WorldWideScience

Sample records for big brains small

  1. Big ideas for small brains: what can psychiatry learn from worms, flies, bees and fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burne, T; Scott, E; van Swinderen, B; Hilliard, M; Reinhard, J; Claudianos, C; Eyles, D; McGrath, J

    2011-01-01

    While the research community has accepted the value of rodent models as informative research platforms, there is less awareness of the utility of other small vertebrate and invertebrate animal models. Neuroscience is increasingly turning to smaller, non-rodent models to understand mechanisms related to neuropsychiatric disorders. Although they can never replace clinical research, there is much to be learnt from 'small brains'. In particular, these species can offer flexible genetic 'tool kits' that can be used to explore the expression and function of candidate genes in different brain regions. Very small animals also offer efficiencies with respect to high-throughput screening programs. This review provides a concise overview of the utility of models based on worm, fruit fly, honeybee and zebrafish. Although these species may have small brains, they offer the neuropsychiatric research community opportunities to explore some of the most important research questions in our field.

  2. Big and Small

    CERN Document Server

    Ekers, R D

    2010-01-01

    Technology leads discovery in astronomy, as in all other areas of science, so growth in technology leads to the continual stream of new discoveries which makes our field so fascinating. Derek de Solla Price had analysed the discovery process in science in the 1960s and he introduced the terms 'Little Science' and 'Big Science' as part of his discussion of the role of exponential growth in science. I will show how the development of astronomical facilities has followed this same trend from 'Little Science' to 'Big Science' as a field matures. We can see this in the discoveries resulting in Nobel Prizes in astronomy. A more detailed analysis of discoveries in radio astronomy shows the same effect. I include a digression to look at how science progresses, comparing the roles of prediction, serendipity, measurement and explanation. Finally I comment on the differences between the 'Big Science' culture in Physics and in Astronomy.

  3. A small frog that makes a big difference: brain wave testing of TV advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohme, Rafal; Matukin, Michal

    2012-01-01

    It is important for the marketing industry to better understand the role of the unconscious and emotions in advertising communication and shopping behavior. Yet, traditional consumer research is not enough for such a purpose. Conventional paper-and-pencil or verbal declarations favor conscious pragmatism and functionality as the principles underlying consumer decisions and motives. These approaches should be combined with an emerging discipline (consumer neuroscience or neuromarketing) to examine the brain and its functioning in the context of consumer choices. It has been widely acknowledged that patterns of brain activity are closely related to consumers cognition and behavior. Thus, the analysis of consumers neurophysiology may increase the understanding of how consumers process incoming information and how they use their memory and react emotionally (See "Three Types of Brain Wave Research on TV Advertisements"): Moreover, as the majority of consumer mental processes occur below the level of conscious awareness, observations of the brain reactions enable researchers to reach the very core (which is consciously inaccessible) foundations of consumer decisions, emotions, motivations, and preferences.

  4. Small Schools, Big Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Historically, small schools have played a very important role in the provision of schooling in Australia. Numerically, using an enrollment of 200 or less, small schools represent approximately 45% of the schools in Australia. Population growth and the consequences of this, in particular for food production, water and energy, mean that the…

  5. Big Brains, Small Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Earlier 20th-century thinkers like Lewis Mumford and Edmund Wilson kept the university and its apparatus at arm's length. Indeed, they often disdained it. They oriented themselves toward an educated public, and, as a result, they developed a straightforward prose and gained a nonprofessional audience. As his reputation grew, Wilson printed up a…

  6. Brain Projects Think Big

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Idan; Schürmann, Felix

    2013-01-01

    When you read these words, hundreds of millions of nerve cells are electrically and chemically active in your brain. This activity enables you to recognize words, sense the world, learn, enjoy, and create new things, and be curious about the world around you. Indeed, our brains – those of Homo sapiens – are the most fascinating physical substances ever to have emerged on earth, some 200,000 years ago. The brain is so curious and ambitious that it strives to understand itself and cure its frag...

  7. Team Science and Big Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Recently, I was honored with the task of moderating a session at the Oncology Nursing Society's 42nd Annual Congress in Denver, Colorado. The panel discussion, "Team Science: A Discussion With the Experts," was described as an opportunity to learn about team science implementation in the conduct of cancer research. The panel members were leaders in oncology research. As the session was about to begin, I looked over at the panelists and decided that this session should have been called "The Big Brains Session" because the panelists are giants in the field. And yes, I was just a little intimidated to be posing questions to the panel, not to mention moderating their discussion.
.

  8. Small government or big government?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATEO SPAHO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the twentieth century, economists and philosophers were polarizedon their positions beyond the role that the government should have in the economy. On one hand John Maynard Keynes represented, within the optics of market economy, a position where the state should intervene in the economy to maintain the aggregate demand and the employment in the country, without hesitation in creating budget deficits and public debt expansion. This approach happens especially in the moments when the domestic economy and global economic trends show a weak growth or a recession. This means a heavy interference inthe economy, with higher income but with high expenditure to GDP too. On the other side, Liberals and Neoliberalsled by Friedrich Hayek advocated a withdrawal of the government from economic activity not just in moments of economic growth but also during the crisis, believing that the market has self-regulating mechanisms within itself. The government, as a result will have a smaller dimension with lower income and also low expenditures compared to the GDP of the country. We took the South-Eastern Europe countries distinguishing those with a "Big Government" or countries with "Small Government". There are analyzed the economic performances during the global crisis (2007-2014. In which countries the public debt grew less? Which country managed to attract more investments and which were the countries that preserved the purchasing power of their consumers? We shall see if during the economic crisis in Eastern Europe the Great Government or the Liberal and "Small" one has been the most successful the model.

  9. Small Molecules-Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter

    2016-11-17

    Quantum mechanics builds large-scale graphs (networks): the vertices are the discrete energy levels the quantum system possesses, and the edges are the (quantum-mechanically allowed) transitions. Parts of the complete quantum mechanical networks can be probed experimentally via high-resolution, energy-resolved spectroscopic techniques. The complete rovibronic line list information for a given molecule can only be obtained through sophisticated quantum-chemical computations. Experiments as well as computations yield what we call spectroscopic networks (SN). First-principles SNs of even small, three to five atomic molecules can be huge, qualifying for the big data description. Besides helping to interpret high-resolution spectra, the network-theoretical view offers several ideas for improving the accuracy and robustness of the increasingly important information systems containing line-by-line spectroscopic data. For example, the smallest number of measurements necessary to perform to obtain the complete list of energy levels is given by the minimum-weight spanning tree of the SN and network clustering studies may call attention to "weakest links" of a spectroscopic database. A present-day application of spectroscopic networks is within the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) approach, whereby the transitions information on a measured SN is turned into experimental energy levels via a weighted linear least-squares refinement. MARVEL has been used successfully for 15 molecules and allowed to validate most of the transitions measured and come up with energy levels with well-defined and realistic uncertainties. Accurate knowledge of the energy levels with computed transition intensities allows the realistic prediction of spectra under many different circumstances, e.g., for widely different temperatures. Detailed knowledge of the energy level structure of a molecule coming from a MARVEL analysis is important for a considerable number of modeling

  10. Small Business's Big Training Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Leslie

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the training needs of small businesses in light of their high failure rate (50 percent). Includes characteristics of successful small businesses, potential training needs, training methods, and topics for seminars. (JOW)

  11. XIVth Little Brain Big Brain: next-generation enteric neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyder, Arthur; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Hoffman, Jill M

    2017-03-01

    Little Brain Big Brain has been a biannual meeting organized and attended exclusively by young investigators in neurogastroenterology since 1989. The XIVth meeting featured cutting-edge work advancing several novel hypotheses in the main themes of motility, inflammation and metabolism.

  12. Funding big research with small money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Joanne V; Koithan, Mary; Unruh, Lynn; Lundmark, Vicki

    2014-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that maybe successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives.With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advancing organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tools,and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives.In this article, the guest authors introduce crowd sourcing asa strategy for funding big research with small money.

  13. The Big Five default brain: functional evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Soares, José Miguel; Coutinho, Joana; Sousa, Nuno; Gonçalves, Óscar F

    2014-11-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies have provided evidence that different dimensions of human personality may be associated with specific structural neuroanatomic correlates. Identifying brain correlates of a situation-independent personality structure would require evidence of a stable default mode of brain functioning. In this study, we investigated the correlates of the Big Five personality dimensions (Extraversion, Neuroticism, Openness/Intellect, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness) and the default mode network (DMN). Forty-nine healthy adults completed the NEO-Five Factor. The results showed that the Extraversion (E) and Agreeableness (A) were positively correlated with activity in the midline core of the DMN, whereas Neuroticism (N), Openness (O), and Conscientiousness (C) were correlated with the parietal cortex system. Activity of the anterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with A and negatively with C. Regions of the parietal lobe were differentially associated with each personality dimension. The present study not only confirms previous functional correlates regarding the Big Five personality dimensions, but it also expands our knowledge showing the association between different personality dimensions and specific patterns of brain activation at rest.

  14. [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, G; Kövari, E

    2011-11-09

    Vascular dementia due to multiple large strokes (multi-infarct dementia) is a well known entity. However, new clinicopathologic and neuroimaging data have highlighted the common occurrence of small vessel and microscopic vascular pathology in aging brains and recognized that vascular dementia due to small lesions is probably the most common form. In such cases, cortical microinfarcts are the strongest correlate of global cognitive function followed by basal ganglia and thalamic lacunes. Demyelination is only weekly associated with cognition and this relation is no longer significant after adjustement for the presence of lacunes. Awareness of the importance of small vascular lesions in brain aging, can improve diagnostic accuracy and help identify new targets, that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches in old age dementia.

  15. ATLAS: Big Data in a Small Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneau, Larry; Tonry, John

    2015-08-01

    For even small telescope projects, the petabyte scale is now upon us. The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS; Tonry 2011) will robotically survey the entire visible sky from Hawaii multiple times per night to search for near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) on impact trajectories. While the ATLAS optical system is modest by modern astronomical standards -- two 0.5 m F/2.0 telescopes -- each year the ATLAS system will obtain ~103 measurements of 109 astronomical sources to a photometric accuracy of tens of minutes from detection. ATLAS's all-sky coverage ensures it will discover many ``rifle shot'' near-misses moving rapidly on the sky as they shoot past the Earth, so the system will need software to automatically detect highly-trailed sources and discriminate them from the thousands of satellites and pieces of space junk that ATLAS will see each night. Additional interrogation will identify interesting phenomena from beyond the solar system occurring over millions of transient sources per night. The data processing and storage requirements for ATLAS demand a ``big data'' approach typical of commercial Internet enterprises. We describe our approach to deploying a nimble, scalable and reliable data processing infrastructure, and promote ATLAS as steppingstone to eventual processing scales in the era of LSST.

  16. ATLAS: Big Data in a Small Package?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneau, Larry

    2016-01-01

    For even small astronomy projects, the petabyte scale is now upon us. The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (Tonry 2011) will survey the entire visible sky from Hawaii multiple times per night to search for near-Earth asteroids on impact trajectories. While the ATLAS optical system is modest by modern astronomical standards - two 0.5 m F/2.0 telescopes - each night the ATLAS system will measure nearly 109 astronomical sources to a photometric accuracy of <5%, totaling 1012 individual observations over its initial 3-year mission. This ever-growing dataset must be searched in real-time for moving objects and transients then archived for further analysis, and alerts for newly discovered near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) disseminated within tens of minutes from detection. ATLAS's all-sky coverage ensures it will discover many `rifle shot' near-misses moving rapidly on the sky as they shoot past the Earth, so the system will need software to automatically detect highly-trailed sources and discriminate them from the thousands of low-Earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites ATLAS will see each night. Additional interrogation will identify interesting phenomena from millions of transient sources per night beyond the solar system. The data processing and storage requirements for ATLAS demand a `big data' approach typical of commercial internet enterprises. We describe our experience in deploying a nimble, scalable and reliable data processing infrastructure, and suggest ATLAS as steppingstone to data processing capability needed as we enter the era of LSST.

  17. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    Small buildings have a big impact on energy use. In the United States, 44.6 million small buildings consume 44% of the overall energy used in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. How big is big and how small is small the sizes of everything and why

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Timothy Paul

    2013-01-01

    This book is about how big is the universe and how small are quarks, and what are the sizes of dozens of things between these two extremes. It describes the sizes of atoms and planets, quarks and galaxies, cells and sequoias. It is a romp through forty-five orders of magnitude from the smallest sub-nuclear particles we have measured, to the edge of the observed universe. It also looks at time, from the epic age of the cosmos to the fleeting lifetimes of ethereal particles. It is a narrative that trips its way from stellar magnitudes to the clocks on GPS satellites, from the nearly logarithmic scales of a piano keyboard through a system of numbers invented by Archimedes and on to the measurement of the size of an atom. Why do some things happen at certain scales? Why are cells a hundred thousandths of a meter across? Why are stars never smaller than about 100 million meters in diameter? Why are trees limited to about 120 meters in height? Why are planets spherical, but asteroids not? Often the size of an objec...

  19. On Computational Small Steps and Big Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Jacob

    rules in the small-step semantics cause the refocusing step of the syntactic correspondence to be inapplicable. Second, we propose two solutions to overcome this in-applicability: backtracking and rule generalization. Third, we show how these solutions affect the other transformations of the two...

  20. Understanding brains: details, intuition, and big data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve Marder

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the brain works requires a delicate balance between the appreciation of the importance of a multitude of biological details and the ability to see beyond those details to general principles. As technological innovations vastly increase the amount of data we collect, the importance of intuition into how to analyze and treat these data may, paradoxically, become more important.

  1. A Big Year for Small Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Louis; Erickson, K.

    2013-10-01

    2013 is a watershed year for celestial events involving the solar system’s unsung heroes, small bodies. The Cosmic Valentine of Asteroid 2012 DA14 which passed within ~ 3.5 Earth radii of the Earth's surface (February 15, 2013), Comet C/2011 L4 PANSTARRS and the Thanksgiving 2013 pass of Comet ISON, which will pass less than 0.012 AU (1.8 million km) from the solar surface and could be visible during the day. All this in addition to Comet Lemmon and a host of meteor showers makes 2013 a landmark year to deliver the excitement of planetary science to the audiences worldwide. To deliver the excitement and wonder of our solar system’s small bodies to worldwide audiences, NASA’s JPL and GSFC education teams in partnership with NASA EDGE will reach out to the public through multiple venues including broadcast media, social media, science and math focused educational activities, observing challenges, interactive visualization tools like “Eyes on the Solar System” and more culminating in the Thanksgiving Day Comet ISON perihelion passage. This talk will highlight NASA’s focused education effort to engage the public in small bodies science and the role these objects play in our understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system.

  2. Small data, data infrastructures and big data (Working Paper 1)

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Lauriault, Tracey P.

    2014-01-01

    The production of academic knowledge has progressed for the past few centuries using small data studies characterized by sampled data generated to answer specific questions. It is a strategy that has been remarkably successful, enabling the sciences, social sciences and humanities to advance in leaps and bounds. This approach is presently being challenged by the development of big data. Small data studies will, however, continue to be important in the future because of their utility in answer...

  3. Small data in the era of big data

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Lauriault, Tracey P.

    2015-01-01

    Academic knowledge building has progressed for the past few centuries using small data studies characterized by sampled data generated to answer specific questions. It is a strategy that has been remarkably successful, enabling the sciences, social sciences and humanities to advance in leaps and bounds. This approach is presently being challenged by the development of big data. Small data studies will however, we argue, continue to be popular and valuable in the fut...

  4. Exosomes in cancer: small particle, big player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Yuan, Xiao; Shi, Hui; Wu, Lijun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2015-07-10

    Exosomes have emerged as a novel mode of intercellular communication. Exosomes can shuttle bioactive molecules including proteins, DNA, mRNA, as well as non-coding RNAs from one cell to another, leading to the exchange of genetic information and reprogramming of the recipient cells. Increasing evidence suggests that tumor cells release excessive amount of exosomes, which may influence tumor initiation, growth, progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. In addition, exosomes transfer message from tumor cells to immune cells and stromal cells, contributing to the escape from immune surveillance and the formation of tumor niche. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in the biology of exosomes as cancer communicasomes. We review the multifaceted roles of exosomes, the small secreted particles, in communicating with other cells within tumor microenvironment. Given that exosomes are cell type specific, stable, and accessible from body fluids, exosomes may provide promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and represent new targets for cancer therapy.

  5. Small Area Model-Based Estimators Using Big Data Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The timely, accurate monitoring of social indicators, such as poverty or inequality, on a finegrained spatial and temporal scale is a crucial tool for understanding social phenomena and policymaking, but poses a great challenge to official statistics. This article argues that an interdisciplinary approach, combining the body of statistical research in small area estimation with the body of research in social data mining based on Big Data, can provide novel means to tackle this problem successfully. Big Data derived from the digital crumbs that humans leave behind in their daily activities are in fact providing ever more accurate proxies of social life. Social data mining from these data, coupled with advanced model-based techniques for fine-grained estimates, have the potential to provide a novel microscope through which to view and understand social complexity. This article suggests three ways to use Big Data together with small area estimation techniques, and shows how Big Data has the potential to mirror aspects of well-being and other socioeconomic phenomena.

  6. The Picture—Small and Big: Iceland and the Crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Baruchello

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper was written for the 2014 Winter Symposium of the Nordic Summer University’s (NSU research group number three, dealing with the concept of crisis. In it, I provide two pictures of Iceland’s notorious 2008 economic crisis and unexpected 2009-2013 recovery: one small, another big. The small one is a concise three-step account of what sort of policies preceded the economic crisis, what this crisis consisted primarily in, and what sort of policies followed it. The big one is a twofold reflection on how the Icelandic experience fits within larger global trends, which means considering the country’s experience from an economic-historical perspective and from an axiological one.

  7. Big History or the 13800 million years from the Big Bang to the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gústafsson, Ludvik E.

    2017-04-01

    structures like plants, animals and fungi. 3. Matter starts to think A comet or an asteroid crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago, ending the dominance of dinosaurs. Small animals giving birth to living offspring were now able to evolve into a multitude of species, among them the primates. A group of primates migrated from Africa to other continents less than 100000 years ago. Their brain developed a special quality, self-conscience. This ability to reflect about oneself boosted their survival considerably. Man (Homo sapiens) had entered the scene, becoming one of the dominant species of this planet. Due to his immense ability today to handle matter and energy he has become something of a caretaker of planet Earth. Man is responsible for sustainable development for the good of his society and of the whole biosphere. If there is a fourth step in the history of the universe, discoveries in astrobiology may provide us with some clues in the next decades.

  8. Small Bodies, Big Discoveries: NASA's Small Bodies Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, L.; Erickson, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    2014 is turning out to be a watershed year for celestial events involving the solar system's unsung heroes, small bodies. This includes the close flyby of comet C/2013 A1 / Siding Spring with Mars in October and the historic Rosetta mission with its Philae lander to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Beyond 2014, the much anticipated 2015 Pluto flyby by New Horizons and the February Dawn Mission arrival at Ceres will take center stage. To deliver the excitement and wonder of our solar system's small bodies to worldwide audiences, NASA's JPL and GSFC education teams in partnership with NASA EDGE will reach out to the public through multiple venues including broadcast media, social media, science and math focused educational activities, observing challenges, interactive visualization tools like "Eyes on the Solar System" and more. This talk will highlight NASA's focused education effort to engage the public in small bodies mission science and the role these objects play in our understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system.

  9. Small decisions with big impact on data analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Diesner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Big social data have enabled new opportunities for evaluating the applicability of social science theories that were formulated decades ago and were often based on small- to medium-sized samples. Big Data coupled with powerful computing has the potential to replace the statistical practice of sampling and estimating effects by measuring phenomena based on full populations. Preparing these data for analysis and conducting analytics involves a plethora of decisions, some of which are already embedded in previously collected data and built tools. These decisions refer to the recording, indexing and representation of data and the settings for analysis methods. While these choices can have tremendous impact on research outcomes, they are not often obvious, not considered or not being made explicit. Consequently, our awareness and understanding of the impact of these decisions on analysis results and derived implications are highly underdeveloped. This might be attributable to occasional high levels of over-confidence in computational solutions as well as the possible yet questionable assumption that Big Data can wash out minor data quality issues, among other reasons. This article provides examples for how to address this issue. It argues that checking, ensuring and validating the quality of big social data and related auxiliary material is a key ingredient for empowering users to gain reliable insights from their work. Scrutinizing data for accuracy issues, systematically fixing them and diligently documenting these processes can have another positive side effect: Closely interacting with the data, thereby forcing ourselves to understand their idiosyncrasies and patterns, can help us to move from being able to precisely model and formally describe effects in society to also understand and explain them.

  10. On minorities and outliers: The case for making Big Data small

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Foucault Welles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, I make the case for choosing to examine small subsets of Big Data datasets—making big data small. Big Data allows us to produce summaries of human behavior at a scale never before possible. But in the push to produce these summaries, we risk losing sight of a secondary but equally important advantage of Big Data—the plentiful representation of minorities. Women, minorities and statistical outliers have historically been omitted from the scientific record, with problematic consequences. Big Data affords the opportunity to remedy those omissions. However, to do so, Big Data researchers must choose to examine very small subsets of otherwise large datasets. I encourage researchers to embrace an ethical, empirical and epistemological stance on Big Data that includes minorities and outliers as reference categories, rather than the exceptions to statistical norms.

  11. "small problems, Big Trouble": An Art and Science Collaborative Exhibition Reflecting Seemingly small problems Leading to Big Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, J. L.; Brey, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    "small problems, Big Trouble" (spBT) is an exhibition of artist Judith Waller's paintings accompanied by text panels written by Earth scientist Dr. James A. Brey and several science researchers and educators. The text panels' message is as much the focus of the show as the art--true interdisciplinarity! Waller and Brey's history of art and earth science collaborations include the successful exhibition "Layers: Places in Peril". New in spBT is extended collaboration with other scientists in order to create awareness of geoscience and other subjects (i.e. soil, parasites, dust, pollutants, invasive species, carbon, ground water contaminants, solar wind) small in scale which pose significant threats. The paintings are the size of a mirror, a symbol suggesting the problems depicted are those we increasingly need to face, noting our collective reflections of shared current and future reality. Naturalistic rendering and abstract form in the art helps reach a broad audience including those familiar with art and those familiar with science. The goal is that gallery visitors gain greater appreciation and understanding of both—and of the sober content of the show as a whole. "small problems, Big Trouble" premiers in Wisconsin April, 2015. As in previous collaborations, Waller and Brey actively utilize art and science (specifically geoscience) as an educational vehicle for active student learning. Planned are interdisciplinary university and area high school activities linked through spBT. The exhibition in a public gallery offers a means to enhance community awareness of and action on scientific issues through art's power to engage people on an emotional level. This AGU presentation includes a description of past Waller and Brey activities: incorporating art and earth science in lab and studio classrooms, producing gallery and museum exhibitions and delivering workshops and other presentations. They also describe how walking the paths of several past earth science

  12. Big data in small steps : Assessing the value of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, A.F.E. van; Bakker, T.P.; Esmeijer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Data is seen as the new oil: an important driver of innovation and economic growth. At the same time, many find it difficult to determine the value of big data for their organization. TNO presents a stepwise big data model that supports private and public organizations to assess the potential of big

  13. Big data in small steps : Assessing the value of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, A.F.E. van; Bakker, T.P.; Esmeijer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Data is seen as the new oil: an important driver of innovation and economic growth. At the same time, many find it difficult to determine the value of big data for their organization. TNO presents a stepwise big data model that supports private and public organizations to assess the potential of big

  14. Big data from small data: data-sharing in the 'long tail' of neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Nielson, Jessica L; Cragin, Melissa H; Bandrowski, Anita E; Martone, Maryann E

    2014-11-01

    The launch of the US BRAIN and European Human Brain Projects coincides with growing international efforts toward transparency and increased access to publicly funded research in the neurosciences. The need for data-sharing standards and neuroinformatics infrastructure is more pressing than ever. However, 'big science' efforts are not the only drivers of data-sharing needs, as neuroscientists across the full spectrum of research grapple with the overwhelming volume of data being generated daily and a scientific environment that is increasingly focused on collaboration. In this commentary, we consider the issue of sharing of the richly diverse and heterogeneous small data sets produced by individual neuroscientists, so-called long-tail data. We consider the utility of these data, the diversity of repositories and options available for sharing such data, and emerging best practices. We provide use cases in which aggregating and mining diverse long-tail data convert numerous small data sources into big data for improved knowledge about neuroscience-related disorders.

  15. Big data from small data: data-sharing in the ‘long tail’ of neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Nielson, Jessica L; Cragin, Melissa H; Bandrowski, Anita E; Martone, Maryann E

    2016-01-01

    The launch of the US BRAIN and European Human Brain Projects coincides with growing international efforts toward transparency and increased access to publicly funded research in the neurosciences. The need for data-sharing standards and neuroinformatics infrastructure is more pressing than ever. However, ‘big science’ efforts are not the only drivers of data-sharing needs, as neuroscientists across the full spectrum of research grapple with the overwhelming volume of data being generated daily and a scientific environment that is increasingly focused on collaboration. In this commentary, we consider the issue of sharing of the richly diverse and heterogeneous small data sets produced by individual neuroscientists, so-called long-tail data. We consider the utility of these data, the diversity of repositories and options available for sharing such data, and emerging best practices. We provide use cases in which aggregating and mining diverse long-tail data convert numerous small data sources into big data for improved knowledge about neuroscience-related disorders. PMID:25349910

  16. Pocket data mining big data on small devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gaber, Mohamed Medhat; Gomes, Joao Bartolo

    2014-01-01

    Owing to continuous advances in the computational power of handheld devices like smartphones and tablet computers, it has become possible to perform Big Data operations including modern data mining processes onboard these small devices. A decade of research has proved the feasibility of what has been termed as Mobile Data Mining, with a focus on one mobile device running data mining processes. However, it is not before 2010 until the authors of this book initiated the Pocket Data Mining (PDM) project exploiting the seamless communication among handheld devices performing data analysis tasks that were infeasible until recently. PDM is the process of collaboratively extracting knowledge from distributed data streams in a mobile computing environment. This book provides the reader with an in-depth treatment on this emerging area of research. Details of techniques used and thorough experimental studies are given. More importantly and exclusive to this book, the authors provide detailed practical guide on the depl...

  17. Transforming fragments into candidates: small becomes big in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kloe, Gerdien E; Bailey, David; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2009-07-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) represents a logical and efficient approach to lead discovery and optimisation. It can draw on structural, biophysical and biochemical data, incorporating a wide range of inputs, from precise mode-of-binding information on specific fragments to wider ranging pharmacophoric screening surveys using traditional HTS approaches. It is truly an enabling technology for the imaginative medicinal chemist. In this review, we analyse a representative set of 23 published FBDD studies that describe how low molecular weight fragments are being identified and efficiently transformed into higher molecular weight drug candidates. FBDD is now becoming warmly endorsed by industry as well as academia and the focus on small interacting molecules is making a big scientific impact.

  18. Small wormholes change our picture of the big bang

    CERN Multimedia

    1990-01-01

    Matt Visser has studied tiny wormholes, which may be produced on a subatomic scale by quantum fluctuations in the energy of the vacuum. He believes these quantum wormholes could change our picture of the origin of the Universe in the big bang (1/2 p)

  19. Making a Big Bang on the small screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nick

    2010-01-01

    While the quality of some TV sitcoms can leave viewers feeling cheated out of 30 minutes of their lives, audiences and critics are raving about the science-themed US comedy The Big Bang Theory. First shown on the CBS network in 2007, the series focuses on two brilliant postdoc physicists, Leonard and Sheldon, who are totally absorbed by science. Adhering to the stereotype, they also share a fanatical interest in science fiction, video-gaming and comic books, but unfortunately lack the social skills required to connect with their 20-something nonacademic contemporaries.

  20. Parkinson’s Brain Disease Prediction Using Big Data Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shamli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In healthcare industries, the demand for maintaining large amount of patients’ data is steadily growing due to rising population which has resulted in the increase of details about clinical and laboratory tests, imaging, prescription and medication. These data can be called “Big Data”, because of their size, complexity and diversity. Big data analytics aims at improving patient care and identifying preventive measures proactively. To save lives and recommend life style changes for a peaceful and healthier life at low costs. The proposed predictive analytics framework is a combination of Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine and Artificial Neural Network which is used to gain insights from patients. Parkinson’s disease voice dataset from UCI Machine learning repository is used as input. The experimental results show that early detection of disease will facilitate clinical monitoring of elderly people and increase the chances of their life span and improved lifestyle to lead peaceful life.

  1. Measuring too-big-to-fail funding advantages from small banks’ CDS spreads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.; Lukkezen, J.H.J.; Marinova, K.

    2014-01-01

    Large banks derive a funding advantage from being too-big-to-fail, while small banks do not. To estimate the funding advantage we explain the CDS spreads of small banks in six major European countries during the crisis by market fundamentals and bank-specific characteristics. Next, we extrapolate an

  2. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-09-01

    This fact sheet describes the Small Buildings and Small Portfolios roadmap, which outlines approaches and strategic priorities for the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Technologies Office to pursue over the next three to five years that will support the implementation of high-potential energy efficiency opportunities for small business and building owners and operators.

  3. Big Challenges, Small States : Regulatory Options to Overcome Infrastructure Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrhardt, David; Oliver, Chloë

    2007-01-01

    Small island economies face special challenges in providing affordable infrastructure services. Effective regulation can help, by encouraging providers to seek innovative solutions better suited for small and remote islands. But conventional regulation may be out of reach for small islands, requiring more money, competence, and independence than they have. Low-discretion rules and light or...

  4. Bigger data for big data: from Twitter to brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Etienne B; Stahl, Frederic; Gaber, Mohamed Medhat

    2014-02-01

    We are sympathetic with Bentley et al.'s attempt to encompass the wisdom of crowds in a generative model, but posit that a successful attempt at using big data will include more sensitive measurements, more varied sources of information, and will also build from the indirect information available through technology, from ancillary technical features to data from brain-computer interfaces.

  5. CTG trinucleotide repeat "big jumps": large expansions, small mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Gomes-Pereira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Trinucleotide repeat expansions are the genetic cause of numerous human diseases, including fragile X mental retardation, Huntington disease, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Disease severity and age of onset are critically linked to expansion size. Previous mouse models of repeat instability have not recreated large intergenerational expansions ("big jumps", observed when the repeat is transmitted from one generation to the next, and have never attained the very large tract lengths possible in humans. Here, we describe dramatic intergenerational CTG*CAG repeat expansions of several hundred repeats in a transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1, resulting in increasingly severe phenotypic and molecular abnormalities. Homozygous mice carrying over 700 trinucleotide repeats on both alleles display severely reduced body size and splicing abnormalities, notably in the central nervous system. Our findings demonstrate that large intergenerational trinucleotide repeat expansions can be recreated in mice, and endorse the use of transgenic mouse models to refine our understanding of triplet repeat expansion and the resulting pathogenesis.

  6. Granular computing with multiple granular layers for brain big data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyin; Xu, Ji

    2014-12-01

    Big data is the term for a collection of datasets so huge and complex that it becomes difficult to be processed using on-hand theoretical models and technique tools. Brain big data is one of the most typical, important big data collected using powerful equipments of functional magnetic resonance imaging, multichannel electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, Positron emission tomography, near infrared spectroscopic imaging, as well as other various devices. Granular computing with multiple granular layers, referred to as multi-granular computing (MGrC) for short hereafter, is an emerging computing paradigm of information processing, which simulates the multi-granular intelligent thinking model of human brain. It concerns the processing of complex information entities called information granules, which arise in the process of data abstraction and derivation of information and even knowledge from data. This paper analyzes three basic mechanisms of MGrC, namely granularity optimization, granularity conversion, and multi-granularity joint computation, and discusses the potential of introducing MGrC into intelligent processing of brain big data.

  7. Big impacts by small RNAs in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, George; Candela, Héctor; Hake, Sarah

    2009-02-01

    The identification and study of small RNAs, including microRNAs and trans-acting small interfering RNAs, have added a layer of complexity to the many pathways that regulate plant development. These molecules, which function as negative regulators of gene expression, are now known to have greatly expanded roles in a variety of developmental processes affecting all major plant structures, including meristems, leaves, roots, and inflorescences. Mutants with specific developmental phenotypes have also advanced our knowledge of the biogenesis and mode of action of these diverse small RNAs. In addition, previous models on the cell autonomy of microRNAs may have to be revised as more data accumulate supporting their long distance transport. As many of these small RNAs appear to be conserved across different species, knowledge gained from one species is expected to have general application. However, a few surprising differences in small RNA function seem to exist between monocots and dicots regarding meristem initiation and sex determination. Integrating these unique functions into the overall scheme for plant growth will give a more complete picture of how they have evolved as unique developmental systems.

  8. Small Bodies, Big Concepts: Engaging Teachers and Their Students in Visual Analysis of Comets and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, W. H.; Buxner, S.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Ristvey, J.; Weeks, S.; Zolensky, M.

    2011-12-01

    Small Bodies, Big Concepts is a multi-disciplinary, professional development project that engages 5th - 8th grade teachers in high end planetary science using a research-based pedagogical framework, Designing Effective Science Instruction (DESI). In addition to developing sound background knowledge with a focus on visual analysis, teachers' awareness of the process of learning new content is heightened, and they use that experience to deepen their science teaching practice. Culling from NASA E/PO educational materials, activities are sequenced to enhance conceptual understanding of big ideas in space science: what do we know, how do we know it, why do we care? Helping teachers develop a picture of the history and evolution of our understanding of the solar system, and honing in on the place of comets and asteroids in helping us answer old questions and discover new ones, teachers see the power and excitement underlying planetary science as human endeavor. Research indicates that science inquiry is powerful in the classroom and mission scientists are real-life models of science inquiry in action. Using guest scientist facilitators from the Planetary Science Institute, NASA Johnson Space Center, Lockheed Martin, and NASA E/PO professionals from McREL and NASA AESP, teachers practice framing scientific questions, using current visual data, and adapting NASA E/PO activities related to current exploration of asteroids and comets in our Solar System. Cross-curricular elements included examining research-based strategies for enhancing English language learners' ability to engage in higher order questions and a professional astronomy artist's insight into how visual analysis requires not just our eyes engaged, but our brains: comparing, synthesizing, questioning, evaluating, and wondering. This summer we pilot tested the SBBC curriculum with thirteen 5th- 10th grade teachers modeling a variety of instructional approaches over eight days. Each teacher developed lesson plans

  9. Big Policies and a Small World: An Analysis of Policy Problems and Solutions in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses Ball's [1998. Big policies/small world: An introduction to international perspectives in education policy. "Comparative Education," 34(2), 119-130] policy analysis and Bernstein's [1990. "The structuring of pedagogic discourse. Volume IV class, codes and control". London: Routledge; 2000, "Pedagogy,…

  10. Neuronal chloride and excitability - the big impact of small changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Joseph V; Richards, Blake A; Woodin, Melanie A

    2016-12-16

    Synaptic inhibition is a critical regulator of neuronal excitability, and in the mature brain the majority of synaptic inhibition is mediated by Cl(-)-permeable GABAA receptors. Unlike other physiologically relevant ions, Cl(-) is dynamically regulated, and alterations in the Cl(-) gradient can have significant impact on neuronal excitability. Due to changes in the neuronal Cl(-) concentration, GABAergic transmission can bidirectionally regulate the induction of excitatory synaptic plasticity and gate the closing of the critical period for monocular deprivation in visual cortex. GABAergic circuitry can also provide a powerful restraining mechanism for the spread of excitation, however Cl(-) extrusion mechanisms can become overwhelmed and GABA can paradoxically contribute to pathological excitation such as the propagation of seizure activity.

  11. When Small is Big: Microcredit and Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Brown

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Microcredit - the extension of small loans - gives people who would otherwise not have access to credit the opportunity to begin or expand businesses or to pursue job-specific training. These borrowers lack the income, credit history, assets, or security to borrow from other sources. Although the popularity and success of microcredit in developing countries has been trumpeted in the media, microcredit is established and growing in the United States and Canada as well. Its appeal comes from its capacity to provide the means for those who have the ability, drive, and commitment to overcome the hurdles to self-sufficiency. In this article, the role of microcredit as a stimulant for economic development is examined. First, its importance for the establishment of small businesss is described. Second, the article provides an overview of the general microcredit climate in the United states and the local situation in the Ottawa area. Third, brief stories about individuals who have received this type of loan reveal the human impact behind the economic benefits. Finally, the role of microcredit in funding startups is analyzed in comparison to other sources of available funding. The article concludes with a summary of the benefits of microcredit as a win-win proposition for economic development.

  12. Small robot will give astronauts a big hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, E D

    2000-02-01

    Now being built at NASA-Ames is a small robot that will work independently alongside astronauts in space. About the size of a softball, the 5-in.-diam. Personal Satellite Assistant (PSA) will serve as an intelligent robot, providing another set of eyes and ears and an extra nose to the crew and ground support personnel. The device will move and operate on its own in the microgravity environment of space-based vehicles. Yuri Gawdiak, principal investigator for the projects, expects astronauts to fly a demonstration model of the device aboard a Space Shuttle in about two years. The first crew to use PSAs will test the examine safety issues. Those tests, if successful, will lead to a demonstration aboard the International Space Station. Gawdiak says the project has an annual budget of about $500,000.

  13. Internet-based brain training games, citizen scientists, and big data: ethical issues in unprecedented virtual territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Ryan H; Rommelfanger, Karen S

    2015-04-22

    Internet brain training programs, where consumers serve as both subjects and funders of the research, represent the closest engagement many individuals have with neuroscience. Safeguards are needed to protect participants' privacy and the evolving scientific enterprise of big data.

  14. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Introducing the Next Small Big Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Hina; Drummen, Gregor P C; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-02-06

    Intercellular communication was long thought to be regulated exclusively through direct contact between cells or via release of soluble molecules that transmit the signal by binding to a suitable receptor on the target cell, and/or via uptake into that cell. With the discovery of small secreted vesicular structures that contain complex cargo, both in their lumen and the lipid membrane that surrounds them, a new frontier of signal transduction was discovered. These "extracellular vesicles" (EV) were initially thought to be garbage bags through which the cell ejected its waste. Whilst this is a major function of one type of EV, i.e., apoptotic bodies, many EVs have intricate functions in intercellular communication and compound exchange; although their physiological roles are still ill-defined. Additionally, it is now becoming increasingly clear that EVs mediate disease progression and therefore studying EVs has ignited significant interests among researchers from various fields of life sciences. Consequently, the research effort into the pathogenic roles of EVs is significantly higher even though their protective roles are not well established. The "Focus on extracellular vesicles" series of reviews highlights the current state of the art regarding various topics in EV research, whilst this review serves as an introductory overview of EVs, their biogenesis and molecular composition.

  15. When small is big: the role of impurities in electrocatalysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strmcnik, Dusan; Li, Dongguo; Lopes, Pietro P.; Tripkovic, Dusan; Kodama, Kensaku; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2015-11-01

    Improvements in the fundamental understanding of electrocatalysis have started to revolutionize the development of electrochemical interfaces for the efficient conversion of chemical energy into electricity, as well as for the utilization of electrons to produce new chemicals that then can be re-used in energy conversion systems. Here, some facets of the role of trace level of impurities (from 10-7 to 10-6 M) in electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction, hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions, and CO oxidation reactions are explored on well-characterized platinum single crystal surfaces and high surface area materials in alkaline and acidic environments. Of particular interest is the effect of anions (e.g., Cl-, NO3-) and cations (i.e., Cu2+) present in the supporting electrolytes as well as surface defects (i.e., ad-islands) that are present on metal surfaces. The examples presented are chosen to demonstrate that a small level of impurities may play a crucial role in governing the reactivity of electrochemical interfaces.

  16. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Introducing the Next Small Big Thing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hina Kalra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication was long thought to be regulated exclusively through direct contact between cells or via release of soluble molecules that transmit the signal by binding to a suitable receptor on the target cell, and/or via uptake into that cell. With the discovery of small secreted vesicular structures that contain complex cargo, both in their lumen and the lipid membrane that surrounds them, a new frontier of signal transduction was discovered. These “extracellular vesicles” (EV were initially thought to be garbage bags through which the cell ejected its waste. Whilst this is a major function of one type of EV, i.e., apoptotic bodies, many EVs have intricate functions in intercellular communication and compound exchange; although their physiological roles are still ill-defined. Additionally, it is now becoming increasingly clear that EVs mediate disease progression and therefore studying EVs has ignited significant interests among researchers from various fields of life sciences. Consequently, the research effort into the pathogenic roles of EVs is significantly higher even though their protective roles are not well established. The “Focus on extracellular vesicles” series of reviews highlights the current state of the art regarding various topics in EV research, whilst this review serves as an introductory overview of EVs, their biogenesis and molecular composition.

  17. Nanotechnology: what is it and why is small so big?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, James F

    2010-10-01

    SIZE matters… the size of the scalpel determines the precision of the surgery. Nanotechnology affords us the chance to construct nanotools that are on the size scale of molecules, allowing us to treat each cell of the human body as a patient. Nanomedicine will allow for eradication of disease at the single-cell level. Since nanotools are self-assembling, nanomedicine has the potential to perform parallel processing medicine on a massive scale. These nanotools can be made of biocompatible and biodegradable nanomaterials. They can be "smart" in that they can use sophisticated targeting strategies, which can perform error checking to prevent harm if even a very small fraction of them are mistargeted. Built-in molecular biosensors can provide controlled drug delivery with feedback control for individual cell dosing. If designed to repair existing cells rather than to just destroy diseased cells, these nanomedical devices can perform in-situ regenerative medicine, programming cells along less dangerous cell pathways to prevent tissues and organs from being destroyed by the treatments and thus providing an attractive alternative to allogeneic organ transplants. Nanomedical tools, while tiny in size, can have a huge impact on medicine and health care. Earlier and more sensitive diagnosis will lead to presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment of disease before permanent damage occurs to tissues and organs. This should result in the delivery of better medicine at lower costs with better outcomes. Lastly, and importantly, some of the first uses of nanotechnology and nanomedicine are occurring in the field of ophthalmology. Some of the potential benefits of nanotechnology for future treatment of retinopathies and optic nerve damage are discussed at the end of this paper.

  18. Small things make a big difference: particulate matter and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrufello, Paul T; Smoliga, James M; Rundell, Kenneth W

    2012-12-01

    The increased risk of morbidity and mortality among adults and children with pre-existing cardiovascular or respiratory illness from emission-derived particulate matter (PM) is well documented. However, the detrimental effects of PM inhalation on the exercising, healthy population is still in question. This review will focus on the acute and chronic responses to PM inhalation during exercise and how PM exposure influences exercise performance. The smaller ultrafine PM (population is not immune to the effects of PM inhalation, especially during exercise. This population, including the competitive athlete, is susceptible to pulmonary inflammation, decreased lung function (both acute and chronic in nature), the increased risk of asthma, vascular endothelial dysfunction, mild elevations in pulmonary artery pressure and diminished exercise performance. PM exposure is usually associated with vehicular traffic, but other sources of PM, including small engines from lawn and garden equipment, cigarette smoke, wood smoke and cooking, may also impair health and performance. The physiological effects of PM are dependent on the source of PM, various environmental factors, physical attributes and nature of exercise. There are a number of measures an athlete can take to reduce exposure to PM, as well as the deleterious effects that result from the inevitable exposure to PM. Considering the acute and chronic physiological responses to PM inhalation, individuals living and exercising in urban areas in close proximity to major roadways should consider ambient air pollution levels (in particular, PM and ozone) prior to engaging in vigorous exercise, and those exposed to PM through other sources may need to make lifestyle alterations to avoid the deleterious effects of PM inhalation. Although it is clear that PM exposure is detrimental to healthy individuals engaging in exercise, further research is necessary to better understand the role of PM on athlete health and performance, as

  19. Faro Lake, a big picture from a small ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Alessandro

    2017-04-01

    Faro Lake is a small coastal basin located by the Straits of Messina (Central Mediterranean Sea) and is the deepest basin in Sicily and one of the deepest coastal lakes in Italy. Considering the correspondence of the shorelines of the lake with half-graben faults, a tectonic event is the most likely explanation for its remarkable depth (30 m in the central region). Due to its funnel-shape bathymetry and its limited water exchanges with the nearby sea, Faro Lake shows the typical trait of a meromictic basin, that is a persistent physical and chemical stratification of the water column. While the upper water layer is well oxygenated, chiefly due to advection processes, the bottom layer is anoxic and characterized by a vertical gradient of hydrogen sulfide concentration, reaching a maximum at the water/sediment interface. A transition zone also exists between these two layers where oxygen concentration sharply decreases with depth. As a result of this environmental heterogeneity, a variety of ecological niches arise along the water column of Faro Lake, which are exploited by a host of prokaryote groups showing a multiplicity of metabolic pathways. These microbes, in turn, affect the chemical gradients of the water column in a complex interplay and also serve as a food source for microbial eukaryotes in the so-called microbial food web. In summer, thanks to enhanced light availability and higher water temperature, a bloom of brown-colored photosynthetic sulfur bacteria develops in the upper part of the anoxic zone, resulting in a distinct "red water layer", coupled with significantly high biomasses of ciliated protozoa. During my researches, I have documented and quantified the trophic interactions between phagotrophic protozoa and the prokaryotes thriving in the "red water layer". I have also found a peculiar photosynthetic sulfur bacterium and a unique bacteriochlorophyll homologue that have been retrieved, to date, only from Faro Lake and from the Black Sea. I have

  20. Big Data Concept in the Food Supply Chain: Small Markets Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickas Valentinas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The strategies of competitive advantage are changing dramatically because of high technology development. The data size in the world is multiplying rapidly - the amount of information in the world doubles every 12 months. Therefore, the authors analyzed Big data in the food supply chain. The methodology used in the paper consists of a review of global competitiveness reports and secondary data analysis together with document-based literature synthesis; a competitiveness maximization methodology was modelled referring to a case of small markets. The supply of food industry is complicated, because of various regulations and a demand for high quality products just on time. Various companies are transporting partial freight; therefore, the visibility, lead-time and cost minimization is essential for them. However, they are unable to use all the gathered information and are not utilizing the potential that is possible. The problem of data analysis is a bigger concern to the smaller markets. Many of the small markets are less developed countries that still are not using Big data in their enterprises. In addition, new technologies are developing in the Big data industry. Therefore, the gap of technology will increase even more between large and small markets. The analysed innovation level and technology usage indicated a need for the food industry to change competitiveness strategies. Therefore, the authors developed a competitiveness strategy that is orientated to the food industry of small markets.

  1. Evaluation research of small and medium-sized enterprise informatization on big data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na

    2017-09-01

    Under the background of big data, key construction of small and medium-sized enterprise informationization level was needed, but information construction cost was large, while information cost of inputs can bring benefit to small and medium-sized enterprises. This paper established small and medium-sized enterprise informatization evaluation system from hardware and software security level, information organization level, information technology application and the profit level, and information ability level. The rough set theory was used to brief indexes, and then carry out evaluation by support vector machine (SVM) model. At last, examples were used to verify the theory in order to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  2. Testing predictions from personality neuroscience. Brain structure and the big five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Colin G; Hirsh, Jacob B; Shane, Matthew S; Papademetris, Xenophon; Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Gray, Jeremy R

    2010-06-01

    We used a new theory of the biological basis of the Big Five personality traits to generate hypotheses about the association of each trait with the volume of different brain regions. Controlling for age, sex, and whole-brain volume, results from structural magnetic resonance imaging of 116 healthy adults supported our hypotheses for four of the five traits: Extraversion, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. Extraversion covaried with volume of medial orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region involved in processing reward information. Neuroticism covaried with volume of brain regions associated with threat, punishment, and negative affect. Agreeableness covaried with volume in regions that process information about the intentions and mental states of other individuals. Conscientiousness covaried with volume in lateral prefrontal cortex, a region involved in planning and the voluntary control of behavior. These findings support our biologically based, explanatory model of the Big Five and demonstrate the potential of personality neuroscience (i.e., the systematic study of individual differences in personality using neuroscience methods) as a discipline.

  3. Brain size and ecology in small mammals and primates.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Comparisons of brain-body size relationships within small mammal and primate families reveal intergeneric differences related to diet and foraging strategy. These same associations between relative brain size and ecology are also evident among interfamily comparisons.

  4. Drosophila big brain does not act as a water channel, but mediates cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsumi, Kimiko; Tsuji, Shoji; Miwa, Hideki; Morisaku, Toshinori; Nuriya, Mutsuo; Orihara, Minako; Kaneko, Kazunari; Okano, Hideyuki; Yasui, Masato

    2009-06-18

    The neurogenic gene Drosophila big brain (bib) has a high sequence homology to aquaporin-4. However, its cellular functions in Drosophila neurogenesis have remained elusive. Here we investigated cell adhesion, and the ion and water permeability of Bib. The adhesive function was examined by a cell aggregation assay using L cells. Bib-transfected L cells formed aggregated clusters, while control-L cells remained as a single cell suspension. Ion permeation was not confirmed in L cells stably expressing Bib. When expressed in COS7 cells, Bib exhibited limited water permeability. This newly found cell adhesive function of Bib may be important for Drosophila neurogenesis.

  5. Thinking Big about Getting Small: An Ideological Genealogy of Small-School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Background: Support for small schools, and specifically for the creation of small, autonomous schools of choice, has grown considerably in the past decade--particularly in the context of urban schooling. Funded by private and public monies, small-school initiatives have been implemented in most of the nation's city school districts and have become…

  6. Big data, open science and the brain: lessons learned from genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Suparna; Fishman, Jennifer R; McGowan, Michelle L; Juengst, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    The BRAIN Initiative aims to break new ground in the scale and speed of data collection in neuroscience, requiring tools to handle data in the magnitude of yottabytes (10(24)). The scale, investment and organization of it are being compared to the Human Genome Project (HGP), which has exemplified "big science" for biology. In line with the trend towards Big Data in genomic research, the promise of the BRAIN Initiative, as well as the European Human Brain Project, rests on the possibility to amass vast quantities of data to model the complex interactions between the brain and behavior and inform the diagnosis and prevention of neurological disorders and psychiatric disease. Advocates of this "data driven" paradigm in neuroscience argue that harnessing the large quantities of data generated across laboratories worldwide has numerous methodological, ethical and economic advantages, but it requires the neuroscience community to adopt a culture of data sharing and open access to benefit from them. In this article, we examine the rationale for data sharing among advocates and briefly exemplify these in terms of new "open neuroscience" projects. Then, drawing on the frequently invoked model of data sharing in genomics, we go on to demonstrate the complexities of data sharing, shedding light on the sociological and ethical challenges within the realms of institutions, researchers and participants, namely dilemmas around public/private interests in data, (lack of) motivation to share in the academic community, and potential loss of participant anonymity. Our paper serves to highlight some foreseeable tensions around data sharing relevant to the emergent "open neuroscience" movement.

  7. Big data, open science and the brain: lessons learned from genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suparna eChoudhury

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The BRAIN Initiative aims to break new ground in the scale and speed of data collection in neuroscience, requiring tools to handle data in the magnitude of yottabytes (1024. The scale, investment and organization of it are being compared to the Human Genome Project (HGP, which has exemplified ‘big science’ for biology. In line with the trend towards Big Data in genomic research, the promise of the BRAIN Initiative, as well as the European Human Brain Project, rests on the possibility to amass vast quantities of data to model the complex interactions between the brain and behaviour and inform the diagnosis and prevention of neurological disorders and psychiatric disease. Advocates of this ‘data driven’ paradigm in neuroscience argue that harnessing the large quantities of data generated across laboratories worldwide has numerous methodological, ethical and economic advantages, but it requires the neuroscience community to adopt a culture of data sharing and open access to benefit from them. In this article, we examine the rationale for data sharing among advocates and briefly exemplify these in terms of new ‘open neuroscience’ projects. Then, drawing on the frequently invoked model of data sharing in genomics, we go on to demonstrate the complexities of data sharing, shedding light on the sociological and ethical challenges within the realms of institutions, researchers and participants, namely dilemmas around public/private interests in data, (lack of motivation to share in the academic community, and potential loss of participant anonymity. Our paper serves to highlight some foreseeable tensions around data sharing relevant to the emergent ‘open neuroscience’ movement.

  8. Mapping fetal brain development in utero using magnetic resonance imaging: the Big Bang of brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, Colin

    2011-08-15

    The development of tools to construct and investigate probabilistic maps of the adult human brain from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to advances in both basic neuroscience and clinical diagnosis. These tools are increasingly being applied to brain development in adolescence and childhood, and even to neonatal and premature neonatal imaging. Even earlier in development, parallel advances in clinical fetal MRI have led to its growing use as a tool in challenging medical conditions. This has motivated new engineering developments encompassing optimal fast MRI scans and techniques derived from computer vision, the combination of which allows full 3D imaging of the moving fetal brain in utero without sedation. These promise to provide a new and unprecedented window into early human brain growth. This article reviews the developments that have led us to this point, examines the current state of the art in the fields of fast fetal imaging and motion correction, and describes the tools to analyze dynamically changing fetal brain structure. New methods to deal with developmental tissue segmentation and the construction of spatiotemporal atlases are examined, together with techniques to map fetal brain growth patterns.

  9. Small-world brain networks in schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingli LI; Zhuangfei CHEN; Tao LI

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade the combination of brain neuroimaging techniques and graph theoretical analysis of the complex anatomical and functional networks in the brain have provided an exciting new platform for exploring the etiology of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. This review introduces the current status of this work, focusing on these networks in schizophrenia. The evidence supporting the findings of reduced efficiency of information exchange in schizophrenia both within local brain regions and globally throughout the brain is reviewed and the potential relationship of these changes to cognitive and clinical symptoms is discussed. Finally we propose some suggestions for future research.

  10. Revisiting constraints on small scale perturbations from big-bang nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Tada, Yuichiro

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the constraints on the small scale density perturbations (1 04 Mpc-1≲k ≲1 05 Mpc-1 ) from the modification of the freeze-out value of the neutron-proton ratio at the big-bang nucleosynthesis era. Around the freeze-out temperature T ˜0.5 MeV , the universe can be divided into several local patches that have different temperatures since any perturbation that enters the horizon after the neutrino decoupling has not diffused yet. Taking account of this situation, we calculate the freeze-out value in detail. We find that the small scale perturbations decrease the n -p ratio in contrast to previous works. With the use of the latest observed 4He abundance, we obtain the constraint on the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations as ΔR2≲0.018 on 1 04 Mpc-1≲k ≲1 05 Mpc-1 .

  11. Big Bath as a Determinant of Creative Accounting in Small and Micro Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Zemánková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Creative accounting is a 21st century phenomenon and in the context of the economic crisis and deficit budget it has been receiving increasing attention, in particular in the area of prevention and detection of accounting manipulation. The focus of the research on small and micro-enterprises stems from little attention paid to these enterprises and the undeniable importance of small and micro-enterprises for the economy. Primary research is based on the examination of a phenomenological paradigm, i.e. it focuses on understanding human behaviour on the basis of a reference framework for research participants. The main research method used in research is a comparative case study, which is one of few methods that allow research of this sensitive topic. Research will focus on the existence of a big bath in the company’s ratio of profit and turnover as a determinant of a change in the company’s approach to creative accounting.

  12. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small NTR Engine and Stage: How Small is Big Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg (Abraham); Joyner, Claude R.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) derives its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse potential of approximately 900 seconds - a 100% increase over today's best chemical rockets. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) project, funded by NASA's AES program, includes five key task activities: (1) Recapture, demonstration, and validation of heritage graphite composite (GC) fuel (selected as the "Lead Fuel" option); (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Operating Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable Development Strategy. During FY'14, a preliminary DDT&E plan and schedule for NTP development was outlined by GRC, DOE and industry that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included GTD tests at the NNSS, followed by a FTD mission. To reduce cost for the GTD tests and FTD mission, small NTR engines, in either the 7.5 or 16.5 klbf thrust class, were considered. Both engine options used GC fuel and a "common" fuel element (FE) design. The small approximately 7.5 klbf "criticality-limited" engine produces approximately 157 megawatts of thermal power (MWt) and its core is configured with parallel rows of hexagonal-shaped FEs and tie tubes (TTs) with a FE to TT ratio of approximately 1:1. The larger approximately 16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE), developed by LANL at the end of the Rover program, produces approximately 367 MWt and has a FE to TT ratio of approximately 2:1. Although both engines use a common 35 inch (approximately 89 cm) long FE, the SNRE's larger diameter core contains approximately 300 more FEs needed to produce an additional 210 MWt of power. To reduce the cost of the FTD mission, a simple "1-burn" lunar flyby mission was considered to reduce the LH2 propellant loading, the stage size and complexity. Use of existing and

  13. Big ambitions for small reactors as investors size up power options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear24, Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Earlier this year, US nuclear developer NuScale Power completed a study for the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) that supported the suitability of NuScale's small modular reactor (SMR) technology for the effective disposition of plutonium. The UK is a frontrunner to compete in the SMR marketplace, both in terms of technological capabilities, trade and political commitment. Industry observers are openly speculating whether SMR design and construction could start to move ahead faster than 'big and conventional' nuclear construction projects - not just in the UK but worldwide. Economies of scale could increase the attraction of SMRs to investors and the general public.

  14. Human brain evolution writ large and small.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Chet C; Bauernfeind, Amy L; Bianchi, Serena; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Hof, Patrick R

    2012-01-01

    Human evolution was marked by an extraordinary increase in total brain size relative to body size. While it is certain that increased encephalization is an important factor contributing to the origin of our species-specific cognitive abilities, it is difficult to disentangle which aspects of human neural structure and function are correlated by-products of brain size expansion from those that are specifically related to particular psychological specializations, such as language and enhanced "mentalizing" abilities. In this chapter, we review evidence from allometric scaling studies demonstrating that much of human neocortical organization can be understood as a product of brain enlargement. Defining extra-allometric specializations in humans is often hampered by a severe lack of comparative data from the same neuroanatomical variables across a broad range of primates. When possible, we highlight evidence for features of human neocortical architecture and function that cannot be easily explained as correlates of brain size and, hence, might be more directly associated with the evolution of uniquely human cognitive capacities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Efficiency of a Small-World Functional Brain Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; ZHANG Xiao-Fei; SUI Dan-Ni; ZHOU Zhi-Jin; CHEN Qi-Cai; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the small-world topology of a functional brain network means high information processing efficiency by calculating the correlation between the small-world measures of a functional brain network and behavioral reaction during an imagery task.Functional brain networks are constructed by multichannel eventrelated potential data,in which the electrodes are the nodes and the functional connectivities between them are the edges.The results show that the correlation between small-world measures and reaction time is task-specific,such that in global imagery,there is a positive correlation between the clustering coefficient and reaction time,while in local imagery the average path length is positively correlated with the reaction time.This suggests that the efficiency of a functional brain network is task-dependent.%We investigate whether the small-world topology of a functional brain network means high information processing efficiency by calculating the correlation between the small-world measures of a functional brain network and behavioral reaction during an imagery task. Functional brain networks are constructed by multichannel event-related potential data, in which the electrodes are the nodes and the functional connectivities between them are the edges. The results show that the correlation between small-world measures and reaction time is task-specific, such that in global imagery, there is a positive correlation between the clustering coefficient and reaction time, while in local imagery the average path length is positively correlated with the reaction time. This suggests that the efficiency of a functional brain network is task-dependent.

  16. The Astronaut Glove Challenge: Big Innovation from a (Very) Small Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Many measurements were taken by test engineers from Hamilton Sundstrand, the prime contractor for the current EVA suit. Because the raw measurements needed to be converted to torques and combined into a final score, it was impossible to keep track of who was ahead in this phase. The final comfort and dexterity test was performed in a depressurized glove box to simulate real on-orbit conditions. Each competitor was required to exercise the glove through a defined set of finger, thumb, and wrist motions without any sign of abrasion or bruising of the competitor's hand. I learned a lot about arm fatigue! This was a pass-fail event, and both of the remaining competitors came through intact. After taking what seemed like an eternity to tally the final scores, the judges announced that I had won the competition. My glove was the only one to have achieved lower finger-bending torques than the Phase VI glove. Looking back, I see three sources of the success of this project that I believe also operate in other programs where small teams have broken new ground in aerospace technologies. These are awareness, failure, and trust. By remaining aware of the big picture, continuously asking myself, "Am I converging on a solution?" and "Am I converging fast enough?" I was able to see that my original design was not going to succeed, leading to the decision to start over. I was also aware that, had I lingered over this choice or taken time to analyze it, I would not have been ready on the first day of competition. Failure forced me to look outside conventional thinking and opened the door to innovation. Choosing to make incremental failures enabled me to rapidly climb the learning curve. Trusting my "gut" feelings-which are really an internalized accumulation of experiences-and my newly acquired skills allowed me to devise new technologies rapidly and complete both gloves just in time. Awareness, failure, and trust are intertwined: failure provides experiences that inform awareness

  17. [Cultivation strategy and path analysis on big brand Chinese medicine for small and medium-sized enterprises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Yan; Yang, Hong-Jun

    2014-03-01

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are important components in Chinese medicine industry. However, the lack of big brand is becoming an urgent problem which is critical to the survival of SMEs. This article discusses the concept and traits of Chinese medicine of big brand, from clinical, scientific and market value three aspects. Guided by market value, highlighting clinical value, aiming at the scientific value improvement of big brand cultivation, we put forward the key points in cultivation, aiming at obtaining branded Chinese medicine with widely recognized efficacy, good quality control system and mechanism well explained and meanwhile which can bring innovation improvement to theory of Chinese medicine. According to the characters of SMEs, we hold a view that to build multidisciplinary research union could be considered as basic path, and then, from top-level design, skill upgrading and application three stages to probe the implementation strategy.

  18. Big Cat Coalitions: A comparative analysis of regional brain volumes in Felidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharleen T Sakai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Broad-based species comparisons across mammalian orders suggest a number of factors that might influence the evolution of large brains. However, the relationship between these factors and total and regional brain size remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between relative brain size and regional brain volumes and sociality in 13 felid species in hopes of revealing relationships that are not detected in more inclusive comparative studies. In addition, a more detailed analysis was conducted of 4 focal species: lions (Panthera leo, leopards (Panthera pardus, cougars (Puma concolor, and cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus. These species differ markedly in sociality and behavioral flexibility, factors hypothesized to contribute to increased relative brain size and/or frontal cortex size. Lions are the only truly social species, living in prides. Although cheetahs are largely solitary, males often form small groups. Both leopards and cougars are solitary. Of the four species, leopards exhibit the most behavioral flexibility, readily adapting to changing circumstances. Regional brain volumes were analyzed using computed tomography (CT. Skulls (n=75 were scanned to create three-dimensional virtual endocasts, and regional brain volumes were measured using either sulcal or bony landmarks obtained from the endocasts or skulls. Phylogenetic least squares (PGLS regression analyses found that sociality does not correspond with larger relative brain size in these species. However, the sociality/solitary variable significantly predicted anterior cerebrum (AC volume, a region that includes frontal cortex. This latter finding is despite the fact that the two social species in our sample, lions and cheetahs, possess the largest and smallest relative AC volumes, respectively. Additionally, an ANOVA comparing regional brain volumes in 4 focal species revealed that lions and leopards, while not significantly different from one another, have relatively

  19. Big Cat Coalitions: A Comparative Analysis of Regional Brain Volumes in Felidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Sharleen T.; Arsznov, Bradley M.; Hristova, Ani E.; Yoon, Elise J.; Lundrigan, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Broad-based species comparisons across mammalian orders suggest a number of factors that might influence the evolution of large brains. However, the relationship between these factors and total and regional brain size remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between relative brain size and regional brain volumes and sociality in 13 felid species in hopes of revealing relationships that are not detected in more inclusive comparative studies. In addition, a more detailed analysis was conducted of four focal species: lions (Panthera leo), leopards (Panthera pardus), cougars (Puma concolor), and cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). These species differ markedly in sociality and behavioral flexibility, factors hypothesized to contribute to increased relative brain size and/or frontal cortex size. Lions are the only truly social species, living in prides. Although cheetahs are largely solitary, males often form small groups. Both leopards and cougars are solitary. Of the four species, leopards exhibit the most behavioral flexibility, readily adapting to changing circumstances. Regional brain volumes were analyzed using computed tomography. Skulls (n = 75) were scanned to create three-dimensional virtual endocasts, and regional brain volumes were measured using either sulcal or bony landmarks obtained from the endocasts or skulls. Phylogenetic least squares regression analyses found that sociality does not correspond with larger relative brain size in these species. However, the sociality/solitary variable significantly predicted anterior cerebrum (AC) volume, a region that includes frontal cortex. This latter finding is despite the fact that the two social species in our sample, lions and cheetahs, possess the largest and smallest relative AC volumes, respectively. Additionally, an ANOVA comparing regional brain volumes in four focal species revealed that lions and leopards, while not significantly different from one another, have relatively larger AC volumes

  20. Small-World Propensity and Weighted Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Bridgeford, Eric W; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-02-25

    Quantitative descriptions of network structure can provide fundamental insights into the function of interconnected complex systems. Small-world structure, diagnosed by high local clustering yet short average path length between any two nodes, promotes information flow in coupled systems, a key function that can differ across conditions or between groups. However, current techniques to quantify small-worldness are density dependent and neglect important features such as the strength of network connections, limiting their application in real-world systems. Here, we address both limitations with a novel metric called the Small-World Propensity (SWP). In its binary instantiation, the SWP provides an unbiased assessment of small-world structure in networks of varying densities. We extend this concept to the case of weighted brain networks by developing (i) a standardized procedure for generating weighted small-world networks, (ii) a weighted extension of the SWP, and (iii) a method for mapping observed brain network data onto the theoretical model. In applying these techniques to compare real-world brain networks, we uncover the surprising fact that the canonical biological small-world network, the C. elegans neuronal network, has strikingly low SWP. These metrics, models, and maps form a coherent toolbox for the assessment and comparison of architectural properties in brain networks.

  1. Small-World Propensity and Weighted Brain Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt; Bridgeford, Eric W.; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative descriptions of network structure can provide fundamental insights into the function of interconnected complex systems. Small-world structure, diagnosed by high local clustering yet short average path length between any two nodes, promotes information flow in coupled systems, a key function that can differ across conditions or between groups. However, current techniques to quantify small-worldness are density dependent and neglect important features such as the strength of network connections, limiting their application in real-world systems. Here, we address both limitations with a novel metric called the Small-World Propensity (SWP). In its binary instantiation, the SWP provides an unbiased assessment of small-world structure in networks of varying densities. We extend this concept to the case of weighted brain networks by developing (i) a standardized procedure for generating weighted small-world networks, (ii) a weighted extension of the SWP, and (iii) a method for mapping observed brain network data onto the theoretical model. In applying these techniques to compare real-world brain networks, we uncover the surprising fact that the canonical biological small-world network, the C. elegans neuronal network, has strikingly low SWP. These metrics, models, and maps form a coherent toolbox for the assessment and comparison of architectural properties in brain networks.

  2. Small vessel ischemic disease of the brain and brain metastases in lung cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Mazzone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain metastases occur commonly in patients with lung cancer. Small vessel ischemic disease is frequently found when imaging the brain to detect metastases. We aimed to determine if the presence of small vessel ischemic disease (SVID of the brain is protective against the development of brain metastases in lung cancer patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort of 523 patients with biopsy confirmed lung cancer who had received magnetic resonance imaging of the brain as part of their standard initial staging evaluation was reviewed. Information collected included demographics, comorbidities, details of the lung cancer, and the presence of SVID of the brain. A portion of the cohort had the degree of SVID graded. The primary outcome measure was the portion of study subjects with and without SVID of the brain who had evidence of brain metastases at the time of initial staging of their lung cancer.109 patients (20.8% had evidence of brain metastases at presentation and 345 (66.0% had evidence of SVID. 13.9% of those with SVID and 34.3% of those without SVID presented with brain metastases (p<0.0001. In a model including age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and tobacco use, SVID of the brain was found to be the only protective factor against the development of brain metastases, with an OR of 0.31 (0.20, 0.48; p<0.001. The grade of SVID was higher in those without brain metastases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that vascular changes in the brain are protective against the development of brain metastases in lung cancer patients.

  3. Relapsing pattern of brain metastasis after brain irradiation in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Masao; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Kono, Koichi; Yoden, Eisaku; Mori, Takeki [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Many reports concerning radiation therapy for brain metastasis have been published, and which of the various methods urged by these reports provide optional control is still controversial. According to developing diagnosis of metastasis in CNS, therapeutic problems should be referred. We reviewed 67 patients with small cell lung cancer and brain metastasis who underwent brain irradiation (Ave. 47 Gy/5W), and all 15 patients with brain relapse after the irradiation. Relapsing patterns in this clinical setting were divided into local regrowth in the same lesions and re-metastasis (reseeding) in other regions, by reviewing follow up CT and MRI studies. Total survival among 15 patients with brain relapse and 52 without relapse was longer in the former cases than the later: 1-, and 2-year survival (47/19%, 13/8%) and MST (10.8/5.7 months), from the initial brain irradiation. The concerned significant factors limited in younger age, low value of LDH and improvement of NF. Of the 15 patients with brain relapse, 4 developed local regrowth and 11 did re-metastasis. The period of remission since brain irradiation were 172{+-}94.4 and 393{+-}281 days, respectively. Lower number of brain metastasis and lower value of LDH were shown in re-metastasis patients. At the time of brain relapse, 11 patients had recurrence of carcinomatous meningitis. 4 patients were treated with whole brain re-irradiation. All patients died of cancer, including 12 of relapsing CNS diseases and 3 of primary lesion and hepatic metastasis. Leukoencephalopathy developed in 2 patients. Survival since the brain relapse was 2 to 238 days without significant difference in cases of local regrowth and re-metastasis. According to our data on relapsing pattern of brain metastasis after conventional fractionated brain irradiation with an objective dose of 50 Gy, 75% of brain relapse were re-metastasis, we appreciate this irradiation for initial brain metastasis if limited to the brain. (author)

  4. Narrative health research: exploring big and small stories as analytical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sools, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    In qualitative health research many researchers use a narrative approach to study lay health concepts and experiences. In this article, I explore the theoretical linkages between the concepts narrative and health, which are used in a variety of ways. The article builds on previous work that conceptualizes health as a multidimensional, positive, dynamic and morally dilemmatic yet meaningful practice. I compare big and small stories as analytical tools to explore what narrative has to offer to address, nuance and complicate five challenges in narrative health research: (1) the interplay between health and other life issues; (2) the taken-for-granted yet rare character of the experience of good health; (3) coherence or incoherence as norms for good health; (4) temporal issues; (5) health as moral practice. In this article, I do not present research findings per se; rather, I use two interview excerpts for methodological and theoretical reflections. These interview excerpts are derived from a health promotion study in the Netherlands, which was partly based on peer-to-peer interviews. I conclude with a proposal to advance narrative health research by sensitizing researchers to different usages of both narrative and health, and the interrelationship(s) between the two.

  5. Small Stress Change Triggering a Big Earthquake: a Test of the Critical Point Hypothesis for Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万永革; 吴忠良; 周公威

    2003-01-01

    Whether or not a small stress change can trigger a big earthquake is one of the most important problems related to the critical point hypothesis for earthquakes. We investigate global earthquakes with different focal mechanisms which have different levels of ambient shear stress. This ambient stress level is the stress level required by the earthquakes for their occurrence. Earthquake pairs are studied to see whether the occurrence of the preceding event encourages the occurrence of the succeeding one in terms of the Coulomb stress triggering. It is observed that the stress triggering effect produced by the change of Coulomb failure stress in the same order of magnitudes,about 10-2 MPa, is distinctly different for different focal mechanisms, and thus for different ambient stress levels.For non-strike-slip earthquakes with a relatively low ambient stress level, the triggering effect is more evident,while for strike-slip earthquakes with a relatively high ambient stress level, there is no evident triggering effect.This water level test provides an observational support to the critical point hypothesis for earthquakes.

  6. CREDIT SCORING MODELS IN ESTIMATING THE CREDITWORTHINESS OF SMALL AND MEDIUM AND BIG ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zenzerović

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on estimating the credit scoring models for companies operating in the Republic of Croatia. According to level of economic and legal development, especially in the area of bankruptcy regulation as well as business ethics in the Republic of Croatia, the models derived can be applied in wider region particularly in South-eastern European countries that twenty years ago transferred from state directed to free market economy. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the relevance and possibilities of particular financial ratios in estimating the creditworthiness of business entities what was realized by performing the research among 110 companies. Along most commonly used research methods of description, analysis and synthesis, induction, deduction and surveys, the mathematical and statistical logistic regression method took the central part in this research. The designed sample of 110 business entities represented the structure of firms operating in Republic of Croatia according to their activities as well as to their size. The sample was divided in two sub samples where the first one consist of small and medium enterprises (SME and the second one consist of big business entities. In the next phase the logistic regression method was applied on the 50 independent variables – financial ratios calculated for each sample unit in order to find ones that best discriminate financially stable from unstable companies. As the result of logistic regression analysis, two credit scoring models were derived. First model include the liquidity, solvency and profitability ratios and is applicable for SME’s. With its classification accuracy of 97% the model has high predictive ability and can be used as an effective decision support tool. Second model is applicable for big companies and include only two independent variables – liquidity and solvency ratios. The classification accuracy of this model is 92,5% and, according to criteria of

  7. Start small, dream big: Experiences of physical activity in public spaces in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Del Castillo, Adriana; González, Silvia Alejandra; Ríos, Ana Paola; Páez, Diana C; Torres, Andrea; Díaz, María Paula; Pratt, Michael; Sarmiento, Olga L

    2016-08-26

    Multi-sectoral strategies to promote active recreation and physical activity in public spaces are crucial to building a "culture of health". However, studies on the sustainability and scalability of these strategies are limited. This paper identifies the factors related to the sustainability and scaling up of two community-based programs offering physical activity classes in public spaces in Colombia: Bogotá's Recreovía and Colombia's "Healthy Habits and Lifestyles Program-HEVS". Both programs have been sustained for more than 10years, and have benefited 1455 communities. We used a mixed-methods approach including semi-structured interviews, document review and an analysis of data regarding the programs' history, characteristics, funding, capacity building and challenges. Interviews were conducted between May-October 2015. Based on the sustainability frameworks of Shediac-Rizkallah and Bone and Scheirer, we developed categories to independently code each interview. All information was independently analyzed by four of the authors and cross-compared between programs. Findings showed that these programs underwent adaptation processes to address the challenges that threatened their continuation and growth. The primary strategies included flexibility/adaptability, investing in the working conditions and training of instructors, allocating public funds and requesting accountability, diversifying resources, having community support and champions at different levels and positions, and carrying out continuous advocacy to include physical activity in public policies. Recreovía and HEVS illustrate sustainability as an incremental, multi-level process at different levels. Lessons learned for similar initiatives include the importance of individual actions and small events, a willingness to start small while dreaming big, being flexible, and prioritizing the human factor.

  8. Big Data Concept in the Food Supply Chain: Small Markets Case

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valentinas Navickas; Valentas Gružauskas

    2016-01-01

    .... Therefore, the authors analyzed Big data in the food supply chain. The methodology used in the paper consists of a review of global competitiveness reports and secondary data analysis together with document-based literature synthesis...

  9. Big Data solutions on a small scale: Evaluating accessible high-performance computing for social research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Murthy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Though full of promise, Big Data research success is often contingent on access to the newest, most advanced, and often expensive hardware systems and the expertise needed to build and implement such systems. As a result, the accessibility of the growing number of Big Data-capable technology solutions has often been the preserve of business analytics. Pay as you store/process services like Amazon Web Services have opened up possibilities for smaller scale Big Data projects. There is high demand for this type of research in the digital humanities and digital sociology, for example. However, scholars are increasingly finding themselves at a disadvantage as available data sets of interest continue to grow in size and complexity. Without a large amount of funding or the ability to form interdisciplinary partnerships, only a select few find themselves in the position to successfully engage Big Data. This article identifies several notable and popular Big Data technologies typically implemented using large and extremely powerful cloud-based systems and investigates the feasibility and utility of development of Big Data analytics systems implemented using low-cost commodity hardware in basic and easily maintainable configurations for use within academic social research. Through our investigation and experimental case study (in the growing field of social Twitter analytics, we found that not only are solutions like Cloudera’s Hadoop feasible, but that they can also enable robust, deep, and fruitful research outcomes in a variety of use-case scenarios across the disciplines.

  10. Big Data solutions on a small scale: Evaluating accessible high-performance computing for social research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Murthy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Though full of promise, Big Data research success is often contingent on access to the newest, most advanced, and often expensive hardware systems and the expertise needed to build and implement such systems. As a result, the accessibility of the growing number of Big Data-capable technology solutions has often been the preserve of business analytics. Pay as you store/process services like Amazon Web Services have opened up possibilities for smaller scale Big Data projects. There is high demand for this type of research in the digital humanities and digital sociology, for example. However, scholars are increasingly finding themselves at a disadvantage as available data sets of interest continue to grow in size and complexity. Without a large amount of funding or the ability to form interdisciplinary partnerships, only a select few find themselves in the position to successfully engage Big Data. This article identifies several notable and popular Big Data technologies typically implemented using large and extremely powerful cloud-based systems and investigates the feasibility and utility of development of Big Data analytics systems implemented using low-cost commodity hardware in basic and easily maintainable configurations for use within academic social research. Through our investigation and experimental case study (in the growing field of social Twitter analytics, we found that not only are solutions like Cloudera’s Hadoop feasible, but that they can also enable robust, deep, and fruitful research outcomes in a variety of use-case scenarios across the disciplines.

  11. IEDA: Making Small Data BIG Through Interdisciplinary Partnerships Among Long-tail Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Ferrini, V. L.; Hsu, L.; Song, L.; Ghiorso, M. S.; Walker, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Big Data world in the Earth Sciences so far exists primarily for disciplines that generate massive volumes of observational or computed data using large-scale, shared instrumentation such as global sensor networks, satellites, or high-performance computing facilities. These data are typically managed and curated by well-supported community data facilities that also provide the tools for exploring the data through visualization or statistical analysis. In many other domains, especially those where data are primarily acquired by individual investigators or small teams (known as 'Long-tail data'), data are poorly shared and integrated, lacking a community-based data infrastructure that ensures persistent access, quality control, standardization, and integration of data, as well as appropriate tools to fully explore and mine the data within the context of broader Earth Science datasets. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications, www.iedadata.org) is a data facility funded by the US NSF to develop and operate data services that support data stewardship throughout the full life cycle of observational data in the solid earth sciences, with a focus on the data management needs of individual researchers. IEDA builds on a strong foundation of mature disciplinary data systems for marine geology and geophysics, geochemistry, and geochronology. These systems have dramatically advanced data resources in those long-tail Earth science domains. IEDA has strengthened these resources by establishing a consolidated, enterprise-grade infrastructure that is shared by the domain-specific data systems, and implementing joint data curation and data publication services that follow community standards. In recent years, other domain-specific data efforts have partnered with IEDA to take advantage of this infrastructure and improve data services to their respective communities with formal data publication, long-term preservation of data holdings, and better sustainability. IEDA hopes to

  12. Can Big Data Solve Small Problems? Paper Use in a Paperless Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlen, Petter; Pedersen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    A "Big Data" approach was used in part to study the use of printed paper in a 700 bed paperless hospital, in part to study the usefulness of the approach. Between 1,2 and 1,5 million pages were printed each month, corresponding to 10% of a citizens' monthly paper use. The identified use of printed paper did not seem to be high compared to other organisations. The big data approach was not able to answer all our questions, primarily because we did not get log data for the source programmes for the printing. The approach could consequently not provide the data needed to reduce paper printing.

  13. Big is not always beautiful - small can be a short cut to blue oceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Often it is claimed that big investments are the only way to success in tourism and the experience economy. Only by building some of the world's biggest hotels - like the ones in Dubai or Las Vegas where hotels with 3-4,000 rooms are not uncommon - success can be achieved. It is understandable th...

  14. Brain-only metastases of small cell lung cancer; efficacy of whole brain radiotherapy. An EORTC phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, PE; Haaxma-Reiche, H; Gregor, A; Groen, HJM; Lewinski, T; Scolard, T; Kirkpatrick, A; Curran, D; Sahmoud, T; Giaccone, G

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of WBRT as a single treatment modality in patients with brain metastases of small cell lung cancer. Patients and methods: The patients had brain metastases of small cell lung cancer without any sign of tumour outside the brain and were treated with 10

  15. Quantitative Partitions, Benford's Law, and why the Small is Numerous but the Big is Rare in the World

    CERN Document Server

    Kossovsky, Alex Ely

    2016-01-01

    It is often asked why there are many more small things in the world than big things. Why there are many more poor people than rich people. Why there are more villages than cities, and more cities than metropolitans. Such quantitative preference for the small in real-life physical data sets has a corresponding digital preference known as Benford's Law which predicts that the first digit on the leftmost side of numbers in real-life data is proportioned between all possible 1 to 9 digits approximately as in LOG(1 + 1/digit), so that low digits occur much more frequently than high digits. In this article various quantitative partition models are examined in terms of the quantitative and digital behavior of the resultant set of parts. The universal feature found across all partition models is having many small parts but only very few big parts, while Benford's Law is valid only in some particular partition cases and under certain constraints. Hence another vista of Benford's Law is to view it as a particular subse...

  16. An examination of cetacean brain structure with a novel hypothesis correlating thermogenesis to the evolution of a big brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manger, Paul R

    2006-05-01

    This review examines aspects of cetacean brain structure related to behaviour and evolution. Major considerations include cetacean brain-body allometry, structure of the cerebral cortex, the hippocampal formation, specialisations of the cetacean brain related to vocalisations and sleep phenomenology, paleoneurology, and brain-body allometry during cetacean evolution. These data are assimilated to demonstrate that there is no neural basis for the often-asserted high intellectual abilities of cetaceans. Despite this, the cetaceans do have volumetrically large brains. A novel hypothesis regarding the evolution of large brain size in cetaceans is put forward. It is shown that a combination of an unusually high number of glial cells and unihemispheric sleep phenomenology make the cetacean brain an efficient thermogenetic organ, which is needed to counteract heat loss to the water. It is demonstrated that water temperature is the major selection pressure driving an altered scaling of brain and body size and an increased actual brain size in cetaceans. A point in the evolutionary history of cetaceans is identified as the moment in which water temperature became a significant selection pressure in cetacean brain evolution. This occurred at the Archaeoceti - modern cetacean faunal transition. The size, structure and scaling of the cetacean brain continues to be shaped by water temperature in extant cetaceans. The alterations in cetacean brain structure, function and scaling, combined with the imperative of producing offspring that can withstand the rate of heat loss experienced in water, within the genetic confines of eutherian mammal reproductive constraints, provides an explanation for the evolution of the large size of the cetacean brain. These observations provide an alternative to the widely held belief of a correlation between brain size and intelligence in cetaceans.

  17. Comparative study of visual acuity and aberrations after intralase femtosecond LASIK: small corneal flap versus big corneal flap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Li; Zhang; Lei; Liu; Chang-Xia; Cui; Ming; Hu; Zhao-Na; Li; Li-Jun; Cao; Xiu-Hua; Jing; Guo-Ying; Mu

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of different flap sizes on visual acuity, refractive outcomes, and aberrations after femtosecond laser for laser keratomileusis (LASIK). ·METHODS: In each of the forty patients enrolled, 1 eye was randomly assigned to receive treatment with a 8.1mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the small flap, while the other eye was treated with a 8.6mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the big flap. Refractive errors, visual acuity, and higher -order aberrations were compared between the two groups at week 1, month 1 and 3 postoperatively. · RESULTS: The postoperative refractive errors and visual acuity all conformed to the intended goal. Postoperative higher -order aberrations were increased, especially in spherical aberration (Z12) and vertical coma (Z7). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of postoperative refractive errors, visual acuity, root mean square of total HOAs (HO -RMS), trefoil 30° (Z6), vertical coma (Z7), horizontal coma (Z8), trefoil 0° (Z9), and spherical aberration (Z12) at any point during the postoperative follow-up. ·CONCLUSION: Both the small and big flaps are safe and effective procedures to correct myopia, provided the exposure stroma meets the excimer laser ablations. The personalized size corneal flap is feasible, as we can design the size of corneal flap based on the principle that the corneal flap diameter should be equal to or greater than the sum of the maximum ablation diameter and apparatus error.

  18. Small Big Data: Using multiple data-sets to explore unfolding social and economic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Gray

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bold approaches to data collection and large-scale quantitative advances have long been a preoccupation for social science researchers. In this commentary we further debate over the use of large-scale survey data and official statistics with ‘Big Data’ methodologists, and emphasise the ability of these resources to incorporate the essential social and cultural heredity that is intrinsic to the human sciences. In doing so, we introduce a series of new data-sets that integrate approximately 30 years of survey data on victimisation, fear of crime and disorder and social attitudes with indicators of socio-economic conditions and policy outcomes in Britain. The data-sets that we outline below do not conform to typical conceptions of ‘Big Data’. But, we would contend, they are ‘big’ in terms of the volume, variety and complexity of data which has been collated (and to which additional data can be linked and ‘big’ also in that they allow us to explore key questions pertaining to how social and economic policy change at the national level alters the attitudes and experiences of citizens. Importantly, they are also ‘small’ in the sense that the task of rendering the data usable, linking it and decoding it, required both manual processing and tacit knowledge of the context of the data and intentions of its creators.

  19. Optimising rigid motion compensation for small animal brain PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler-Bickell, Matthew G.; Zhou, Lin; Kyme, Andre Z.; De Laat, Bart; Fulton, Roger R.; Nuyts, Johan

    2016-10-01

    Motion compensation (MC) in PET brain imaging of awake small animals is attracting increased attention in preclinical studies since it avoids the confounding effects of anaesthesia and enables behavioural tests during the scan. A popular MC technique is to use multiple external cameras to track the motion of the animal’s head, which is assumed to be represented by the motion of a marker attached to its forehead. In this study we have explored several methods to improve the experimental setup and the reconstruction procedures of this method: optimising the camera-marker separation; improving the temporal synchronisation between the motion tracker measurements and the list-mode stream; post-acquisition smoothing and interpolation of the motion data; and list-mode reconstruction with appropriately selected subsets. These techniques have been tested and verified on measurements of a moving resolution phantom and brain scans of an awake rat. The proposed techniques improved the reconstructed spatial resolution of the phantom by 27% and of the rat brain by 14%. We suggest a set of optimal parameter values to use for awake animal PET studies and discuss the relative significance of each parameter choice.

  20. World Standards Day 14 October 2006 Standards: big benefits for small business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Small business could claim to be the world's biggest business. It is estimated that more than 95 per cent of the world's businesses are small to medium sized. Thus, international standards need to provide as many benefits for small businesses as they do for global enterprises, governments and society at large.

  1. Small Firms, Big Opportunities: The Potential of Careers for Business Graduates in SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad; Helms, Marilyn M.

    1997-01-01

    The current business climate enables small businesses to grow faster, creating more advancement opportunities. Business graduates should consider small and medium-sized employers with good growth prospects and work environments satisfying their preferences, but should have realistic expectations of working in small companies. (SK)

  2. Small Schools in a Big World: Thinking about a Wicked Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Michael; Tinkham, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The position of small rural schools is precarious in much of rural Canada today. What is to be done about small schools in rural communities which are often experiencing population decline and aging, economic restructuring, and the loss of employment and services? We argue this issue is a classic "wicked" policy problem. Small schools…

  3. Resumption-based big-step and small-step interpreters for While with interactive I/O

    CERN Document Server

    Nakata, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    In this tutorial, we program big-step and small-step total interpreters for the While language extended with input and output primitives. While is a simple imperative language consisting of skip, assignment, sequence, conditional and loop. We first develop trace-based interpreters for While. Traces are potentially infinite nonempty sequences of states. The interpreters assign traces to While programs: for us, traces are denotations of While programs. The trace is finite if the program is terminating and infinite if the program is non-terminating. However, we cannot decide (i.e., write a program to determine), for any given program, whether its trace is finite or infinite, which amounts to deciding the halting problem. We then extend While with interactive input/output primitives. Accordingly, we extend the interpreters by generalizing traces to resumptions. The tutorial is based on our previous work with T. Uustalu on reasoning about interactive programs in the setting of constructive type theory.

  4. From Big Data to Small Transportable Products for Decision Support for Floods in Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, D.; Frye, S.; Cappelaere, P.; Policelli, F.; Handy, M.; Sohlberg, R. A.; Grossman, R.

    2013-12-01

    During the past four years, a team from NASA, Oklahoma University, University of Maryland and University of Chicago in collaboration with the Namibia Hydrological Services (NHS) has explored ways to provide decision support products for floods. The products include a variety of data including a hydrological model, ground measurements such as river gauges, and earth remote sensing data. This poster or presentation highlights the lessons learned in acquiring, storing, managing big data on the cloud and turning it into relevant products for GEOSS users. Technology that has been explored includes the use of Hadoop/MapReduce and Accumulo to process and manage the large data sets. OpenStreetMap was explored for use in cataloging water boundaries and enabling collaborative mapping of the base water mask and floods. A Flood Dashboard was created to customize displays of various data products. Finally, a higher level Geo-Social Application Processing Interface (API) was developed so that users can discover, generate products dynamically for their specific needs/societal benefit areas and then share them with their Community of Practice over social networks. Results of this experiment have included 100x reduction in size of some flood products, making it possible to distribute these products to mobile platforms and/or bandwidth-limited users.

  5. Big Data with small cases: A method for discovering students centered contexts for Physics courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Bülbül

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a methodology that could assist teachers in understanding their students’ primary needs or interests to decide on the kind of examples or contexts to be used in the classroom. The methodology was tested on 100 volunteers from university (N=50 and high school (N=50 in Ankara, Turkey. The participants were asked to write down the first word they thought of when they were presented with a single letter from the Turkish alphabet, which contains 29 letters. Then all the collected words (29x100=2900 were analyzed with the online word cloud creator, Wordle. According to results, the most cited words from the high-school classes were similar to each other, while the data from university participants showed more diversity. The most chosen word by the participants may give some clues in relation to the context that the teacher can utilize in planning a course. This study shows how to use a big-data-visualization-tool-based methodology to analyze the data gleaned from the participants’ life-long experiences.

  6. Big and small numbers: Empirical support for a single, flexible mechanism for numerosity perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Rakesh; Bapiraju, S; Melcher, David

    2017-01-01

    The existence of perceptually distinct numerosity ranges has been proposed for small (i.e., subitizing range) and larger numbers based on differences in precision, Weber fractions, and reaction times. This raises the question of whether such dissociations reflect distinct mechanisms operating across the two numerosity ranges. In the present work, we explore the predictions of a single-layer recurrent on-center, off-surround network model of attentional priority that has been applied to object individuation and enumeration. Activity from the network can be used to model various phenomena in the domain of visual number perception based on a single parameter: the strength of inhibition between nodes. Specifically, higher inhibition allows for precise representation of small numerosities, while low inhibition is preferred for high numerosities. The model makes novel predictions, including that enumeration of small numerosities following large numerosities should result in longer reaction times than when a small numerosity trial following small numerosities. Moreover, the model predicts underestimation of number when a display containing a large number of items follows a trial with small numerosities. We behaviorally confirmed these predictions in a series of experiments. This pattern of results is consistent with a single, flexible object individuation system, which can be modeled successfully by dynamic on-center, off-surround network model of the attentional priority (saliency) map.

  7. Small Wars, Small Investments, and Big Dividends: Clarifying Airpower’s Indirect Approach Amidst New Strategy and Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    suggested that while the Phoenix Cycle is an outstanding paradigm for understanding the historic plight of traditional SOF units, a different...statement) – nonetheless, small wars do have consequences that matter, even in ways reconcilable with realist foreign policy paradigms . Robert...above as one of his many thinly-veiled critiques of positivist military theorists including Antoine Henri Jomini and Dietrich von Bulow. These

  8. Affordable Development and Demonstration of a Small Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Engine and Stage: How Small Is Big Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Sefcik, Robert J.; Fittje, James E.; McCurdy, David R.; Qualls, Arthur L.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Weitzberg, Abraham; Joyner, Claude R.

    2016-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) derives its energy from fission of uranium-235 atoms contained within fuel elements that comprise the engine's reactor core. It generates high thrust and has a specific impulse potential of approximately 900 specific impulse - a 100 percent increase over today's best chemical rockets. The Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) project, funded by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program, includes five key task activities: (1) Recapture, demonstration, and validation of heritage graphite composite (GC) fuel (selected as the Lead Fuel option); (2) Engine Conceptual Design; (3) Operating Requirements Definition; (4) Identification of Affordable Options for Ground Testing; and (5) Formulation of an Affordable Development Strategy. During fiscal year (FY) 2014, a preliminary Design Development Test and Evaluation (DDT&E) plan and schedule for NTP development was outlined by the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Department of Energy (DOE) and industry that involved significant system-level demonstration projects that included Ground Technology Demonstration (GTD) tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), followed by a Flight Technology Demonstration (FTD) mission. To reduce cost for the GTD tests and FTD mission, small NTR engines, in either the 7.5 or 16.5 kilopound-force thrust class, were considered. Both engine options used GC fuel and a common fuel element (FE) design. The small approximately 7.5 kilopound-force criticality-limited engine produces approximately157 thermal megawatts and its core is configured with parallel rows of hexagonal-shaped FEs and tie tubes (TTs) with a FE to TT ratio of approximately 1:1. The larger approximately 16.5 kilopound-force Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) at the end of the Rover program, produces approximately 367 thermal megawatts and has a FE to TT ratio of approximately 2:1. Although both engines use a common 35-inch (approximately

  9. How to Make Big Improvements in the Small PR Shop. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. Keith, Comp.; Hunt, Susan, Ed.

    This guide for small public relations (PR) offices at colleges and universities includes sample job descriptions, information on PR duties and priorities, sample policy statements and operating guidelines, sample publicity materials, questionnaires, and internal forms for organization. Twenty-six tips on time management are provided in an article…

  10. Big concerns with small projects: Evaluating the socio-ecological impacts of small hydropower projects in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumani, Suman; Rao, Shishir; Machado, Siddarth; Prakash, Anup

    2017-05-01

    Although Small Hydropower Projects (SHPs) are encouraged as sources of clean and green energy, there is a paucity of research examining their socio-ecological impacts. We assessed the perceived socio-ecological impacts of 4 SHPs within the Western Ghats in India by conducting semi-structured interviews with local respondents. Primary interview data were sequentially validated with secondary data, and respondent perceptions were subsequently compared against the expected baseline of assured impacts. We evaluated the level of awareness about SHPs, their perceived socio-economic impacts, influence on resource access and impacts on human-elephant interactions. The general level of awareness about SHPs was low, and assurances of local electricity and employment generation remained largely unfulfilled. Additionally most respondents faced numerous unanticipated adverse impacts. We found a strong relationship between SHP construction and increasing levels of human-elephant conflict. Based on the disparity between assured and actual social impacts, we suggest that policies regarding SHPs be suitably revised.

  11. Traumatic brain injury, a big headache%"脑创伤"与"伤脑筋"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费舟; 李侠

    2011-01-01

    @@ 历史源远流长,伴随人类文明和进步的不仅有征服自然的艰辛、改造世界的喜悦,更有无穷无尽的心灵烦扰和身体伤害.颅脑创伤(traumatic brain injury,TBI),其核心是"脑刨伤",在众多身体伤害中"首"当其冲.

  12. Functional brain networks: great expectations, hard times and the big leap forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papo, David; Zanin, Massimiliano; Pineda-Pardo, José Angel; Boccaletti, Stefano; Buldú, Javier M

    2014-10-05

    Many physical and biological systems can be studied using complex network theory, a new statistical physics understanding of graph theory. The recent application of complex network theory to the study of functional brain networks has generated great enthusiasm as it allows addressing hitherto non-standard issues in the field, such as efficiency of brain functioning or vulnerability to damage. However, in spite of its high degree of generality, the theory was originally designed to describe systems profoundly different from the brain. We discuss some important caveats in the wholesale application of existing tools and concepts to a field they were not originally designed to describe. At the same time, we argue that complex network theory has not yet been taken full advantage of, as many of its important aspects are yet to make their appearance in the neuroscience literature. Finally, we propose that, rather than simply borrowing from an existing theory, functional neural networks can inspire a fundamental reformulation of complex network theory, to account for its exquisitely complex functioning mode.

  13. Study on clear stereo image pair acquisition method for small objects with big vertical size in SLM vision system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuezong; Jin, Yan; Wang, Lika; Geng, Benliang

    2016-05-01

    Microscopic vision system with stereo light microscope (SLM) has been applied to surface profile measurement. If the vertical size of a small object exceeds the range of depth, its images will contain clear and fuzzy image regions. Hence, in order to obtain clear stereo images, we propose a microscopic sequence image fusion method which is suitable for SLM vision system. First, a solution to capture and align image sequence is designed, which outputs an aligning stereo images. Second, we decompose stereo image sequence by wavelet analysis theory, and obtain a series of high and low frequency coefficients with different resolutions. Then fused stereo images are output based on the high and low frequency coefficient fusion rules proposed in this article. The results show that Δw1 (Δw2 ) and ΔZ of stereo images in a sequence have linear relationship. Hence, a procedure for image alignment is necessary before image fusion. In contrast with other image fusion methods, our method can output clear fused stereo images with better performance, which is suitable for SLM vision system, and very helpful for avoiding image fuzzy caused by big vertical size of small objects.

  14. Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Philip D; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Hodgson, David J.; Mangel, Jeffrey C; Witt, Matthew J.; Godley, Brendan J.

    2014-01-01

    Shark take, driven by vast demand for meat and fins, is increasing. We set out to gain insights into the impact of small-scale longline fisheries in Peru. Onboard observers were used to document catch from 145 longline fishing trips (1668 fishing days) originating from Ilo, southern Peru. Fishing effort is divided into two seasons: targeting dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus; December to February) and sharks (March to November). A total of 16,610 sharks were observed caught, with 11,166 identi...

  15. Big Data: Big Confusion? Big Challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    12th Annual Acquisition Research Symposium 12th Annual Acquisition Research Symposium Big Data : Big Confusion? Big Challenges? Mary Maureen... Data : Big Confusion? Big Challenges? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...Acquisition Research Symposium • ~!& UNC CHARlD1TE 90% of the data in the world today was created in the last two years Big Data growth from

  16. The Great Celestial Numbers - The Infinitely Big and The Infinitely Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorani, M.

    2009-11-01

    This book is a travel that brings the reader to penetrate dimensionally the infinitely small and the infinitely large in the Universe, ranging from quarks to galaxies, and to compare these extreme numbers with the numbers that people encounters in normal life here on Earth. Several numerical examples are illustrated all over the text in a sort of scientific orienteering that describes dimensionally the realms of space, time and energy. The last part of the book shows how all spatial and temporal dimensions disappear when the mechanism of quantum entanglement is considered.

  17. Big Science, Small-Budget Space Experiment Package Aka MISSE-5: A Hardware And Software Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Flatico, Joseph; Jenkins, Phillip; Spina, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Conducting space experiments with small budgets is a fact of life for many design groups with low-visibility science programs. One major consequence is that specialized space grade electronic components are often too costly to incorporate into the design. Radiation mitigation now becomes more complex as a result of being restricted to the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts. Unique hardware and software design techniques are required to succeed in producing a viable instrument suited for use in space. This paper highlights some of the design challenges and associated solutions encountered in the production of a highly capable, low cost space experiment package.

  18. Big Software for SmallSats: Adapting cFS to CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan P.; Crum, Gary Alex; Sheikh, Salman; Marshall, James

    2015-01-01

    Expanding capabilities and mission objectives for SmallSats and CubeSats is driving the need for reliable, reusable, and robust flight software. While missions are becoming more complicated and the scientific goals more ambitious, the level of acceptable risk has decreased. Design challenges are further compounded by budget and schedule constraints that have not kept pace. NASA's Core Flight Software System (cFS) is an open source solution which enables teams to build flagship satellite level flight software within a CubeSat schedule and budget. NASA originally developed cFS to reduce mission and schedule risk for flagship satellite missions by increasing code reuse and reliability. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which launched in 2009, was the first of a growing list of Class B rated missions to use cFS.

  19. Post-translational Modifications in Heart Failure: Small Changes, Big Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ahyoung; Oh, Jae Gyun; Gorski, Przemek A; Hajjar, Roger J; Kho, Changwon

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is a complex disease process with various aetiologies and is a significant cause of morbidity and death world-wide. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) alter protein structure and provide functional diversity in terms of physiological functions of the heart. In addition, alterations in protein PTMs have been implicated in human disease pathogenesis. Small ubiquitin-like modifier mediated modification (SUMOylation) pathway was found to play essential roles in cardiac development and function. Abnormal SUMOylation has emerged as a new feature of heart failure pathology. In this review, we will highlight the importance of SUMOylation as a regulatory mechanism of SERCA2a function, and its therapeutic potential for the treatment of heart failure.

  20. MicroRNA: a small molecule with a big biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2012-01-01

    One of the most significant achievements in biological science in the last decade is the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), a process within living cells that regulates gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Historically, this process was described by other more generic names, such as co-suppression and post transcriptional gene silencing. Only after the molecular mechanism underlying these apparently unrelated processes was fully understood did it become apparent that they all described the RNAi phenomenon. In 2006, Dr. Andrew Fire and Dr. Craig C. Mello were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on RNAi interference. RNAi is an RNA-dependent gene silencing process that is controlled by the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and is initiated by two types of small RNA molecules - microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA). However, the function of microRNA appears to be far beyond RNAi alone, including direct interaction with the gene promoter and epigenetic regulation of the DNA methylation and histone modification. By regulating gene expression, miRNAs are likely to be involved in diverse biological activities, such as tumorigenesis, immune response, insulin secretion, neurotransmitter synthesis, and circadian rhythm, to name a few. MicroRNAs are 21-23 nucleotide single stranded RNA molecules found in eukaryotic cells. The first miRNA, lin-4, was characterized in C. elegans in the early 1990s [1]. In the early years, the progress on microRNA research was slow and experienced substantial growing pains. The short length and uniqueness of each microRNA rendered many conventional hybridization based methods ineffective; very small RNAs are difficult to reliably amplify or label without introducing bias. In addition, hybridization-based methods for microRNA profiling relied on probes designed to detect known microRNAs or known microRNA species previously identified by sequencing or homology search. Recent evidence of

  1. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  2. Managing Astronomy Research Data: Case Studies of Big and Small Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Ashley E.

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy data management refers to all actions taken upon data over the course of the entire research process. It includes activities involving the collection, organization, analysis, release, storage, archiving, preservation, and curation of research data. Astronomers have cultivated data management tools, infrastructures, and local practices to ensure the use and future reuse of their data. However, new sky surveys will soon amass petabytes of data requiring new data management strategies.The goal of this dissertation, to be completed in 2015, is to identify and understand data management practices and the infrastructure and expertise required to support best practices. This will benefit the astronomy community in efforts toward an integrated scholarly communication framework.This dissertation employs qualitative, social science research methods (including interviews, observations, and document analysis) to conduct case studies of data management practices, covering the entire data lifecycle, amongst three populations: Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) collaboration team members; Individual and small-group users of SDSS data; and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) collaboration team members. I have been observing the collection, release, and archiving of data by the SDSS collaboration, the data practices of individuals and small groups using SDSS data in journal articles, and the LSST collaboration's planning and building of infrastructure to produce data.Preliminary results demonstrate that current data management practices in astronomy are complex, situational, and heterogeneous. Astronomers often have different management repertoires for working on sky surveys and for their own data collections, varying their data practices as they move between projects. The multitude of practices complicates coordinated efforts to maintain data.While astronomy expertise proves critical to managing astronomy data in the short, medium, and long term, the larger astronomy

  3. Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyan QU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized.

  4. Using small data to interpret big data: 311 reports as individual contributions to informal social control in urban neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Daniel Tumminelli

    2016-09-01

    Informal social control is considered a vital component of the well-being of urban communities. Though some argue that the actions that constitute this social process are often said to reflect territoriality, little else is known about how individuals contribute to it. The current study leverages a database of over 600,000 requests for government services received by the city of Boston, MA's 311 system as a way to answer such questions, focusing particularly on reports of issues in the public space arising from incivilities. In order to establish construct validity for the "big data" of the 311 system, they are combined with the "small data" of a survey of 311 users, permitting the simultaneous analysis of objective reporting behaviors with self-report attitudes. The analysis occurs in two parts. First, reporting of incivilities is distinguished behaviorally from reporting public issues arising from natural deterioration, and people are found to specialize in one or the other. Second, the survey is used to test whether the reports are a reflection of territoriality. Reports of incivilities were unique in their association with a desire to enforce local social norms. They were also associated with a second territorial motivation to benefit the community. Implications for future research are discussed.

  5. Microcredit in West Africa: how small loans make a big impact on poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbezo, B E

    1999-01-01

    This article examines the impact of microfinancing schemes in West Africa and the role of the International Labor Organization (ILO) in their development. Microfinancing or microcredit schemes are meant to create the kind of jobs that can keep households severely hit by the economic crisis afloat. They affect not only the financial, but also the agricultural, crafts, financing of social economy, and social protection sectors of the society. Thus, they contribute to improved access to basic social, health and family planning services and to drinking water. The challenge then, is for institutes to adopt microfinancing and to reach out to more than 100 million families in the region. To realize this, nongovernmental organizations are setting up as veritable microfinancing institutions, which are able to realize the resulting benefits so as to be economically viable. In the context of its role in the development of microfinancing schemes, ILO manages a portfolio of technical cooperation and research projects aimed at identifying and removing constraints in the access to credit, savings, insurance, and other financial services through its Social Finance Unit. In addition, ILO is promoting women's entrepreneurship through the International Small Enterprise Programme and the International Programme on More and Better Jobs for Women.

  6. SMPDB 2.0: big improvements to the Small Molecule Pathway Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewison, Timothy; Su, Yilu; Disfany, Fatemeh Miri; Liang, Yongjie; Knox, Craig; Maciejewski, Adam; Poelzer, Jenna; Huynh, Jessica; Zhou, You; Arndt, David; Djoumbou, Yannick; Liu, Yifeng; Deng, Lu; Guo, An Chi; Han, Beomsoo; Pon, Allison; Wilson, Michael; Rafatnia, Shahrzad; Liu, Philip; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB, http://www.smpdb.ca) is a comprehensive, colorful, fully searchable and highly interactive database for visualizing human metabolic, drug action, drug metabolism, physiological activity and metabolic disease pathways. SMPDB contains >600 pathways with nearly 75% of its pathways not found in any other database. All SMPDB pathway diagrams are extensively hyperlinked and include detailed information on the relevant tissues, organs, organelles, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Since its last release in 2010, SMPDB has undergone substantial upgrades and significant expansion. In particular, the total number of pathways in SMPDB has grown by >70%. Additionally, every previously entered pathway has been completely redrawn, standardized, corrected, updated and enhanced with additional molecular or cellular information. Many SMPDB pathways now include transporter proteins as well as much more physiological, tissue, target organ and reaction compartment data. Thanks to the development of a standardized pathway drawing tool (called PathWhiz) all SMPDB pathways are now much more easily drawn and far more rapidly updated. PathWhiz has also allowed all SMPDB pathways to be saved in a BioPAX format. Significant improvements to SMPDB's visualization interface now make the browsing, selection, recoloring and zooming of pathways far easier and far more intuitive. Because of its utility and breadth of coverage, SMPDB is now integrated into several other databases including HMDB and DrugBank.

  7. miRNAs: small genes with big potential in metazoan phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, James E; Sperling, Erik A; Nailor, Audrey; Heimberg, Alysha M; Robinson, Jeffrey M; King, Benjamin L; Pisani, Davide; Donoghue, Philip C J; Peterson, Kevin J

    2013-11-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a key component of gene regulatory networks and have been implicated in the regulation of virtually every biological process found in multicellular eukaryotes. What makes them interesting from a phylogenetic perspective is the high conservation of primary sequence between taxa, their accrual in metazoan genomes through evolutionary time, and the rarity of secondary loss in most metazoan taxa. Despite these properties, the use of miRNAs as phylogenetic markers has not yet been discussed within a clear conceptual framework. Here we highlight five properties of miRNAs that underlie their utility in phylogenetics: 1) The processes of miRNA biogenesis enable the identification of novel miRNAs without prior knowledge of sequence; 2) The continuous addition of miRNA families to metazoan genomes through evolutionary time; 3) The low level of secondary gene loss in most metazoan taxa; 4) The low substitution rate in the mature miRNA sequence; and 5) The small probability of convergent evolution of two miRNAs. Phylogenetic analyses using both Bayesian and parsimony methods on a eumetazoan miRNA data set highlight the potential of miRNAs to become an invaluable new tool, especially when used as an additional line of evidence, to resolve previously intractable nodes within the tree of life.

  8. Big Software for SmallSats: Adapting CFS to CubeSat Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudmore, Alan P.; Crum, Gary; Sheikh, Salman; Marshall, James

    2015-01-01

    Expanding capabilities and mission objectives for SmallSats and CubeSats is driving the need for reliable, reusable, and robust flight software. While missions are becoming more complicated and the scientific goals more ambitious, the level of acceptable risk has decreased. Design challenges are further compounded by budget and schedule constraints that have not kept pace. NASA's Core Flight Software System (cFS) is an open source solution which enables teams to build flagship satellite level flight software within a CubeSat schedule and budget. NASA originally developed cFS to reduce mission and schedule risk for flagship satellite missions by increasing code reuse and reliability. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which launched in 2009, was the first of a growing list of Class B rated missions to use cFS. Large parts of cFS are now open source, which has spurred adoption outside of NASA. This paper reports on the experiences of two teams using cFS for current CubeSat missions. The performance overheads of cFS are quantified, and the reusability of code between missions is discussed. The analysis shows that cFS is well suited to use on CubeSats and demonstrates the portability and modularity of cFS code.

  9. Small things make a big difference: binder effects on the performance of Li and Na batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shu-Lei; Pan, Yuede; Wang, Jia-Zhao; Liu, Hua-Kun; Dou, Shi-Xue

    2014-10-14

    Li and Na batteries are very important as energy storage devices for electric vehicles and smart grids. It is well known that, when an electrode is analysed in detail, each of the components (the active material, the conductive carbon, the current collector and the binder) makes a portion of contribution to the battery performance in terms of specific capacity, rate capability, cycle life, etc. However, there has not yet been a review on the binder, though there are already many review papers on the active materials. Binders make up only a small part of the electrode composition, but in some cases, they play an important role in affecting the cycling stability and rate capability for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) has been the mainstream binder, but there have been discoveries that aqueous binders can sometimes make a battery perform better, not to mention they are cheaper, greener, and easier to use for electrode fabrication. In this review, we focus on several kinds of promising electrode materials, to show how their battery performance can be affected significantly by binder materials: anode materials such as Si, Sn and transitional metal oxides; cathode materials such as LiFePO4, LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2, LiCoO2 and sulphur.

  10. Big catch, little sharks: Insight into Peruvian small-scale longline fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Philip D; Alfaro-Shigueto, Joanna; Hodgson, David J; Mangel, Jeffrey C; Witt, Matthew J; Godley, Brendan J

    2014-06-01

    Shark take, driven by vast demand for meat and fins, is increasing. We set out to gain insights into the impact of small-scale longline fisheries in Peru. Onboard observers were used to document catch from 145 longline fishing trips (1668 fishing days) originating from Ilo, southern Peru. Fishing effort is divided into two seasons: targeting dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus; December to February) and sharks (March to November). A total of 16,610 sharks were observed caught, with 11,166 identified to species level. Of these, 70.6% were blue sharks (Prionace glauca), 28.4% short-fin mako sharks (Isurus oxyrinchus), and 1% were other species (including thresher (Alopias vulpinus), hammerhead (Sphyrna zygaena), porbeagle (Lamnus nasus), and other Carcharhinidae species (Carcharhinus brachyurus, Carcharhinus falciformis, Galeorhinus galeus). Mean ± SD catch per unit effort of 33.6 ± 10.9 sharks per 1000 hooks was calculated for the shark season and 1.9 ± 3.1 sharks per 1000 hooks were caught in the dolphinfish season. An average of 83.7% of sharks caught (74.7% blue sharks; 93.3% mako sharks) were deemed sexually immature and under the legal minimum landing size, which for species exhibiting k-selected life history traits can result in susceptibility to over exploitation. As these growing fisheries operate along the entire Peruvian coast and may catch millions of sharks per annum, we conclude that their continued expansion, along with ineffective legislative approaches resulting in removal of immature individuals, has the potential to threaten the sustainability of the fishery, its target species, and ecosystem. There is a need for additional monitoring and research to inform novel management strategies for sharks while maintaining fisher livelihoods.

  11. Why small males have big sperm: dimorphic squid sperm linked to alternative mating behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiba Kogiku

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sperm cells are the target of strong sexual selection that may drive changes in sperm structure and function to maximize fertilisation success. Sperm evolution is regarded to be one of the major consequences of sperm competition in polyandrous species, however it can also be driven by adaptation to the environmental conditions at the site of fertilization. Strong stabilizing selection limits intra-specific variation, and therefore polymorphism, among fertile sperm (eusperm. Here we analyzed reproductive morphology differences among males employing characteristic alternative mating behaviours, and so potentially different conditions of sperm competition and fertilization environment, in the squid Loligo bleekeri. Results Large consort males transfer smaller (average total length = 73 μm sperm to a female's internal sperm storage location, inside the oviduct; whereas small sneaker males transfer larger (99 μm sperm to an external location around the seminal receptacle near the mouth. No significant difference in swimming speed was observed between consort and sneaker sperm. Furthermore, sperm precedence in the seminal receptacle was not biased toward longer sperm, suggesting no evidence for large sperm being favoured in competition for space in the sperm storage organ among sneaker males. Conclusions Here we report the first case, in the squid Loligo bleekeri, where distinctly dimorphic eusperm are produced by different sized males that employ alternative mating behaviours. Our results found no evidence that the distinct sperm dimorphism was driven by between- and within-tactic sperm competition. We propose that presence of alternative fertilization environments with distinct characteristics (i.e. internal or external, whether or not in combination with the effects of sperm competition, can drive the disruptive evolution of sperm size.

  12. Big brains are not enough: performance of three parrot species in the trap-tube paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Jannis; Werdenich, Dagmar; Gajdon, Gyula K; Huber, Ludwig; Wanker, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The trap-tube task has become a benchmark test for investigating physical causality in vertebrates. In this task, subjects have to retrieve food out of a horizontal tube using a tool and avoiding a trap hole in the tube. Great apes and corvids succeeded in this task. Parrots with relative brain volumes comparable to those of corvids and primates also demonstrate high cognitive abilities. We therefore tested macaws, a cockatoo, and keas on the trap-tube paradigm. All nine parrots failed to solve the task. In a simplified task, trap tubes with a slot inserted along the top were offered. The slot allowed the birds to move the reward directly with their bills. All but one individual solved this task by lifting the food over the trap. However, the parrots failed again when they were prevented from lifting the reward, although they anticipated that food will be lost when moved into the trap. We do not think that the demanding use of an external object is the main reason for the parrots' failure. Moreover, we suppose these parrots fail to consider the trap's position in the beginning of a trial and were not able to stop their behaviour and move the reward in the trap's opposite direction.

  13. 符号大O与符号小o的探究%The Discussion of Big O Notation and Small o Notation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘梓航

    2016-01-01

    文章旨在介绍符号大O及符号小o的定义。通过比较它们的不同,指出学生们在学习大O及小o会遇到的问题,并结合具体的例子探讨如何解决这些问题。%The aim of this paper is to introduce the definitions of the big O notation and the small o no-tation. Their differences are compared to show some of the problems which the students encountered in learning big O notation and small o notation. Solutions are discussed by using some examples.

  14. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  15. Surgical Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao BAI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. Usual treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, these methods result in poor patient prognosis. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of surgical resection in the multimodality management of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. Methods The clinical data of 46 non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgical resection of primary lung tumor, followed by whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In addition, 13 out of the 46 patients underwent resection of brain metastasis, whereas the remaining 33 patients received stereotactic radiosurgery. Results The median survival time of the enrolled patients was 16.8 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 76.1%, 20.9%, and 4.7%, respectively. The median survival times of the patients with brain metastasis resection or stereotactic radiosurgery were 18.3 and 15.8 months, respectively (P=0.091,2. Conclusion Surgical resection of primary lung tumor and brain metastasis may improve prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. However, the survival benefit of surgical resection over brain metastasis resection or stereotactic radiosurgery is uncertain.

  16. Revealing the Value of “Green” and the Small Group with a Big Heart in Transportation Mode Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gaker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To address issues of climate change, people are more and more being presented with the greenhouse gas emissions associated with their alternatives. Statements of pounds or kilograms of CO2 are showing up in trip planners, car advertisements, and even restaurant menus under the assumption that this information influences behavior. This research contributes to the literature that investigates how travelers respond to such information. Our objective is to better understand the “value of green” or how much travelers are willing to pay in money in order to reduce the CO2 associated with their travel. As with previous work, we designed and conducted a mode choice experiment using methods that have long been used to study value of time. The contributions of this paper are twofold. First, we employ revealed preference data, whereas previous studies have been based on stated preferences. Second, we provide new insight on how the value of green is distributed in the population. Whereas previous work has specified heterogeneity either systematically or with a continuous distribution, we find that a latent class choice model specification better fits the data and also is attractive behaviorally. The best fitting latent class model has two classes: one large class (76% of the sample who are not willing to spend any time or money to reduce their CO2 and a second class (24% of the sample who value reducing their CO2 at a very high rate of $2.68 per pound of reduction—our so-called small group with a big heart. We reanalyzed three datasets that we had previously collected and found considerable robustness of this two class result.

  17. The small-world organization of large-scale brain systems and relationships with subcortical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    Brain structure and function is characterized by large-scale brain systems. However, each system has its own "small-world" organization, with sub-regions, or "hubs," that have varying degrees of specialization for certain cognitive and behavioral processes. This article describes this small-world organization, and the concepts of functional specialization and functional integration are defined and explained through practical examples. We also describe the development of large-scale brain systems and this small-world organization as a sensitive, protracted process, vulnerable to a variety of influences that generate neurodevelopmental disorders.

  18. Big Data, Small Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Bollmer

    2014-08-01

    Andrew Dubber Radio in the Digital Age Polity, Cambridge, 2013   Charles Ess Digital Media Ethics, Second Edition Polity, Cambridge, 2014   Graeme Kirkpatrick Computer Games and the Social Imaginary Polity, Cambridge, 2013   Dhiraj Murthy Twitter: Social Communication in the Twitter Age Polity, Cambrige, 2013   Jill Walker Rettberg Blogging, Second Edition Polity, Cambridge, 2014

  19. Small country, big business?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Kerstin; Starke, Peter

    2008-01-01

    of education shows that this is not necessarily the case, at least not in the medium-term: New Zealand's government rather appears to be an active facilitator of the liberalisation process in education. We review its recent move towards treating education as an international export good and present data...... the example of New Zealand as a case study for the internationalisation of education services, the study depicts the way the government is involved in this process. Commodification of sectors traditionally subject to domestic public policy is often associated with a less interventionist state, but our example...

  20. Small Places, Big Stakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Sörbom, Adrienne

    , and at other staged, formal events. In addition, such fieldwork tends to be both multilocal, mobile, and discontinuous. It may not provide as much of a flavour of the different local sites and a sense of ‘being there' as one would wish for. The tendency in anthropology to favour the informal, the ‘genuine...

  1. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...... and the emergence of the technological community involved in designing and manufacturing computer chips. The community is structured in a way that reflects the underlying physical nature silicon and the numerous other materials and chemicals involved. But it also reflects the human agency of defining new projects...... instrument. It is found that technological progress is not hindered, but rather aided by the use of imperfect principles, abstractions and representations of reality. The power of such imperfections is discussed and generalized....

  2. Coassembly of big conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels and L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Kaufmann, Walter A

    2004-01-01

    . The nature of the apparent coupling is not known. In the present study we report a direct coassembly of big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK) and L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in rat brain. Saturation immunoprecipitation studies were performed on membranes labeled for BK channels...... to separate ion channel complexes. Finally, immunochemical studies showed a distinct but overlapping expression pattern of the two types of ion channels investigated. BK and L-type Ca(2+) channels were colocalized in various compartments throughout the rat brain. Taken together, these results demonstrate...... a direct coassembly of BK channels and L-type Ca(2+) channels in certain areas of the brain....

  3. Big Data, Big Problems: A Healthcare Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa S; Aldosari, Bakheet; Alanazi, Abdullah; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2017-01-01

    Much has been written on the benefits of big data for healthcare such as improving patient outcomes, public health surveillance, and healthcare policy decisions. Over the past five years, Big Data, and the data sciences field in general, has been hyped as the "Holy Grail" for the healthcare industry promising a more efficient healthcare system with the promise of improved healthcare outcomes. However, more recently, healthcare researchers are exposing the potential and harmful effects Big Data can have on patient care associating it with increased medical costs, patient mortality, and misguided decision making by clinicians and healthcare policy makers. In this paper, we review the current Big Data trends with a specific focus on the inadvertent negative impacts that Big Data could have on healthcare, in general, and specifically, as it relates to patient and clinical care. Our study results show that although Big Data is built up to be as a the "Holy Grail" for healthcare, small data techniques using traditional statistical methods are, in many cases, more accurate and can lead to more improved healthcare outcomes than Big Data methods. In sum, Big Data for healthcare may cause more problems for the healthcare industry than solutions, and in short, when it comes to the use of data in healthcare, "size isn't everything."

  4. Genetics Home Reference: COL4A1-related brain small-vessel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Intracerebral Hemorrhage Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery: Stroke MalaCards: col4a1-related brain small-vessel disease ...

  5. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Gretchen; Balke, Jordan E; Andras, Ibolya E; Park, Minseon; Toborek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6) D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma) cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies) or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies) post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  6. Exercise modulates redox-sensitive small GTPase activity in the brain microvasculature in a model of brain metastasis formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Wolff

    Full Text Available Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier (BBB. There is evidence that exercise can alter the oxidation status of the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell invasion into the brain, although the mechanisms are not well understood. In the current study, we focused on the role of microenvironment generated by exercise and metastasizing tumor cells at the levels of brain microvessels, influencing oxidative stress-mediated responses and activation of redox-sensitive small GTPases. Mature male mice were exercised for four weeks using a running wheel with the average voluntary running distance 9.0 ± 0.3 km/day. Mice were then infused with 1.0 × 10(6 D122 (murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells into the brain microvasculature, and euthanized either 48 hours (in short-term studies or 2-3 weeks (in long-term studies post tumor cell administration. A significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species was observed following 48 hours or 3 weeks of tumor cells growth, which was accompanied by a reduction in MnSOD expression in the exercised mice. Activation of the small GTPase Rho was negatively correlated with running distance in the tumor cell infused mice. Together, these data suggest that exercise may play a significant role during aggressive metastatic invasion, especially at higher intensities in pre-trained individuals.

  7. Big data, big governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reep, Frans van der

    2016-01-01

    “Natuurlijk is het leuk dat mijn koelkast zelf melk bestelt op basis van data gerelateerde patronen. Deep learning op basis van big data kent grote beloften,” zegt Frans van der Reep van Inholland. Geen wonder dat dit op de Hannover Messe tijdens de Wissenstag van ScienceGuide een hoofdthema zal zij

  8. When the Big Fish Turns Small: Effects of Participating in Gifted Summer Programs on Academic Self-Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, David Yun; Rinn, Anne N.; Tan, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the presence and prevalence of the big-fish-little-pond effect (BFLPE) in summer programs for the gifted, (b) identify group and individual difference variables that help predict those who are more susceptible to the BFLPE, and (c) put the possible BFLPE on academic self-concept in a larger context of…

  9. Driving and driven architectures of directed small-world human brain functional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaogan Yan

    Full Text Available Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the investigation of the human brain connectome that describes the patterns of structural and functional connectivity networks of the human brain. Many studies of the human connectome have demonstrated that the brain network follows a small-world topology with an intrinsically cohesive modular structure and includes several network hubs in the medial parietal regions. However, most of these studies have only focused on undirected connections between regions in which the directions of information flow are not taken into account. How the brain regions causally influence each other and how the directed network of human brain is topologically organized remain largely unknown. Here, we applied linear multivariate Granger causality analysis (GCA and graph theoretical approaches to a resting-state functional MRI dataset with a large cohort of young healthy participants (n = 86 to explore connectivity patterns of the population-based whole-brain functional directed network. This directed brain network exhibited prominent small-world properties, which obviously improved previous results of functional MRI studies showing weak small-world properties in the directed brain networks in terms of a kernel-based GCA and individual analysis. This brain network also showed significant modular structures associated with 5 well known subsystems: fronto-parietal, visual, paralimbic/limbic, subcortical and primary systems. Importantly, we identified several driving hubs predominantly located in the components of the attentional network (e.g., the inferior frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area, insula and fusiform gyrus and several driven hubs predominantly located in the components of the default mode network (e.g., the precuneus, posterior cingulate gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobule. Further split-half analyses indicated that our results were highly reproducible between two

  10. Targeted Therapy as an Alternative to Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in EGFR-Mutant or ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer With Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pablo; Mak, Raymond H; Oxnard, Geoffrey R

    2017-09-01

    Is up-front whole-brain radiotherapy required to treat multiple brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer when highly active targeted therapies are available? Patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer with brain metastases now have the potential to achieve a prolonged survival. Through use of highly active targeted therapies, whole-brain radiotherapy can be safely postponed, diminishing toxic effects that could impair quality of life.

  11. Lack of mutation induction with exposure to 1.5 GHz electromagnetic near fields used for cellular phones in brains of Big Blue mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Inaguma, Shingo; Cho, Young-Man; Imaida, Katsumi; Wang, Jianqing; Fujiwara, Osamu; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2002-04-01

    The possible mutagenic potential of exposure to 1.5 GHz electromagnetic near field (EMF) was investigated using brain tissues of Big Blue mice (BBM). Male BBM were locally exposed to EMF in the head region at 2.0, 0.67, and 0 W/kg specific absorption rate for 90 min/day, 5 days/week, for 4 weeks. No gliosis or degenerative lesions were histopathologically noted in brain tissues, and no obvious differences in Ki-67 labeling and apoptotic indices of glial cells were evident among the groups. There was no significant variation in the frequency of independent mutations of the lacI transgene in the brains. G:C to A:T transitions at CpG sites constituted the most prevalent mutations in all groups and at all time points. Deletion mutations were slightly increased in both the high and low EMF exposure groups as compared with the sham-exposed group, but the differences were not statistically significant. These findings suggest that exposure to 1.5 GHz EMF is not mutagenic to mouse brain cells and does not create any increased hazard with regard to brain tumor development.

  12. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  13. Big data, big responsibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primavera De Filippi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Big data refers to the collection and aggregation of large quantities of data produced by and about people, things or the interactions between them. With the advent of cloud computing, specialised data centres with powerful computational hardware and software resources can be used for processing and analysing a humongous amount of aggregated data coming from a variety of different sources. The analysis of such data is all the more valuable to the extent that it allows for specific patterns to be found and new correlations to be made between different datasets, so as to eventually deduce or infer new information, as well as to potentially predict behaviours or assess the likelihood for a certain event to occur. This article will focus specifically on the legal and moral obligations of online operators collecting and processing large amounts of data, to investigate the potential implications of big data analysis on the privacy of individual users and on society as a whole.

  14. Small-world anatomical networks in the human brain revealed by cortical thickness from MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Chen, Zhang J; Evans, Alan C

    2007-10-01

    An important issue in neuroscience is the characterization for the underlying architectures of complex brain networks. However, little is known about the network of anatomical connections in the human brain. Here, we investigated large-scale anatomical connection patterns of the human cerebral cortex using cortical thickness measurements from magnetic resonance images. Two areas were considered anatomically connected if they showed statistically significant correlations in cortical thickness and we constructed the network of such connections using 124 brains from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping database. Significant short- and long-range connections were found in both intra- and interhemispheric regions, many of which were consistent with known neuroanatomical pathways measured by human diffusion imaging. More importantly, we showed that the human brain anatomical network had robust small-world properties with cohesive neighborhoods and short mean distances between regions that were insensitive to the selection of correlation thresholds. Additionally, we also found that this network and the probability of finding a connection between 2 regions for a given anatomical distance had both exponentially truncated power-law distributions. Our results demonstrated the basic organizational principles for the anatomical network in the human brain compatible with previous functional networks studies, which provides important implications of how functional brain states originate from their structural underpinnings. To our knowledge, this study provides the first report of small-world properties and degree distribution of anatomical networks in the human brain using cortical thickness measurements.

  15. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  16. Graph analysis of structural brain networks in Alzheimer's disease: beyond small world properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Majnu; Ikuta, Toshikazu; Ferbinteanu, Janina

    2017-03-01

    Changes in brain connectivity in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been investigated using graph analysis. However, these studies were based on small data sets, explored a limited range of network parameters, and did not focus on more restricted sub-networks, where neurodegenerative processes may introduce more prominent alterations. In this study, we constructed structural brain networks out of 87 regions using data from 135 healthy elders and 100 early AD patients selected from the Open Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS) database. We evaluated the graph properties of these networks by investigating metrics of network efficiency, small world properties, segregation, product measures of complexity, and entropy. Because degenerative processes take place at different rates in different brain areas, analysis restricted to sub-networks may reveal changes otherwise undetected. Therefore, we first analyzed the graph properties of a network encompassing all brain areas considered together, and then repeated the analysis after dividing the brain areas into two sub-networks constructed by applying a clustering algorithm. At the level of large scale network, the analysis did not reveal differences between AD patients and controls. In contrast, the same analysis performed on the two sub-networks revealed that small worldness diminished with AD only in the sub-network containing the areas of medial temporal lobe known to be heaviest and earliest affected. The second sub-network, which did not present significant AD-induced modifications of 'classical' small world parameters, nonetheless showed a trend towards an increase in small world propensity, a novel metric that unbiasedly quantifies small world structure. Beyond small world properties, complexity and entropy measures indicated that the intricacy of connection patterns and structural diversity decreased in both sub-networks. These results show that neurodegenerative processes impact volumetric

  17. The conundrum of functional brain networks: small-world efficiency or fractal modularity

    CERN Document Server

    Gallos, Lazaros K; Makse, Hernan A

    2012-01-01

    The human brain has been studied at multiple scales, from neurons, circuits, areas with well defined anatomical and functional boundaries, to large-scale functional networks which mediate coherent cognition. In a recent work, we addressed the problem of the hierarchical organization in the brain through network analysis. Our analysis identified functional brain modules of fractal structure that were inter-connected in a small-world topology. Here, we provide more details on the use of network science tools to elaborate on this behavior. We indicate the importance of using percolation theory to highlight the modular character of the functional brain network. These modules present a fractal, self-similar topology, identified through fractal network methods. When we lower the threshold of correlations to include weaker ties, the network as a whole assumes a small-world character. These weak ties are organized precisely as predicted by theory maximizing information transfer with minimal wiring costs.

  18. 静息态人脑功能网络的小世界特性%Small-World Properties of Resting State Human Brain Functional Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文涛; 冯又层

    2011-01-01

    研究了静息态下健康人脑的功能连接模式有助于理解人脑在正常或疾病状态下的功能活动规律.利用小波变换从健康志愿者静息态的功能磁共振成像中提取时间序列,计算90个脑区的相关性,设定阈值建立脑功能网络的无向简单图,然后计算特征路径长度和聚类系数,并对度分布进行拟合.结果显示:脑功能网络具有规则网络的大聚集系数又具有随机网络的小特征路径长度,度的拟合显示具有指数截断幂律分布,即脑功能网络具有小世界特性.%It is important to study the resting state functional pattern of healthy human brain because it will aid us to understand the law of functional activities of human brain in normal or disease states.Using wavelet transformation,time series of 90 brain regions were extracted from functional magnetic resonance imagines of resting state healthy volunteers.Functional correlations between brain regions were calculated,and the threshold was set to establish the simple undirected graph,then characteristic path length and clustering coefficient were computed,finally the degree distribution was fitted.The results demonstrated that the brain functional networks had both big clustering coefficients like regular networks and small characteristic path lengths similar as random networks,degree distribution met exponentially truncated power-law distribution.Taken together,the human brain functional networks have small world properties.

  19. Big science

    CERN Multimedia

    Nadis, S

    2003-01-01

    " "Big science" is moving into astronomy, bringing large experimental teams, multi-year research projects, and big budgets. If this is the wave of the future, why are some astronomers bucking the trend?" (2 pages).

  20. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This review will focus on the emerging data supporting the involvement of the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the brain metastatic evolution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the pharmacological tools that may be used to interfere with this signaling axis.

  1. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation.

  2. Relation of cerebral small-vessel disease and brain atrophy to mild Parkinsonism in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Christiane; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kretzschmar, Konrad; Roesler, Andreas; V Eckardstein, Arnold; Berger, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    The association between cerebral small-vessel disease, brain atrophy, and the risk and severity of mild parkinsonian signs (MPS) remains unclear. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs), and cortical atrophy on the risk and severity of MPS. This study is a cross-sectional community-based cohort study comprising 268 subjects, 65 to 83 years of age, residing in the Augsburg region of southern Germany, and without contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Main outcome measures. Subcortical and periventricular WMLs, lacunar brain infarcts, and cortical atrophy determined using a standardized MRI protocol developed for the Rotterdam Scan Study and an established rating scale. MPS, assessed in a standardized neurological examination and based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scale. Lacunar brain infarcts and large subcortical white matter lesions were associated with an elevated risk of resting tremor. More severe cortical atrophy was related to an increased risk of rigidity and bradykinesia. In a linear regression analysis relating each individual MRI measurement with the severity of MPS, the number of lacunar brain infarcts and the degree of brain atrophy were correlated with the severity of resting tremor, whereas the size of subcortical and periventricular WMLs was correlated with the severity of rigidity. A higher degree of brain atrophy was associated with increased severity of either cardinal sign. In our study, presence and volume of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral WMLs, and cortical atrophy were associated with the risk as well as severity of MPS. Determining the presence of these brain changes using brain imaging might contribute to identify persons at risk for MPS.

  3. Stability principle of big and small structures of rock surrounding roadway driven along goaf in fully mechanized top coal caving face

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, C.; Li, X. [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China)

    2001-02-01

    Based on the characteristics of the surrounding rock of roadway driven along the goaf in a fully mechanised top coal caving face, the stability principle of big and small structures is put forward, which provides the theoretical basis to the application of bolting. The mechanical characteristics of the arc-triangle key block in the main roof and the stability of the roadway during drivage and extraction and the effect on the roadway driven along the next goaf are analysed. The main factors which affect the stability of the small structure of the surrounding rock are discussed. The bolting surrounding strength reinforcement theory is applied to study the important significance of improving the pre-tension of bolting and the support strength. 4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Crowd-funded micro-grants for genomics and "big data": an actionable idea connecting small (artisan) science, infrastructure science, and citizen philanthropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Vural; Badr, Kamal F; Dove, Edward S; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hotez, Peter J; Milius, Djims; Neves-Pereira, Maria; Pang, Tikki; Rotimi, Charles N; Sabra, Ramzi; Sarkissian, Christineh N; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tims, Hesther; Zgheib, Nathalie K; Kickbusch, Ilona

    2013-04-01

    Biomedical science in the 21(st) century is embedded in, and draws from, a digital commons and "Big Data" created by high-throughput Omics technologies such as genomics. Classic Edisonian metaphors of science and scientists (i.e., "the lone genius" or other narrow definitions of expertise) are ill equipped to harness the vast promises of the 21(st) century digital commons. Moreover, in medicine and life sciences, experts often under-appreciate the important contributions made by citizen scholars and lead users of innovations to design innovative products and co-create new knowledge. We believe there are a large number of users waiting to be mobilized so as to engage with Big Data as citizen scientists-only if some funding were available. Yet many of these scholars may not meet the meta-criteria used to judge expertise, such as a track record in obtaining large research grants or a traditional academic curriculum vitae. This innovation research article describes a novel idea and action framework: micro-grants, each worth $1000, for genomics and Big Data. Though a relatively small amount at first glance, this far exceeds the annual income of the "bottom one billion"-the 1.4 billion people living below the extreme poverty level defined by the World Bank ($1.25/day). We describe two types of micro-grants. Type 1 micro-grants can be awarded through established funding agencies and philanthropies that create micro-granting programs to fund a broad and highly diverse array of small artisan labs and citizen scholars to connect genomics and Big Data with new models of discovery such as open user innovation. Type 2 micro-grants can be funded by existing or new science observatories and citizen think tanks through crowd-funding mechanisms described herein. Type 2 micro-grants would also facilitate global health diplomacy by co-creating crowd-funded micro-granting programs across nation-states in regions facing political and financial instability, while sharing similar disease

  5. The conundrum of functional brain networks: small-world or fractal modularity

    CERN Document Server

    Gallos, Lazaros K; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    The human brain is organized in functional modules. Such an organization poses a conundrum: modules ought to be sufficiently independent to guarantee functional specialization and sufficiently connected to bind multiple processors for efficient information transfer. It is commonly accepted that small-world architecture may solve this problem. However, there is intrinsic tension between shortcuts generating small-worlds and the persistence of modules. Here we provide a solution to this puzzle. We show that the functional brain network formed by percolation of strong links is highly modular. Contrary to the common view, modules are self-similar and therefore are very far from being small-world. Incorporating the weak ties to the network converts it into a small-world preserving an underlying backbone of well-defined modules. Weak ties are organized precisely as predicted by theory maximizing information transfer with minimal wiring costs. This trade-off architecture is reminiscent of the "strength of weak ties"...

  6. Feynman Clocks, Casual Networks, and the Origin of Hierarchical "Arrows of Time" in Complex Systems from the Big Bang to the Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Hitchcock, S M

    2000-01-01

    A theory of 'time' as a form of 'information' is proposed. New tools such as Feynman Clocks, Collective Excitation Networks, Sequential Excitation Networks, Plateaus of Complexity, Causal Networks, and Quantum Computation methods are used to unify previously separate 'arrows of time'. The 'direction' and 'dimension' of 'time' are found to be secondary information structures created by the 'processing' of the information carried by signals connecting 'clocks' together in networks. The 'problem of time' may be solved by identification of a fundamental 'irreversible' Quantum Arrow of Time and 'reversible' Classical Arrows of Time. These 'arrows' can used to map information flow through complex causal networks from the Big Bang to the Brain. Keywords; unification of the fundamental interactions of matter, consciousness, entangled states, time reversal, time travel, and FTL or superluminal signals

  7. Gamma knife radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer. Comparison with whole brain radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serizawa, Toru; Ono, Junichi [Chiba Cardiovascular Center (Japan); Iuchi, Toshihiko; Osato, Katsunobu

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to compare the effectiveness of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) with that of whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for multiple cerebral metastases from non-small cell lung cancer. Among 302 cases with cerebral metastases from non-small cell lung cancer treated at the Chiba Cardiovascular Center and Chiba Cancer Center between 1990 and 1999, 100 consecutive patients filling the following 4 entry criteria were analyzed in this study: Up to 10 multiple brain lesions at initial MRI study; No surgically inaccessible tumors with more than 30 mm in diameter; No carcinomatous meningitis; More than 3 months of life expectancy. The patients were divided into two groups: the GKS group (66 patients) and the WBRT group (34 patients). In the GKS group, large lesions ({>=}30mm) were removed microsurgically and all other small lesions (<30 mm) were treated by GKS. New distant lesions were treated by repeated GKS without prophylactic WBRT. In the WBRT group, the patients were treated by the traditional combined therapy of WBRT and surgery. In both groups, chemotherapy was administered according to the primary physician's protocol. The two groups did not differ in terms of age, gender, initial Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, pathology of lung caner, number, and size of brain lesion, systemic control, and chemotherapy. Overall survival (OS), neurological survival (NS) and qualitative survival (QS) of the GKS group were longer than those of the WBRT group according to Kaplan-Meier's method. In a multivariate analysis the WBRT group also had significant poor prognostic factors for OS, NS and QS. GKS without prophylactic WBRT could be a primary choice of treatment method for patients with as many as 10 cerebral metastases from non-small cell lung cancer. (author)

  8. Brain development, intelligence and cognitive outcome in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, H M A; Oostrom, K J; Delemarre-van de Waal, H A

    2010-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) can lead to infants being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality as well as short stature, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and end-stage renal disease in adulthood. In addition, SGA children have decreased levels of intelligence and cognition, although the effects are mostly subtle. The overall outcome of each child is the result of a complex interaction between intrauterine and extrauterine factors. Animal and human studies show structural alterations in the brains of individuals with IUGR/SGA. The presence of growth hormone (GH) receptors in the brain implies that the brain is also a target for GH. Exogenous GH theoretically has the ability to act on the brain. This is exemplified by the effects of GH on cognition in GH-deficient adults. In SGA children, data on the effect of exogenous GH on intelligence and cognition are scant and contradictory.

  9. MRI detection of brain metastases at initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, M. van de [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oosterhout, A.G. van [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Velde, G.P.M. ten [Dept. of Pulmonology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Twijnstra, A. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    We prospectively investigated 40 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) for signs of brain metastasis by neurological examination and MRI of the brain, to determine the significance of MRI for staging. MRI could not be completed in one patient, who was excluded from the study. The MRI studies of the remaining patients showed no abnormalities in 12, cerebral infarcts in 2 and brain metastases in 11 patients, of whom 3 no relevant symptoms. Nonenhancing white matter lesions were found in 14 patients. In 3 of the 4 patients with an abnormal neurological examination at diagnosis, nonenhancing white matter lesions later developed into contrast enhancing lesions compatible with breain metastases; in 2, this occurred during the course of the chemotherapy. MRI did not change the clinical staging in patients with asymptomatic brain metastases. (orig.)

  10. Big universe, big data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Stensbo-Smidt, Kristoffer; Gieseke, Fabian Cristian

    2017-01-01

    , modern astronomy requires big data know-how, in particular it demands highly efficient machine learning and image analysis algorithms. But scalability is not the only challenge: Astronomy applications touch several current machine learning research questions, such as learning from biased data and dealing......Astrophysics and cosmology are rich with data. The advent of wide-area digital cameras on large aperture telescopes has led to ever more ambitious surveys of the sky. Data volumes of entire surveys a decade ago can now be acquired in a single night and real-time analysis is often desired. Thus...... with label and measurement noise. We argue that this makes astronomy a great domain for computer science research, as it pushes the boundaries of data analysis. In the following, we will present this exciting application area for data scientists. We will focus on exemplary results, discuss main challenges...

  11. Big universe, big data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kremer, Jan; Stensbo-Smidt, Kristoffer; Gieseke, Fabian Cristian

    2017-01-01

    , modern astronomy requires big data know-how, in particular it demands highly efficient machine learning and image analysis algorithms. But scalability is not the only challenge: Astronomy applications touch several current machine learning research questions, such as learning from biased data and dealing......Astrophysics and cosmology are rich with data. The advent of wide-area digital cameras on large aperture telescopes has led to ever more ambitious surveys of the sky. Data volumes of entire surveys a decade ago can now be acquired in a single night and real-time analysis is often desired. Thus...... with label and measurement noise. We argue that this makes astronomy a great domain for computer science research, as it pushes the boundaries of data analysis. In the following, we will present this exciting application area for data scientists. We will focus on exemplary results, discuss main challenges...

  12. Roles for small noncoding RNAs in silencing of retrotransposons in the mammalian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sayan; Chandramohan, Dhruva; Fioriti, Luana; Melnick, Ari M; Hébert, Jean M; Mason, Christopher E; Rajasethupathy, Priyamvada; Kandel, Eric R

    2016-10-24

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), long thought to be restricted to germline, have recently been discovered in neurons of Aplysia, with a role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression underlying long-term memory. We here ask whether piwi/piRNAs are also expressed and have functional roles in the mammalian brain. Large-scale RNA sequencing and subsequent analysis of protein expression revealed the presence in brain of several piRNA biogenesis factors including a mouse piwi (Mili), as well as small RNAs, albeit at low levels, resembling conserved piRNAs in mouse testes [primarily LINE1 (long interspersed nuclear element1) retrotransposon-derived]. Despite the seeming low expression of these putative piRNAs, single-base pair CpG methylation analyses across the genome of Mili/piRNA-deficient (Mili(-/-)) mice demonstrate that brain genomic DNA is preferentially hypomethylated within intergenic areas and LINE1 promoter areas of the genome. Furthermore, Mili mutant mice exhibit behavioral deficits such as hyperactivity and reduced anxiety. These results suggest that putative piRNAs exist in mammalian brain, and similar to the role of piRNAs in testes, they may be involved in the silencing of retrotransposons, which in brain have critical roles in contributing to genomic heterogeneity underlying adaptation, stress response, and brain pathology. We also describe the presence of another class of small RNAs in the brain, with features of endogenous siRNAs, which may have taken over the role of invertebrate piRNAs in their capacity to target both transposons, as well as protein-coding genes. Thus, RNA interference through gene and retrotransposon silencing previously encountered in Aplysia may also have potential roles in the mammalian brain.

  13. Explanatory Variables Associated with the Yield Performance Gap among Small- Medium-and Large-Scale Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum Growers at Ubombo Sugar, Big bend, Swaziland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbuyazwe M. Dlamini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the ex post facto study was to determine explanatory variables for sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum yield among small, medium and large scale-growers at Ubombo Sugar, Swaziland. The target population of the census study was all small-medium-and large-scale-growers, milling their cane at the Big Bend Mill. Data were collected using valid and reliable questionnaires. The findings indicated that large-scale farmers obtained significantly higher yields than small and medium scale-growers. However, sucrose percentage was higher with small-scale than medium and large scale-growers. Production inputs and farming services were available, accessible, and affordable to all groups of sugarcane growers. Sugarcane growers were within the recommended delays in implementing the crucial planting and post harvest operations for sugarcane; and the man-days used per activity per hectare were within recommended practice. Explanatory variables for sugarcane yield were found to be distance between the farm and the mill; hand application of fertilizer man-days per hectare; and labour strength. Distance between the farm and the mill had a significantly negative influence on sugarcane yield. The research failed to reject the research hypothesis that good management and adequate production inputs increases sugarcane yield. The main conclusion was that, those farmers who were furthest from the mill should consider replacing sugarcane with other viable business ventures.

  14. Phosphorus mass balance in a highly eutrophic semi-enclosed inlet near a big metropolis: a small inlet can contribute towards particulate organic matter production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji

    2011-01-01

    Terrigenous loading into enclosed water bodies has been blamed for eutrophic conditions marked by massive algal growth and subsequent hypoxia due to decomposition of dead algal cells. This study aims to describe the eutrophication and hypoxia processes in a semi-enclosed water body lying near a big metropolis. Phosphorus mass balance in a small inlet, Ohko Inlet, located at the head of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, was quantified using a numerical model. Dissolved inorganic phosphorous inflow from Kaita Bay next to the inlet was five times higher than that from terrigenous load, which may cause an enhancement of primary production. Therefore, it was concluded that not only the reduction of material load from the land and the suppression of benthic flux are needed, but also reducing the inflow of high phosphorus and oxygen depleted water from Kaita Bay will form a collective alternative measure to remediate the environmental condition of the inlet.

  15. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work.

  16. Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi SONG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients’ quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work.

  17. Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients’ quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approa...

  18. Disrupted small-world brain networks in moderate Alzheimer's disease: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Zhao

    Full Text Available The small-world organization has been hypothesized to reflect a balance between local processing and global integration in the human brain. Previous multimodal imaging studies have consistently demonstrated that the topological architecture of the brain network is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, these studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the topological properties of brain alterations in AD. One potential explanation for these inconsistent results lies with the diverse homogeneity and distinct progressive stages of the AD involved in these studies, which are thought to be critical factors that might affect the results. We investigated the topological properties of brain functional networks derived from resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of carefully selected moderate AD patients and normal controls (NCs. Our results showed that the topological properties were found to be disrupted in AD patients, which showing increased local efficiency but decreased global efficiency. We found that the altered brain regions are mainly located in the default mode network, the temporal lobe and certain subcortical regions that are closely associated with the neuropathological changes in AD. Of note, our exploratory study revealed that the ApoE genotype modulates brain network properties, especially in AD patients.

  19. Big Atoms for Small Children: Building Atomic Models from Common Materials to Better Visualize and Conceptualize Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Laura; Ferrari, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on approach to introduce the chemical elements and the atomic structure to elementary/middle school students is described. The proposed classroom activity presents Bohr models of atoms using common and inexpensive materials, such as nested plastic balls, colored modeling clay, and small-sized pasta (or small plastic beads).

  20. Big Atoms for Small Children: Building Atomic Models from Common Materials to Better Visualize and Conceptualize Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla, Laura; Ferrari, Lia A.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on approach to introduce the chemical elements and the atomic structure to elementary/middle school students is described. The proposed classroom activity presents Bohr models of atoms using common and inexpensive materials, such as nested plastic balls, colored modeling clay, and small-sized pasta (or small plastic beads).

  1. Big data to smart data in Alzheimer's disease: The brain health modeling initiative to foster actionable knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, Hugo; Dacks, Penny A; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Haas, Magali; Khachaturian, Zaven S; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Maudsley, Stuart; Romero, Klaus; Stephenson, Diane

    2016-09-01

    Massive investment and technological advances in the collection of extensive and longitudinal information on thousands of Alzheimer patients results in large amounts of data. These "big-data" databases can potentially advance CNS research and drug development. However, although necessary, they are not sufficient, and we posit that they must be matched with analytical methods that go beyond retrospective data-driven associations with various clinical phenotypes. Although these empirically derived associations can generate novel and useful hypotheses, they need to be organically integrated in a quantitative understanding of the pathology that can be actionable for drug discovery and development. We argue that mechanism-based modeling and simulation approaches, where existing domain knowledge is formally integrated using complexity science and quantitative systems pharmacology can be combined with data-driven analytics to generate predictive actionable knowledge for drug discovery programs, target validation, and optimization of clinical development.

  2. Therapeutic potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a small molecular mimics of BDNF for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzelmann, Mary; Romeika, Jennifer; Sun, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem worldwide. Following primary mechanical insults, a cascade of secondary injuries often leads to further neural tissue loss. Thus far there is no cure to rescue the damaged neural tissue. Current therapeutic strategies primarily target the secondary injuries focusing on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has significant effect in both aspects, promoting neuronal survival, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Recently, the flavonoid 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a small TrkB agonist that mimics BDNF function, has shown similar effects as BDNF in promoting neuronal survival and regeneration following TBI. Compared to BDNF, 7,8-DHF has a longer half-life and much smaller molecular size, capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier, which makes it possible for non-invasive clinical application. In this review, we summarize functions of the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and studies examining the potential of BDNF and 7,8-DHF as a therapy for TBI.

  3. Therapeutic potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a small molecular mimics of BDNF for traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzelmann, Mary; Romeika, Jennifer; Sun, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem worldwide. Following primary mechanical insults, a cascade of secondary injuries often leads to further neural tissue loss. Thus far there is no cure to rescue the damaged neural tissue. Current therapeutic strategies primarily target the secondary injuries focusing on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has significant effect in both aspects, promoting neuronal survival, synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Recently, the flavonoid 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a small TrkB agonist that mimics BDNF function, has shown similar effects as BDNF in promoting neuronal survival and regeneration following TBI. Compared to BDNF, 7,8-DHF has a longer half-life and much smaller molecular size, capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier, which makes it possible for non-invasive clinical application. In this review, we summarize functions of the BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and studies examining the potential of BDNF and 7,8-DHF as a therapy for TBI.

  4. Evidence for small scale variation in the vertebrate brain: mating strategy and sex affect brain size and structure in wild brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolm, N; Gonzalez-Voyer, A; Brelin, D; Winberg, S

    2009-12-01

    The basis for our knowledge of brain evolution in vertebrates rests heavily on empirical evidence from comparative studies at the species level. However, little is still known about the natural levels of variation and the evolutionary causes of differences in brain size and brain structure within-species, even though selection at this level is an important initial generator of macroevolutionary patterns across species. Here, we examine how early life-history decisions and sex are related to brain size and brain structure in wild populations using the existing natural variation in mating strategies among wild brown trout (Salmo trutta). By comparing the brains of precocious fish that remain in the river and sexually mature at a small size with those of migratory fish that migrate to the sea and sexually mature at a much larger size, we show, for the first time in any vertebrate, strong differences in relative brain size and brain structure across mating strategies. Precocious fish have larger brain size (when controlling for body size) but migratory fish have a larger cerebellum, the structure in charge of motor coordination. Moreover, we demonstrate sex-specific differences in brain structure as female precocious fish have a larger brain than male precocious fish while males of both strategies have a larger telencephalon, the cognitive control centre, than females. The differences in brain size and structure across mating strategies and sexes thus suggest the possibility for fine scale adaptive evolution of the vertebrate brain in relation to different life histories.

  5. How to Make Big Improvements in the Small PR Shop. Samples of Policy Statements, Guidelines, and Forms Collected from Educational Institutions with Small Public Relations Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. Keith, Comp.

    Sample policy statements, guidelines, and forms collected from 16 educational institutions with small public relations staffs are presented as a guide to campus relations personnel. The importance of written policies for small public relations staffs is emphasized, and it is proposed that there be a written job description for the public relations…

  6. Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi More

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Demand and spurt in collections and accumulation of data has coined new term “Big Data” has begun. Accidently, incidentally and by interaction of people, information so called data is massively generated. This BIG DATA is to be smartly and effectively used Computer scientists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, political scientists, bio-informaticists, sociologists and many Variety of Intellegesia debate over the potential benefits and costs of analysing information from Twitter, Google, Facebook, Wikipedia and every space where large groups of people leave digital traces and deposit data. Given the rise of Big Data as both a phenomenon and a methodological persuasion, it is time to start critically interrogating this phenomenon, its assumptions and its biases. Big data, which refers to the data sets that are too big to be handled using the existing database management tools, are emerging in many important applications, such as Internet search, business informatics, social networks, social media, genomics, and meteorology. Big data presents a grand challenge for database and data analytics research. This paper is a blend of non-technical and introductory-level technical detail, ideal for the novice. We conclude with some technical challenges as well as the solutions that can be used to these challenges. Big Data differs from other data with five characteristics like volume, variety, value, velocity and complexity. The article will focus on some current and future cases and causes for BIG DATA.

  7. How small accounting firms can compete in an environment in which the big four are getting bigger

    OpenAIRE

    Moncure, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to determine how small accounting firms can compete in the United States in the early 21st century. The first chapter identifies the central goal of the paper: namely, to use existing literature and market data to define a business strategy for Ross & Moncure, Inc., a small accounting firm in the metropolitan Washington area. The second chapter is a literature review, and in it the author finds that large accounting firms are advantaged in terms of reputation, ...

  8. Big data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Koed; Flyverbom, Mikkel; Hilbert, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The claim that big data can revolutionize strategy and governance in the context of international relations is increasingly hard to ignore. Scholars of international political sociology have mainly discussed this development through the themes of security and surveillance. The aim of this paper...... is to outline a research agenda that can be used to raise a broader set of sociological and practice-oriented questions about the increasing datafication of international relations and politics. First, it proposes a way of conceptualizing big data that is broad enough to open fruitful investigations...... into the emerging use of big data in these contexts. This conceptualization includes the identification of three moments contained in any big data practice. Second, it suggests a research agenda built around a set of subthemes that each deserve dedicated scrutiny when studying the interplay between big data...

  9. Big data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Koed; Ruppert, Evelyn; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    The claim that big data can revolutionize strategy and governance in the context of international relations is increasingly hard to ignore. Scholars of international political sociology have mainly discussed this development through the themes of security and surveillance. The aim of this paper...... is to outline a research agenda that can be used to raise a broader set of sociological and practice-oriented questions about the increasing datafication of international relations and politics. First, it proposes a way of conceptualizing big data that is broad enough to open fruitful investigations...... into the emerging use of big data in these contexts. This conceptualization includes the identification of three moments that is contained in any big data practice. Secondly, it suggest a research agenda built around a set of sub-themes that each deserve dedicated scrutiny when studying the interplay between big...

  10. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel [Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guillot@usherbrooke.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4, Canada and Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  11. Whole Brain Irradiation and Hypo-fractionation Radiotherapy for the Metastases in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingting GU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Up to 40% non-small cell lung cancer patients developed brain metastasis during progression. Multiple brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Radio therapy for brain metastases has gradually developed from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT to various radiation strategies. WBRT, surgery+WBRT, stereotactic radiotherapy+WBRT or WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB, etc. have better overall survival than those untreated patients. The damage of the cognitive function from WBRT has been realized recently, however, options of radiation strategies for long expected survival patients remain controversial. This paper will discuss different WBRT strategies and treatment side effects of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

  12. Advances in Treatment of Brain Metastases 
from Primary Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen LIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors involving the brain are an important complication in the overall management of non-small cell lung cancers. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy, however, the burgeoning knowledge of tumor biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. This review mainly summarizes the current applications of these data to surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  13. Prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases and the clinical role of cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Tomioka, Hiromi; Okazaki, Miki; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Ishihara, Kyosuke; Iwasaki, Hironobu; Umeda, Fumikazu; Nakai, Hitoshi (Kobe City General Hospital, Hyogo (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    Prognosis of 95 consecutive patients with non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases were evaluated. Three factors, therapy for brain metastases, general performance status (PS) and distant metastases to other organs had significant impact on survival. Among these 3 factors, PS was independent from the other 2 factors. Significant correlation was present, however, between therapy and other organ metastases, and few patients with brain and other distant metastases received aggressive treatment for brain metastases. Cranial irradiation had significant impact on survival even in those patients with brain and other distant metastases. Cranial irradiation also reduced death from brain metastases in responders. Our results indicate that there are several subgroups with different prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases, therefore the most beneficial treatment modality should be selected for each group of patients. (author).

  14. Impact of small vessel disease in the brain on gait and balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Daniela; Ritchie, Stuart J.; Doubal, Fergus; Gattringer, Thomas; Morris, Zoe; Bastin, Mark E.; del C. Valdés Hernández, Maria; Royle, Natalie A.; Corley, Janie; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Pattie, Alison; Dickie, David A.; Staals, Julie; Gow, Alan J.; Starr, John M.; Deary, Ian J.; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Gait and balance impairment is highly prevalent in older people. We aimed to assess whether and how single markers of small vessel disease (SVD) or a combination thereof explain gait and balance function in the elderly. We analysed 678 community-dwelling healthy subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 at the age of 71–74 years who had undergone comprehensive risk factor assessment, gait and balance assessment as well as brain MRI. We investigated the impact of individual SVD markers (white matter hyperintensity – WMH, microbleeds, lacunes, enlarged perivascular spaces, brain atrophy) as seen on structural brain MRI and of a global SVD score on the patients’ performance. A regression model revealed that age, sex, and hypertension significantly explained gait speed. Among SVD markers white matter hyperintensity (WMH) score or volume were additional significant and independent predictors of gait speed in the regression model. A similar association was seen with the global SVD score. Our study confirms a negative impact of SVD-related morphologic brain changes on gait speed in addition to age, sex and hypertension independent from brain atrophy. The presence of WMH seems to be the major driving force for SVD on gait impairment in healthy elderly subjects. PMID:28134332

  15. Impact of small vessel disease in the brain on gait and balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Daniela; Ritchie, Stuart J; Doubal, Fergus; Gattringer, Thomas; Morris, Zoe; Bastin, Mark E; Del C Valdés Hernández, Maria; Royle, Natalie A; Corley, Janie; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Pattie, Alison; Dickie, David A; Staals, Julie; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2017-01-30

    Gait and balance impairment is highly prevalent in older people. We aimed to assess whether and how single markers of small vessel disease (SVD) or a combination thereof explain gait and balance function in the elderly. We analysed 678 community-dwelling healthy subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 at the age of 71-74 years who had undergone comprehensive risk factor assessment, gait and balance assessment as well as brain MRI. We investigated the impact of individual SVD markers (white matter hyperintensity - WMH, microbleeds, lacunes, enlarged perivascular spaces, brain atrophy) as seen on structural brain MRI and of a global SVD score on the patients' performance. A regression model revealed that age, sex, and hypertension significantly explained gait speed. Among SVD markers white matter hyperintensity (WMH) score or volume were additional significant and independent predictors of gait speed in the regression model. A similar association was seen with the global SVD score. Our study confirms a negative impact of SVD-related morphologic brain changes on gait speed in addition to age, sex and hypertension independent from brain atrophy. The presence of WMH seems to be the major driving force for SVD on gait impairment in healthy elderly subjects.

  16. Crowd-Funded Micro-Grants for Genomics and “Big Data”: An Actionable Idea Connecting Small (Artisan) Science, Infrastructure Science, and Citizen Philanthropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Kamal F.; Dove, Edward S.; Endrenyi, Laszlo; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hotez, Peter J.; Milius, Djims; Neves-Pereira, Maria; Pang, Tikki; Rotimi, Charles N.; Sabra, Ramzi; Sarkissian, Christineh N.; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tims, Hesther; Zgheib, Nathalie K.; Kickbusch, Ilona

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biomedical science in the 21st century is embedded in, and draws from, a digital commons and “Big Data” created by high-throughput Omics technologies such as genomics. Classic Edisonian metaphors of science and scientists (i.e., “the lone genius” or other narrow definitions of expertise) are ill equipped to harness the vast promises of the 21st century digital commons. Moreover, in medicine and life sciences, experts often under-appreciate the important contributions made by citizen scholars and lead users of innovations to design innovative products and co-create new knowledge. We believe there are a large number of users waiting to be mobilized so as to engage with Big Data as citizen scientists—only if some funding were available. Yet many of these scholars may not meet the meta-criteria used to judge expertise, such as a track record in obtaining large research grants or a traditional academic curriculum vitae. This innovation research article describes a novel idea and action framework: micro-grants, each worth $1000, for genomics and Big Data. Though a relatively small amount at first glance, this far exceeds the annual income of the “bottom one billion”—the 1.4 billion people living below the extreme poverty level defined by the World Bank ($1.25/day). We describe two types of micro-grants. Type 1 micro-grants can be awarded through established funding agencies and philanthropies that create micro-granting programs to fund a broad and highly diverse array of small artisan labs and citizen scholars to connect genomics and Big Data with new models of discovery such as open user innovation. Type 2 micro-grants can be funded by existing or new science observatories and citizen think tanks through crowd-funding mechanisms described herein. Type 2 micro-grants would also facilitate global health diplomacy by co-creating crowd-funded micro-granting programs across nation-states in regions facing political and financial instability, while

  17. The Analysis of Erlotinib on Brain Metastases in Patients with Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohui HAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Brain metastases are common in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the prognosis is poor. Erlotinib is a specific inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor-associated tyrosine kinase (EGFRTKI, which has been gradually used in the treatment for advanced NSCLC. The aim of this study is to evaluate the antitumor efficacy and its relevant factors of erlotinib in NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Methods The clinical data of 30 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were reviewed retrospectively. All of them were treated with erlotinib, given orally 150mg daily. These patients discontinued administration of erlotinib until disease progression, death or intolerable side effects. Results In terms of intracranial lesions, partial response (PR was observed in 2 patients (6.7%, with stable disease (SD in 17 patients (56.7%, for overall disease control rate (DCR of 63.4%. As for systemic disease, PR was observed in 2 patients (6.7%, with SD in 5 patients (16.7%, for overall DCR of 23.4%. There was no statistical difference in DCR among different subtypes of age, gender, smoking history, histology, PS score, the number of brain metastases, the onset of brain metastases, chemotherapy, brain radiotherapy and side effects. The median time to disease progression (MTTP and median survival time (MST was 2.4 months and 7.7 months respectively. The 1 and 2 year survival rate was 38.4% and 15.2%. The univariate analysis showed that the survival time was related to the patients’ PS score, smoking history, brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The multivariate analysis indicated that brain radiotherapy was the independent prognostic factor and the relationship between the survival time and smoking history was near to statistical significance. Conclusion The patients receiving brain radiotherapy may have better survival benefit. Non-smokers have a trend to survive longer than smokers. Erlotinib may be effective on brain metastases

  18. Small Businesses Save Big: A Borrower's Guide To Increase the Bottom Line Using Energy Efficiency (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Dollars saved through energy efficiency can directly impact your bottom line. Whether you are planning for a major renovation or upgrading individual pieces of building equipment, these improvements can help reduce operating costs, save on utility bills, and boost profits. This fact sheet provides a guide for small businesses to find the resources to increase the energy efficiency of their buildings.

  19. Children's Behaviors and Emotions in Small-Group Argumentative Discussion: Explore the Influence of Big Five Personality Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting

    2009-01-01

    The assessment and structure of personality traits and small group learning during classroom discussions are both research fields that have undergone fast development in the past few decades. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between individual personality characteristics and performance in discussions, especially with…

  20. Big brains, meat, tuberculosis and the nicotinamide switches: co-evolutionary relationships with modern repercussions on longevity and disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Adrian C; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2014-07-01

    Meat eating has been an important trigger for human evolution however the responsible component in meat has not been clearly identified. Here we propose that the limiting factors for expanding brains and increasing longevity were the micronutrient nicotinamide (vitamin B3) and the metabolically related essential amino-acid, tryptophan. Meat offers significant sourcing challenges and lack causes a deficiency of nicotinamide and tryptophan and consequently the energy carrier nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) that gets consumed in regulatory circuits important for survival, resulting in premature ageing, poor cognition and brain atrophy. If a trophic supply of dietary nicotinamide/tryptophan is so essential for building brains, constraining their size and connectivity, we hypothesise that back-up mechanisms to ensure the supply evolved. One strategy may be increasing the reliance on gut symbionts to break down celluloses that produces NADH and only nicotinamide indirectly, and may cause diarrhoea. We suggest that a direct supplier was the chronic mycobacterial infection tuberculosis (TB) that is a surprise candidate but it co-evolved early, does not inevitably cause disease (90-95% of those infected are healthy), and secretes (and is inhibited by) nicotinamide. We hypothesise that TB evolved first as a symbiont that enabled humans to cope with short-lived shortages of meat and only later behaved as a pathogen when the supply deteriorated chronically, for those in poverty. (TB immunology and epidemiology is riddled with paradoxes for a conventional pathogen). We test this in pilot data showing that sharp declines in TB (and diarrhoea) - `environmental enteropathy' strongly correlate with increasing meat consumption and therefore nicotinamide exposure, unlike later onset cancers and Parkinson's disease that increased in incidence, perhaps - as we propose a hypothetical hypervitaminosis B3 (to include obesity and the metabolic syndrome) - as the trade-off for

  1. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christian; Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson's R = -0.69, P atrophy occurs annually (P atrophy rates, in the medial-frontal, orbito-frontal, parietal and occipital regions. Conversely, increased rates of global grey matter atrophy are significantly associated with faster white matter hyperintensity growth in the frontal and parietal regions. Together, these results link the progression of white matter hyperintensities

  2. On the equivalence between small-step and big-step abstract machines: a simple application of lightweight fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Millikin, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    We show how Ohori and Sasano’s recent lightweight fusion by fixed-point promotion provides a simple way to prove the equivalence of the two standard styles of specification of abstract machines: (1) in small-step form, as a state-transition function together with a ‘driver loop’, i.e., a function......-step specification. We illustrate this observation here with a recognizer for Dyck words, the CEK machine, and Krivine’s machine with call/cc. The need for such a simple proof is motivated by our current work on small-step abstract machines as obtained by refocusing a function implementing a reduction semantics (a...

  3. Clinical Features of Brain Metastases in Small Cell Lung Cancer: an Implication for Hippocampal Sparing Whole Brain Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Long Guo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the clinical features and distribution of brain metastases (BMs of small cell lung cancer (SCLC in the hippocampal and perihippocampal region, with the purpose of exploring the viability of hippocampal-sparing whole-brain radiation therapy (HS-WBRT on reducing neurocognitive deficits. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of the clinical characteristics and patterns of BMs in patients with SCLC. Associations between the clinical characteristics and hippocampal metastases (HMs/perihippocampal metastases (PHMs were evaluated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. RESULTS: A total of 1594 brain metastatic lesions were identified in 180 patients. Thirty-two (17.8% patients were diagnosed with BMs at the time of primary SCLC diagnosis. The median interval between diagnosis of primary SCLC and BMs was 9.3 months. There were 9 (5.0% and 22 (12.2% patients with HMs and PHMs (patients with BMs located in or within 5 mm around the hippocampus, respectively. In the univariate and multivariate analysis, the number of BMs was the risk factor for HMs and PHMs. Patients with BMs ≥ 5 had significantly higher risk of HMs (odds ratio [OR] 7.892, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.469-42.404, P = .016, and patients with BMs ≥ 7 had significantly higher risk of PHMs (OR 5.162, 95% CI 2.017-13.213, P = .001. Patients with extracranial metastases are also associated with HMs. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that patients with nonoligometastatic disease are significantly associated with HMs and PHMs. The incidence of PHMs may be acceptably low enough to perform HS-WBRT for SCLC. Our findings provide valuable clinical data to assess the benefit of HS-WBRT in SCLC patients with BMs.

  4. Small groups, big gains: efficacy of a tier 2 phonological awareness intervention with preschoolers with early literacy deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Lydia G; Spencer, Trina D; Olszewski, Arnold; Goldstein, Howard

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a phonological awareness (PA) intervention, designed for Tier 2 instruction in a Response to Intervention (RTI) model, delivered to small groups of preschoolers. A multiple-baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention on low-income preschool children's PA skills. A trained interventionist delivered small group sessions 3 to 4 days a week and ensured children received frequent opportunities to respond and contingent feedback. Participants received 28 to 36 lessons that lasted about 10 min each and focused on PA and alphabet knowledge. Initiation of intervention was staggered across 3 triads, and 7 children completed the study. The intervention produced consistent gains on weekly progress monitoring assessments of the primary outcome measure for first sound identification (First Sound Fluency). Most children also demonstrated gains on other measures of PA and alphabet knowledge. Results provide support for the application of a small group intervention consistent with an RTI framework and document the potential benefits of the intervention to learners who need early literacy instruction beyond the core curriculum.

  5. Small drains, big problems: the impact of dry weather runoff on shoreline water quality at enclosed beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippy, Megan A; Stein, Robert; Sanders, Brett F; Davis, Kristen; McLaughlin, Karen; Skinner, John F; Kappeler, John; Grant, Stanley B

    2014-12-16

    Enclosed beaches along urban coastlines are frequent hot spots of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) pollution. In this paper we present field measurements and modeling studies aimed at evaluating the impact of small storm drains on FIB pollution at enclosed beaches in Newport Bay, the second largest tidal embayment in Southern California. Our results suggest that small drains have a disproportionate impact on enclosed beach water quality for five reasons: (1) dry weather surface flows (primarily from overirrigation of lawns and ornamental plants) harbor FIB at concentrations exceeding recreational water quality criteria; (2) small drains can trap dry weather runoff during high tide, and then release it in a bolus during the falling tide when drainpipe outlets are exposed; (3) nearshore turbulence is low (turbulent diffusivities approximately 10(-3) m(2) s(-1)), limiting dilution of FIB and other runoff-associated pollutants once they enter the bay; (4) once in the bay, runoff can form buoyant plumes that further limit vertical mixing and dilution; and (5) local winds can force buoyant runoff plumes back against the shoreline, where water depth is minimal and human contact likely. Outdoor water conservation and urban retrofits that minimize the volume of dry and wet weather runoff entering the local storm drain system may be the best option for improving beach water quality in Newport Bay and other urban-impacted enclosed beaches.

  6. A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

    2000-02-27

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  7. A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

    2000-03-01

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  8. Outcome and prognostic factors in patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with whole brain radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Denise; Adeberg, Sebastian; Bozorgmehr, Farastuk; Opfermann, Nils; Hoerner-Rieber, Juliane; König, Laila; Kappes, Jutta; Thomas, Michael; Herth, Felix; Heußel, Claus Peter; Warth, Arne; Debus, Jürgen; Steins, Martin; Rieken, Stefan

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors associated with overall survival (OS) and neurological progression free survival (nPFS) in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with brain metastases who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). From 2003 to 2015, 229 SCLC patients diagnosed with brain metastases who received WBRT were analyzed retrospectively. In this cohort 219 patients (95%) received a total photon dose of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. The prognostic factors evaluated for OS and nPFS were: age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), number of brain metastases, synchronous versus metachronous disease, initial response to chemotherapy, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class and thoracic radiation. Median OS after WBRT was 6 months and the median nPFS after WBRT was 11 months. Patients with synchronous cerebral metastases had a significantly better median OS with 8 months compared to patients with metachronous metastases with a median survival of 3 months (p < 0.0001; HR 0.46; 95% CI 0.31-0.67). Based on RPA classification median survival after WBRT was 17 months in RPA class I, 7 months in class II and 3 months in class III (p < 0.0001). Karnofsky performance status scale (KPS < 70%) was significantly associated with OS in both univariate (HR 2.84; p < 0.001) and multivariate analyses (HR 2.56; p = 0.011). Further, metachronous brain metastases (HR 1.8; p < 0.001), initial response to first-line chemotherapy (HR 0.51, p < 0.001) and RPA class III (HR 2.74; p < 0.001) were significantly associated with OS in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis metachronous disease (HR 1.89; p < 0.001) and initial response to chemotherapy (HR 0.61; p < 0.001) were further identified as significant prognostic factors. NPFS was negatively significantly influenced by poor KPS (HR 2.56; p = 0.011), higher number of brain metastases (HR 1.97; p = 0.02), and

  9. Small and big Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines L-428 and L-1236 lack consistent differences in gene expression profiles and are capable to reconstitute each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengstl, Benjamin; Kim, Sooji; Döring, Claudia; Weiser, Christian; Bein, Julia; Bankov, Katrin; Herling, Marco; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Hartmann, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    The hallmark of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is the presence of giant, mostly multinucleated Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Whereas it has recently been shown that giant HRS cells evolve from small Hodgkin cells by incomplete cytokinesis and re-fusion of tethered sister cells, it remains unsolved why this phenomenon particularly takes place in this lymphoma and what the differences between these cell types of variable sizes are. The aim of the present study was to characterize microdissected small and giant HRS cells by gene expression profiling and to assess differences of clonal growth behavior as well as susceptibility toward cytotoxic intervention between these different cell types to provide more insight into their distinct cellular potential. Applying stringent filter criteria, only two differentially expressed genes between small and giant HRS cells, SHFM1 and LDHB, were identified. With looser filter criteria, 13 genes were identified to be differentially overexpressed in small compared to giant HRS cells. These were mainly related to energy metabolism and protein synthesis, further suggesting that small Hodgkin cells resemble the proliferative compartment of cHL. SHFM1, which is known to be involved in the generation of giant cells, was downregulated in giant RS cells at the RNA level. However, reduced mRNA levels of SHFM1, LDHB and HSPA8 did not translate into decreased protein levels in giant HRS cells. In cell culture experiments it was observed that the fraction of small and big HRS cells was adjusted to the basic level several days after enrichment of these populations via cell sorting, indicating that small and big HRS cells can reconstitute the full spectrum of cells usually observed in the culture. However, assessment of clonal growth of HRS cells indicated a significantly reduced potential of big HRS cells to form single cell colonies. Taken together, our findings pinpoint to strong similarities but also some differences between small and

  10. Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Synchronous Brain Metastasis from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui LI; Sheng-cai HOU; Bin HU; Tong LI; Yang Wang; Jin-bai Miao; Bin You; Yi-li Fu

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of surgery with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with a single synchronous brain metastasis from successfully treated non-small cell lung cancer.Methods: Between 1995 and 2002, 53 patients underwent resection of both primary non-small cell lung cancer and the associated single brain metastasis. There were 33 men and 20 women with a mean age of 57 years (range, 32(85 years). At the time of diagnosis, 42 patients experienced lung cancer related symptoms, whereas 11 patients experienced brain metastases-related symptoms. 42 patients had received thoracic surgery first, and 11 patients had undergone neurosurgery or radiosurgery first. Pneumonectomy was performed in 9 out of 42 patients (21.4%), lobectomies in 30 (71.4%), and wedge resection in 3 (7.2%). 48 patients (90.5%) underwent complete lymphadenectomy. 35 patients underwent brain metastasectomy. 18 underwent SRS.Results: There was no postoperative mortality and severe complications after either lung or brain surgery. Histology showed 34 adenocarcinomas, 16 squamous cell carcinomas, and 3 large cell lung cancers. 15 patients (28.3%) had no evidence of lymph node metastases (N0), 20 patients (37.7%) had hilar metastases (N1), and 18 patients (34%) had mediastinal metastases (N2). The 1-, 2-, 3- and 5-year overall survival rates were 49%, 19%, 10%, and 5%, respectively. The corresponding data for neurosurgery group were 55%, 17%, 11%, and 6%, respectively. The median survival time was 13 months. For SRS group the corresponding data were 44.8%, 20.9% 10.5%, and 2%, respectively. The median survival time was 14 months. The differences between the two groups were not significant (P>0.05). In lymph node negative patients (N0), the overall 5-year survival rate was 10%, as compared with a 1% survival rate in patients with lymph node metastases (N1(2). The difference was significant (P0.05).Conclusion: Although the overall survival rate for

  11. Small satellites for big science: the challenges of high-density design in the DLR Kompaktsatellit AsteroidFinder/SSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimo Grundmann, Jan

    The design of small satellites requires a paradigm shift in the thinking of satellite designers as well as mission scientists, payload users, and programme management -in brief, everyone involved. In a conventional approach, spacecraft design evolves in a mostly linear fashion from mission requirements by well-defined procedures through a series of reviews into a design space that is essentially not limited by constraints other than programmatic. The mission defines a pallet of instruments, their needs then shape the spacecraft bus, and the integrated spacecraft is finally mated to a dedicated launch, to be placed into an orbit carefully custom-tailored by mission analysis and continuously trimmed by on-board propulsion. Components are manufactured to spec, one-off plus spares, and painstaking testing has to iron out the many space firsts and compromises made in an arduous and protracted design process. Small satellite design reverses this comfortable line of thinking. It begins with hard, and not just programmatic constraints on most of the essential parameters that define a satellite. Launch as a secondary payload is the choice, not just for budgetary reasons, but due to the lack of viable dedicated launchers. It requires a small stowed envelope and a tightly limited mass budget. This results in limited surface area for solar panels and radiators. Small project volume enables a high flight cadence which makes re-use of designs and components desirable and feasible, in a self-catalyzing cycle. Re-use and constraints force the system perspective on every participant in a quick succession of sometimes diverging but generally converging iterations that lends itself to the Concurrent Engineering approach. There is simply no space left in a small satellite project for boxes to think in. To exploit the technological convergence that has created powerful and miniaturized science instruments and satellite components, the DLR research and development programme has

  12. Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Demand and spurt in collections and accumulation of data has coined new term “Big Data” has begun. Accidently, incidentally and by interaction of people, information so called data is massively generated. This BIG DATA is to be smartly and effectively used Computer scientists, physicists, economists, mathematicians, political scientists, bio-informaticists, sociologists and many Variety of Intellegesia debate over the potential benefits and costs of analysing information from Twitter, Google,...

  13. Global and regional differences in brain anatomy of young children born small for gestational age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrica M A De Bie

    Full Text Available In children who are born small for gestational age (SGA, an adverse intrauterine environment has led to underdevelopment of both the body and the brain. The delay in body growth is (partially restored during the first two years in a majority of these children. In addition to a negative influence on these physical parameters, decreased levels of intelligence and cognitive impairments have been described in children born SGA. In this study, we used magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain anatomy in 4- to 7-year-old SGA children with and without complete bodily catch-up growth and compared them to healthy children born appropriate for gestational age. Our findings demonstrate that these children strongly differ on brain organisation when compared with healthy controls relating to both global and regional anatomical differences. Children born SGA displayed reduced cerebral and cerebellar grey and white matter volumes, smaller volumes of subcortical structures and reduced cortical surface area. Regional differences in prefrontal cortical thickness suggest a different development of the cerebral cortex. SGA children with bodily catch-up growth constitute an intermediate between those children without catch-up growth and healthy controls. Therefore, bodily catch-up growth in children born SGA does not implicate full catch-up growth of the brain.

  14. Radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Akae, Mayuko [Osaka Prefectural Habikino Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Systemic chemotherapy has been performed for brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer based on the idea that the blood-brain-barrier may not function in the tumor tissue. In order to elucidate the role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in this situation, a retrospective study was performed. Response rates to radiotherapy and chemotherapy were 55% and 31%, respectively. The median survival times (MST) of radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and combined therapy were 1.6, 4.0 and 6.1 months, respectively, and there were significant differences between radiotherapy alone and combined therapy and between chemotherapy alone and combined therapy. Forty-nine percent of patients who were treated with radiotherapy alone, 63% with chemotherapy alone and 42% with combined therapy died of brain metastasis. The MST of the patients with no prior therapy, relapsed patients whose response to the initial chemotherapy was CR and relapsed patients whose response were PR, were 6.1, 6.1 and 3.3 months, respectively. In the former 2 groups, the presence of brain metastasis is not considered to be a contraindication for chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should be combined with radiotherapy since relative poor survival and high frequency of death due to tumor were observed when treated with chemotherapy alone, and radiotherapy is considered to be useful as a palliative treatment because of its high response rate and low toxicity. (author)

  15. Big Egos in Big Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Vaarst Andersen, Kristina; Lauto, Giancarlo

    In this paper we investigate the micro-mechanisms governing structural evolution and performance of scientific collaboration. Scientific discovery tends not to be lead by so called lone ?stars?, or big egos, but instead by collaboration among groups of researchers, from a multitude of institutions...... a stochastic actor oriented model (SAOM) to analyze both network endogeneous mechanisms and individual agency driving the collaboration network and further if being a Big Ego in Big Science translates to increasing performance. Our findings suggest that the selection of collaborators is not based...... knowledge producing environments with more visible boundaries and higher thresholds for collaboration....

  16. Can fat explain the human brain's big bang evolution?-Horrobin's leads for comparative and functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, T C; Erren, M

    2004-04-01

    When David Horrobin suggested that phospholipid and fatty acid metabolism played a major role in human evolution, his 'fat utilization hypothesis' unified intriguing work from paleoanthropology, evolutionary biology, genetic and nervous system research in a novel and coherent lipid-related context. Interestingly, unlike most other evolutionary concepts, the hypothesis allows specific predictions which can be empirically tested in the near future. This paper summarizes some of Horrobin's intriguing propositions and suggests as to how approaches of comparative genomics published in Cell, Nature, Science and elsewhere since 1997 may be used to examine his evolutionary hypothesis. Indeed, systematic investigations of the genomic clock in the species' mitochondrial DNA, the Y and autosomal chromosomes as evidence of evolutionary relationships and distinctions can help to scrutinize associated predictions for their validity, namely that key mutations which differentiate us from Neanderthals and from great apes are in the genes coding for proteins which regulate fat metabolism, and particularly the phospholipid metabolism of the synapses of the brain. It is concluded that beyond clues to humans' relationships with living primates and to the Neanderthals' cognitive performance and their disappearance, the suggested molecular clock analyses may provide crucial insights into the biochemical evolution-and means of possible manipulation-of our brain.

  17. Making big communities small: using network science to understand the ecological and behavioral requirements for community social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Zachary

    2015-06-01

    The concept of social capital is becoming increasingly common in community psychology and elsewhere. However, the multiple conceptual and operational definitions of social capital challenge its utility as a theoretical tool. The goals of this paper are to clarify two forms of social capital (bridging and bonding), explicitly link them to the structural characteristics of small world networks, and explore the behavioral and ecological prerequisites of its formation. First, I use the tools of network science and specifically the concept of small-world networks to clarify what patterns of social relationships are likely to facilitate social capital formation. Second, I use an agent-based model to explore how different ecological characteristics (diversity and segregation) and behavioral tendencies (homophily and proximity) impact communities' potential for developing social capital. The results suggest diverse communities have the greatest potential to develop community social capital, and that segregation moderates the effects that the behavioral tendencies of homophily and proximity have on community social capital. The discussion highlights how these findings provide community-based researchers with both a deeper understanding of the contextual constraints with which they must contend, and a useful tool for targeting their efforts in communities with the greatest need or greatest potential.

  18. Metabolic and hemodynamic evaluation of brain metastases from small cell lung cancer with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Andersen, P; Daugaard, G

    1998-01-01

    for studies of metabolic and hemodynamic features. This study was performed to determine regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in brain metastases from small cell lung cancer and the surrounding brain. Tumor r......CMRglu, rCBF, and rCBV exerted a broad variability, but were higher than the corresponding values in white matter and higher than or similar to those of gray matter. Tumor rCMRglu and rCBF were highly correlated (P metabolic or hemodynamic parameters...... was not observed. Other methods for noninvasive in vivo analysis of tumor hemodynamics are needed, especially for discrimination between tumor necrosis and hypoxia....

  19. THE MANAGEMENT OF BRAIN METASTASES IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eOwen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BM are a common and lethal complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC which portend a poor prognosis. In addition, their management implies several challenges including preservation of neurological and neuro-cognitive function during surgery or radiation -therapy, minimizing iatrogenic complications of supportive medications, and optimizing drug delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB. Despite these challenges, advancements in combined modality approaches can deliver hope of improved overall survival and quality of life for a subset of NSCLC patients with BM. Moreover, new drugs harnessing our greater understanding of tumour biology promise to build on this hope. In this mini-review, we revised the management of BM in NSCLC including advancements in neurosurgery, radiation therapy, as well as systemic and supportive therapy.

  20. [Spectrofluorometric determination of dopamine in small areas of rat brain (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Novoa, J M; Martínez-Conde, E; Fraile, A

    1977-03-01

    A method for the extraction and quantification of Dopamine from small areas of rat brain has been developed. The extraction with solvents eliminates the column cromatography separations and allows the simultaneous processing of a good number of samples. Sample retrieval is quite high (70%) and very reproducible. The evaluation was made from areas with a minimal weight of 0.225 g. The quantification of Dopamine was obtained using spectrofluorometric techniques, reading the fluorescence of the trihydroxy indol derivate. The linear relation between the instrument readings and the concentration of Dopamine is from 0 to 0.5 microng/ml. The maximal concentration of Dopamine was found in the decorticated cerebral hemispheres (1.485 microng/g), the next highest values in the diencephalon (1.046 microng/), and the minimal concentration in the cerebellum (0.283 microng/g). The concentration of the whole brain was 0.701 microng/g.

  1. Mapping small-world properties through development in the human brain: disruption in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardo Tomasi

    Full Text Available Evidence from imaging studies suggests that the human brain has a small-world network topology that might be disrupted in certain brain disorders. However, current methodology is based on global graph theory measures, such as clustering, C, characteristic path length, L, and small-worldness, S, that lack spatial specificity and are insufficient to identify regional brain abnormalities. Here we propose novel ultra-fast methodology for mapping local properties of brain network topology such as local C, L and S (lC, lL and lS in the human brain at 3-mm isotropic resolution from 'resting-state' magnetic resonance imaging data. Test-retest datasets from 40 healthy children/adolescents were used to demonstrate the overall good reliability of the measures across sessions and computational parameters (intraclass correlation > 0.5 for lC and lL and their low variability across subjects (< 29%. Whereas regions with high local functional connectivity density (lFCD; local degree in posterior parietal and occipital cortices demonstrated high lC and short lL, subcortical regions (globus pallidus, thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala, cerebellum (lobes and vermis, cingulum and temporal cortex also had high, lS, demonstrating stronger small-world topology than other hubs. Children/adolescents had stronger lFCD, higher lC and longer lL in most cortical regions and thalamus than 74 healthy adults, consistent with pruning of functional connectivity during maturation. In contrast, lFCD, lC and lL were weaker in thalamus and midbrain, and lL was shorter in frontal cortical regions and cerebellum for 69 schizophrenia patients than for 74 healthy controls, suggesting exaggerated pruning of connectivity in schizophrenia. Follow up correlation analyses for seeds in thalamus and midbrain uncovered lower positive connectivity of these regions in thalamus, putamen, cerebellum and frontal cortex (cingulum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and lower negative connectivity in

  2. Therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis Therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Li; Yuchen Bao Co-first author; Bin Chen; Songwen Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a major cause of poor prognosis and high mortality for non-smal celllung cancer patients. The prognosis of non-smal-celllung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastasis is generaly poor and more efective treatment is required to improve their prognosis. Whole-brain radiotherapy, surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, chemotherapy and targeted therapy are the main treatment for brain metastasis. This review focuses on the five therapeutic strategy and in particular, on targeted therapy.

  3. Handedness- and brain size-related efficiency differences in small-world brain networks: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meiling; Wang, Junping; Liu, Feng; Chen, Heng; Lu, Fengmei; Wu, Guorong; Yu, Chunshui; Chen, Huafu

    2015-05-01

    The human brain has been described as a complex network, which integrates information with high efficiency. However, the relationships between the efficiency of human brain functional networks and handedness and brain size remain unclear. Twenty-one left-handed and 32 right-handed healthy subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The whole brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding Pearson correlation matrices of 90 cortical and subcortical regions. Graph theory-based methods were employed to further analyze their topological properties. As expected, all participants demonstrated small-world topology, suggesting a highly efficient topological structure. Furthermore, we found that smaller brains showed higher local efficiency, whereas larger brains showed higher global efficiency, reflecting a suitable efficiency balance between local specialization and global integration of brain functional activity. Compared with right-handers, significant alterations in nodal efficiency were revealed in left-handers, involving the anterior and median cingulate gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, and amygdala. Our findings indicated that the functional network organization in the human brain was associated with handedness and brain size.

  4. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of transgene expression in the brain using small epitope tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debyser Zeger

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo overexpression of proteins is a powerful approach to study their biological function, generate disease models or evaluate gene therapy approaches. In order to investigate an exogenously expressed protein, specific and sensitive detection is essential. Unfortunately, antibodies that allow histological detection of the protein of interest are not always readily available. The use of an epitope tag fused to the protein can circumvent this problem as well as provide the possibility to discriminate endogenous from overexpressed proteins. In order to minimize impact on the bioactivity and biodistribution of the overexpressed protein, preference is given to small tags. Results In the present study, we evaluated several small epitope tags together with corresponding anti-tag antibodies for the detection of overexpressed proteins in rat brain, using eGFP as a reference. We generated several lentiviral vectors encoding eGFP with different N-terminally fused small epitope tags (AU1, flag, 3flag, HA, myc and V5. After confirmation of their functionality in cell culture, we injected these lentiviral vectors stereotactically into the striatum of rats and prepared paraformaldehyde fixed floating sections for immunohistochemical analysis. Using multiple antibodies and antibody dilutions per epitope tag, we extensively assessed the efficiency of several anti-tag antibodies for chromogenic immunohistochemical detection of the epitope tagged eGFPs by determining the proportion of immunoreactivity detected by anti-tag antibodies compared to anti-GFP antibody. Using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we also quantified the proportion of eGFP-positive cells detected by anti-tag antibodies. Our results show that all the examined small epitope tags could be detected by anti-tag antibodies both in cell extracts as well as in vivo, although to varying degrees depending on the tag and antibody used. Using the presented

  6. Control of a specific motor program by a small brain area in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eFajardo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex motor behaviors are thought to be coordinated by networks of brain nuclei that may control different elementary motor programs. Transparent zebrafish larvae offer the opportunity to analyze the functional organization of motor control networks by optical manipulations of neuronal activity during behavior. We examined motor behavior in transgenic larvae expressing channelrhodopsin-2 throughout many neurons in the brain. Wide-field optical stimulation triggered backward and rotating movements caused by the repeated execution of J-turns, a specific motor program that normally occurs during prey capture. Although optically evoked activity was widespread, behavioral responses were highly coordinated and lateralized. 3-D mapping of behavioral responses to local optical stimuli revealed that J-turns can be triggered specifically in the anterior-ventral optic tectum and/or the adjacent pretectum. These results suggest that the execution of J-turns is controlled by a small group of neurons in the midbrain that may act as a command center. The identification of a brain area controlling a defined motor program involved in prey capture is a step towards a comprehensive analysis of neuronal circuits mediating sensorimotor behaviors of zebrafish.

  7. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn eSchouten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a process that continues in the adult and also aging brain. It generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. This phenomenon is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, in the hippocampus. With age, the hippocampus and particularly the dentate gyrus are affected. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both the number of proliferating cells as well as their neuronal differentiation, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons appears unaffected by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, survival and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the dentate gyrus are closely related to each other, they appear differentially regulated with aging. In this review we discuss the crucial role of a novel class of recently discovered regulators of gene expression, i.e. the small non-coding RNAs, in the development of adult neurogenesis from neural stem cells to functionally integrated neurons. In particular, a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune many events during adult neurogenesis progression. Moreover, multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the aged hippocampus. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate, and possibly correct or prevent, the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we briefly summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis and subsequent vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a possible role of microRNAs in stress-associated alterations in adult neurogenesis during aging.

  8. Results of radiation therapy for patients with brain metastases of small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Takeki; Murakami, Masao; Kuroda, Yasumasa [Tenri Hospital, Nara (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The results of cranial irradiation for brain metastases (BM) of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were investigated. Of a total of 67 patients, aged 33 to 80, 47 patients received whole brain irradiation ranging from 30 to 57.6 Gy (mean: 44.3 Gy), and the remaining 20 with localized BM received boost irradiation up to 40-60 Gy (mean: 52.5 Gy) totally on the policy of high dose irradiation. Response to treatment was evaluated by the neurological function (NF) score proposed by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), as well as tumor size on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or both. The results were as follows: improvement of NF in 70%, complete response in 36%, partial response in 51%, no change in 10% and progressive disease in 1%, respectively. Overall survival rates at 1-, and 2-years from the start of cranial irradiation were 26% and 9%, respectively, resulting in a median survival time (MST) of 6.2 months. The patients who already had BM at the diagnosis of lung cancer survived much longer (p<0.01) than those who developed brain metastases after the initial treatment. Five patients with a small BM detected only by MRI had a survival of 12.9 months in MST. Multivariate analysis showed the significant prognostic factors to be a low level of serum lactate dehydrogenase, a primary lesion well-controlled at the time of cranial irradiation and age younger than 62. Our data suggest that high dose irradiation to control BM is necessary to extend survival. (author)

  9. Enhanced Z-LDA for Small Sample Size Training in Brain-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongrui Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Usually the training set of online brain-computer interface (BCI experiment is small. For the small training set, it lacks enough information to deeply train the classifier, resulting in the poor classification performance during online testing. Methods. In this paper, on the basis of Z-LDA, we further calculate the classification probability of Z-LDA and then use it to select the reliable samples from the testing set to enlarge the training set, aiming to mine the additional information from testing set to adjust the biased classification boundary obtained from the small training set. The proposed approach is an extension of previous Z-LDA and is named enhanced Z-LDA (EZ-LDA. Results. We evaluated the classification performance of LDA, Z-LDA, and EZ-LDA on simulation and real BCI datasets with different sizes of training samples, and classification results showed EZ-LDA achieved the best classification performance. Conclusions. EZ-LDA is promising to deal with the small sample size training problem usually existing in online BCI system.

  10. Big Opportunities and Big Concerns of Big Data in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinying

    2016-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the ever-increasing influx of big data, this article examines the opportunities and concerns over big data in education. Specifically, this article first introduces big data, followed by delineating the potential opportunities of using big data in education in two areas: learning analytics and educational policy. Then, the…

  11. Big Opportunities and Big Concerns of Big Data in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinying

    2016-01-01

    Against the backdrop of the ever-increasing influx of big data, this article examines the opportunities and concerns over big data in education. Specifically, this article first introduces big data, followed by delineating the potential opportunities of using big data in education in two areas: learning analytics and educational policy. Then, the…

  12. Big Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The Keen Johnson Building is symbolic of Eastern Kentucky University's historic role as a School of Opportunity. It is a place that has inspired generations of students, many from disadvantaged backgrounds, to dream big dreams. The construction of the Keen Johnson Building was inspired by a desire to create a student union facility that would not…

  13. Altered small-world brain networks in schizophrenia patients during working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Sui, Jing; Yu, Qingbao; Turner, Jessica A; Ho, Beng-Choon; Sponheim, Scott R; Manoach, Dara S; Clark, Vincent P; Calhoun, Vince D

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of working memory (WM) performance in schizophrenia patients (SZ) is well-established. Compared to healthy controls (HC), SZ patients show aberrant blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activations and disrupted functional connectivity during WM performance. In this study, we examined the small-world network metrics computed from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected as 35 HC and 35 SZ performed a Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm (SIRP) at three WM load levels. Functional connectivity networks were built by calculating the partial correlation on preprocessed time courses of BOLD signal between task-related brain regions of interest (ROIs) defined by group independent component analysis (ICA). The networks were then thresholded within the small-world regime, resulting in undirected binarized small-world networks at different working memory loads. Our results showed: 1) at the medium WM load level, the networks in SZ showed a lower clustering coefficient and less local efficiency compared with HC; 2) in SZ, most network measures altered significantly as the WM load level increased from low to medium and from medium to high, while the network metrics were relatively stable in HC at different WM loads; and 3) the altered structure at medium WM load in SZ was related to their performance during the task, with longer reaction time related to lower clustering coefficient and lower local efficiency. These findings suggest brain connectivity in patients with SZ was more diffuse and less strongly linked locally in functional network at intermediate level of WM when compared to HC. SZ show distinctly inefficient and variable network structures in response to WM load increase, comparing to stable highly clustered network topologies in HC.

  14. Altered small-world brain networks in schizophrenia patients during working memory performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao He

    Full Text Available Impairment of working memory (WM performance in schizophrenia patients (SZ is well-established. Compared to healthy controls (HC, SZ patients show aberrant blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD activations and disrupted functional connectivity during WM performance. In this study, we examined the small-world network metrics computed from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data collected as 35 HC and 35 SZ performed a Sternberg Item Recognition Paradigm (SIRP at three WM load levels. Functional connectivity networks were built by calculating the partial correlation on preprocessed time courses of BOLD signal between task-related brain regions of interest (ROIs defined by group independent component analysis (ICA. The networks were then thresholded within the small-world regime, resulting in undirected binarized small-world networks at different working memory loads. Our results showed: 1 at the medium WM load level, the networks in SZ showed a lower clustering coefficient and less local efficiency compared with HC; 2 in SZ, most network measures altered significantly as the WM load level increased from low to medium and from medium to high, while the network metrics were relatively stable in HC at different WM loads; and 3 the altered structure at medium WM load in SZ was related to their performance during the task, with longer reaction time related to lower clustering coefficient and lower local efficiency. These findings suggest brain connectivity in patients with SZ was more diffuse and less strongly linked locally in functional network at intermediate level of WM when compared to HC. SZ show distinctly inefficient and variable network structures in response to WM load increase, comparing to stable highly clustered network topologies in HC.

  15. Small molecules for big tasks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ One of the most important achievements in the post-genome era is discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs), which widely exist from simple-genome organisms such as viruses and bacteria to complexgenome organisms such as plants and animals.miRNAs are single-stranded non-coding RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides in length, which are generated from larger precursors that are transcribed from noncoding genes.As a new type of regulatory molecules, miRNAs present unique features in regulating gene and its products, including rapidly turning off protein production, reversibly, and compartmentalized regulating gene expression.

  16. Small Stage,big Charm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a world where bigger is often seen as better, entertainment, especially the world of theater, has gone full circle and returned to smaller, more cozy productions that allow both the directors and the audience more freedom of interpretation and expression. Established in 1953, the Beijing People’s Art Theater on the northern end of Wangfujing Street, Beijing’s most popular pedestrian-only commercial street, has a colorful past, cataloguing a stream of trends, thoughts and ideas on stage for 55 years. In 1995, a new concept in theater was introduced in. The former canteen of the Beijing People’s Art Theater was changed into a smaller theater.

  17. Small Big Data Congress 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koers, W.A.; Bomhof, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    NOWADAYS DATA IS EVERYWHERE AND IT IS RAPIDLY BECOMING BUSINESS’ BIGGEST RESOURCE. THROUGH NUMEROUS SYSTEMS AND DEVICES, A HUGE AMOUNT OF DATA CAN BE COLLECTED. JUST THINK OF THE MANY SENSOR SYSTEMS, SUCH AS SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS, LOOPS IN THE ROAD, SMARTPHONES OR THE DIGITAL MARKERS WE CREATE OURSEL

  18. Big Pile or Small Pile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branca, Mario; Quidacciolu, Rossana G.; Soletta, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    The construction of a voltaic pile (battery) is a simple laboratory activity that commemorates the invention of this important device and is of great help in teaching physics. The voltaic pile is often seen as a scientific toy, with the "pile" being constructed from fruit. These toys use some strips of copper and zinc inserted in a piece…

  19. Small Pictures, Big New Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The Spring Festival, China's traditional lunar new year,has a history of a thousand more years, in the meantime, the influence of its cultural and tradition has beenglobally appreciated, for instance, in America, Briton,Australia, New Zealand, the Asian countries, etc., wherever the Chinese people live, the sounds of the Chinese gongs and drums of the Spring Festival celebration can be heard. Why? Because it is hard to find any history or culture of a nation or a nationality in the world can be compared with China's Spring Festival.

  20. Small Pictures, Big New Year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

      The Spring Festival, China's traditional lunar new year,has a history of a thousand more years, in the meantime, the influence of its cultural and tradition has beenglobally appreciated, for instance, in America, Briton,Australia, New Zealand, the Asian countries, etc., wherever the Chinese people live, the sounds of the Chinese gongs and drums of the Spring Festival celebration can be heard. Why? Because it is hard to find any history or culture of a nation or a nationality in the world can be compared with China's Spring Festival.……

  1. Small City With Big Ambitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGPEI

    2004-01-01

    Yiwu is a county-level city in the central part of Zhejiang Province with no obvious geographical advantage or traditional industrial foundation. And yet it has dazzled the country with its sizzling economic figures. The city posted an annual growth of 16 percent in GDP in 2003 on 15.6bn yuan {US$1.9 billion)from the previous year. Its average annual GDP increase from 1978 to 1999 reached 18.5 percent. Exports from Yiwu were valued at US$734 million last year, compared with US$390m for 2002. So what is it about Yiwu that has molded the city into such handsome shape?

  2. Big news in small samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Schotman (Peter); S. Straetmans; C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractUnivariate time series regressions of the forex return on the forward premium generate mostly negative slope coefficients. Simple and refined panel estimation techniques yield slope estimates that are much closer to unity. We explain the two apparently opposing results by allowing for

  3. Big Books and Small Marvels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanistreet, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The Reader Organisation's Get into Reading programme is all about getting people together in groups to engage with serious books. The groups are mixed and the participants sometimes challenging, but the outcomes are often remarkable. Jane Davis, who founded the Reader Organisation and continues to oversee Get into Reading, has witnessed a massive…

  4. Big news in small samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Schotman (Peter); S. Straetmans; C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractUnivariate time series regressions of the forex return on the forward premium generate mostly negative slope coefficients. Simple and refined panel estimation techniques yield slope estimates that are much closer to unity. We explain the two apparently opposing results by allowing for bo

  5. GATE simulation of a new design of pinhole SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun Ozsahin, D.; Bläckberg, L.; El Fakhri, G.; Sabet, H.

    2017-01-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging has gained an increased interest over the past decade since it is an excellent tool for developing new drugs and tracers. Therefore, there is a huge effort on the development of cost-effective SPECT detectors with high capabilities. The aim of this study is to simulate the performance characteristics of new designs for a cost effective, stationary SPECT system dedicated to small animal imaging with a focus on mice brain. The conceptual design of this SPECT system platform, Stationary Small Animal SSA-SPECT, is to use many pixelated CsI:TI detector modules with 0.4 mm × 0.4 mm pixels in order to achieve excellent intrinsic detector resolution where each module is backed by a single pinhole collimator with 0.3 mm hole diameter. In this work, we present the simulation results of four variations of the SSA-SPECT platform where the number of detector modules and FOV size is varied while keeping the detector size and collimator hole size constant. Using the NEMA NU-4 protocol, we performed spatial resolution, sensitivity, image quality simulations followed by a Derenzo-like phantom evaluation. The results suggest that all four SSA-SPECT systems can provide better than 0.063% system sensitivity and < 1.5 mm FWHM spatial resolution without resolution recovery or other correction techniques. Specifically, SSA-SPECT-1 showed a system sensitivity of 0.09% in combination with 1.1 mm FWHM spatial resolution.

  6. DARPA's Big Mechanism program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul R.

    2015-07-01

    Reductionist science produces causal models of small fragments of complicated systems. Causal models of entire systems can be hard to construct because what is known of them is distributed across a vast amount of literature. The Big Mechanism program aims to have machines read the literature and assemble the causal fragments found in individual papers into huge causal models, automatically. The current domain of the program is cell signalling associated with Ras-driven cancers.

  7. DARPA's Big Mechanism program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul R

    2015-07-16

    Reductionist science produces causal models of small fragments of complicated systems. Causal models of entire systems can be hard to construct because what is known of them is distributed across a vast amount of literature. The Big Mechanism program aims to have machines read the literature and assemble the causal fragments found in individual papers into huge causal models, automatically. The current domain of the program is cell signalling associated with Ras-driven cancers.

  8. Brain delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid and drugs through intranasal administration with nano-sized polymer micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanazawa T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Takanori Kanazawa School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Recently, the development of effective strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the brain has been a topic of great interest in both clinical and pharmaceutical fields. In this review, we summarize our studies evaluating nose-to-brain delivery of drugs and small interfering ribonucleic acids in combination with cell-penetrating peptide-modified polymer micelles. Our findings show that the use of polymer micelles with surface modification with Tat peptide in the intranasal administration enables the non-invasive delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain by increasing the transfer of the administered drug or small interfering ribonucleic acid to the central nervous system from the nasal cavity. Keywords: nose-to-brain, polymer micelles, cell-penetrating peptide, intranasal administration, nucleic acid

  9. Specific Regional and Age-Related Small Noncoding RNA Expression Patterns Within Superior Temporal Gyrus of Typical Human Brains Are Less Distinct in Autism Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P.; Barger, Nicole; Sharp, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs play a critical role in regulating messenger RNA throughout brain development and when altered could have profound effects leading to disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We assessed small noncoding RNAs, including microRNA and small nucleolar RNA, in superior temporal sulcus association cortex and primary auditory cortex in typical and ASD brains from early childhood to adulthood. Typical small noncoding RNA expression profiles were less distinct in ASD, both between regions and changes with age. Typical micro-RNA coexpression associations were absent in ASD brains. miR-132, miR-103, and miR-320 micro-RNAs were dysregulated in ASD and have previously been associated with autism spectrum disorders. These diminished region- and age-related micro-RNA expression profiles are in line with previously reported findings of attenuated messenger RNA and long noncoding RNA in ASD brain. This study demonstrates alterations in superior temporal sulcus in ASD, a region implicated in social impairment, and is the first to demonstrate molecular alterations in the primary auditory cortex. PMID:26350727

  10. Pulsatile crizotinib treatment for brain metastasis in a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Chen, J; Xie, Z; Xia, L; Luo, W; Li, J; Li, Q; Yang, Z

    2017-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a distinct subtype with patients showing peculiar clinicopathological features and dramatic responses to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib. Patients with this cancer variant have a dismal prognosis and limited treatment options when it has progressed to intracranial metastasis because of inadequate drug penetration into the central nervous system (CNS). Factors associated with response to TKI therapy have been reported to include pharmacokinetic and biodynamic resistance phenomena. In our NSCLC patient with multiple intracranial metastases, we administered high-dose pulsatile crizotinib therapy (1000 mg/d) on a one-day-on/one-day-off basis. A significant central nervous system (CNS) response was achieved, and time to neurological progression was prolonged to 6 months. High-dose pulsatile therapy may be an effective dosing strategy for crizotinib in NSCLC showing progression to metastasis in the brain. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP and its sham point (SHAM. Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (P<0.05, corrected by false discovery rate approach effects of only acupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM. Using an uncorrected P<0.05, point-related effects were also observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal and occipital regions while stimulation-related effects in various brain regions of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex regions. In addition, we found that several limbic and subcortical brain regions exhibited point- and stimulation-related alterations in their regional homogeneity (P<0.05, uncorrected. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional

  12. Small-world bias of correlation networks: From brain to climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Hartman, David; Jajcay, Nikola; Tomeček, David; Tintěra, Jaroslav; Paluš, Milan

    2017-03-01

    Complex systems are commonly characterized by the properties of their graph representation. Dynamical complex systems are then typically represented by a graph of temporal dependencies between time series of state variables of their subunits. It has been shown recently that graphs constructed in this way tend to have relatively clustered structure, potentially leading to spurious detection of small-world properties even in the case of systems with no or randomly distributed true interactions. However, the strength of this bias depends heavily on a range of parameters and its relevance for real-world data has not yet been established. In this work, we assess the relevance of the bias using two examples of multivariate time series recorded in natural complex systems. The first is the time series of local brain activity as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging in resting healthy human subjects, and the second is the time series of average monthly surface air temperature coming from a large reanalysis of climatological data over the period 1948-2012. In both cases, the clustering in the thresholded correlation graph is substantially higher compared with a realization of a density-matched random graph, while the shortest paths are relatively short, showing thus distinguishing features of small-world structure. However, comparable or even stronger small-world properties were reproduced in correlation graphs of model processes with randomly scrambled interconnections. This suggests that the small-world properties of the correlation matrices of these real-world systems indeed do not reflect genuinely the properties of the underlying interaction structure, but rather result from the inherent properties of correlation matrix.

  13. 大骨瓣减压术治疗50例重型颅脑损伤体会%Experience of the Cure for 50 Cases of Severe Brain Injury by Big Bone Flap Pressure-reduction Operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李汉城; 邱平华; 黄谷; 王育胜

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical effect of severe brain injuries by big bone flap pressure-reduction operation.Method:The clinical data of 50 cases of severe brain injuries treated with big bone flap pressure-reduction operation in our department in recent years were analysed retrospectively.Result:With the GCS recovery standards in post-surgery after half a year,there were 25 cases with good effects,10 cases with moderate disability,5 cases with severe disability, 3 cases with vegetative survival and 7 cases with death.Conclusion:For severe brain injuries,the effect of big bone flap pressure-reduction operation is better than those of routine decompressive craniotomy,which could obviously has lower the mortality and disability rate.%目的:探讨大骨瓣减压术在抢救重型颅脑损伤的作用。方法:回顾性分析近年来笔者所在科室应用大骨瓣减压术治疗50例重型颅脑损伤患者的临床资料。结果:按术后半年GCS恢复标准,疗效良好25例,中残10例,重残5例,植物生存3例,死亡7例。结论:大骨瓣减压术在重型颅脑损伤救治中效果优于常规去骨瓣开颅术,可明显降低死亡率、致残率。

  14. Retinal structure assessed by OCT as a biomarker of brain development in children born small for gestational age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Victoria; Pérez, Teresa; González, Inmaculada; Altemir, Irene; Gimenez, Galadriel; Prieto, Esther; Paules, Cristina; Oros, Daniel; Lopez-Pison, Javier; Fayed, Nicolás; Garcia-Martí, Gracián; Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Marin, Miguel Angel

    2017-09-01

    To identify differences in neuronal tissue from retinal and brain structures in children born small for gestational age (SGA) with no abnormality in neonatal brain ultrasonography and no previous neurological impairment, and to evaluate the relationship between retinal structure and brain changes in school-age children born SGA. Two cohorts of children were recruited: 25 children born SGA and 25 children born with an appropriate birth weight according to gestational age. All the children underwent an ophthalmic examination, which included retinal imaging using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and a brain MRI. MRI images were automatically segmented and global and regional brain volumes were obtained. Although visual function did not differ between both groups, the complex ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL-IPL) was thinner in SGA children. Total intracranial volume, and global grey and white matter volumes in brain and cerebellum were correlated with birthweight centile, as were certain regional volumes (temporal and parietal lobes, hippocampus and putamen). Abnormal GCL-IPL measurements accurately identified SGA children with the most severe grey and white matter changes in the brain. SGA children, both preterm and term born, showed evidence of structural abnormalities in the retina, which may be an accurate and non-invasive biomarker of neuronal damage in brain tissue. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Networking for big data

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Shui; Misic, Jelena; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2015-01-01

    Networking for Big Data supplies an unprecedented look at cutting-edge research on the networking and communication aspects of Big Data. Starting with a comprehensive introduction to Big Data and its networking issues, it offers deep technical coverage of both theory and applications.The book is divided into four sections: introduction to Big Data, networking theory and design for Big Data, networking security for Big Data, and platforms and systems for Big Data applications. Focusing on key networking issues in Big Data, the book explains network design and implementation for Big Data. It exa

  16. Really big numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Richard Evan

    2014-01-01

    In the American Mathematical Society's first-ever book for kids (and kids at heart), mathematician and author Richard Evan Schwartz leads math lovers of all ages on an innovative and strikingly illustrated journey through the infinite number system. By means of engaging, imaginative visuals and endearing narration, Schwartz manages the monumental task of presenting the complex concept of Big Numbers in fresh and relatable ways. The book begins with small, easily observable numbers before building up to truly gigantic ones, like a nonillion, a tredecillion, a googol, and even ones too huge for names! Any person, regardless of age, can benefit from reading this book. Readers will find themselves returning to its pages for a very long time, perpetually learning from and growing with the narrative as their knowledge deepens. Really Big Numbers is a wonderful enrichment for any math education program and is enthusiastically recommended to every teacher, parent and grandparent, student, child, or other individual i...

  17. Big Data and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Shaw

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequencers, Twitter, MRIs, Facebook, particle accelerators, Google Books, radio telescopes, Tumblr: what do these things have in common? According to the evangelists of “data science,” all of these are instruments for observing reality at unprecedentedly large scales and fine granularities. This perspective ignores the social reality of these very different technological systems, ignoring how they are made, how they work, and what they mean in favor of an exclusive focus on what they generate: Big Data. But no data, big or small, can be interpreted without an understanding of the process that generated them. Statistical data science is applicable to systems that have been designed as scientific instruments, but is likely to lead to confusion when applied to systems that have not. In those cases, a historical inquiry is preferable.

  18. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  19. Application of Texture Analysis to Study Small Vessel Disease and Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del C. Valdés Hernández

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesWe evaluate the alternative use of texture analysis for evaluating the role of blood–brain barrier (BBB in small vessel disease (SVD.MethodsWe used brain magnetic resonance imaging from 204 stroke patients, acquired before and 20 min after intravenous gadolinium administration. We segmented tissues, white matter hyperintensities (WMH and applied validated visual scores. We measured textural features in all tissues pre- and post-contrast and used ANCOVA to evaluate the effect of SVD indicators on the pre-/post-contrast change, Kruskal–Wallis for significance between patient groups and linear mixed models for pre-/post-contrast variations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF with Fazekas scores.ResultsTextural “homogeneity” increase in normal tissues with higher presence of SVD indicators was consistently more overt than in abnormal tissues. Textural “homogeneity” increased with age, basal ganglia perivascular spaces scores (p < 0.01 and SVD scores (p < 0.05 and was significantly higher in hypertensive patients (p < 0.002 and lacunar stroke (p = 0.04. Hypertension (74% patients, WMH load (median = 1.5 ± 1.6% of intracranial volume, and age (mean = 65.6 years, SD = 11.3 predicted the pre/post-contrast change in normal white matter, WMH, and index stroke lesion. CSF signal increased with increasing SVD post-contrast.ConclusionA consistent general pattern of increasing textural “homogeneity” with increasing SVD and post-contrast change in CSF with increasing WMH suggest that texture analysis may be useful for the study of BBB integrity.

  20. Big queues

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesh, Ayalvadi; Wischik, Damon

    2004-01-01

    Big Queues aims to give a simple and elegant account of how large deviations theory can be applied to queueing problems. Large deviations theory is a collection of powerful results and general techniques for studying rare events, and has been applied to queueing problems in a variety of ways. The strengths of large deviations theory are these: it is powerful enough that one can answer many questions which are hard to answer otherwise, and it is general enough that one can draw broad conclusions without relying on special case calculations.

  1. Acute strength exercise and the involvement of small or large muscle mass on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Correia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Blood neurotrophins, such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, are considered to be of great importance in mediating the benefits of physical exercise. In this study, the effect of acute strength exercise and the involvement of small versus large muscle mass on the levels of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor were evaluated in healthy individuals. METHODS: The concentric strengths of knee (large and elbow (small flexor and extensor muscles were measured on two separate days. Venous blood samples were obtained from 16 healthy subjects before and after exercise. RESULTS: The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the plasma did not significantly increase after both arm and leg exercise. There was no significant difference in the plasma levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the arms and legs. CONCLUSION: The present results demonstrate that acute strength exercise does not induce significant alterations in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor plasma concentrations in healthy individuals. Considering that its levels may be affected by various factors, such as exercise, these findings suggest that the type of exercise program may be a decisive factor in altering peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  2. Evaluation of anesthesia effects on [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake in mouse brain and heart using small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hiroshi E-mail: htoyama@fujita-hu.ac.jp; Ichise, Masanori; Liow, Jeih-San; Vines, Douglass C.; Seneca, Nicholas M.; Modell, Kendra J.; Seidel, Jurgen; Green, Michael V.; Innis, Robert B

    2004-02-01

    This study evaluates effects of anesthesia on {sup 18}F-FDG (FDG) uptake in mouse brain and heart to establish the basic conditions of small animal PET imaging. Prior to FDG injection, 12 mice were anesthetized with isoflurane gas; 11 mice were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a ketamine/xylazine mixture; and 11 mice were awake. In isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine conditions, FDG brain uptake (%ID/g) was significantly lower than in controls. Conversely, in the isoflurane condition, %ID/g in heart was significantly higher than in controls, whereas heart uptake in ketamine/xylazine mice was significantly lower. Results suggest that anesthesia impedes FDG uptake in mouse brain and affects FDG uptake in heart; however, the effects in the brain and heart differ depending on the type of anesthesia used.

  3. Altered topological properties of functional network connectivity in schizophrenia during resting state: a small-world brain network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingbao; Sui, Jing; Rachakonda, Srinivas; He, Hao; Gruner, William; Pearlson, Godfrey; Kiehl, Kent A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant topological properties of small-world human brain networks in patients with schizophrenia (SZ) have been documented in previous neuroimaging studies. Aberrant functional network connectivity (FNC, temporal relationships among independent component time courses) has also been found in SZ by a previous resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. However, no study has yet determined if topological properties of FNC are also altered in SZ. In this study, small-world network metrics of FNC during the resting state were examined in both healthy controls (HCs) and SZ subjects. FMRI data were obtained from 19 HCs and 19 SZ. Brain images were decomposed into independent components (ICs) by group independent component analysis (ICA). FNC maps were constructed via a partial correlation analysis of ICA time courses. A set of undirected graphs were built by thresholding the FNC maps and the small-world network metrics of these maps were evaluated. Our results demonstrated significantly altered topological properties of FNC in SZ relative to controls. In addition, topological measures of many ICs involving frontal, parietal, occipital and cerebellar areas were altered in SZ relative to controls. Specifically, topological measures of whole network and specific components in SZ were correlated with scores on the negative symptom scale of the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS). These findings suggest that aberrant architecture of small-world brain topology in SZ consists of ICA temporally coherent brain networks.

  4. CARBOPLATIN AS 2ND LINE TREATMENT FOR RECURRENT OR PROGRESSIVE BRAIN METASTASES FROM SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROEN, HJM; SMIT, EF; HAAXMAREICHE, H; POSTMUS, PE

    1993-01-01

    Patients with brain metastases from small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have a poor prognosis. Although most patients die from metastatic disease outside the central nervous system, this disabling metastatic site often needs treatment to mitigate the signs and symptoms of intracranial disease. The effect

  5. Big Man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秀文

    2012-01-01

    <正>梁炳"Edmond"说他演唱会后会跟太太去旅行。无论飞机降落在地球的哪角,有伴在旁就是幸福。他的concert名字是big man,初时我看错是big mac演唱会:心想干吗是大汉堡演唱会?嘻!后来才知看错。但其实细想,在成长路上,谁不曾是活得像个傻傻的面包,一团面粉暴露在这大千世界,时间和各式人生经历就是酵母,多少年月日,你我都会发酵成长。友情也是激发彼此成长的酵母,看到对方早已经从男仔成了男人,我都原来一早已不再能够以"女仔"称呼自己。在我眼中,他的改变是大的,爱玩外向的个性收窄了,现在的我们,

  6. Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Jon; Nielsen, Jeppe Agger

    2016-01-01

    Big Data byder sig til som en af tidens mest hypede teknologiske innovationer, udråbt til at rumme kimen til nye, værdifulde operationelle indsigter for private virksomheder og offentlige organisationer. Mens de optimistiske udmeldinger er mange, er forskningen i Big Data i den offentlige sektor...... indtil videre begrænset. Denne artikel belyser, hvordan den offentlige sundhedssektor kan genanvende og udnytte en stadig større mængde data under hensyntagen til offentlige værdier. Artiklen bygger på et casestudie af anvendelsen af store mængder sundhedsdata i Dansk AlmenMedicinsk Database (DAMD......). Analysen viser, at (gen)brug af data i nye sammenhænge er en flerspektret afvejning mellem ikke alene økonomiske rationaler og kvalitetshensyn, men også kontrol over personfølsomme data og etiske implikationer for borgeren. I DAMD-casen benyttes data på den ene side ”i den gode sags tjeneste” til...

  7. Big data analytics turning big data into big money

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlhorst, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    Unique insights to implement big data analytics and reap big returns to your bottom line Focusing on the business and financial value of big data analytics, respected technology journalist Frank J. Ohlhorst shares his insights on the newly emerging field of big data analytics in Big Data Analytics. This breakthrough book demonstrates the importance of analytics, defines the processes, highlights the tangible and intangible values and discusses how you can turn a business liability into actionable material that can be used to redefine markets, improve profits and identify new business opportuni

  8. Radiolabeled cetuximab plus whole-brain irradiation (WBI) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk; Nadrowitz, Roger [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Buchmann, Inga; Meller, Birgit [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Noack, Frank [Inst. of Pathology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Background and Purpose: The addition of systemic drugs to whole-brain irradiation has not improved the survival of patients with multiple brain metastases, most likely because the agents did not readily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Radiolabeling of cetuximab was performed to investigate whether this antibody crosses the BBB. Case Report: A patient with multiple brain lesions from non-small cell lung cancer was investigated. The largest metastasis (40 x 33 x 27 mm) was selected the reference lesion. On day 1, 200 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab (0.25% hot and 99.75% cold antibody) were given. On day 3, 200 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab (cold antibody) were given. Weekly doses of 250 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab were administered for 3 months. Results: The reference lesion showed enhancement of radiolabeled cetuximab ({sup 123}I-Erbi) on scintigraphy; {sup 123}I-Erbi crossed the BBB and accumulated in the lesion. The reference lesion measured 31 x 22 x 21 mm at 4 months. Enhancement of contrast medium was less pronounced. Conclusion: This is the first demonstration of cetuximab crossing the BBB and accumulating in brain metastasis. (orig.)

  9. Design of a Small Modified Minkowski Fractal Antenna for Passive Deep Brain Stimulation Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Manafi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A small planar modified Minkowski fractal antenna is designed and simulated in dual frequency bands (2.4 and 5.8 GHz for wireless energy harvesting by deep brain stimulation (DBS devices. The designed antenna, physically being confined inside a miniaturized structure, can efficiently convert the wireless signals in dual ISM frequency bands to the energy source to recharge the DBS battery or power the pulse generator directly. The performance metrics such as the return loss, the specific absorption rate (SAR, and the radiation pattern within skin and muscle-fat-skin tissues are evaluated for the designed antenna. The gain of the proposed antenna is 3.2 dBi at 2.4 GHz and 4.7 dBi at 5.8 GHz; also the averaged SAR of the antenna in human body tissue is found to be well below the legally allowed limit at both frequency bands. The link budget shows the received power at the distance of 25 cm at 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz are around 0.4 mW and 0.04 mW, which can empower the DBS implant. The large operational bandwidth, the physical compactness, and the efficiency in wireless signal reception make this antenna suitable in being used in implanted biomedical devices such as DBS pulse generators.

  10. Treatment of brain metastases of small-cell lung cancer : Comparing teniposide and teniposide with whole-brain radiotherapy - A phase III study of the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Lung Cancer Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, PE; Haaxma-Reiche, H; Smit, EF; Groen, HJM; Karnicka, H; Lewinski, T; van Meerbeeck, J; Clerico, M; Gregor, A; Curran, D; Sahmoud, T; Kirkpatrick, A; Giaccone, G

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 60% of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) develop brain metastases, Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) gives symptomatic improvement in more than 50% of these patients. Because brain metastases are a sign of systemic progression, and chemotherapy was found to be

  11. Structuring the Curriculum around Big Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Janet; Knighton, Barbara; Brophy, Jere

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an inside look at Barbara Knighton's classroom teaching. She uses big ideas to guide her planning and instruction and gives other teachers suggestions for adopting the big idea approach and ways for making the approach easier. This article also represents a "small slice" of a dozen years of collaborative research,…

  12. Challenges of Big Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Han, Fang; Liu, Han

    2014-06-01

    Big Data bring new opportunities to modern society and challenges to data scientists. On one hand, Big Data hold great promises for discovering subtle population patterns and heterogeneities that are not possible with small-scale data. On the other hand, the massive sample size and high dimensionality of Big Data introduce unique computational and statistical challenges, including scalability and storage bottleneck, noise accumulation, spurious correlation, incidental endogeneity, and measurement errors. These challenges are distinguished and require new computational and statistical paradigm. This article gives overviews on the salient features of Big Data and how these features impact on paradigm change on statistical and computational methods as well as computing architectures. We also provide various new perspectives on the Big Data analysis and computation. In particular, we emphasize on the viability of the sparsest solution in high-confidence set and point out that exogeneous assumptions in most statistical methods for Big Data can not be validated due to incidental endogeneity. They can lead to wrong statistical inferences and consequently wrong scientific conclusions.

  13. Prognostic predictors for non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastasis after radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhong FAN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Brain metastasis (BM is often found in the patients with lung cancer. Radiotherapy is regular and effective means of therapy and it aims at palliating symptoms and prolonging survival time. However, now there are different viewpoints on protocols of radiotherapy and prognostic factors. A retrospective analysis is used to evaluate the results of treatment for 82 cases with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and explore the prognostic factors to establish a prognostic index (PI model. Methods From Feb.1995 to Oct. 2006, 82 patients irradiated for BM from NSCLC, with both complete medical charts and follow-up data available, were eligible for this retrospective analysis. A number of potential factors which might affect prognosis after irradiation were evaluated. The significance of prognostic variables in the survival resulted from both univariate analysis by Kaplan-Meier combining with log-rank test and multivariate Cox regression model. The prognostic index (PI was established based on Cox regression analysis and subgrouping values. Results The follow-up time was 1-120 months. For the entire cohort, the median survival from the start of radiation for BM was 10.5 months, and the actuarial overall survival rate was 50.8%, 23.7% and 5.1% at 0.5, 1 and 2 years respectively. Univariate analysis showed KPS, control of primary tumor, interval from the beginning of diagnostic to BM, extracranial systemic metastasis, counts of lymphocyte and solitary BM were predictors of prognosis. However, in the Cox multivariate analysis, only KPS, control of primary tumor, interval from the beginning of diagnostic to BM and solitary BM were significant prognostic factors. The prognostic index was established based on Cox regression analysis and 82 patients were stratified good, intermediate and poor prognostic sub-groups. The difference of survival rate among 3 subgroups is significant (P<0.001. Conclusion Radiotherapy is

  14. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  15. Hemisphere- and gender-related differences in small-world brain networks: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lixia; Wang, Jinhui; Yan, Chaogan; He, Yong

    2011-01-01

    We employed resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) to investigate hemisphere- and gender-related differences in the topological organization of human brain functional networks. Brain networks were first constructed by measuring inter-regional temporal correlations of R-fMRI data within each hemisphere in 86 young, healthy, right-handed adults (38 males and 48 females) followed by a graph-theory analysis. The hemispheric networks exhibit small-world attributes (high clustering and short paths) that are compatible with previous results in the whole-brain functional networks. Furthermore, we found that compared with females, males have a higher normalized clustering coefficient in the right hemispheric network but a lower clustering coefficient in the left hemispheric network, suggesting a gender-hemisphere interaction. Moreover, we observed significant hemisphere-related differences in the regional nodal characteristics in various brain regions, such as the frontal and occipital regions (leftward asymmetry) and the temporal regions (rightward asymmetry), findings that are consistent with previous studies of brain structural and functional asymmetries. Together, our results suggest that the topological organization of human brain functional networks is associated with gender and hemispheres, and they provide insights into the understanding of functional substrates underlying individual differences in behaviors and cognition.

  16. NO-tryptophan: a new small molecule located in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mangas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W with good affinity (10-9 M and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms. 

  17. NO-tryptophan: a new small molecule located in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, A; Yajeya, J; González, N; Duleu, S; Geffard, M; Coveñas, R

    2016-09-22

    A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W) with good affinity (10-9 M) and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms.

  18. 2nd INNS Conference on Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Manolopoulos, Yannis; Iliadis, Lazaros; Roy, Asim; Vellasco, Marley

    2017-01-01

    The book offers a timely snapshot of neural network technologies as a significant component of big data analytics platforms. It promotes new advances and research directions in efficient and innovative algorithmic approaches to analyzing big data (e.g. deep networks, nature-inspired and brain-inspired algorithms); implementations on different computing platforms (e.g. neuromorphic, graphics processing units (GPUs), clouds, clusters); and big data analytics applications to solve real-world problems (e.g. weather prediction, transportation, energy management). The book, which reports on the second edition of the INNS Conference on Big Data, held on October 23–25, 2016, in Thessaloniki, Greece, depicts an interesting collaborative adventure of neural networks with big data and other learning technologies.

  19. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  20. Big Egos in Big Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Vaarst Andersen, Kristina; Lauto, Giancarlo

    to estimate both the structural and performance effects of selection, as well as the behavioral of crossing organizational boundaries. Preliminary results suggest that the selection of collaborators still is skewed, and identify a large assortativity effect, as well as a tendency to interact with both authors......In this paper we investigate the micro-mechanisms governing the structural evolution of a scientific collaboration. Empirical evidence indicates that we have transcended into a new paradigm with a new modus operandi where scientific discovery are not lead by so called lone ?stars?, or big egos......, but instead by a group of people, from a multitude of institutions, having a diverse knowledge set and capable of operating more and more complex instrumentation. Using a dataset consisting of full bibliometric coverage from a Large Scale Research Facility, we utilize a stochastic actor oriented model...

  1. Magnetic-resonance-imaging-coupled broadband near-infrared tomography system for small animal brain studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Heng; Springett, Roger; Dehghani, Hamid; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2005-04-01

    A novel magnetic-resonance-coupled broadband near-infrared (NIR) tomography system for small animal brain studies is described. Several features of the image formation approach are new in NIR tomography and represent major advances in the path to recovering high-resolution hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images of tissue. The NIR data were broadband and continuous wave and were used along with a second-derivative-based estimation of the path length from water absorption. The path length estimation from water was then used along with the attenuation spectrum to recover absorption and reduced scattering coefficient images at multiple wavelengths and then to recover images of total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation. Going beyond these basics of NIR tomography, software has been developed to allow inclusion of structures derived from MR imaging (MRI) for the external and internal tissue boundaries, thereby improving the accuracy and spatial resolution of the properties in each tissue type. The system has been validated in both tissue-simulating phantoms, with 10% accuracy observed, and in a rat cranium imaging experiment. The latter experiment used variation in inspired oxygen (FiO2) to vary the observed hemoglobin and oxygen saturation images. Quantitative agreement was observed between the changes in deoxyhemoglobin values derived from NIR and the changes predicted with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI. This system represents the initial stage in what will likely be a larger role for NIR tomography, coupled to MRI, and illustrates that the technological challenges of using continuous-wave broadband data and inclusion of a priori structural information can be met with careful phantom studies.

  2. Comparison of whole brain radiation therapy and locally limited radiation therapy in the treatment of solitary brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueki, Keisuke; Matsutani, Masao; Nakamura, Osamu; Tanaka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The benefit and risk of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) compared to locally limited radiation therapy was assessed in 61 patients with solitary brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer without an unresectable active primary lesion or systemic dissemination in the other organs. Twenty-three patients received local irradiation (Group A), and 38 patients received whole brain irradiation with or without local irradiation (Group B). The survival was significantly better in Group A than in Group B (p<0.05), with median survivals of 83.1 and 30.7 weeks, respectively. One-year local recurrence rates were 7% in Group A and 21% in Group B, but the difference was not statistically significant. The 1-year distant recurrence rate was similar at 18%. Radiation-induced dementia occurred in two patients in Group A (8.7%) and seven in Group B (18.4%), but was not statistically significant (p=0.30). There is no obvious benefit and possible disadvantages of WBRT compared to local irradiation for the population of patients investigated in this study. Intraoperative radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery without WBRT should be considered in the patients with solitary brain metastases. (author)

  3. Small-World Brain Functional Networks in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Revealed by EEG Synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian; Chen, Yanni; Lin, Pan; Wang, Jue

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the topologic properties of human brain attention-related functional networks associated with Multi-Source Interference Task (MSIT) performance using electroencephalography (EEG). Data were obtained from 13 children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 13 normal control children. Functional connectivity between all pairwise combinations of EEG channels was established by calculating synchronization likelihood (SL). The cluster coefficients and path lengths were computed as a function of degree K. The results showed that brain attention functional networks of normal control subjects had efficient small-world topologic properties, whereas these topologic properties were altered in ADHD. In particular, increased local characteristics combined with decreased global characteristics in ADHD led to a disorder-related shift of the network topologic structure toward ordered networks. These findings are consistent with a hypothesis of dysfunctional segregation and integration of the brain in ADHD, and enhance our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism of this illness.

  4. Sequential Change of Hypometabolic Metastasis from Non-small-cell Lung Cancer on Brain FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Yang, Sei Hoon; Yang, Chung Yong; Choi, Keum Ha [Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    A 60-year-old woman, who had non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in left lower lobe underwent brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for evaluation of cerebral metastasis. On follow-up FDG-PET/CT, only hypometaolic lesion was detected and progressed in right frontal lobe at 6 months and 10 months, later. Hypermetabolic metastasis was not detected even at last scan time of FDG-PET/CT. Brain MRI showed brain metastasis in right frontal lobe. As might be expected, the physician should take cerebral metastasis into consideration even though there is only hypometabolic change on subsequent FDG-PET/CT in patients with NSCLC.

  5. The -G1245A IGF1 polymorphism is related with small head size and less brain sparing in small for gestational age born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Wietske A; van Meurs, Joyce B; Arends, Nicolette J; Uitterlinden, André G; de Ridder, Maria A; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C

    2009-04-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA) subjects experience pre- and postnatal growth restriction, which might be influenced by polymorphisms in the IGF1 gene. The well-known -841(CA)(n)/192 bp polymorphism has been associated with birth size, cardiovascular disease, and IGF-1 levels, and is in linkage disequilibrium with the -G1245A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs35767). To associate the -G1245A SNP with head circumference (HC) and brain sparing (a greater head compared with height SDS) in short SGA and SGA catch-up subjects. Gene association study. We studied 635 SGA subjects out of which 439 remained short and 196 had a postnatal height >-2.00 SDS. The -G1245A SNP IGF1 gene polymorphism and head size. All SGA subjects had a postnatal head size below the population mean (-1.01 SDS, P<0.001). Whereas SGA catch-up subjects had a head size that was in proportion with their height, short SGA subjects displayed extensive brain sparing (HC - height: SGA CU: 0.01 versus short SGA: 1.75 SDS, P<0.001). The most severely SGA born subjects had a 0.4 SDS smaller postnatal head size and 0.6 SDS less brain sparing when carrying the -1245 A-allele in contrast to G-allele carriers (P=0.03). The association between the -G1245A SNP and head size remained significant after correction for birth weight and postnatal height SDS (P=0.03). Birth weight, birth length and postnatal height SDS were not related with the - G1245A SNP. The -1245 A-allele of the IGF1 promoter SNP is associated with a small head size and less brain sparing in SGA born subjects and particularly those with the lowest birth weight.

  6. "Big Data" : big gaps of knowledge in the field of internet science

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders, CCP Chris; Matzat, U Uwe; Reips, UD

    2012-01-01

    Research on so-called 'Big Data' has received a considerable momentum and is expected to grow in the future. One very interesting stream of research on Big Data analyzes online networks. Many online networks are known to have some typical macro-characteristics, such as 'small world' properties. Much less is known about underlying micro-processes leading to these properties. The models used by Big Data researchers usually are inspired by mathematical ease of exposition. We propose to follow in...

  7. On Big Data Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Rui; Lu, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Big data systems address the challenges of capturing, storing, managing, analyzing, and visualizing big data. Within this context, developing benchmarks to evaluate and compare big data systems has become an active topic for both research and industry communities. To date, most of the state-of-the-art big data benchmarks are designed for specific types of systems. Based on our experience, however, we argue that considering the complexity, diversity, and rapid evolution of big data systems, fo...

  8. National trends in radiotherapy for brain metastases at time of diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Sheehan, Jason P; Grover, Surbhi; Dutta, Sunil W; Rusthoven, Chad G; Kavanagh, Brian D; Sahgal, Arjun; Showalter, Timothy N

    2017-08-31

    To analyze the national trends of patients treated radiotherapy for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that were found at diagnosis. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with NSCLC diagnosed from 2004 to 2013 that received brain irradiation for metastases and patients grouped into having had received fractionated brain radiotherapy (5-15 fractions with or without radiosurgery) or intracranial radiosurgery alone (1-5 fractions). Univariable and multivariable (MVA) analyses were performed to investigate factors associated with the receipt of SRS alone, and temporal/regional trends. 47,746 patients met inclusion criteria, of which 42,148 received fractionated brain irradiation (88%) and 5,598 received radiosurgery (12%). 345 patients received fractioned brain irradiation with a radiosurgical boost (0.8%). The utilization of radiosurgery-alone increased over time owing to increases in each radiosurgery modality. On MVA, several factors were associated with increased odds of receiving intracranial radiosurgery-alone over fractionated brain radiotherapy including more recent year of diagnosis, increased median income, eastern U.S. regions, further distance to the hospital, and the receipt of chemotherapy (each p<0.001). Patients of Asian descent were less likely to receive radiosurgery alone (p=0.044). In the management of brain metastases from NSCLC, overall utilization of an intracranial radiosurgery alone treatment strategy has increased over the past decade. Despite this, there appear to be significant geographic variations and disparities remain based on patient income level and race. Further study is needed to define the reasons for these disparities and appropriate actions to mitigate them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The costs of a big brain: extreme encephalization results in higher energetic demand and reduced hypoxia tolerance in weakly electric African fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhum, Kimberley V; Freiler, Megan K; Wang, Robert; Carlson, Bruce A

    2016-12-28

    A large brain can offer several cognitive advantages. However, brain tissue has an especially high metabolic rate. Thus, evolving an enlarged brain requires either a decrease in other energetic requirements, or an increase in overall energy consumption. Previous studies have found conflicting evidence for these hypotheses, leaving the metabolic costs and constraints in the evolution of increased encephalization unclear. Mormyrid electric fishes have extreme encephalization comparable to that of primates. Here, we show that brain size varies widely among mormyrid species, and that there is little evidence for a trade-off with organ size, but instead a correlation between brain size and resting oxygen consumption rate. Additionally, we show that increased brain size correlates with decreased hypoxia tolerance. Our data thus provide a non-mammalian example of extreme encephalization that is accommodated by an increase in overall energy consumption. Previous studies have found energetic trade-offs with variation in brain size in taxa that have not experienced extreme encephalization comparable with that of primates and mormyrids. Therefore, we suggest that energetic trade-offs can only explain the evolution of moderate increases in brain size, and that the energetic requirements of extreme encephalization may necessitate increased overall energy investment.

  10. 优化国土空间开发格局与大中小城市协调发展%Improve the Land Spacial Development Pattern and Coordinate the Development of Big-Medium-Small City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡继明

    2015-01-01

    According to the“concentration-equilibrium”city development strategy in the nationwide main functional area planning, only the urbanization way, which focuses on the big city or big city urban agglomeration, will improve the territorial resources allocation efficiency, relieve the contradiction between the occupation of farmland during the urbanization and guarantee the national food security. Therefore, we need promote the land system reformation, allow the rural construction land access to markets, construct the long-term mechanism of land increasing income and reducing expenditure and the long-term mechanism of guarantee the national food security, improve policy system of the coordination development among big city, medium city and small city.%按照全国主题功能区规划所提出的“集中—均衡”的城市化发展战略,走以大城市(群)为主的城市化道路,才能提高国土资源配置效率,缓解城市化占用耕地和保证国家粮食安全之间的矛盾。为此要推进土地制度改革,建立城乡土地开源节流和确保国家粮食安全的长效机制,加快建立人口城市化的机制,完善大中小城市协调发展的政策体系。

  11. Big data=Big marketing?!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖明超

    2012-01-01

    <正>互联网刚刚兴起的时候,有句话很流行:"在网上,没人知道你是一条狗。"但是,在20多年后的今天,这句话已经早被扔进了历史的垃圾堆,因为在技术的推动下,随着移动互联、社交网络、电子商务等的迅速发展,消费者的"行踪"变得越来越容易被把握,消费者在互联网上的眼球、行为轨迹、谈论、喜好、购物经历等等都可能被捕捉到,消费者进入一个几乎透明化生存的"大数据时代"(Age of Big Data)。数据不仅仅正在变得更加可用,人工智能(AI)技术,包括自然语言处理、模式识别和机器学习等技术的发展,正在让数据变得更加容易被计算机所理解,

  12. Brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Prognostic importance of the number of involved extracranial organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdan, L. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); University of Luebeck, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Segedin, B. [Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Nagy, V. [Oncology Institute Ion Ciricuta, Department of Radiotherapy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Khoa, M.T. [Hanoi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trang, N.T. [Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Schild, S.E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Rades, D. [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated the potential prognostic value of the number of involved extracranial organs in patients with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 472 patients who received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone with 5 x 4 Gy or 10 x 3 Gy for brain metastasis from NSCLC were included in this retrospective study. In addition to the number of involved extracranial organs, 6 further potential prognostic factors were investigated including WBRT regimen, age, gender, Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), number of brain metastases, and the interval from cancer diagnosis to WBRT. Subgroup analyses were performed for patients with metastatic involvement of one (lung vs. bone vs. other metastasis) and two (lung+bone vs. lung+lymph nodes vs. other combinations) extracranial organs. The survival rates at 6 months of the patients with involvement of 0, 1, 2, 3, and ≥4 extracranial organs were 52, 27, 17, 4, and 14%, respectively (p<0.001). On multivariate analysis, the number of involved extracranial organs remained significant (risk ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.19-1.46; p<0.001). Age <65 years (p=0.004), KPS ≥70 (p<0.001), and only 1-3 brain metastases (p=0.022) were also significantly associated with survival in the multivariate analysis. In the separate analyses of patients with involvement of one and two extracranial organs, survival was not significantly different based on the pattern of extracranial organ involvement. The number of involved extracranial organs is an independent prognostic factor of survival in patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC, irrespective of the pattern of extracranial organ involvement. (orig.)

  13. Functional brain development in growth-restricted and constitutionally small fetuses: a fetal magnetoencephalography case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, E C; Schleger, F; Preissl, H; Braendle, J; Eswaran, H; Abele, H; Brucker, S; Kiefer-Schmidt, I

    2015-08-01

    Fetal magnetoencephalography records fetal brain activity non-invasively. Delayed brain responses were reported for fetuses weighing below the tenth percentile. To investigate whether this delay indicates delayed brain maturation resulting from placental insufficiency, this study distinguished two groups of fetuses below the tenth percentile: growth-restricted fetuses with abnormal umbilical artery Doppler velocity (IUGR) and constitutionally small-for-gestational-age fetuses with normal umbilical artery Doppler findings (SGA) were compared with fetuses of adequate weight for gestational age (AGA), matched for age and behavioural state. A case-control study of matched pairs. Fetal magnetoencephalography-Center at the University Hospital of Tuebingen. Fourteen IUGR fetuses and 23 SGA fetuses were matched for gestational age and fetal behavioural state with 37 healthy, normal-sized fetuses. A 156-channel fetal magentoencephalography system was used to record fetal brain activity. Light flashes as visual stimulation were applied to the fetus. The Student's t-test for paired groups was performed. Latency of fetal visual evoked magnetic responses (VER). The IUGR fetuses showed delayed VERs compared with controls (IUGR, 233.1 ms; controls, 184.6 ms; P = 0.032). SGA fetuses had similar evoked response latencies compared with controls (SGA, 216.1 ms; controls, 219.9 ms; P = 0.828). Behavioural states were similarly distributed. Visual evoked responses are delayed in IUGR fetuses, but not in SGA. Fetal behavioural state as an influencing factor of brain response latency was accounted for in the comparison. This reinforces that delayed brain maturation is the result of placental insufficiency. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  14. 大数据分析在中小型企业管理中的应用探讨%The Application of Big Data Analysis in the Management of Small and Medium Sized Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志兵

    2016-01-01

    介绍了大数据的概念及应用前景,以熔炼过程中材质的化学成分对铸件裂纹焊补率的影响为研究课题,选择合适的挖掘软件进行数据挖掘,数据分析,找出各个数据之间的关联,有效地解决数据孤岛问题。验证了大数据分析结果在企业管理中具有参考和控制性作用,大数据分析方法可在中小企业管理中加以应用。%This paper introduces the concept of big data and application prospects in foundry enterprises smelting process for casting crack of chemical composition of the influence of welding repair rate as the research subject, selecting suitable mining software for data mining, data analysis, find out the connections between various data, effectively solve the problem of data island. Big data to verify the result has reference and controlling function in enterprise management, large data analysis method can be applied in the management of small and medium-sized enterprises.

  15. The Small Steel Assembled Big Template Used in Construction of High rise Building%小钢模拼装大模板在高层建筑施工中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈茸

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with the increasing high-rise build-ing construction project, new technology and construction exp-erience of high-rise buildings emerge in an endless stream, es-pecial y the construction method is the smal steel assembled big template used in construction of high rise building. This p-aper takes the project as an example to introduce the small ste-el assembled big template construction technology, and puts forward some construction experiences and at ention points, f-or reference only.%近年来随着高层建筑施工项目的逐渐增多,新兴高层建筑技术和施工经验层出不穷,其中比较突出施工手段就是小钢模拼装大模板在高层建筑施工中的应用。本文就以实际工程项目为例来介绍小钢模拼装大模板施工技术,并且对此提出一些施工经验和注意要点,仅供参考。

  16. Transitional times:"small times" in "big times"%“过渡时代”:“大时代”中的“小时代”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金波

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of the nature of the times,currently we are in the transitional period from capitalism to socialism.It seems that there is no difference between the words transition period and transition times literally.But the fact is not so.The academic holds this point that the transitional period is big times of history,but in fact,it is a small times in big times which has a long span of time.%从时代性质来说,当今时代处于资本主义向社会主义过渡的过渡时代。过渡时代和过渡时期从字面上看内涵没什么区别,其实不然。一般认为,过渡时代是历史的大时代,事实上,它是大时代里时间跨度比较长的小时代。

  17. Thinking Big

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim; Krumhansl, Ruth; Baker, Irene

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed at teachers already experienced with activities involving small, student-collected data sets and who are now ready to begin working with large, online data sets collected by scientists and engineers. The authors discuss challenges, instructional strategies, and sources of appropriate lesson plans. With guidance, plus online…

  18. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced and splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach eSoreq

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson’s disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC. RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation, 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3’ and 5’ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation

  19. EGFR mutations are associated with favorable intracranial response and progression-free survival following brain irradiation in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with increased radiosensitivity in vitro. However, the results from clinical studies regarding the radiosensitivity in NSCLC with mutant EGFR are inconclusive. We retrospectively analyzed our NSCLC patients who had been regularly followed up by imaging studies after irradiation for brain metastases, and investigated the impact of EGFR mutations on radiotherapy (RT). Methods Forty-three patients with brain metastases treated with RT, together with EGFR mutation status, demographics, smoking history, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, tumor characteristics, and treatment modalities, were included. Radiological images were taken at 1 to 3 months after RT, and 3 to 6 months thereafter. Radiographic response was evaluated by RECIST criteria version 1.1 according to the intracranial images before and after RT. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to correlate EGFR mutation status and other clinical features with intracranial radiological progression-free survival (RPFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up duration was 15 months. Patients with mutant EGFR had higher response rates to brain RT than those with wild-type EGFR (80% vs. 46%; p = 0.037). Logistic regression analysis showed that EGFR mutation status is the only predictor for treatment response (p = 0.032). The median intracranial RPFS was 18 months (95% CI = 8.33-27.68 months). In Cox regression analysis, mutant EGFR (p = 0.025) and lower RPA class (p = 0.026) were associated with longer intracranial RPFS. EGFR mutation status (p = 0.061) and performance status (p = 0.076) had a trend to predict OS. Conclusions Mutant EGFR in NSCLC patients is an independent prognostic factor for better treatment response and longer intracranial RPFS following RT for brain metastases. PMID:23110940

  20. Biodistribution of ultra small gadolinium-based nanoparticles as theranostic agent: application to brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Imen; Duc, Géraldine Le; Kryza, David; Berniard, Aurélie; Mowat, Pierre; Roux, Stéphane; Taleb, Jacqueline; Bonazza, Pauline; Perriat, Pascal; Lux, François; Tillement, Olivier; Billotey, Claire; Janier, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles are novel objects with interesting physical properties, allowing their use for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were imaged following intravenous injection in healthy rats and rats grafted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors using magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphic imaging. Quantitative biodistribution using gamma-counting of each sampled organ confirmed that these nanoparticles were rapidly cleared essentially by renal excretion. Accumulation of these nanoparticles in 9L gliosarcoma tumors implanted in the rat brain was quantitated. This passive and long-duration accumulation of gadolinium-based nanoparticles in tumor, which is related to disruption of the blood-brain barrier, is in good agreement with the use of these nanoparticles as radiosensitizers for brain tumors.

  1. The Current Role of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganadane, Gokoulakrichenane; Hendriks, Lizza; Le Péchoux, Cécile; Levy, Antonin

    2017-10-01

    The incidence of brain metastases has increased in patients with NSCLC as a result of better systemic disease control and advances in imaging modalities. Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) has been the mainstay treatment of multiple symptomatic brain metastases for years. A number of recent publications have questioned its place in the absence of a survival and quality of life benefit and the possible risk for long-term neurotoxicity. Omission or deferral of WBRT and strategies consisting of stereotactic radiosurgery or delivery of systemic therapies alone are being proposed more and more. However, critical analysis of the literature shows that WBRT still has relevant indications in well-selected patients. Within this review, we discuss the place of WBRT in the modern management of patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic factors to predict survival in non-small-cell lung cancer with brain metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tiantian Li; Xuezhen Ma; Yuan Yao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of the study was to assess prognostic factors to predict overal survival (OS) and progres-sion-free survival (PFS) in non-smal-celllung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastasis (BM). Methods:From November 2011 to March 2013, the clinical data of 31 NSCLC cases with BM treated with multiple modalities including brain radiotherapy alone, systemic chemotherapy, whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKIs). The ef icacy and adverse reaction were evaluated after treatment. Results:In terms of intracranial lesions, the objective response rate (ORR) and the disease control rate (DCR) were 22.6%and 90.3%, respectively. As for systemic disease, ORR and DCR were 32.3%and 93.5%, respectively. The median time to progression-free survival (PFS) was 298 days (95%CI:258.624-337.376 days), whereas in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation patients was 331 days. Patients who received EGFR-TKIs combined with brain radiation had better response rate (RR) than those only brain radiation. Univariate analysis showed that the EGFR-mutations could predictive factors for PFS, and not to other clinical pathological features. The most common toxici-ties were rash and diarrhea, but al were wel-tolerated. Conclusion:EGFR-mutations is the independent prognostic factors af ecting the survival rates of NSCLC patients with BM. Through the clinical observation, icotinib combined with WBRT may be ef ective on brain metastases in NSCLC patients, and toxicities are tolerable, which worth further study.

  3. Asteroids Were Born Big

    CERN Document Server

    Morbidelli, Alessandro; Nesvorny, David; Levison, Harold F

    2009-01-01

    How big were the first planetesimals? We attempt to answer this question by conducting coagulation simulations in which the planetesimals grow by mutual collisions and form larger bodies and planetary embryos. The size frequency distribution (SFD) of the initial planetesimals is considered a free parameter in these simulations, and we search for the one that produces at the end objects with a SFD that is consistent with asteroid belt constraints. We find that, if the initial planetesimals were small (e.g. km-sized), the final SFD fails to fulfill these constraints. In particular, reproducing the bump observed at diameter D~100km in the current SFD of the asteroids requires that the minimal size of the initial planetesimals was also ~100km. This supports the idea that planetesimals formed big, namely that the size of solids in the proto-planetary disk ``jumped'' from sub-meter scale to multi-kilometer scale, without passing through intermediate values. Moreover, we find evidence that the initial planetesimals ...

  4. Dosimetry analysis of small radiation fields in stereotactic radiosurgery of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Najjar, Waleed Hassan

    Accurate dosimetric data of narrow circular photon beams are needed for stereotactic radiosurgery of brain tumors. However, the measurement of dosimetric data of narrow circular beams is beset with several constraints. Usually, 6 MV photon beams produced by isocentric linear accelerators are mostly used for routine radiosurgery although other photon energies are available. Systematic dosimetric studies were performed on 12.5, 20, 30 and 40 mm diameter collimators using different measuring techniques in order to examine the possible accuracies associated in the measured dosimetric data of narrow circular photon beams. In addition, the relative suitabilities of 4, 6 and 10 MV photon beams for stereotactic radiosurgery were assessed. The lack of electronic equilibrium and steep dose gradient effects were found to be minimal for a 4 MV photon beam compared to the 6 and 10 MV photon beams. The measured output factors with a small volume (0.02 cc) ionization chamber were found to agree with film and MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) detector measurements for 4 MV photon beam even for smaller field sizes. The measured beam profiles were also found to be in better agreement with the expected shapes for the 4 MV beam than for 6 and 10 MV beams. The 80% isodose volumes for a typical 20.0 mm diameter field for 1 to 10 non-coplanar converging arcs showed that the volumes for the 4 MV beam are slightly larger than the corresponding volumes for the 6 and 10 MV photon beams for any given isodose level. The dose fall- off distances from the 80% to 50% isodoses are also, in general, found to be smaller for the 4 MV beam. Therefore, for radiosurgery, the dose calculations for the 4 MV beam have less uncertainty than the dose calculations for the 6 and 10 MV beams. The output factors can be measured with an ionization chamber for the 4 MV photon beam over the range 12.5 to 40.0 mm diameter field size, whereas for the 6 MV beam they can only be measured for

  5. Big Game Reporting Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Point locations of big game reporting stations. Big game reporting stations are places where hunters can legally report harvested deer, bear, or turkey. These are...

  6. A discussion on the all-in-one of receiving after changing "small" table tennis ball to the "big one"%从乒乓球"小球"改"大球"看接发球"一体化"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨杰锋

    2009-01-01

    After analysis of the tech-tacties of China's team matches vs. Sweden and the 2nd period matches in man teams, this paper thinks that the all-in-one of receiving is not only one of key-elements to win, but also one of China team's innovations after changing the "small ball" to the big one.%对第40届世乒赛男团中国对瑞典比赛中中国技战术和本届中国男团第二阶段的技战术进行了分析,认为"接发球一体化"的确是"小球"改"大球"后中国乒乓球男队获胜的关键因素之一,也是中国队的重要创新之一.

  7. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schouten; M.R. Buijink; P.J. Lucassen; C.P. Fitzsimons

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. It is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), in the hippocampus. With age, the function of th

  8. Interstitial laser thermotherapy: developments in the treatment of small deep-seated brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; Roux, F X; Bown, S G

    1996-12-01

    New technical advances have made feasible the utilization of laser to destroy deep-seated brain tumors under real-time monitoring. Experience with interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT) in animal and clinical studies has been obtained. These studies are summarized and the future potential of ILTT in neurosurgery is discussed.

  9. New neurons in aging brains: molecular control by small non-coding RNAs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, M.; Buijink, M.R.; Lucassen, P.J.; Fitzsimons, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. It is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), in the hippocampus. With age, the function of

  10. Social big data mining

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Social Media. Big Data and Social Data. Hypotheses in the Era of Big Data. Social Big Data Applications. Basic Concepts in Data Mining. Association Rule Mining. Clustering. Classification. Prediction. Web Structure Mining. Web Content Mining. Web Access Log Mining, Information Extraction and Deep Web Mining. Media Mining. Scalability and Outlier Detection.

  11. Five Big Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Debbie

    2012-01-01

    Designing quality continuing professional development (CPD) for those teaching mathematics in primary schools is a challenge. If the CPD is to be built on the scaffold of five big ideas in mathematics, what might be these five big ideas? Might it just be a case of, if you tell me your five big ideas, then I'll tell you mine? Here, there is…

  12. High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) for three dimensional tomographic imaging of the small animal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojević, Tanja; Varma, Hari M; Hollmann, Joseph L; Valdes, Claudia P; Culver, Joseph P; Justicia, Carles; Durduran, Turgut

    2017-06-01

    High-density speckle contrast optical tomography (SCOT) utilizing tens of thousands of source-detector pairs, was developed for in vivo imaging of blood flow in small animals. The reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF) due to local ischemic stroke in a mouse brain was transcanially imaged and reconstructed in three dimensions. The reconstructed volume was then compared with corresponding magnetic resonance images demonstrating that the volume of reduced CBF agrees with the infarct zone at twenty-four hours. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    A small number of prokaryotic species have a unique physiology or ecology related to their development of unusually large size. The biomass of bacteria varies over more than 10 orders of magnitude, from the 0.2 mum wide nanobacteria to the largest cells of the colorless sulfur bacteria......, Thiomargarita namibiensis, with a diameter of 750 mum. All bacteria, including those that swim around in the environment, obtain their food molecules by molecular diffusion. Only the fastest and largest swimmers known, Thiovulum majus, are able to significantly increase their food supply by motility...... and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria...

  14. Whole brain radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available The aim of the present meta-analysis is to evaluate the response rate, median survival time (MST and toxicity in patients with brain metastases (BM originating from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and who were treated using either whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy or WBRT alone.PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, The Cochrane Library, clinical trials and current controlled trials were searched to identify any relevant publications. After screening the literature and undertaking quality assessment and data extraction, the meta-analysis was performed using Stata11.0 software.In total, six randomized controlled trials (RCT involving 910 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the analysis indicate that WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy was more effective at improving response rate (RR = 2.06, 95% CI [1.13, 3.77]; P = 0.019 than WBRT alone. However, WBRT plus concurrent chemotherapy did not improve median survival time (MST (HR = 1.09, 95%CI [0.94, 1.26]; P = 0.233 or time of neurological progression (CNS-TTP (HR = 0.93, 95%CI [0.75, 1.16]; P = 0.543, and increased adverse events (Grade≥3 (RR = 2.59, 95% CI [1.88, 3.58]; P = 0.000. There were no significant differences in Grade 3-5 neurological or hematological toxicity between two patient groups (RR = 1.08, 95%CI [0.23, 5.1]; P = 0.92.The combination of chemotherapy plus WBRT in patients with BM originating from NSCLC may increase treatment response rates of brain metastases with limited toxicity. Although the therapy schedule did not prolong MST or CNS-TTP, further assessment is warranted.

  15. Timing of Whole Brain Radiotherapy on Survival of Patients with EGFR-mutated 
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimei LIU

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There is no high-level evidence for the time of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT for patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and brain metastases. The aim of this study is to assess the appropriate timing of WBRT for patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC and brain metastases (BM. Methods There were 78 patients diagnosed with EGFR-mutated NSCLC and BM in Beijing Chest Hospital between August 2009 and May 2015. 48 untreated patients who received both WBRT and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs therapy. Prognostic factors of intracranial progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were identified by Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Intracranial objective response rate was 81.3% and disease control rate was 93.8%. Median intracranial PFS was 10 months. Median OS was 18 months. Multivariate analysis of intracranial PFS revealed that Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status (PS 0-1 (HR=30.436, 95%CI: 4.721-196.211, P<0.001 and early WBRT (HR=3.663, 95%CI: 1.657-8.098, P=0.001 had a better intracranial PFS. Multivariate analysis of OS revealed that PS 0-1 (HR=57.607, 95%CI: 6.135-540.953, P<0.001, early WBRT (HR=2.757, 95%CI: 1.140-6.669, P=0.024, and stereotactic radiosurgery (HR=5.964, 95%CI: 1.895-18.767, P=0.002 were independent prognostic factors of OS. Conclusion Early WBRT combined with EGFR-TKIs can improve outcomes of patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC and BM, but it needs to be confirmed by large-sample-size and multicenter prospective clinical trials.

  16. Big data computing

    CERN Document Server

    Akerkar, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Due to market forces and technological evolution, Big Data computing is developing at an increasing rate. A wide variety of novel approaches and tools have emerged to tackle the challenges of Big Data, creating both more opportunities and more challenges for students and professionals in the field of data computation and analysis. Presenting a mix of industry cases and theory, Big Data Computing discusses the technical and practical issues related to Big Data in intelligent information management. Emphasizing the adoption and diffusion of Big Data tools and technologies in industry, the book i

  17. Microsoft big data solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Adam; Welch, John; Clark, Dan; Price, Christopher; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Tap the power of Big Data with Microsoft technologies Big Data is here, and Microsoft's new Big Data platform is a valuable tool to help your company get the very most out of it. This timely book shows you how to use HDInsight along with HortonWorks Data Platform for Windows to store, manage, analyze, and share Big Data throughout the enterprise. Focusing primarily on Microsoft and HortonWorks technologies but also covering open source tools, Microsoft Big Data Solutions explains best practices, covers on-premises and cloud-based solutions, and features valuable case studies. Best of all,

  18. Big 4 and non-Big 4 Audit Production Costs: Office Level Audit Technology and the Impact on Audit Fees

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, Louis-Philippe; Marmousez, Sophie; Simunic, Dan,

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We empirically evaluate the degree to which Big 4 auditors achieve economies of scale resulting from investments in audit technology at the local U.S. office level and, more importantly, determine how this affects audit pricing differences between Big 4 and non-Big 4 auditors. Focusing on the U.S. audit market for small to medium sized public companies, we argue and find that, relative to non-Big 4 auditors, Big 4 audit firms benefit from economies of scale at the loca...

  19. Extrapulmonary small cell sarcinoma: involvement of the brain without evidence of extracranial malignancy by serial PET/CT scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlioglu Necat

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC involving the brain is a rare manifestation of an uncommon tumor type. Case presentation We report a 59 year-old Caucasian female diagnosed with an EPSCC involving the left parietal lobe without detectable extracranial primary tumor followed by serial positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging. Histopathological examination at both initial presentation and recurrence revealed small cell carcinoma. Serial PET/CT scans of the entire body failed to reveal any extracranial [18F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG avid lesions at either diagnosis or follow-up. Conclusion Chemotherapy may show a transient response in the treatment of EPSCC. Further studies are needed to help identify optimal treatment strategies. Combination PET/CT technology may be a useful tool to monitor EPSCC and assess for an occult primary malignancy.

  20. Anatomical standardization of small animal brain FDG-PET images using synthetic functional template: experimental comparison with anatomical template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Christopher; Hjornevik, Trine; Courivaud, Frédéric; Willoch, Frode

    2011-07-15

    Anatomical standardization (also called spatial normalization) of positron emission tomography (PET) small animal brain images is required to make statistical comparisons across individuals. Frequently, PET images are co-registered to an individual MR or CT image of the same subject in order to transform the functional images to an anatomical space. In the present work, we evaluate the normalization of synthetic PET (synPET) images to a synthetic PET template. To provide absolute error in terms of pixel misregistration, we created a synthetic PET image from the individual MR image through segmentation of the brain into gray and white matter which produced functional and anatomical images in the same space. When comparing spatial normalization of synPET images to a synPET template with the gold standard (MR images to an MR template), a mean translation error of 0.24mm (±0.20) and a maximal mean rotational error of 0.85° (±0.91) were found. Significant decrease in misregistration error was measured when achieving spatial normalization of functional images to a functional template instead of an anatomical template. This accuracy strengthens the use of standardization methods where individual PET images are registered to a customized PET template in order to statistically assess physiological changes in rat brains.

  1. High probability and frequency of EGFR mutations in non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Mengxi; Zhuang, Yingjie; Zhou, Xinli; Huang, Ruofan; Liang, Xiaohua; Zhan, Qiong

    2017-08-05

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide. Brain metastasis (BMs) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most important cause of death. This study aimed to explore the association of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and BMs in NSCLC. We analyzed 50 NSCLC patients with BMs and 50 match-paired NSCLC patients with no brain metastases (NBMs). The EGFR mutation status of primary lesions was detected using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction. The BMs patients had a higher frequency of EGFR mutations than the NBMs patients (52.0 vs. 22.0% respectively, P < 0.001), in both adenocarcinoma (60.5 vs. 30.6%, P = 0.003) and squamous carcinoma (37.5 vs. 0%, P = 0.04). The incidence of BMs in patients with EGFR mutations was higher than in patients with wild-type EGFR (70.3 vs. 38.1%, P = 002). NSCLC patients with BMs had a higher incidence of EGFR mutations and those with mutant EGFR had a higher frequency of BMs. EGFR mutations may promote brain metastasis growth of NSCLC.

  2. From brain to earth and climate systems: small-world interaction networks or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    We consider recent reports on small-world topologies of interaction networks derived from the dynamics of spatially extended systems that are investigated in diverse scientific fields such as neurosciences, geophysics, or meteorology. With numerical simulations that mimic typical experimental situations, we have identified an important constraint when characterizing such networks: indications of a small-world topology can be expected solely due to the spatial sampling of the system along with the commonly used time series analysis based approaches to network characterization.

  3. Characterizing Big Data Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Rossi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Big data management is a reality for an increasing number of organizations in many areas and represents a set of challenges involving big data modeling, storage and retrieval, analysis and visualization. However, technological resources, people and processes are crucial to facilitate the management of big data in any kind of organization, allowing information and knowledge from a large volume of data to support decision-making. Big data management can be supported by these three dimensions: technology, people and processes. Hence, this article discusses these dimensions: the technological dimension that is related to storage, analytics and visualization of big data; the human aspects of big data; and, in addition, the process management dimension that involves in a technological and business approach the aspects of big data management.

  4. Phenotypic Screening of Small-Molecule Inhibitors: Implications for Therapeutic Discovery and Drug Target Development in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2016-01-01

    The inability of central nervous system (CNS) neurons to regenerate damaged axons and dendrites following traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a substantial obstacle for functional recovery. Apoptotic cell death, deposition of scar tissue, and growth-repressive molecules produced by glia further complicate the problem and make it challenging for re-growing axons to extend across injury sites. To date, there are no approved drugs for the treatment of TBI, accentuating the need for relevant leads. Cell-based and organotypic bioassays can better mimic outcomes within the native CNS microenvironment than target-based screening methods and thus should speed the discovery of therapeutic agents that induce axon or dendrite regeneration. Additionally, when used to screen focused chemical libraries such as small-molecule protein kinase inhibitors, these assays can help elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in neurite outgrowth and regeneration as well as identify novel drug targets. Here, we describe a phenotypic cellular (high content) screening assay that utilizes brain-derived primary neurons for screening small-molecule chemical libraries.

  5. The involvement of nitric oxide in the hemodynamic and metabolic activities of the brain and small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmasov, M.; Barbiro-Michaely, E.; Mayevsky, A.

    2009-02-01

    Nitric oxide is a mediator in many physiological processes including vasodilatation of blood vessels, neurotransmission and prevention of platelet aggregation. It has also a role in the pathophysiology of sepsis, hemorrhagic shock, various traumatic events and critical conditions involved with circulatory abnormalities. The last one is accompanied by blood flow redistribution and is considered to be the putative cause of altered oxygen metabolism in various pathophysiological conditions. The present study tested the involvement of NO in the brain as a vital organ versus the small intestine, a less vital organ using the non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME and exogenous NO donor - nitrite. The parameters that were simultaneously monitored in both organs included mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), tissue blood flow (TBF), using laser Doppler flowmetery and NADH fluorescence using the fluorometric technique. Three groups were tested. Group 1 - L-NAME +nitrite, group 2 - control L-NAME and group 3 - control nitrite. Following LNAME, MAP significantly increased and remained elevated through the entire experiment. TBF decreased in both organs with full recovery in the brain and no recovery in the intestine, whereas NADH showed no significant changes. Nitrite alone had no significant effect on the parameters in any of the organs. In group 1 the infusion of nitrite decreased the level of elevated MAP earlier induced by L-NAME. Nitrite also recovered the reduced TBF in the brain whereas it had no beneficial effect on intestinal blood flow indicating for its regulatory role in the brain but not in the intestine.

  6. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan [Division of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  7. Beyond Scale-Free Small-World Networks: Cortical Columns for Quick Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Ralph; Saase, Victor; Wagner, Clemens; Stoop, Britta; Stoop, Ruedi

    2013-03-01

    We study to what extent cortical columns with their particular wiring boost neural computation. Upon a vast survey of columnar networks performing various real-world cognitive tasks, we detect no signs of enhancement. It is on a mesoscopic—intercolumnar—scale that the existence of columns, largely irrespective of their inner organization, enhances the speed of information transfer and minimizes the total wiring length required to bind distributed columnar computations towards spatiotemporally coherent results. We suggest that brain efficiency may be related to a doubly fractal connectivity law, resulting in networks with efficiency properties beyond those by scale-free networks.

  8. Tight junction modulation of the blood brain barrier: CNS delivery of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chris; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) represents a major obstacle for targeted drug delivery to the brain for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Significant advances in barrier research over the past decade has led to the discovery of an increasing number of structural and regulatory proteins in tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ). These discoveries are providing the framework for the development of novel TJ modulators which can act specifically and temporarily to alter BBB function and regulate paracellular uptake of molecules. TJ modulators that have shown therapeutic potential in preclinical models include claudin-5 and occludin siRNAs, peptides derived from zonula occludens toxin as well as synthetic peptides targeting the extracellular loops of TJs. Adding to the array of modulating agents are novel mechanisms of BBB regulation such as focused ultrasound (FUS). This review will give a succinct overview of BBB biology and TJ modulation in general. Novel insights into BBB regulation in health and disease will also be summarized.

  9. Hemorrhage of brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer post gefitinib therapy: two case reports and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Xin-Biao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gefitinib is one of the small molecule inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR TKIs. Clinical trials have demonstrated it is effective for treatment of a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Gefitinib has been generally considered to be a relatively safe agent. Besides a small proportion of fatal interstitial pneumonia, the common adverse drug reactions of gefitinib include diarrhea and skin rash, which are generally mild and reversible. Herein, we report the first two cases of brain metastasis hemorrhage that might be involved with the use of gefitinib. Case presentation Two patients with brain metastasis from NSCLC developed brain hemorrhage after gefitinib therapy. The hemorrhage in one case occurred one month after gefitinib combined with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT, and in the another case hemorrhage developed slowly within brain metastases eight months post gefitinib monotherapy for diffuse pulmonary metastasis from a lung cancer undergone surgical removal previously. Conclusion We speculate brain hemorrhage could be one of the adverse drug reactions of gefitinib treatment for NSCLC and suggest clinicians be aware of this possible rare entity. More data are needed to confirm our findings, especially when gefitinib is used in the settings of brain metastases from NSCLC or other origins.

  10. HARNESSING BIG DATA VOLUMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan DINU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Big Data can revolutionize humanity. Hidden within the huge amounts and variety of the data we are creating we may find information, facts, social insights and benchmarks that were once virtually impossible to find or were simply inexistent. Large volumes of data allow organizations to tap in real time the full potential of all the internal or external information they possess. Big data calls for quick decisions and innovative ways to assist customers and the society as a whole. Big data platforms and product portfolio will help customers harness to the full the value of big data volumes. This paper deals with technical and technological issues related to handling big data volumes in the Big Data environment.

  11. Combining Whole-Brain Radiotherapy with Gefitinib/Erlotinib for Brain Metastases from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-hua Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To comprehensively assess the efficacy and safety of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT combined with gefitinib/erlotinib for treatment of brain metastases (BM from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE.com, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library were searched from inception to April 12, 2015. Studies on randomized controlled trials (RCTs and case-control trials comparing WBRT combined with gefitinib/erlotinib versus WBRT alone for BM from NSCLC were included. Literature selection, data extraction, and quality assessment were performed independently by two trained reviewers. RevMan 5.3 software was used to analyze data. Results. A total of 7 trials involving 622 patients were included. Compared with WBRT alone or WBRT plus chemotherapy, WBRT plus gefitinib/erlotinib could significantly improve response rate (OR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.35–3.47; P=0.001, remission rate of central nervous system (OR = 6.06, 95% CI: 2.57–14.29; P<0.0001, disease control rate (OR = 3.34, 95% CI: 1.84–6.07; P<0.0001, overall survival (HR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58–0.89; P=0.002, and 1-year survival rate (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.51–3.91; P=0.0002. In adverse events (III-IV, statistically significant differences were not found, except for rash (OR = 7.96, 95% CI: 2.02–31.34; P=0.003 and myelosuppression (OR = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.07–0.51; P=0.0010. Conclusions. WBRT plus gefitinib/erlotinib was superior to WBRT alone and well tolerated in patients with BM from NSCLC.

  12. Combining Small-Volume Metabolomic and Transcriptomic Approaches for Assessing Brain Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Jonathan V. Sweedler

    2013-01-01

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured chan...

  13. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  14. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Haksoo; Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Sloan, Andrew; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Welford, Scott; Sohn, Jason W

    2014-02-01

    Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system--MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was "printed" using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm). A passing rate of 99% was measured in

  15. Establishing a process of irradiating small animal brain using a CyberKnife and a microCT scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Haksoo; Welford, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Fabien, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yiran; Yuan, Jake; Brindle, James; Yao, Min; Lo, Simon; Wessels, Barry; Machtay, Mitchell; Sohn, Jason W., E-mail: jason.sohn@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and University Hospitals of Cleveland, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Establish and validate a process of accurately irradiating small animals using the CyberKnife G4 System (version 8.5) with treatment plans designed to irradiate a hemisphere of a mouse brain based on microCT scanner images. Methods: These experiments consisted of four parts: (1) building a mouse phantom for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA), (2) proving usability of a microCT for treatment planning, (3) fabricating a small animal positioning system for use with the CyberKnife's image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system, and (4)in vivo verification of targeting accuracy. A set of solid water mouse phantoms was designed and fabricated, with radiochromic films (RCF) positioned in selected planes to measure delivered doses. After down-sampling for treatment planning compatibility, a CT image set of a phantom was imported into the CyberKnife treatment planning system—MultiPlan (ver. 3.5.2). A 0.5 cm diameter sphere was contoured within the phantom to represent a hemispherical section of a mouse brain. A nude mouse was scanned in an alpha cradle using a microCT scanner (cone-beam, 157 × 149 pixels slices, 0.2 mm longitudinal slice thickness). Based on the results of our positional accuracy study, a planning treatment volume (PTV) was created. A stereotactic body mold of the mouse was “printed” using a 3D printer laying UV curable acrylic plastic. Printer instructions were based on exported contours of the mouse's skin. Positional reproducibility in the mold was checked by measuring ten CT scans. To verify accurate dose delivery in vivo, six mice were irradiated in the mold with a 4 mm target contour and a 2 mm PTV margin to 3 Gy and sacrificed within 20 min to avoid DNA repair. The brain was sliced and stained for analysis. Results: For the IMRT QA using a set of phantoms, the planned dose (6 Gy to the calculation point) was compared to the delivered dose measured via film and analyzed using Gamma analysis (3% and 3 mm

  16. Summary big data

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This work offers a summary of Cukier the book: "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How we Live, Work, and Think" by Viktor Mayer-Schonberg and Kenneth. Summary of the ideas in Viktor Mayer-Schonberg's and Kenneth Cukier's book: " Big Data " explains that big data is where we use huge quantities of data to make better predictions based on the fact we identify patters in the data rather than trying to understand the underlying causes in more detail. This summary highlights that big data will be a source of new economic value and innovation in the future. Moreover, it shows that it will

  17. Big Numbers in String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schellekens, A N

    2016-01-01

    This paper contains some personal reflections on several computational contributions to what is now known as the "String Theory Landscape". It consists of two parts. The first part concerns the origin of big numbers, and especially the number $10^{1500}$ that appeared in work on the covariant lattice construction (with W. Lerche and D. Luest). This part contains some new results. I correct a huge but inconsequential error, discuss some more accurate estimates, and compare with the counting for free fermion constructions. In particular I prove that the latter only provide an exponentially small fraction of all even self-dual lattices for large lattice dimensions. The second part of the paper concerns dealing with big numbers, and contains some lessons learned from various vacuum scanning projects.

  18. Big Data for Business Ecosystem Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perko Igor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the provided research, some of the Big Data most prospective usage domains connect with distinguished player groups found in the business ecosystem. Literature analysis is used to identify the state of the art of Big Data related research in the major domains of its use-namely, individual marketing, health treatment, work opportunities, financial services, and security enforcement. System theory was used to identify business ecosystem major player types disrupted by Big Data: individuals, small and mid-sized enterprises, large organizations, information providers, and regulators. Relationships between the domains and players were explained through new Big Data opportunities and threats and by players’ responsive strategies. System dynamics was used to visualize relationships in the provided model.

  19. Markerless rat head motion tracking using structured light for brain PET imaging of unrestrained awake small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Alan; Staelens, Steven; Stroobants, Sigrid; Verhaeghe, Jeroen

    2017-03-01

    Preclinical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in small animals is generally performed under anesthesia to immobilize the animal during scanning. More recently, for rat brain PET studies, methods to perform scans of unrestrained awake rats are being developed in order to avoid the unwanted effects of anesthesia on the brain response. Here, we investigate the use of a projected structure stereo camera to track the motion of the rat head during the PET scan. The motion information is then used to correct the PET data. The stereo camera calculates a 3D point cloud representation of the scene and the tracking is performed by point cloud matching using the iterative closest point algorithm. The main advantage of the proposed motion tracking is that no intervention, e.g. for marker attachment, is needed. A manually moved microDerenzo phantom experiment and 3 awake rat [18F]FDG experiments were performed to evaluate the proposed tracking method. The tracking accuracy was 0.33 mm rms. After motion correction image reconstruction, the microDerenzo phantom was recovered albeit with some loss of resolution. The reconstructed FWHM of the 2.5 and 3 mm rods increased with 0.94 and 0.51 mm respectively in comparison with the motion-free case. In the rat experiments, the average tracking success rate was 64.7%. The correlation of relative brain regional [18F]FDG uptake between the anesthesia and awake scan reconstructions was increased from on average 0.291 (not significant) before correction to 0.909 (p  <  0.0001) after motion correction. Markerless motion tracking using structured light can be successfully used for tracking of the rat head for motion correction in awake rat PET scans.

  20. Brain-machine interface control of a manipulator using small-world neural network and shared control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Hong, Jun; Zhang, Jinhua; Guo, Feng

    2014-03-15

    The improvement of the resolution of brain signal and the ability to control external device has been the most important goal in BMI research field. This paper describes a non-invasive brain-actuated manipulator experiment, which defined a paradigm for the motion control of a serial manipulator based on motor imagery and shared control. The techniques of component selection, spatial filtering and classification of motor imagery were involved. Small-world neural network (SWNN) was used to classify five brain states. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed classifier, we replace the SWNN classifier by a radial basis function (RBF) networks neural network, a standard multi-layered feed-forward backpropagation network (SMN) and a multi-SVM classifier, with the same features for the classification. The results also indicate that the proposed classifier achieves a 3.83% improvement over the best results of other classifiers. We proposed a shared control method consisting of two control patterns to expand the control of BMI from the software angle. The job of path building for reaching the 'end' point was designated as an assessment task. We recorded all paths contributed by subjects and picked up relevant parameters as evaluation coefficients. With the assistance of two control patterns and series of machine learning algorithms, the proposed BMI originally achieved the motion control of a manipulator in the whole workspace. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed BMI method for 3D motion control of a manipulator using EEG during motor imagery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of small cell carcinoma of lung with combined high dose mediastinal irradiation, whole brain prophylaxis and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, B.; Natale, R.B.; Hilaris, B.S.; Wittes, R.E.

    1981-04-01

    Survival of patients with small cell carcinoma of lung, treated on a new combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy protocol, compares favorably with other regimens in the literature and our own previous combined approaches. Radiation, given after induction chemotherapy, consisted of whole brain prophylaxis in all 44 evaluable patients. Patients with limited disease were also treated to the primary and mediastinum to a high dose (5000 rad equivalent) using multiple fields. The new chemotherapy regimen consisted of induction with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine alternated with cis-platinum and VP-16 (an epipodophyllotoxin) for two cycles, followed by consolidation with low dose cyclophosphamide and vincristine concurrent with irradiation. Patients with limited disease who achieved less than complete response, and all patients with extensive disease were not continued on maintenance chemotherapy. Out of 24 evaluable patients with limited disease, there was 73% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis, measured from treatment initiation. After induction, 16/24 of these limited disease patients were CR (complete responders): 20/24 were CR at completion of their irradiation. Out of 20 evaluable patients with extensive disease, there was 59% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis. Only 4/44 (9%) brain parenchymal relapses occurred, one at 3 months and one at 6 months after local failure and two in patients who did not become CRs, implicating a possible re-seeding mechanism. Five patients had central nervous system relapses outside of brain parenchyma (spinal epidural and leptomeningeal); in three patients this was the initial site of failure. Significant complications included leukopenia (50%) and thrombocytopenia (24%) primarily during induction, and chronic pulmonary fibrosis (25%), possibly contributing to two deaths.

  2. Whole brain radiotherapy in management of non-small-cell lung carcinoma associated leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: evaluation of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Yurday; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Topkan, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and prognostic factors in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. WBRT records of 51 LMC patients confined to brain were reviewed. Eligible patients had squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status (ECOG PS) 0-3. The WBRT was either 20 or 30 Gray. The primary and secondary objectives were to determine overall survival (OS) and prognostic factors for improved treatment response, respectively. Median age was 53 years (range 39-68), 58.8 % had SCC, 74.5 % had ECOG PS 1-2, and 70.6 % had LMC accompanied by parenchymal brain metastases (BM). The median follow-up was 4.1 months (range 0.7-14.4); all patients died due to disease progression. Median OS was 3.9 months (95 % CI 3.3-4.5) with 6 and 12 month estimates of 19.6 and 5.9 %, respectively. Evaluation of prognostic factors revealed that patients with ECOG 1, longer time to LMC (TT-LMC) from NSCLC diagnosis (>11.3 months), and absence of parenchymal BM had significantly superior OS than those patients with ECOG 2 (p = 0.01) or 3 (p  11.3 months, and no BM as independent prognosticators for better response to WBRT in NSCLC patients with LMC.

  3. Patient-derived xenografts from non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases are valuable translational platforms for the development of personalized targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Won; Lee, Jung-Il; Lee, Se Jeong; Cho, Hyun Jung; Song, Hye Jin; Jeong, Da Eun; Seo, Yun Jee; Shin, Sang; Joung, Je-Gun; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Woong-Yang; Lee, Hyun Moo; Seol, Ho Jun; Shim, Young Mog; Joo, Kyeung Min; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of distant metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) indicates an urgent need for novel therapeutic modalities. Brain metastasis is particularly common in NSCLC, with severe adverse effects on clinical prognosis. Although the molecular heterogeneity of NSCLC and availability of various targeted agents suggest personalized therapeutic approaches for such brain metastases, further development of appropriate preclinical models is needed to validate the strategies. We established patient-derived xenografts (PDX) using NSCLC brain metastasis surgical samples and elucidated their possible preclinical and clinical implications for personalized treatment. NSCLC brain metastases (n = 34) showed a significantly higher successful PDX establishment rate than primary specimens (n = 64; 74% vs. 23%). PDXs derived from NSCLC brain metastases recapitulated the pathologic, genetic, and functional properties of corresponding parental tumors. Furthermore, tumor spheres established in vitro from the xenografts under serum-free conditions maintained their in vivo brain metastatic potential. Differential phenotypic and molecular responses to 20 targeted agents could subsequently be screened in vitro using these NSCLC PDXs derived from brain metastases. Although PDX establishment from primary NSCLCs was significantly influenced by histologic subtype, clinical aggressiveness, and genetic alteration status, the brain metastases exhibited consistently adequate in vivo tumor take rate and in vitro tumor sphere formation capacity, regardless of clinical and molecular conditions. Therefore, PDXs from NSCLC brain metastases may better represent the heterogeneous advanced NSCLC population and could be utilized as preclinical models to meet unmet clinical needs such as drug screening for personalized treatments. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Modality-independent representations of small quantities based on brain activation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarla, Saudamini Roy; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Just, Marcel Adam

    2016-04-01

    Machine learning or MVPA (Multi Voxel Pattern Analysis) studies have shown that the neural representation of quantities of objects can be decoded from fMRI patterns, in cases where the quantities were visually displayed. Here we apply these techniques to investigate whether neural representations of quantities depicted in one modality (say, visual) can be decoded from brain activation patterns evoked by quantities depicted in the other modality (say, auditory). The main finding demonstrated, for the first time, that quantities of dots were decodable by a classifier that was trained on the neural patterns evoked by quantities of auditory tones, and vice-versa. The representations that were common across modalities were mainly right-lateralized in frontal and parietal regions. A second finding was that the neural patterns in parietal cortex that represent quantities were common across participants. These findings demonstrate a common neuronal foundation for the representation of quantities across sensory modalities and participants and provide insight into the role of parietal cortex in the representation of quantity information.

  5. A High-Content Larval Zebrafish Brain Imaging Method for Small Molecule Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Harrison; Chen, Steven; Huang, Kevin; Kim, Jeffrey; Mo, Han; Iovine, Raffael; Gendre, Julie; Pascal, Pauline; Li, Qiang; Sun, Yaping; Dong, Zhiqiang; Arkin, Michelle; Guo, Su

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery in whole-organisms such as zebrafish is a promising approach for identifying biologically-relevant lead compounds. However, high content imaging of zebrafish at cellular resolution is challenging due to the difficulty in orienting larvae en masse such that the cell type of interest is in clear view. We report the development of the multi-pose imaging method, which uses 96-well round bottom plates combined with a standard liquid handler to repose the larvae within each well multiple times, such that an image in a specific orientation can be acquired. We have validated this method in a chemo-genetic zebrafish model of dopaminergic neuron degeneration. For this purpose, we have developed an analysis pipeline that identifies the larval brain in each image and then quantifies neuronal health in CellProfiler. Our method achieves a SSMD* score of 6.96 (robust Z’-factor of 0.56) and is suitable for screening libraries up to 105 compounds in size. PMID:27732643

  6. A neonatal piglet model for investigating brain and cognitive development in small for gestational age human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlowski, Emily C; Conrad, Matthew S; Lezmi, Stephane; Dilger, Ryan N; Sutton, Brad; Larsen, Ryan; Johnson, Rodney W

    2014-01-01

    The piglet was investigated as a potential model for studying brain and cognitive deficits associated with being born small for gestational age (SGA). Naturally farrowed SGA (0.7-1.0 kg BW) and average for gestational age (AGA, 1.3-1.6 kg BW) piglets were obtained on postnatal day (PD) 2, placed in individual cages, and provided a nutritionally adequate milk replacer diet (285 ml/kg/d). Beginning at PD14, performance in a spatial T-maze task was assessed. At PD28, piglets were anesthetized for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assess brain structure (voxel-based morphometry), connectivity (diffusion-tensor imaging) and metabolites in the hippocampus and corpus callosum (proton MR spectroscopy). Piglets born SGA showed compensatory growth such that BW of SGA and AGA piglets was similar (P>0.05), by PD15. Birth weight affected maze performance, with SGA piglets taking longer to reach criterion than AGA piglets (pdevelopment and connectivity. None of the metabolites measured were different between groups. Collectively, the results show that SGA piglets have spatial learning deficits and abnormal development of white matter. As learning deficits and abnormalities in white matter are common in SGA human infants, the piglet is a tractable translational model that can be used to investigate SGA-associated cognitive deficits and potential interventions.

  7. The Small-Molecule TrkB Agonist 7, 8-Dihydroxyflavone Decreases Hippocampal Newborn Neuron Death After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Shu; Hu, Weipeng; Chen, Jinhui

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies in rodents have shown that after a moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) with a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device, the adult-born immature granular neurons in the dentate gyrus are the most vulnerable cell type in the hippocampus. There is no effective approach for preventing immature neuron death after TBI. We found that tyrosine-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is highly expressed in adult-born immature neurons. We determined that the small molecule imitating BDNF, 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF), increased phosphorylation of TrkB in immature neurons both in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with DHF protected immature neurons from excitotoxicity-mediated death in vitro, and systemic administration of DHF before moderate CCI injury reduced the death of adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampus 24 hours after injury. By contrast, inhibiting BDNF signaling using the TrkB antagonist ANA12 attenuated the neuroprotective effects of DHF. These data indicate that DHF may be a promising chemical compound that promotes immature neuron survival after TBI through activation of the BDNF signaling pathway.

  8. Diffusion tensor and volumetric magnetic resonance measures as biomarkers of brain damage in a small animal model of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Lentz

    Full Text Available There are currently no widely accepted neuro-HIV small animal models. We wanted to validate the HIV-1 Transgenic rat (Tg as an appropriate neuro-HIV model and then establish in vivo imaging biomarkers of neuropathology, within this model, using MR structural and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Young and middle-aged Tg and control rats were imaged using MRI. A subset of middle-aged animals underwent longitudinal repeat imaging six months later. Total brain volume (TBV, ventricular volume (VV and parenchymal volume (PV = TBV-VV were measured. Fractional anisotropy (FA and mean diffusivity (MD values of the corpus callosum (CC were calculated from DTI data.TBV and PV were smaller in Tg compared to control rats in young and middle-aged cohorts (p0.05.We detected brain volume loss in the Tg rat, probably due to astrocytic dysfunction/loss, loss of structural/axonal matrix and striatal neuronal loss as suggested by immunofluorescence. Increased MD and decreased FA in the CC probably reflect microstructural differences between the Tg and Control rats which could include increased extracellular space between white matter tracts, demyelination and axonal degeneration, among other pathologies. We believe that the Tg rat is an adequate model of neuropathology in HIV and that volumetric MR and DTI measures can be potentially used as biomarkers of disease progression.

  9. Acute onset of brain atrophy and dementia in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Michiko; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Wada, Sae; Ono, Katsuichiro; Ozaki, Shinji; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2011-03-01

    A 59-year-old man who was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), achieved a complete response to the induction chemoradiotherapy and received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) (25 Gy at 250 cGy per fraction) in October 2008. Three months later, he complained of anorexia, weight loss, fatigue, and short-term memory loss and developed dementia and systemic muscle weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging in April and July 2009 revealed the progression of the diffuse brain atrophy without evidence of the metastasis of SCLC. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome was suspected because anti-Hu antibody was detected in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid, but the adverse effects of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were also suspected as the cause of his neurological disorder.

  10. Combining small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches for assessing brain chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M; Nautiyal, Katherine M; Nemes, Peter; Kalachikov, Sergey; Morozova, Irina; Silver, Rae; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-03-19

    The integration of disparate data types provides a more complete picture of complex biological systems. Here we combine small-volume metabolomic and transcriptomic platforms to determine subtle chemical changes and to link metabolites and genes to biochemical pathways. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) and whole-genome gene expression arrays, aided by integrative pathway analysis, were utilized to survey metabolomic/transcriptomic hippocampal neurochemistry. We measured changes in individual hippocampi from the mast cell mutant mouse strain, C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh). These mice have a naturally occurring mutation in the white spotting locus that causes reduced c-Kit receptor expression and an inability of mast cells to differentiate from their hematopoietic progenitors. Compared with their littermates, the mast cell-deficient mice have profound deficits in spatial learning, memory, and neurogenesis. A total of 18 distinct metabolites were identified in the hippocampus that discriminated between the C57BL/6 Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and control mice. The combined analysis of metabolite and gene expression changes revealed a number of altered pathways. Importantly, results from both platforms indicated that multiple pathways are impacted, including amino acid metabolism, increasing the confidence in each approach. Because the CE-MS and expression profiling are both amenable to small-volume analysis, this integrated analysis is applicable to a range of volume-limited biological systems.

  11. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua, E-mail: wlhwq@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  12. Development of Small and Micro Enterprises Brand Based on Big Data Background%基于大数据背景的小微企业品牌发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁科杰; 李新平

    2016-01-01

    我国当今处在一个全民创业的阶段,也处在一个大数据的时代,今后在大环境的支持下将会加速涌现出各种小微企业。小微企业要想在激烈的国内外市场竞争中取得生存、壮大就必须拥有市场竞争能力,逐步形成自己的品牌。本文通过对我国小微企业在大数据环境下经营的SWOT分析,探讨了小微企业经营的特点,针对这些特点从产业选择、认识对手、品牌战略、公共关系、考核与创新等方面提出了小微企业品牌发展的策略,并就品牌建设关键控制节点的识别与推进进行了探讨。%Today China is in a stage of national entrepreneurship, and also in an era of big data. A variety of small and micro enterprises will accelerate the emergence in support of the environment. In order to survive in the fierce market competition at home and abroad,small and micro enterprises must have market competitiveness, and gradually form their own brand. Based on SWOT analysis of the operation of small and micro enterprises in the large data environments, this article discusses the characteristics of small and micro-business, and proposes brand development strategy for small micro-enterprise according to the characteristics from choice of industry, knowing opponents, brand strategy, public relations, assessment and innovation, and discusses the recognition and promotion of the brand-building critical control nodes.

  13. Bliver big data til big business?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Danmark har en digital infrastruktur, en registreringskultur og it-kompetente medarbejdere og kunder, som muliggør en førerposition, men kun hvis virksomhederne gør sig klar til næste big data-bølge.......Danmark har en digital infrastruktur, en registreringskultur og it-kompetente medarbejdere og kunder, som muliggør en førerposition, men kun hvis virksomhederne gør sig klar til næste big data-bølge....

  14. Big Boss Interval Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alparslan-Gok, S.Z.; Brânzei, R.; Tijs, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper big boss interval games are introduced and various characterizations are given. The structure of the core of a big boss interval game is explicitly described and plays an important role relative to interval-type bi-monotonic allocation schemes for such games. Specifically, each element

  15. Big Ideas in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how she was able to discover some big ideas about art education. She relates how she found great ideas to improve her teaching from the book "Rethinking Curriculum in Art." She also shares how she designed a "Big Idea" unit in her class.

  16. Creating big data from small: using semantic web technology to facilitate the aggregation of diverse European contaminant data for regulatory assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R.; Kokkinaki, A.; Lowry, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    The European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) requires evidence-based reporting to assess the quality of European seas by member states to determine whether they are achieving Good Ecological Status by 2020. One descriptor addresses contaminants; fertilizers, pesticides, antifoulants, heavy metals, etc. There are large amounts of contaminant data available to support this process: >600000 data granules identified, ingested and made available from 303 organizations in 38 countries through the EU funded EMODNet Chemistry program, built on the SeaDataNet (SDN) infrastructure. However when marked up consistently with SDN vocabularies the number of unique parameters available is huge (>3000). While many parameters might superficially appear similar the concentrations reported cannot always be considered equivalent, particularly in sediment and biota. The planned regional-scale data products risked being limited to localized patterns. The strategy adopted to make meaningful aggregations for data product development was to capture the knowledge of domain experts about what could be considered equivalent and publish this knowledge as a thesaurus (or SKOS schema) through the NERC Vocabulary Server (NVS). Of the >3000 parameters identified, so far 1095 have been mapped to 222 aggregated terms. This "captured domain knowledge" has been used to harmonize the data granules into aggregated data collections. The publication of this knowledge through NVS allows transparency and reproducibility of the aggregation process. Gridded data products are derived from the data collection with visualizations available as products generated from the gridded data collections: currently 140 products available either as WFS visualization or netCDF file download. This approach shows how small data sets integrated into larger-scale products, some of which can be targeted at non-scientists, have much greater value than envisaged when the data were originally collected.

  17. Big data for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Perez, Javier; Poon, Carmen C Y; Merrifield, Robert D; Wong, Stephen T C; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent developments in big data in the context of biomedical and health informatics. It outlines the key characteristics of big data and how medical and health informatics, translational bioinformatics, sensor informatics, and imaging informatics will benefit from an integrated approach of piecing together different aspects of personalized information from a diverse range of data sources, both structured and unstructured, covering genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, as well as imaging, clinical diagnosis, and long-term continuous physiological sensing of an individual. It is expected that recent advances in big data will expand our knowledge for testing new hypotheses about disease management from diagnosis to prevention to personalized treatment. The rise of big data, however, also raises challenges in terms of privacy, security, data ownership, data stewardship, and governance. This paper discusses some of the existing activities and future opportunities related to big data for health, outlining some of the key underlying issues that need to be tackled.

  18. Long-Term Survival in a Patient with Multiple Brain Metastases from Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery on Four Occasions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer L. Elaimy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases are the most common cancerous neoplasm in the brain. The treatment of these lesions is challenging and often includes a multimodality management approach with whole-brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and neurosurgery options. Although advances in biomedical imaging technologies and the treatment of extracranial cancer have led to the overall increase in the survival of brain metastases patients, the finding that select patients survive several years remains puzzling. For this reason, we present the case of a 70-year-old patient who was diagnosed with multiple brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer five years ago and is currently alive following treatment with chemotherapy for the primary cancer and whole-brain radiation therapy and Gamma Knife radiosurgery on four separate occasions for the neurological cancer. Since the diagnosis of brain metastases five years ago, the patient’s primary cancer has remained controlled. Furthermore, multiple repeat GKRS procedures provided this patient with high levels of local tumor control, which in combination with a stable primary cancer led to an extended period of survival and a highly functional life. Further analysis and clinical research will be valuable in assessing the durability of multiple GKRS for brain metastases patients who experience long-term survival.

  19. Incidence of Brain Metastases on Follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT Scans of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Should We Include the Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nia, Emily S; Garland, Linda L; Eshghi, Naghmehossadat; Nia, Benjamin B; Avery, Ryan J; Kuo, Phillip H

    2017-09-01

    The brain is the most common site of distant metastasis from lung cancer. Thus, MRI of the brain at initial staging is routinely performed, but if this examination is negative a follow-up examination is often not performed. This study evaluates the incidence of asymptomatic brain metastases in non-small cell lung cancer patients detected on follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans. Methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review, all vertex to thigh (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans in patients with all subtypes of lung cancer from August 2014 to August 2016 were reviewed. A total of 1,175 (18)F-FDG PET/CT examinations in 363 patients were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included brain metastases on initial staging, histologic subtype of small-cell lung cancer, and no follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT examinations. After our exclusion criteria were applied, a total of 809 follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans in 227 patients were included in the final analysis. The original report of each (18)F-FDG PET/CT study was reviewed for the finding of brain metastasis. The finding of a new brain metastasis prompted a brain MRI, which was reviewed to determine the accuracy of the (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Results: Five of 227 patients with 809 follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans reviewed were found to have incidental brain metastases. The mean age of the patients with incidental brain metastasis was 68 y (range, 60-77 y). The mean time from initial diagnosis to time of detection of incidental brain metastasis was 36 mo (range, 15-66 mo). When MRI was used as the gold standard, our false-positive rate was zero. Conclusion: By including the entire head during follow-up (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans of patients with non-small cell lung cancer, brain metastases can be detected earlier while still asymptomatic. But, given the additional scan time, radiation, and low incidence of new brain metastases in asymptomatic patients, the cost-to-benefit ratio should be weighed by each institution. © 2017 by the

  20. Using "Big Ideas" to Enhance Teaching and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ian; Keast, Stephen; Panizzon, Debra; Mitchell, Judie

    2017-01-01

    Organising teaching of a topic around a small number of "big ideas" has been argued by many to be important in teaching for deep understanding, with big ideas being able to link different activities and to be framed in ways that provide perceived relevance and routes into engagement. However it is our view that, at present, the…

  1. Big data, big knowledge: big data for personalized healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viceconti, Marco; Hunter, Peter; Hose, Rod

    2015-07-01

    The idea that the purely phenomenological knowledge that we can extract by analyzing large amounts of data can be useful in healthcare seems to contradict the desire of VPH researchers to build detailed mechanistic models for individual patients. But in practice no model is ever entirely phenomenological or entirely mechanistic. We propose in this position paper that big data analytics can be successfully combined with VPH technologies to produce robust and effective in silico medicine solutions. In order to do this, big data technologies must be further developed to cope with some specific requirements that emerge from this application. Such requirements are: working with sensitive data; analytics of complex and heterogeneous data spaces, including nontextual information; distributed data management under security and performance constraints; specialized analytics to integrate bioinformatics and systems biology information with clinical observations at tissue, organ and organisms scales; and specialized analytics to define the "physiological envelope" during the daily life of each patient. These domain-specific requirements suggest a need for targeted funding, in which big data technologies for in silico medicine becomes the research priority.

  2. Activation of brain B-Raf protein kinase by Rap1B small GTP-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, T; Shimizu, K; Yamamori, B; Kuroda, S; Takai, Y

    1996-01-19

    Rap1 small GTP-binding protein has the same amino acid sequence at its effector domain as that of Ras. Rap1 has been shown to antagonize the Ras functions, such as the Ras-induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells and the Ras-induced activation of the c-Raf-1 protein kinase-dependent mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in Rat-1 cells, whereas we have shown that Rap1 as well as Ras stimulates DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. We have established a cell-free assay system in which Ras activates bovine brain B-Raf protein kinase. Here we have used this assay system and examined the effect of Rap1 on the B-Raf activity to phosphorylate recombinant MAP kinase kinase (MEK). Recombinant Rap1B stimulated the activity of B-Raf, which was partially purified from bovine brain and immunoprecipitated by an anti-B-Raf antibody. The GTP-bound form was active, but the GDP-bound form was inactive. The fully post-translationally lipid-modified form was active, but the unmodified form was nearly inactive. The maximum B-Raf activity stimulated by Rap1B was nearly the same as that stimulated by Ki-Ras. Rap1B enhanced the Ki-Ras-stimulated B-Raf activity in an additive manner. These results indicate that not only Ras but also Rap1 is involved in the activation of the B-Raf-dependent MAP kinase cascade.

  3. Vorinostat and Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Clara Y H; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Pinder-Schenck, Mary C; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael; Chang, Steven D; Adler, John R; Modlin, Leslie A; Harsh, Griffith R; Soltys, Scott G

    2017-09-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, given concurrently with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Secondary objectives were to determine toxicity, local failure, distant intracranial failure, and overall survival rates. In this multicenter study, patients with 1 to 4 NSCLC brain metastases, each ≤2 cm, were enrolled in a phase 1, 3 + 3 dose escalation trial. Vorinostat dose levels were 200, 300, and 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days. Single-fraction SRS was delivered on day 3. A dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 3 to 5 acute nonhematologic adverse event related to vorinostat or SRS occurring within 30 days. From 2009 to 2014, 17 patients were enrolled and 12 patients completed study treatment. Because no DLTs were observed, the MTD was established as 400 mg. Acute adverse events were reported by 10 patients (59%). Five patients discontinued vorinostat early and withdrew from the study. The most common reasons for withdrawal were dyspnea (n=2), nausea (n=1), and fatigue (n=2). With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-64 months), Kaplan-Meier overall survival was 13 months. There were no local failures. One patient (8%) at the 400-mg dose level with a 2.0-cm metastasis developed histologically confirmed grade 4 radiation necrosis 2 months after SRS. The MTD of vorinostat with concurrent SRS was established as 400 mg. Although no DLTs were observed, 5 patients withdrew before completing the treatment course, a result that emphasizes the need for supportive care during vorinostat administration. There were no local failures. A larger, randomized trial may evaluate both the tolerability and potential local control benefit of vorinostat concurrent with SRS for brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garsa, Adam A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Badiyan, Shahed N.; DeWees, Todd; Simpson, Joseph R.; Huang, Jiayi; Drzymala, Robert E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barani, Igor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Dowling, Joshua L.; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Kim, Albert H.; Leuthardt, Eric C. [Department of Neurosurgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Robinson, Clifford G., E-mail: crobinson@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  5. Big data a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuyan, Prachet; Chenthati, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    This book is a collection of chapters written by experts on various aspects of big data. The book aims to explain what big data is and how it is stored and used. The book starts from  the fundamentals and builds up from there. It is intended to serve as a review of the state-of-the-practice in the field of big data handling. The traditional framework of relational databases can no longer provide appropriate solutions for handling big data and making it available and useful to users scattered around the globe. The study of big data covers a wide range of issues including management of heterogeneous data, big data frameworks, change management, finding patterns in data usage and evolution, data as a service, service-generated data, service management, privacy and security. All of these aspects are touched upon in this book. It also discusses big data applications in different domains. The book will prove useful to students, researchers, and practicing database and networking engineers.

  6. Big Data in industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinović, T. S.; Preradović, D. M.; Barz, C. R.; Latinović, M. T.; Petrica, P. P.; Pop-Vadean, A.

    2016-08-01

    The amount of data at the global level has grown exponentially. Along with this phenomena, we have a need for a new unit of measure like exabyte, zettabyte, and yottabyte as the last unit measures the amount of data. The growth of data gives a situation where the classic systems for the collection, storage, processing, and visualization of data losing the battle with a large amount, speed, and variety of data that is generated continuously. Many of data that is created by the Internet of Things, IoT (cameras, satellites, cars, GPS navigation, etc.). It is our challenge to come up with new technologies and tools for the management and exploitation of these large amounts of data. Big Data is a hot topic in recent years in IT circles. However, Big Data is recognized in the business world, and increasingly in the public administration. This paper proposes an ontology of big data analytics and examines how to enhance business intelligence through big data analytics as a service by presenting a big data analytics services-oriented architecture. This paper also discusses the interrelationship between business intelligence and big data analytics. The proposed approach in this paper might facilitate the research and development of business analytics, big data analytics, and business intelligence as well as intelligent agents.

  7. Recht voor big data, big data voor recht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafarre, Anne

    Big data is een niet meer weg te denken fenomeen in onze maatschappij. Het is de hype cycle voorbij en de eerste implementaties van big data-technieken worden uitgevoerd. Maar wat is nu precies big data? Wat houden de vijf V's in die vaak genoemd worden in relatie tot big data? Ter inleiding van

  8. Recht voor big data, big data voor recht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lafarre, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Big data is een niet meer weg te denken fenomeen in onze maatschappij. Het is de hype cycle voorbij en de eerste implementaties van big data-technieken worden uitgevoerd. Maar wat is nu precies big data? Wat houden de vijf V's in die vaak genoemd worden in relatie tot big data? Ter inleiding van dez

  9. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  10. The role of microRNA-21 in predicting brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong J

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Jing Dong,1 Zhi Zhang,2 Tao Gu,3 Shu-Feng Xu,4 Li-Xin Dong,3 Xin Li,5 Bao-Hong Fu,3 Zhan-Zhao Fu3 1Basic Research for Oncology, North China University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Oncology, Workers’ Hospital of Tangshan City, Tangshan, 3Department of Oncology, 4Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of Qinhuangdao City, Qinhuangdao, 5Department of Oncology, Chengde Medical College, Chengde, People’s Republic of China Objective: This study aimed at exploring the role of microRNA-21 (miR-21 in predicting brain metastases (BM from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods: A total of 132 NSCLC patients, including 68 patients with BM and 64 patients without BM, were included in the study. NSCLC cells were collected and assigned to the inhibitor (IN group, the mock group, and the negative control (NC group. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the miR-21 expression. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were detected by colony-forming assay, MTT assay, transwell assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Angiogenesis was measured by endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results: The miR-21 expression was higher in NSCLC patients with BM than in those without BM. The miR-21 expression in the IN group was lower than that in the NC and mock groups. Compared with the NC and mock groups, the values of optical density (OD and the colony-forming number decreased in the IN group. Compared with the NC and mock groups, cell invasion and migration abilities significantly reduced in the IN group. The IN group had higher apoptosis rate than the NC and mock groups. The tube length was shorter and the number of junction points was less in the IN group in comparison to the NC and mock groups. Conclusion: miR-21 might be a potential biomarker for the development of BM in NSCLC patients and could promote the proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of NSCLC cells

  11. Afatinib-refractory brain metastases from EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer successfully controlled with erlotinib: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonagase, Yoshikane; Okamoto, Kunio; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takeda, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Toshio; Tsurutani, Junji; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Both afatinib and erlotinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors that inhibit aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signals in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Afatinib is an irreversible inhibitor directed against EGFR, ErbB-2, and ErbB-4, whereas erlotinib is a reversible inhibitor directed against EGFR only. Although afatinib has been shown to be effective in the treatment for erlotinib-refractory and/or gefitinib-refractory central nervous system metastases from NSCLC, little is known about the efficacy of erlotinib for afatinib-refractory central nervous system metastases. In the present report we describe a case of EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC in which brain metastases developed during first-line afatinib treatment. Whole-brain radiation therapy and substitution of erlotinib for afatinib led to successful shrinkage of the brain metastases. Our report highlights the potential benefit of erlotinib for the management of brain metastases refractory over afatinib in patients with NSCLC.

  12. Minimum Transendothelial Electrical Resistance Thresholds for the Study of Small and Large Molecule Drug Transport in a Human in Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantle, Jennifer L; Min, Lie; Lee, Kelvin H

    2016-12-05

    A human cell-based in vitro model that can accurately predict drug penetration into the brain as well as metrics to assess these in vitro models are valuable for the development of new therapeutics. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are differentiated into a polarized monolayer that express blood-brain barrier (BBB)-specific proteins and have transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values greater than 2500 Ω·cm(2). By assessing the permeabilities of several known drugs, a benchmarking system to evaluate brain permeability of drugs was established. Furthermore, relationships between TEER and permeability to both small and large molecules were established, demonstrating that different minimum TEER thresholds must be achieved to study the brain transport of these two classes of drugs. This work demonstrates that this hPSC-derived BBB model exhibits an in vivo-like phenotype, and the benchmarks established here are useful for assessing functionality of other in vitro BBB models.

  13. Big data for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hurwitz, Judith; Halper, Fern; Kaufman, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Find the right big data solution for your business or organization Big data management is one of the major challenges facing business, industry, and not-for-profit organizations. Data sets such as customer transactions for a mega-retailer, weather patterns monitored by meteorologists, or social network activity can quickly outpace the capacity of traditional data management tools. If you need to develop or manage big data solutions, you'll appreciate how these four experts define, explain, and guide you through this new and often confusing concept. You'll learn what it is, why it m

  14. Assessing Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimbach, Timo; Bachlechner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, big data has been one of the most controversially discussed technologies in terms of its possible positive and negative impact. Therefore, the need for technology assessments is obvious. This paper first provides, based on the results of a technology assessment study, an overview...... of the potential and challenges associated with big data and then describes the problems experienced during the study as well as methods found helpful to address them. The paper concludes with reflections on how the insights from the technology assessment study may have an impact on the future governance of big...... data....

  15. Inhomogeneous Big Bang Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wagh, S M

    2002-01-01

    In this letter, we outline an inhomogeneous model of the Big Bang cosmology. For the inhomogeneous spacetime used here, the universe originates in the infinite past as the one dominated by vacuum energy and ends in the infinite future as the one consisting of "hot and relativistic" matter. The spatial distribution of matter in the considered inhomogeneous spacetime is {\\em arbitrary}. Hence, observed structures can arise in this cosmology from suitable "initial" density contrast. Different problems of the standard model of Big Bang cosmology are also resolved in the present inhomogeneous model. This inhomogeneous model of the Big Bang Cosmology predicts "hot death" for the universe.

  16. Assessing Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimbach, Timo; Bachlechner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, big data has been one of the most controversially discussed technologies in terms of its possible positive and negative impact. Therefore, the need for technology assessments is obvious. This paper first provides, based on the results of a technology assessment study, an overview...... of the potential and challenges associated with big data and then describes the problems experienced during the study as well as methods found helpful to address them. The paper concludes with reflections on how the insights from the technology assessment study may have an impact on the future governance of big...... data....

  17. A split microdrive for simultaneous multi-electrode recordings from two brain areas in awake small animals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. Lansink; M. Bakker; W. Buster; J. Lankelma; R. van der Blom; R. Westdorp; R.N.J.M.A. Joosten; B.L. Mc.Naughton; C.M.A. Pennartz

    2007-01-01

    Complex cognitive operations such as memory formation and decision-making are thought to be mediated not by single, isolated brain structures but by multiple, connected brain areas. To facilitate studies on the neural communication between connected brain structures, we developed a multi-electrode m

  18. The relevance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen as an indicator of brain metastasis detection in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Sil; Jung, So-Lyoung; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Park, Sarah; Kim, Young-Kyoon; Yoo, Ie-Ryung; Choi, Byung-Ock; Jang, Hong-Seok; Yoon, Sei-Chul

    2012-08-01

    Although many biomarkers have emerged in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predictive value of site-specific spread is not fully defined. We designed this study to determine if there is an association between serum biomarkers and brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. We evaluated 227 eligible advanced NSCLC patients between May 2005 and March 2010. Patients who had been newly diagnosed with stage IV NSCLC but had not received treatment previously, and had available information on at least one of the following pretreatment serum biomarkers were enrolled: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragments (CYFRA 21-1), cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9, and squamous cancer cell antigen. Whole body imaging studies and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were reviewed, and the total number of metastatic regions was scored. Brain metastasis was detected in 66 (29.1%) patients. Although serum CEA, CYFRA 21-1, and CA 125 levels were significantly different between low total metastatic score group (score 1-3) and high total metastatic score group (score 4-7), only CEA level was significantly different between patients with brain metastasis and those without brain metastasis (p present study demonstrated that the pretreatment serum CEA level was significantly correlated with brain metastasis in advanced NSCLC. These findings suggested the possible role of CEA in the pathogenesis of brain invasion. More vigilant surveillance would be warranted in the high-risk group of patients with high serum CEA level and multiple synchronous metastasis.

  19. Outcome of surgical resection for brain metastases and radical treatment of the primary tumor in Chinese non–small-cell lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Z

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Zhenye Li,1,3,* Xiangheng Zhang,1,* Xiaobing Jiang,1 Chengcheng Guo,1 Ke Sai,1 Qunying Yang,1 Zhenqiang He,1 Yang Wang,1 Zhongping Chen,1 Wei Li,2 Yonggao Mou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors have contributed equally to this work Purpose: Brain metastasis is the most common complication of brain cancer; nevertheless, primary lung cancer accounts for approximately 20%–40% of brain metastases cases. Surgical resection is the preferred treatment for brain metastases. However, no studies have reported the outcome of surgical resection of brain metastases from non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the People’s Republic of China. Moreover, the optimal treatment for primary NSCLC in patients with synchronous brain metastases is hitherto controversial. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the cases of NSCLC patients with brain metastases who underwent neurosurgical resection at the Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, and assessed the efficacy of surgical resection and the necessity of aggressive treatment for primary NSCLC in synchronous brain metastases patients. Results: A total of 62 patients, including 47 men and 15 women, with brain metastases from NSCLC were enrolled in the study. The median age at the time of craniotomy was 54 years (range 29–76 years. At the final follow-up evaluation, 50 patients had died. The median OS time was 15.1 months, and the survival rates were 70% and 37% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The median OS

  20. Big data opportunities and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This ebook aims to give practical guidance for all those who want to understand big data better and learn how to make the most of it. Topics range from big data analysis, mobile big data and managing unstructured data to technologies, governance and intellectual property and security issues surrounding big data.

  1. Big Data in der Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leimbach, Timo; Bachlechner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Technology assessment of big data, in particular cloud based big data services, for the Office for Technology Assessment at the German federal parliament (Bundestag)......Technology assessment of big data, in particular cloud based big data services, for the Office for Technology Assessment at the German federal parliament (Bundestag)...

  2. Functional connectomics from a "big data" perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingrui; He, Yong

    2017-02-14

    In the last decade, explosive growth regarding functional connectome studies has been observed. Accumulating knowledge has significantly contributed to our understanding of the brain's functional network architectures in health and disease. With the development of innovative neuroimaging techniques, the establishment of large brain datasets and the increasing accumulation of published findings, functional connectomic research has begun to move into the era of "big data", which generates unprecedented opportunities for discovery in brain science and simultaneously encounters various challenging issues, such as data acquisition, management and analyses. Big data on the functional connectome exhibits several critical features: high spatial and/or temporal precision, large sample sizes, long-term recording of brain activity, multidimensional biological variables (e.g., imaging, genetic, demographic, cognitive and clinic) and/or vast quantities of existing findings. We review studies regarding functional connectomics from a big data perspective, with a focus on recent methodological advances in state-of-the-art image acquisition (e.g., multiband imaging), analysis approaches and statistical strategies (e.g., graph theoretical analysis, dynamic network analysis, independent component analysis, multivariate pattern analysis and machine learning), as well as reliability and reproducibility validations. We highlight the novel findings in the application of functional connectomic big data to the exploration of the biological mechanisms of cognitive functions, normal development and aging and of neurological and psychiatric disorders. We advocate the urgent need to expand efforts directed at the methodological challenges and discuss the direction of applications in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reframing Open Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Avital, Michel; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-01-01

    ’, these developments introduce an unprecedented level of societal and organizational engagement with the potential of computational data to generate new insights and information. Based on the commonalities shared by open data and big data, we develop a research framework that we refer to as open big data (OBD......Recent developments in the techniques and technologies of collecting, sharing and analysing data are challenging the field of information systems (IS) research let alone the boundaries of organizations and the established practices of decision-making. Coined ‘open data’ and ‘big data......) by employing the dimensions of ‘order’ and ‘relationality’. We argue that these dimensions offer a viable approach for IS research on open and big data because they address one of the core value propositions of IS; i.e. how to support organizing with computational data. We contrast these dimensions with two...

  4. Big Creek Pit Tags

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The BCPITTAGS database is used to store data from an Oncorhynchus mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) population dynamics study in Big Creek, a coastal stream along the...

  5. Big Data Analytics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-01

    The volume and variety of data being generated using computersis doubling every two years. It is estimated that in 2015,8 Zettabytes (Zetta=1021) were generated which consistedmostly of unstructured data such as emails, blogs, Twitter,Facebook posts, images, and videos. This is called big data. Itis possible to analyse such huge data collections with clustersof thousands of inexpensive computers to discover patterns inthe data that have many applications. But analysing massiveamounts of data available in the Internet has the potential ofimpinging on our privacy. Inappropriate analysis of big datacan lead to misleading conclusions. In this article, we explainwhat is big data, how it is analysed, and give some case studiesillustrating the potentials and pitfalls of big data analytics.

  6. Big Data as Governmentality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Madsen, Anders Koed; Rasche, Andreas

    This paper conceptualizes how large-scale data and algorithms condition and reshape knowledge production when addressing international development challenges. The concept of governmentality and four dimensions of an analytics of government are proposed as a theoretical framework to examine how big...... data is constituted as an aspiration to improve the data and knowledge underpinning development efforts. Based on this framework, we argue that big data’s impact on how relevant problems are governed is enabled by (1) new techniques of visualizing development issues, (2) linking aspects...... shows that big data problematizes selected aspects of traditional ways to collect and analyze data for development (e.g. via household surveys). We also demonstrate that using big data analyses to address development challenges raises a number of questions that can deteriorate its impact....

  7. Reframing Open Big Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marton, Attila; Avital, Michel; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the techniques and technologies of collecting, sharing and analysing data are challenging the field of information systems (IS) research let alone the boundaries of organizations and the established practices of decision-making. Coined ‘open data’ and ‘big data......’, these developments introduce an unprecedented level of societal and organizational engagement with the potential of computational data to generate new insights and information. Based on the commonalities shared by open data and big data, we develop a research framework that we refer to as open big data (OBD......) by employing the dimensions of ‘order’ and ‘relationality’. We argue that these dimensions offer a viable approach for IS research on open and big data because they address one of the core value propositions of IS; i.e. how to support organizing with computational data. We contrast these dimensions with two...

  8. Big Data Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinikos, Jannis; Constantiou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    We elaborate on key issues of our paper New games, new rules: big data and the changing context of strategy as a means of addressing some of the concerns raised by the paper’s commentators. We initially deal with the issue of social data and the role it plays in the current data revolution...... and the technological recording of facts. We further discuss the significance of the very mechanisms by which big data is produced as distinct from the very attributes of big data, often discussed in the literature. In the final section of the paper, we qualify the alleged importance of algorithms and claim...... that the structures of data capture and the architectures in which data generation is embedded are fundamental to the phenomenon of big data....

  9. The Big Bang Singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Eric

    The big bang theory is a model of the universe which makes the striking prediction that the universe began a finite amount of time in the past at the so called "Big Bang singularity." We explore the physical and mathematical justification of this surprising result. After laying down the framework of the universe as a spacetime manifold, we combine physical observations with global symmetrical assumptions to deduce the FRW cosmological models which predict a big bang singularity. Next we prove a couple theorems due to Stephen Hawking which show that the big bang singularity exists even if one removes the global symmetrical assumptions. Lastly, we investigate the conditions one needs to impose on a spacetime if one wishes to avoid a singularity. The ideas and concepts used here to study spacetimes are similar to those used to study Riemannian manifolds, therefore we compare and contrast the two geometries throughout.

  10. Sharing big biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, Arthur W; Dinov, Ivo D

    The promise of Big Biomedical Data may be offset by the enormous challenges in handling, analyzing, and sharing it. In this paper, we provide a framework for developing practical and reasonable data sharing policies that incorporate the sociological, financial, technical and scientific requirements of a sustainable Big Data dependent scientific community. Many biomedical and healthcare studies may be significantly impacted by using large, heterogeneous and incongruent datasets; however there are significant technical, social, regulatory, and institutional barriers that need to be overcome to ensure the power of Big Data overcomes these detrimental factors. Pragmatic policies that demand extensive sharing of data, promotion of data fusion, provenance, interoperability and balance security and protection of personal information are critical for the long term impact of translational Big Data analytics.

  11. Boarding to Big data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Claudia BRATOSIN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Today Big data is an emerging topic, as the quantity of the information grows exponentially, laying the foundation for its main challenge, the value of the information. The information value is not only defined by the value extraction from huge data sets, as fast and optimal as possible, but also by the value extraction from uncertain and inaccurate data, in an innovative manner using Big data analytics. At this point, the main challenge of the businesses that use Big data tools is to clearly define the scope and the necessary output of the business so that the real value can be gained. This article aims to explain the Big data concept, its various classifications criteria, architecture, as well as the impact in the world wide processes.

  12. FID navigator-based MR thermometry method to monitor small temperature changes in the brain of ventilated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulant, Nicolas; Bottlaender, Michel; Uhrig, Lynn; Giacomini, Eric; Luong, Michel; Amadon, Alexis; Massire, Aurélien; Larrat, Benoît; Vignaud, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    An MR thermometry method is proposed for measuring in vivo small temperature changes engendered by external RF heat sources. The method relies on reproducible and stable respiration and therefore currently applies to ventilated animals whose breathing is carefully controlled. It first consists in characterizing the stability of the main magnetic field as well as the variations induced by breathing during a first monitoring stage. Second, RF heating is applied while the phase and thus temperature evolutions are continuously measured, the corrections due to breathing and field drift being made thanks to the data accumulated during the first period. The RF heat source is finally stopped and the temperature rise likewise is continuously monitored during a third and last stage to observe the animal cooling down and to validate the assumptions made for correcting for the main field variation and the physiological noise. Experiments were performed with a clinical 7 T scanner on an anesthetized baboon and with a dedicated RF heating setup. Analysis of the data reveals a precision around 0.1°C, which allows us to reliably measure sub-degree temperature rises in the muscle and in the brain of the animal.

  13. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 may predict brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shuan-Shuan; Tan, Min; Lin, Hai-Yan; Xu, Lei; Shen, Chang-Xing; Yuan, Qing; Song, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Chang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting brain metastasis (BM) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The model comprises 120 cases of NSCLC that were treated and followed up for 4 years. The patients were divided into the BM (n=50) and non-BM (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence) (n=70) groups. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses were performed in metastatic tissues of NSCLC. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate the immunoreactive cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) signal with BM. Survival analyses were performed by using the Kaplan-Meier method. CAP1 protein content and immunoreactivity were significantly increased in BM specimens compared to other-metastatic specimens. The survival analysis revealed that CAP1 overexpression was significantly associated with survival (P<0.05). The ROC test suggested that the area under the curve was 73.33% (P<0.001; 95% CI, 63.5-83.2%). When P=0.466, the sensitivity and specificity reached 79.5 and 67.1%, respectively. These findings suggested that CAP1 is involved in the BM of NSCLC, and that elevated levels of CAP1 expression may indicate a poor prognosis for patients with BM. The CAP1 molecular model may be useful in the prediction of the risk of BM in NSCLC.

  14. The remarkable visual capacities of nocturnal insects: vision at the limits with small eyes and tiny brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrant, Eric J

    2017-04-05

    Nocturnal insects have evolved remarkable visual capacities, despite small eyes and tiny brains. They can see colour, control flight and land, react to faint movements in their environment, navigate using dim celestial cues and find their way home after a long and tortuous foraging trip using learned visual landmarks. These impressive visual abilities occur at light levels when only a trickle of photons are being absorbed by each photoreceptor, begging the question of how the visual system nonetheless generates the reliable signals needed to steer behaviour. In this review, I attempt to provide an answer to this question. Part of the answer lies in their compound eyes, which maximize light capture. Part lies in the slow responses and high gains of their photoreceptors, which improve the reliability of visual signals. And a very large part lies in the spatial and temporal summation of these signals in the optic lobe, a strategy that substantially enhances contrast sensitivity in dim light and allows nocturnal insects to see a brighter world, albeit a slower and coarser one. What is abundantly clear, however, is that during their evolution insects have overcome several serious potential visual limitations, endowing them with truly extraordinary night vision.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'.

  15. "Big Data": Big Knowledge Gaps in the Field of Internet Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf-Dietrich Reips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on so-called ‘Big Data’ has received a considerable momentum and is expected to grow in the future. One very interesting stream of research on Big Data analyzes online networks. Many online networks are known to have some typical macro-characteristics, such as ‘small world’ properties. Much less is known about underlying micro-processes leading to these properties. The models used by Big Data researchers usually are inspired by mathematical ease of exposition. We propose to follow in addition a different strategy that leads to knowledge about micro-processes that match with actual online behavior. This knowledge can then be used for the selection of mathematically-tractable models of online network formation and evolution. Insight from social and behavioral research is needed for pursuing this strategy of knowledge generation about micro-processes. Accordingly, our proposal points to a unique role that social scientists could play in Big Data research. ...

  16. Small RNAs tell big stories in Whistler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seila, Amy C; Sharp, Phillip A

    2008-06-01

    The Keystone Symposium on RNAi, microRNA and non-coding RNA convened on March 25-30 at Whistler Resort in Whistler, British Columbia, Canada. Researchers with backgrounds in different biochemical disciplines came together to exchange ideas on short RNAs and their roles in a host of biological processes.

  17. String Theory: Big Problem for Small Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.

    2009-01-01

    String theory is the most promising candidate theory for a unified description of all the fundamental forces that exist in nature. It provides a mathematical framework that combines quantum theory with Einstein's general theory of relativity. The typical size of a string is of the order of 10[superscript -33] cm, called the Planck length. But due…

  18. Intrauterine growth retardation - small events, big consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syed R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intrauterine growth retardation refers to a rate of growth of a fetus that is less than normal for the growth potential of a fetus (for that particular gestational age. As one of the leading causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity, intrauterine growth retardation has immense implications for the short term and long term growth of children. It is an important public health concern in the developing countries. Health statistics encompassing parameters for maternal and child health in the Indian subcontinent have shown improvement in the past few years but they are still far from perfect. Maternal health, education and empowerment bears a strong influence on perinatal outcomes including intrauterine growth retardation and should be the primary focus of any stratagem targeted at reducing the incidence of intrauterine growth retardation. A concerted liaison of various medical and social disciplines is imperative in this regard.

  19. String Theory: Big Problem for Small Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.

    2009-01-01

    String theory is the most promising candidate theory for a unified description of all the fundamental forces that exist in nature. It provides a mathematical framework that combines quantum theory with Einstein's general theory of relativity. The typical size of a string is of the order of 10[superscript -33] cm, called the Planck length. But due…

  20. A Small Essay About a Big Boulevard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The essay presents the analogies of turning city borders and walls into boulevards and gardens through the examples of Moscow and Irkutsk. The main street of Irkutsk is viewed in a new light, as a boulevard. It is proposed to take into consideration the peculiarities of the four sense-parts of the street when working on design codes.

  1. Small Potatoes for the Big Apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, Amy

    1978-01-01

    New York's Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) is described with emphasis on its effect or lack of effect on access, urban students, and middle-income parents. Its role within the three major higher education systems in the state--SUNY, CUNY, and the independents--is examined. (LBH)

  2. Sustainable Offices: Small Practices for Big Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    environmental impacts • Scientific Certification Systems (SCS) certifies a wide variety of claims related to environmental performance • Forest...16 Reducing Fuel Consumption • Participate in meetings via telephone • Telecommute or alternate work schedules • Carpool • Bike or walk around

  3. A small jab - a big effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Christine Stabell; Netea, Mihai G; Selin, Liisa K

    2013-01-01

    with a substantial reduction in overall child mortality, which cannot be explained by prevention of the target disease. New research suggests that the nonspecific effects of vaccines are related to cross-reactivity of the adaptive immune system with unrelated pathogens, and to training of the innate immune system......Recent epidemiological studies have shown that, in addition to disease-specific effects, vaccines against infectious diseases have nonspecific effects on the ability of the immune system to handle other pathogens. For instance, in randomized trials tuberculosis and measles vaccines are associated...... through epigenetic reprogramming. Hence, epidemiological findings are backed by immunological data. This generates a new understanding of the immune system and about how it can be modulated by vaccines to impact the general resistance to disease....

  4. Big School Change in a Small Town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Jacqueline; Thorson, Gregory; Fluegel, David

    2000-01-01

    A rural Minnesota district with a declining regional population and little public support involved the community in developing a consensus for reforms and creating a common vision and action plan for each school. Innovations were adopted regarding curriculum, scheduling, technology use, and marketing approaches. (MLH)

  5. Exosomes in cancer: small particle, big player

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes have emerged as a novel mode of intercellular communication. Exosomes can shuttle bioactive molecules including proteins, DNA, mRNA, as well as non-coding RNAs from one cell to another, leading to the exchange of genetic information and reprogramming of the recipient cells. Increasing evidence suggests that tumor cells release excessive amount of exosomes, which may influence tumor initiation, growth, progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. In addition, exosomes transfer messag...

  6. Human neuroimaging as a "Big Data" science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Toga, Arthur W

    2014-06-01

    The maturation of in vivo neuroimaging has led to incredible quantities of digital information about the human brain. While much is made of the data deluge in science, neuroimaging represents the leading edge of this onslaught of "big data". A range of neuroimaging databasing approaches has streamlined the transmission, storage, and dissemination of data from such brain imaging studies. Yet few, if any, common solutions exist to support the science of neuroimaging. In this article, we discuss how modern neuroimaging research represents a multifactorial and broad ranging data challenge, involving the growing size of the data being acquired; sociological and logistical sharing issues; infrastructural challenges for multi-site, multi-datatype archiving; and the means by which to explore and mine these data. As neuroimaging advances further, e.g. aging, genetics, and age-related disease, new vision is needed to manage and process this information while marshalling of these resources into novel results. Thus, "big data" can become "big" brain science.

  7. ANALYTICS OF BIG DATA

    OpenAIRE

    Asst. Prof. Shubhada Talegaon

    2014-01-01

    Big Data analytics has started to impact all types of organizations, as it carries the potential power to extract embedded knowledge from big amounts of data and react according to it in real time. The current technology enables us to efficiently store and query large datasets, the focus is now on techniques that make use of the complete data set, instead of sampling. This has tremendous implications in areas like machine learning, pattern recognition and classification, senti...

  8. Conociendo Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Camargo-Vega

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Teniendo en cuenta la importancia que ha adquirido el término Big Data, la presente investigación buscó estudiar y analizar de manera exhaustiva el estado del arte del Big Data; además, y como segundo objetivo, analizó las características, las herramientas, las tecnologías, los modelos y los estándares relacionados con Big Data, y por último buscó identificar las características más relevantes en la gestión de Big Data, para que con ello se pueda conocer todo lo concerniente al tema central de la investigación.La metodología utilizada incluyó revisar el estado del arte de Big Data y enseñar su situación actual; conocer las tecnologías de Big Data; presentar algunas de las bases de datos NoSQL, que son las que permiten procesar datos con formatos no estructurados, y mostrar los modelos de datos y las tecnologías de análisis de ellos, para terminar con algunos beneficios de Big Data.El diseño metodológico usado para la investigación fue no experimental, pues no se manipulan variables, y de tipo exploratorio, debido a que con esta investigación se empieza a conocer el ambiente del Big Data.

  9. Minsky on "Big Government"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Santana Vasconcelos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper objective is to assess, in light of the main works of Minsky, his view and analysis of what he called the "Big Government" as that huge institution which, in parallels with the "Big Bank" was capable of ensuring stability in the capitalist system and regulate its inherently unstable financial system in mid-20th century. In this work, we analyze how Minsky proposes an active role for the government in a complex economic system flawed by financial instability.

  10. Big data need big theory too

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Edward R.; Highfield, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    The current interest in big data, machine learning and data analytics has generated the widespread impression that such methods are capable of solving most problems without the need for conventional scientific methods of inquiry. Interest in these methods is intensifying, accelerated by the ease with which digitized data can be acquired in virtually all fields of endeavour, from science, healthcare and cybersecurity to economics, social sciences and the humanities. In multiscale modelling, machine learning appears to provide a shortcut to reveal correlations of arbitrary complexity between processes at the atomic, molecular, meso- and macroscales. Here, we point out the weaknesses of pure big data approaches with particular focus on biology and medicine, which fail to provide conceptual accounts for the processes to which they are applied. No matter their ‘depth’ and the sophistication of data-driven methods, such as artificial neural nets, in the end they merely fit curves to existing data. Not only do these methods invariably require far larger quantities of data than anticipated by big data aficionados in order to produce statistically reliable results, but they can also fail in circumstances beyond the range of the data used to train them because they are not designed to model the structural characteristics of the underlying system. We argue that it is vital to use theory as a guide to experimental design for maximal efficiency of data collection and to produce reliable predictive models and conceptual knowledge. Rather than continuing to fund, pursue and promote ‘blind’ big data projects with massive budgets, we call for more funding to be allocated to the elucidation of the multiscale and stochastic processes controlling the behaviour of complex systems, including those of life, medicine and healthcare. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Multiscale modelling at the physics–chemistry–biology interface’. PMID:27698035

  11. Big data need big theory too

    OpenAIRE

    Coveney, Peter V.; Dougherty, Edward R; Highfield, Roger R.

    2016-01-01

    The current interest in big data, machine learning and data analytics has generated the widespread impression that such methods are capable of solving most problems without the need for conventional scientific methods of inquiry. Interest in these methods is intensifying, accelerated by the ease with which digitized data can be acquired in virtually all fields of endeavour, from science, healthcare and cybersecurity to economics, social sciences and the humanities. In multiscale modelling, ma...

  12. Big data need big theory too.

    OpenAIRE

    Coveney, P. V.; Dougherty, E. R.; Highfield, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    The current interest in big data, machine learning and data analytics has generated the widespread impression that such methods are capable of solving most problems without the need for conventional scientific methods of inquiry. Interest in these methods is intensifying, accelerated by the ease with which digitized data can be acquired in virtually all fields of endeavour, from science, healthcare and cybersecurity to economics, social sciences and the humanities. In multiscale modelling, ma...

  13. Big data need big theory too.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coveney, Peter V; Dougherty, Edward R; Highfield, Roger R

    2016-11-13

    The current interest in big data, machine learning and data analytics has generated the widespread impression that such methods are capable of solving most problems without the need for conventional scientific methods of inquiry. Interest in these methods is intensifying, accelerated by the ease with which digitized data can be acquired in virtually all fields of endeavour, from science, healthcare and cybersecurity to economics, social sciences and the humanities. In multiscale modelling, machine learning appears to provide a shortcut to reveal correlations of arbitrary complexity between processes at the atomic, molecular, meso- and macroscales. Here, we point out the weaknesses of pure big data approaches with particular focus on biology and medicine, which fail to provide conceptual accounts for the processes to which they are applied. No matter their 'depth' and the sophistication of data-driven methods, such as artificial neural nets, in the end they merely fit curves to existing data. Not only do these methods invariably require far larger quantities of data than anticipated by big data aficionados in order to produce statistically reliable results, but they can also fail in circumstances beyond the range of the data used to train them because they are not designed to model the structural characteristics of the underlying system. We argue that it is vital to use theory as a guide to experimental design for maximal efficiency of data collection and to produce reliable predictive models and conceptual knowledge. Rather than continuing to fund, pursue and promote 'blind' big data projects with massive budgets, we call for more funding to be allocated to the elucidation of the multiscale and stochastic processes controlling the behaviour of complex systems, including those of life, medicine and healthcare.This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling at the physics-chemistry-biology interface'.

  14. 大数据时代小微印刷企业的发展策略研究%Development Strategy for Small and Micro Printing Enterprises in Big Data Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢玮朋; 梁金星

    2015-01-01

    面对大数据引发的信息革命浪潮及国家文化产业大发展、大繁荣的新形势,我国传统小微印刷企业面临着严峻挑战与历史机遇.我国小微印刷企业普遍存在创新能力欠缺、产业结构不合理、盈利手段单一、抗风险能力较差及污染环境等诸多弊病,小微印刷业应顺应时代潮流,抓住历史机遇,加快由传统加工型产业向现代服务业转型的步伐.我国小微印刷企业可采取融入文化创意元素、丰富印刷文化内涵,对接互联网络平台、探索增值盈利模式,推行全数字化流程、发展绿色按需印刷等科学转型之道,以实现企业的转型升级.%In view of the information revolution wave triggered by big data and new situation of great development of the national cultural industry, the serious challenge and historic opportunity are analyzed for the traditional small and micro enterprises. First, the demerits such as the innovation insufficiency, unreasonable industrial structure, undiversified profit source, poor risk resistance and serious environment pollution generally existing in many printing enterprises are pointed out, with the ways to conforming to the times and keeping up with the trend to accelerate the transition from the traditional processing industry to modern services being discussed. Finally, three upgrading strategies are creatively put forward for small and micro enterprises to realize the transformation and upgrading, which are cultural creative industry integration and cultural connotation enrichment, networking platform fusion, value-added profit exploitation, all media digitalization and development of green on-demand printing.

  15. Small-world and scale-free organization of voxel-based resting-state functional connectivity in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, M P; Stam, C J; Boersma, M; Hulshoff Pol, H E

    2008-11-15

    The brain is a complex dynamic system of functionally connected regions. Graph theory has been successfully used to describe the organization of such dynamic systems. Recent resting-state fMRI studies have suggested that inter-regional functional connectivity shows a small-world topology, indicating an organization of the brain in highly clustered sub-networks, combined with a high level of global connectivity. In addition, a few studies have investigated a possible scale-free topology of the human brain, but the results of these studies have been inconclusive. These studies have mainly focused on inter-regional connectivity, representing the brain as a network of brain regions, requiring an arbitrary definition of such regions. However, using a voxel-wise approach allows for the model-free examination of both inter-regional as well as intra-regional connectivity and might reveal new information on network organization. Especially, a voxel-based study could give information about a possible scale-free organization of functional connectivity in the human brain. Resting-state 3 Tesla fMRI recordings of 28 healthy subjects were acquired and individual connectivity graphs were formed out of all cortical and sub-cortical voxels with connections reflecting inter-voxel functional connectivity. Graph characteristics from these connectivity networks were computed. The clustering-coefficient of these networks turned out to be much higher than the clustering-coefficient of comparable random graphs, together with a short average path length, indicating a small-world organization. Furthermore, the connectivity distribution of the number of inter-voxel connections followed a power-law scaling with an exponent close to 2, suggesting a scale-free network topology. Our findings suggest a combined small-world and scale-free organization of the functionally connected human brain. The results are interpreted as evidence for a highly efficient organization of the functionally connected

  16. Big Data in Caenorhabditis elegans: quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Harald; Moerman, Donald

    2015-11-05

    A clear definition of what constitutes "Big Data" is difficult to identify, but we find it most useful to define Big Data as a data collection that is complete. By this criterion, researchers on Caenorhabditis elegans have a long history of collecting Big Data, since the organism was selected with the idea of obtaining a complete biological description and understanding of development. The complete wiring diagram of the nervous system, the complete cell lineage, and the complete genome sequence provide a framework to phrase and test hypotheses. Given this history, it might be surprising that the number of "complete" data sets for this organism is actually rather small--not because of lack of effort, but because most types of biological experiments are not currently amenable to complete large-scale data collection. Many are also not inherently limited, so that it becomes difficult to even define completeness. At present, we only have partial data on mutated genes and their phenotypes, gene expression, and protein-protein interaction--important data for many biological questions. Big Data can point toward unexpected correlations, and these unexpected correlations can lead to novel investigations; however, Big Data cannot establish causation. As a result, there is much excitement about Big Data, but there is also a discussion on just what Big Data contributes to solving a biological problem. Because of its relative simplicity, C. elegans is an ideal test bed to explore this issue and at the same time determine what is necessary to build a multicellular organism from a single cell.

  17. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  18. Short-Term Blood Pressure Variability Relates to the Presence of Subclinical Brain Small Vessel Disease in Primary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filomena, Josefina; Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Vinyoles, Ernest; Tovar, José L; Mundet, Xavier; Castañé, Xavier; Vilar, Andrea; López-Rueda, Antonio; Jiménez-Baladó, Joan; Cartanyà, Anna; Montaner, Joan; Delgado, Pilar

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability is associated with stroke risk, but less is known about subclinical cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD). We aimed to determine whether CSVD relates to short-term BP variability independently of BP levels and also, whether they improve CSVD discrimination beyond clinical variables and office BP levels. This was a cohort study on asymptomatic hypertensives who underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Office and average 24-hour, daytime and nighttime BP levels, and several metrics of BP variability (SD, weighted SD, coefficient of variation, and average real variability [ARV]) were calculated. Definition of CSVD was based on the presence of lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensity grades. Multivariate analysis and integrated discrimination improvement were performed to assess whether BP variability and levels were independently associated with CSVD and improved its discrimination. Four hundred eighty-seven individuals participated (median age, 64; 47% women). CSVD was identified in 18.9%, related to age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, use of treatment, ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels, and ARV of systolic BP at any period. The highest prevalence (33.7%) was found in subjects with both 24-hour BP levels and ARV elevated. BP levels at any period and ARV (24 hours and nocturnal) emerged as independent predictors of CSVD, and discrimination was incrementally improved although not to a clinically significant extent (integrated discrimination improvement, 5.31%, 5.17% to 5.4%). Ambulatory BP monitoring-defined BP levels and ARV of systolic BP relate to subclinical CSVD in hypertensive individuals.

  19. The role of microRNA-21 in predicting brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Zhi; Gu, Tao; Xu, Shu-Feng; Dong, Li-Xin; Li, Xin; Fu, Bao-Hong; Fu, Zhan-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at exploring the role of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in predicting brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 132 NSCLC patients, including 68 patients with BM and 64 patients without BM, were included in the study. NSCLC cells were collected and assigned to the inhibitor (IN) group, the mock group, and the negative control (NC) group. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the miR-21 expression. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were detected by colony-forming assay, MTT assay, transwell assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Angiogenesis was measured by endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results The miR-21 expression was higher in NSCLC patients with BM than in those without BM. The miR-21 expression in the IN group was lower than that in the NC and mock groups. Compared with the NC and mock groups, the values of optical density (OD) and the colony-forming number decreased in the IN group. Compared with the NC and mock groups, cell invasion and migration abilities significantly reduced in the IN group. The IN group had higher apoptosis rate than the NC and mock groups. The tube length was shorter and the number of junction points was less in the IN group in comparison to the NC and mock groups. Conclusion miR-21 might be a potential biomarker for the development of BM in NSCLC patients and could promote the proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of NSCLC cells.

  20. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Hideo; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Mikako; Kitamura, Youji; Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko; Shimazu, Seiichiro; Yoneda, Fumiro [Fujimoto Pharmaceutical Corporation, Matsubara, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [{sup 123}I]2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  1. EGFR and KRAS Mutations Predict the Incidence and Outcome of Brain Metastases in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasini, Pascale; Serdjebi, Cindy; Khobta, Nataliya; Metellus, Philippe; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Nanni, Isabelle; Greillier, Laurent; Loundou, Anderson; Fina, Frederic; Mascaux, Celine; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of brain metastases (BM). The identification of driver oncogenes and matched targeted therapies has improved outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients; however, a better understanding of BM molecular biology is needed to further drive the process in this field. Methods: In this observational study, stage IV NSCLC patients tested for EGFR and KRAS mutations were selected, and BM incidence, recurrence and patients’ outcome were assessed. Results: A total of 144 patients (142 Caucasian and two Asian) were selected, including 11.27% with EGFR-mutant and 33.10% with KRAS-mutant tumors, and 57.04% patients had developed BM. BM incidence was more frequent in patients with EGFR mutation according to multivariate analyses (MVA) (Odds ratio OR = 8.745 [1.743–43.881], p = 0.008). Among patients with treated BM, recurrence after local treatment was less frequent in patients with KRAS mutation (OR = 0.234 [0.078–0.699], p = 0.009). Among patients with untreated BM, overall survival (OS) was shorter for patients with KRAS mutation according to univariate analysis (OR = 7.130 [1.240–41.012], p = 0.028), but not MVA. Conclusions: EGFR and KRAS mutations have a predictive role on BM incidence, recurrence and outcome in Caucasian NSCLC patients. These results may impact the routine management of disease in these patients. Further studies are required to assess the influence of other biomarkers on NSCLC BM. PMID:27999344

  2. EGFR and KRAS Mutations Predict the Incidence and Outcome of Brain Metastases in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Tomasini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung cancer is the leading cause of brain metastases (BM. The identification of driver oncogenes and matched targeted therapies has improved outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients; however, a better understanding of BM molecular biology is needed to further drive the process in this field. Methods: In this observational study, stage IV NSCLC patients tested for EGFR and KRAS mutations were selected, and BM incidence, recurrence and patients’ outcome were assessed. Results: A total of 144 patients (142 Caucasian and two Asian were selected, including 11.27% with EGFR-mutant and 33.10% with KRAS-mutant tumors, and 57.04% patients had developed BM. BM incidence was more frequent in patients with EGFR mutation according to multivariate analyses (MVA (Odds ratio OR = 8.745 [1.743–43.881], p = 0.008. Among patients with treated BM, recurrence after local treatment was less frequent in patients with KRAS mutation (OR = 0.234 [0.078–0.699], p = 0.009. Among patients with untreated BM, overall survival (OS was shorter for patients with KRAS mutation according to univariate analysis (OR = 7.130 [1.240–41.012], p = 0.028, but not MVA. Conclusions: EGFR and KRAS mutations have a predictive role on BM incidence, recurrence and outcome in Caucasian NSCLC patients. These results may impact the routine management of disease in these patients. Further studies are required to assess the influence of other biomarkers on NSCLC BM.

  3. Risk factors of brain metastases in completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM is one of the most common failures of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC after combined-modality therapy. The outcome of trials on prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has prompted us to identify the highest-risk subset most likely to benefit from PCI. Focusing on patients with completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 (pIIIA-N2 NSCLC, we aimed to assess risk factors of BM and to define the highest-risk subset. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, the records of 217 consecutive patients with pIIIA-N2 NSCLC in our institution were reviewed. The cumulative incidence of BM was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and differences between the groups were analyzed using log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied to assess risk factors of BM. Results Fifty-three (24.4 % patients developed BM at some point during their clinical course. On multivariate analysis, non-squamous cell cancer (relative risk [RR]: 4.13, 95 % CI: 1.86–9.19; P = 0.001 and the ratio of metastatic to examined nodes or lymph node ratio (LNR ≥ 30 % (RR: 3.33, 95 % CI: 1.79–6.18; P = 0.000 were found to be associated with an increased risk of BM. In patients with non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 %, the 5-year actuarial risk of BM was 57.3 %. Conclusions In NSCLC, patients with completely resected pIIIA-N2 non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 % are at the highest risk for BM, and are most likely to benefit from PCI. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of PCI on this subset of patients.

  4. From the Big Bang to the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boliek, Carol A.; Lohmeier, Heather

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes research findings that challenge long-standing theories of infant cognition and motor development and proposes alternative theoretical models to describe skill acquisition during the first several years of life. Findings are discussed with respect to research in the area of infant speech physiology and production. (Author/CR)

  5. BigDansing

    KAUST Repository

    Khayyat, Zuhair

    2015-06-02

    Data cleansing approaches have usually focused on detecting and fixing errors with little attention to scaling to big datasets. This presents a serious impediment since data cleansing often involves costly computations such as enumerating pairs of tuples, handling inequality joins, and dealing with user-defined functions. In this paper, we present BigDansing, a Big Data Cleansing system to tackle efficiency, scalability, and ease-of-use issues in data cleansing. The system can run on top of most common general purpose data processing platforms, ranging from DBMSs to MapReduce-like frameworks. A user-friendly programming interface allows users to express data quality rules both declaratively and procedurally, with no requirement of being aware of the underlying distributed platform. BigDansing takes these rules into a series of transformations that enable distributed computations and several optimizations, such as shared scans and specialized joins operators. Experimental results on both synthetic and real datasets show that BigDansing outperforms existing baseline systems up to more than two orders of magnitude without sacrificing the quality provided by the repair algorithms.

  6. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth......-MRS. No effect was observed in brain at any dose level. In contrast, 40 Gy induced a statistically significant reduction in ATP/Pi ratio during the 12-h post-irradiation period. This effect was more pronounced in 54A than in 54B. Some reduction was observed following 10 Gy, whereas 2.5 Gy induced no changes...... in ATP/Pi. The differential effect on tumors and brain might be relevant for monitoring irradiation effects by in vivo 31P-MRS in patients with brain metastases....

  7. From Big Data to Big Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Pedersen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Idea in Brief: Problem: There is an enormous profit potential for manufacturing firms in big data, but one of the key barriers to obtaining data-driven growth is the lack of knowledge about which capabilities are needed to extract value and profit from data. Solution: We (BDBB research group at CBS......) have developed a research-based capability mapping tool, entitled DataProfit, which the public business consultants can use to upgrade their tool kit to enable data-driven growth in manufacturing organizations. Benefit: The DataProfit model/tool comprises insights of an extensive research project...

  8. Focus : big data, little questions?

    OpenAIRE

    Uprichard, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Big data. Little data. Deep data. Surface data. Noisy, unstructured data. Big. The world of data has gone from being analogue and digital, qualitative and quantitative, transactional and a by-product, to, simply, BIG. It is as if we couldn’t quite deal with its omnipotence and just ran out of adjectives. BIG. With all the data power it is supposedly meant to entail, one might have thought that a slightly better descriptive term might have been latched onto. But, no. BIG. Just BIG.

  9. Big data challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bachlechner, Daniel; Leimbach, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Although reports on big data success stories have been accumulating in the media, most organizations dealing with high-volume, high-velocity and high-variety information assets still face challenges. Only a thorough understanding of these challenges puts organizations into a position in which...... they can make an informed decision for or against big data, and, if the decision is positive, overcome the challenges smoothly. The combination of a series of interviews with leading experts from enterprises, associations and research institutions, and focused literature reviews allowed not only...... framework are also relevant. For large enterprises and startups specialized in big data, it is typically easier to overcome the challenges than it is for other enterprises and public administration bodies....

  10. Thick-Big Descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Signe Sophus

    The paper discusses the rewards and challenges of employing commercial audience measurements data – gathered by media industries for profitmaking purposes – in ethnographic research on the Internet in everyday life. It questions claims to the objectivity of big data (Anderson 2008), the assumption...... communication systems, language and behavior appear as texts, outputs, and discourses (data to be ‘found’) – big data then documents things that in earlier research required interviews and observations (data to be ‘made’) (Jensen 2014). However, web-measurement enterprises build audiences according...... to a commercial logic (boyd & Crawford 2011) and is as such directed by motives that call for specific types of sellable user data and specific segmentation strategies. In combining big data and ‘thick descriptions’ (Geertz 1973) scholars need to question how ethnographic fieldwork might map the ‘data not seen...

  11. Evaluation of Biomarkers Predictive of Benefit From PD-1 Inhibitor MK-3475 in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    our purposes (i.e. tissue was obtained via fine needle aspiration and is unable to be cored) or the tissue has already been exhausted. To date we...the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in patients with untreated brain metastases from NSCLC (NCT 02085070). The tumor biopsy specimens and blood...to small biopsy samples, and also tissue samples that were previously exhausted. We have screened several hundred patients to find cases that are

  12. Icotinib versus whole-brain irradiation in patients with EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer and multiple brain metastases (BRAIN): a multicentre, phase 3, open-label, parallel, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Ji; Zhou, Caicun; Huang, Yisheng; Feng, Jifeng; Lu, Sun; Song, Yong; Huang, Cheng; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Ying; Hu, Chengping; Chen, Gongyan; Zhang, Li; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yan, Hong Hong; Tan, Fen Lai; Zhong, Wenzhao; Wu, Yi-Long

    2017-09-01

    For patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and multiple brain metastases, whole-brain irradiation (WBI) is a standard-of-care treatment, but its effects on neurocognition are complex and concerning. We compared the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), icotinib, versus WBI with or without chemotherapy in a phase 3 trial of patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC and multiple brain metastases. We did a multicentre, open-label, parallel randomised controlled trial (BRAIN) at 17 hospitals in China. Eligible participants were patients with NSCLC with EGFR mutations, who were naive to treatment with EGFR-TKIs or radiotherapy, and had at least three metastatic brain lesions. We randomly assigned participants (1:1) to either icotinib 125 mg orally (three times per day) or WBI (30 Gy in ten fractions of 3 Gy) plus concurrent or sequential chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles, until unacceptable adverse events or intracranial disease progression occurred. The randomisation was done by the Chinese Thoracic Oncology Group with a web-based allocation system applying the Pocock and Simon minimisation method; groups were stratified by EGFR gene mutation status, treatment line (first line or second line), brain metastases only versus both intracranial and extracranial metastases, and presence or absence of symptoms of intracranial hypertension. Clinicians and patients were not masked to treatment assignment, but individuals involved in the data analysis did not participate in the treatments and were thus masked to allocation. Patients receiving icotinib who had intracranial progression only were switched to WBI plus either icotinib or chemotherapy until further progression; those receiving icotinib who had extracranial progression only were switched to icotinib plus chemotherapy. Patients receiving WBI who progressed were switched to icotinib until further progression. Icotinib could be continued beyond progression if a clinical benefit

  13. Commentary: Treatment Considerations for Patients With Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases in the Era of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca, Silvia Daniela; Connolly, Ian David; Ho, Clement; Neal, Joel; Hayden Gephart, Melanie

    2017-08-12

    Brain metastasis is a serious complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) affecting up to 40% of NSCLC patients. A subset of NSCLC tumors has mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and determination of tumor EGFR mutation status is essential in guiding treatment decisions, as it directly affects the treatment approach. Patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC have a higher cumulative incidence of brain metastases, and are especially sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients with newly diagnosed EGFR-mutated lung cancer presenting to a neurosurgeon with a new diagnosis of brain metastases now have a variety of treatment options available, including whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, surgical resection, chemotherapy, and targeted therapeutics such as the EGFR TKIs. In this review, we discuss the impact of EGFR mutation status on brain and leptomeningeal metastasis treatment considerations. Additionally, we present clinical cases of patients treated with EGFR TKIs alone and in combination with other therapies to highlight treatment alternatives. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  14. Clinical Experience with First-generation Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 
Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients 
with Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixing DONG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective A survival analysis and the influencing factors for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with brain metastases accepting first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs treatment have not yet been elucidated to date. In this study, we collected and analyzed the survival data of NSCLC patients with brain metastasis to obtain evidence and to provide guidance in clinical practice. Methods NSCLC patients with brain metastases who were treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs were retrospectively collected in 2012-2013 from Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression were performed for univariate and multivariate analyses, respectively, to explore the independent predictors influencing the survival of patients with NSCLC brain metastases. Results The median progression-free survival (PFS and median overall survival (OS of all patients treated with first-generation EGFR-TKIs were 10.0 months (95%CI: 8.3-11.7 and 28.0 months (95%CI: 22.9-33.1, respectively. Pathological subtypes were the independent predictors of PFS (P=0.001, and tumor differentiations were the independent predictors of OS (P=0.050. Conclusion First-generation EGFR-TKIs showed promising efficacy in NSCLC patients with brain metastases. PFS was longer in patients with adenocarcinoma than in those with a non-adenocarcinoma subtype. OS was longer in patients with differentiated tumors than in those who developed poorly differentiated tumors.

  15. Security Issues Associated with Big Data in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Narasimha Inukollu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss security issues for cloud computing, Big data, Map Reduce and Hadoop environment. The main focus is on security issues in cloud computing that are associated with big data. Big data applications are a great benefit to organizations, business, companies and many large scale and small scale industries.We also discuss various possible solutions for the issues in cloud computing security and Hadoop. Cloud computing security is developing at a rapid pace which includes computer security, network security, information security, and data privacy. Cloud computing plays a very vital role in protecting data, applications and the related infrastructure with the help of policies, technologies, controls, and big data tools Moreover, cloud computing, big data and its applications, advantages are likely to represent the most promising new frontiers in science.

  16. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery as salvage therapy after failure of whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D; Lovato, James F; Ellis, Thomas L; Tatter, Stephen B; Bourland, J Daniel; Munley, Michael T; deGuzman, Allan F; Shaw, Edward G; Urbanic, James J; McMullen, Kevin P

    2012-05-01

    Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve this. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Sunit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Chan, Michael D., E-mail: mchan@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Lovato, James F. [Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to

  18. SNPs in the TGF-β signaling pathway are associated with increased risk of brain metastasis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianxia Li

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Brain metastasis (BM from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is relatively common, but identifying which patients will develop brain metastasis has been problematic. We hypothesized that genotype variants in the TGF-β signaling pathway could be a predictive biomarker of brain metastasis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We genotyped 33 SNPs from 13 genes in the TGF-β signaling pathway and evaluated their associations with brain metastasis risk by using DNA from blood samples from 161 patients with NSCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess brain metastasis risk; Cox hazard analyses were used to evaluate the effects of various patient and disease characteristics on the risk of brain metastasis. RESULTS: The median age of the 116 men and 45 women in the study was 58 years; 62 (39% had stage IIIB or IV disease. Within 24 months after initial diagnosis of lung cancer, brain metastasis was found in 60 patients (37%. Of these 60 patients, 16 had presented with BM at diagnosis. Multivariate analysis showed the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 to be associated with a significantly higher risk of brain metastasis at 24 months follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 2.540, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.204-5.359, P = 0.014; and HR 1.885, 95% CI 1.086-3.273, P = 0.024, compared with the GA or CT/CC genotypes, respectively. When we analyzed combined subgroups, these rates showed higher for those having both the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and the TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 (HR 2.353, 95% CI 1.390-3.985, P = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We found the GG genotype of SMAD6: rs12913975 and TT genotype of INHBC: rs4760259 to be associated with risk of brain metastasis in patients with NSCLC. This finding, if confirmed, can help to identify patients at high risk of brain metastasis.

  19. Architecture technology for Big Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juan José Camargo Vega; Jonathan Felipe Camargo Ortega; Luis Joyanes Aguilar

    2015-01-01

    The term Big Data with each passing day, it becomes more important, which is why in this research is studied, analyzed and disclosed in a comprehensive manner the different architectures of Big Data...

  20. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shandra Gutierrez

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP. However, magnetic resonance (MR imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE, and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1 and 2 ms (UTE2 echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%. When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute

  1. MRI-Only Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for the Rat Brain on a Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Shandra; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality in radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP). However, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides superior soft tissue contrast, increasing the precision of target volume selection. We present MR-only based RTP for a rat brain on a small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) using probabilistic voxel classification with multiple MR sequences. Six rat heads were imaged, each with one CT and five MR sequences. The MR sequences were: T1-weighted, T2-weighted, zero-echo time (ZTE), and two ultra-short echo time sequences with 20 μs (UTE1) and 2 ms (UTE2) echo times. CT data were manually segmented into air, soft tissue, and bone to obtain the RTP reference. Bias field corrected MR images were automatically segmented into the same tissue classes using a fuzzy c-means segmentation algorithm with multiple images as input. Similarities between segmented CT and automatic segmented MR (ASMR) images were evaluated using Dice coefficient. Three ASMR images with high similarity index were used for further RTP. Three beam arrangements were investigated. Dose distributions were compared by analysing dose volume histograms. The highest Dice coefficients were obtained for the ZTE-UTE2 combination and for the T1-UTE1-T2 combination when ZTE was unavailable. Both combinations, along with UTE1-UTE2, often used to generate ASMR images, were used for further RTP. Using 1 beam, MR based RTP underestimated the dose to be delivered to the target (range: 1.4%-7.6%). When more complex beam configurations were used, the calculated dose using the ZTE-UTE2 combination was the most accurate, with 0.7% deviation from CT, compared to 0.8% for T1-UTE1-T2 and 1.7% for UTE1-UTE2. The presented MR-only based workflow for RTP on a SARRP enables both accurate organ delineation and dose calculations using multiple MR sequences. This method can be useful in longitudinal studies where CT's cumulative radiation dose might contribute to the total

  2. Correlation between EGFR mutation status and the incidence of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lina; Luo, Shuimei; Lin, Heng; Yang, Haitao; Chen, Huijuan; Liao, Ziyuan; Lin, Wanzun; Zheng, Weili; Xie, Xianhe

    2017-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Numerous studies have been performed to investigate the correlation between epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status and the incidence of brain metastases (BMs) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however, the outcomes were inconsistent. Thus, we performed this study to establish the role of EGFR mutation status in BMs. Electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, CBM, WanFang, CNKI were searched to identify relevant trials. The primary endpoint was the incidence of BMs in EGFR mutations or wild type NSCLC and the secondary endpoint was overall survival calculated from the BMs emerging (BMOS). Twenty-two studies incorporating 8,152 participants were eligible. EGFR mutations group possessed a significantly higher risk of BMs (OR =1.99; 95% CI, 1.59-2.48; P=0.000) than EGFR wild type group. In the stratified analysis, compared with EGFR wild type group, EGFR mutations group had a significant higher incidence (OR =2.01; 95% CI, 1.56-2.59; P=0.000) of subsequent BMs while only a trend of increasing the incidence of initial BMs (OR =1.38; 95% CI, 0.98-1.94; P=0.066). Moreover, exon 19 deletion had a trend of increasing the incidence of BMs than exon 21 mutation (OR =1.44; 95% CI, 0.77-2.68; P=0.252). Compared with EGFR wild type group, EGFR mutations group possessed a prolonged overall BMOS (HR =0.68; 95% CI, 0.47-0.98; P=0.038) and a longer BMOS in initial BMs (HR =0.50; 95% CI, 0.31-0.80; P=0.004) but no significant difference in NSCLC with subsequent BMs (HR =0.95; 95% CI, 0.42-2.15; P=0.901). Patients with EGFR mutations were more susceptible to develop into BMs than those with EGFR wild type, especially during the course of disease.

  3. Identifying Dwarfs Workloads in Big Data Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wanling; Luo, Chunjie; Zhan, Jianfeng; Ye, Hainan; He, Xiwen; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yuqing; Tian, Xinhui

    2015-01-01

    Big data benchmarking is particularly important and provides applicable yardsticks for evaluating booming big data systems. However, wide coverage and great complexity of big data computing impose big challenges on big data benchmarking. How can we construct a benchmark suite using a minimum set of units of computation to represent diversity of big data analytics workloads? Big data dwarfs are abstractions of extracting frequently appearing operations in big data computing. One dwarf represen...

  4. Big Data and Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romanillos, Gustavo; Zaltz Austwick, Martin; Ettema, Dick; De Kruijf, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Big Data has begun to create significant impacts in urban and transport planning. This paper covers the explosion in data-driven research on cycling, most of which has occurred in the last ten years. We review the techniques, objectives and findings of a growing number of studies we have classified

  5. The big bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    Our universe was born billions of years ago in a hot, violent explosion of elementary particles and radiation - the big bang. What do we know about this ultimate moment of creation, and how do we know it? Drawing upon the latest theories and technology, this new edition of The big bang, is a sweeping, lucid account of the event that set the universe in motion. Joseph Silk begins his story with the first microseconds of the big bang, on through the evolution of stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, quasars, and into the distant future of our universe. He also explores the fascinating evidence for the big bang model and recounts the history of cosmological speculation. Revised and updated, this new edition features all the most recent astronomical advances, including: Photos and measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE), and Infrared Space Observatory; the latest estimates of the age of the universe; new ideas in string and superstring theory; recent experiments on neutrino detection; new theories about the presence of dark matter in galaxies; new developments in the theory of the formation and evolution of galaxies; the latest ideas about black holes, worm holes, quantum foam, and multiple universes.

  6. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  7. Big Java late objects

    CERN Document Server

    Horstmann, Cay S

    2012-01-01

    Big Java: Late Objects is a comprehensive introduction to Java and computer programming, which focuses on the principles of programming, software engineering, and effective learning. It is designed for a two-semester first course in programming for computer science students.

  8. Big Data ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwitter, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The speed of development in Big Data and associated phenomena, such as social media, has surpassed the capacity of the average consumer to understand his or her actions and their knock-on effects. We are moving towards changes in how ethics has to be perceived: away from individual decisions with

  9. The Big Bang

    CERN Multimedia

    Moods, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    How did the Universe begin? The favoured theory is that everything - space, time, matter - came into existence at the same moment, around 13.7 thousand million years ago. This event was scornfully referred to as the "Big Bang" by Sir Fred Hoyle, who did not believe in it and maintained that the Universe had always existed.

  10. The Big Sky inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Earle; Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Hester, Carolyn; Knuth, Randy; Spangler, Todd; Jones, David; Henthorn, Melissa; Hammill, Brock; Smith, Paul; Salisbury, Rob; Reckin, Gene; Boulafentis, Johna

    2009-01-01

    The University of Montana (UM)-Missoula has implemented a problem-based program in which students perform scientific research focused on indoor air pollution. The Air Toxics Under the Big Sky program (Jones et al. 2007; Adams et al. 2008; Ward et al. 2008) provides a community-based framework for understanding the complex relationship between poor…

  11. Big Data ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwitter, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The speed of development in Big Data and associated phenomena, such as social media, has surpassed the capacity of the average consumer to understand his or her actions and their knock-on effects. We are moving towards changes in how ethics has to be perceived: away from individual decisions with sp

  12. Governing Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej J. Zwitter

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day through pictures, messages, gps-data, etc. "Big Data" is seen simultaneously as the new Philosophers Stone and Pandora's box: a source of great knowledge and power, but equally, the root of serious problems.

  13. Big data in history

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Big Data in History introduces the project to create a world-historical archive, tracing the last four centuries of historical dynamics and change. Chapters address the archive's overall plan, how to interpret the past through a global archive, the missions of gathering records, linking local data into global patterns, and exploring the results.

  14. Big Data ethics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwitter, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    The speed of development in Big Data and associated phenomena, such as social media, has surpassed the capacity of the average consumer to understand his or her actions and their knock-on effects. We are moving towards changes in how ethics has to be perceived: away from individual decisions with sp

  15. Space big book

    CERN Document Server

    Homer, Charlene

    2007-01-01

    Our Combined resource includes all necessary areas of Space for grades five to eight. Get the big picture about the Solar System, Galaxies and the Universe as your students become fascinated by the interesting information about the Sun, Earth, Moon, Comets, Asteroids Meteoroids, Stars and Constellations. Also, thrill your young astronomers as they connect Earth and space cycles with their daily life.

  16. Big Data and Chemical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Harry E.; Williams, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of computerized information that organizations collect and process is growing so large that the term Big Data is commonly being used to describe the situation. Accordingly, Big Data is defined by a combination of the Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity of the data being processed. Big Data tools are already having an impact in…

  17. Big Data and Chemical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Harry E.; Williams, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of computerized information that organizations collect and process is growing so large that the term Big Data is commonly being used to describe the situation. Accordingly, Big Data is defined by a combination of the Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity of the data being processed. Big Data tools are already having an impact in…

  18. Scaling Big Data Cleansing

    KAUST Repository

    Khayyat, Zuhair

    2017-07-31

    Data cleansing approaches have usually focused on detecting and fixing errors with little attention to big data scaling. This presents a serious impediment since identify- ing and repairing dirty data often involves processing huge input datasets, handling sophisticated error discovery approaches and managing huge arbitrary errors. With large datasets, error detection becomes overly expensive and complicated especially when considering user-defined functions. Furthermore, a distinctive algorithm is de- sired to optimize inequality joins in sophisticated error discovery rather than na ̈ıvely parallelizing them. Also, when repairing large errors, their skewed distribution may obstruct effective error repairs. In this dissertation, I present solutions to overcome the above three problems in scaling data cleansing. First, I present BigDansing as a general system to tackle efficiency, scalability, and ease-of-use issues in data cleansing for Big Data. It automatically parallelizes the user’s code on top of general-purpose distributed platforms. Its programming inter- face allows users to express data quality rules independently from the requirements of parallel and distributed environments. Without sacrificing their quality, BigDans- ing also enables parallel execution of serial repair algorithms by exploiting the graph representation of discovered errors. The experimental results show that BigDansing outperforms existing baselines up to more than two orders of magnitude. Although BigDansing scales cleansing jobs, it still lacks the ability to handle sophisticated error discovery requiring inequality joins. Therefore, I developed IEJoin as an algorithm for fast inequality joins. It is based on sorted arrays and space efficient bit-arrays to reduce the problem’s search space. By comparing IEJoin against well- known optimizations, I show that it is more scalable, and several orders of magnitude faster. BigDansing depends on vertex-centric graph systems, i.e., Pregel

  19. Big and small women facing small culture / Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Varblane, Reet, 1952-

    1999-01-01

    Feministlik kunst Eestis alates 1994. aastast. Näitustest EST. FEM, Kood-eks, Private Views. Videod. Fotoinstallatsioonid. Tuntumad kunstnikud: Mare Tralla, Ene-Liis Semper, Mari Laanemets, Eve Kiiler, Tiina Tammetalu, Kai Kaljo, Ly Lestberg, Liina Siib jt. Kunstnike rühmitused: F.F.F.F. Teemad: ema, väike naine, keha. 6 illustratsiooni

  20. Big and small women facing small culture / Reet Varblane

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Varblane, Reet, 1952-

    1999-01-01

    Feministlik kunst Eestis alates 1994. aastast. Näitustest EST. FEM, Kood-eks, Private Views. Videod. Fotoinstallatsioonid. Tuntumad kunstnikud: Mare Tralla, Ene-Liis Semper, Mari Laanemets, Eve Kiiler, Tiina Tammetalu, Kai Kaljo, Ly Lestberg, Liina Siib jt. Kunstnike rühmitused: F.F.F.F. Teemad: ema, väike naine, keha. 6 illustratsiooni

  1. Advancements in Big Data Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Vaniachine, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ever-increasing volumes of scientific data present new challenges for Distributed Computing and Grid-technologies. The emerging Big Data revolution drives new discoveries in scientific fields including nanotechnology, astrophysics, high-energy physics, biology and medicine. New initiatives are transforming data-driven scientific fields by pushing Bid Data limits enabling massive data analysis in new ways. In petascale data processing scientists deal with datasets, not individual files. As a result, a task (comprised of many jobs) became a unit of petascale data processing on the Grid. Splitting of a large data processing task into jobs enabled fine-granularity checkpointing analogous to the splitting of a large file into smaller TCP/IP packets during data transfers. Transferring large data in small packets achieves reliability through automatic re-sending of the dropped TCP/IP packets. Similarly, transient job failures on the Grid can be recovered by automatic re-tries to achieve reliable Six Sigma produc...

  2. Business and Science - Big Data, Big Picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, A.

    2013-12-01

    Data Science is more than the creation, manipulation, and transformation of data. It is more than Big Data. The business world seems to have a hold on the term 'data science' and, for now, they define what it means. But business is very different than science. In this talk, I address how large datasets, Big Data, and data science are conceptually different in business and science worlds. I focus on the types of questions each realm asks, the data needed, and the consequences of findings. Gone are the days of datasets being created or collected to serve only one purpose or project. The trick with data reuse is to become familiar enough with a dataset to be able to combine it with other data and extract accurate results. As a Data Curator for the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS), my specialty is communication. Our team enables Arctic sciences by ensuring datasets are well documented and can be understood by reusers. Previously, I served as a data community liaison for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). Again, my specialty was communicating complex instructions and ideas to a broad audience of data users. Before entering the science world, I was an entrepreneur. I have a bachelor's degree in economics and a master's degree in environmental social science. I am currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Geography. Because my background has embraced both the business and science worlds, I would like to share my perspectives on data, data reuse, data documentation, and the presentation or communication of findings. My experiences show that each can inform and support the other.

  3. Solitary brain metastasis of an occult and stable small-cell lung cancer in a schizophrenic patient: a 3-year control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesien-Lewandowicz, Emilia; Spych, Michal; Fijuth, Jacek; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2010-08-01

    Small-cell lung cancer is a highly aggressive carcinoma, with poorer prognosis in patients with brain metastases. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with a cerebellar tumour which, following surgery, was revealed to be a metastatic small-cell lung carcinoma. Subsequent CT and PET scanning showed a small, isolated 8 mm nodule in the upper lobe of the right lung. The patient was suffering from schizophrenia and has been treated with clozapine for 17 years. Because of the unusual presentation, there was no therapy given for the primary tumour at the time, and systemic therapy or surgery was discussed. However, 18 months later, the nodule was slightly larger (14 mm), and surgery was performed. On pathology examination, the tumour was presented as a typical small-cell carcinoma. Standard chest irradiation with systemic chemotherapy was given. At the time of writing, 39 months after diagnosis of metastatic small-cell carcinoma, the patient is disease free. However, this case is unusual in that a long-term observation of a small stable primary tumour in the lung took place without any therapy being given. This case strongly supports the thesis that small-cell lung cancer may comprise a heterogeneous group of tumours with different biological properties. The proapoptotic effect of clozapine may be also taken into account.

  4. Analysis of Small Ischemic Lesions in the Examinees of a Brain Dock and Neurological Examination of Animals Subjected to Cortical or Basal Ganglia Photothrombotic Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Tabata, Hitoshi; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya; Schallert, Timothy; Keep, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cases of small brain ischemic lesions found in examinees of a brain dock (neurological health screening center). Small cerebral infarction was found in 17 % of the examinees (733 cases). White matter lesions were found in 24 %. Infarctions were located in the cortex or subcortical white matter in 31 % and in the basal ganglia in 44 % of cases. Infratentorial infarction was found in 1.6 %. We have developed an animal model of small infarction in the cortex or basal ganglia induced by photothrombosis in rodents. Sprague-Dawley rats or Mongolian gerbils were anesthetized and photothrombotic infarction was induced in the left caudate nucleus or parietal cortex by light exposure via an optic fiber and intravenous Rose Bengal dye injection. Histological examination revealed development of a small spherical infarction surrounding the tip of the optic fiber. The lesion turned to a cyst by 6 weeks after lesioning. Neurological deficits were found in animals both with cortical and caudate infarction. Behavioral changes in an open field test differed with the lesion site. Neurological deficits were sustained longer in animals with larger infarctions. Thus, photothrombotic infarction is useful for analyzing location-dependent and size-dependent neurological and neuropathological changes after cerebral infarction.

  5. How Big Are "Martin's Big Words"? Thinking Big about the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Traci

    "Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." tells of King's childhood determination to use "big words" through biographical information and quotations. In this lesson, students in grades 3 to 5 explore information on Dr. King to think about his "big" words, then they write about their own…

  6. A Single Session of rTMS Enhances Small-Worldness in Writer’s Cramp: Evidence from Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Multi-Modal Brain Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose D. Bharath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS induces widespread changes in brain connectivity. As the network topology differences induced by a single session of rTMS are less known we undertook this study to ascertain whether the network alterations had a small-world morphology using multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI.Method: Simultaneous EEG-fMRI was acquired in duplicate before (R1 and after (R2 a single session of rTMS in 14 patients with Writer’s Cramp (WC. Whole brain neuronal and hemodynamic network connectivity were explored using the graph theory measures and clustering coefficient, path length and small-world index were calculated for EEG and resting state fMRI (rsfMRI. Multi-modal graph theory analysis was used to evaluate the correlation of EEG and fMRI clustering coefficients.Result: A single session of rTMS was found to increase the clustering coefficient and small-worldness significantly in both EEG and fMRI (p < 0.05. Multi-modal graph theory analysis revealed significant modulations in the fronto-parietal regions immediately after rTMS. The rsfMRI revealed additional modulations in several deep brain regions including cerebellum, insula and medial frontal lobe.Conclusion: Multi-modal graph theory analysis of simultaneous EEG-fMRI can supplement motor physiology methods in understanding the neurobiology of rTMS in vivo. Coinciding evidence from EEG and rsfMRI reports small-world morphology for the acute phase network hyper-connectivity indicating changes ensuing low-frequency rTMS is probably not “noise”.

  7. High plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count unfavorably impact survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Fei; Cai, Ling; Zhang, Xue-Wen; Wen, Yin-Sheng; Su, Xiao-Dong; Rong, Tie-Hua; Zhang, Lan-Jun

    2014-02-01

    High expression of fibrinogen and platelets are often observed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with local regional or distant metastasis. However, the role of these factors remains unclear. The aims of this study were to evaluate the prognostic significance of plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count, as well as to determine the overall survival of NSCLC patients with brain metastases. A total of 275 NSCLC patients with brain metastasis were enrolled into this study. Univariate analysis showed that high plasma fibrinogen concentration was associated with age≥65 years (P = 0.011), smoking status (P = 0.009), intracranial symptoms (P = 0.022), clinical T category (P = 0.010), clinical N category (P = 0.003), increased partial thromboplastin time (P low plasma fibrinogen concentration demonstrated longer overall survival compared with those with high plasma fibrinogen concentration (median, 17.3 months versus 11.1 months; P≤0.001). A similar result was observed for platelet counts (median, 16.3 months versus 11.4 months; P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed that both plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count were independent prognostic factors for NSCLC with brain metastases (R2 = 1.698, P high plasma fibrinogen concentration and platelet count indicate poor prognosis for NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Thus, these two biomarkers might be independent prognostic predictors for this subgroup of NSCLC patients.

  8. Influence of dietary fatty acids on endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain, liver and small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Andreas; Petersen, Gitte; Hellgren, Lars

    2008-01-01

    acid in brain, jejunum and liver. The OA-diet increased brain levels of anandamide and oleoylethanolamide (not 2-arachidonoylglycerol) without changing tissue fatty acid composition. The same diet increased oleoylethanolamide in liver. All five dietary fats decreased oleoylethanolamide in jejunum...... (AA)) on tissue levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, oleoylethanolamide, palmitoylethanolamide, stearoylethanolamide, linoleoylethanolamide, eicosapentaenoylethanolamide, docosahexaenoylethanolamide and tissue fatty acid composition. The LA-diet increased linoleoylethanolamide and linoleic...... without changing levels of anandamide, suggesting that dietary fat may have an orexigenic effect. The AA-diet increased anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in jejunum without effect on liver. The FO-diet decreased liver levels of all N-acylethanolamines (except eicosapentaenoylethanolamide...

  9. The BIG gene is required for auxin-mediated organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Lu, Wenwen; Ma, Yurong; Qin, Qianqian; Hou, Suiwen

    2013-04-01

    Control of organ size by cell expansion and cell proliferation is a fundamental process during development, but the importance of BIG in this process is still poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new allele mutant of BIG in Arabidopsis: big-j588. The mutant displayed small aerial organs that were characterized by reduced cell size in the epidermis and short roots with decreased cell numbers. The big-j588 axr1 double and big-j588 arf7 arf19 triple mutants displayed more severe defects in leaf expansion and root elongation than their parents, implying BIG is involved in auxin-dependent organ growth. Genetic analysis suggests that BIG may act synergistically with PIN1 to affect leaf growth. The PIN1 protein level decreased in both the root cells and the tips of leaf pavement cell lobes of big-j588. Further analysis showed that the auxin maxima in the roots and the leaves of big-j588 decreased. Therefore, we concluded that the small leaves and the short roots of big-j588 were associated with reduction of auxin maxima. Overall, our study suggested that BIG is required for Arabidopsis organ growth via auxin action.

  10. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth...... characteristics, but a different radiosensitivity. The 54A tumors are twice as radiosensitive as the 54B's. In the present study the tumors were treated with 2.5, 10, and 40 Gy. For comparison, nude mice were given cranial irradiation at the same three doses, and the effect was evaluated by in vivo 31P-MRS...... in ATP/Pi. The differential effect on tumors and brain might be relevant for monitoring irradiation effects by in vivo 31P-MRS in patients with brain metastases....

  11. Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients after Chemotherapy Treatment: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Bromis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC patients have mainly focused on exploring neurocognitive deficits associated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI. Little is known about functional brain alterations that might occur due to chemotherapy treatment in this population before PCI is administered. For this reason, we used resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to examine potential functional connectivity disruptions in brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, the Sensorimotor Network, and the Task-Positive Network (TPN. Nineteen SCLC patients after platinum-based chemotherapy treatment and thirteen controls were recruited in the current study. ROI-to-ROI and Seed-to-Voxel analyses were carried out and revealed functional connectivity deficits in patients within all the networks investigated demonstrating the possible negative effect of chemotherapy in cognitive functions in SCLC populations.

  12. ANALYTICS OF BIG DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Shubhada Talegaon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Big Data analytics has started to impact all types of organizations, as it carries the potential power to extract embedded knowledge from big amounts of data and react according to it in real time. The current technology enables us to efficiently store and query large datasets, the focus is now on techniques that make use of the complete data set, instead of sampling. This has tremendous implications in areas like machine learning, pattern recognition and classification, sentiment analysis, social networking analysis to name a few. Therefore, there are a number of requirements for moving beyond standard data mining technique. Purpose of this paper is to understand various techniques to analysis data.

  13. Big Data-Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.S.G. Aruna Sri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Big data is the term for any gathering of information sets, so expensive and complex, that it gets to be hard to process for utilizing customary information handling applications. The difficulties incorporate investigation, catch, duration, inquiry, sharing, stockpiling, Exchange, perception, and protection infringement. To reduce spot business patterns, anticipate diseases, conflict etc., we require bigger data sets when compared with the smaller data sets. Enormous information is hard to work with utilizing most social database administration frameworks and desktop measurements and perception bundles, needing rather enormously parallel programming running on tens, hundreds, or even a large number of servers. In this paper there was an observation on Hadoop architecture, different tools used for big data and its security issues.

  14. Big Data as Governmentality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Klinkby Madsen, Anders; Rasche, Andreas

    This paper conceptualizes how large-scale data and algorithms condition and reshape knowledge production when addressing international development challenges. The concept of governmentality and four dimensions of an analytics of government are proposed as a theoretical framework to examine how big...... data is constituted as an aspiration to improve the data and knowledge underpinning development efforts. Based on this framework, we argue that big data’s impact on how relevant problems are governed is enabled by (1) new techniques of visualizing development issues, (2) linking aspects...... of international development agendas to algorithms that synthesize large-scale data, (3) novel ways of rationalizing knowledge claims that underlie development efforts, and (4) shifts in professional and organizational identities of those concerned with producing and processing data for development. Our discussion...

  15. Finding the big bang

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Lyman A; Partridge, R Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Cosmology, the study of the universe as a whole, has become a precise physical science, the foundation of which is our understanding of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) left from the big bang. The story of the discovery and exploration of the CMBR in the 1960s is recalled for the first time in this collection of 44 essays by eminent scientists who pioneered the work. Two introductory chapters put the essays in context, explaining the general ideas behind the expanding universe and fossil remnants from the early stages of the expanding universe. The last chapter describes how the confusion of ideas and measurements in the 1960s grew into the present tight network of tests that demonstrate the accuracy of the big bang theory. This book is valuable to anyone interested in how science is done, and what it has taught us about the large-scale nature of the physical universe.

  16. N末端脑钠肽和大内皮素-1对心衰的预后价值%Prognostic Value of N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Big Endothelin-1 in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪隆海; 陈启松; 夏芳; 张平; 何海军

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study was prospectively desigued to investigate the prognostic factors for chronic heart failure and the prognostic ability of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and big endothelin-l (Big ET-1) in patients with chronic heart failure. Methods To study 143 consecutive patients hospitalized for chronic heart failure. Serum concentration of NT-proBNP,cTnI,CKMB and plasma Big ET-1 as well as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and NYHA class I to IV on admission were measured. Cardiac events were found by patients to discharge after 360~480 days, prospectively. Results During a median follow-up period of 380 days,the endpoint of recurrence for cardiac events was reached in 57 patients with 143 heart failure. Patients with endpoint events were older (82 vs 52,P = 0. 000),in a higher functional class (3 vs l,P=0. 000),had higher levels of NT-proBNP (3 802 pmol/L vs 891 pmol/L,P=0. 000) and Big ET-1 (5.13 pmol/L vs 3. 53 pmol/L,P = 0. 000) compared with those without endpoint events. On a Cox proportional hazards regression models analyses, age NT-proBNP and Big ET-1 were found to be the independent predictors of cardiac events. Risk ratio (RR) were 1.175,3. 987 and 2. 691,respectively. Logistic regression models analyses,NT-proBNP and Big ET-1 were found independent predictors of death. Odd ratio (OR) were 2.515 and 1. 978,respectively. Conclusion Measurement of NT-proBNP and Big ET-1 in patients with chronic heart failure could help to identify patients at higher risk for cardiac events and patients for prognosis.%目的 通过对心衰患者的随访研究,探讨N末端脑钠肽(NT-proBNP)和大内皮素-1(Big ET-1)对心衰患者的预后价值.方法 研究143例心衰住院患者,检测入院时NT-proBNP,Big ET-1,肌钙蛋白I,CK-MB和左室射血分数以及NYHA分级.并随访观察患者出院后360~480 d的心血管事件再发生情况.结果 143例心衰患者的中位随访380 d,发生心脏事件57例.发生与未发生

  17. Small-Animal PET Study of Adenosine A(1) Receptors in Rat Brain : Blocking Receptors and Raising Extracellular Adenosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Kwizera, Chantal; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    2011-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain causes sedation, reduces anxiety, inhibits seizures, and promotes neuroprotection. Cerebral A(1)R can be visualized using 8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-C-11-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine (C-11-MPDX) and PET. This study aims to test whether C-11-MPDX

  18. Small-Animal PET Study of Adenosine A(1) Receptors in Rat Brain : Blocking Receptors and Raising Extracellular Adenosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Kwizera, Chantal; Sijbesma, Jurgen W. A.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van Waarde, Aren

    2011-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain causes sedation, reduces anxiety, inhibits seizures, and promotes neuroprotection. Cerebral A(1)R can be visualized using 8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-C-11-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine (C-11-MPDX) and PET. This study aims to test whether C-11-MPDX c

  19. Big³. Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C U; Séroussi, B; Jaulent, M-C

    2014-05-22

    To provide an editorial introduction into the 2014 IMIA Yearbook of Medical Informatics with an overview of the content, the new publishing scheme, and upcoming 25th anniversary. A brief overview of the 2014 special topic, Big Data - Smart Health Strategies, and an outline of the novel publishing model is provided in conjunction with a call for proposals to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Yearbook. 'Big Data' has become the latest buzzword in informatics and promise new approaches and interventions that can improve health, well-being, and quality of life. This edition of the Yearbook acknowledges the fact that we just started to explore the opportunities that 'Big Data' will bring. However, it will become apparent to the reader that its pervasive nature has invaded all aspects of biomedical informatics - some to a higher degree than others. It was our goal to provide a comprehensive view at the state of 'Big Data' today, explore its strengths and weaknesses, as well as its risks, discuss emerging trends, tools, and applications, and stimulate the development of the field through the aggregation of excellent survey papers and working group contributions to the topic. For the first time in history will the IMIA Yearbook be published in an open access online format allowing a broader readership especially in resource poor countries. For the first time, thanks to the online format, will the IMIA Yearbook be published twice in the year, with two different tracks of papers. We anticipate that the important role of the IMIA yearbook will further increase with these changes just in time for its 25th anniversary in 2016.

  20. Big Bang 8

    CERN Document Server

    Apolin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Physik soll verständlich sein und Spaß machen! Deshalb beginnt jedes Kapitel in Big Bang mit einem motivierenden Überblick und Fragestellungen und geht dann von den Grundlagen zu den Anwendungen, vom Einfachen zum Komplizierten. Dabei bleibt die Sprache einfach, alltagsorientiert und belletristisch. Band 8 vermittelt auf verständliche Weise Relativitätstheorie, Kern- und Teilchenphysik (und deren Anwendungen in der Kosmologie und Astrophysik), Nanotechnologie sowie Bionik.

  1. Big Bang 6

    CERN Document Server

    Apolin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Physik soll verständlich sein und Spaß machen! Deshalb beginnt jedes Kapitel in Big Bang mit einem motivierenden Überblick und Fragestellungen und geht dann von den Grundlagen zu den Anwendungen, vom Einfachen zum Komplizierten. Dabei bleibt die Sprache einfach, alltagsorientiert und belletristisch. Der Band 6 RG behandelt die Gravitation, Schwingungen und Wellen, Thermodynamik und eine Einführung in die Elektrizität anhand von Alltagsbeispielen und Querverbindungen zu anderen Disziplinen.

  2. Big Bang 5

    CERN Document Server

    Apolin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Physik soll verständlich sein und Spaß machen! Deshalb beginnt jedes Kapitel in Big Bang mit einem motivierenden Überblick und Fragestellungen und geht dann von den Grundlagen zu den Anwendungen, vom Einfachen zum Komplizierten. Dabei bleibt die Sprache einfach, alltagsorientiert und belletristisch. Der Band 5 RG behandelt die Grundlagen (Maßsystem, Größenordnungen) und die Mechanik (Translation, Rotation, Kraft, Erhaltungssätze).

  3. Big Bang 7

    CERN Document Server

    Apolin, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Physik soll verständlich sein und Spaß machen! Deshalb beginnt jedes Kapitel in Big Bang mit einem motivierenden Überblick und Fragestellungen und geht dann von den Grundlagen zu den Anwendungen, vom Einfachen zum Komplizierten. Dabei bleibt die Sprache einfach, alltagsorientiert und belletristisch. In Band 7 werden neben einer Einführung auch viele aktuelle Aspekte von Quantenmechanik (z. Beamen) und Elektrodynamik (zB Elektrosmog), sowie die Klimaproblematik und die Chaostheorie behandelt.

  4. Big Bang Circus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, C.

    2011-06-01

    Big Bang Circus is an opera I composed in 2001 and which was premiered at the Venice Biennale Contemporary Music Festival in 2002. A chamber group, four singers and a ringmaster stage the story of the Universe confronting and interweaving two threads: how early man imagined it and how scientists described it. Surprisingly enough fancy, myths and scientific explanations often end up using the same images, metaphors and sometimes even words: a strong tension, a drumskin starting to vibrate, a shout…

  5. In silico genome wide mining of conserved and novel miRNAs in the brain and pineal gland of Danio rerio using small RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Suyash; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Pandey, Manmohan; Srivastava, Shreya

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that bind to the mRNA of the target genes and regulate the expression of the gene at the post-transcriptional level. Zebrafish is an economically important freshwater fish species globally considered as a good predictive model for studying human diseases and development. The present study focused on uncovering known as well as novel miRNAs, target prediction of the novel miRNAs and the differential expression of the known miRNA using the small RNA sequencing data of the brain and pineal gland (dark and light treatments) obtained from NCBI SRA. A total of 165, 151 and 145 known zebrafish miRNAs were found in the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Chromosomes 4 and 5 of zebrafish reference assembly GRCz10 were found to contain maximum number of miR genes. The miR-181a and miR-182 were found to be highly expressed in terms of number of reads in the brain and pineal gland, respectively. Other ncRNAs, such as tRNA, rRNA and snoRNA, were curated against Rfam. Using GRCz10 as reference, the subsequent bioinformatic analyses identified 25, 19 and 9 novel miRNAs from the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Targets of the novel miRNAs were identified, based on sequence complementarity between miRNAs and mRNA, by searching for antisense hits in the 3'-UTR of reference RNA sequences of the zebrafish. The discovery of novel miRNAs and their targets in the zebrafish genome can be a valuable scientific resource for further functional studies not only in zebrafish but also in other economically important fishes.

  6. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperduto, Paul W., E-mail: psperduto@mropa.com [Metro MN CCOP, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wang, Meihua [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Schell, Michael C. [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shah, Sunjay A. [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Perry, Gad [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Suh, John H. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  7. Big Data Knowledge Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Umar Banuqitah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Big Data (BD era has been arrived. The ascent of big data applications where information accumulation has grown beyond the ability of the present programming instrument to catch, manage and process within tolerable short time. The volume is not only the characteristic that defines big data, but also velocity, variety, and value. Many resources contain BD that should be processed. The biomedical research literature is one among many other domains that hides a rich knowledge. MEDLINE is a huge biomedical research database which remain a significantly underutilized source of biological information. Discovering the useful knowledge from such huge corpus leading to many problems related to the type of information such as the related concepts of the domain of texts and the semantic relationship associated with them. In this paper, an agent-based system of two–level for Self-supervised relation extraction from MEDLINE using Unified Medical Language System (UMLS Knowledgebase, has been proposed . The model uses a Self-supervised Approach for Relation Extraction (RE by constructing enhanced training examples using information from UMLS with hybrid text features. The model incorporates Apache Spark and HBase BD technologies with multiple data mining and machine learning technique with the Multi Agent System (MAS. The system shows a better result in comparison with the current state of the art and naïve approach in terms of Accuracy, Precision, Recall and F-score.

  8. Disaggregating asthma: Big investigation versus big data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrave, Danielle; Henderson, John; Simpson, Angela; Buchan, Iain; Bishop, Christopher; Custovic, Adnan

    2017-02-01

    We are facing a major challenge in bridging the gap between identifying subtypes of asthma to understand causal mechanisms and translating this knowledge into personalized prevention and management strategies. In recent years, "big data" has been sold as a panacea for generating hypotheses and driving new frontiers of health care; the idea that the data must and will speak for themselves is fast becoming a new dogma. One of the dangers of ready accessibility of health care data and computational tools for data analysis is that the process of data mining can become uncoupled from the scientific process of clinical interpretation, understanding the provenance of the data, and external validation. Although advances in computational methods can be valuable for using unexpected structure in data to generate hypotheses, there remains a need for testing hypotheses and interpreting results with scientific rigor. We argue for combining data- and hypothesis-driven methods in a careful synergy, and the importance of carefully characterized birth and patient cohorts with genetic, phenotypic, biological, and molecular data in this process cannot be overemphasized. The main challenge on the road ahead is to harness bigger health care data in ways that produce meaningful clinical interpretation and to translate this into better diagnoses and properly personalized prevention and treatment plans. There is a pressing need for cross-disciplinary research with an integrative approach to data science, whereby basic scientists, clinicians, data analysts, and epidemiologists work together to understand the heterogeneity of asthma.

  9. Small business & employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, Harm van

    2015-01-01

    Understanding SMEs is essential to our aspired succes as an economic partner. Small enterprises are not small big enterprises, and differ substantially among them The key ingredient to our help from education remains the education of a new highly skilled generation of workers … and entrepreneurs.

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  11. Random Forests for Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    Genuer, Robin; Poggi, Jean-Michel; Tuleau-Malot, Christine; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Big Data is one of the major challenges of statistical science and has numerous consequences from algorithmic and theoretical viewpoints. Big Data always involve massive data but they also often include online data and data heterogeneity. Recently some statistical methods have been adapted to process Big Data, like linear regression models, clustering methods and bootstrapping schemes. Based on decision trees combined with aggregation and bootstrap ideas, random forests were introduced by Bre...

  12. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined in vivo [sup 31]P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristjansen, P.E.G. (Finseninstitutet, Copenhagen (Denmark) Copenhagen University, Panum Institute (Denmark). Department of Biochemistry, NMR-Center, Institute of Pathological Anatomy); Pedersen, A.G. (Finseninstitutet, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Quistorff, B. (Copenhagen University, Panum Institute (Denmark). Department of Biochemistry, NMR-Center); Spang-Thomsen, M. (Copenhagen University (Denmark). Institute of Pathological Anatomy)

    1992-07-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo [sup 31]P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([sup 31]P-MRS) of 2 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth characteristics, but a different radiosensitivity. The 54A tumors are twice as radiosensitive as the 54B's. In the present study the tumors were treated with 2.5, 10 and 40 Gy. For comparison, nude mice were given cranial irradiation at the same 3 doses, and the effect was evaluated by in vivo [sup 31]P-MRS. No effect was observed in brain at any dose level. In contrast, 40 Gy induced a statistically significant reduction in ATP/p[sub i] ratio during the 12-h post-irradiation period. This effect was more pronounced in 54A than in 54B. Some reduction was observed following 10 Gy, whereas 2.5 Gy induced no changes in ATP/P[sub i]. The differential effect on tumors and brain might be relevant for monitoring irradiation effects by in vivo [sup 31]P-MRS in patients with brain metastases. (author). 11 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs.

  13. Paradigm shift of therapeutic management of brain metastases in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer in the era of targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Akimasa; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2017-07-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations commonly present brain metastases (BM) at the time of NSCLC diagnosis or during the clinical course. Conventionally, the prognosis of BM has been extremely poor, but the advent of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has drastically improved the prognosis in these patients. Despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier, EGFR-TKIs have dramatic therapeutic effects on both BM and extracranial disease. In addition, recent systemic chemotherapies reportedly play a role in controlling BM. These treatment modalities can potentially replace whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to prevent or delay neurocognitive decline. Therefore, how to utilize these treatments is one issue. The other issue is what kind of treatment is best for recurrence after TKI therapy. Recent reports have shown a positive effect of a combination therapy of EGFR-TKI and radiotherapy on BM. Although neurocognitive decline is underscored when WBRT is considered, a survival benefit from WBRT has been proven especially in the potential long survivors with good prognostic index, especially disease-specific graded prognostic index (DS-GPA). In this review, treatment strategy including chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy is discussed in terms of risk-benefit balance in conjunction with DS-GPA.

  14. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  15. Acute brain hemorrhage in dengue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a tropical arboviral infection that can have severe hemorrhagic complication.Acute brain hemorrhage in dengue is rare and is a big challenge in neurosurgery.To perform surgery for management of acute brain hemorrhage in dengue is a controversial issue.Here, the authors try to summarize the previous reports on this topic and compare neurosurgery versus conservative management.

  16. Privacy and Big Data

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Terence

    2011-01-01

    Much of what constitutes Big Data is information about us. Through our online activities, we leave an easy-to-follow trail of digital footprints that reveal who we are, what we buy, where we go, and much more. This eye-opening book explores the raging privacy debate over the use of personal data, with one undeniable conclusion: once data's been collected, we have absolutely no control over who uses it or how it is used. Personal data is the hottest commodity on the market today-truly more valuable than gold. We are the asset that every company, industry, non-profit, and government wants. Pri

  17. Big Data Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Adrian TOLE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The amount of data that is traveling across the internet today, not only that is large, but is complex as well. Companies, institutions, healthcare system etc., all of them use piles of data which are further used for creating reports in order to ensure continuity regarding the services that they have to offer. The process behind the results that these entities requests represents a challenge for software developers and companies that provide IT infrastructure. The challenge is how to manipulate an impressive volume of data that has to be securely delivered through the internet and reach its destination intact. This paper treats the challenges that Big Data creates.

  18. How can SMEs benefit from big data? Challenges and a path forward

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Shirley; Goeb, Rainer; Manco, Giuseppe; Pievatolo, Antonio; Tort-Martorell Llabrés, Xavier; Reis, Marco Seabra

    2016-01-01

    Big data is big news, and large companies in all sectors are making significant advances in their customer relations, product selection and development and consequent profitability through using this valuable commodity. Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) have proved themselves to be slow adopters of the new technology of big data analytics and are in danger of being left behind. In Europe, SMEs are a vital part of the economy, and the challenges they encounter need to be addressed as a matte...

  19. Can Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf Save China's Animation Industry?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liqin

    2009-01-01

    "My dreamed husband is big big wolf," claimed Miss Fang, a young lady who works in KPMG Beijing Office. This big big wolf is a lovely cartoon wolf appeared in a Pleasant Goat and Big Big Wolf produced independently by Chinese.

  20. Cyclodiene insecticide, DDE, DDT, arsenic, and mercury contamination of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) foraging at a Colorado Superfund site

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, T.J.; Everette, A.L.; Ellison, L.E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) National Wildlife Area, near Denver, Colorado, is a Superfund site contaminated by past military and industrial uses, including pesticide manufacturing. From an ecosystem standpoint, the most critical contaminants at RMA are certain cyclodiene insecticides and metabolites, p,p???-DDE, p,p???-DDT, arsenic, and mercury. Bats are important ecosystem components that can be impacted by persistent contaminants because of their position in the food chain and their potential longevity and thus duration of exposure. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) were captured (n = 51) while foraging at RMA in the summers of 1997 and 1998 for determination of concentrations of contaminants of concern in carcasses, brains, and stomach contents. Adult females (n = 15) were also tracked by radiotelemetry to determine locations of nearest maternity roosts for sampling of guano for contaminant analysis and inspection for potential contaminant-induced mortality. Bats captured while foraging at RMA had measurable quantities of dieldrin and DDE in masticated insect samples from stomach contents and significantly higher concentrations of dieldrin, DDE, DDT, and mercury (juveniles) in carcasses than big brown bats (n = 26) sampled at a reference area 80 km to the north. Concentrations of dieldrin and DDE in brains of bats captured while foraging at RMA were also greater than in bats from the reference area, but not high enough to suggest mortality. Maximum concentrations of DDE, DDT, and cyclodienes in brains of big brown bats were found in adult males from RMA. Guano from the two closest known roosts had significantly higher concentrations of dieldrin, DDE, and mercury than guano from two roosts at the reference area. Dieldrin concentrations in carcasses of bats from RMA were highest in juveniles, followed by adult males and adult females. DDE concentrations in carcasses were lowest in adult females at both sites and highest in adult males at RMA. No contaminant