned with their weight (O1) watch more episodes of The Biggest Loser (S). Meanwhile, consumption of The Biggest Loser leads to greater perceived locus of weight control (O2), indicating that body weight is under personal control. Perceived locus of weight control, in turn, significantly predicts the attribution of obesity to personal responsibility (R). Ultimately, attributing obesity to personal responsibility leads to the formation of anti-fat attitudes (R). This study offers an integrative theoretical framework to investigate media effects on the formation of an obesity stigma by using the O-S-O-R model. The results imply that certain lifestyle transformation media, such as The Biggest Loser, might reinforce the notion that individuals control their own weight and thus further amplify the obesity stigma. PMID:22742588

  16. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Williams, D; DiSantis, D; Hardy, P; Oates, M [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  17. SU-E-E-05: Initial Experience On Physics Rotation of Radiological Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The new ABR core exam integrates physics into clinical teaching, with an emphasis on understanding image quality, image artifacts, radiation dose and patient safety for each modality and/or sub-specialty. Accordingly, physics training of radiological residents faces a challenge. A traditional teaching of physics through didactic lectures may not fully fulfill this goal. It is also difficult to incorporate physics teaching in clinical practice due to time constraints. A dedicated physics rotation may be a solution. This study is to evaluate a full week physics workshop developed for the first year radiological residents. Methods: The physics rotation took a full week. It included three major parts, introduction lectures, hand-on experiences and observation of technologist operation. An introduction of basic concepts was given to each modality at the beginning. Hand-on experiments were emphasized and took most of time. During hand-on experiments, residents performed radiation measurements, studied the relationship between patient dose and practice (i.e., fluoroscopy), investigated influence of acquisition parameters (i.g., kV, mAs) on image quality, and evaluated image quality using phantoms A physics test before and after the workshop was also given but not for comparison purpose. Results: The evaluation shows that the physics rotation during the first week of residency in radiology is preferred by all residents. The length of a full week of physics workshop is appropriate. All residents think that the intensive workshop can significantly benefit their coming clinical rotations. Residents become more comfortable regarding the use of radiation and counseling relevant questions such as a pregnant patient risk from a CE PE examination. Conclusion: A dedicated physics rotation, assisting with didactic lectures, may fulfill the requirements of physics of the new ABR core exam. It helps radiologists deeply understand the physics concepts and more efficiently use

  18. $\\gamma\\gamma$ physics with the KLOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Archilli, F; Badoni, D; Balwierz, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bulychjev, S A; Campana, P; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Zorzi, G; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Hoistad, B; Iarocci, E; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kulikov, V; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Loddo, F; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Matsyuk, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2011-01-01

    The processes $e^+e^-\\to e^+e^-X$, with $X$ being either the $\\eta$ meson or $\\pi^0\\pi^0$, are studied at DA$\\Phi$NE, with $e^+e^-$ beams colliding at $\\sqrt{s}\\simeq1$ GeV, below the $\\phi$ resonance peak. The data sample is from an integrated luminosity of 240 pb$^{-1}$, collected by the KLOE experiment without tagging of the outgoing $e^+e^-$. Preliminary results are presented on the observation of the $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\eta$ process, with both $\\eta\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ and $\\eta\\to\\pi^0\\pi^0\\pi^0$ channels, and the evidence for $\\gamma\\gamma\\to\\pi^0\\pi^0$ production at low $\\pi^0\\pi^0$ invariant mass.

  19. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  20. IRPhEP-handbook, International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description: The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhEP is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments,' a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The IRPhE Handbook is available on DVD. You may request a DVD by completing the DVD Request Form available at: http://irphep.inl.gov/handbook/hbrequest.shtml The evaluation process entails the following steps: 1. Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, 2. Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, 3. Compile the data into a standardized format, 4. Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, 5. Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at various nuclear experimental facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor physics personal to validate calculational techniques. The 2008 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments contains data from 25 different

  1. Physics reach of the XENON1T dark matter experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, E.; Aalbers, J.; Agostini, F.; Alfonsi, M.; Amaro, F. D.; Anthony, M.; Arazi, L.; Arneodo, F.; Balan, C.; Barrow, P.; Baudis, L.; Bauermeister, B.; Berger, T.; Breur, P.; Breskin, A.; Brown, A.; Brown, E.; Bruenner, S.; Bruno, G.; Budnik, R.; Bütikofer, L.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Cervantes, M.; Cichon, D.; Coderre, D.; Colijn, A. P.; Conrad, J.; Contreras, H.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Decowski, M. P.; de Perio, P.; Di Gangi, P.; Di Giovanni, A.; Duchovni, E.; Fattori, S.; Ferella, A. D.; Fieguth, A.; Franco, D.; Fulgione, W.; Galloway, M.; Garbini, M.; Geis, C.; Goetzke, L. W.; Greene, Z.; Grignon, C.; Gross, E.; Hampel, W.; Hasterok, C.; Itay, R.; Kaether, F.; Kaminsky, B.; Kessler, G.; Kish, A.; Landsman, H.; Lang, R. F.; Lellouch, D.; Levinson, L.; Le Calloch, M.; Levy, C.; Lindemann, S.; Lindner, M.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Lyashenko, A.; Macmullin, S.; Manfredini, A.; Marrodán Undagoitia, T.; Masbou, J.; Massoli, F. V.; Mayani, D.; Melgarejo Fernandez, A. J.; Meng, Y.; Messina, M.; Micheneau, K.; Miguez, B.; Molinario, A.; Murra, M.; Naganoma, J.; Oberlack, U.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Pakarha, P.; Pelssers, B.; Persiani, R.; Piastra, F.; Pienaar, J.; Plante, G.; Priel, N.; Rauch, L.; Reichard, S.; Reuter, C.; Rizzo, A.; Rosendahl, S.; Rupp, N.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Sartorelli, G.; Scheibelhut, M.; Schindler, S.; Schreiner, J.; Schumann, M.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Shagin, P.; Simgen, H.; Stein, A.; Thers, D.; Tiseni, A.; Trinchero, G.; Tunnell, C.; von Sivers, M.; Wall, R.; Wang, H.; Weber, M.; Wei, Y.; Weinheimer, C.; Wulf, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The XENON1T experiment is currently in the commissioning phase at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Italy. In this article we study the experiment's expected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section, based on Monte Carlo predictions of the electronic and nuclear recoil backgrounds. The total electronic recoil background in 1 tonne fiducial volume and (1, 12) keV electronic recoil equivalent energy region, before applying any selection to discriminate between electronic and nuclear recoils, is (1.80 ± 0.15) · 10‑4 (kg·day·keV)‑1, mainly due to the decay of 222Rn daughters inside the xenon target. The nuclear recoil background in the corresponding nuclear recoil equivalent energy region (4, 50) keV, is composed of (0.6 ± 0.1) (t·y)‑1 from radiogenic neutrons, (1.8 ± 0.3) · 10‑2 (t·y)‑1 from coherent scattering of neutrinos, and less than 0.01 (t·y)‑1 from muon-induced neutrons. The sensitivity of XENON1T is calculated with the Profile Likelihood Ratio method, after converting the deposited energy of electronic and nuclear recoils into the scintillation and ionization signals seen in the detector. We take into account the systematic uncertainties on the photon and electron emission model, and on the estimation of the backgrounds, treated as nuisance parameters. The main contribution comes from the relative scintillation efficiency Script Leff, which affects both the signal from WIMPs and the nuclear recoil backgrounds. After a 2 y measurement in 1 t fiducial volume, the sensitivity reaches a minimum cross section of 1.6 · 10‑47 cm2 at mχ = 50 GeV/c2.

  2. An educational physics laboratory experiment for directly measuring the speed of light

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Lyutskanov; Peicho Popov; Krassimira Kardjilova; Vladimir Pulov; Mariela Mihova

    2010-01-01

    With the aid of modern electronics the speed of light was directly measured by timing the delay of a light pulse from a laser in reflecting from a mirror in experiment performed in educational Physics Laboratory.

  3. Gender Differences in the High School and Affective Experiences of Introductory College Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Sadler, Philip M.; Tai, Robert H.

    2008-10-01

    The disparity in persistence between males and females studying physics has been a topic of concern to physics educators for decades. Overall, while female students perform as well as or better than male students, they continue to lag considerably in terms of persistence. The most significant drop in females studying physics occurs between high school and college.2 Since most female physicists report that they became attracted to physics and decided to study it further while in high school, according to the International Study of Women in Physics,3 it is problematic that high school is also the stage at which females begin to opt out at much higher rates than males. Although half of the students taking one year of physics in high school are female, females are less likely than males to take a second or Advanced Placement (AP) physics course.4 In addition, the percentage of females taking the first physics course in college usually falls between 30% and 40%. In other words, although you may see gender parity in a first high school physics course, this parity does not usually persist to the next level of physics course. In addition, even if there is parity in a high school physics course, it does not mean that males and females experience the course in the same way. It is this difference in experience that may help to explain the drop in persistence of females.

  4. Advanced tokamak physics experiments on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.S. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy confinement time ({tau}{sub E}) and the plasma pressure (or beta {beta}{sub T} = 2 {mu}{sub 0} < p > /B{sub T}{sup 2}) can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self driven bootstrap current fraction. In addition, effective power exhaust and impurity and particle control is required. Significant progress has been made in experimentally achieving regimes having the required performance in all of these aspects as well as in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. The authors have extended the duration of high performance ELMing H-mode plasmas with {beta}{sub N} H{sub iop} {approximately} 10 for 5 {tau}{sub E} ({approximately}1 s) and have demonstrated that core transport barriers can be sustained for the entire 5-s neutral beam duration in L-mode plasmas. Recent DIII-D work has advanced the understanding of improved confinement and internal transport barriers in terms of E x B shear stabilization of micro turbulence. With the aim of current profile control in discharges with negative central magnetic shear, they have demonstrated off-axis electron cyclotron current drive for the first time in a tokamak, finding an efficiency above theoretical expectations. MHD stability has been improved through shape optimization, wall stabilization, and modification of the pressure and current density profiles. Heat flux reduction and improved impurity and particle control have been realized through edge/divertor radiation and understanding and utilization of forced scrape off layer flow and divertor baffling.

  5. Physical modeling of glacier contact with bedrock (experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Epifanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the adhesive strength of glacial ice connection with bedrock has been studied using the analysis of the amplitude-frequency characteristics of acoustic emission (AE in the frequency range from 15 Hz to 20,000 Hz. Identification of signal source on bed is based on physical modeling of adhesive ice fracture at the complex shear and patterns of elastic waves propagation in the ice using data on ice thickness of the ice and its acoustic properties. The experimental dependence of the ice and serpentinite substrate adhesive strength with temperature (from 0 °C to −30 °C has been obtained at constraint axial shear. It is shown that the destruction of adhesive ice contact with substrate begins long before the maximum shear stress achieved, and AE signals in the coordinates amplitude-frequency-time have been obtained for the for static friction and sliding parts of deformation curves. Influence of shear to normal stresses ratio on the adhesive ice/substrate strength has been shown. Influence of the ratio of longitudinal and transverse shear stresses on the adhesive bond strength of ice to the substrate has been shown. The natural glacier spectra revealed periodic reduction of AE signals frequency in the middle range of frequencies. The similar effect of AE signals shifting along the frequency axis to the low frequency domain was obtained by testing of freshwater ice samples and related with expansion of the destruction scale. Practical application of the strain AE results for remote determination of the local glacial stability and for studies of glacier ice mechanics is discussed.

  6. The experiences of physical violence in childhood of Nursing undergraduate students

    OpenAIRE

    Janice Machado da Cunha; Francisco Gleidson de Azevedo Gonçalves; Danielle Cristina de Castro Simões; Danielle Abraão do Carmo; Valleska Maturano de Souza

    2011-01-01

    This research had as its object of study: “The experiences of physical violence in childhood of nursing undergraduate students.” The objectives were: a) to review the occurrence of physical violence in childhood students of nursing; b) to characterize the factors surrounding the experience of violence; and c) to identify the effects in adulthood of the violence suffered in childhood. The quantitative descriptive methods were used. The study subjects were 190 students in an undergraduate cours...

  7. The Acculturation Experiences of Foreign-Born Students of Color in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries-Britt, Sharon; George Mwangi, Chrystal A.; Peralta, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on 15 foreign-born students majoring in physics who are also racial/ethnic minorities. We address the research question: What are the acculturation experiences of foreign-born Students of Color majoring in physics? Berry's (2003) theory of acculturation and Bandura's (1994) theory of self-efficacy were substantive…

  8. The Nature and Role of Thought Experiments in Solving Conceptual Physics Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösem, Sule Dönertas; Özdemir, Ömer Faruk

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the possible variations of thought experiments in terms of their nature, purpose, and reasoning resources adopted during the solution of conceptual physics problems. A phenomenographic research approach was adopted for this study. Three groups of participants with varying levels of physics knowledge--low, medium, and high…

  9. Experiences and Outcomes of Preschool Physical Education: An Analysis of Developmental Discourses in Scottish Curricular Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvilly, Nollaig

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an analysis of developmental discourses underpinning preschool physical education in Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence. Implementing a post-structural perspective, the article examines the preschool experiences and outcomes related to physical education as presented in the Curriculum for Excellence "health and…

  10. Using the mobile phone acceleration sensor in Physics experiments: free and damped harmonic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Palacio, Juan Carlos; Gimenez, Marcos H; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    The mobile acceleration sensor has been used to in Physics experiments on free and damped oscillations. Results for the period, frequency, spring constant and damping constant match very well to measurements obtained by other methods. The Accelerometer Monitor application for Android has been used to get the outputs of the sensor. Perspectives for the Physics laboratory have also been discussed.

  11. Review Committee report on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment: Role and mission of TPX; overview of design; physics design assessment; engineering design assessment; evaluation of cost, schedule, and management plans; and, environment safety and health.

  12. Review Committee report on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the conceptual design of the Tokamak Physics Experiment: Role and mission of TPX; overview of design; physics design assessment; engineering design assessment; evaluation of cost, schedule, and management plans; and, environment safety and health

  13. Physicists purchase materials testing machine in support of pioneering particle physics experiments

    CERN Multimedia

    Sharpe, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    "The particle physics group at Liverpool University has purchased an LRXPlus singlecolumn materials testing machine from Lloyd Instruments, which will be used to help characterise the carbon-fibre support frames for detectors used for state-of-the-art particle physics experiments." (1 page)

  14. Including Visually Impaired Students in Physical Education Lessons: A Case Study of Teacher and Pupil Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Frank; Dandolo, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Following recent education policy and curriculum changes in England, the notion of inclusion of children with special educational needs in physical education has increasingly become a topic of research interest and concern. It was the aim of this study to explore personal experiences and perspectives of inclusion in physical education. To this end…

  15. The burden of bacterial vaginosis: women's experience of the physical, emotional, sexual and social impact of living with recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade E Bilardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial vaginosis is a common vaginal infection, causing an abnormal vaginal discharge and/or odour in up to 50% of sufferers. Recurrence is common following recommended treatment. There are limited data on women's experience of bacterial vaginosis, and the impact on their self-esteem, sexual relationships and quality of life. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and impact of recurrent bacterial vaginosis on women. METHODS: A social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty five women with male and/or female partners participated in semi-structured interviews face-to-face or by telephone about their experience of recurrent bacterial vaginosis. RESULTS: Recurrent bacterial vaginosis impacted on women to varying degrees, with some women reporting it had little impact on their lives but most reporting it had a moderate to severe impact. The degree to which it impacted on women physically, emotionally, sexually and socially often depended on the frequency of episodes and severity of symptoms. Women commonly reported that symptoms of bacterial vaginosis made them feel embarrassed, ashamed, 'dirty' and very concerned others may detect their malodour and abnormal discharge. The biggest impact of recurrent bacterial vaginosis was on women's self-esteem and sex lives, with women regularly avoiding sexual activity, in particular oral sex, as they were too embarrassed and self-conscious of their symptoms to engage in these activities. Women often felt confused about why they were experiencing recurrent bacterial vaginosis and frustrated at their lack of control over recurrence. CONCLUSION: Women's experience of recurrent bacterial vaginosis varied broadly and significantly in this study. Some women reported little impact on their lives but most reported a moderate to severe impact, mainly on their self-esteem and sex life. Further support and acknowledgement of these impacts are required when

  16. Results on axion physics from the CAST Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Eleftheriadis, Christos A; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Beltran, B; Bräuninger, H; Carmona, J; Cebrián, S; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Di Lella, L; Englhauser, J; Fanourakis, G K; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Geralis, T; Giomataris, Ioanis; Gninenko, S; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, D H H; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakovcic, K; Kang, D; Königsmann, K C; Kotthaus, R; Krcmar, M; Kousouris, K; Kuster, M; Laki, B; Lasseur, C; Liolios, A; Ljubicic, cA; Lutz, G; Luzón, G; Miller, D; Morales, A; Morales, J; Nordt, A; Ortiz, A; Papaevangelou, T; Placci, A; Raffelt, G; Riege1, H; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Semertzidis, Y K; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Stewart, L; Villar, J; Vogel, J; Walckiers, L; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    Axions are expected to be produced in the sun via the Primakoff process. They may be detected through the inverse process in the laboratory, under the influence of a strong magnetic field, giving rise to X-rays of energies in the range of a few keV. Such an Axion detector is the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), collecting data since 2003. Results have been published, pushing the axion-photon coupling g$_{a\\gamma}$ below the 10$^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ limit at 95% CL, for axion masses less than 0.02 eV. This limit is nearly an order of magnitude lower than previous experimental limits and surpassed for the first time limits set from astrophysical arguments based on the energy-loss concept. The experiment is currently exploring axion masses in the range of 0.02 eV $< m_a <$ 1.1 eV. In the next run, currently under preparation, the axion mass explored will be extended up to the limit of 1.1 eV, testing for the first time the region of theoretical axion models with the axion helioscope method.

  17. New calorimeters for space experiments: physics requirements and technological challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct measurements of charged cosmic radiation with instruments in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), or flying on balloons above the atmosphere, require the identification of the incident particle, the measurement of its energy and possibly the determination of its sign-of-charge. The latter information can be provided by a magnetic spectrometer together with a measurement of momentum. However, magnetic deflection in space experiments is at present limited to values of the Maximum Detectable Rigidity (MDR) hardly exceeding a few TV. Advanced calorimetric techniques are, at present, the only way to measure charged and neutral radiation at higher energies in the multi-TeV range. Despite their mass limitation, calorimeters may achieve a large geometric factor and provide an adequate proton background rejection factor, taking advantage of a fine granularity and imaging capabilities. In this lecture, after a brief introduction on electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry, an innovative approach to the design of a space-borne, large acceptance, homogeneous calorimeter for the detection of high energy cosmic rays will be described

  18. Physically Abused Women's Experiences of Sexual Victimization and their Children's Disruptive Behavior Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Laura C; Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee; Skopp, Nancy A

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the substantial co-occurrence of women's experiences of physical and sexual violence, very little is known about their separate and combined effects on child functioning. The present study examines whether sexual victimization experienced by physically abused women is associated with their children's disruptive behavior problems, after controlling for mothers' physical victimization and parent to child aggression. It also tests the hypothesis that maternal distress mediates the association between women's sexual victimization and their children's disruptive behavior problems. METHOD: The sample includes 449 mothers and their children (4-8 years) who were recruited while residing in domestic violence shelters. Mothers reported on their experiences of physical and sexual victimization over the past year and their current symptoms of psychological distress. Trained diagnosticians interviewed mothers about their children's disruptive behavior problems. RESULTS: Approximately 75% of the women reported experiences of sexual victimization. Physically abused women's experiences of sexual victimization correlated positively with their children's disruptive behavior problems and their own psychological distress. The results of path analyses indicated that maternal psychological distress mediates the relation between women's experiences of sexual victimization and their children's disruptive behavior problems. CONCLUSIONS: This research suggests that physically abused women's experiences of sexual victimization are important for understanding their children's disruptive behavior problems. Additionally, this research provides further evidence that maternal psychological distress is important for understanding how intimate partner violence might influence children. PMID:23166861

  19. International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project. IRPhE Handbook - 2015 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation (IRPhE) Project is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. This work of the IRPhE Project is formally documented in the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments', a single source of verified and extensively peer-reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The evaluation process entails the following steps: Identify a comprehensive set of reactor physics experimental measurements data, Evaluate the data and quantify overall uncertainties through various types of sensitivity analysis to the extent possible, verify the data by reviewing original and subsequently revised documentation, and by talking with the experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimental facility, Compile the data into a standardized format, Perform calculations of each experiment with standard reactor physics codes where it would add information, Formally document the work into a single source of verified and peer reviewed reactor physics benchmark measurements data. The International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains reactor physics benchmark specifications that have been derived from experiments that were performed at nuclear facilities around the world. The benchmark specifications are intended for use by reactor designers, safety analysts and nuclear data evaluators to validate calculation techniques and data. Example calculations are presented; these do not constitute a validation or endorsement of the codes or cross-section data. The 2015 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments contains data from 143 experimental series that were

  20. The Early Years of Indirect Drive Development for High Energy Density Physics Experiments at AWE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian

    2016-10-01

    The importance of laser driven indirect drive for high energy density physics experiments was recognised at A WE in 1971. The two beam 1TW HELEN laser was procured to work in this area and experiments with this system began in 1980. Early experiments in hohlraum coupling and performance scaling with both l.06μm and 0.53μm will be described together with experiments specifically designed to confirm the understanding of radiation wave propagation, hohlraum heating and hohlraum plasma filling. The use of indirect drive for early experiments to study spherical and cylindrical implosions, opacity, EOS, mix and planar radiation hydrodynamics experiments will also be described.

  1. Feasibility study of a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiments laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinden, A. B.; Eaton, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility and concepts study for a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiment laboratory is discussed. The primary objective was to define a set of cloud physics experiments which will benefit from the near zero-gravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft, identify merits of this environment relative to those of groundbased laboratory facilities, and identify conceptual approaches for the accomplishment of the experiments in an orbiting spacecraft. Solicitation, classification and review of cloud physics experiments for which the advantages of a near zero-gravity environment are evident are described. Identification of experiments for potential early flight opportunities is provided. Several significant accomplishments achieved during the course of this study are presented.

  2. CALET on the ISS: a high energy astroparticle physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchesi, Pier Simone; CALET Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    CALET is a space mission of the Japanese Aerospace Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI) and NASA. The CALET instrument (CALorimetric Electron Telescope) is planned for a long exposure on the JEM-EF, an external platform of the Japanese Experiment Module KIBO, aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The main science objectives include high precision measurements of the inclusive electron (+positron) spectrum below 1 TeV and the exploration of the energy region above 1 TeV, where the shape of the high end of the spectrum might reveal the presence of nearby sources of acceleration. With an excellent energy resolution and low background contamination CALET will search for possible spectral signatures of dark matter with both electrons and gamma rays. It will also measure the high energy spectra and relative abundance of cosmic nuclei from proton to iron and detect trans-iron elements up to Z ~ 40. With a large exposure and high energy resolution, CALET will be able to verify and complement the observations of CREAM, PAMELA and AMS-02 on a possible deviation from a pure power-law of proton and He spectra in the region of a few hundred GeV and to extend the study to the multi-TeV region. CALET will also contribute to clarify the present experimental picture on the energy dependence of the boron/carbon ratio, below and above 1 TeV/n, thereby providing valuable information on cosmic-ray propagation in the galaxy. Gamma-ray transients will be studied with a dedicated Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM).

  3. Experiment on Physical Desalinisation of Uranium-contaminated Gravel Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jai-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    As a result, the method to wash uranium-contaminated gravels could not get satisfactory desalinization rate. During the long oxidization process it was judged that uranium penetrated inside the gravels, so we tried to increase the desalinization rate by fragmentizing them into pieces and then washing them. The desalinization rate after fragmentizing the gravels into pieces and washing them brought a satisfactory result.. However, we could obtain desired concentration for gravels with high uranium concentration by fragmentizing them and breaking them further into even smaller pieces. Likewise, desalinization using soil washing process is complicated and has to go through multiple washing steps, resulting in too much of waste fluid generated accordingly. The increase of waste fluid generated leads to the increase in by-products of the final disposal process later on, bringing a not good economic result. Furthermore, taking into account that the desalinization rate is 65% during soil washing process, it is expected that gravel washing will show a similar desalinization result; it is considered uneasy to have a perfect desalinization only by soil washing. The grinding method is actually used in the primary desalinization process in order to desalinize radioactivity-contaminated concrete. This method does desalinization by grinding the radioactivity-contaminated area of the concrete surface with desalinization equipment, which enables a near-to-perfect desalinization for relatively thinly contaminated surface. Likewise, this research verified the degree of desalinization by applying the grinding method and comparing it to the fragmentizing-washing method, and attempted to find a method to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively. In order to desalinize uranium-contaminated gravels more effectively and compare to the existing washing-desalinization method, we conducted a desalinization experiment with grinding method that grinds gravel surface. As a

  4. New Physics search in mono-jet final states with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavino, Giuliano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The search for new physics in final states with an energetic jet and large missing transverse momentum plays a major role in the physics program of the LHC experiments. This experimental signature is sensitive to different new physics models including the production of weakly interacting Dark Matter candidates, different scenarios of supersymmetry, models that predict the existence of extra dimensions and also to invisible decays of the Higgs boson. Preliminary results from the analysis performed with data collected at the center of mass energy of 13 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are presented.

  5. New Physics search in mono-jet final states with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavino, Giuliano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The search for New Physics in final states with an energetic jet and large missing transverse momentum plays a major role in the physics program of the LHC experiments. This experimental signature is sensitive to different New Physics models including different scenarios of supersymmetry, models that predict the existence of extra dimensions and the production of Weakly Interacting Dark Matter candidates. Results based on the LHC Run-1 dataset corrisponding to 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ and firsts performance plots based on the data collected at the center of mass energy of 13 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are presented.

  6. Practical Applications for Using Peer Assessment in Physical Education Teacher Education Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Beth J.; Marty-Snyder, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment (PA) occurs in many higher education programs. However, there is limited research examining PA in physical education teacher education (PETE) in regards to student teaching experiences. PA may be a method to better prepare PETE students to assess their future students. The field experience students assessed their fellow peers on…

  7. Lived Employment Experiences of College Students and Graduates with Physical Disabilities in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mikyong Minsun; Williams, Brenda C.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study aims at understanding lived experiences of college seniors and recent college graduates with physical disabilities seeking employment opportunities after graduation in the USA The extensive interviews revealed that participants' attitudes about and experiences with disability are diverse (pain to pride, denied…

  8. Muslim Girls' Experiences in Physical Education in Norway: What Role Does Religiosity Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walseth, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in scholarly attention to minority pupils and their experience of physical education (PE). UK research identifies specific challenges related to Muslim pupils' participation in PE. In Norway, little research has been undertaken on Muslim pupils' experiences in PE, something this paper hopes to redress…

  9. Terascale Physics Opportunities at a High Statistics, High Energy Neutrino Scattering Experiment: NuSOnG

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, T; Bugel, L; Camilleri, L; Conrad, J M; De Gouvêa, A; Fisher, P H; Formaggio, J A; Jenkins, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kobilarcik, T R; Kopp, S; Kyle, G; Loinaz, W A; Mason, D A; Milner, R; Moore, R; Morfín, J G; Nakamura, M; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Olness, F I; Owens, J F; Pate, S F; Pronin, A; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Schellman, H; Schienbein, I; Syphers, M J; Tait, T M P; Takeuchi, T; Tan, C Y; Van de Water, R G; Yamamoto, R K; Yu, J Y

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the physics case for a new high-energy, ultra-high statistics neutrino scattering experiment, NuSOnG (Neutrino Scattering on Glass). This experiment uses a Tevatron-based neutrino beam to obtain over an order of magnitude higher statistics than presently available for the purely weak processes $\

  10. Grounded Learning Experience: Helping Students Learn Physics through Visuo-Haptic Priming and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Chieh Douglas

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the effects of a grounded learning experience on college students' mental models of physics systems. The grounded learning experience consisted of a priming stage and an instruction stage, and within each stage, one of two different types of visuo-haptic representation was applied: visuo-gestural simulation…

  11. Energetic particle physics in fusion research in preparation for burning plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics in fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by Heidbrink and Sadler (1994 Nucl. Fusion 34 535). That review coincided with the start of deuterium–tritium (DT) experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the ‘sea’ of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs), in particular by the toroidicity-induced AE (TAE) modes and reversed shear AEs (RSAEs). In the present paper we attempt a broad review of the progress that has been made in EP physics in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus), including stellarator/helical devices. Introductory discussions on the basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e., particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others, are given to help understanding of the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues related to the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). (review)

  12. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  13. Laser-based acceleration for nuclear physics experiments at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesileanu, O.; Asavei, Th.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Negoita, F.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the Extreme Light pan-European research infrastructure, Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) in Romania will focus on topics in Nuclear Physics, fundamental Physics and applications, based on very intense photon beams. Laser-based acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy ions is a prerequisite for a multitude of laser-driven nuclear physics experiments already proposed by the international research community. A total of six outputs of the dual-amplification chain laser system, two of 100TW, two of 1PW and two of 10PW will be employed in 5 experimental areas, with the possibility to use long and short focal lengths, gas and solid targets, reaching the whole range of laser acceleration processes. We describe the main techniques and expectations regarding the acceleration of electrons, protons and heavy nuclei at ELI-NP, and some physics cases for which these techniques play an important role in the experiments.

  14. Experiment and theory in particle physics: Reflections on the discovery of the tau lepton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is thoughts from the author on particle physics work from his perspective. It is not a summary of his work on the tau lepton, but rather a look at what makes good science, experimental and theoretical, from his experiences in the field. The section titles give a good summary on the topics the author chooses to touch upon. They are: the state of elementary particle physics; getting good ideas in experimental science; a difficult field; experiments and experimenting; 10% of the money and 30% of the time; the dictatorship of theory; technological dreams; last words

  15. Physical pendulum—a simple experiment can give comprehensive information about a rigid body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladivová, Mária; Mucha, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    A simple experiment with a physical pendulum examining some aspects of rigid body motion is presented in this paper. The experiment consists of measuring the period of oscillation of a rod with non-homogeneous mass distribution used as a physical pendulum, dependent upon the position of the pivot axis. The obtained dependence provides sufficient information to calculate the position of the centre of mass, moment of inertia of the rigid body and local gravitational acceleration. This experiment is intended for secondary school and undergraduate students.

  16. Visual complexity, player experience, performance and physical exertion in motion-based games for older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Smeddinck, Jan D.; Gerling, Kathrin M.; Tiemkeo, Saranat

    2013-01-01

    Motion-based video games can have a variety of benefits for the players and are increasingly applied in physical therapy, rehabilitation and prevention for older adults. However, little is known about how this audience experiences playing such games, how the player experience affects the way older adults interact with motion-based games, and how this can relate to therapy goals. In our work, we decompose the player experience of older adults engaging with motion-based games, focusing on the e...

  17. Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project : - An Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Katarina; Loelv, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Experiences of Barriers and Facilitators for Physical Activity from People with Mental Disorders who Participated in a Physical Activity Project - An Interview Study   Purpose: To explore the experiences regarding perceived barriers and facilitators for physical activity of three participants with mental disorders who took part in the Norwegian Physical Activity Mentor project. Design and methods: Descriptive qualitative design. Individual semi-structured interviews were used for data collec...

  18. Weighing in on NBC's The Biggest Loser: governmentality and self-concept on the scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readdy, Tucker; Ebbeck, Vicki

    2012-12-01

    Previous analyses (i.e., Bernstein & St. John, 2006; Sender & Sullivan, 2008) of the television show The Biggest Loser have detailed its negative presentation of the obese body, potential consequences for viewers, and its role as a technology of governmentality. However there has been little exploration of how audience members conceptualize and enact the messages communicated in the show within these intricate frameworks. The current research used information from semistructured interviews with 40 dedicated viewers to capture the salient meanings they ascribed to The Biggest Loser within the themes of governmentality and self-concept. Overall, the group experienced the program as a transformative, entertaining, and inspirational event that produced little change in their exercise behavior. Thus, the role of reality television in creating healthy behavior change is potentially limited. PMID:23367821

  19. Shijiazhuang will Build the World’s Biggest Replacingcopper-with-aluminum Cable Production Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>Shijiazhuang City will build the world’s biggest replacing-copper-with-aluminum cable production base,the annual output value can reach 100 billion yuan,in the future it will develop replacing-copper-with-aluminum highend industry cluster.This piece of news was learned by the reporter at the Rare Earth highiron Aluminum Alloy[Nonferrous Business Opportunity:Aluminum alloy door]Cable Conductor New Technology Application Seminar held at the provincial capital.

  20. BiGGEsTS: integrated environment for biclustering analysis of time series gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeira Sara C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to monitor changes in expression patterns over time, and to observe the emergence of coherent temporal responses using expression time series, is critical to advance our understanding of complex biological processes. Biclustering has been recognized as an effective method for discovering local temporal expression patterns and unraveling potential regulatory mechanisms. The general biclustering problem is NP-hard. In the case of time series this problem is tractable, and efficient algorithms can be used. However, there is still a need for specialized applications able to take advantage of the temporal properties inherent to expression time series, both from a computational and a biological perspective. Findings BiGGEsTS makes available state-of-the-art biclustering algorithms for analyzing expression time series. Gene Ontology (GO annotations are used to assess the biological relevance of the biclusters. Methods for preprocessing expression time series and post-processing results are also included. The analysis is additionally supported by a visualization module capable of displaying informative representations of the data, including heatmaps, dendrograms, expression charts and graphs of enriched GO terms. Conclusion BiGGEsTS is a free open source graphical software tool for revealing local coexpression of genes in specific intervals of time, while integrating meaningful information on gene annotations. It is freely available at: http://kdbio.inesc-id.pt/software/biggests. We present a case study on the discovery of transcriptional regulatory modules in the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat stress.

  1. Benchmark physics experiment of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA. 2; Experiments of FCA assembly XVI-1 and their analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Susumu; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Akio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Nemoto, Tatsuo; Osugi, Toshitaka; Satoh, Kunio; Hayasaka, Katsuhisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Bando, Masaru

    1993-10-01

    An availability of data and method for a design of metallic-fueled LMFBR is examined by using the experiment results of FCA assembly XVI-1. Experiment included criticality and reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, sodium void, fuel shifting and fuel expansion. Reaction rate ratios, sample worth and control rod worth were also measured. Analysis was made by using three-dimensional diffusion calculations and JENDL-2 cross sections. Predictions of assembly XVI-1 reactor physics parameters agree reasonably well with the measured values, but for some reactivity coefficients such as Doppler, large zone sodium void and fuel shifting further improvement of calculation method was need. (author).

  2. The Impact of Space Experiments on our Knowledge of the Physics of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Franco; Sabau-Graziati, Lola

    2004-05-01

    With the advent of space experiments it was demonstrated that cosmic sources emit energy practically across all the electromagnetic spectrum via different physical processes. Several physical quantities give witness to these processes which usually are not stationary; those physical observable quantities are then generally variable. Therefore simultaneous multifrequency observations are strictly necessary in order to understand the actual behaviour of cosmic sources. Space experiments have opened practically all the electromagnetic windows on the Universe. A discussion of the most important results coming from multifrequency photonic astrophysics experiments will provide new inputs for the advance of the knowledge of the physics, very often in its more extreme conditions. A multitude of high quality data across practically the whole electromagnetic spectrum came at the scientific community's disposal a few years after the beginning of the Space Era. With these data we are attempting to explain the physics governing the Universe and, moreover, its origin, which has been and still is a matter of the greatest curiosity for humanity. In this paper we will try to describe the last steps of the investigation born with the advent of space experiments, to note upon the most important results and open problems still existing, and to comment upon the perspectives we can reasonably expect. Once the idea of this paper was well accepted by ourselves, we had the problem of how to plan the exposition. Indeed, the exposition of the results can be made in different ways, following several points of view, according to: - a division in diffuse and discrete sources; - different classes of cosmic sources; - different spectral ranges, which implies in turn a sub-classification in accordance with different techniques of observations; - different physical emission mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation; - different vehicles used for launching the experiments (aircraft, balloons, rockets

  3. Bayesian inference of inaccuracies in radiation transport physics from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffney, Jim A; Sonnad, Vijay; Libby, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    First principles microphysics models are essential to the design and analysis of high energy density physics experiments. Using experimental data to investigate the underlying physics is also essential, particularly when simulations and experiments are not consistent with each other. This is a difficult task, due to the large number of physical models that play a role, and due to the complex (and as a result, noisy) nature of the experiments. This results in a large number of parameters that make any inference a daunting task; it is also very important to consistently treat both experimental and prior understanding of the problem. In this paper we present a Bayesian method that includes both these effects, and allows the inference of a set of modifiers which have been constructed to give information about microphysics models from experimental data. We pay particular attention to radiation transport models. The inference takes into account a large set of experimental parameters and an estimate of the prior kno...

  4. Revealing Fundamental Physics from the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment using Deep Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Racah, Evan; Sadowski, Peter; Bhimji, Wahid; Tull, Craig; Oh, Sang-Yun; Baldi, Pierre; Prabhat,

    2016-01-01

    Experiments in particle physics produce enormous quantities of data that must be analyzed and interpreted by teams of physicists. This analysis is often exploratory, where scientists are unable to enumerate the possible types of signal prior to performing the experiment. Thus, tools for summarizing, clustering, visualizing and classifying high-dimensional data are essential. In this work, we show that meaningful physical content can be revealed by transforming the raw data into a learned high-level representation using deep neural networks, with measurements taken at the Daya Bay Neutrino Experiment as a case study. We further show how convolutional deep neural networks can provide an effective classification filter with greater than 97% accuracy across different classes of physics events, significantly better than other machine learning approaches.

  5. SNiPER: an offline software framework for non-collider physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, J. H.; Huang, X. T.; Li, W. D.; Lin, T.; Li, T.; Zhang, K.; Deng, Z. Y.; Cao, G. F.

    2015-12-01

    SNiPER (Software for Non-collider Physics ExpeRiments) has been developed based on common requirements from both nuclear reactor neutrino and cosmic ray experiments. The design and implementation of SNiPER is described in this proceeding. Compared to the existing offline software frameworks in the high energy physics domain, the design of SNiPER is more focused on execution efficiency and flexibility. SNiPER has an open structure. User applications are executed as plug-ins based on it. The framework contains a compact kernel for software components management, event execution control, job configuration, common services, etc. Some specific features are attractive to non-collider physics experiments.

  6. Medical students’ experiences learning intimate physical examination skills: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Dabson, Andra M; Magin, Parker J.; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate physical examination skills are essential skills for any medical graduate to have mastered to an appropriate level for the safety of his or her future patients. Medical schools are entrusted with the complex task of teaching and assessing these skills for their students. The objectives of this study were to explore a range of medical students’ experiences of learning intimate physical examination skills and to explore their perceptions of factors which impede or promote th...

  7. An Eoetvoes versus a Galileo experiment: A study in two versus three-dimensional physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show how the net effect of two new approximately cancelling (vector and scalar) gravitational forces could produce a measureable effect from a horizontal thin slab in an Eoetvoes experiment, yet yield a null result at the same level for a Galileo experiment. The resolution is an example of two-versus three-dimensional physics and the cancelling nature of the two forces. Using two different earth models, we apply this result to the Australian mine gravity data of Stacey et al., the Brookhaven Eoetvoes experiment of Thieberger, and the Colorado Galileo experiment of Niebauer et al. (orig.)

  8. Experiences of physical activity: A phenomenological study of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Rachael; Mercer, Jenny; Mills-Bennett, Rebekah; O'Leary, Catherine; Thirlaway, Kathryn

    2016-02-01

    Although extensive research has investigated the benefits of physical activity in cystic fibrosis, minimal exploration of the experiences for individuals from a qualitative, phenomenological perspective has been carried out. The aim of this study was to explore the subjective experiences of physical activity for individuals with cystic fibrosis. The health-care team, at an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit in the United Kingdom, recruited 12 participants to take part. Interview data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. A central theme of 'self-monitoring' emerged from the accounts and was embedded in the three super-ordinate themes.

  9. NPTool: a simulation and analysis framework for low-energy nuclear physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, A.; Morfouace, P.; de Séréville, N.; Flavigny, F.; Labiche, M.; Shearman, R.

    2016-08-01

    The Nuclear Physics Tool (NPTool) is an open source data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation framework that has been developed for low-energy nuclear physics experiments with an emphasis on radioactive beam experiments. The NPTool offers a unified framework for designing, preparing and analyzing complex experiments employing multiple detectors, each of which may comprise some hundreds of channels. The framework has been successfully used for the analysis and simulation of experiments at facilities including GANIL, RIKEN, ALTO and TRIUMF, using both stable and radioactive beams. This paper details the NPTool philosophy together with an overview of the workflow. The framework has been benchmarked through the comparison of simulated and experimental data for a variety of detectors used in charged particle and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  10. Multichannel readout ASIC design flow for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A.; Malankin, E.

    2016-02-01

    In the large-scale high energy physics and astrophysics experiments multi-channel readout application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are widely used. The ASICs for such experiments are complicated systems, which usually include both analog and digital building blocks. The complexity and large number of channels in such ASICs require the proper methodological approach to their design. The paper represents the mixed-signal design flow of the ASICs for high energy physics and cosmic rays experiments. This flow was successfully embedded to the development of the read-out ASIC prototype for the muon chambers of the CBM experiment. The approach was approved in UMC CMOS MMRF 180 nm process. The design flow enable to analyse the mixed-signal system operation on the different levels: functional, behavioural, schematic and post layout including parasitic elements. The proposed design flow allows reducing the simulation period and eliminating the functionality mismatches on the very early stage of the design.

  11. Realizing a Framework for Enhancing the Laboratory Experiences of Non-Physics Majors: From Pilot to Large-Scale Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Les; Pizzica, Jenny; Waite, Katrina; Srinivasan, Lakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Physics experiments for students not majoring in physics may have little meaning for those students and appear to them unconnected in any way to their majors. This affects student engagement and influences the extent to which they regard their experiences in the physics laboratory as positive. We apply a framework for the development and…

  12. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physic Experiments, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different tech...

  13. Problem learning and intersubject connections at physics learning with use of computer experiment in technical college

    OpenAIRE

    Yevstigneyev, V. V.; Kotyrlo, T. V.; Belitsyn, I. V.; Makarov, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The technique of inclusion of computer demonstrations and computer experiment for problem learning, stimulating solution of problem situation has been given. The way of student motivation to mastering new knowledge on intersubject connection between subject studied here and now with disciplines which will be studied later is shown. The fragment of lecture on physics with use of computer experiment and intersubject connection with TOE course with development of problem situations is given

  14. Physical health and well-being: Experiences and perspectives of young adult mental health consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; Foster, Kim; Kerley, David; Delgado, Cynthia; Turnell, Adrienne

    2016-08-01

    Compromised physical health and raised levels of morbidity and mortality are experienced by young people (16-24 years) with mental illness, and are compounded by psychotropic medication. How this group conceives and experiences physical health is not well understood. We investigated the meanings, beliefs, and endeavours of young people that impact their physical health understandings and behaviours. The present study formed the qualitative phase of a sequential mixed-methods study, and incorporated semistructured interviews with 12 hospitalized young people. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse data. Participants held a holistic ideal of physical health that they did not meet. Weight change, poor sleep, and limited exercise adversely impacted their lives and self-image. Sedentary behaviour, reduced energy, and limited health literacy compromised effective management of physical health. Young people needed structure and support to assist them in addressing their physical health needs when amotivation overwhelmed their internal resources. Nurses are well placed to help young people increase their competency for health management. Individualized information and methods to promote good physical health are required for this group in jeopardy from physical morbidity and mortality. PMID:26856981

  15. X-Ray Diffraction of Intermetallic Compounds: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Skakuj, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students synthesize the intermetallic compounds AlNi and AlNi3 and study them by X-ray diffractometry. The compounds are synthesized in a simple one-step reaction occurring in the solid state. Powder X-ray diffractograms are recorded for the two compounds…

  16. The Oil Drop Experiment: An Illustration of Scientific Research Methodology and its Implications for Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria A.; Niaz, Mansoor

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of this study are: (1) evaluation of the methodology used in recent search for particles with fractional electrical charge (quarks) and its implications for understanding the scientific research methodology of Millikan; (2) evaluation of 43 general physics textbooks and 11 laboratory manuals, with respect to the oil drop experiment,…

  17. The Systems of the Proportional Chambers Registration Electronics for Present Experiments in Nuclear Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main direction of the development of present systems of the proportional chambers registration electronics for experiments in nuclear physics is described. The following features of each type of systems and their future are considered in the review. (author). 23 refs., 11 figs

  18. Computational Modeling of the Optical Rotation of Amino Acids: An "in Silico" Experiment for Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Autschbach, Jochen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates the optical activity of the amino acid valine has been developed for an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Hybrid density functional theory calculations were carried out for valine to confirm the rule that adding a strong acid to a solution of an amino acid in the l…

  19. Theoretical Frames and Teaching Styles of Physical Therapy Faculty Who Lead International Service-Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audette, Jennifer Gail

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: International service-learning (ISL) is popular in higher education, and many physical therapy educational programs are adding ISL opportunities to their curricula because doing so aligns with student interest and the increasingly global nature of the profession. The faculty leading these experiences have not been studied. Nearly all…

  20. An Attenuated Total Reflectance Sensor for Copper: An Experiment for Analytical or Physical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Zudans, Imants; Seliskar, Carl J.; Heineman, William R.; Richardson, John N.

    2004-01-01

    A sensor experiment which can be applied to advanced undergraduate laboratory course in physical or analytical chemistry is described along with certain concepts like the demonstration of chemical sensing, preparation of thin films on a substrate, microtitration, optical determination of complex ion stoichiometry and isosbestic point. It is seen…

  1. Parents’ experiences and needs regarding physical and occupational therapy for their young children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijsen-Terpstra, A.J.A.; Verschuren, O.; Ketelaar, M.; Riedijk, L.; Gorter, J.W.; Jongmans, M.J.; Boeije, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the experiences and needs of parents of young children (aged 2–4 years) with cerebral palsy (CP) regarding their child's physical and occupational therapy process in a rehabilitation setting. Methods A qualitative design was used involving semi-

  2. Parents' Perceptions of Their Children's Experiences in Physical Education and Youth Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jaekwon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine parents' perceptions of their children's experiences in physical education and youth sport. Qualitative research design was employed in this study. Data collection methods included phenomenological interviews and qualitative questionnaires. Forty-one questionnaires were collected and analyzed through…

  3. Measurement of the Compressibility Factor of Gases: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Bendelsmith, Andrew J.; Kuwata, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students measure the compressibility factor of two gases, helium and carbon dioxide, as a function of pressure at constant temperature. The experimental apparatus is relatively inexpensive to construct and is described and diagrammed in detail.…

  4. The Learners' Experience of Variation: Following Students' Threads of Learning Physics in Computer Simulation Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerman, Ake; Linder, Cedric; Marshall, Delia

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to describe students' process of learning physics using the notion of experiencing variation as the basic mechanism for learning, and thus explores what variation, with respect to a particular object of learning, that students experience in their process of constituting understanding. Theoretically, the analysis relies on…

  5. High School Physical Education: What Contributes to the Experience of Flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormoen, Sidsel; Urke, Helga Bjørnøy; Tjomsland, Hege Eikeland; Wold, Bente; Diseth, Åge

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to identify factors that promote positive experiences in high school physical education (PE). The study combines elements of Self-determination Theory (SDT) with the theory of "flow". Special attention is given to gender differences. The study sample consisted of 167 Norwegian senior high school students (78 females and…

  6. "In Situ" Observation of a Soap-Film Catenoid--A Simple Educational Physics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masato; Sato, Taku

    2010-01-01

    The solution to the Euler-Lagrange equation is an extremal functional. To understand that the functional is stationary at local extrema (maxima or minima), we propose a physics experiment that involves using a soap film to form a catenoid. A catenoid is a surface that is formed between two coaxial circular rings and is classified mathematically as…

  7. Spin physics at A Fixed-Target ExpeRiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Rakotozafindrabe, A; Arnaldi, R; Brodsky, S J; Chambert, V; Didelez, J P; Ferreiro, E G; Fleuret, F; Genolini, B; Hadjidakis, C; Lansberg, J P; Lorce, C; Rosier, P; Schienbein, I; Scomparin, E; Uggerhoj, U I

    2013-01-01

    We outline the opportunities for spin physics which are offered by a next generation and multi-purpose fixed-target experiment exploiting the proton LHC beam extracted by a bent crystal. In particular, we focus on the study of single transverse spin asymetries with the polarisation of the target.

  8. Experiments Using Cell Phones in Physics Classroom Education: The Computer-Aided "g" Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen; Muller, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This paper continues the collection of experiments that describe the use of cell phones as experimental tools in physics classroom education. We describe a computer-aided determination of the free-fall acceleration "g" using the acoustical Doppler effect. The Doppler shift is a function of the speed of the source. Since a free-falling objects…

  9. On-line computer system for use with low- energy nuclear physics experiments is reported

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, D. S.

    1969-01-01

    Computer program handles data from low-energy nuclear physics experiments which utilize the ND-160 pulse-height analyzer and the PHYLIS computing system. The program allows experimenters to choose from about 50 different basic data-handling functions and to prescribe the order in which these functions will be performed.

  10. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory Using Noncorrosive Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigodich, Richard V.

    2014-01-01

    Stopped-flow kinetics techniques are important to the study of rapid chemical and biochemical reactions. Incorporation of a stopped-flow kinetics experiment into the physical chemistry laboratory curriculum would therefore be an instructive addition. However, the usual reactions studied in such exercises employ a corrosive reagent that can over…

  11. Physical Science Informatics: Providing Open Science Access to Microheater Array Boiling Experiment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Green, Robert D.; Henrie, Ben; Miller, Teresa; Chiaramonte, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The Physical Science Informatics (PSI) system is the next step in this an effort to make NASA sponsored flight data available to the scientific and engineering community, along with the general public. The experimental data, from six overall disciplines, Combustion Science, Fluid Physics, Complex Fluids, Fundamental Physics, and Materials Science, will present some unique challenges. Besides data in textual or numerical format, large portions of both the raw and analyzed data for many of these experiments are digital images and video, requiring large data storage requirements. In addition, the accessible data will include experiment design and engineering data (including applicable drawings), any analytical or numerical models, publications, reports, and patents, and any commercial products developed as a result of the research. This objective of paper includes the following: Present the preliminary layout (Figure 2) of MABE data within the PSI database. Obtain feedback on the layout. Present the procedure to obtain access to this database.

  12. Two experiments for the measurement of the centre of percussion of a physical pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgieri, Massimiliano; Onorato, Pasquale; Mascheretti, Paolo; De Ambrosis, Anna

    2016-09-01

    In this article we describe two experiments, performed with instrumentation commonly available in undergraduate laboratories, to measure the position of the centre of percussion of a physical pendulum. The first one makes use of a constant external force provided by a common spring dynamometer, and allows for a straightforward analysis founded on basic concepts of rigid body dynamics. The second one is, more properly, an experiment based on a percussion, i.e. a collision involving an almost impulsive force, and displays the typical difficulties, but also the physical richness, of this type of phenomena. We provide an historical overview of the problem of the centre of percussion, starting from its first formulation given by Bernardino Baldi at the end of the 16th century, and we show how the mathematical model built for analysing the impact between a physical pendulum and a localised object is helpful in understanding that such a problem, in its original formulation, does not have a unique answer.

  13. Spin and diffractive physics with a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER-LHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorce, C.; Chambert, V.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rosier, P. [IPNO, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91406, Orsay (France); Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Scomparin, E. [INFN Sez. Torino, Via P. Giuria 1,1-10125, Torino (Italy); Brodsky, S. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford U, Stanford, CA 94309, (United States); Ferreiro, E. G. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Univ. de Santiago de C, 15782 Santiago de C (Spain); Fleuret, F. [Laboratoire Leprince Ringuet, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Rakotozafindrabe, A. [IRFU/SPhN, CFA Society, 91191 Gifsur-Yvette Cedex (France); Schienbein, I. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier, CNRS/IN2P3/INPG, F-38026 Grenoble (France); Uggerhoj, U. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-04-15

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose f xed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic f xed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The f xed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  14. Book review: Presence: bringing your boldest self to your biggest challenges by Amy Cuddy

    OpenAIRE

    Koob, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Have you ever wished for a second chance at a job interview, performance or difficult conversation? Drawing upon her popular TED talk, in Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges, Harvard Business School Professor Amy Cuddy encourages readers to see transformative power in small ‘nudges’ in behaviour, body language and mind-set that can generate a better sense of ‘presence’ in our everyday lives. Marion Koob finds much in the way of useful advice within the book but won...

  15. Experimenting with impacts in a conceptual physics or descriptive astronomy laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-07-01

    What follows is a description of the procedure for and results of a simple experiment on the formation of impact craters designed for the laboratory portions of lower mathematical-level general education science courses such as conceptual physics or descriptive astronomy. The experiment provides necessary experience with data collection and analysis as well as practice with quantitative skills such as measurement and calculation in a manner that does not exceed the mathematical scope of the courses while, due to its hands-on nature and interesting topic, remaining engaging.

  16. Can this machine rescue physics?

    CERN Multimedia

    Mone, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    "When the world's biggest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, opens next year near Geneva, the focal point of the high-energy physics world will shift from U.S. soil for the first time in half a century."

  17. The Nature and Role of Thought Experiments in Solving Conceptual Physics Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kösem, Şule Dönertaş; Özdemir, Ömer Faruk

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the possible variations of thought experiments in terms of their nature, purpose, and reasoning resources adopted during the solution of conceptual physics problems. A phenomenographic research approach was adopted for this study. Three groups of participants with varying levels of physics knowledge—low, medium, and high level—were selected in order to capture potential variations. Five participants were selected within each level group and the study was conducted with fifteen participants in total. Think aloud and retrospective questioning strategies were used throughout the individually conducted problem solving sessions to capture variations in the participants' thinking processes. The analysis of the data showed that thought experiments were actively used cognitive tools by participants from all there levels while working on the problems. Four different thought experiment structures were observed and categorized as limiting case, extreme case, simple case, and familiar case. It was also observed that participants conducted thought experiments for different purposes such as prediction, proof, and explanation. The reasoning resources behind the thought experiment processes were classified in terms of observed facts, intuitive principles, and scientific concepts. The results of the analysis suggested that thought experiments used as a creative reasoning tool for scientists can also be a productive tool for students. It was argued that instructional practices enriched with thought experiments and related practices not only reveal hidden elements of students' reasoning but also provide students opportunities to advance their inquiry skills through thought experimentation processes.

  18. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physic Experiments, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the ...

  19. The 2010 Interim Report of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Collaboration Physics Working Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Akiri, T; Andrews, M; Arisaka, K; Arrieta-Diaz, E; Artuso, M; Bai, X; Balantekin, B; Baller, B; Barletta, W; Barr, G; Bass, M; Beck, A; Becker, B; Bellini, V; Benhar, O; Berger, B; Bergevin, M; Berman, E; Berns, H; Bernstein, A; Beroz, F; Bhatnagar, V; Bhuyan, B; Bionta, R; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Blaufuss, E; Bleakley, B; Blucher, E; Blusk, S; Boehnlein, D; Bolton, T; Brack, J; Bradford, R; Breedon, R; Bromberg, C; Brown, R; Buchanan, N; Camilleri, L; Campbell, M; Carr, R; Carminati, G; Chen, A; Chen, H; Cherdack, D; Chi, C; Childress, S; Choudhary, B; Church, E; Cline, D; Coleman, S; Corey, R; D'Agostino, M; Davies, G; Dazeley, S; De Jong, J; DeMaat, B; Demuth, D; Dighe, A; Djurcic, Z; Dolph, J; Drake, G; Drozhdin, A; Duan, H; Duyang, H; Dye, S; Dykhuis, T; Edmunds, D; Elliott, S; Enomoto, S; Escobar, C; Felde, J; Feyzi, F; Fleming, B; Fowler, J; Fox, W; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B; Gallagher, H; Garilli, G; Garvey, G; Gehman, V; Geronimo, G; Gill, R; Goodman, M; Goon, J; Gorbunov, D; Gran, R; Guarino, V; Guarnaccia, E; Guenette, R; Gupta, P; Habig, A; Hackenberg, R; Hahn, A; Hahn, R; Haines, T; Hans, S; Harton, J; Hays, S; Hazen, E; He, Q; Heavey, A; Heeger, K; Hellauer, R; Himmel, A; Horton-Smith, G; Howell, J; Huber, P; Hurh, P; Huston, J; Hylen, J; Insler, J; Jaffe, D; James, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnson, R; Johnson, W; Johnston, W; Johnstone, J; Jones, B; Jostlein, H; Junk, T; Junnarkar, S; Kadel, R; Kafka, T; Kaminski, D; Karagiorgi, G; Karle, A; Kaspar, J; Katori, T; Kayser, B; Kearns, E; Kettell, S; Khanam, F; Klein, J; Kneller, J; Koizumi, G; Kopp, J; Kopp, S; Kropp, W; Kudryavtsev, V; Kumar, A; Kumar, J; Kutter, T; Lackowski, T; Lande, K; Lane, C; Lang, K; Lanni, F; Lanza, R; Latorre, T; Learned, J; Lee, D; Lee, K; Li, Y; Linden, S; Ling, J; Link, J; Littenberg, L; Loiacono, L; Liu, T; Losecco, J; Louis, W; Lucas, P; Lunardini, C; Lundberg, B; Lundin, T; Makowiecki, D; Malys, S; Mandal, S; Mann, A; Mann, A; Mantsch, P; Marciano, W; Mariani, C; Maricic, J; Marino, A; Marshak, M; Maruyama, R; Mathews, J; Matsuno, S; Mauger, C; McCluskey, E; McDonald, K; McFarland, K; McKeown, R; McTaggart, R; Mehdiyev, R; Melnitchouk, W; Meng, Y; Mercurio, B; Messier, M; Metcalf, W; Milincic, R; Miller, W; Mills, G; Mishra, S; MoedSher, S; Mohapatra, D; Mokhov, N; Moore, C; Morfin, J; Morse, W; Moss, A; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Napolitano, J; Newcomer, M; Norris, B; Ouedraogo, S; Page, B; Pakvasa, S; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Papadimitriou, V; Parsa, Z; Partyka, K; Pavlovic, Z; Pearson, C; Perasso, S; Petti, R; Plunkett, R; Polly, C; Pordes, S; Potenza, R; Prakash, A; Prokofiev, O; Qian, X; Raaf, J; Radeka, V; Raghavan, R; Rameika, R; Rebel, B; Rescia, S; Reitzner, D; Richardson, M; Riesselman, K; Robinson, M; Rosen, M; Rosenfeld, C; Rucinski, R; Russo, T; Sahijpal, S; Salon, S; Samios, N; Sanchez, M; Schmitt, R; Schmitz, D; Schneps, J; Scholberg, K; Seibert, S; Sergiampietri, F; Shaevitz, M; Shanahan, P; Shaposhnikov, M; Sharma, R; Simos, N; Singh, V; Sinnis, G; Sippach, W; Skwarnicki, T; Smy, M; Sobel, H; Soderberg, M; Sondericker, J; Sondheim, W; Spitz, J; Spooner, N; Stancari, M; Stancu, I; Stewart, J; Stoler, P; Stone, J; Stone, S; Strait, J; Straszheim, T; Striganov, S; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szczerbinska, B; Szelc, A; Talaga, R; Tanaka, H; Tayloe, R; Taylor, D; Thomas, J; Thompson, L; Thomson, M; Thorn, C; Tian, X; Toki, W; Tolich, N; Tripathi, M; Trovato, M; Tseung, H; Tzanov, M; Urheim, J; Usman, S; Vagins, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R; Varner, G; Vaziri, K; Velev, G; Viren, B; Wachala, T; Walter, C; Wang, H; Wang, Z; Warner, D; Webber, D; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wendt, C; Wetstein, M; White, H; White, S; Whitehead, L; Willis, W; Wilson, R J; Winslow, L; Ye, J; Yeh, M; Yu, B; Zeller, G; Zhang, C; Zimmerman, E; Zwaska, R

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) science collaboration initiated a study to investigate the physics potential of the experiment with a broad set of different beam, near- and far-detector configurations. Nine initial topics were identified as scientific areas that motivate construction of a long-baseline neutrino experiment with a very large far detector. We summarize the scientific justification for each topic and the estimated performance for a set of far detector reference configurations. We report also on a study of optimized beam parameters and the physics capability of proposed Near Detector configurations. This document was presented to the collaboration in fall 2010 and updated with minor modifications in early 2011.

  20. The use of a Nintendo Wii remote control in physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, F. J.; Arenas, A.; Núñez, M. J.; Victoria, L.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we describe how a Nintendo Wii remote control (known as the Wiimote) can be used in the design and implementation of several undergraduate-level experiments in a physics laboratory class. An experimental setup composed of a Wiimote and a conveniently located IR LED allows the trajectory of one or several moving objects to be tracked and recorded accurately, in both long and short displacement. The authors have developed a user interface program to configure the operation of the acquisition system of such data. The two experiments included in this work are the free fall of a body with magnetic braking and the simple pendulum, but other physics experiments could have been chosen. The treatment of the data was performed using Bayesian inference.

  1. Promoting physical activity for people with neurological disability: perspectives and experiences of physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Hilda; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Hale, Leigh; Thomas, David; Häger-Ross, Charlotte

    2011-08-01

    Both New Zealand and Sweden have health and disability policies that promote recreational exercise within society for people with disability. Despite these policies, levels of physical activity by people with disability in these countries are low. Physiotherapists are equipped to assist people with disabling conditions into physical activity. This qualitative study explored the perspectives and experiences of physiotherapists in New Zealand and Sweden toward promoting physically active recreation for adults with chronic neurological conditions. Nine physiotherapists who worked with adults with neurological disability in a range of long-term rehabilitation and community (home) health services were interviewed and the data analysed for themes. The physiotherapists described innovative and resourceful expertise to assist patients to be physically active. However, they perceived a lack of support for their work from within the health system and a lack of knowledge of disability issues within the recreational arena, both of which they perceived hindered their promotion of physical activity for people with neurological disability. Physiotherapists feel unable to fully support health and disability policies for the promotion of physically active recreation for people with neurological conditions, because of perceived constraints from within the recreational arena and their own health systems. If these constraints were addressed, then physiotherapists could be better agents to promote physical activity for people with neurological conditions.

  2. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    2010-01-01

    The collisions last year at 900 GeV and 2.36 TeV provided the long anticipated collider data to the CMS physics groups. Quite a lot has been accomplished in a very short time. Although the delivered luminosity was small, CMS was able to publish its first physics paper (with several more in preparation), and commence the commissioning of physics objects for future analyses. Many new performance results have been approved in advance of this CMS Week. One remarkable outcome has been the amazing agreement between out-of-the-box data with simulation at these low energies so early in the commissioning of the experiment. All of this is testament to the hard work and preparation conducted beforehand by many people in CMS. These analyses could not have happened without the dedicated work of the full collaboration on building and commissioning the detector, computing, and software systems combined with the tireless work of many to collect, calibrate and understand the data and our detector. To facilitate the efficien...

  3. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. D'Hondt

    The Electroweak and Top Quark Workshop (16-17th of July) A Workshop on Electroweak and Top Quark Physics, dedicated on early measurements, took place on 16th-17th July. We had more than 40 presentations at the Workshop, which was an important milestone for 2007 physics analyses in the EWK and TOP areas. The Standard Model has been tested empirically by many previous experiments. Observables which are nowadays known with high precision will play a major role for data-based CMS calibrations. A typical example is the use of the Z to monitor electron and muon reconstruction in di-lepton inclusive samples. Another example is the use of the W mass as a constraint for di-jets in the kinematic fitting of top-quark events, providing information on the jet energy scale. The predictions of the Standard Model, for what concerns proton collisions at the LHC, are accurate to a level that the production of W/Z and top-quark events can be used as a powerful tool to commission our experiment. On the other hand the measure...

  4. Ground Handling Business at Non-European Biggest World Airports as a Problem of Market Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tomová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper we analyse the market structures of ground handling at the biggest non-European passenger and cargo airports in accordance with the ACI list of the most important world airports in 2014. Using the IATA IGHC database as of spring 2015, our analysis revealed that out of Europe double digit numbers of providers are rare what contrasts with situation in Europe where ground handling markets were deregulated by the Council Directive 96/67/EC. The analysis also brought that the monopolistic structures of ground handling markets were more specific for the regions of Asia and the Middle East. Airports as ground handling providers were not found within the analysed sample in North America, Latin America, Africa and Australia and Oceania, while this arrangement was to a larger extent present at the analysed Asian airports. Asia and the Middle East biggest airports are identified by us as candidates for further deregulation of ground handling arguing by forecasted demand for air services in the regions, although expected deregulation may be curbed by national regulators.

  5. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The role of teaching experience and country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as moderating variable, physics teachers (N = 780) from Switzerland, Austria, and Germany graded a fictive student's answer to a physics test question. While the answer was exactly the same for each teacher, only the student's gender and specialization in languages vs. science were manipulated. Specialization was included to gauge the relative strength of potential gender bias effects. Multiple group regression analyses, with the grade that was awarded as the dependent variable, revealed only partial cross-border generalizability of the effect pattern. While the overall results in fact indicated the existence of a consistent and clear gender bias against girls in the first part of physics teachers' careers that disappeared with increasing teaching experience for Swiss teachers, Austrian teachers, and German female teachers, German male teachers showed no gender bias effects at all. The results are discussed regarding their relevance for educational practice and research.

  6. The MoEDAL experiment - a new light on LHC physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfold James L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2010 the MoEDAL experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC was unanimously approved by CERN’s Research Board to start data taking in 2015. MoEDAL is a pioneering experiment designed to search for highly ionizing messengers of new physics such as magnetic monopoles or massive (pseudo-stable charged particles. Its groundbreaking physics program defines a number of scenarios that yield potentially revolutionary insights into foundational questions. MoEDAL’s purpose is to meet such far-reaching challenges at the frontier of the field. The innovative MoEDAL detector is tuned to the prospect of discovery physics. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Point 8 on the LHC ring, has a dual nature. First, it acts like a giant camera, comprised of nuclear track detectors - analyzed offline by ultra fast scanning microscopes – sensitive only to new physics. Second, it is uniquely able to trap the particle harbingers of new physics beyond the Standard Model for further study. MoEDAL’s radiation environment is monitored by a state-of-the-art real-time TimePix pixel detector array.

  7. Adaptive Response of the Heart and Peripheral Vasculature on Single Physical Exercises in Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Biryukova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to assess the parameters of urgent adaptation of the heart and peripheral vasculature to single physical exercises to determine an individually safe value of motor activity. Materials and Methods. The experiments were carried out on 84 mongrel male dogs. Physical exercises were modeled in laboratory environment by treadmill run. Three types of exercises were used in the experiment: mild, optimal and excessive. Exercise duration was controlled individually, for each animal considering cardio-respiratory system state by heart rate. Cardiac work was assessed by echocardiography and electrocardiography, peripheral circulation — by hindleg rheovasogram. Results. Experimental findings indicate significant alterations in cardiac conducting system under single physical exercises. A single mild exercise causes the increase of minute blood output due to heart rate increase. Hind leg muscular blood filling decreases. An optimal exercise results in minute blood output increase due to stroke blood volume growth. Myocardial contractility increases. Muscular blood filling rises. In excessive load increased stroke output is accompanied by left ventricular cavity dilatation. Pulse volume decreases, peripheral vasculature elasticity reduces, and hind leg muscular venous outflow gets worse. Conclusion. Urgent adaptation of the heart and peripheral vasculature in single physical exercises shows as a marked response to a simulated factor. The technique to assess the body adaptation considering cardiovascular system condition enables to calculate individual volume of physical activity and develop recommendations for it to be used efficiently in medicine.

  8. Korean immigrant women's physical activity experience: a situation-specific theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Ok; Chang, Sun Ju; Nguyen, Giang; Stringer, Lynn; Chee, Wonshik; Chee, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    To develop successful physical activity promotion programs for midlife immigrant women, especially for Korean immigrant midlife women, concrete theoretical bases are needed. However, virtually no theoretical frameworks and/or theories exist that can explain the influences of immigration transition on the physical activity experience of midlife immigrant women in general or Korean immigrant midlife women in specific. The purpose of this article is to present a situation-specific theory on physical activity experience of Korean immigrant midlife women (SPAKIM) with its development process. An integrative approach was used to develop the theory based on the midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity (MAPA) theory, the transitions theory, a review of the relevant literature, and two studies on midlife women's attitudes toward physical activity. The proposed theory includes nature of transitions, nonmodifiable and modifiable transition conditions, contexts of daily life, patterns of response, and nursing therapeutics as major concepts, and each major concept includes several related subconcepts. Because several concepts of the theory were developed mainly based on the literature review, the major concepts and related subconcepts need to be further developed and evaluated in future studies.

  9. Associations between students' situational interest, mastery experiences, and physical activity levels in an interactive dance game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaoqun; Gao, Zan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of previous experiences on students' situational interest and physical activity (PA) levels, as well as the relationships between situational interest and PA levels in Dance Dance Revolution (DDR). A total of 135 seventh through ninth graders participated in DDR unit for two weeks, and reported their previous DDR experiences. Students' PA levels were measured by ActiGraph accelerometers for three classes with percentages of time spent in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) as the outcome variable. They also responded to the Situational Interest Scale (including novelty, challenge, attention demand, exploration intention, and instant enjoyment) at the end of each class. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) yielded a significant main effect for experience. Follow-up tests revealed that students with DDR experiences scored significantly higher than those without experiences at following dimensions: challenge; exploration intention; instant enjoyment; and attention demand. Regression analysis yielded that novelty emerged as the only significant predictor for MVPA. The findings suggested that four dimensions of situational interest differed between students with and without previous experiences. Novelty emerged as the only predictor for MVPA, suggesting that students would have higher PA when they feel the activity provides new information.

  10. Dynamics of physical preparedness of preschool age children in the process of experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bychuk I.A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Influence of method of prophylaxis of flatfoot is considered on physical preparedness of under-fives. In an experiment 40 children took part 5-6 years. The indexes of speed (at run 30 m are certain, to flexibility (forward inclination from sitting position, adroitness (at shuttle run 4 х 9 m, speed-power qualities (broad jump from a place, jump upwards. The substantive provisions of the program of prophylaxis of flatfoot are rotined for children. Certain and analysed changes of indexes physical preparedness of children.

  11. Learning Physics Down a Slide: A Set of Experiments to Measure Reality Through Smartphone Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lander Martínez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the use of smartphones among teenagers in their daily life has grown significantly. Despite the efforts to use tablets in learning processes, these teenagers are often prompted to switch off their personal devices before entering a classroom. Moreover, most mobile learning applications do not take advantage of the device sensors (e.g., touchscreen, accelerometer, or gyroscope. In order to overcome this situation, we have developed Serious Physics, a free mobile app that allows using smartphones as measuring tools to conduct experiments on Physics.

  12. Artificial intelligence steering for the interactive analysis of a high energy physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Prolog user interface for the steering of the off-line software of a high energy physics experiment is described. It performs the syntax check of the commands, and triggers the execution of adequate Fortran subroutines to execute the required actions. Available facilities include display of objects selected by their physical mnemonic name and attributes, by screen input with the mouse on the object itself or on a range in a displayed histogram, and on-line reconstruction of objects when necessary. Histograms can be built and manipulated interactively, via the command language. No knowledge of the internal organization of the data is required from the user. (orig.)

  13. The physics case for the MoEDAL experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2015-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment (Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC) is designed to directly search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising stable or metastable particles arising in theoretical scenarios beyond the Standard Model. Its physics goals are accomplished by the deployment of plastic nuclear track detectors combined with trapping volumes for capturing charged highly-ionising particles and TimePix pixel devices for monitoring. This paper is an overview of the MoEDAL physics reach, which is largely complementary to the programs of the large multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS.

  14. An undergraduate experiment demonstrating the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, James T.; Whitehouse, Christopher B.; Oulton, Rupert F.; Gennaro, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel undergraduate research project that highlights the physics of metamaterials with acoustic waves and soda cans. We confirm the Helmholtz resonance nature of a single can by measuring its amplitude and phase response to a sound wave. Arranging multiple cans in arrays smaller than the wavelength, we then design an antenna that redirects sound into a preferred direction. The antenna can be thought of as a new resonator, composed of artificially engineered meta-atoms, similar to a metamaterial. These experiments are illustrative, tactile, and open ended so as to enable students to explore the physics of matter/wave interaction.

  15. News Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Report: The career paths of physics graduates Education: Network day to hold workshops for teaching ideas Experiments: PhysHOME brings innovators together Meeting: Physics Education Networks collaborate at WCPE Workshop: World experts in physics education meet Training: Something for everyone at SPEED 2012 Conference: Sun, cocktails and physics create a buzz at WCPE Students: The physics paralympian 2012 Forthcoming events

  16. Substance Abuse during Adulthood Subsequent to the Experience of Physical Abuse and Psychological Distress during Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Longman-Mills

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigated if there was a significant relationship between physical abuse during childhood and experiencing psychological distress and substance abuse among university students. Methods: This cross-sectional study utilized a questionnaire to collect retrospective data from 382 university students (103 males and 279 females about their substance use patterns, level of psychological distress and their exposure to physical abuse. The data were then analysed using bivariate statistics. Results: Most (61.8% participants met the criteria for being physically abused, however, only 27.2% recognized the experience as abuse. Another 38.9% of the students reported moderate to severe psychological distress. There was a significant relationship between being physically abused and experiencing higher levels of psychological distress (p < 0.001. Cannabis was the most frequently utilized illicit drug (10.3% while alcohol was the most frequently utilized licit drug (37.4%. Drug abuse was found to be significantly associated with being physically abused during childhood (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Even though the results obtained are not generalizable, this study has provided important preliminary information, that experiencing physical abuse increases the likelihood of having higher levels of psychological distress and becoming a substance abuser during adulthood; thereby identifying an overlooked area to target anti-drug use interventions.

  17. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  18. Evaluation guide for the international reactor physics experiments evaluation project (IRPhEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data including separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated as a pilot activity in 1999 by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. This document outlines the general presentation guidelines that evaluators should follow for the description of the experiments and all relevant experimental data in order to ensure the consistency between the evaluations published in the final Handbook. Publication templates will be used to ensure this consistency and will follow the general scheme below: 1 - Experiment identification number; 2- Date; 3 - Name of experiment (Purpose of experiment, Phenomena measured and scope); 4 - Name or designation of experimental programme; 5 - Description of facility; 6 - Description of test or experiment (Experimental configuration, Core life cycle, Experimental limitations or shortcomings); 7 - Phenomena measured (Description of results and analysis, Special features and characteristics of experiment, Measurement systems/methods and uncertainties); 8 - Duplicate or complementary experiments / other related experiments; 9 - Status of completion of the evaluation; 10 - References (pointer to evaluation, archive if available, otherwise generic bibliographic reference); 11 - Authors/ organisers 12 - Material available

  19. We experience more than we comprehend. Quantum physics and quaesions of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantum physics has been arrived by thinking and experimenting to revolutioning knowledges, which determine our world, also if only few have understood these theories in their real sense. The present book follows the question, whether and how far a consciousness trained by quantum physics can reach more directly to the understanding of questions of life and religious questions than a thinking, which is obliged to classical physics. It deals especially with fundamental existential questions: The theme of personal responsibility, the value of the indivdual existence, the evaluation of the personal I-you relation. Hans Peter Duerr, a personality with guiding qualities, as they are necessary in the new milennium, is the ideal speech partner for the deimension of this theme. The connections of natural sciences and religion, ecology, and sociological change have always driven the Heisenberg successo. How can we speech about that, which science cannot comprehend?. What means self, identity, responsibilit for the quantum physicist? An exciting meeting

  20. Employing real experiments and modern viewpoints in the teaching of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of a course on modern physics designed and taught to undergraduate science and engineering students in the Spring of 2013. The course, meant for freshmen, attempts to integrate statistical mechanics into non-classical physics and introduces some novel teaching ideas such as the field approach in contrast to typical wave and particle viewpoints traditionally covered in usual textbooks. The various modern applications of quantum theory in realizing practical devices are recounted in a way that is amenable to beginners. Especially, we describe the inclusion of visually appealing and carefully designed robust experiments inside the formal classroom environment. This collection of applications and demonstrations serves as a useful collection of teaching aids and can be easily transformed into active learning exercises. The impact of this teaching strategy on student learning and its role in exciting an interest in physics is assessed.

  1. Health physics experience during 46Sc radiotracer injection at Kolkata Port, Kolkata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the suitability of dumping site for dredged sediment, 46Sc in scandium glass matrix is mainly used for the investigation at ports and harbours. In this paper authors share Health Physics experience on control of personnel exposure in order to achieve ALARA. About 260 GBq of 46Sc was used for sediment transport study near SAGAR Island at Kolkata Port, Kolkata. During the study, the maximum dose was found to be less than 0.37 mSv, which is 1.23 % of the authorized annual effective dose limits for occupational radiation worker. The average dose for the experiment was computed as 0.21 mSv. (author)

  2. Physical protection of nuclear materials: Experience in regulation, implementation and operations. Proceedings of a conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 10 to 14 November 1997. It was attended by 162 registered participants from 42 countries and eight international organizations. The 58 papers presented dealt with the experience of regulators, designers and facility operators, including response forces, in meeting the demands and requirements in this changing area of physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for each of the papers. Topics covered include contemporary and emerging issues, experience in regulation, implementation at facilities, program assessment and cooperation, hardware and software, illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, and transportation

  3. Linear halogen bulb as a powerful light source for physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochníček, Zdeněk

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the usage of a conventional lamp equipped with a linear halogen bulb for physics experiments. The irradiance gain and limitation of spectral resolution are treated in detail theoretically and verified experimentally. The analysis shows that, in comparison with a standard bulb and slit arrangement, the linear bulb can increase irradiance of the spectrum image by an order of magnitude without a significant loss of spectral resolution in comparable experimental arrangements. Some concrete examples of experiments with a white light spectrum and diffraction are presented.

  4. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  5. Investigating children's spiritual experiences through the Health and Physical Education (HPE) learning area in Australian schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Timothy

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore spirituality within the Health and Physical Education (HPE) learning area, through investigating children's experiences within three Brisbane Catholic Education primary schools (Queensland, Australia). There are seven dimensions of wellness: physical, intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, environmental, and occupational, which are all strongly connected (Robbins et al. in A wellness way of life, 9th edition, McGraw Hill, USA, 2011). It is logical that HPE, which promotes students to adopt lifelong health and well-being, offers opportunities for spirituality to be experienced and warrants investigation. Data gathered in this qualitative research suggest that regular quality inclusive HPE lessons increased students' potential for spiritual experiences. PMID:24306452

  6. Collaborative Virtual 3D Environment for Internet-Accessible Physics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Scheucher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Immersive 3D worlds have increasingly raised the interest of researchers and practitioners for various learning and training settings over the last decade. These virtual worlds can provide multiple communication channels between users and improve presence and awareness in the learning process. Consequently virtual 3D environments facilitate collaborative learning and training scenarios. In this paper we focus on the integration of internet-accessible physics experiments (iLabs combined with the TEALsim 3D simulation toolkit in Project Wonderland, Sun's toolkit for creating collaborative 3D virtual worlds. Within such a collaborative environment these tools provide the opportunity for teachers and students to work together as avatars as they control actual equipment, visualize physical phenomenon generated by the experiment, and discuss the results. In particular we will outline the steps of integration, future goals, as well as the value of a collaboration space in Wonderland's virtual world.

  7. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments in a technological irradiation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Material Testing Reactor (MTR) makes it possible to irradiate material samples under intense neutron and photonic fluxes. These experiments are carried out in experimental devices localised in the reactor core or in periphery (reflector). Available physics simulation tools only treat, most of the time, one physics field in a very precise way. Multi-physic simulations of irradiation experiments therefore require a sequential use of several calculation codes and data exchanges between these codes: this corresponds to problems coupling. In order to facilitate multi-physic simulations, this thesis sets up a data model based on data-processing objects, called Technological Entities. This data model is common to all of the physics fields. It permits defining the geometry of an irradiation device in a parametric way and to associate information about materials to it. Numerical simulations are encapsulated into interfaces providing the ability to call specific functionalities with the same command (to initialize data, to launch calculations, to post-treat, to get results,... ). Thus, once encapsulated, numerical simulations can be re-used for various studies. This data model is developed in a SALOME platform component. The first application case made it possible to perform neutronic simulations (OSIRIS reactor and RJH) coupled with fuel behavior simulations. In a next step, thermal hydraulics could also be taken into account. In addition to the improvement of the calculation accuracy due to the physical phenomena coupling, the time spent in the development phase of the simulation is largely reduced and the possibilities of uncertainty treatment are under consideration. (author)

  8. Neural chips, neural computers and application in high and superhigh energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Architecture peculiarity and characteristics of series of neural chips and neural computes used in scientific instruments are considered. Tendency of development and use of them in high energy and superhigh energy physics experiments are described. Comparative data which characterize the efficient use of neural chips for useful event selection, classification elementary particles, reconstruction of tracks of charged particles and for search of hypothesis Higgs particles are given. The characteristics of native neural chips and accelerated neural boards are considered

  9. Physically disabled adolescents' experience of therapeutic riding : a phenomenological investigation / by Suzette Weideman.

    OpenAIRE

    Weideman, Suzette

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation serves as a report of a qualitative exploration of the experience of adolescents with physical disabilities during therapeutic horse-riding. The aim of the study is to understand the impact of therapeutic riding on the lived world of the participants in this unique form of animal assisted therapy. In order to achieve the set goals, phenomenological psychological research is utilised. The perspective of the participants was explored through unstructured, in-depth interviews, ...

  10. Development of triple GEM detector for a heavy ion physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building and testing of micro-pattern gas detector such as Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) for several upcoming High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiment projects, is an advance area of research in the field of detector development. We have carried out the long-term stability test and the uniformity of the relative gain over a GEM detector. The method of long-term test and uniformity of the relative gain and the results are presented in this article

  11. The Scaffolded Mind: Higher mental processes are grounded in early experience of the physical world

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Lawrence E.; Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2009-01-01

    It has long been a staple of psychological theory that early life experiences significantly shape the adult's understanding of and reactions to the social world. Here we consider how early concept development along with evolved motives operating early in life can come to exert a passive, unconscious influence on the human adult's higher-order goal pursuits, judgments, and actions. In particular, we focus on concepts and goal structures specialized for interacting with the physical environment...

  12. Physical, mechanical and rheological properties of polymers: test facilities and experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laboratories in polymer pilot plant of BTPS, MINT TECH-PARK well equipped with various polymer testing facilities. The determination of physical, mechanical and rheological properties of polymers are very important not only for research purpose but also for characterizations of polymer products from industries. This paper illustrates the polymer testing facilities available at polymer pilot plant of BTPS. The discussion includes the list of equipment, applications, customers, experience and problem faced during the daily operation. (Author)

  13. Black and minority ethnic trainees’ experiences of physical education initial teacher training

    OpenAIRE

    Flintoff, A; Chappell, A.; Gower, C; Keyworth, S; Lawrence, J.; Money, J; Squires, S; Webb, L.

    2008-01-01

    The official published version can be accessed at the link below. This report draws together the findings of research that aimed to explore black and minority ethnic (BME) trainees’ experiences of Physical Education (PE) initial teacher training (ITT). Although the numbers of BME trainees opting to enter teaching have improved considerably over the last few years, PE remains one of three specific subject areas where they remain significantly under-represented. Current figures suggest that ...

  14. Powerful nanosecond light sources based on LEDs for astroparticle physics experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Poleshuk, R. V.; Shaibonov, B. A. J.; Vyatchin, Y. E.

    2007-01-01

    Powerful nanosecond light sources based on LEDs have been developed for use in astroparticle physics experiments. The light sources use either matrixes of ultra bright blue LEDs or a new generation high power blue LEDs. It's shown that such light sources have light yield of up to 10**10 - 10**12 photons per pulse with very fast light emission kinetics. The described light sources are important for use in calibration systems of Cherenkov and scintillator detectors. The developed light sources ...

  15. Fast Track Pattern Recognition in High Energy Physics Experiments with the Automata Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Michael H L S; Green, Christopher; Guo, Deyuan; Wang, Ke; Zmuda, Ted

    2016-01-01

    We explore the Micron Automata Processor (AP) as a suitable commodity technology that can address the growing computational needs of track pattern recognition in High Energy Physics experiments. A toy detector model is developed for which a track trigger based on the Micron AP is used to demonstrate a proof-of-principle. Although primarily meant for high speed text-based searches, we demonstrate that the Micron AP is ideally suited to track finding applications.

  16. Muon trigger, flavour tagging and physics performance of the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LHCb experiment that is being settled in CERN is dedicated to the study of CP violation and rare decays in the field of beauty hadrons. The phenomenological background necessary to an adequate understanding of the physics of flavor is presented in the first chapter, it is shown how the flavordynamics can open the way to new physics. The second chapter is dedicated to a brief presentation of the LHCb detector. Two aspects of the design of the muon trigger are more detailed: the radiation resistance of the opto-electronic transmitters and the simulated performances of the trigger. The third chapter reviews the tasks linked to the tagging of the savors of B mesons which will be an important step in all the experiments made at LHCb. The recent progress in heavy savor physics as well as the expected contribution of LHCb in this field are presented in the fourth chapter, especially the search for new physics in penguin diagrams b → s

  17. Future high energy physics experiments using RICH detectors: The next generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1995-08-01

    This report describes some features of the new detectors now being constructed for use in high energy physics experiments that utilize RICH counters as a central element. The scope of this discussion is limited only to experiments which have been formally approved for construction as follows: (1) BaBar at PEP-II, which contains a quartz radiator DIRC counter; (2) CLEO III at the CESR upgrade, which utilizes a LiF/TEA Fast RICH; and (3) HERA-B at HERA, which uses a gas radiator RICH with either a TMAE- or a CsI-based photon detector. These experiments have much in common; all emphasize B-physics, run at the luminosity frontier, and plan to take first data either in 1998 or 1999. This review begins with a discussion of the physics goals and experimental context, and then explore the designs which have been chosen to confront the experimental issues. Particular emphasis is placed on the design and expected performance of the RICH detectors in these systems. Due to space limitations, only a few of the recent R and D results not covered elsewhere at the conference can be presented.

  18. Topological Properties of Urban Public Traffic Networks in Chinese Top-Ten Biggest Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; XIONG Xing; QIAO Zhong-Liang; YUAN Gang-Qiang; SUN Xing; WANG Bing-Hong

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the topological characteristics of complex networks as exemplified by the urban public traffic network (UPTN) in Chinese top-ten biggest cities. It is found that the UPTNs have small world behaviour,by the examination of their topological parameters. The quantitative analysis of the transport efficiency of the UPTNs reveals their higher local efficiency El and lower global efficiency Eg, which coincide well with the status quo of those Chinese cities still at their developing stage. Furthermore, the topological properties of efficiency in the UPTNs are also examined, and the findings indicate that, on the one hand, the UPTNs show robustness to random attacks and frangibility to malicious attacks on a global scale; on the other hand, the interrelation between UPTN efficiency and network motifs deserves our attention. The motifs which interrelate the UPTN efficiency are always triangular-formed patterns, e.g. motifs ID 238, ID 174 and ID 102, etc.

  19. Edutainment's Impact on Health Promotion: Viewing The Biggest Loser Through the Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocarski, Richard; Bissell, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Through a critical rhetorical analysis using Bandura's social cognitive theory as a lens to view The Biggest Loser (TBL), this article illustrates the contradictions between the show's health promotional aims and its entertainment aims, which show the problems the show creates for health promotion practitioners working on obesity. The social cognitive theory constructs of observational learning, psychological determinants, and environmental determinants emerged from this reading of TBL as central to how the show masquerades as a health promotion tool. This reading reveals that TBL promotes a neoliberal construction of health and obesity that challenges the worldview that many health promotion campaigns take and, therefore, complicates our own efforts to combat obesity. With this revealed, it is suggested that TBL be incorporated into health promotion campaigns only as a foil.

  20. Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment: Scattering, Rheology and Microscopy Study of Colloidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.-D.; Zhu, J.; Phan, S.-E.; Russel, W. B.; Chaikin, P. M.; Meyer, W. V.

    2002-01-01

    The Physics of Hard Sphere Experiment has two incarnations: the first as a scattering and rheology experiment on STS-83 and STS-94 and the second as a microscopy experiment to be performed in the future on LMM on the space station. Here we describe some of the quantitative and qualitative results from previous flights on the dynamics of crystallization in microgravity and especially the observed interaction of growing crystallites in the coexistance regime. To clarify rheological measurements we also present ground based experiments on the low shear rate viscosity and diffusion coefficient of several hard sphere experiments at high volume fraction. We also show how these experiments will be performed with confocal microscopy and laser tweezers in our lab and as preparation for the phAse II experiments on LMM. One of the main aims of the microscopy study will be the control of colloidal samples using an array of applied fields with an eye toward colloidal architectures. Temperature gradients, electric field gradients, laser tweezers and a variety of switchable imposed surface patterns are used toward this control.

  1. Probing Pre-and In-Service Physics Teachers' Knowledge Using the Double-Slit Thought Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.; Hirvonen, Pekka E.

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the use of the double-slit thought experiment as a diagnostic tool for probing physics teachers' understanding. A total of 9 pre-service teachers and 18 in-service teachers with a variety of different experience in modern physics teaching at the upper secondary level responded in a paper-and-pencil test and three of these…

  2. Effects of Physical Environement and Social Experience on Stimulus Seeking Behaviour and Emotionality in Rats (Rattus norvegius)

    OpenAIRE

    Pisula, W.; Ostaszewski, P M; Matysiak, J

    1992-01-01

    Theinfluences of the physical and social aspects of the environment on temperament in rats are reported in two experiments. In Experiment One changes in animal behavior due to social isolation and enrichment of the physical environment were studied in rats subjected to experimental conditions when they were 25-30 days old. Enrichment of the physical environment led to decreased need for light stimulation and increased exploratory behavior. Social isolation led to an increase in emotional reac...

  3. The experiences of physical violence in childhood of Nursing undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Machado da Cunha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research had as its object of study: “The experiences of physical violence in childhood of nursing undergraduate students.” The objectives were: a to review the occurrence of physical violence in childhood students of nursing; b to characterize the factors surrounding the experience of violence; and c to identify the effects in adulthood of the violence suffered in childhood. The quantitative descriptive methods were used. The study subjects were 190 students in an undergraduate course in nursing. This research was approved by the Ethics in Research Committee (2102-CEP/HUPE Project. From the total, 61 (32% of the study subjects experienced violence in childhood, predominantly at home, and the most frequent offenders are relatives. Most students believe spanking sometimes is necessary, and 9 (14% of those were abused in childhood reported that the experience reflected in their adult life. Thus, family violence in childhood was important for students, and corporal punishment was a kind of ordinary education. We suggested approaching this problem more deeply in the undergraduate courses in nursing, promoting the prevention of violence and supporting those who experienced violence in childhood and those who experience it nowadays.

  4. Future explosive pulse-power technology for high-energy plasma physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of high-performance pulse-power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been built in the last ten years or are planned in the next 3--5 years. Such systems, using capacitive energy storage, are employed in particle beam fusion, x-ray effects, x-ray physics, and plasma physics experiments. Advances in the technology of high-energy- density capacitors over the same time period has substantially decreased the cost per joule of the basic capacitor and kept the total parts count in large systems within reason. Overall, the savings in capacitor costs has about balanced the generally increasing system costs keeping the total cost of large, high-performance systems at $1--2 per joule over the period. The next step, to 100-MJ class systems, will profit from the improvements of the last decade, but there seems little reason to project a lowering of the cost per joule. In contrast, there is every reason to expect the continuously growing system costs to outstrip any savings to be realized from improvements in capacitor technology. Over the same period, explosive pulse power systems in the 10 to 20-MJ class have been employed, routinely, in plasma physics experiments. These one- shot systems currently cost about $100 K for the generator and switching and deliver energy to a plasma physics experiment in a few microseconds. Comparing only hardware costs, such systems are competitive with capacitor systems for developmental activities involving 100--200 shots -- but not for repetitive applications involving 1000's of shots. At this rate, explosive systems are competitive systems for applications involving up to 200--500 shots. In this paper, we discuss general concepts for generators and power-conditioning systems appropriate for high-energy applications. We scope two such applications and show how explosive pulse power can address those applications. And we describe one example of an explosively powered generator suitable for 100-MJ operation

  5. UV Radiation: a new first year physics/life sciences laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petelina, S. V.; Siddaway, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Unfortunately, Australia leads the world in the number of skin cancer cases per capita. Three major factors that contribute to this are: 1) the level of damaging ultraviolet (UV) radiation in Australia is higher than in many other countries. This is caused, among other factors, by the stratospheric ozone depletion and Antarctic ozone hole; 2) many people in Australia are of Irish-Scottish origin and their skin can not repair the damage caused by the UV radiation as effectively as the skin of people of other origins; 3) Australia is one of the world’s leaders in the outdoor activities where people tend to spend more time outside. As our experience has shown, most Australian University students, high school students, and even high school teachers were largely unaware of the UV damage details and effective safety measures. Therefore, a need for new ways to educate people became apparent. The general aim of this new 1st year laboratory experiment, developed and first offered at La Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) in 2009, is to investigate how UV-B radiation levels change under various solar illumination conditions and how effective different types of protection are. After pre-lab readings on physical concepts and biological effects of UV radiation, and after solving all pre-lab problems, the students go outside and measure the actual change in UV-B and UV-A radiation levels under various conditions. Some of these conditions are: direct sun, shade from a building, shade under the roof, reflection from various surfaces, direct sun through cheap and expensive sunglasses and eyeglasses, direct sun through various types of cloth and hair. The equipment used is the UV-Probe manufactured by sglux SolGel Technologies GmbH. The students’ feedback on this new laboratory experiment was very positive. It was ranked top among all physics experiments offered as part of that subject (Physics for Life Sciences) in 2009 and top among all physics experiments presented for

  6. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  7. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  8. Monolithic circuits for barium fluoride detectors used in nuclear physics experiments. CRADA final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custom monolithic electronic circuits have been developed recently for large detector applications in high energy physics where subsystems require tens of thousands of channels of signal processing and data acquisition. In the design and construction of these enormous detectors, it has been found that monolithic circuits offer significant advantages over discrete implementations through increased performance, flexible packaging, lower power and reduced cost per channel. Much of the integrated circuit design for the high energy physics community is directly applicable to intermediate energy heavy-ion and electron physics. This STTR project conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sought to develop a new integrated circuit chip set for barium fluoride (BaF2) detector arrays based upon existing CMOS monolithic circuit designs created for the high energy physics experiments. The work under the STTR Phase 1 demonstrated through the design, simulation, and testing of several prototype chips the feasibility of using custom CMOS integrated circuits for processing signals from BaF2 detectors. Function blocks including charge-sensitive amplifiers, comparators, one shots, time-to-amplitude converters, analog memory circuits and buffer amplifiers were implemented during Phase 1 effort. Experimental results from bench testing and laboratory testing with sources were documented

  9. Using the Heterodyne Method to Measure Velocities on Shock Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Oliver

    2007-06-01

    Velocimetry is an important diagnostic for shock physics experiments. Velocities for these types of experiments can be in the kilometer-per-second range. We have developed a new velocimetry diagnostic for use on shock physics experiments that is based upon the heterodyne method. This diagnostic is easily assembled from commercially available parts developed for the telecommunication industry. The entire system uses single mode fibers to transport the signals from the laser to the probes and back to the detectors. We mix the Doppler-shifted light from the moving surface with non-shifted light from the laser itself to generate a beat signal at the detector. For this system using 1550 nm lasers, a velocity of 1 km/s generates a beat signal of 1.29 GHz. The detectors and the digitizers must have high-bandwidth capabilities to faithfully follow the beat waveform to allow a determination of the frequency as a function of time. Our current system has a maximum velocity capability of over 5 km/s. This paper will describe the heterodyne velocimeter and will present some of the data that has been taken with it. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. System of Modelling and Calculation Analysis of Neutron- Physical Experiments at Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseyev, A.V. [SSC RF - IPPE, 1 Bondarenko Square, Obninsk, Kaluga Region 249033 (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    There is an actual task on storage, processing and analysis of the unique experimental data received on power fast reactors for their subsequent use in projects of fast reactors of new (4.) generation. For modeling and carrying out analysis of experiments the integrated computing system MODEXSYS has been developed. In this system the mechanism for consecutive calculation of a fast reactor states with the detailed description of its components is created. The system includes the database describing fast reactor states, results of neutron-physical characteristics measurements at fast reactor, calculation and benchmark models of experiments and calculation results. In system convenient search means and the special graphics shell are provided. It has Interfaces for processing of calculation results and their analysis. MODEXSYS system has been applied for analysis of three types of experiments at fast reactor: k{sub eff}, control rod worth and energy release distribution. The most important results of this analysis are described. Application of MODEXSYS system will raise accuracy and reliability of forecasting of fast reactors neutron-physical characteristics; for BN-600 reactor recommended level of accuracy is resulted. (authors)

  11. From Earth to Heaven: Using `Newton's Cannon' Thought Experiment for Teaching Satellite Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentzas, Athanasios; Halkia, Krystallia

    2013-10-01

    Thought Experiments are powerful tools in both scientific thinking and in the teaching of science. In this study, the historical Thought Experiment (TE) `Newton's Cannon' was used as a tool to teach concepts relating to the motion of satellites to students at upper secondary level. The research instruments were: (a) a teaching-interview designed and implemented according to the Teaching Experiment methodology and (b) an open-ended questionnaire administered to students 2 weeks after the teaching-interview. The sample consisted of forty students divided into eleven groups. The teaching and learning processes which occurred during the teaching-interview were recorded and analyzed. The findings of the present study show that the use of the TE helped students to mentally construct a physical system which has nothing to do with their everyday experience (i.e. they had to imagine themselves as observers in a context in which the whole Earth was visible) and to draw conclusions about phenomena within this system. Specifically, students managed (1) to conclude that if an object is appropriately launched, it may be placed in an orbit around the Earth and to support this conclusion by giving necessary arguments, and (2) to realize that the same laws of physics describe, on the one hand, the motion of the Moon around the Earth (and the motion of other celestial bodies as well) and, on the other hand, the motion of `terrestrial' objects (i.e. objects on the Earth, such as a tennis ball). The main difficulties students met were caused by their idea that there is no gravity in the vacuum (i.e. the area outside of the Earth's atmosphere) and also by their everyday experience, according to which it is impossible for a projectile to move continuously parallel to the ground.

  12. Benchmark experiment for physics parameters of metallic-fueled LMFBR at FCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, S.; Oigawa, H.; Sakurai, T.; Nemoto, T.; Okajima, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-09-01

    The calculated prediction for reactor physics parameters in a metallic-fueled LMFBR was tested using the benchmark experiments performed at FCA. The reactivity feedback parameters such as sodium void worth, Doppler reactivity worth and {sup 238}U-capture-to-{sup 239}Pu -fission ratio have been measured. The fuel expansion reactivity has also measured. Direct comparison with the results from similar oxide fuel assembly was made. Analysis was done with the JENDL-2 cross section library and JENDL-3.2. Prediction of reactor physics parameters with JENDL-3.2 in the metallic-fueled core agreed reasonably well with the measured values and showed similar trend to the results in the oxide fuel core. (author)

  13. UNIX trademark in high energy physics: What we can learn from the initial experiences at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1991-03-01

    The reasons why Fermilab decided to support the UNIX operating system are reviewed and placed in the content of an overall model for high energy physics data analysis. The strengths and deficiencies of the UNIX environment for high energy physics are discussed. Fermilab's early experience in dealing with a an open'' multivendor environment, both for computers and for peripherals, is described. The human resources required to fully exploit the opportunities are clearly growing. The possibility of keeping the development and support efforts within reasonable bounds may depend on our ability to collaborate or at least to share information even more effectively than we have in the past. 7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Manufacturing of calcium, lithium and molybdenum targets for use in nuclear physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheswa, N.Y., E-mail: kheswa@tlabs.ac.z [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Western Cape (South Africa); Papka, P.; Buthelezi, E.Z.; Lieder, R.M.; Neveling, R.; Newman, R.T. [iThemba Laboratory for Accelerator Based Science, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2010-02-11

    This paper describes methods used in the manufacturing of chemically reactive targets such as calcium ({sup nat}Ca), lithium-6 ({sup 6}Li) and molybdenum-97 ({sup 97}Mo) for nuclear physics experiments at the iThemba LABS cyclotron facility (Faure, South Africa). Due to the chemical properties of these materials a suitable and controlled environment was established in order to minimize oxygen contamination of targets. Calcium was prepared by means of vacuum evaporation while lithium was cold rolled to a desired thickness. In the case of molybdenum, the metallic powder was melted under vacuum using an e-gun followed by cold rolling of the metal bead to a desired thickness. In addition, latest developments toward the establishment of a dedicated nuclear physics target laboratory are discussed.

  15. Health physics experience in commissioning and operation of radiation and air activity monitoring system at FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation and Air Activity Monitoring System (RAAMS) at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is meant to monitor and record the radiation and air activity levels at various potentially active areas in FBTR complex. Health Physics Group, FBTR was associated during commissioning of RAAMS in fixing the alarm settings for the monitors, their relocation and in formulating the surveillance procedures. The areas were surveyed to check for any release of activity for confirming the observed readings during operation of the reactor. In such cases, augmentation of shielding was recommended and was promptly implemented by the station management. The details of the long and fruitful experience gained by the Health Physics Group, FBTR are described in this paper. (author)

  16. Using virtual Lustre clients on the WAN for analysis of data from high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourilkov, D.; Avery, P.; Cheng, M.; Fu, Y.; Kim, B.; Palencia, J.; Budden, R.; Benninger, K.; Shrum, D.; Wilgenbusch, J.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the work on creating system images of Lustre virtual clients in the ExTENCI project (Extending Science Through Enhanced National Cyberlnfrastructure), using several virtual technologies (Xen, VMware, VirtualBox, KVM). These virtual machines can be built at several levels, from a basic Linux installation (we use Scientific Linux 5 as an example), adding a Lustre client with Kerberos authentication, and up to complete clients including local or distributed (based on CernVM-FS) installations of the full CERN and project specific software stack for typical LHC experiments. The level, and size, of the images are determined by the users on demand. Various sites and individual users can just download and use them out of the box on Linux/UNIX, Windows and Mac OS X based hosts. We compare the performance of virtual clients with that of real physical systems for typical high energy physics applications like Monte Carlo simulations or analysis of data stored in ROOT trees.

  17. Frontiers of the Physics of Dense Plasmas and Planetary Interiors: Experiment, Theory, Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortney, J J; Glenzer, S H; Koenig, M; Brambrink, E; Militzer, B; Saumon, D; Valencia, D

    2008-09-12

    We review recent developments of dynamic x-ray characterization experiments of dense matter, with particular emphasis on conditions relevant to interiors of terrestrial and gas giant planets. These studies include characterization of compressed states of matter in light elements by x-ray scattering and imaging of shocked iron by radiography. We examine several applications of this work. These include the structure of massive 'Super Earth' terrestrial planets around other stars, the 40 known extrasolar gas giants with measured masses and radii, and Jupiter itself, which serves as our benchmark for giant planets. We are now in an era of dramatic improvement in our knowledge of the physics of materials at high density. For light elements, this theoretical and experimental work has many applications, including internal confinement fusion as well as the interiors of gas giant planets. For heavy elements, experiments on silicates and iron at high pressure are helping to better understand the Earth, as well as terrestrial planets as a class of objects. In particular, the discovery of rocky and gaseous planets in other planetary systems has opened our imaginations to planets not found in our own solar system. While the fields of experiments of matter at high densities, first principles calculations of equations of state (EOS), planetary science, and astronomy do progress independently of each other, it is important for there to be communication between fields. For instance, in the realm of planets, physicists can learn of key problems that exist in the area of planetary structure, and how advances in our understanding of input physics could shed new light in this area. Astronomers and planetary scientists can learn where breakthroughs in physics of materials under extreme conditions are occurring, and be ready to apply these findings within their fields.

  18. Principles of Equivalence Their Role in Gravitation Physics and Experiments that Test Them

    CERN Document Server

    Haugan, Mark P; Haugan, Mark P.

    2001-01-01

    Modern formulations of equivalence principles provide the foundation for an efficient approach to understanding and organizing the structural features of gravitation field theories. Since theories' predictions reflect differences in their structures, principles of equivalence also support an efficient experimental strategy for testing gravitation theories and for exploring the range of conceivable gravitation physics. These principles focus attention squarely on empirical consequences of the fundamental structural differences that distinguish one gravitation theory from another. Interestingly, the variety of such consequences makes it possible to design and perform experiments that test equivalence principles stringently but do so in markedly different ways than the most familiar experimental tests.

  19. A new application of V-F converter in laser physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new application of V-F converter for quasi-continuum laser physics experiment is described. It is used to convert not only direct current analog voltage outputted by powermeter, but also pulse analog voltage outputted by particle detector. Tests have demonstrated that linearity of the conversion reached ±0.015% for 10-1000 mV of direct current analog voltage and ±0.23% for 400-7800 mV of pulsed analog voltage. The accuracy satisfies experimental requirement. (authors)

  20. Test on the reactor with the intelligent extrapolation criticality device for physical startup experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Intelligent Extrapolation Criticality Device is used for automatic counting and automatic extrapolation during the criticality experiment on the reactor. Test must be performed on the zero-power reactor or other reactor before the Device is used. The paper describes the test situation and test results of the Device on the zero-power reactor. The test results show that the Device has the function of automatic counting and automatic extrapolation, the deviation of the extrapolation data is small, and it can satisfy the requirements of physical startup on the reactor. (author)

  1. Multi-hit time-to-digital converter VLSI for high-energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Y

    2001-01-01

    A multi-hit time-to-digital converter VLSI has been developed using a CMOS 0.3 mu m gate-array technology. The chip is designed for use in a high-energy physics experiment ATLAS. Precise timing signals are generated from 16 taps of an asymmetric ring oscillator oscillating at 80 MHz and controlled by a PLL circuit. A prototype chip has been developed, and a time resolution of 300 ps RMS was obtained. Many macro cells are developed to achieve such high resolution still using commercial gate-array technology. (4 refs).

  2. Optical Microscopy Characterization for Borehole U-15n#12 in Support of NCNS Source Physics Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jennifer E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sussman, Aviva Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    Optical microscopy characterization of thin sections from corehole U-15n#12 is part of a larger material characterization effort for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). The SPE program was conducted in Nevada with a series of explosive tests designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves inside Stock quartz monzonite. Optical microscopy analysis includes the following: 1) imaging of full thin sections (scans and mosaic maps); 2) high magnification imaging of petrographic texture (grain size, foliations, fractures, etc.); and 3) measurement of microfracture density.

  3. Dr Julia King CBE FREng, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (United Kingdom), visiting the NA48 experiment.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (right) with A. Ceccucci and K. Peach. Photo 05: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (centre) with A. Ceccucci and C. Lazzeroni. Photo 08: Visiting the NA48 experiment, Dr Julia King, Chief Executive Designate, Institute of Physics (Britain and Ireland) (second from left) with (left to right) R. Barlow, J. Wood, N. McCubbin, K. Peach, A. Ceccucci, C. Lazzeroni, M. Patel and D. Munday.

  4. A high-speed, four-wavelength infrared pyrometer for low temperature shock physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the standard problems associated with contactless temperature measurements, pyrometry in shock physics experiments has many additional concerns. These include background temperatures which are often higher than the substrate temperature, non-uniform sample temperature due to hotspots and ejecta, fast sample motion up to several km s-1, fast-changing sample emissivity at shock breakout, and very short measurement times. We have designed a four channel, high speed near-infrared (NIR) pyrometer for measurements in the 400 to 1000K blackbody temperature regime. The front end optics are specific to each experiment, utilizing preferably reflective optics in order to mitigate spectral dispersion. Next-generation instruments under development are also discussed.

  5. A new PCI card for readout in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Floris, M; Marras, D; Usai, G L; David, A

    2004-01-01

    Recently some high energy physics experiments started to adopt readout systems based on the PCI architecture. In this context a new PCI card that can be adapted to several readout schemes has been designed. The card contains a large 64 MB local buffer, programmable FPGA logic and a PLX PCI bridge. The solution to use a PCI bridge external to the programmable logic allows to greatly simplify projects at the level of the on-board local bus. The card is presently used as the basic readout unit of the NA60 experiment. In this context, coupling it to different mezzanine cards it is possible to create interfaces to VME/CAMAC modules or to custom front-end electronics as for the case of the silicon vertex detector. Moreover, it is used as a readout test system for the ALICE muon chambers. (10 refs).

  6. Design of a multiplicity logical unit applied for multi-inclusive physical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author briefly introduces a NIM module which can be widely used in the data acquisition system as event trigger generator, where the data of many relative parameters inclusive physical experiments are analyzed logically and selected beforehand. According to the inclusive multiplicity 'N', the module produces a NIM signal to trigger Data Acquisition System and ADC or TDC to convert the Events' data if the events' inclusive multiplicity is no less than 'N'. Otherwise, if the inclusive multiplicity is less than 'N', then the Events will be ignored. Consequently, the inclusive multiplicity as well as its distribution of the inclusive events can be known and the module makes the background computers of the data acquisition system to select and acquire the data more easily and faster. Therefore , lots of useless data and low inclusive events are excluded so as to save the expensive beam time and improve the experiment efficiency

  7. Interactions between spacecraft motions and the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    In evaluating the effects of spacecraft motions on atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) experimentation, the motions of concern are those which will result in the movement of the fluid or cloud particles within the experiment chambers. Of the various vehicle motions and residual forces which can and will occur, three types appear most likely to damage the experimental results: non-steady rotations through a large angle, long-duration accelerations in a constant direction, and vibrations. During the ACPL ice crystal growth experiments, the crystals are suspended near the end of a long fiber (20 cm long by 200 micron diameter) of glass or similar material. Small vibrations of the supported end of the fiber could cause extensive motions of the ice crystal, if care is not taken to avoid this problem.

  8. Zero-gravity cloud physics laboratory: Candidate experiments definition and preliminary concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, L. R.; Greco, R. V.; Hollinden, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The candidate definition studies on the zero-g cloud physics laboratory are covered. This laboratory will be an independent self-contained shuttle sortie payload. Several critical technology areas have been identified and studied to assure proper consideration in terms of engineering requirements for the final design. Areas include chambers, gas and particle generators, environmental controls, motion controls, change controls, observational techniques, and composition controls. This unique laboratory will allow studies to be performed without mechanical, aerodynamics, electrical, or other type techniques to support the object under study. This report also covers the candidate experiment definitions, chambers and experiment classes, laboratory concepts and plans, special supporting studies, early flight opportunities and payload planning data for overall shuttle payload requirements assessments.

  9. Manifestations of the rotation and gravity of the Earth in high-energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Obukhov, Yuri N; Teryaev, Oleg V

    2016-01-01

    The inertial (due to rotation) and gravitational fields of the Earth affect the motion of an elementary particle and its spin dynamics. This influence is not negligible and should be taken into account in high-energy physics experiments. Earth's influence is manifest in perturbations in the particle motion, in an additional precession of the spin, and in a change of the constitutive tensor of the Maxwell electrodynamics. Bigger corrections are oscillatory, and their contributions average to zero. Other corrections due to the inhomogeneity of the inertial field are not oscillatory but they are very small and may be important only for the storage ring electric dipole moment experiments. Earth's gravity causes the Newton-like force, the reaction force provided by a focusing system, and additional torques acting on the spin. However, there are no observable indications of the electromagnetic effects due to Earth's gravity.

  10. Manifestations of the rotation and gravity of the Earth in high-energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Silenko, Alexander J.; Teryaev, Oleg V.

    2016-08-01

    The inertial (due to rotation) and gravitational fields of the Earth affect the motion of an elementary particle and its spin dynamics. This influence is not negligible and should be taken into account in high-energy physics experiments. Earth's influence is manifest in perturbations in the particle motion, in an additional precession of the spin, and in a change of the constitutive tensor of the Maxwell electrodynamics. Bigger corrections are oscillatory, and their contributions average to zero. Other corrections due to the inhomogeneity of the inertial field are not oscillatory but they are very small and may be important only for the storage ring electric dipole moment experiments. Earth's gravity causes the Newton-like force, the reaction force provided by a focusing system, and additional torques acting on the spin. However, there are no observable indications of the electromagnetic effects due to Earth's gravity.

  11. Identification of relaxation parameter of a physical model of vein from fluid transient experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hromádka David

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new fluid transient inflation experiment applied on a physical model of vein (short latex tube, 5mm diameter. Aim of experiments is assessment of wall viscous behaviour from attenuated pulsation of the tested sample. Experimental data obtained from dynamic test are compared with numerical simulation and a viscoelastic parameter of Haslach constitutive model is identified. It is verified that the viscoelasticity of wall has a greater impact to the damping of pulsation than the viscosity of water filling the sample and the attached capillary. Volume of sample depends on internal pressure measured by a pressure transducer. The maximum dissipation constitutive model of viscoelastic wall sample was employed for description of viscoelastic behaviour. Frequency of natural oscillation of pressure is determined by inertia of water column within the tested sample and attached capillary and by the tested specimen stiffness. The pressure pulsations are initiated by a sudden pressure drop at water surface.

  12. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    There have been three physics meetings since the last CMS week: “physics days” on March 27-29, the Physics/ Trigger week on April 23-27 and the most recent physics days on May 22-24. The main purpose of the March physics days was to finalize the list of “2007 analyses”, i.e. the few topics that the physics groups will concentrate on for the rest of this calendar year. The idea is to carry out a full physics exercise, with CMSSW, for select physics channels which test key features of the physics objects, or represent potential “day 1” physics topics that need to be addressed in advance. The list of these analyses was indeed completed and presented in the plenary meetings. As always, a significant amount of time was also spent in reviewing the status of the physics objects (reconstruction) as well as their usage in the High-Level Trigger (HLT). The major event of the past three months was the first “Physics/Trigger week” in Apri...

  13. Physical experiments of land subsidence within a maar crater: insights for porosity variations and fracture localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerca, M.; Rocha, L.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Aranda, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a series of physical models aiming to reproduce rapid subsidence (at least 25 m in 30 years) observed in the sediments of a maar crater caused by extraction of groundwater in the interconnected adjacent aquifer. The model considered plausible variations in the geometry of the crater basement and the measured rate of groundwater extraction (1 m per year in the time interval from 2005 to 2011) in 15 wells located around the structure. The experiments were built within a rigid plastic bowl in which the sediments and rocks of the maar sequence were modeled using different materials: (a) plasticine for the rigid country rock, (b) gravel for the fractured country rock forming the diatreme fill and, (c) water saturated hollow glass microbeads for the lacustrine sedimentary fill of the crater. Water table was maintained initially at the surface of the sediments and then was allowed to flow through a hole made at the base of the rigid bowl. Water extraction provoked a sequence of gentle deformation, fracturing, and faulting of the surface in all the experiments. Vertical as well as lateral displacements were observed in the surface of the experiments. We discuss the results of 2 representative models. The model results reproduced the main geometry of the ring faults affecting the crater sediments and helps to explain the diversity of structures observed in relation with the diatreme geometry. The surface of the models was monitored continuously with an optical interferometric technique called structured light projection. Images collected at nearly constant time intervals were analyzed using the ZEBRA software and the obtained interferometric pairs permitted to analyze the full field subsidence in the model (submilimetric vertical displacements). The experiments were conducted at a continuous flow rate extraction and show a also a linear subsidence rate. Comparison among the results of the physical models and the fault system associated to

  14. Dynamic Weighing Experiments--The Way to New Physics of Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic weighing is a measuring of size of the average gravity force acting on a test body which is in the state of accelerated movement. The acceleration of a body, or its microparticles, can be caused both by forces of gravitation, and by a direct, electromagnetic in nature, influence on the part of other bodies. It is just dynamic weighing of bodies which is informative in studying the features of electromagnetic and gravitational forces interaction. The report gives a brief review of results of experiments with weighing of accelerated moving bodies--in case of shock phenomena, in state of rotation, and in heating. Special attention is given to measurements of free fall accelerations of a mechanical rotor. In majority of the laboratory experiments executed with the purpose of checking the equivalence principle, the axis of a rotor was oriented vertically. In our experiment we measured the free fall accelerations of the closed container inside which a mechanical rotor (gyroscope) with a horizontal axis of rotation was installed. There was observed an appreciable, essentially exceeding errors of measurements increase of acceleration of free falling of the container at angular speed of rotation of a rotor up to 20 000 rev/min. The physical conditions of free vertical falling of a body essentially differ from conditions of rotary (orbital) movement of a body in the field of gravity and the result obtained by us does not contradict the results of measurements of a gyroscope precession on satellites. Experiments with dynamic weighing of bodies give useful information on complex properties of the gravity force which are beyond the scope of well-known theories. Their careful analysis will allow to expand and supplement the concepts based on the general theory of relativity, and probably to open a way to new physics of gravitation and to new principles of movement.

  15. MONITORING OF A GLUTEN CONTENT IN SELECTED MEAT PRODUCTS FROM THREE BIGGEST MEAT PRODUCERS IN SLOVAKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Staruch

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The work is focused on a monitoring of a gluten content in selected meat products from three biggest and most popular meat producers in Slovakia. Gluten is a type of protein complex which is typical naturally presented component of wheat, barley and rye. Flour from this sources with natural gluten content is also added into the some type of meat products and other foodstuffs for a technological reasons hand in hand with economic reasons.  Some of the gluten quantities could be hazardous for sensitive people as celiatics and allergic to gluten. Within the context of this reasons there is a need to control the amounts of this hidden type of gluten inclusive of spice mixes using in a meat production. Monitoring by itself was realized with a use of the sandwich ELISA RIDASCREEN® Fast Gliadin test. ELISA means enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. It is based on a specific reaction among the enzyme and antigen leading to a creation of a complex.  This test provides us exact quantitification of a gluten content in this type of food products using a colorimetric reaction of a complex by observing of all fundamentals of this technique. There were analysed 16 meat products and 5 types of spice mixes in total.doi:10.5219/167

  16. Emphasising Images in Peace Journalism: Theory and Practice in the Case of Norway's Biggest Newspaper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Ottosen

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests that more emphasis should be placed on visual aspects in the concept of peace journalism. The author argues, through theoretical and practical examples, that visual aspects of journalism are underestimated when it comes to analysing how the human brain deals with textual and visual impulses. Examples such as the controversy around Jyllands-Posten's publication of the Mohammed cartoons proves the power of the image in a digital and global media environment. Using as a case study the coverage by Norway's biggest newspaper, Verdens Gang (VG, of, respectively, Colin Powell's presentation to the UN Security Council before the Iraq War in 2003, and the attack on the Iraqi town of Fallujah by US and Iraqi forces in November 2004, the author argues that by placing more emphasis on visual elements like graphics and photographs, peace journalism can be an ever stronger instrument for developing a critical journalism during wars and conflicts. By contrasting VG's coverage in Fallujah with the powerful and emphatic coverage of the Asian tsunami a month later, the author suggests that new digital media can be a powerful tool for journalists with ambitions to promote peace journalism.

  17. Possible Scales of New Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Dine, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The biggest question in beyond the standard model physics is what are the scales of new physics. Ideas about scales, as well as experimental evidence and constraints, are surveyed for a variety of possible forms of new physics: supersymmetry, neutrino masses, unification, and superstring theory.

  18. The Relationship Between Academic Writing Experience and Academic Publishing for Graduate Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steven Timothy Michael

    Writing for scientific publication represents an opportunity to interact with colleagues and make a positive contribution to the academic community. However, there is a growing concern regarding the ability of graduate students' to transfer writing skill sets learned at the graduate and undergraduate levels into professional settings. The main research question in this quantitative correlational study explored potential relationships between the publication rates and the number and types of English and composition classes taken by survey participants. Fischerian development, life course theory, and phenomenological sociology framed this study. Participants from private, public, and commercial institutions of higher learning in the United States participated. Data were analyzed using correlational, chi-square, ANOVA, and multiple regression techniques to reveal relationships between the number and types of English and composition classes taken and publication rates. Open-ended questions gathered opinions about scientific writing and writing class experiences and helped triangulate the findings. The results suggested a relationship between publication rates and number of English and composition classes among certain physics specializations and a need for physics institutions to create specialized publishing courses. The results may lead to positive social change by facilitating the examination of writing within particular physics specializations and motivating the creation of departmental constructed writing courses targeting the scientific community responsible for producing technically skilled literate workers. This could enable increased sharing of scientific findings with professional societies.

  19. Rossby vortices, spiral structures, solitons astrophysics and plasma physics in shallow water experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nezlin, Mikhail V

    1993-01-01

    This book can be looked upon in more ways than one. On the one hand, it describes strikingly interesting and lucid hydrodynamic experiments done in the style of the "good old days" when the physicist needed little more than a piece of string and some sealing wax. On the other hand, it demonstrates how a profound physical analogy can help to get a synoptic view on a broad range of nonlinear phenomena involving self-organization of vortical structures in planetary atmo­ spheres and oceans, in galaxies and in plasmas. In particular, this approach has elucidated the nature and the mechanism of such grand phenomena as the Great of galaxies. A number of our Red Spot vortex on Jupiter and the spiral arms predictions concerning the dynamics of spiral galaxies are now being confirmed by astronomical observations stimulated by our experiments. This book is based on the material most of which was accumulated during 1981-88 in close cooperation with our colleagues, experimenters from the Plasma Physics Department of the...

  20. Muon decay: an old, yet alive experiment in the university physics curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, F.; La Rocca, P.; Riggi, S.

    2016-07-01

    The classic experiment on muon decay is proposed in the undergraduate or master physics curriculum, making use of a single scintillation detector and observing in coincidence the delayed signal due to the electron following muon decay. Two experimental setups, with different geometries and scintillation materials, were considered, making use of standard equipment available in most undergraduate labs. The results obtained in the two cases were compared and discussed. For a better understanding of the results, and to also evaluate the possible effect of material surrounding the detector, detailed GEANT simulations were carried out for both experimental setups. Such simulations are also intended as an additional student activity to virtually exploit in a short time the effect of modifying detector and material configuration, which cannot be achieved during a single student session. The results of this experiment and its interpretation also proved to be a useful way to discuss with students many topics of interest in modern physics, such as—among others—the time dilation, the dependence of muon lifetime in matter, the Fermi weak interaction coupling constant and the parity violation in weak interactions.

  1. Data Release Report for Source Physics Experiment 1 (SPE-1), Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Margaret [NSTec; Mercadente, Jennifer [NSTec

    2014-04-28

    The first Source Physics Experiment shot (SPE-1) was conducted in May 2011. The explosive source was a ~100-kilogram TNT-equivalent chemical set at a depth of 60 meters. It was recorded by an extensive set of instrumentation that includes sensors both at near-field (less than 100 meters) and far-field (more than 100 meters) distances. The near-field instruments consisted of three-component accelerometers deployed in boreholes around the shot and a set of singlecomponent vertical accelerometers on the surface. The far-field network comprised a variety of seismic and acoustic sensors, including short-period geophones, broadband seismometers, three-component accelerometers, and rotational seismometers at distances of 100 meters to 25 kilometers. This report coincides with the release of these data for analysts and organizations that are not participants in this program. This report describes the first Source Physics Experiment and the various types of near-field and far-field data that are available.

  2. Forward and Small-x QCD Physics Results from CMS Experiment at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sunar Cerci, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the two large, multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. During the Run I Phase a large pp collision dataset has been collected and the CMS collaboration has explored measurements that shed light on a new era. Forward and small-$x$ quantum chromodynamics (QCD) physics measurements with CMS experiment covers a wide range of physics subjects. Some of highlights in terms of testing the very low-$x$ QCD, underlying event and multiple interaction characteristics, photon-mediated processes, jets with large rapidity separation at high pseudo-rapidities and the inelastic proton-proton cross section dominated by diffractive interactions are presented. Results are compared to Monte Carlo (MC) models with different parameter tunes for the description of the underlying event and to perturbative QCD calculations. The prominent role of multi-parton interactions has been confirmed in the semihard sector but no clear deviation from the standard DGLAP parto...

  3. The Physics Programme Of The MoEDAL Experiment At The LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, BKing's Coll. London; Bernabeu, J; Campbell, M; Cecchini, S; Chwastowski, J; De Montigny, M; Derendarz, D; De Roeck, A; Ellis, J R; Fairbairn, M; Felea, D; Frank, M; Frekers, D; Garcia, C; Giacomelli, G; Giorgini, M; Hasegan, D; Hott, T; Jakubek, J; Katre, A; Kim, D-W; King, M G L; Kinoshita, K; Lacarrere, D; Lee, S C; Leroy, C; Margiotta, A; Mauri, N; Mavromatos, N E; Mermod, P; Mitsou, V A; Orava, R; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Pavalas, G E; Pinfold, J L; Platkevic, M; Popa, V; Pozzato, M; Pospisil, S; Rajantie, A; Sahnoun, Z; Sakellariadou, M; Sarkar, S; Semenoff, G; Sirri, G; Sliwa, K; Soluk, R; Spurio, M; Srivastava, Y N; Staszewski, R; Swain, J; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Trzebinski, M; Tuszynski, J A; Vento, V; Vives, O; Vykydal, Z; Widom, A; Yoon, J H

    2014-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment at Point 8 of the LHC ring is the seventh and newest LHC experiment. It is dedicated to the search for highly ionizing particle avatars of physics beyond the Standard Model, extending significantly the discovery horizon of the LHC. A MoEDAL discovery would have revolutionary implications for our fundamental understanding of the Microcosm. MoEDAL is an unconventional and largely passive LHC detector comprised of the largest array of Nuclear Track Detector stacks ever deployed at an accelerator, surrounding the intersection region at Point 8 on the LHC ring. Another novel feature is the use of paramagnetic trapping volumes to capture both electrically and magnetically charged highly-ionizing particles predicted in new physics scenarios. It includes an array of TimePix pixel devices for monitoring highly-ionizing particle backgrounds. The main passive elements of the MoEDAL detector do not require a trigger system, electronic readout, or online computerized data acquisition. The aim of this...

  4. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  5. Numerical simulation of a physical stochastic signal in ether-drift experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, M; Rapisarda, A; Tudisco, S

    2012-01-01

    Ether-drift experiments are the only known experiments which, in principle, can distinguish Einstein's interpretation of the relativistic effects from the Lorentzian point of view with some underlying form of ether which plays the role of a preferred reference frame. To test experimentally this latter point of view, it is usually assumed that the macroscopic Earth's motion should be detectable in the laboratory from the time dependence of the data. Therefore any observed stochastic signal, which does not exhibit the smooth modulations expected from the Earth's rotation, tends to be considered as a spurious instrumental effect, e.g. thermal noise. The real situation, however, might be more subtle if the hypothetical ether (i.e. the physical vacuum) resembles a turbulent fluid where large-scale and small-scale motions are only indirectly related. In this case in fact, besides thermal noise, the data might contain a genuine physical stochastic component. To test this scenario, we have performed a numerical simul...

  6. Older Adults’ Experiences Using a Commercially Available Monitor to Self-Track Their Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity contributes to older adults’ autonomy, mobility, and quality of life as they age, yet fewer than 1 in 5 engage in activities as recommended. Many older adults track their exercise using pencil and paper, or their memory. Commercially available physical activity monitors (PAM) have the potential to facilitate these tracking practices and, in turn, physical activity. An assessment of older adults’ long-term experiences with PAM is needed to understand this potential. Objective To assess short and long-term experiences of adults >70 years old using a PAM (Fitbit One) in terms of acceptance, ease-of-use, and usefulness: domains in the technology acceptance model. Methods This prospective study included 95 community-dwelling older adults, all of whom received a PAM as part of randomized controlled trial piloting a fall-reducing physical activity promotion intervention. Ten-item surveys were administered 10 weeks and 8 months after the study started. Survey ratings are described and analyzed over time, and compared by sex, education, and age. Results Participants were mostly women (71/95, 75%), 70 to 96 years old, and had some college education (68/95, 72%). Most participants (86/95, 91%) agreed or strongly agreed that the PAM was easy to use, useful, and acceptable both 10 weeks and 8 months after enrolling in the study. Ratings dropped between these time points in all survey domains: ease-of-use (median difference 0.66 points, P=.001); usefulness (median difference 0.16 points, P=.193); and acceptance (median difference 0.17 points, P=.032). Differences in ratings by sex or educational attainment were not statistically significant at either time point. Most participants 80+ years of age (28/37, 76%) agreed or strongly agreed with survey items at long-term follow-up, however their ratings were significantly lower than participants in younger age groups at both time points. Conclusions Study results indicate it is feasible for older

  7. Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

    2005-09-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

  8. PROPOSAL FOR AN EXPERIMENT PROGRAM IN NEUTRINO PHYSICS AND PROTON DECAY IN THE HOMESTAKE LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DIWAN, M.; KETTELL, S.; LITTENBERG, W.; MARIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.; SAMIOS, N.; WHITE, S.; ET AL.

    2006-07-24

    This report is intended to describe first, the principal physics reasons for an ambitious experimental program in neutrino physics and proton decay based on construction of a series of massive water Cherenkov detectors located deep underground (4850 ft) in the Homestake Mine of the South Dakota Science and Technology Authority (SDSTA); and second, the engineering design of the underground chambers to house the Cherenkov detector modules; and third, the conceptual design of the water Cherenkov detectors themselves for this purpose. In this proposal we show the event rates and physics sensitivity for beams from both FNAL (1300 km distant from Homestake) and BNL (2540 km distant from Homestake). The program we propose will benefit with a beam from FNAL because of the high intensities currently available from the Main Injector with modest upgrades. The possibility of tuning the primary proton energy over a large range from 30 to 120 GeV also adds considerable flexibility to the program from FNAL. On the other hand the beam from BNL over the larger distance will produce very large matter effects, and consequently a hint of new physics (beyond CP violation) can be better tested with that configuration. In this proposal we focus on the CP violation physics. Included in this document are preliminary costs and time-to-completion estimates which have been exposed to acknowledged experts in their respective areas. This presentation is not, however, to be taken as a technical design report with the extensive documentation and contingency costs that a TDR usually entails. Nevertheless, some contingency factors have been included in the estimates given here. The essential ideas expressed here were first laid out in a letter of intent to the interim director of the Homestake Laboratory on July 26, 2001. Since that time, the prospect of a laboratory in the Homestake Mine has been realized, and the design of a long baseline neutrino experiment has been refined. The extrapolation

  9. Lived experiences of self-care among older physically active urban-living individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundsli K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kari Sundsli,1,2 Geir Arild Espnes,3 Olle Söderhamn21Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway, 2Centre for Caring Research, Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway, 3Research Centre for Health Promotion and Resources HiST-NTNU, Department of Social Work and Health Science, Faculty of Social Sciences and Technology Management, NTNU, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Promoting physical activity is a public health priority in most industrial countries, and physical function is an important factor when taking into consideration older people’s self-care and health. Despite the increasing challenges associated with urbanization and the aging population, urban life appears to be positive in many ways for urban dwellers. However, the manner in which older people live in urban settings and how this influences their ability to take care of themselves should be considered important knowledge for health professionals and politicians to acquire. The aim of this study was to describe the lived experiences of self-care and features that may influence health and self-care among older urban home-dwelling individuals who are physically active.Methods: Ten subjects, three women and seven men, who were aged 65–82 years and identified to be physically active, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed according to the descriptive phenomenological method devised by Giorgi.Results: Our findings showed beneficial self-care. The participants lived active everyday lives and were frequently physically active. They were part of a supportive, inclusive, and promoting fellowship, and they had the opportunity to travel. They utilized their competence and experienced making themselves useful. It was a privilege to be part of a family life as a husband, wife, parent, and/or a grandparent. They

  10. Patients’ experiences of using a smartphone application to increase physical activity: the SMART MOVE qualitative study in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Monica; Hayes, Patrick S; Glynn, Fergus; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; Heaney, David; Murphy, Andrew W; Glynn, Liam G

    2014-01-01

    Background Regular physical activity is known to help prevent and treat numerous non-communicable diseases. Smartphone applications (apps) have been shown to increase physical activity in primary care but little is known regarding the views of patients using such technology or how such technology may change behaviour. Aim To explore patients’ views and experiences of using smartphones to promote physical activity in primary care. Design and setting This qualitative study was embedded within t...

  11. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD, and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS and geographical information systems (GIS. The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students. A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular. Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  12. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  13. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual fieldtrips in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field trip for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field trip over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field trip in particular). We believe our experiences are directly relevant to the implementation of such novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  14. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    2010-01-01

    A remarkable amount of progress has been made in Physics since the last CMS Week in June given the exponential growth in the delivered LHC luminosity. The first major milestone was the delivery of a variety of results to the ICHEP international conference held in Paris this July. For this conference, CMS prepared 15 Physics Analysis Summaries on physics objects and 22 Summaries on new and interesting physics measurements that exploited the luminosity recorded by the CMS detector. The challenge was incorporating the largest batch of luminosity that was delivered only days before the conference (300 nb-1 total). The physics covered from this initial running period spanned hadron production measurements, jet production and properties, electroweak vector boson production, and even glimpses of the top quark. Since then, the accumulated integrated luminosity has increased by a factor of more than 100, and all groups have been working tremendously hard on analysing this dataset. The September Physics Week was held ...

  15. How Clinical Instructors Can Enhance the Learning Experience of Physical Therapy Students in an Introductory Clinical Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Beverley; Wessel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: There is little understanding of how physical therapy students are influenced by clinical instructors (CIs) particularly at the outset of their clinical learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physical therapy students' perceptions of their learning experiences during an introductory clinical placement. Methods: Subjects were…

  16. Teaching Practice: University Supervisors' Experiences and Perceptions of a Cooperating Physical Education Teacher Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Sarah; Dunning, Carol; Belton, Sarahjane; Woods, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine university supervisors' experiences and perceptions of a cooperating physical education teacher education (COPET) programme while on teaching practice. Teaching practice is a central tenet of physical education teacher education (PETE) preparation. The COPET programme was designed to support the…

  17. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sphicas

    The CPT project came to an end in December 2006 and its original scope is now shared among three new areas, namely Computing, Offline and Physics. In the physics area the basic change with respect to the previous system (where the PRS groups were charged with detector and physics object reconstruction and physics analysis) was the split of the detector PRS groups (the old ECAL-egamma, HCAL-jetMET, Tracker-btau and Muons) into two groups each: a Detector Performance Group (DPG) and a Physics Object Group. The DPGs are now led by the Commissioning and Run Coordinator deputy (Darin Acosta) and will appear in the correspond¬ing column in CMS bulletins. On the physics side, the physics object groups are charged with the reconstruction of physics objects, the tuning of the simulation (in collaboration with the DPGs) to reproduce the data, the provision of code for the High-Level Trigger, the optimization of the algorithms involved for the different physics analyses (in collaboration with the analysis gr...

  18. World as The Biggest Clasroom. Travel as The Best Lesson. Independent Scientific School Expeditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksik, Ireneusz; Lorek, Grzegorz; Dacy-Ignatiuk, Katarzyna

    2013-04-01

    We are a group of teachers from Poland who think that classroom lessons are not enough for our pupils to understand the world. We had a dream to take our students and show them the most beautiful places and phenomena on the Earth. But how to do it? Though today's travelling is so easy as never before, there are still some problems for young Poles - not only funding but also philosophy of travelling. It looks that we found a solution a few years ago - why not to organise quite independent school scientific expeditions? Without travel agencies and agents we can reduce costs of travelling 2-3 times! And we did it! We buy cheap flight tickets, fly to our destination and then... we must manage with all problems ourselves. We sleep in tents or budget hostels, use local means of transport and eat food from cheap markets or street eating places. Our motto is: "To see as much as possible for the minimum money". There are many more advantages - we decide where to go and how much time we spend in one area, we can change our route in every moment if something appears worth seeing. Our small groups are very mobile, sometimes local people invite us to visit their houses (like in Iran or Morocco). Expeditions allow students to watch, feel, touch, taste and smell phenomena, places and organisms which they could only read about in a classroom and to understand people from other cultures and religions. The list of nature and culture jewels that we have already seen is still growing - sands and oasis of Sahara, snow peaks of Himalayas, salt waters of Caspian Sea in Iran, geysers, volcanoes and glaciers of Iceland, the biggest sea birds colonies and whales in the North Atlantic, ancient cities - Fez, Marrakesh, Esfahan, Varanasi and Yazd.

  19. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  20. Using the Bifocal Modeling Framework to Resolve "Discrepant Events" Between Physical Experiments and Virtual Models in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Fuhrmann, Tamar; Salehi, Shima

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate an approach to supporting students' learning in science through a combination of physical experimentation and virtual modeling. We present a study that utilizes a scientific inquiry framework, which we call "bifocal modeling," to link student-designed experiments and computer models in real time. In this study, a group of high school students designed computer models of bacterial growth with reference to a simultaneous physical experiment they were conducting, and were able to validate the correctness of their model against the results of their experiment. Our findings suggest that as the students compared their virtual models with physical experiments, they encountered "discrepant events" that contradicted their existing conceptions and elicited a state of cognitive disequilibrium. This experience of conflict encouraged students to further examine their ideas and to seek more accurate explanations of the observed natural phenomena, improving the design of their computer models.

  1. The Scaffolded Mind: Higher mental processes are grounded in early experience of the physical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lawrence E; Huang, Julie Y; Bargh, John A

    2009-12-01

    It has long been a staple of psychological theory that early life experiences significantly shape the adult's understanding of and reactions to the social world. Here we consider how early concept development along with evolved motives operating early in life can come to exert a passive, unconscious influence on the human adult's higher-order goal pursuits, judgments, and actions. In particular, we focus on concepts and goal structures specialized for interacting with the physical environment (e.g., distance cues, temperature, cleanliness, and self-protection), which emerge early and automatically as a natural part of human development and evolution. It is proposed that via the process of scaffolding, these early sensorimotor experiences serve as the foundation for the later development of more abstract concepts and goals. Experiments using priming methodologies reveal the extent to which these early concepts serve as the analogical basis for more abstract psychological concepts, such that we come easily and naturally to speak of close relationships, warm personalities, moral purity, and psychological pain. Taken together, this research demonstrates the extent to which such foundational concepts are capable of influencing people's information processing, affective judgments, and goal pursuit, oftentimes outside of their intention or awareness.

  2. Astroparticle physics at LHC: The LHCf experiment ready for data taking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongi, M., E-mail: massimo.bongi@fi.infn.i [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone, 1 I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Adriani, O.; Bonechi, L. [Universita degli Studi di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC-CNR and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); D' Alessandro, R. [Universita degli Studi di Firenze and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Faus, D.A. [IFIC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Fukui, K. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Grandi, M. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone, 1 I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Haguenauer, M. [Ecole-Polytechnique, Paris (France); Itow, Y. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Kasahara, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Macina, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mase, T.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Menjo, H. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Mizuishi, M. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan); Muraki, Y. [Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Papini, P. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone, 1 I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Perrot, A.L. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-01-11

    LHCf is a high-energy physics experiment designed to study the forward production of neutral particles in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. The set-up consists of two small calorimetric systems symmetrically placed 140 m away on both the sides of the ATLAS interaction point. Results from the experiment will provide valuable information to the calibration of the nuclear interaction models used in the Monte Carlo codes for air-shower simulations, which are of great importance for present and future ground-based cosmic-ray experiments. In particular, since LHCf will start taking data in the first phase of operation of the LHC (during the beam commissioning phase at 5+5TeV energy) and will complete its data taking at the beginning of the 7+7TeV runs (laboratory equivalent collision energy 10{sup 17}eV), it will span an energy range up to the region between the 'knee' and the GZK cut-off of the cosmic-ray spectrum.

  3. The Scaffolded Mind: Higher mental processes are grounded in early experience of the physical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lawrence E; Huang, Julie Y; Bargh, John A

    2009-12-01

    It has long been a staple of psychological theory that early life experiences significantly shape the adult's understanding of and reactions to the social world. Here we consider how early concept development along with evolved motives operating early in life can come to exert a passive, unconscious influence on the human adult's higher-order goal pursuits, judgments, and actions. In particular, we focus on concepts and goal structures specialized for interacting with the physical environment (e.g., distance cues, temperature, cleanliness, and self-protection), which emerge early and automatically as a natural part of human development and evolution. It is proposed that via the process of scaffolding, these early sensorimotor experiences serve as the foundation for the later development of more abstract concepts and goals. Experiments using priming methodologies reveal the extent to which these early concepts serve as the analogical basis for more abstract psychological concepts, such that we come easily and naturally to speak of close relationships, warm personalities, moral purity, and psychological pain. Taken together, this research demonstrates the extent to which such foundational concepts are capable of influencing people's information processing, affective judgments, and goal pursuit, oftentimes outside of their intention or awareness. PMID:20046813

  4. NEAR FIELD MODELING OF SPE1 EXPERIMENT AND PREDICTION OF THE SECOND SOURCE PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS (SPE2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T; Xu, H; Vorobiev, O; Lomov, I

    2011-10-20

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was

  5. Near Field Modeling Of SPE1 Experiment And Prediction Of The Second Source Physics Experiments (SPE2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motion along joints and fractures in the rock has been proposed as one of the sources of near-source shear wave generation, and demonstrating the validity of this hypothesis is a focal scientific objective of the source physics experimental campaign in the Climax Stock granitic outcrop. A modeling effort has been undertaken by LLNL to complement the experimental campaign, and over the long term provide a validated computation capability for the nuclear explosion monitoring community. The approach involves performing the near-field nonlinear modeling with hydrodynamic codes (e.g., GEODYN, GEODYN-L), and the far-field seismic propagation with an elastic wave propagation code (e.g., WPP). the codes will be coupled together to provide a comprehensive source-to-sensor modeling capability. The technical approach involves pre-test predictions of each of the SPE experiments using their state of the art modeling capabilities, followed by code improvements to alleviate deficiencies identified in the pre-test predictions. This spiral development cycle wherein simulations are used to guide experimental design and the data from the experiment used to improve the models is the most effective approach to enable a transition from the descriptive phenomenological models in current use to the predictive, hybrid physics models needed for a science-based modeling capability for nuclear explosion monitoring. The objective of this report is to describe initial results of non-linear motion predictions of the first two SPE shots in the Climax Stock: a 220-lb shot at a depth of 180 ft (SPE No.1), and a 2570-lb shot at a depth of 150 ft (SPE No.2). The simulations were performed using the LLNL ensemble granite model, a model developed to match velocity and displacement attenuation from HARDHAT, PILE DRIVER, and SHOAL, as well as Russian and French nuclear test data in granitic rocks. This model represents the state of the art modeling capabilities as they existed when the SPE campaign was

  6. The Effect of Early Teaching and Training Experience on Physics Achievement, Attitude Toward Science and Science Teaching, and Process Skill Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A factorial design which intersected process skill instruction with field experience was utilized. Significantly higher physics achievement scores and process skill competency were observed for the field-experience, process-supplemented physics course. (CP)

  7. PHYSICS

    CERN Multimedia

    Submitted by

    Physics Week: plenary meeting on physics groups plans for startup (14–15 May 2008) The Physics Objects (POG) and Physics Analysis (PAG) Groups presented their latest developments at the plenary meeting during the Physics Week. In the presentations particular attention was given to startup plans and readiness for data-taking. Many results based on the recent cosmic run were shown. A special Workshop on SUSY, described in a separate section, took place the day before the plenary. At the meeting, we had also two special DPG presentations on “Tracker and Muon alignment with CRAFT” (Ernesto Migliore) and “Calorimeter studies with CRAFT” (Chiara Rovelli). We had also a report from Offline (Andrea Rizzi) and Computing (Markus Klute) on the San Diego Workshop, described elsewhere in this bulletin. Tracking group (Boris Mangano). The level of sophistication of the tracking software increased significantly over the last few months: V0 (K0 and Λ) reconstr...

  8. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I; Bird, J P

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In

  9. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, I.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In

  10. Undergraduate Research Experiences in Geosciences for Physical Science and Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bililign, S.; Schimmel, K.; Lin, Y. L.; Germuth, A.

    2015-12-01

    The recruitment of undergraduate students, especially minorities, into geoscience career paths continues to be a challenge. An REU program that focused on recruiting students majoring in physical sciences and engineering from HBCU's within North Carolina started in 2012. The program offers an academic year REU for North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T) students (8 students), summer research for non-NCA&T students (18 students), and field experiences in national labs for selected students. In this REU, the design of projects involves several faculty members (at least two from different disciplines) that expose students to interdisciplinary research approaches. The outcomes of this program, challenges, opportunities and lessons learned will be presented.

  11. TSV last for hybrid pixel detectors: Application to particle physics and imaging experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Henry, D; Berthelot, A; Cuchet, R; Chantre, C; Campbell, M

    Hybrid pixel detectors are now widely used in particle physics experiments and at synchrotron light sources. They have also stimulated growing interest in other fields and, in particular, in medical imaging. Through the continuous pursuit of miniaturization in CMOS it has been possible to increase the functionality per pixel while maintaining or even shrinking pixel dimensions. The main constraint on the more extensive use of the technology in all fields is the cost of module building and the difficulty of covering large areas seamlessly [1]. On another hand, in the field of electronic component integration, a new approach has been developed in the last years, called 3D Integration. This concept, based on using the vertical axis for component integration, allows improving the global performance of complex systems. Thanks to this technology, the cost and the form factor of components could be decreased and the performance of the global system could be enhanced. In the field of radiation imaging detectors the a...

  12. In Search of the Physics: The Interplay of Experiment and Computation in Slat Aeroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Choudhari, Meelan; Singer, Bart A.; Lockard, David P.; Streett, Craig L.

    2003-01-01

    The synergistic use of experiments and numerical simulations can uncover the underlying physics of airframe noise sources. We focus on the high-lift noise component associated with a leading-edge slat; flap side-edge noise is discussed in a companion paper by Streett et al. (2003). The present paper provides an overview of how slat noise was split into subcomponents and analyzed with carefully planned complementary experimental and numerical tests. We consider both tonal and broadband aspects of slat noise. The predicted far-field noise spectra are shown to be in good qualitative (and, to lesser extent, good quantitative agreement) with acoustic array measurements. Although some questions remain unanswered, the success of current airframe noise studies provides ample promise that remaining technical issues can be successfully addressed in the near future.

  13. Demonstration experiments for solid state physics using a table top mechanical Stirling refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, M R; Rodrigo, J G; Suderow, H; Vieira, S; 10.1088/0143-0807/33/4/757

    2012-01-01

    Liquid free cryogenic devices are acquiring importance in basic science and engineering. But they can also lead to improvements in teaching low temperature an solid state physics to graduate students and specialists. Most of the devices are relatively expensive, but small sized equipment is slowly becoming available. Here, we have designed several simple experiments which can be performed using a small Stirling refrigerator. We discuss the measurement of the critical current and temperature of a bulk YBa2Cu3O(7-d) (YBCO) sample, the observation of the levitation of a magnet over a YBCO disk when cooled below the critical temperature and the observation of a phase transition using ac calorimetry. The equipment can be easily handled by students, and also used to teach the principles of liquid free cooling.

  14. RADIATION HARDNESS / TOLERANCE OF SI SENSORS / DETECTORS FOR NUCLEAR AND HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LI,Z.

    2002-09-09

    Silicon sensors, widely used in high energy and nuclear physics experiments, suffer severe radiation damage that leads to degradations in sensor performance. These degradations include significant increases in leakage current, bulk resistivity, and space charge concentration. The increase in space charge concentration is particularly damaging since it can significantly increase the sensor full depletion voltage, causing either breakdown if operated at high biases or charge collection loss if operated at lower biases than full depletion. Several strategies can be used to make Si detectors more radiation had tolerant to particle radiations. In this paper, the main radiation induced degradations in Si detectors will be reviewed. The details and specifics of the new engineering strategies: material/impurity/defect engineering (MIDE); device structure engineering (DSE); and device operational mode engineering (DOME) will be given.

  15. Prototype VME and CAMAC form factor time stamping module development for nuclear physics experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern nuclear physics experiments employ large detector arrays for measurement of different radiations, like charge particle, Gamma, Neutron etc. Heterogeneous detector systems may have different response time and different front end processing. The trigger rate of the individual detector system, as well as the width of the acquisition window may vary accordingly. It may not be possible to generate a common GATE signal to acquire correlated events, without introducing significant dead time. It is proposed to run multiple DAQ (Data Acquisition System) independently on its own trigger and mark the data with high-resolution time stamps. Time stamp may be the absolute time or a local counter value. The offline event builder generates the global correlated events by matching the time stamp values

  16. Development of CMOS pixel sensors for tracking and vertexing in high energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Senyukov, Serhiy; Besson, Auguste; Claus, Giles; Cousin, Loic; Dulinski, Wojciech; Goffe, Mathieu; Hippolyte, Boris; Maria, Robert; Molnar, Levente; Castro, Xitzel Sanchez; Winter, Marc

    2014-01-01

    CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) represent a novel technological approach to building charged particle detectors. CMOS processes allow to integrate a sensing volume and readout electronics in a single silicon die allowing to build sensors with a small pixel pitch ($\\sim 20 \\mu m$) and low material budget ($\\sim 0.2-0.3\\% X_0$) per layer. These characteristics make CPS an attractive option for vertexing and tracking systems of high energy physics experiments. Moreover, thanks to the mass production industrial CMOS processes used for the manufacturing of CPS the fabrication construction cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to more standard semiconductor technologies. However, the attainable performance level of the CPS in terms of radiation hardness and readout speed is mostly determined by the fabrication parameters of the CMOS processes available on the market rather than by the CPS intrinsic potential. The permanent evolution of commercial CMOS processes towards smaller feature sizes and high resistivity ...

  17. Fundamental Magnetofluid Physics Studies on the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment: Reconnection and Sustainment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general goal of the Magnetofluids Laboratory at Swarthmore College is to understand how magnetofluid kinetic energy can be converted to magnetic energy as it is in the core of the earth and sun (the dynamo problem) and to understand how magnetic energy can be rapidly converted back to kinetic energy and heat as it is in solar flares (the magnetic reconnection problem). Magnetic reconnection has been studied using the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) which was designed and built under this Junior Faculty Grant. In SSX we generate and merge two rings of magnetized plasma called spheromaks and study their interaction. The spheromaks have many properties similar to solar flares so this work is directly relevant to basic solar physics. In addition, since the spheromak is a magnetic confinement fusion configuration, issues of formation and stability have direct impact on the fusion program

  18. Searches for New Physics Using High Mass Dimuons at the CDF II Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagoz Unel, Muge [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the D0 experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb-1. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics. This work points out the aspects of the detector which need better understanding to reach Run I precision and to constrain the PDFs.

  19. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27Al+ in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser

  20. Fission physics experiments at the time-of-flight spectrometer GNEIS in Gatchina (PNPI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outline of and fission physics experiments at the Gatchina neutron spectrometer GNEIS based on the 1 GeV PNPI proton synchrotron are presented. The prefission gamma-ray spectrum of the (n, gamma f) reaction were investigated. The capture gamma-ray spectra for 721.6 eV and 1211.4 eV resonances in U-238 were measured and the nature of the 721.6 eV resonance in U-238 were examined. The forward-backward asymmetry in slow neutron fission of U-235 and energy dependence of the forward-backward and instrumental asymmetry coefficients were obtained. Fission cross section ratios for Th-232 to U-235 and for U-238 to U-235 in the energy range up to 200 MeV were measured. The results of the cross section ratios agreed well with those of Behrens et al. and Difilippo et al. (T.H.)