WorldWideScience

Sample records for bifunctional nucleases ombbd

  1. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease,including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis","dinuclear synergistic catalysis","metal-free catalysis" ,and especially,the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  2. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JingJing; SHAO Ying; WEI Li; LI Ying; SHENG Xin; LIU Fang; LU GuoYuan

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease, including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis", "dinuclear synergistic catalysis", "metal-free catalysis", and especially, the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  3. Mutation detection using Surveyor nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Peter; Shandilya, Harini; D'Alessio, James M; O'Connor, Kevin; Durocher, Jeffrey; Gerard, Gary F

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a simple and flexible mutation detection technology for the discovery and mapping of both known and unknown mutations. This technology is based on a new mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease from celery, Surveyor nuclease, which is a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases. Surveyor nuclease cleaves with high specificity at the 3' side of any mismatch site in both DNA strands, including all base substitutions and insertion/deletions up to at least 12 nucleotides. Surveyor nuclease technology involves four steps: (i) PCR to amplify target DNA from both mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (ii) hybridization to form heteroduplexes between mutant and wild-type reference DNA; (iii) treatment of annealed DNA with Surveyor nuclease to cleave heteroduplexes; and (iv) analysis of digested DNA products using the detection/separation platform of choice. The technology is highly sensitive, detecting rare mutants present at as low as 1 in 32 copies. Unlabeled Surveyor nuclease digestion products can be analyzed using conventional gel electrophoresis or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while end labeled digestion products are suitable for analysis by automated gel or capillary electrophoresis. The entire protocol can be performed in less than a day and is suitable for automated and high-throughput procedures.

  4. Genome engineering with targetable nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Current technology enables the production of highly specific genome modifications with excellent efficiency and specificity. Key to this capability are targetable DNA cleavage reagents and cellular DNA repair pathways. The break made by these reagents can produce localized sequence changes through inaccurate nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), often leading to gene inactivation. Alternatively, user-provided DNA can be used as a template for repair by homologous recombination (HR), leading to the introduction of desired sequence changes. This review describes three classes of targetable cleavage reagents: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). As a group, these reagents have been successfully used to modify genomic sequences in a wide variety of cells and organisms, including humans. This review discusses the properties, advantages, and limitations of each system, as well as the specific considerations required for their use in different biological systems.

  5. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.H. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: wen_yuehua@126.com; Cheng, J. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China); Xun, Y. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, P.H. [Full Cell R and D Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Yang, Y.S. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-08-20

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O{sub 2}), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2}. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes.

  6. Copper complexes as chemical nucleases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhil R Chakravarty; Pattubala A N Reddy; Bidyut K Santra; Anitha M Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Redox active mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. The complexes have planar N-donor heterocyclic bases like 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), dipyridoquinoxaline (dpq) and dipyridophenazine (dppz) ligands that are suitable for intercalation to B-DNA. Complexes studied for nuclease activity have the formulations [Cu(dpq)2(H2O)] (ClO4)2.H2O (1), [{CuL(H2O)}2(-ox)](ClO4)2 (L = bpy, 2; phen, 3; dpq, 4; and dppz, 5) and [Cu(L)(salgly)] (L = bpy, 6; phen, 7; dpq, 8; and dppz, 9), where salgly is a tridentate Schiff base obtained from the condensation of glycine and salicylaldehyde. The dpq complexes are efficient DNA binding and cleavage active species. The dppz complexes show good binding ability but poor nuclease activity. The cleavage activity of the bis-dpq complex is significantly higher than the bis-phen complex of copper(II). The nuclease activity is found to be dependent on the intercalating nature of the complex and on the redox potential of the copper(II)/copper(I) couple. The ancillary ligand plays a significant role in binding and cleavage activity.

  7. Quantitative Microplate Assay for Real-Time Nuclease Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the phenomenon of nucleases exposing oligonucleotide phosphate backbones to phosphatases we present a novel quantitative method for kinetics of nuclease catalysis. Inorganic phosphate released from nuclease products by phosphatases could be quantified in real-time by a fluorescent sensor of inorganic phosphate. Two different nucleases were employed, showing the versatility of this assay for multiple turnover label-free nuclease studies.

  8. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Daniel F Voytas; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific geno...

  9. Designed nucleases for targeted genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junwon; Chung, Jae-Hee; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Hyongbum

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome-editing technology using designed nucleases has been evolving rapidly, and its applications are widely expanding in research, medicine and biotechnology. Using this genome-modifying technology, researchers can precisely and efficiently insert, remove or change specific sequences in various cultured cells, micro-organisms, animals and plants. This genome editing is based on the generation of double-strand breaks (DSBs), repair of which modifies the genome through nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). In addition, designed nickase-induced generation of single-strand breaks can also lead to precise genome editing through HDR, albeit at relatively lower efficiencies than that induced by nucleases. Three kinds of designed nucleases have been used for targeted DSB formation: zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and RNA-guided engineered nucleases derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system. A growing number of researchers are using genome-editing technologies, which have become more accessible and affordable since the discovery and adaptation of CRISPR-Cas9. Here, the repair mechanism and outcomes of DSBs are reviewed and the three types of designed nucleases are discussed with the hope that such understanding will facilitate applications to genome editing.

  10. [TALE nuclease engineering and targeted genome modification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Xiao, An; Huang, Peng; Wang, Wei-Ye; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Zhang, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Artificial designer nucleases targeting specific DNA sequences open up a new field for reverse genetics study. The rapid development of engineered endonucleases (EENs) enables targeted genome modification theoretically in any species. The construction of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is simpler with higher specificity and less toxicity than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Here, we summarized the recent progresses and prospects of TALEN technology, with an emphasis on its structure, function, and construction strategies, as well as a collection of species and genes that have been successfully modified by TALENs, especially the application in zebrafish.

  11. TALE nucleases: tailored genome engineering made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni

    2012-10-01

    Custom-made designer nucleases have evolved into an indispensable platform to precisely alter complex genomes for basic research, biotechnology, synthetic biology, or human gene therapy. In this review we describe how transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a chief technology for targeted genome editing in different model organisms as well as human stem cells. We summarize the technological background and provide an overview of the current state-of-the-art of TALENs with regard to activity and specificity of these nucleases for targeted genome engineering.

  12. Mouse genome engineering using designer nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Mario; Cermak, Tomas; Voytas, Daniel F; Pelczar, Pawel

    2014-04-02

    Transgenic mice carrying site-specific genome modifications (knockout, knock-in) are of vital importance for dissecting complex biological systems as well as for modeling human diseases and testing therapeutic strategies. Recent advances in the use of designer nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) 9 system for site-specific genome engineering open the possibility to perform rapid targeted genome modification in virtually any laboratory species without the need to rely on embryonic stem (ES) cell technology. A genome editing experiment typically starts with identification of designer nuclease target sites within a gene of interest followed by construction of custom DNA-binding domains to direct nuclease activity to the investigator-defined genomic locus. Designer nuclease plasmids are in vitro transcribed to generate mRNA for microinjection of fertilized mouse oocytes. Here, we provide a protocol for achieving targeted genome modification by direct injection of TALEN mRNA into fertilized mouse oocytes.

  13. Biological and biomedical applications of engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yunzhi; Xiao, Li; Li, Alice S S; Zhang, Xu; Sirois, Pierre; Zhang, Jia; Li, Kai

    2013-09-01

    The development of engineered nucleases is the fruit of a new technological approach developed in the last two decades which has led to significant benefits on genome engineering, particularly on gene therapy. These applications enable efficient and specific genetic modifications via the induction of a double-strand break (DSB) in a specific genomic target sequence, followed by the homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. In addition to the application on gene modification in cells and intact organisms, a number of recent papers have reported that this gene editing technology can be applied effectively to human diseases. With the promising data obtained using engineered endonucleases in gene therapy, it appears reasonable to expect that more diseases could be treated and even be cured in this new era of individualized medicine. This paper first brief introduces the development of engineered nucleases with a special emphasis on zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs), and then takes CCR5-based gene therapy as an example to discuss the therapeutic applications of engineered nucleases.

  14. Genome Editing in Rats Using TALE Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Ménoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thinard, Reynald; Savignard, Chloé; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The rat is an important animal model to understand gene function and model human diseases. Since recent years, the development of gene-specific nucleases has become important for generating new rat models of human diseases, to analyze the role of genes and to generate human antibodies. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases efficiently create gene-specific knockout rats and lead to the possibility of gene targeting by homology-directed recombination (HDR) and generating knock-in rats. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout and knock-in rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  15. Minimizing off-Target Mutagenesis Risks Caused by Programmable Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Ishida

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Programmable nucleases, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs, and clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats associated protein-9 (CRISPR-Cas9, hold tremendous potential for applications in the clinical setting to treat genetic diseases or prevent infectious diseases. However, because the accuracy of DNA recognition by these nucleases is not always perfect, off-target mutagenesis may result in undesirable adverse events in treated patients such as cellular toxicity or tumorigenesis. Therefore, designing nucleases and analyzing their activity must be carefully evaluated to minimize off-target mutagenesis. Furthermore, rigorous genomic testing will be important to ensure the integrity of nuclease modified cells. In this review, we provide an overview of available nuclease designing platforms, nuclease engineering approaches to minimize off-target activity, and methods to evaluate both on- and off-target cleavage of CRISPR-Cas9.

  16. Targeting DNA double-strand breaks with TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Michelle; Cermak, Tomas; Doyle, Erin L; Schmidt, Clarice; Zhang, Feng; Hummel, Aaron; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2010-10-01

    Engineered nucleases that cleave specific DNA sequences in vivo are valuable reagents for targeted mutagenesis. Here we report a new class of sequence-specific nucleases created by fusing transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to the catalytic domain of the FokI endonuclease. Both native and custom TALE-nuclease fusions direct DNA double-strand breaks to specific, targeted sites.

  17. Identification of off-target cleavage sites of zinc finger nucleases and TAL effector nucleases using predictive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Eli J; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Using engineered nucleases, such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), to make targeted genomic modifications has become a common technique to create new model organisms and custom cell lines, and has shown great promise for disease treatment. However, these nucleases have the potential for off-target cleavage that could confound interpretation of experimental results and be detrimental for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method to test for nuclease cleavage at potential off-target sites predicted by bioinformatics models.

  18. Synthesis of bifunctional antibodies for immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, B S; Wilson, G S

    2000-09-01

    The synthesis of bifunctional antibodies using the principle of solid-phase synthesis is described. Two Fab' fragments were chemically linked together via a bismaleimide crosslinking reagent. The F(ab')(2) fragments from intact immunoglobulin G (IgG) were prepared using an immobilized pepsin column. Goat, mouse, and human antibodies were digested completely within 4 h. The F(ab')(2) fragments thus produced did not contain any IgG impurities. Fab' fragments were produced by reducing the heavy interchain disulfide bonds using 2-mercaptoethylamine. Use of the solid-phase reactor in the preparation of the bifunctional antibodies eliminated many of the time-consuming separation steps between the fragmentation and conjugation steps. This procedure facilitates the automation of bifunctional antibody preparation and the rapid optimization of reaction conditions.

  19. Solid phase synthesis of bifunctional antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, B S; Wilson, G S

    1995-12-15

    Bifunctional antibodies were prepared using the principle of solid-phase synthesis. The two Fab' fragments were chemically linked together via a bismaleimide crosslinking reagent. The F(ab')2 fragments from intact IgG were prepared using an immobilized pepsin column. Goat, mouse and human antibodies were digested completely within 4 h. The F(ab')2 fragments thus produced did not contain any IgG impurities. The Fab' fragments were produced by reducing the inter-heavy chain disulfide bonds using 2-mercaptoethylamine. The use of the solid-phase reactor in the preparation of the bifunctional antibodies eliminated many of the time-consuming separation steps between the fragmentation and conjugation steps. This procedure facilitates the automation of the bifunctional antibody preparation and the rapid optimization of reaction conditions.

  20. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclease-based editing strategies, and challenges that are specific to various applications of the TALEN technology. We review examples of applying TALENs for studying gene function and regulation, generating disease models, and developing gene therapies. The current status of genome editing and future directions for other uses of these technologies are also discussed.

  1. The Development of TALE Nucleases for Biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Ousterout, David G.; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    The development of a facile genome engineering technology based on transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has led to significant advances in diverse areas of science and medicine. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the development of TALENs and the use of this technology in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical applications. This includes the discovery of DNA recognition by TALEs, engineering new TALE proteins to diverse targets, general advances in nuclea...

  2. Genome editing with engineered nucleases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Osakabe, Keishi

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of successful 'genome editing' now exist. Genome editing uses engineered nucleases as powerful tools to target specific DNA sequences to edit genes precisely in the genomes of both model and crop plants, as well as a variety of other organisms. The DNA-binding domains of zinc finger (ZF) proteins were the first to be used as genome editing tools, in the form of designed ZF nucleases (ZFNs). More recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), as well as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, which utilizes RNA-DNA interactions, have proved useful. A key step in genome editing is the generation of a double-stranded DNA break that is specific to the target gene. This is achieved by custom-designed endonucleases, which enable site-directed mutagenesis via a non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway and/or gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) to occur efficiently at specific sites in the genome. This review provides an overview of recent advances in genome editing technologies in plants, and discusses how these can provide insights into current plant molecular biology research and molecular breeding technology.

  3. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  4. Origins of Programmable Nucleases for Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan; Carroll, Dana

    2016-02-27

    Genome engineering with programmable nucleases depends on cellular responses to a targeted double-strand break (DSB). The first truly targetable reagents were the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) showing that arbitrary DNA sequences could be addressed for cleavage by protein engineering, ushering in the breakthrough in genome manipulation. ZFNs resulted from basic research on zinc finger proteins and the FokI restriction enzyme (which revealed a bipartite structure with a separable DNA-binding domain and a non-specific cleavage domain). Studies on the mechanism of cleavage by 3-finger ZFNs established that the preferred substrates were paired binding sites, which doubled the size of the target sequence recognition from 9 to 18bp, long enough to specify a unique genomic locus in plant and mammalian cells. Soon afterwards, a ZFN-induced DSB was shown to stimulate homologous recombination in cells. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that are based on bacterial TALEs fused to the FokI cleavage domain expanded this capability. The fact that ZFNs and TALENs have been used for genome modification of more than 40 different organisms and cell types attests to the success of protein engineering. The most recent technology platform for delivering a targeted DSB to cellular genomes is that of the RNA-guided nucleases, which are based on the naturally occurring Type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas9 system. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs that use protein motifs for DNA sequence recognition, CRISPR-Cas9 depends on RNA-DNA recognition. The advantages of the CRISPR-Cas9 system-the ease of RNA design for new targets and the dependence on a single, constant Cas9 protein-have led to its wide adoption by research laboratories around the world. These technology platforms have equipped scientists with an unprecedented ability to modify cells and organisms almost at will, with wide-ranging implications across biology and medicine. However, these nucleases have also been shown to cut

  5. A guide to genome engineering with programmable nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2014-05-01

    Programmable nucleases - including zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) derived from the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) system - enable targeted genetic modifications in cultured cells, as well as in whole animals and plants. The value of these enzymes in research, medicine and biotechnology arises from their ability to induce site-specific DNA cleavage in the genome, the repair (through endogenous mechanisms) of which allows high-precision genome editing. However, these nucleases differ in several respects, including their composition, targetable sites, specificities and mutation signatures, among other characteristics. Knowledge of nuclease-specific features, as well as of their pros and cons, is essential for researchers to choose the most appropriate tool for a range of applications.

  6. Genome Editing in Mice Using TALE Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Benedikt; Brandl, Christina; Ortiz, Oskar; Wurst, Wolfgang; Kühn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Gene engineering for generating targeted mouse mutants is a key technology for biomedical research. Using TALENs as sequence-specific nucleases to induce targeted double-strand breaks, the mouse genome can be directly modified in zygotes in a single step without the need for embryonic stem cells. By embryo microinjection of TALEN mRNAs and targeting vectors, knockout and knock-in alleles can be generated fast and efficiently. In this chapter we provide protocols for the application of TALENs in mouse zygotes.

  7. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-04-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  8. TALE nucleases and next generation GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific and adaptable DNA binding domains are essential modules to develop genome engineering technologies for crop improvement. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) proteins are used to provide a highly specific and adaptable DNA binding modules. TALE chimeric nucleases (TALENs) were used to generate site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in vitro and in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mammalian and plant cells. The genomic DSBs can be generated at predefined and user-selected loci and repaired by either the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology dependent repair (HDR). Thus, TALENs can be used to achieve site-specific gene addition, stacking, deletion or inactivation. TALE-based genome engineering tools should be powerful to develop new agricultural biotechnology approaches for crop improvement. Here, we discuss the recent research and the potential applications of TALENs to accelerate the generation of genomic variants through targeted mutagenesis and to produce a non-transgenic GM crops with the desired phenotype.

  9. Okazaki fragment maturation: nucleases take centre stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Binghui Shen

    2011-01-01

    Completion of lagging strand DNA synthesis requires processing of up to 50 million Okazaki fragments per cell cycle in mammalian cells. Even in yeast, the Okazaki fragment maturation happens approximately a million times during a singte round of DNA replication. Therefore, efficient processing of Okazaki fragments is vital for DNA replication and cell proliferation. During this process,primase-synthesized RNA/DNA primers are removed, and Okazaki fragments are joined into an intact lagging strand DNA. The processing of RNA/DNA primers requires a group of structure-specific nucleases typified by flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1). Here, we summarize the distinct roles of these nucleases in different pathways for removal of RNA/DNA primers. Recent findings reveal that Okazaki fragment maturation is highly coordinated. The dynamic interactions of polymerase δ, FEN1 and DNA ligase I with proliferating cell nuclear antigen allow these enzymes to act sequentially during Okazaki fragment maturation. Such protein-protein interactions may be regulated by post-translational modifications. We also discuss studies using mutant mouse models that suggest two distinct cancer etiological mechanisms arising from defects in different steps of Okazaki fragment maturation.Mutations that affect the efficiency of RNA primer removal may result in accumulation of unligated nicks and DNA double-strand breaks. These DNA strand breaks can cause varying forms of chromosome aberrations, contributing to development of cancer that associates with aneuploidy and gross chromosomal rearrangement. On the other hand, mutations that impair editing out of polymerase o incorporation errors result in cancer displaying a strong mutator phenotype.

  10. Genetic correction using engineered nucleases for gene therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei Lisa; Nakano, Takao; Hotta, Akitsu

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations in humans are associated with congenital disorders and phenotypic traits. Gene therapy holds the promise to cure such genetic disorders, although it has suffered from several technical limitations for decades. Recent progress in gene editing technology using tailor-made nucleases, such as meganucleases (MNs), zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) and, more recently, CRISPR/Cas9, has significantly broadened our ability to precisely modify target sites in the human genome. In this review, we summarize recent progress in gene correction approaches of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the clinical applications of gene therapy.

  11. Genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Wang, Haoyi; Kiani, Samira; Lai, Christine S; Gao, Qing; Cassady, John P; Cost, Gregory J; Zhang, Lei; Santiago, Yolanda; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zeitler, Bryan; Cherone, Jennifer M; Meng, Xiangdong; Hinkley, Sarah J; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-07-07

    Targeted genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells is a prerequisite for exploiting their full potential. Such genetic manipulations can be achieved using site-specific nucleases. Here we engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) for five distinct genomic loci. At all loci tested we obtained human embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones carrying transgenic cassettes solely at the TALEN-specified location. Our data suggest that TALENs employing the specific architectures described here mediate site-specific genome modification in human pluripotent cells with similar efficiency and precision as do zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs).

  12. Genome Editing in Human Cells Using CRISPR/Cas Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2015-10-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. This unit describes protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases.

  13. GENOME EDITING IN HUMAN CELLS USING CRISPR/CAS NUCLEASES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyvekens, Nicolas; Tsai, Shengdar; Joung, J. Keith

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been broadly adopted for highly efficient genome editing in a variety of model organisms and human cell types. Unlike previous genome editing technologies such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), the CRISPR/Cas technology does not require complex protein engineering and can be utilized by any researcher proficient in basic molecular biology and cell culture techniques. Here we describe protocols for design and cloning of vectors expressing single or multiplex gRNAs, for transient transfection of human cell lines, and for quantitation of mutation frequencies by T7 Endonuclease I assay. These protocols also include guidance for using two improvements that increase the specificity of CRISPR/Cas nucleases: truncated gRNAs and dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases. PMID:26423589

  14. Astaxanthin diferulate as a bifunctional antioxidant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papa, T.B.R.; Pinho, V.D.; Nascimento, E.P. do;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Astaxanthin when esterified with ferulic acid is better singlet oxygen quencher with k2 = (1.58 ± 0.1) 10(10) L mol(- 1)s(- 1) in ethanol at 25°C compared with astaxanthin with k2 = (1.12 ± 0.01) 10(9) L mol(- 1)s(- 1). The ferulate moiety in the astaxanthin diester is a better radical s....... The mutual enhancement of antioxidant activity for the newly synthetized astaxanthin diferulate becoming a bifunctional antioxidant is rationalized according to a two-dimensional classification plot for electron donation and electron acceptance capability....

  15. Editing the Plasmodium vivax Genome, Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes Barros, Roberto R.; Straimer, Judith; Sa, Juliana M; Salzman, Rebecca E.; Melendez-Muniz, Viviana A.; Mu, Jianbing; David A Fidock; Thomas E. Wellems

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria morbidity worldwide yet has remained genetically intractable. To stably modify this organism, we used zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which take advantage of homology-directed DNA repair mechanisms at the site of nuclease action. Using ZFNs specific to the gene encoding P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr), we transfected blood specimens from Saimiri boliviensis monkeys infected with the pyrimethamine (Pyr)–susceptible Chesson strain with a ZFN ...

  16. Acid-base bifunctional catalytic surfaces for nucleophilic addition reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    This article illustrates the modification of oxide surfaces with organic amine functional groups to create acid-base bifunctional catalysts, summarizing our previous reports and also presenting new data. Immobilization of organic amines as bases on inorganic solid-acid surfaces afforded highly active acid-base bifunctional catalysts, which enabled various organic transformations including C--C coupling reactions, though these reactions did not proceed with either the homogeneous amine precursors or the acidic supports alone. Spectroscopic characterization, such as by solid-state MAS NMR and FTIR, revealed not only the interactions between acidic and basic sites but also bifunctional catalytic reaction mechanisms.

  17. Iron Group Hydrides in Noyori Bifunctional Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robert H

    2016-12-01

    This is an overview of the hydride-containing catalysts prepared in the Morris group for the efficient hydrogenation of simple ketones, imines, nitriles and esters and the asymmetric hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation of prochiral ketones and imines. The work was inspired by and makes use of Noyori metal-ligand bifunctional concepts involving the hydride-ruthenium amine-hydrogen HRuNH design. It describes the synthesis and some catalytic properties of hydridochloro, dihydride and amide complexes of ruthenium and in one case, osmium, with monodentate, bidentate and tetradentate phosphorus and nitrogen donor ligands. The iron hydride that has been identified in a very effective asymmetric transfer hydrogenation process is also mentioned. The link between the HMNH structure and the sense of enantioinduction is demonstrated by use of simple transition state models.

  18. Bifunctional xylanases and their potential use in biotechnology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Numan, M.Th.

    is half as sweet as sucrose, can be applicable to foods as a sweetener that is capable of improving diabetic symptoms [37]. Concluding remarks This review provides the information on most of the aspects of bifunctional enzyme with special reference... of the bifunctional xylanases it is necessary in future to utilize such hybrid protein as an alternative to expensive and polluting chemical treatments or to improve already existing enzymatic processes for utilization of veg- etal by-products in the agro...

  19. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    element of immunosuppressive regimens for organ transplantation (1). Despite these 24 Bifunctional Ligand Control of Nuclear Receptors 3 well...Gerez J, Paez-Pereda M, Rein T, Iniguez-Lluhi JA, Holsboer F, Arzt E 2013 RSUME enhances glucocorticoid receptor SUMOylation and transcriptional... transplant recipients. Transpl Immunol 27:12-18 42. Marinec PS, Lancia JK, Gestwicki JE 2008 Bifunctional molecules evade cytochrome P(450) metabolism

  20. Hybrid nanosensor for colorimetric and ultrasensitive detection of nuclease contaminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Paola; Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Nucleases are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade DNA or RNA, thus they can prejudice the good outcome of molecular biology experiments involving nucleic acids. We propose a colorimetric test for the naked-eye detection of nuclease contaminations. The system uses an hybrid nanosensor, based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with DNA probes. Our assay is rapid, instrument-free, simple and low-cost. Moreover, it reaches sensitivity equal or better than those of commercial kits, and presents a lot of advantageous aspects. Therefore, it is very competitive, with a real market potential. This test will be relevant in routine process monitoring in scientific laboratories, and in quality control in clinical laboratories and industrial processes, allowing the simultaneous detection of nucleases with different substrate specificities and large-scale screening.

  1. Generation and functional analysis of zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathomen, Toni; Segal, David J; Brondani, Vincent; Müller-Lerch, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of artificial endonucleases with tailored specificities has opened the door for a wide range of new applications, including the correction of mutated genes directly in the chromosome. This kind of gene therapy is based on homologous recombination, which can be stimulated by the creation of a targeted DNA double-strand break (DSB) near the site of the desired recombination event. Artificial nucleases containing zinc finger DNA-binding domains have provided important proofs of concept, showing that inserting a DSB in the target locus leads to gene correction frequencies of 1-18% in human cells. In this paper, we describe how zinc finger nucleases are assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and present two methods to assess these custom nucleases quickly in vitro and in a cell-based recombination assay.

  2. A TALE nuclease architecture for efficient genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey C; Tan, Siyuan; Qiao, Guijuan; Barlow, Kyle A; Wang, Jianbin; Xia, Danny F; Meng, Xiangdong; Paschon, David E; Leung, Elo; Hinkley, Sarah J; Dulay, Gladys P; Hua, Kevin L; Ankoudinova, Irina; Cost, Gregory J; Urnov, Fyodor D; Zhang, H Steve; Holmes, Michael C; Zhang, Lei; Gregory, Philip D; Rebar, Edward J

    2011-02-01

    Nucleases that cleave unique genomic sequences in living cells can be used for targeted gene editing and mutagenesis. Here we develop a strategy for generating such reagents based on transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins from Xanthomonas. We identify TALE truncation variants that efficiently cleave DNA when linked to the catalytic domain of FokI and use these nucleases to generate discrete edits or small deletions within endogenous human NTF3 and CCR5 genes at efficiencies of up to 25%. We further show that designed TALEs can regulate endogenous mammalian genes. These studies demonstrate the effective application of designed TALE transcription factors and nucleases for the targeted regulation and modification of endogenous genes.

  3. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich

    the protein specifically recognizes ribonucleotides and their bases and the importance of specific divalent ions for the binding of these. Both Pop2p and Rrp6p belong to the family of DEDD nucleases with the active sites of the two proteins containing these four acidic residues as well as two divalent cations...

  4. Adenoviral vector DNA for accurate genome editing with engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Henriques, Sara F D; Janssen, Josephine M; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2014-10-01

    Engineered sequence-specific nucleases and donor DNA templates can be customized to edit mammalian genomes via the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. Here we report that the nature of the donor DNA greatly affects the specificity and accuracy of the editing process following site-specific genomic cleavage by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases. By applying these designer nucleases together with donor DNA delivered as protein-capped adenoviral vector (AdV), free-ended integrase-defective lentiviral vector or nonviral vector templates, we found that the vast majority of AdV-modified human cells underwent scarless homology-directed genome editing. In contrast, a significant proportion of cells exposed to free-ended or to covalently closed HR substrates were subjected to random and illegitimate recombination events. These findings are particularly relevant for genome engineering approaches aiming at high-fidelity genetic modification of human cells.

  5. Astaxanthin diferulate as a bifunctional antioxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, T B R; Pinho, V D; do Nascimento, E S P; Santos, W G; Burtoloso, A C B; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin when esterified with ferulic acid is better singlet oxygen quencher with k2 = (1.58 ± 0.1) 10(10) L mol(-1)s(-1) in ethanol at 25°C compared with astaxanthin with k2 = (1.12 ± 0.01) 10(9) L mol(-1)s(-1). The ferulate moiety in the astaxanthin diester is a better radical scavenger than free ferulic acid as seen from the rate constant of scavenging of 1-hydroxyethyl radicals in ethanol at 25°C with a second-order rate constant of (1.68 ± 0.1) 10(8) L mol(-1)s(-1) compared with (1.60 ± 0.03) 10(7) L mol(-1)s(-1) for the astaxanthin:ferulic acid mixture, 1:2 equivalents. The mutual enhancement of antioxidant activity for the newly synthetized astaxanthin diferulate becoming a bifunctional antioxidant is rationalized according to a two-dimensional classification plot for electron donation and electron acceptance capability.

  6. Shadow enhancers enable Hunchback bifunctionality in the Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staller, Max V; Vincent, Ben J; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Lydiard-Martin, Tara; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-01-20

    Hunchback (Hb) is a bifunctional transcription factor that activates and represses distinct enhancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Hb can activate and repress the same enhancer. Computational models predicted that Hb bifunctionally regulates the even-skipped (eve) stripe 3+7 enhancer (eve3+7) in Drosophila blastoderm embryos. We measured and modeled eve expression at cellular resolution under multiple genetic perturbations and found that the eve3+7 enhancer could not explain endogenous eve stripe 7 behavior. Instead, we found that eve stripe 7 is controlled by two enhancers: the canonical eve3+7 and a sequence encompassing the minimal eve stripe 2 enhancer (eve2+7). Hb bifunctionally regulates eve stripe 7, but it executes these two activities on different pieces of regulatory DNA--it activates the eve2+7 enhancer and represses the eve3+7 enhancer. These two "shadow enhancers" use different regulatory logic to create the same pattern.

  7. Editing the Plasmodium vivax genome, using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Straimer, Judith; Sa, Juliana M; Salzman, Rebecca E; Melendez-Muniz, Viviana A; Mu, Jianbing; Fidock, David A; Wellems, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of malaria morbidity worldwide yet has remained genetically intractable. To stably modify this organism, we used zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), which take advantage of homology-directed DNA repair mechanisms at the site of nuclease action. Using ZFNs specific to the gene encoding P. vivax dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr), we transfected blood specimens from Saimiri boliviensis monkeys infected with the pyrimethamine (Pyr)-susceptible Chesson strain with a ZFN plasmid carrying a Pyr-resistant mutant pvdhfr sequence. We obtained Pyr-resistant parasites in vivo that carried mutant pvdhfr and additional silent mutations designed to confirm editing. These results herald the era of stable P. vivax genetic modifications.

  8. The Effect of Micrococcal Nuclease Digestion on Nucleosome Positioning Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Ryun Chung; Ilona Dunkel; Franziska Heise; Christian Linke; Sylvia Krobitsch; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E.; Sperling, Silke R; Martin Vingron

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent mod...

  9. Designing and testing the activities of TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yanni; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a powerful tool for genome editing. To avoid labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental screening for active TALENs, a scoring system can help select optimal target sites. Here we describe a procedure to design active TALENs using a scoring system named Scoring Algorithm for Predicted TALEN Activity (SAPTA) and a method to test the activity of individual and pairs of TALENs.

  10. Editing livestock genomes with site-specific nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F; Tan, Wenfang; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a major transformation in our ability to precisely manipulate the genomes of animals. Efficiencies of introducing precise genetic alterations in large animal genomes have improved 100000-fold due to a succession of site-specific nucleases that introduce double-strand DNA breaks with a specificity of 10(-9). Herein we describe our applications of site-specific nucleases, especially transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to engineer specific alterations in the genomes of pigs and cows. We can introduce variable changes mediated by non-homologous end joining of DNA breaks to inactive genes. Alternatively, using homology-directed repair, we have introduced specific changes that support either precise alterations in a gene's encoded polypeptide, elimination of the gene or replacement by another unrelated DNA sequence. Depending on the gene and the mutation, we can achieve 10%-50% effective rates of precise mutations. Applications of the new precision genetics are extensive. Livestock now can be engineered with selected phenotypes that will augment their value and adaption to variable ecosystems. In addition, animals can be engineered to specifically mimic human diseases and disorders, which will accelerate the production of reliable drugs and devices. Moreover, animals can be engineered to become better providers of biomaterials used in the medical treatment of diseases and disorders.

  11. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNAfootprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L.; Yin, Yadong; Gerion, Daniele; Kunchakarra, Siri; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Jett, Stephen D.; Bear, David G.; Alivisatos, Paul; Lee, Luke P.

    2006-08-15

    We have constructed a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of DNA length changes and perform DNA footprinting. The ruler was created by tethering double-stranded DNA to single Au nanoparticles. The scattering spectra of Au-DNA nanoconjugates showed red-shifted peak plasmon resonance wavelength dependent on DNA length, which can be measured with sub-nanometer axial resolution, averaging {approx}1.24 nm peak wavelength shift per DNA base pair. The spectra of individual Au-DNA nanoconjugates in the presence of nuclease showed a time-resolved dependence on the reaction dynamics, allowing quantitative, kinetic and real-time measurement of nuclease activity. The ruler was further developed into a new DNA footprinting platform. We showed the specific binding of a protein to DNA and the accurate mapping of its footprint. This work promises a very fast and convenient platform for mapping DNA-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other DNA size-based methods.

  12. Safety evaluation of nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okado, Nobuo; Hasegawa, Kazushige; Mizuhashi, Fukutaro; Lynch, Barry S; Vo, Trung D; Roberts, Ashley S

    2016-02-01

    Nuclease P1 has been widely used in the food industry to enhance or create flavor. One commercial source of this enzyme is Penicillium citrinum, an anamorphic mesophilic fungus with a long history of safe use in Europe and Asia as a fermentation organism used in the production of ribonucleases. Given the intended use in food for human consumption, and noting its potential presence at trace levels in finished products, a series of safety studies including an in vitro Ames and chromosome aberration assay, an in vivo rat erythrocyte micronucleus assay and a 90-day oral toxicity study in rats were conducted. No mutagenic activity was observed in the Ames assay. Equivocal activity in the chromosome aberration assay was not replicated in the micronucleus assay at doses of up to 1007 mg total organic solids (TOS)/kg body weight (bw)/day. Following oral administration of nuclease P1 at dosages of 10.1, 101 or 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day to Sprague-Dawley rats, no adverse effects on any study parameter were observed. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 1007 mg TOS/kg bw/day. The results of the genotoxicity studies and subchronic rat study support the safe use in food production of nuclease P1 produced from P. citrinum.

  13. Single flexible nanofiber to simultaneously realize electricity-magnetism bifunctionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Sheng, Shujuan; Ma, Qianli; Lv, Nan; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Dong, Xiangting; Liu, Guixia, E-mail: wenshengyu2009@sina.com, E-mail: dongxiangting888@163.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry and Nanotechnology at Universities of Jilin Province, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun (China)

    2016-03-15

    In order to develop new-typed multifunctional composite nanofibers, PANI/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PVP flexible bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous electrical conduction and magnetism have been successfully fabricated via a facile electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of polyaniline (PANI) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10{sup -3} S·cm{sup -1}. The electrical conductivity and saturation magnetization of the composite nanofibers can be respectively tuned by adding various amounts of PANI and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. The obtained electricity-magnetism bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as electromagnetic interference shielding, special coating, microwave absorption, molecular electronics and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construct technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional nanostructures. (author)

  14. Use of Bifunctional Immunotherapeutic Agents to Target Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Selective Tumor Cell Targeting Using Low-Affinity, Multivalent Interactions Coby B. Carlson†,‡, Patricia Mowery‡, Robert M. Owen†, Emily C. Dykhuizen†, and...washed cells and immediately analyzed for fluorescence using a FACSCalibur flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson ). Data were ana- lyzed using CellQuest...software (Becton Dickinson ). An identical assay omitting the bifunctional conjugate assessed background fluorescence. The relative fluorescence is

  15. Environmentally Benign Bifunctional Solid Acid and Base Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elmekawy, A.; Shiju, N.R.; Rothenberg, G.; Brown, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Solid bifunctional acid-​base catalysts were prepd. in two ways on an amorphous silica support: (1) by grafting mercaptopropyl units (followed by oxidn. to propylsulfonic acid) and aminopropyl groups to the silica surface (NH2-​SiO2-​SO3H)​, and (2) by grafting only aminopropyl groups and then parti

  16. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts(1-4). Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon source

  17. DNA nuclease activity of Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Keuper, Kevin D; Cowan, J A

    2012-06-07

    Artificial nucleases containing Rev-coupled metal chelates based on combinations of the transition metals Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) and the chelators DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, NTA, tripeptide GGH, and tetrapeptide KGHK have been tested for DNA nuclease activity. Originally designed to target reactive transition metal chelates (M-chelates) to the HIV-1 Rev response element mRNA, attachment to the arginine-rich Rev peptide also increases DNA-binding affinity for the attached M-chelates. Apparent K(D) values ranging from 1.7 to 3.6 µM base pairs for binding of supercoiled pUC19 plasmid DNA by Ni-chelate-Rev complexes were observed, as a result of electrostatic attraction between the positively-charged Rev peptide and negatively-charged DNA. Attachment of M-chelates to the Rev peptide resulted in enhancements of DNA nuclease activity ranging from 1-fold (no enhancement) to at least 13-fold (for Cu-DTPA-Rev), for the rate of DNA nicking, with second order rate constants for conversion of DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) up to 6 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for conversion of DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 1 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Freifelder-Trumbo analysis and the ratios of linearization and nicking rate constants (k(lin)/k(nick)) revealed concerted mechanisms for nicking and subsequent linearization of plasmid DNA for all of the Rev-coupled M-chelates, consistent with higher DNA residency times for the Rev-coupled M-chelates. Observed rates for Rev-coupled M-chelates were less skewed by differing DNA-binding affinities than for M-chelates lacking Rev, as a result of the narrow range of DNA-binding affinities observed, and therefore relationships between DNA nuclease activity and other catalyst properties, such as coordination unsaturation, the ability to consume ascorbic acid and generate diffusible radicals, and the identity of the metal center, are now clearly illustrated in light of the similar DNA-binding affinities of all M-chelate-Rev complexes. This work

  18. Current and future delivery systems for engineered nucleases: ZFN, TALEN and RGEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Ain, Qurrat; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2015-05-10

    Gene therapy by engineered nucleases is a genetic intervention being investigated for curing the hereditary disorders by targeting selected genes with specific nucleotides for establishment, suppression, abolishment of a function or correction of mutation. Here, we review the fast developing technology of targeted genome engineering using site specific programmable nucleases zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator like nucleases (TALENs) and cluster regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas) based RNA-guided DNA endonucleases (RGENs) and their different characteristics including pros and cons of genome modifications by these nucleases. We have further discussed different types of delivery methods to induce gene editing, novel development in genetic engineering other than nucleases and future prospects.

  19. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  20. Improved Somatic Mutagenesis in Zebrafish Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs)

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Finola E.; Deepak Reyon; Sander, Jeffry D.; Sarah A Martinez; Blackburn, Jessica S; Cyd Khayter; Ramirez, Cherie L.; J Keith Joung; Langenau, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebra...

  1. Targeted genome editing in human cells using CRISPR/Cas nucleases and truncated guide RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfang; Reyon, Deepak; Joung, J Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases have recently emerged as a robust genome-editing platform that functions in a wide range of organisms. To reduce off-target effects of these nucleases, we developed and validated a modified system that uses truncated guide RNAs (tru-gRNAs). The use of tru-gRNAs leads to decreases in off-target effects and does not generally compromise the on-target efficiencies of these genome-editing nucleases. In this chapter, we describe guidelines for identifying potential tru-gRNA target sites and protocols for measuring the on-target efficiencies of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases in human cells.

  2. Non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Glass, Z A; Xu, Q

    2016-12-01

    Manipulating the genetic makeup of mammalian cells using programmable nuclease-based genome-editing technology has recently evolved into a powerful avenue that holds great potential for treating genetic disorders. There are four types of genome-editing nucleases, including meganucleases, zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat-associated nucleases such as Cas9. These nucleases have been harnessed to introduce precise and specific changes of the genome sequence at virtually any genome locus of interest. The therapeutic relevance of these genome-editing technologies, however, is challenged by the safe and efficient delivery of nuclease into targeted cells. Herein, we summarize recent advances that have been made on non-viral delivery of genome-editing nucleases. In particular, we focus on non-viral delivery of Cas9/sgRNA ribonucleoproteins for genome editing. In addition, the future direction for developing non-viral delivery of programmable nucleases for genome editing is discussed.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 1 December 2016; doi:10.1038/gt.2016.72.

  3. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  4. Targeted mutagenesis in the malaria mosquito using TALE nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Smidler

    Full Text Available Anopheles gambiae, the main mosquito vector of human malaria, is a challenging organism to manipulate genetically. As a consequence, reverse genetics studies in this disease vector have been largely limited to RNA interference experiments. Here, we report the targeted disruption of the immunity gene TEP1 using transgenic expression of Transcription-Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs, and the isolation of several TEP1 mutant A. gambiae lines. These mutations inhibited protein production and rendered TEP1 mutants hypersusceptible to Plasmodium berghei. The TALEN technology opens up new avenues for genetic analysis in this disease vector and may offer novel biotechnology-based approaches for malaria control.

  5. Targeted mutagenesis in the malaria mosquito using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidler, Andrea L; Terenzi, Olivier; Soichot, Julien; Levashina, Elena A; Marois, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae, the main mosquito vector of human malaria, is a challenging organism to manipulate genetically. As a consequence, reverse genetics studies in this disease vector have been largely limited to RNA interference experiments. Here, we report the targeted disruption of the immunity gene TEP1 using transgenic expression of Transcription-Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and the isolation of several TEP1 mutant A. gambiae lines. These mutations inhibited protein production and rendered TEP1 mutants hypersusceptible to Plasmodium berghei. The TALEN technology opens up new avenues for genetic analysis in this disease vector and may offer novel biotechnology-based approaches for malaria control.

  6. The aminoindanol core as a key scaffold in bifunctional organocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac G. Sonsona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The 1,2-aminoindanol scaffold has been found to be very efficient, enhancing the enantioselectivity when present in organocatalysts. This may be explained by its ability to induce a bifunctional activation of the substrates involved in the reaction. Thus, it is easy to find hydrogen-bonding organocatalysts ((thioureas, squaramides, quinolinium thioamide, etc. in the literature containing this favored structural core. They have been successfully employed in reactions such as Friedel–Crafts alkylation, Michael addition, Diels–Alder and aza-Henry reactions. However, the 1,2-aminoindanol core incorporated into proline derivatives has been scarcely explored. Herein, the most representative and illustrative examples are compiled and this review will be mainly focused on the cases where the aminoindanol moiety confers bifunctionality to the organocatalysts.

  7. Genome editing using FACS enrichment of nuclease-expressing cells and indel detection by amplicon analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonowski, Lindsey A; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Riaz, Anjum;

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes methods for increasing and evaluating the efficiency of genome editing based on the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated 9) system, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs...

  8. Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) Hybrid Nucleases for Genome Engineering Application

    KAUST Repository

    Wibowo, Anjar

    2011-06-06

    Gene targeting is a powerful genome engineering tool that can be used for a variety of biotechnological applications. Genomic double-strand DNA breaks generated by engineered site-specific nucleases can stimulate gene targeting. Hybrid nucleases are composed of DNA binding module and DNA cleavage module. Zinc Finger Nucleases were used to generate double-strand DNA breaks but it suffers from failures and lack of reproducibility. The transcription activator–like effectors (TALEs) from plant pathogenic Xanthomonas contain a unique type of DNA-binding domain that bind specific DNA targets. The purpose of this study is to generate novel sequence specific nucleases by fusing a de novo engineered Hax3 TALE-based DNA binding domain to a FokI cleavage domain. Our data show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence and create double-strand DNA breaks in vitro. We also show that the de novo engineered TALE nuclease is capable of generating double-strand DNA breaks in its target sequence in vivo, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that TALE-based hybrid nucleases can be tailored to bind a user-selected DNA sequence and generate site-specific genomic double-strand DNA breaks. TALE-based hybrid nucleases hold much promise as powerful molecular tools for gene targeting applications.

  9. Characterization of a novel non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaobo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thermostable enzymes from thermophiles have attracted extensive studies. In this investigation, a nuclease-encoding gene (designated as GBSV1-NSN was obtained from a thermophilic bacteriophage GBSV1 for the first time. Results After recombinant expression in Escherichia coli, the purified GBSV1-NSN exhibited non-specific nuclease activity, being able to degrade various nucleic acids, including RNA, single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA that was circular or linear. Based on sequence analysis, the nuclease shared no homology with any known nucleases, suggesting that it was a novel nuclease. The characterization of the recombinant GBSV1-NSN showed that its optimal temperature and pH were 60°C and 7.5, respectively. The results indicated that the enzymatic activity was inhibited by enzyme inhibitors or detergents, such as ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, citrate, dithiothreitol, β-mercaptoethanol, guanidine hydrochloride, urea and SDS. In contrast, the nuclease activity was enhanced by TritonX-100, Tween-20 or chaps to approximately 124.5% – 141.6%. The Km of GBSV1-NSN nuclease was 231, 61 and 92 μM, while its kcat was 1278, 241 and 300 s-1 for the cleavage of dsDNA, ssDNA and RNA, respectively. Conclusion Our study, therefore, presented a novel thermostable non-specific nuclease from thermophilic bacteriophage and its overexpression and purification for scientific research and applications.

  10. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2013-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and ra...

  11. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  12. Expanded activity of dimer nucleases by combining ZFN and TALEN for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Smith, Cory; Cheng, Linzhao

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to precisely and efficiently edit mammalian and plant genomes has been significantly improved in recent years, partially due to increasing use of designer nucleases that recognize a pre-determined DNA sequence, make a specific DNA double-strand break, and stimulate gene targeting. A pair of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that recognize two adjacent unique DNA sequences dimerize through the fused FokI nuclease domain and cut in the middle of target DNA sequences. We report here that increasing the length of recognition DNA sequences by TALENs or ZFNs does not necessarily translate to a higher efficiency or specificity. We also discover that one subunit of ZFNs and one subunit of TALENs can form a pair of hybrid nucleases with expanded specificity at two diverse targets, and stimulate gene targeting in multiple cell types including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with improved efficiency.

  13. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) enable targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. The primary advantage of TALENs over other sequence-specific nucleases, namely zinc finger nucleases and meganucleases, lies in their ease of assembly, reliability of function, and thei...

  14. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001.

  15. Barley aleurone cell death is not apoptotic: characterization of nuclease activities and DNA degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P C; Jones, R L

    1999-11-01

    Barley aleurone cells undergo programmed cell death (PCD) when exposed to gibberellic acid (GA), but incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) prevent PCD. We tested the hypothesis that PCD in aleurone cells occurs by apoptosis, and show that the hallmark of apoptosis, namely DNA cleavage into 180 bp fragments, plasma membrane blebbing, and the formation of apoptotic bodies do not occur when aleurone cells die. We show that endogenous barley aleurone nucleases and nucleases present in enzymes used for protoplast preparation degrade aleurone DNA and that DNA degradation by these nucleases is rapid and can result in the formation of 180 bp DNA ladders. Methods are described that prevent DNA degradation during isolation from aleurone layers or protoplasts. Barley aleurone cells contain three nucleases whose activities are regulated by GA and ABA. CA induction and ABA repression of nuclease activities correlate with PCD in aleurone cells. Cells incubated in ABA remain alive and do not degrade their DNA, but living aleurone cells treated with GA accumulate nucleases and hydrolyze their nuclear DNA. We propose that barley nucleases play a role in DNA cleavage during aleurone PCD.

  16. Automated 5 ' nuclease PCR assay for identification of Salmonella enterica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Ahrens, Peter; Rådström, P.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and ready-to-go test based on a 5' nuclease (TaqMan) PCR technique was developed for identification of presumptive Salmonella enterica isolates. The results were compared with those of conventional methods. The TaqMan assay was evaluated for its ability to accurately detect 210 S. enterica...... isolates, including 100 problematic "rough" isolates. An internal positive control was designed to use the same Salmonella primers for amplification of a spiked nonrelevant template (116 bp) in the sample tube. The PCR test correctly identified all the Salmonella strains by resulting in positive end...... Salmonella strains tested resulted in positive FAM and TET signals. In addition, it was found that the complete PCR mixture, predispensed in microwell plates, could be stored for up to 3 months at -20 degrees C, Thus, the diagnostic TaqMan assay developed can be a useful and simple alternative method...

  17. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ryun Chung

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase. Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  18. The effect of micrococcal nuclease digestion on nucleosome positioning data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho-Ryun; Dunkel, Ilona; Heise, Franziska; Linke, Christian; Krobitsch, Sylvia; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E; Sperling, Silke R; Vingron, Martin

    2010-12-29

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into chromatin, whose basic repeating unit is the nucleosome. Nucleosome positioning is a widely researched area. A common experimental procedure to determine nucleosome positions involves the use of micrococcal nuclease (MNase). Here, we show that the cutting preference of MNase in combination with size selection generates a sequence-dependent bias in the resulting fragments. This strongly affects nucleosome positioning data and especially sequence-dependent models for nucleosome positioning. As a consequence we see a need to re-evaluate whether the DNA sequence is a major determinant of nucleosome positioning in vivo. More generally, our results show that data generated after MNase digestion of chromatin requires a matched control experiment in order to determine nucleosome positions.

  19. Genome editing in plant cells by zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinthal, Dan; Tovkach, Andriy; Zeevi, Vardit; Tzfira, Tzvi

    2010-06-01

    Gene targeting is a powerful tool for functional gene studies. However, only a handful of reports have been published describing the successful targeting of genome sequences in model and crop plants. Gene targeting can be stimulated by induction of double-strand breaks at specific genomic sites. The expression of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) can induce genomic double-strand breaks. Indeed, ZFNs have been used to drive the replacement of native DNA sequences with foreign DNA molecules, to mediate the integration of the targeted transgene into native genome sequences, to stimulate the repair of defective transgenes, and as site-specific mutagens in model and crop plant species. This review introduces the principles underlying the use of ZFNs for genome editing, with an emphasis on their recent use for plant research and biotechnology.

  20. Genome editing using artificial site-specific nucleases in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is a model vertebrate suitable for genetic analysis. Forward genetic analysis via chemical mutagenesis screening has established a variety of zebrafish mutants that are defective in various types of organogenesis, and the genes responsible for the individual mutants have been identified from genome mapping. On the other hand, reverse genetic analysis via targeted gene disruption using embryonic stem (ES) cells (e.g., knockout mouse) can uncover gene functions by investigating the phenotypic effects. However, this approach is mostly limited to mice among the vertebrate models because of the difficulty in establishing ES cells. Recently, new gene targeting technologies, such as the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems, have been developed: that can directly introduce genome modifications at the targeted genomic locus. Here, we summarize these new and powerful genome editing techniques for the study of zebrafish.

  1. Plant plasma membrane-bound staphylococcal-like DNases as a novel class of eukaryotic nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leśniewicz Krzysztof

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of degradative nucleases responsible for genomic DNA digestion has been observed in all kingdoms of life. It is believed that the main function of DNA degradation occurring during plant programmed cell death is redistribution of nucleic acid derived products such as nitrogen, phosphorus and nucleotide bases. Plant degradative nucleases that have been studied so far belong mainly to the S1-type family and were identified in cellular compartments containing nucleic acids or in the organelles where they are stored before final application. However, the explanation of how degraded DNA components are exported from the dying cells for further reutilization remains open. Results Bioinformatic and experimental data presented in this paper indicate that two Arabidopsis staphylococcal-like nucleases, named CAN1 and CAN2, are anchored to the cell membrane via N-terminal myristoylation and palmitoylation modifications. Both proteins possess a unique hybrid structure in their catalytic domain consisting of staphylococcal nuclease-like and tRNA synthetase anticodon binding-like motifs. They are neutral, Ca2+-dependent nucleaces showing a different specificity toward the ssDNA, dsDNA and RNA substrates. A study of microarray experiments and endogenous nuclease activity revealed that expression of CAN1 gene correlates with different forms of programmed cell death, while the CAN2 gene is constitutively expressed. Conclusions In this paper we present evidence showing that two plant staphylococcal-like nucleases belong to a new, as yet unidentified class of eukaryotic nucleases, characterized by unique plasma membrane localization. The identification of this class of nucleases indicates that plant cells possess additional, so far uncharacterized, mechanisms responsible for DNA and RNA degradation. The potential functions of these nucleases in relation to their unique intracellular location are discussed.

  2. Charge transfer to a semi-esterified bifunctional phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brede, O.; Hermann, R.; Orthner, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany)

    1996-03-01

    The charge transfer from solvent radical cations of n-butyl chloride and cyclohexane to 2-butyl-6(3`-t-butyl-2`-hydroxy-5`-methylbenzyl)-4-methyl-phenylac rylate (GM) yields in the first step phenoxyl radicals as well as acrylate radical cations of this semi-acrylated bifunctional phenol. Subsequently an intramolecular charge transfer from the acrylate radical cation to the phenol group takes place. Because of the instability of phenol radical cations, under our experimental conditions (nanosecond pulse radiolysis, non-polar solvents, room temperature) phenoxyl radicals are the only observable products of phenol ionization. (author).

  3. A bifunctional perovskite catalyst for oxygen reduction and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Il; Jeong, Hu Young; Lee, Jang-Soo; Kim, Min Gyu; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-04-25

    La0.3(Ba0.5Sr0.5)0.7Co0.8Fe0.2O3d is a promising bifunctional perovskite catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction. This catalyst has circa 10 nm-scale rhombohedral LaCoO3 cobaltite particles distributed on the surface. The dynamic microstructure phenomena are attributed to the charge imbalance from the replacement of A-site cations with La3+ and local stress on Cosite sub-lattice with the cubic perovskite structure.

  4. Bifunctional activation of a direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikovsky, A. A.; Schmitz, H.; Wippermann, K.; Mergel, J.; Fricke, B.; Sanders, T.; Sauer, D. U.

    We report a novel method for performance recovery of direct methanol fuel cells. Lowering of air flow rate below a critical value turns the cell into bifunctional regime, when the oxygen-rich part of the cell generates current while the rest part works in electrolysis mode (electrolytic domain). Upon restoring the normal (super-critical) air flow rate, the galvanic performance of the electrolytic domain increases. This recovery effect is presumably attributed to Pt surface cleaning on the cathode with the simultaneous increase in catalyst utilization on the anode.

  5. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  6. Is BAC Transgenesis Obsolete? State of the Art in the Era of Designer Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA constructs based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs are frequently used to generate transgenic animals as they reduce the influence of position effects and allow predictable expression patterns for genes whose regulatory sequences are not fully identified. Despite these advantages BAC transgenics suffer from drawbacks such as complicated vector construction, low efficiency of transgenesis, and some remaining expression variegation. The recent development of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs has resulted in new transgenic techniques which do not have the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis. Initial reports indicate that such designer nucleases (DNs allow the targeted insertion of transgenes into endogenous loci by direct injection of the targeting vector and mRNA/DNA encoding the predesigned nucleases into oocytes. This results in the transgene being inserted at a specific locus in the mouse genome, thus circumventing the drawbacks associated with BAC transgenesis.

  7. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  8. Photovoltachromic device with a micropatterned bifunctional counter electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavale, Alessandro; Manca, Michele; De Marco, Luisa; Grisorio, Roberto; Carallo, Sonia; Suranna, Gian Paolo; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2014-02-26

    A photovoltachromic window can potentially act as a smart glass skin which generates electric energy as a common dye-sensitized solar cell and, at the same time, control the incoming energy flux by reacting to even small modifications in the solar radiation intensity. We report here the successful implementation of a novel architecture of a photovoltachromic cell based on an engineered bifunctional counter electrode consisting of two physically separated platinum and tungsten oxide regions, which are arranged to form complementary comb-like patterns. Solar light is partially harvested by a dye-sensitized photoelectrode made on the front glass of the cell which fully overlaps a bifunctional counter electrode made on the back glass. When the cell is illuminated, the photovoltage drives electrons into the electrochromic stripes through the photoelectrochromic circuit and promotes the Li(+) diffusion towards the WO3 film, which thus turns into its colored state: a photocoloration efficiency of 17 cm(2) min(-1) W(-1) at a wavelength of 650 nm under 1.0 sun was reported along with fast response (coloration time photovoltaic functionality was also retained due to the copresence of the independently switchable micropatterned platinum electrode.

  9. Stability and kinetics of a bifunctional amylase/trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiri, S; Singh, T P

    1993-11-10

    The stability of the bifunctional amylase/trypsin inhibitor from ragi (Indian finger millet, Eleusine coracana) has been studied by methods of circular dichroism, UV absorption and intrinsic fluorescence. The inhibitor is stable in 8 M urea and 6 M guanidine-HCl. In 150 mM NaCl, thermal denaturation does not occur up to 90 degrees C. However, it is irreversibly denatured in 5 mM NaCl if heated over 73 degrees C. The acidic denaturation is reversible in both high and low salt conditions, but it shows different behavior below pH 1.65 under similar salt conditions. The helical content is about 2-4% in the pH range of 7-9 at which the inhibitor is active maximally. The NaCl concentration does not have a significant effect on the secondary structure elements. The beta-strand form does not show much variation under various conditions. Arg34-Leu35 is the reactive peptide bond in the trypsin-binding site. Trp and Tyr are involved in the binding with amylase. The bifunctional inhibitor represents the sum of individual inhibitors of trypsin and amylase.

  10. Genetic engineering of human ES and iPS cells using TALE nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Hockemeyer, Dirk; Wang, Haoyi; Kiani, Samira; Lai, Christine S.; Gao, Qing; Cassady, John P.; Cost, Gregory J.; Zhang, Lei; Santiago, Yolanda; Miller, Jeffrey C; Zeitler, Bryan; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Meng, Xiangdong; Hinkley, Sarah J; Rebar, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted genetic engineering of human pluripotent cells is a prerequisite for exploiting their full potential. Such genetic manipulations can be achieved using site-specific nucleases. Here we engineered transcription activator–like effector nucleases (TALENs) for five distinct genomic loci. At all loci tested we obtained human embryonic stem cell (ESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) clones carrying transgenic cassettes solely at the TALEN-specified location. Our data suggest that T...

  11. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embr...

  12. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; George H Silva; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly us...

  13. Role of the nuclease of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae in dispersal of organisms from biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Christine; Chande, Aroon; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Jurcisek, Joseph A; Ketterer, Margaret; Shao, Jian; Gotoh, Kenji; Foster, Eric; Hunt, Jason; O'Brien, Erin; Apicella, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) forms biofilms in the middle ear during human infection. The biofilm matrix of NTHI contains extracellular DNA. We show that NTHI possesses a potent nuclease, which is a homolog of the thermonuclease of Staphylococcus aureus. Using a biofilm dispersal assay, studies showed a biofilm dispersal pattern in the parent strain, no evidence of dispersal in the nuclease mutant, and a partial return of dispersion in the complemented mutant. Quantitative PCR of mRNA from biofilms from a 24-h continuous flow system demonstrated a significantly increased expression of the nuclease from planktonic organisms compared to those in the biofilm phase of growth (P < 0.042). Microscopic analysis of biofilms grown in vitro showed that in the nuclease mutant the nucleic acid matrix was increased compared to the wild-type and complemented strains. Organisms were typically found in large aggregates, unlike the wild-type and complement biofilms in which the organisms were evenly dispersed throughout the biofilm. At 48 h, the majority of the organisms in the mutant biofilm were dead. The nuclease mutant formed a biofilm in the chinchilla model of otitis media and demonstrated a propensity to also form similar large aggregates of organisms. These studies indicate that NTHI nuclease is involved in biofilm remodeling and organism dispersal.

  14. Enhanced gene disruption by programmable nucleases delivered by a minicircle vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, A-B K; Ramakrishna, S; Song, M; Kim, H

    2014-11-01

    Targeted genetic modification using programmable nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is of great value in biomedical research, medicine and biotechnology. Minicircle vectors, which lack extraneous bacterial sequences, have several advantages over conventional plasmids for transgene delivery. Here, for the first time, we delivered programmable nucleases into human cells using transient transfection of a minicircle vector and compared the results with those obtained using a conventional plasmid. Surrogate reporter assays and T7 endonuclease analyses revealed that cells in the minicircle vector group displayed significantly higher mutation frequencies at the target sites than those in the conventional plasmid group. Quantitative PCR and reverse transcription-PCR showed higher vector copy number and programmable nuclease transcript levels, respectively, in 293T cells after minicircle versus conventional plasmid vector transfection. In addition, tryphan blue staining and flow cytometry after annexin V and propidium iodide staining showed that cell viability was also significantly higher in the minicircle group than in the conventional plasmid group. Taken together, our results show that gene disruption using minicircle vector-mediated delivery of ZFNs and TALENs is a more efficient, safer and less toxic method than using a conventional plasmid, and indicate that the minicircle vector could serve as an advanced delivery method for programmable nucleases.

  15. Polyplex-induced cytosolic nuclease activation leads to differential transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, Rahul; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Wu, Gordon S-H; Shakya, Anisha; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2013-08-01

    Cytosolic nucleases have been proposed to play an important role in limiting the effectiveness of polyplex-based gene delivery agents. In order to explore the effect of cell membrane disruption on nuclease activation, nuclease activity upon polyplex uptake and localization, and nuclease activity upon gene expression, we employed an oligonucleotide molecular beacon (MB). The MB was incorporated as an integral part of the polymer/DNA polyplex, and two-color flow cytometry experiments were performed to explore the relationship of MB cleavage with propidium iodide (PI) uptake, protein expression, and polyplex uptake. In addition, confocal fluorescence microcopy was performed to examine both polyplex and cleaved MB localization. The impact of cell membrane disruption was also probed using whole-cell patch clamp measurement of the plasma membrane's electrical conductance. Differential activation of cytosolic nuclease was observed with substantial activity for B-PEI and G5 PAMAM dendrimer (G5), less cleavage for jetPEI, and little activity for L-PEI. jetPEI and L-PEI exhibited substantially greater transgene expression, consistent with the lower amounts of MB oligonucleotide cleavage observed. Cytosolic nuclease activity, although dependent on the choice of polymer employed, was not related to the degree of cell plasma membrane disruption that occurred as measured by PI uptake or whole-cell patch clamp.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of a New Bifunctional Dye Containing Spirobenzopyran and Cinnamoyl Moiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申凯华; 崔东熏

    2005-01-01

    A novel bifunctional dye containing spirobenzopyran and cinnaznoyl moiety has been prepared and its photochromic behavior following irradiation at different wavelengths of monochrome UV light was investigated.The colourless bifunctional dye in film or solution exhibits unusual photochromism through structural and geometrical transformation from spirobenzopyran to merocyanine accompanying with photocrosslinking reaction in cinnamoyl moieties. Two kinds of photochemical reaction were achieved by irradiation at the different wavelengths of monochrome UV light (275 nm, 365 nm) selectively. The photochromic process of the bifunctional dye was discussed and the dynamic behaviors of the decolorization process were investigated.

  17. Myostatin gene mutated mice induced with tale nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangfang; Sun, Ruilin; Chen, Hongyan; Fei, Jian; Lu, Daru

    2015-01-01

    Myostain gene (MSTN) is expressed primarily in skeletal muscle, and negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass; it has been suggested that mice with MSTN inhibition have reduced adiposity and improved insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is important to establish a fast and effective gene editing method. In this report, we established the myostatin mutated-mouse model by microinjection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) mRNA within the mouse fertilized oocytes and achieved high rates of mutagenesis of the mouse MSTN in C57BL/6J. Six of 45 born mice carried target mutations and we appointed one as the parental mating with wild mouse to produce the F1 and backcross to produce the F2 generation. All the mutations of the mice were examined quickly and efficiently by high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and then verified by direct sequencing. We obtained the homozygous of the F2 generation which transmitted the mutant alleles to the progeny with 100% efficiency. Mutant mice exhibited increases in muscle mass comparable to those observed in wild-type mice. Therefore, combining TALEN-mediated gene targeting with HRMA technology is a superior method of constructing genetically modified mice through microinjection in the mouse fertilized oocytes with high efficiency and short time of selection.

  18. A library of TAL effector nucleases spanning the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsub; Kweon, Jiyeon; Kim, Annie; Chon, Jae Kyung; Yoo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hye Joo; Kim, Sojung; Lee, Choongil; Jeong, Euihwan; Chung, Eugene; Kim, Doyoung; Lee, Mi Seon; Go, Eun Mi; Song, Hye Jung; Kim, Hwangbeom; Cho, Namjin; Bang, Duhee; Kim, Seokjoong; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) can be readily engineered to bind specific genomic loci, enabling the introduction of precise genetic modifications such as gene knockouts and additions. Here we present a genome-scale collection of TALENs for efficient and scalable gene targeting in human cells. We chose target sites that did not have highly similar sequences elsewhere in the genome to avoid off-target mutations and assembled TALEN plasmids for 18,740 protein-coding genes using a high-throughput Golden-Gate cloning system. A pilot test involving 124 genes showed that all TALENs were active and disrupted their target genes at high frequencies, although two of these TALENs became active only after their target sites were partially demethylated using an inhibitor of DNA methyltransferase. We used our TALEN library to generate single- and double-gene-knockout cells in which NF-κB signaling pathways were disrupted. Compared with cells treated with short interfering RNAs, these cells showed unambiguous suppression of signal transduction.

  19. Self-quenched covalent fluorescent dye-nucleic acid conjugates as polymeric substrates for enzymatic nuclease assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hagstrom, James E; Budker, Vladimir G

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescent method is described for assessing nuclease activity. The technique is based on the preparation of quenched fluorophore-nucleic acid covalent conjugates and their subsequent dequenching due to degradation by nucleases. The resulting fluorescence increase can be measured by a spectrofluorometer and exhibits subpicogram per milliliter sensitivity level for RNase A and low picogram per milliliter level for DNase I. The method is adaptable for quantitative nuclease inhibitor testing.

  20. Sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases demonstrating higher homologous recombination rates than conventional zinc-finger nucleases in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomoaki; Mori, Koichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Sera, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    We previously reported that our sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), in which a DNA cleavage domain is inserted between two artificial zinc-finger proteins, cleave their target DNA much more efficiently than conventional ZFNs in vitro. In the present study, we compared DNA cleaving efficiencies of a sandwiched ZFN with those of its corresponding conventional ZFN in mammalian cells. Using a plasmid-based single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK293 cells, we confirmed that the sandwiched ZFN induced homologous recombination more efficiently than the conventional ZFN; reporter activation by the sandwiched ZFN was more than eight times that of the conventional one. Western blot analysis showed that the sandwiched ZFN was expressed less frequently than the conventional ZFN, indicating that the greater DNA-cleaving activity of the sandwiched ZFN was not due to higher expression of the sandwiched ZFN. Furthermore, an MTT assay demonstrated that the sandwiched ZFN did not have any significant cytotoxicity under the DNA-cleavage conditions. Thus, because our sandwiched ZFN cleaved more efficiently than its corresponding conventional ZFN in HEK293 cells as well as in vitro, sandwiched ZFNs are expected to serve as an effective molecular tool for genome editing in living cells.

  1. SplitAx: A novel method to assess the function of engineered nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axton, Richard A.; Haideri, Sharmin S.; Lopez-Yrigoyen, Martha; Taylor, Helen A.; Forrester, Lesley M.

    2017-01-01

    Engineered nucleases have been used to generate knockout or reporter cell lines and a range of animal models for human disease. These new technologies also hold great promise for therapeutic genome editing. Current methods to evaluate the activity of these nucleases are time consuming, require extensive optimization and are hampered by readouts with low signals and high background. We have developed a simple and easy to perform method (SplitAx) that largely addresses these issues and provides a readout of nuclease activity. The assay involves splitting the N-terminal (amino acid 1–158) coding region of GFP and an out-of-frame of C-terminal region with a nuclease binding site sequence. Following exposure to the test nuclease, cutting and repair by error prone non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) restores the reading frame resulting in the production of a full length fluorescent GFP protein. Fluorescence can also be restored by complementation between the N-terminal and C-terminal coding sequences in trans. We demonstrate successful use of the SplitAx assay to assess the function of zinc finger nucleases, CRISPR hCAS9 and TALENS. We also test the activity of multiple gRNAs in CRISPR/hCas9/D10A systems. The zinc finger nucleases and guide RNAs that showed functional activity in the SplitAx assay were then used successfully to target the endogenous AAVS1, SOX6 and Cfms loci. This simple method can be applied to other unrelated proteins such as ZsGreen1 and provides a test system that does not require complex optimization. PMID:28212417

  2. Cloning and characterization of a novel nuclease from shrimp hepatopancreas, and prediction of its active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W Y; Liaw, S H; Liao, T H

    2000-03-15

    Approximately 95% of the amino acid sequence of a shrimp (Penaeus japonicus) nuclease was derived from protease-digested peptides. A 1461-base cDNA for the nuclease was amplified and sequenced with degenerate primers based on the amino acid sequence and then specific primers by 3' and 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). It contains an open reading frame encoding a putative 21-residue signal peptide and a 381-residue mature protein. The N-terminus of the enzyme is pyroglutamate, deduced from composition and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS analyses, and confirmed by a glutamine residue in the cDNA sequence. The enzyme has 11 Cys residues, forming five intramolecular disulphides. The eleventh Cys residue was linked to a thiol compound with an estimated molecular mass of between 500 and 700 Da. A sequence similarity search revealed no homologous proteins but residues 205-255 shared a conserved active-site motif within a distinct group of nucleases. His(211) in this conserved motif was shown to be very important in catalysis by site-specific modification with (14)C-labelled iodoacetate. The shrimp nuclease, previously designated DNase I, does indeed possess a low level of hydrolytic activity towards RNA in the presence of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). The conservation of functionally important residues during distant evolution might imply that the catalytic mechanisms are similar in these nucleases, which should be classified in one subfamily. Finally, an active-site structure for shrimp nuclease was proposed on the basis of published structural data and the results of mutational and biochemical analyses of Serratia nuclease.

  3. Bifunctional chelates of RH-105 and AU199 as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droege, P.

    1997-03-01

    Research is presented on new bifunctional chelating ligand systems with stability on the macroscopic and radiochemical levels. The synthesis of the following complexes are described: rhodium 105, palladium 109, and gold 198.

  4. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  5. The bi-functional organization of human basement membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfter, Willi; Monnier, Christophe; Müller, David; Oertle, Philipp; Uechi, Guy; Balasubramani, Manimalha; Safi, Farhad; Lim, Roderick; Loparic, Marko; Henrich, Paul Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The current basement membrane (BM) model proposes a single-layered extracellular matrix (ECM) sheet that is predominantly composed of laminins, collagen IVs and proteoglycans. The present data show that BM proteins and their domains are asymmetrically organized providing human BMs with side-specific properties: A) isolated human BMs roll up in a side-specific pattern, with the epithelial side facing outward and the stromal side inward. The rolling is independent of the curvature of the tissue from which the BMs were isolated. B) The epithelial side of BMs is twice as stiff as the stromal side, and C) epithelial cells adhere to the epithelial side of BMs only. Side-selective cell adhesion was also confirmed for BMs from mice and from chick embryos. We propose that the bi-functional organization of BMs is an inherent property of BMs and helps build the basic tissue architecture of metazoans with alternating epithelial and connective tissue layers.

  6. The bi-functional organization of human basement membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willi Halfter

    Full Text Available The current basement membrane (BM model proposes a single-layered extracellular matrix (ECM sheet that is predominantly composed of laminins, collagen IVs and proteoglycans. The present data show that BM proteins and their domains are asymmetrically organized providing human BMs with side-specific properties: A isolated human BMs roll up in a side-specific pattern, with the epithelial side facing outward and the stromal side inward. The rolling is independent of the curvature of the tissue from which the BMs were isolated. B The epithelial side of BMs is twice as stiff as the stromal side, and C epithelial cells adhere to the epithelial side of BMs only. Side-selective cell adhesion was also confirmed for BMs from mice and from chick embryos. We propose that the bi-functional organization of BMs is an inherent property of BMs and helps build the basic tissue architecture of metazoans with alternating epithelial and connective tissue layers.

  7. Chemoselective Reactivity of Bifunctional Cyclooctynes on Si(001)

    CERN Document Server

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus A; Länger, Christian; Höfer, Ulrich; Koert, Ulrich; Dürr, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Controlled organic functionalization of silicon surfaces as integral part of semiconductor technology offers new perspectives for a wide range of applications. The high reactivity of the silicon dangling bonds, however, presents a major hindrance for the first basic reaction step of such a functionalization, i.e., the chemoselective attachment of bifunctional organic molecules on the pristine silicon surface. We overcome this problem by employing cyclooctyne as the major building block of our strategy. Functionalized cyclooctynes are shown to react on Si(001) selectively via the strained cyclooctyne triple bond while leaving the side groups intact. The achieved selectivity originates from the distinctly different adsorption dynamics of the separate functionalities: A direct adsorption pathway is demonstrated for cyclooctyne as opposed to the vast majority of other organic functional groups. The latter ones react on Si(001) via a metastable intermediate which makes them effectively unreactive in competition wi...

  8. GSK-3: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development.

  9. GSK-3β: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Keith M.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Thotala, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer's disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development. PMID:22675363

  10. [Bifunctional inhibitor of alpha-amylase/trypsin from wheat grain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, R A; Furusov, O V

    2007-01-01

    A trypsin inhibitor, isolated from whole-wheat grain (Triticum aestivum L.) by the method of bio-specific chromatography on trypsin-Sepharose, was potent in inhibiting human salivary alpha-amylase. The bi-functional alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor was characterized by a narrow specificity for other alpha-amylases and proteinases. The high thermostability of the inhibitor was lost in the presence of SH group-reducing agents. The inhibitor-trypsin complex retained its activity against alpha-amylase. The inhibitor-alpha-amylase complex was active against trypsin. Studies of the enzyme kinetics demonstrated that the inhibition of alpha-amylase and trypsin was noncompetitive. Our results suggest the existence of two independent active sites responsible for the interaction with the enzymes.

  11. Opioid bifunctional ligands from morphine and the opioid pharmacophore Dmt-Tic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Marczak, Ewa D; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Si, Yu Gui; Neumeyer, John L

    2011-02-01

    Bifunctional ligands containing an ester linkage between morphine and the δ-selective pharmacophore Dmt-Tic were synthesized, and their binding affinity and functional bioactivity at the μ, δ and κ opioid receptors determined. Bifunctional ligands containing or not a spacer of β-alanine between the two pharmacophores lose the μ agonism deriving from morphine becoming partial μ agonists 4 or μ antagonists 5. Partial κ agonism is evidenced only for compound 4. Finally, both compounds showed potent δ antagonism.

  12. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molphy, Zara; Slator, Creina; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Kellett, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids - as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin - has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II) developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen), [Cu(DPPZ)(phen)]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen), and [{Cu(phen)2}2(μ-terph)](terph) (Cu-Terph), with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen)2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine). Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH) as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited - particularly along A-T rich chains - through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  13. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Topkar, Ved V; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P W; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2015-07-23

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome-editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-seq analysis. In addition, we identify and characterize another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also find that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities.

  14. DNA Oxidation Profiles of Copper Phenanthrene Chemical Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara eMolphy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The deleterious effects of metal-catalyzed reactive oxygen species (ROS in biological systems can be seen in a wide variety of pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ageing, and neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand however, targeted ROS production in the vicinity of nucleic acids – as demonstrated by metal-activated bleomycin – has paved the way for ROS-active chemotherapeutic drug development. Herein we report mechanistic investigations into the oxidative nuclease activity and redox properties of copper(II developmental therapeutics [Cu(DPQ(phen]2+ (Cu-DPQ-Phen, [Cu(DPPZ(phen]2+ (Cu-DPPZ-Phen, and [{Cu(phen2}2(μ-terph](terph (Cu-Terph, with results being compared directly to Sigman’s reagent [Cu(phen2]2+ throughout (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DPQ = dipyridoquinoxaline; DPPZ = dipyridophenazine. Oxidative DNA damage was identified at the minor groove through use of surface bound recognition elements of methyl green, netropsin, and [Co(NH36]Cl3 that functioned to control complex accessibility at selected regions. ROS-specific scavengers and stabilisers were employed to identify the cleavage process, the results of which infer hydrogen peroxide produced metal-hydroxo or free hydroxyl radicals (•OH as the predominant species. The extent of DNA damage owing to these radicals was then quantified through 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG lesion detection under ELISA protocol with the overall trend following Cu-DPQ-Phen > Cu-Terph > Cu-Phen > Cu-DPPZ. Finally, the effects of oxidative damage on DNA replication processes were investigated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR where amplification of 120 base pair DNA sequences of varying base content were inhibited – particularly along A-T rich chains – through oxidative damage of the template strands.

  15. Improving lambda red genome engineering in Escherichia coli via rational removal of endogenous nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Mosberg

    Full Text Available Lambda Red recombineering is a powerful technique for making targeted genetic changes in bacteria. However, many applications are limited by the frequency of recombination. Previous studies have suggested that endogenous nucleases may hinder recombination by degrading the exogenous DNA used for recombineering. In this work, we identify ExoVII as a nuclease which degrades the ends of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA oligonucleotides and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA cassettes. Removing this nuclease improves both recombination frequency and the inheritance of mutations at the 3' ends of ssDNA and dsDNA. Extending this approach, we show that removing a set of five exonucleases (RecJ, ExoI, ExoVII, ExoX, and Lambda Exo substantially improves the performance of co-selection multiplex automatable genome engineering (CoS-MAGE. In a given round of CoS-MAGE with ten ssDNA oligonucleotides, the five nuclease knockout strain has on average 46% more alleles converted per clone, 200% more clones with five or more allele conversions, and 35% fewer clones without any allele conversions. Finally, we use these nuclease knockout strains to investigate and clarify the effects of oligonucleotide phosphorothioation on recombination frequency. The results described in this work provide further mechanistic insight into recombineering, and substantially improve recombineering performance.

  16. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization.

  17. Nuclease-mediated genome editing: At the front-line of functional genomics technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Tetsushi; Woltjen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing with engineered endonucleases is rapidly becoming a staple method in developmental biology studies. Engineered nucleases permit random or designed genomic modification at precise loci through the stimulation of endogenous double-strand break repair. Homology-directed repair following targeted DNA damage is mediated by co-introduction of a custom repair template, allowing the derivation of knock-out and knock-in alleles in animal models previously refractory to classic gene targeting procedures. Currently there are three main types of customizable site-specific nucleases delineated by the source mechanism of DNA binding that guides nuclease activity to a genomic target: zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). Among these genome engineering tools, characteristics such as the ease of design and construction, mechanism of inducing DNA damage, and DNA sequence specificity all differ, making their application complementary. By understanding the advantages and disadvantages of each method, one may make the best choice for their particular purpose.

  18. Multiple-turnover cleavage of double-stranded DNA by sandwiched zinc-finger nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Yusuke; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Doi, Norio; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    To refine zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology, we constructed a sandwiched ZFN, in which a DNA cleavage enzyme was sandwiched with two artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs). Because the sandwiched ZFN is designed to cleave the DNA between the two AZP-binding sites, the sandwiched ZFN is expected to bind preferentially to a DNA substrate rather than to cleavage products and thereby cleave it with multiple turnovers. To prove the concept, we sandwiched a staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), which cleaves DNA as a monomer, between two 3-finger AZPs. The AZP-sandwiched SNase cleaved large amounts of dsDNA site-specifically. Such multiple-turnover cleavage was not observed with control nucleases that possess a single AZP.

  19. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A.; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI Nucleases (RFNs) that recognize extended sequences and can edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. The cleavage activity of an RFN depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation and therefore show improved specificities relative to wi...

  20. Multispot array combined with S1 nuclease-mediated elimination of unpaired nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Dong Min; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    The accurate detection of mismatched base pairs is critical to many DNA hybridization-based applications in basic research and diagnostics. We herein demonstrate that mismatched DNAs on a multispot array can be accurately detected in a multiplexed way by employing the S1 nuclease-based mismatched......-target duplex. This technique of performing S1 nuclease-mediated cleavage on a multispot array offers high specificity and high-throughput detection of mismatched DNAs. It is expected that this assay system will prove useful for single-assay genotyping and/or the diagnosis of various diseases and pathogens....

  1. Mouse Spermatozoa Contain a Nuclease that Is Activated by Pretreatment with EGTA and Subsequent Calcium Incubation

    OpenAIRE

    Boaz, Segal M.; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W. Steven

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into ~50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl2 and CaCl2 in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl2 alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl2 had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by EGTA to digest...

  2. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  3. Defining and improving the genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Joung, J Keith

    2016-05-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nucleases are a transformative technology for biology, genetics and medicine owing to the simplicity with which they can be programmed to cleave specific DNA target sites in living cells and organisms. However, to translate these powerful molecular tools into safe, effective clinical applications, it is of crucial importance to carefully define and improve their genome-wide specificities. Here, we outline our state-of-the-art understanding of target DNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases, methods to determine and improve their specificities, and key considerations for how to evaluate and reduce off-target effects for research and therapeutic applications.

  4. Cloning and analysis of a bifunctional methyltransferase/restriction endonuclease TspGWI, the prototype of a Thermus sp. enzyme family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zylicz-Stachula Agnieszka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restriction-modification systems are a diverse class of enzymes. They are classified into four major types: I, II, III and IV. We have previously proposed the existence of a Thermus sp. enzyme family, which belongs to type II restriction endonucleases (REases, however, it features also some characteristics of types I and III. Members include related thermophilic endonucleases: TspGWI, TaqII, TspDTI, and Tth111II. Results Here we describe cloning, mutagenesis and analysis of the prototype TspGWI enzyme that recognises the 5'-ACGGA-3' site and cleaves 11/9 nt downstream. We cloned, expressed, and mutagenised the tspgwi gene and investigated the properties of its product, the bifunctional TspGWI restriction/modification enzyme. Since TspGWI does not cleave DNA completely, a cloning method was devised, based on amino acid sequencing of internal proteolytic fragments. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme shares significant sequence similarity with another representative of the Thermus sp. family – TaqII. Interestingly, these enzymes recognise similar, yet different sequences in the DNA. Both enzymes cleave DNA at the same distance, but differ in their ability to cleave single sites and in the requirement of S-adenosylmethionine as an allosteric activator for cleavage. Both the restriction endonuclease (REase and methyltransferase (MTase activities of wild type (wt TspGWI (either recombinant or isolated from Thermus sp. are dependent on the presence of divalent cations. Conclusion TspGWI is a bifunctional protein comprising a tandem arrangement of Type I-like domains; particularly noticeable is the central HsdM-like module comprising a helical domain and a highly conserved S-adenosylmethionine-binding/catalytic MTase domain, containing DPAVGTG and NPPY motifs. TspGWI also possesses an N-terminal PD-(D/EXK nuclease domain related to the corresponding domains in HsdR subunits, but lacks the ATP-dependent translocase module

  5. Enhanced cleavage of double-stranded DNA by artificial zinc-finger nuclease sandwiched between two zinc-finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineta, Yusuke; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Doi, Norio; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2008-11-25

    To enhance DNA cleavage by zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), we sandwiched a DNA cleavage enzyme with two artificial zinc-finger proteins (AZPs). Because the DNA between the two AZP-binding sites is cleaved, the AZP-sandwiched nuclease is expected to bind preferentially to a DNA substrate rather than to cleavage products and thereby cleave it with multiple turnovers. To demonstrate the concept, we sandwiched a staphylococcal nuclease (SNase), which cleaves DNA as a monomer, between two three-finger AZPs. The AZP-sandwiched SNase cleaved large amounts of dsDNA site-specifically. Such multiple-turnover cleavage was not observed with nucleases that possess a single AZP. Thus, AZP-sandwiched nucleases will further refine ZFN technology.

  6. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  7. A novel bifunctional transcriptional regulator of riboflavin metabolism in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionova, Irina A; Vetting, Matthew W; Li, Xiaoqing; Almo, Steven C; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2017-01-09

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is the precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are essential coenzymes in all free-living organisms. Riboflavin biosynthesis in many Bacteria but not in Archaea is controlled by FMN-responsive riboswitches. We identified a novel bifunctional riboflavin kinase/regulator (RbkR), which controls riboflavin biosynthesis and transport genes in major lineages of Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. RbkR proteins are composed of the riboflavin kinase domain and a DNA-binding winged helix-turn-helix-like domain. Using comparative genomics, we predicted RbkR operator sites and reconstructed RbkR regulons in 94 archaeal genomes. While the identified RbkR operators showed significant variability between archaeal lineages, the conserved core of RbkR regulons includes riboflavin biosynthesis genes, known/predicted vitamin uptake transporters and the rbkR gene. The DNA motifs and CTP-dependent riboflavin kinase activity of two RbkR proteins were experimentally validated in vitro The DNA binding activity of RbkR was stimulated by CTP and suppressed by FMN, a product of riboflavin kinase. The crystallographic structure of RbkR from Thermoplasma acidophilum was determined in complex with CTP and its DNA operator revealing key residues for operator and ligand recognition. Overall, this study contributes to our understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks for vitamin homeostasis in Archaea.

  8. Bifunctional alkyl nitrates - trace constituents of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, J. [Department of Analytical and Environmental Chemistry, University of Ulm (Germany); Ballschmiter, K. [Center of Technology Assessment in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-04-01

    Mono- and multifunctional esters of nitric acid (alkyl nitrates or organonitrates) form very complex mixtures of organic trace constituents in air. An analytical method was developed which combines selectivity in separation and detection in order to simplify this complexity in analytical terms. Mononitrates, dinitrates, keto nitrates, hydroxy nitrates of alkanes and alkenes, respecitvely, and bifunctional terpene nitrates were synthesized as reference substances. A specially developed new HPLC stationary phase (organonitrate phase) allows a group separation of mono-, di-, and hydroxy nitrates. After the HPLC preseparation the single components were finally separated by capillary HRGC-ECD and HRGC-MSD on polar and non-polar stationary phases. Mass spectrometric detection in the selected-ion-mode using the highly selective NO{sub 2}{sup +} fragment (m/z = 46 amu) led to very good selectivities for the nitric acid ester moiety. The analysis of a 100 m{sup 3} ambient air sample using this new analytical protocol allowed the identification of seven hydroxy nitrates and 24 dinitrates ranging from C2 to C7, 22 of them for the first time ever. (orig.) With 3 figs., 3 tabs., 20 refs.

  9. Bioinspired Bifunctional Membrane for Efficient Clean Water Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lou, Jinwei; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Wu, Jianbo; Dasgupta, Neil P; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-01-13

    Solving the problems of water pollution and water shortage is an urgent need for the sustainable development of modern society. Different approaches, including distillation, filtration, and photocatalytic degradation, have been developed for the purification of contaminated water and the generation of clean water. In this study, we explored a new approach that uses solar light for both water purification and clean water generation. A bifunctional membrane consisting of a top layer of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), a middle layer of Au NPs, and a bottom layer of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) was designed and fabricated through multiple filtration processes. Such a design enables both TiO2 NP-based photocatalytic function and Au NP-based solar-driven plasmonic evaporation. With the integration of these two functions into a single membrane, both the purification of contaminated water through photocatalytic degradation and the generation of clean water through evaporation were demonstrated using simulated solar illumination. Such a demonstration should also help open up a new strategy for maximizing solar energy conversion and utilization.

  10. Bifunctional drugs for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Clive; Cazzola, Mario

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a steady increase in the use of fixed-dose combinations of drugs for the treatment of a range of diseases, including hypertension, cancer, AIDS, tuberculosis and other infectious diseases. It is now evident that patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can also benefit from the use of fixed-dose combinations, including combinations of a long-acting β2-agonist and an inhaled corticosteroid, and combinations of long-acting β2-agonists and long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists. In fact, there are now a number of "triple-inhaler" fixed-dose combinations under development, with the first such triple combination having been approved in India. This use of combinations containing drugs with complementary pharmacological actions in the treatment of patients with asthma or COPD has also led to the discovery and development of drugs having two different primary pharmacological actions in the same molecule, which we have called "bifunctional drugs". In this review, we discuss the state of the art of these new bifunctional drugs as novel treatments for asthma and COPD that can be categorised as bifunctional bronchodilators, bifunctional bronchodilator/anti-inflammatory drugs and bifunctional anti-inflammatory drugs.

  11. Single flexible nanofiber to achieve simultaneous photoluminescence-electrical conductivity bifunctionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shujuan; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Lv, Nan; Wang, Jinxian; Yu, Wensheng; Liu, Guixia

    2015-02-01

    In order to develop new-type multifunctional composite nanofibers, Eu(BA)3 phen/PANI/PVP bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous photoluminescence and electrical conductivity have been successfully fabricated via electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of Eu(BA)3 phen and polyaniline (PANI). X-Ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), fluorescence spectroscopy and a Hall effect measurement system are used to characterize the morphology and properties of the composite nanofibers. The results indicate that the bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent photoluminescence and electrical conductivity. Fluorescence emission peaks of Eu(3+) ions are observed in the Eu(BA)3 phen/PANI/PVP photoluminescence-electrical conductivity bifunctional composite nanofibers. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10(-3)  S/cm. The luminescent intensity and electrical conductivity of the composite nanofibers can be tuned by adjusting the amounts of Eu(BA)3 phen and PANI. The obtained photoluminescence-electrical conductivity bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as microwave absorption, molecular electronics, biomedicine and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construction technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional naonomaterials.

  12. High-frequency genome editing using ssDNA oligonucleotides with zinc-finger nucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fuqiang; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Huang, Yuping

    2011-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) have enabled highly efficient gene targeting in multiple cell types and organisms. Here we describe methods for using simple ssDNA oligonucleotides in tandem with ZFNs to efficiently produce human cell lines with three distinct genetic outcomes: (i) targeted point...

  13. CLONING, SEQUENCING, AND EXPRESSION OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS GENES INVOLVED IN ATP-DEPENDENT NUCLEASE SYNTHESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOOISTRA, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of the Bacillus subtilis ATP-dependent nuclease (add genes) have been cloned. The genes were located on an 8.8-kb SalI-SmaI chromosomal DNA fragment. Transformants of a recBCD deletion mutant of Escherichia coli with plasmid pGV1 carrying this DNA fragment showed ATP-

  14. Tudor domain proteins in protozoan parasites and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum tudor staphylococcal nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Manzar J; Korde, Reshma; Singh, Shivani; Mohmmed, Asif; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, V S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2008-04-01

    RNA-binding proteins play key roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, a multitude of RNA-binding proteins with several RNA-binding domains/motifs have been described. Here, we show the existence of two Tudor domain containing proteins, a survival of motor neuron (SMN)-like protein and a Staphylococcus aureus nuclease homologue referred to as TSN, in Plasmodium and other protozoan parasites. Activity analysis shows that Plasmodium falciparum TSN (PfTSN) possesses nuclease activity and Tudor domain is the RNA-binding domain. A specific inhibitor of micrococcal nucleases, 3',5'-deoxythymidine bisphosphate (pdTp) inhibits the nuclease as well as RNA-binding activities of the protein. PfTSN shows a predominant nuclear localization. Treatment of P. falciparum with pdTp, inhibited in vitro growth of both chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains of P. falciparum, while a four fold concentration of pdTp did not have any significant effect on the mammalian cell line, Huh-7D12. Altogether, these results suggest that PfTSN is an essential enzyme in the parasite's life cycle.

  15. Genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Prew, Michelle S; Nguyen, Nhu T; Welch, Moira M; Lopez, Jose M; McCaw, Zachary R; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2016-08-01

    The activities and genome-wide specificities of CRISPR-Cas Cpf1 nucleases are not well defined. We show that two Cpf1 nucleases from Acidaminococcus sp. BV3L6 and Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 (AsCpf1 and LbCpf1, respectively) have on-target efficiencies in human cells comparable with those of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9). We also report that four to six bases at the 3' end of the short CRISPR RNA (crRNA) used to program Cpf1 nucleases are insensitive to single base mismatches, but that many of the other bases in this region of the crRNA are highly sensitive to single or double substitutions. Using GUIDE-seq and targeted deep sequencing analyses performed with both Cpf1 nucleases, we were unable to detect off-target cleavage for more than half of 20 different crRNAs. Our results suggest that AsCpf1 and LbCpf1 are highly specific in human cells.

  16. Orchestrating the nucleases involved in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengerová, Blanka; Wang, Anderson T; McHugh, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) pose a significant threat to genomic and cellular integrity by blocking essential cellular processes, including replication and transcription. In mammalian cells, much ICL repair occurs in association with DNA replication during S phase, following the stalling of a replication fork at the block caused by an ICL lesion. Here, we review recent work showing that the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease and the hSNM1A exonuclease act in the same pathway, together with SLX4, to initiate ICL repair, with the MUS81-EME1 fork incision activity becoming important in the absence of the XPF-SNM1A-SLX4-dependent pathway. Another nuclease, the Fanconi anemia-associated nuclease (FAN1), has recently been implicated in the repair of ICLs, and we discuss the possible ways in which the activities of different nucleases at the ICL-stalled replication fork may be coordinated. In relation to this, we briefly speculate on the possible role of SLX4, which contains XPF and MUS81- interacting domains, in the coordination of ICL repair nucleases.

  17. Multicomponent synthesis of artificial nucleases and their RNase and DNase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton V. Gulevich

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new, artificial ribonucleases containing two amino acid residues connected by an aliphatic linker has been developed. Target molecules were synthesized via a catalytic three-component Ugi reaction from aliphatic diisocyanides. Preliminary investigations proved unspecific nuclease activity of the new compounds towards single-stranded RNA and double-stranded circular DNA.

  18. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  19. MegaTevs: single-chain dual nucleases for efficient gene disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Jason M; DaSilva, Matthew; Meister, Sarah E; Wang, Xu; Schild-Poulter, Caroline; Edgell, David R

    2014-07-01

    Targeting gene disruptions in complex genomes relies on imprecise repair by the non-homologous end-joining DNA pathway, creating mutagenic insertions or deletions (indels) at the break point. DNA end-processing enzymes are often co-expressed with genome-editing nucleases to enhance the frequency of indels, as the compatible cohesive ends generated by the nucleases can be precisely repaired, leading to a cycle of cleavage and non-mutagenic repair. Here, we present an alternative strategy to bias repair toward gene disruption by fusing two different nuclease active sites from I-TevI (a GIY-YIG enzyme) and I-OnuI E2 (an engineered meganuclease) into a single polypeptide chain. In vitro, the MegaTev enzyme generates two double-strand breaks to excise an intervening 30-bp fragment. In HEK 293 cells, we observe a high frequency of gene disruption without co-expression of DNA end-processing enzymes. Deep sequencing of disrupted target sites revealed minimal processing, consistent with the MegaTev sequestering the double-strand breaks from the DNA repair machinery. Off-target profiling revealed no detectable cleavage at sites where the I-TevI CNNNG cleavage motif is not appropriately spaced from the I-OnuI binding site. The MegaTev enzyme represents a small, programmable nuclease platform for extremely specific genome-engineering applications.

  20. Donor plasmid design for codon and single base genome editing using zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Davis, Gregory D

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, CompoZr zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology has matured to the point that a user-defined double strand break (DSB) can be placed at virtually any location in the human genome within 50 bp of a desired site. Such high resolution ZFN engineering is well within the conversion tract limitations demarcated by the mammalian DNA repair machinery, resulting in a nearly universal ability to create point mutations throughout the human genome. Additionally, new architectures for targeted nuclease engineering have been rapidly developed, namely transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas systems, further expanding options for placement of DSBs. This new capability has created a need to explore the practical limitations of delivering plasmid-based information to the sites of chromosomal double strand breaks so that nuclease-donor methods can be widely deployed in fundamental and therapeutic research. In this chapter, we explore a ZFN-compatible donor design in the context of codon changes at an endogenous locus encoding the human RSK2 kinase.

  1. Electrochemical Investigation of Interaction between a Bifunctional Probe and GG Mismatch Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; He, Hanping; Peng, Xiaoqian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2015-01-01

    A bifunctional probe (FecNC), containing a recognition part and an electrochemical active center, was applied to electrochemical detection of GG mismatch duplexes. The preparation of gold electrodes modified by mismatch and complementatry duplexes was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and optimized for better detection in terms of self-assembly time, hybridization time, and incubation time. The interaction between FecNC and DNA duplexes modified on the surface of a gold electrode was explored by square wave voltammetry (SWV) and EIS. The results showed that the DNA duplexes with GG mismatch on the surface of a gold electrode was easily detected by the largest electrochemical signal of the bifunctional probe because of its selective binding to GG mismatches. The bifunctional probe could offer a simple, effective electrochemical detection of GG mismatches, and theoretical bases for development of electrochemical biosensors. Further, the method would be favorable for diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  2. Enhanced Bifunctional Oxygen Catalysis in Strained LaNiO3 Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Jonathan R.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Freeland, John W.; Meyer, Tricia L.; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lutterman, Daniel A.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2016-03-02

    Strain is known to greatly influence low temperature oxygen electro catalysis on noble metal films, leading to significant enhancements in bifunctional activity essential for fuel cells and Metal-air batteries. However, its catalytic impact on transition-metal oxide thin films, such as perovskites, is not widely understood. Here, we epitaxially strain the conducting perovskite LaNiO3 to systematically determine its influence on both the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reaction. Uniquely, we found that compressive strain could significantly enhance both reactions, yielding a bifunctional catalyst that surpasses the performance of noble metals' such as Pt. We attribute the improved bifunctionality to strain induced splitting of the e(g) Orbitals, which can customize orbital asymmetry at the surface. Analogous to strain induced shifts in the d-band center of noble metals relative to the Fermi level, :such splitting can dramatically affect catalytic activity in this perovskite and other potentially more active Oxides.

  3. Laccase-mediated oxidation of small organics: bifunctional roles for versatile applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong-Rok; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-06-01

    Laccases have been widely used in several biotechnological areas, including organic synthesis, bioremediation, and pulp/textile bleaching. In most applications, the enzymatic actions start with single-electron oxidation of small organics followed by formation of the corresponding radicals. These radicals are subsequently involved in either oxidative coupling (i.e., bond formation) or bond cleavage of target organics. These bifunctional actions--catabolic versus anabolic--are readily identifiable in in vivo metabolic processes involving laccases. Here, we characterize the bifunctionality of laccase-mediated oxidation of small organics and present the view that knowledge of the biological functions of these metabolic processes in vivo can illuminate potential biotechnological applications of this bifunctionality.

  4. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badugu, Sugith Babu; Nabi, Shaik Abdul; Vaidyam, Pratap; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11) plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR). Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11) that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11). Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N). PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  5. Identification of Plasmodium falciparum DNA Repair Protein Mre11 with an Evolutionarily Conserved Nuclease Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugith Babu Badugu

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic Meiotic Recombination protein 11 (Mre11 plays pivotal roles in the DNA damage response (DDR. Specifically, Mre11 senses and signals DNA double strand breaks (DSB and facilitates their repair through effector proteins belonging to either homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair mechanisms. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, HR and alternative-NHEJ have been identified; however, little is known about the upstream factors involved in the DDR of this organism. In this report, we identify a putative ortholog of Mre11 in P. falciparum (PfalMre11 that shares 22% sequence similarity to human Mre11. Homology modeling reveals striking structural resemblance of the predicted PfalMre11 nuclease domain to the nuclease domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 (ScMre11. Complementation analyses reveal functional conservation of PfalMre11 nuclease activity as demonstrated by the ability of the PfalMre11 nuclease domain, in conjunction with the C-terminal domain of ScMre11, to functionally complement an mre11 deficient yeast strain. Functional complementation was virtually abrogated by an amino acid substitution in the PfalMre11 nuclease domain (D398N. PfalMre11 is abundant in the mitotically active trophozoite and schizont stages of P. falciparum and is up-regulated in response to DNA damage, suggesting a role in the DDR. PfalMre11 exhibits physical interaction with PfalRad50. In addition, yeast 2-hybrid studies show that PfalMre11 interacts with ScRad50 and ScXrs2, two important components of the well characterized Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex which is involved in DDR signaling and repair in S. cerevisiae, further supporting a role for PfalMre11 in the DDR. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that PfalMre11 is an evolutionarily conserved component of the DDR in Plasmodium.

  6. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  7. Mouse spermatozoa contain a nuclease that is activated by pretreatment with EGTA and subsequent calcium incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Segal M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrated that mouse spermatozoa cleave their DNA into approximately 50 kb loop-sized fragments with topoisomerase IIB when treated with MnCl(2) and CaCl(2) in a process we term sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF). SCF can be reversed by EDTA. A nuclease then further degrades the DNA in a process we term sperm DNA degradation (SDD). MnCl(2) alone could elicit this activity, but CaCl(2) had no effect. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a nuclease in the vas deferens that can be activated by ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) to digest the sperm DNA by SDD. Spermatozoa were extracted with salt and dithiothreitol to remove protamines and then incubated with EGTA. Next, the EGTA was removed and divalent cations were added. We found that Mn(2+), Ca(2+), or Zn(2+) could each activate SDD in spermatozoa but Mg(2+) could not. When the reaction was slowed by incubation on ice, EGTA pretreatment followed by incubation in Ca(2+) elicited the reversible fragmentation of sperm DNA evident in SCF. When the reactions were then incubated at 37 degrees C they progressed to the more complete degradation of DNA by SDD. EDTA could also be used to activate the nuclease, but required a higher concentration than EGTA. This EGTA-activatable nuclease activity was found in each fraction of the vas deferens plasma: in the spermatozoa, in the surrounding fluid, and in the insoluble components in the fluid. These results suggest that this sperm nuclease is regulated by a mechanism that is sensitive to EGTA, possibly by removing inhibition of a calcium binding protein.

  8. The extracellular nuclease Dns and its role in natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokesch, Melanie; Schoolnik, Gary K

    2008-11-01

    Free extracellular DNA is abundant in many aquatic environments. While much of this DNA will be degraded by nucleases secreted by the surrounding microbial community, some is available as transforming material that can be taken up by naturally competent bacteria. One such species is Vibrio cholerae, an autochthonous member of estuarine, riverine, and marine habitats and the causative agent of cholera, whose competence program is induced after colonization of chitin surfaces. In this study, we investigate how Vibrio cholerae's two extracellular nucleases, Xds and Dns, influence its natural transformability. We show that in the absence of Dns, transformation frequencies are significantly higher than in its presence. During growth on a chitin surface, an increase in transformation efficiency was found to correspond in time with increasing cell density and the repression of dns expression by the quorum-sensing regulator HapR. In contrast, at low cell density, the absence of HapR relieves dns repression, leading to the degradation of free DNA and to the abrogation of the transformation phenotype. Thus, as cell density increases, Vibrio cholerae undergoes a switch from nuclease-mediated degradation of extracellular DNA to the uptake of DNA by bacteria induced to a state of competence by chitin. Taken together, these results suggest the following model: nuclease production by low-density populations of V. cholerae might foster rapid growth by providing a source of nucleotides for the repletion of nucleotide pools. In contrast, the termination of nuclease production by static, high-density populations allows the uptake of intact DNA and coincides with a phase of potential genome diversification.

  9. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takahito; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Horch, Hadley W; Hamaguchi, Naoya; Nakamura, Taro; Bando, Tetsuya; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases into cricket embryos, targeting of a transgene or endogenous gene results in sequence-specific mutations. Up to 48% of founder animals transmit disrupted gene alleles after zinc-finger nucleases microinjection compared with 17% after microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases. Heterozygous offspring is selected using mutation detection assays that use a Surveyor (Cel-I) nuclease, and subsequent sibling crosses create homozygous knockout crickets. This approach is independent from a mutant phenotype or the genetic tractability of the organism of interest and can potentially be applied to manage insect pests using a non-transgenic strategy.

  10. Comparison of T7E1 and surveyor mismatch cleavage assays to detect mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-07

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops formed by single or multiple nucleotides. Bacteriophage resolvases and single-stranded nucleases are used commonly in the assay but have not been compared side-by-side on mutations obtained by engineered nucleases. We present the first comparison of the sensitivity of T7E1 and Surveyor EMC assays on deletions and point mutations obtained by zinc finger nuclease targeting in frog embryos. We report the mutation detection limits and efficiencies of T7E1 and Surveyor. In addition, we find that T7E1 outperforms the Surveyor nuclease in terms of sensitivity with deletion substrates, whereas Surveyor is better for detecting single nucleotide changes. We conclude that T7E1 is the preferred enzyme to scan mutations triggered by engineered nucleases.

  11. Energy Storage in Bifunctional TiO2 Composite Materials under UV and Visible Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialin Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of recent studies on energy storage in bifunctional TiO2 composite materials under UV and visible light. The working mechanism, property improvements and applications of these bifunctional TiO2 composite systems are introduced, respectively. The latest results obtained in our laboratory, especially a new process for photoelectric conversion and energy storage in TiO2/Cu2O bilayer films under visible light, are also presented. Hopefully this review will stimulate more fundamental and applied research on this subject in the future.

  12. Hydroconversion of n-alkanes on bifunctional zeolites with unusual pore architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, G.; Tontisirin, S.; Ernst, S. [Technische Univ. Kaiserslautern (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry, Chemical Technology

    2010-12-30

    Zeolites MCM-68 and ZSM-18, both possessing unusual pore architectures, were synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis using optimized methods. X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy revealed that the obtained zeolites are well crystallized and do not contain visible amounts of amorphous material. The bifunctional forms of MCM- 68 and ZSM-18 (viz. the acid form loaded with small amounts of palladium) were characterized using the hydroconversion of n-decane as catalytic test reaction. In this reaction, both catalysts showed the typical behaviour known from other bifunctional large pore zeolites. (orig.)

  13. Scientific opinion addressing the safety assessment of plants developed using Zinc Finger Nuclease 3 and other Site-Directed Nucleases with similar function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    The European Commission requested that the EFSA Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms deliver a scientific opinion related to risk assessment of plants developed using the zinc finger nuclease 3 technique (ZFN-3 which allows the integration of gene(s in a predefined insertion site in the genome of the recipient species. Since other nucleases with a similar function to ZFN are considered in this opinion the term site-directed nuclease 3 (SDN-3 is used to describe the technique rather than ZFN-3 specifically. The EFSA GMO Panel considers that its guidance documents are applicable for the evaluation of food and feed products derived from plants developed using the SDN-3 technique and for performing an environmental risk assessment. However, on a case-by-case basis lesser amounts of event specific data may be needed for the risk assessment of plants developed using the SDN-3 technique. The EFSA GMO Panel compared the hazards associated with plants produced by the SDN-3 technique with those obtained by conventional plant breeding techniques and by currently used transgenesis. With respect to the genes introduced, the SDN-3 technique does not differ from transgenesis or from the other genetic modification techniques currently used, and can be used to introduce transgenes, intragenes or cisgenes. The main difference between the SDN-3 technique and transgenesis is that the insertion of DNA is targeted to a predefined region of the genome. Therefore, the SDN-3 technique can minimise hazards associated with the disruption of genes and/or regulatory elements in the recipient genome. Whilst the SDN-3 technique can induce off-target changes in the genome of the recipient plant these would be fewer than those occurring with most mutagenesis techniques. Furthermore, where such changes occur they would be of the same types as those produced by conventional breeding techniques.

  14. A nuclease that mediates cell death induced by DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingfei; An, Ran; Umanah, George K.; Park, Hyejin; Nambiar, Kalyani; Eacker, Stephen M.; Kim, BongWoo; Bao, Lei; Harraz, Maged M.; Chang, Calvin; Chen, Rong; Wang, Jennifer E.; Kam, Tae-In; Jeong, Jun Seop; Xie, Zhi; Neifert, Stewart; Qian, Jiang; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition or genetic deletion of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is protective against toxic insults in many organ systems. The molecular mechanisms underlying PARP-1–dependent cell death involve release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and its translocation to the nucleus, which results in chromatinolysis. We identified macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) as a PARP-1–dependent AIF-associated nuclease (PAAN). AIF was required for recruitment of MIF to the nucleus, where MIF cleaves genomic DNA into large fragments. Depletion of MIF, disruption of the AIF-MIF interaction, or mutation of glutamic acid at position 22 in the catalytic nuclease domain blocked MIF nuclease activity and inhibited chromatinolysis, cell death induced by glutamate excitotoxicity, and focal stroke. Inhibition of MIF's nuclease activity is a potential therapeutic target for diseases caused by excessive PARP-1 activation. PMID:27846469

  15. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis and DNA damage-induced polyploidy in Fan1 nuclease-defective knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Christophe; Slean, Meghan; Marchesi, Francesco; Lock, Claire; Odell, Edward; Castor, Dennis; Toth, Rachel; Rouse, John

    2016-03-15

    The Fan1 endonuclease is required for repair of DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Mutations in human Fan1 cause karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), but it is unclear whether defective ICL repair is responsible or whether Fan1 nuclease activity is relevant. We show that Fan1 nuclease-defective (Fan1(nd/nd)) mice develop a mild form of KIN. The karyomegalic nuclei from Fan1(nd/nd) kidneys are polyploid, and fibroblasts from Fan1(nd/nd) mice become polyploid upon ICL induction, suggesting that defective ICL repair causes karyomegaly. Thus, Fan1 nuclease activity promotes ICL repair in a manner that controls ploidy, a role that we show is not shared by the Fanconi anemia pathway or the Slx4-Slx1 nuclease also involved in ICL repair.

  16. Bifunctional catalysts for the direct production of liquid fuels from syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Design and development of catalyst formulations that maximize the direct production of liquid fuels by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), hydrocarbon cracking, and isomerization into one single catalyst particle (bifunctional FTS catalyst) have been investigated in this thesis. To achieve th

  17. Oxidations of amines with molecular oxygen using bifunctional gold–titania catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades it has become clear that supported gold nanoparticles are surprisingly active and selective catalysts for several green oxidation reactions of oxygen-containing hydrocarbons using molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. We here report that bifunctional gold–titania c...... new and environmentally benign routes to caprolactam and cyclohexanone oxime, both of which are precursors for nylon-6....

  18. Purification, characterization, and cloning of a bifunctional molybdoenzyme with hydratase and alcohol dehydrogenase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Hanefeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    A bifunctional hydratase/alcohol dehydrogenase was isolated from the cyclohexanol degrading bacterium Alicycliphilus denitrificans DSMZ 14773. The enzyme catalyzes the addition of water to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and the subsequent alcohol oxidation. The purified enzyme showed three subun

  19. Direct catalytic transformation of carbohydrates into 5-ethoxymethylfurfural with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hu; Khokarale, Santosh Govind; Kotni, Ramakrishna;

    2014-01-01

    carbohydrates. A high EMF yield of 76.6%, 58.5%, 42.4%, and 36.5% could be achieved, when fructose, inulin, sorbose, and sucrose were used as starting materials, respectively. Although, the acid–base bifunctional nanocatalysts were inert for synthesis of EMF from glucose based carbohydrates, ethyl...

  20. Design and Synthesis of Bifunctional Oxime Reactivators of OP- inhibited Cholinesterase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    military and civilian personnel. Reactivators of OP inhibited cholinesterases can serve as OP agent antidotes but can be limited by their poor...assisted bifunctional catalytic mechanism 46 O N O N OH 11 REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: None CONCLUSION: We have successfully evaluated the synthetic

  1. High surface area carbon for bifunctional air electrodes applied in zinc-air batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, H. [on leave from NTT Laboratories (Japan); Mueller, S.; Haas, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Bifunctional air electrodes with high surface area carbon substrates showed low reduction overpotential, thus are promising for enhancing the energy efficiency and power capability of zinc-air batteries. The improved performance is attributed to lower overpotential due to diffusion of the reaction intermediate, namely the peroxide ion. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  2. Novel bifunctional double-layer catalysts for application in microreactors for direct DME synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seungcheol

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes experimental research toward the selective and efficient DME production from syngas in microstructured reactors using bifunctional catalysts. Two catalysts, Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 and ZSM-5, catalyze syngas conversion to methanol and methanol conversion to DME, respectively. The catalysts were prepared and successfully introduced in microchannel reactor for direct DME synthesis.

  3. Enantioselective α-Chlorination of Aldehydes with Recyclable Fluorous (S)-Pyrrolidine-Thiourea Bifunctional Organocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Cai, Chun; Curran, Dennis P; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A novel fluorous (S)-pyrrolidine-thiourea bifunctional organocatalyst is prepared. The catalyst shows good activity and enantioselectivity for direct α-chlorination of aldehydes using N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS) as the chlorine source. It can be recovered from the reaction mixture by fluorous solid-phase extraction with excellent purity for direct reuse.

  4. Non-transgenic genome modifications in a hemimetabolous insect using zinc-finger and TAL effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, T; Ochiai, H.; Sakuma, T.; Horch, HW; Hamaguchi, N.; Nakamura, T.; Bando, T.; Ohuchi, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Noji, S; Mito, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hemimetabolous, or incompletely metamorphosing, insects are phylogenetically relatively basal and comprise many pests. However, the absence of a sophisticated genetic model system, or targeted gene-manipulation system, has limited research on hemimetabolous species. Here we use zinc-finger nuclease and transcription activator-like effector nuclease technologies to produce genetic knockouts in the hemimetabolous insect Gryllus bimaculatus. Following the microinjection of mRNAs encoding zinc-fi...

  5. Comparison of T7E1 and Surveyor Mismatch Cleavage Assays to Detect Mutations Triggered by Engineered Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Vouillot, Léna; Thélie, Aurore; Pollet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases is used for targeted mutagenesis. But because genome editing does not target all loci with similar efficiencies, the mutation hit-rate at a given locus needs to be evaluated. The analysis of mutants obtained using engineered nucleases requires specific methods for mutation detection, and the enzyme mismatch cleavage method is used commonly for this purpose. This method uses enzymes that cleave heteroduplex DNA at mismatches and extrahelical loops form...

  6. Comparison of bifunctional chelates for {sup 64}Cu antibody imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L.; Crisp, Sarah; Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yapp, Donald T.T.; Ng, Sylvia S.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columba, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sutherland, Brent W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocyclics Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Improved bifunctional chelates (BFCs) are needed to facilitate efficient {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under mild conditions and to yield stable, target-specific agents. The utility of two novel BFCs, 1-Oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-5-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-4-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-PCTA), for mAb imaging with {sup 64}Cu were compared to the commonly used S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA). The BFCs were conjugated to trastuzumab, which targets the HER2/neu receptor. {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of the conjugates was optimized. Receptor binding was analyzed using flow cytometry and radioassays. Finally, PET imaging and biodistribution studies were done in mice bearing either HER2/neu-positive or HER2/neu-negative tumors. {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab were prepared at room temperature in >95% radiochemical yield (RCY) in <30 min, compared to only 88% RCY after 2 h for the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab under the same conditions. Cell studies confirmed that the immunoreactivity of the mAb was retained for each of the bioconjugates. In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab had higher uptake than the {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab at 24 h in HER2/neu-positive tumors, resulting in higher tumor to background ratios and better tumor images. By 40 h all three of the {sup 64}Cu-BFC-trastuzumab conjugates allowed for clear visualization of the HER2/neu-positive tumors but not the negative control tumor. The antibody conjugates of PCTA and Oxo-DO3A were shown to have superior {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling efficiency and stability compared to the analogous DOTA conjugate. In addition, {sup 64}Cu-PCTA and Oxo-DO3A antibody conjugates may facilitate earlier imaging with greater target to background ratios than

  7. Detection of Phaeocystis globosa using sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay (NPA-SH)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN Yu; MI Tiezhu; YU Zhigang

    2008-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel is one of the common harmful algae species in coastal waters of the southeastern China. In this study, sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay (NPA-SH) was used to qualitatively and quantitatively detect P. globosa. Results showed that this method had good applicability and validity in analyzing the samples from laboratory cultures and from fields. The linear regression equation for P. globosa was obtained, and the lowest detection number of cells was 1.8×104 cells. Statistics showed that there was no distinct difference between the results of detecting the microalgae by NPA-SH and traditional microscopy. This technique has good reliability, accuracy, and can give a remarkably high sample processing rate. Sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay will provide an efficient alternative to microscopic method for monitoring and investigating the bloom of P. globosa.

  8. Human KIAA1018/FAN1 nuclease is a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenju Lai; Kaishun Hu; Yuanzhong Wu; Jianjun Tang; Yi Sang; Jingying Cao; Tiebang Kang

    2012-01-01

    A recently identified protein,FAN1 (FANCD2-associated nuclease 1,previously known as KIAA1018),is a novel nuclease associated with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 that is required for cellular resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agents.The mechanisms of FAN1 regulation have not yet been explored.Here,we provide evidence that FAN1 is degraded during mitotic exit,suggesting that FAN1 may be a mitotic substrate of the anaphase-promoting cyclosome complex (APC/C).Indeed,.Cdh1,but not Cdc20,was capable of regulating the protein level of FAN1 through the KEN box and the D-box.Moreover,the up- and down-regulation of FAN1 affected the progression to mitotic exit.Collectively,these data suggest that FAN1 may be a new mitotic substrate of APC/CCdh1 that plays a key role during mitotic e xit.

  9. Studies on a Novel Minor-groove Targeting Artificial Nuclease: Synthesis and DNA Binding Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nucleases play an important role in molecular biology, for example, in DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as a novel tool for the selective inhibition of gene expressions and also as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this article, the synthesis of a novel minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, an oligopyrrol-containing compound, has been reported. It was found that this novel compound can bind DNA in AT-rich minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by using UV-Vis and CD. It is indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of DNA from 80. 4 C to 84. 4 ℃ and that it possesses a high binding constant value(Kb = 3.05×104 L/mol).

  10. Glycoengineering of Human Cell Lines Using Zinc Finger Nuclease Gene Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Lectin affinity chromatography is a powerful technique for isolation of glycoproteins carrying a specific glycan structure of interest. However, the enormous diversity of glycans present on the cell surface, as well as on individual proteins, makes it difficult to isolate an entire glycoproteome...... with one or even a series of lectins. Here we present a technique to generate cell lines with homogenous truncated O-glycans using zinc finger nuclease gene targeting. Because of their simplified O-glycoproteome, the cells have been named SimpleCells. Glycoproteins from SimpleCells can be isolated...... in a single purification step by lectin chromatography performed on a long lectin column. This protocol describes Zinc finger nuclease gene targeting of human cells to simplify the glycoproteome, as well as lectin chromatography and isolation of glycopeptides from total cell lysates of SimpleCells....

  11. The SNM1/Pso2 family of ICL repair nucleases: from yeast to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, Emma; Sengerová, Blanka; McHugh, Peter J

    2010-07-01

    Efficient interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair in yeast depends on the Pso2/Snm1 protein. Pso2 is a member of the highly conserved metallo-beta-lactamase structural family of nucleases. Mammalian cells possess three SNM1/Pso2 related proteins, SNM1A, SNM1B/Apollo, and SNM1C/Artemis. Evidence that SNM1A and SNM1B contribute to ICL repair is mounting, whereas Artemis appears to primarily contribute to non-ICL repair pathways, particularly some double-strand break repair events. Yeast Pso2 and all three mammalian SNM1-family proteins have been shown to possess nuclease activity. Here, we review the biochemical, genetic, and cellular evidence for the SNM1 family as DNA repair factors, focusing on ICL repair.

  12. Studies of interaction between a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Fen

    2007-04-01

    Nuclease plays an important role in molecular biology, such as DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as new tool in the selective inhibition of gene expression and as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this paper, a new synthesized minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, oligopyrrol-containing peptide, was reported. It was found that this new compound can bind DNA in AT-riched minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by UV-vis and circular dichroism (CD) methods. It was indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of oligomer DNA from 51.8 to 63.5 °C and possesses large binding constant ( Kb = 8.83 × 10 4 L/mol).

  13. Efficient gene targeting of the Rosa26 locus in mouse zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparek, Petr; Krausova, Michaela; Haneckova, Radka; Kriz, Vitezslav; Zbodakova, Olga; Korinek, Vladimir; Sedlacek, Radislav

    2014-11-03

    Gene targeting in mice mainly employs homologous recombination (HR) in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Although it is a standard way for production of genetically modified mice, the procedure is laborious and time-consuming. This study describes targeting of the mouse Rosa26 locus by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We employed TALEN-assisted HR in zygotes to introduce constructs encoding TurboRFP and TagBFP fluorescent proteins into the first intron of the Rosa26 gene, and in this way generated two transgenic mice. We also demonstrated that these Rosa26-specific TALENs exhibit high targeting efficiency superior to that of zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) specific for the same targeting sequence. Moreover, we devised a reporter assay to assess TALENs activity and specificity to improve the quality of TALEN-assisted targeting.

  14. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  15. megaTALs: a rare-cleaving nuclease architecture for therapeutic genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissel, Sandrine; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Adey, Andrew; Gouble, Agnès; Duchateau, Philippe; Shendure, Jay; Stoddard, Barry L; Certo, Michael T; Baker, David; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2014-02-01

    Rare-cleaving endonucleases have emerged as important tools for making targeted genome modifications. While multiple platforms are now available to generate reagents for research applications, each existing platform has significant limitations in one or more of three key properties necessary for therapeutic application: efficiency of cleavage at the desired target site, specificity of cleavage (i.e. rate of cleavage at 'off-target' sites), and efficient/facile means for delivery to desired target cells. Here, we describe the development of a single-chain rare-cleaving nuclease architecture, which we designate 'megaTAL', in which the DNA binding region of a transcription activator-like (TAL) effector is used to 'address' a site-specific meganuclease adjacent to a single desired genomic target site. This architecture allows the generation of extremely active and hyper-specific compact nucleases that are compatible with all current viral and nonviral cell delivery methods.

  16. A simple molecular beacon with duplex-specific nuclease amplification for detection of microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingcun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhao, Likun; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Zhengping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene activity, promoting or inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with many diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection method. In this paper, based on a simple molecular beacon (MB) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), we developed a target recycling amplification method for miRNA detection. By controlling the number of stem bases to 5, the MB probe used in this method can be prevented from hydrolysis by DSN without special modification. This assay is direct and simple to quantitatively detect miRNA with high sensitivity and specificity. The MB probe design provides a new strategy for nuclease-based amplification reaction.

  17. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  18. Enhancement of nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum YL104 immobilized on activated carbon filter sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Ren, Hengfei; Li, Zhenjian; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Yong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of current methods for industrial production of the enzyme nuclease P1 is limited. In this study, we sought to improve fermentation methods for the production of nuclease P1. An immobilized fermentation system using an activated carbon filter sponge as a carrier was used for the production of nuclease P1. In an airlift internal loop reactor (ALR), the fermentation performance of three different fermentation modes, including free-cell fermentation, repeated-batch fermentation, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentation, were compared. The fermentation kinetics in the fermentation broth of the three fermentation modes, including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH value, cell concentration, residual sugar concentration, and enzyme activity, were tested. The productivity of semi-continuous immobilized fermentation reached 8.76 U/mL/h, which was 33.3 and 80.2% higher than that of repeated-batch fermentation and free-cell fermentation, respectively. The sugar consumption of free-cell, repeated-batch, and semi-continuous immobilized fermentations was 41.2, 30.8, and 25.9 g/L, respectively. These results showed that immobilized-cell fermentation by using Penicillium citrinum with activated carbon filter sponge in an ALR was advantageous for nuclease P1 production, especially in the semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode. In spite of the significant improvement in nuclease P1 production in semi-continuous immobilized fermentation mode, the specific activity of nuclease P1 was almost equal among the three fermentation modes.

  19. The history and market impact of CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    van Erp, Paul B. G.; Bloomer, Gary; Wilkinson, Royce; Wiedenheft, Blake

    2015-01-01

    The interface between viruses and their hosts’ are hot spots for biological and biotechnological innovation. Bacteria use restriction endonucleases to destroy invading DNA, and industry has exploited these enzymes for molecular cut-and-paste reactions that are central to many recombinant DNA technologies. Today, another class of nucleases central to adaptive immune systems that protect bacteria and archaea from invading viruses and plasmids are blazing a similar path from basic science to pro...

  20. Site-Specific Editing of the Plasmodium falciparum Genome Using Engineered Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus CS; Lee, Andrew H.; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E.; Pearl, Jocelynn R.; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; David A Fidock

    2012-01-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum pathogenesis, including drug resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite, using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger hom...

  1. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finola E Moore

    Full Text Available Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  2. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This in...

  3. Factors Influencing the DNA Nuclease Activity of Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, and Copper Chelates

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological coreactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-or...

  4. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding reg...

  5. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner.

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Hua; Tang, Zhen-Xing; Fang, Xiu-Juan; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Shi, Lu-E

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the physical and chemical characteristics, biological structure and function of a non-specific nuclease from Yersinia enterocolitica subsp. palearctica (Y. NSN) found in our group were studied using multiple bioinformatics approaches. The results showed that Y. NSN had 283 amino acids, a weight of 30,692.5 ku and a certain hydrophilic property. Y. NSN had a signal peptide, no transmembrane domains and disulphide bonds. Cleavage site in Y. NSN was between pos. 23 and 24. The prediction result of the secondary structure showed Y. NSN was a coil structure-based protein. The ratio of α-helix, β-folded and random coil were 18.73%, 16.96% and 64.31%, respectively. Active sites were pos. 124, 125, 127, 157, 165 and 169. Mg(2+) binding site was pos. 157. Substrate binding sites were pos. 124, 125 and 169. The analysis of multisequencing alignment and phylogenetic tree indicated that Y. NSN shared high similarity with the nuclease from Y. enterocolitica subsp. enterocolitica 8081. The enzyme activity results showed that Y. NSN was a nuclease with good thermostability.

  7. Applications of genome editing by programmable nucleases to the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Costa, Marina C; Enguita, Francisco J

    2017-01-10

    Genome engineering is a branch of modern biotechnology composed of a cohort of protocols designed to construct and modify a genotype with the main objective of giving rise to a desired phenotype. Conceptually, genome engineering is based on the so called genome editing technologies, a group of genetic techniques that allow either to delete or to insert genetic information in a particular genomic locus. Ten years ago, genome editing tools were limited to virus-driven integration and homologous DNA recombination. However, nowadays the uprising of programmable nucleases is rapidly changing this paradigm. There are two main families of modern tools for genome editing depending on the molecule that controls the specificity of the system and drives the editor machinery to its place of action. Enzymes such as Zn-finger and TALEN nucleases are protein-driven genome editors; while CRISPR system is a nucleic acid-guided editing system. Genome editing techniques are still not widely applied for the design of new compounds with pharmacological activity, but they are starting to be considered as promising tools for rational genome manipulation in biotechnology applications. In this review we will discuss the potential applications of programmable nucleases for the metabolic engineering of secondary metabolites with biological activity.

  8. Application of a 5 ' nuclease assay for detection of Lawsonia intracellularis in fecal samples from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindecrona, R. H.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Andersen, P. H.;

    2002-01-01

    fecal samples derived from a herd known to be free from infection with L. intracellularis all tested negative, with a Ct value of 40. By using a Ct value of 36 as the cutoff limit, the detection limit of the assay was 1 L. intracellularis cell per PCR tube. In conclusion, the 5' nuclease assay that has...... of immunohistochemistry (IM) on ileal sections of the same animals. There was 91% agreement between the results of IM and the 5' nuclease assay. In the 5' nuclease assay, 111 (54%) of the pigs tested positive for L. intracellularis infection, with a mean cycle threshold (Ct) value of 27.2, whereas 98 (48%) of the pigs...... tested positive by IM. On average, the Ct and DeltaRn values for the positive samples were 27.2 (standard deviation [SD], 3.7) and 1.6 (SD, 0.7), respectively. A Ct value of 27.2 corresponds to a fecal excretion of approximately 10(7) L. intracellularis cells per g of feces. Furthermore, a total of 40...

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  10. Geminivirus-Mediated Genome Editing in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Using Sequence-Specific Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Nathaniel M; Baltes, Nicholas J; Voytas, Daniel F; Douches, David S

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated systems (CRISPR/Cas) for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR) was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1) gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and a novel approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  11. Digital PCR to assess gene-editing frequencies (GEF-dPCR) mediated by designer nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Ulrike; Hauber, Ilona; Fehse, Boris

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing using designer nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 nucleases is an emerging technology in basic and applied research. Whereas the application of editing tools, namely CRISPR-Cas9, has recently become very straightforward, quantification of resulting gene knockout rates still remains a bottleneck. This is particularly true if the product of a targeted gene is not easily detectable. To address this problem, we devised a novel gene-editing frequency digital PCR (GEF-dPCR) technique. GEF-dPCR exploits two differently labeled probes that are placed within one amplicon at the gene-editing target site to simultaneously detect wild-type and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-affected alleles. Taking advantage of the principle of dPCR, this enables concurrent quantification of edited and wild-type alleles in a given sample. We propose that our method is optimal for the monitoring of gene-edited cells in vivo, e.g., in clinical settings. Here we describe preparation, design of primers and probes, and setup and analysis of GEF-dPCR. The setup of GEF-dPCR requires up to 2 weeks (depending on the starting point); once the dPCR has been established, the protocol for sample analysis takes <1 d.

  12. Geminivirus-mediated genome editing in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. using sequence-specific nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel M Butler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs is rapidly being developed for genetic engineering in crop species. The utilization of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated systems (Cas for inducing double-strand breaks facilitates targeting of virtually any sequence for modification. Targeted mutagenesis via nonhomologous end-joining has been demonstrated extensively as being the preferred DNA repair pathway in plants. However, gene targeting via homologous recombination remains more elusive but could be a powerful tool for directed DNA repair. To overcome barriers associated with gene targeting, a geminivirus replicon (GVR was used to deliver SSNs targeting the potato ACETOLACTATE SYNTHASE1 (ALS1 gene and repair templates designed to incorporate herbicide-inhibiting point mutations within the ALS1 locus. Transformed events modified with GVRs held both point mutations that were capable of supporting a reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype, while events transformed with conventional T-DNAs held no detectable mutations and were similar to wild-type. Regeneration of transformed events improved detection of point mutations that supported a stronger reduced herbicide susceptibility phenotype. These results demonstrate the use of geminiviruses for delivering genome editing reagents in plant species, and an approach to gene targeting in a vegetatively propagated species.

  13. Structural characterization of the virulence factor nuclease A from Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Andrea F; Gaudu, Philippe; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-11-01

    The group B pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae commonly populates the human gut and urogenital tract, and is a major cause of infection-based mortality in neonatal infants and in elderly or immunocompromised adults. Nuclease A (GBS_NucA), a secreted DNA/RNA nuclease, serves as a virulence factor for S. agalactiae, facilitating bacterial evasion of the human innate immune response. GBS_NucA efficiently degrades the DNA matrix component of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which attempt to kill and clear invading bacteria during the early stages of infection. In order to better understand the mechanisms of DNA substrate binding and catalysis of GBS_NucA, the high-resolution structure of a catalytically inactive mutant (H148G) was solved by X-ray crystallography. Several mutants on the surface of GBS_NucA which might influence DNA substrate binding and catalysis were generated and evaluated using an imidazole chemical rescue technique. While several of these mutants severely inhibited nuclease activity, two mutants (K146R and Q183A) exhibited significantly increased activity. These structural and biochemical studies have greatly increased our understanding of the mechanism of action of GBS_NucA in bacterial virulence and may serve as a foundation for the structure-based drug design of antibacterial compounds targeted to S. agalactiae.

  14. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  15. Plant genome editing by novel tools: TALEN and other sequence specific nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprink, Thorben; Metje, Janina; Hartung, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Genome editing technologies using sequence specific nucleases (SSNs) became a tremendously powerful and precise tool for reverse genetic approaches and applied biology. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in particular, consisting of a free designable DNA binding domain and a nuclease, have been exploited today by a huge number of approaches in many different organisms. The convenience of designing the DNA binding domain and straightforward protocols for their assembly, as well as the broad number of applications in different scientific fields made it Natures method of the year 2011. TALENs act as molecular scissors by introducing double strand breaks (DSBs) to the DNA at a given location. The DSBs are subsequently repaired by the cell itself using different repair pathways such as non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). These mechanisms can lead to deletions, insertions, replacements or larger chromosomal rearrangements. By offering a template DNA it is possible to channel the repair in direction of HR. In this article we review the recent findings in the field of SSN approaches with emphasis on plants.

  16. Energetic methods to study bifunctional biotin operon repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    1998-01-01

    measurements. The results of quantitative studies of the biotin regulatory system can be interpreted in the context of the biological function of the system. The biotin holoenzyme ligases are a class of enzymes found across the evolutionary spectrum. Only a subset of these enzymes, including BirA, also function as transcriptional repressors. The tight binding of the allosteric effector may be understood in light of the bifunctional nature of the BirA-bio-5'-AMP complex. It is possible that the unusually high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the complex ensures that the most probable state of the protein in vivo is the adenylate-bound form. This complex, not the unliganded protein, is active in both enzymatic transfer of biotin and site-specific DNA binding. This ensures that on depletion of the intracellular pool of apoBCCP, BirA-bio-5'-AMP accumulates and binds to bioO to repress transcription of the biotin biosynthesis operon. The intracellular demand for and synthesis of biotin are, consequently, tightly coupled in the system. The dimerization that accompanies adenylate binding to BirA appears to be significant for site-specific binding of the protein to bioO. Functionally, the simultaneous binding of the two monomers to the two operator half-sites, regardless of the kinetic mechanism by which it occurs, ensures coordinate regulation of transcription initiation from both biotin operon promoters. The multifaceted approach utilized in studies of the biotin regulatory system can serve as a model for studies of any complex transcriptional regulatory system. It is critical in elucidating the functional energetics of any of these systems that the assembly first be dissected into the constituent interactions and that each of these interactions be studied in isolation. This is not only critical for understanding the physicochemical properties of each individual contributing interaction, but is also a necessary precursor to studies of thermodynamic linkage in the system. (AB

  17. A Metal-Amino Acid Complex-Derived Bifunctional Oxygen Electrocatalyst for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yanjun; Niu, Yuchen; Yang, Jia; Ma, Liang; Liu, Jianguo; Xiong, Yujie; Xu, Hangxun

    2016-10-01

    Bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst: A metal-amino acid complex is developed to prepare high-performance mesoporous carbon electrocatalyst for both oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions. Such prepared catalyst can be used to assemble rechargeable zinc-air batteries with excellent durability. This work represents a new route toward low-cost, highly active, and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts for cutting-edge energy conversion devices.

  18. Protein switches identified from diverse insertion libraries created using S1 nuclease digestion of supercoiled-form plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullman, Jennifer; Guntas, Gurkan; Dumont, Matthew; Ostermeier, Marc

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate that S1 nuclease converts supercoiled plasmid DNA to unit-length, linear dsDNA through the creation of a single, double-stranded break in a plasmid molecule. These double-stranded breaks occur not only in the origin of replication near inverted repeats but also at a wide variety of locations throughout the plasmid. S1 nuclease exhibits this activity under conditions typically employed for the nuclease's single-stranded nuclease activity. Thus, S1 nuclease digestion of plasmid DNA, unlike analogous digestion with DNaseI, effectively halts after the first double-stranded break. This property makes easier the construction of large domain insertion libraries in which the goal is to insert linear DNA at a variety of locations throughout a plasmid. We used this property to create a library in which a circularly permuted TEM1 β-lactamase gene was inserted throughout a plasmid containing the gene encoding Escherichia coli ribose binding protein. Gene fusions that encode allosteric switch proteins in which ribose modulates β-lactamase catalytic activity were isolated from this library using a combination of a genetic selection and a screen.

  19. Bifunctional metamaterials with simultaneous and independent manipulation of thermal and electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chuwen; Bi, Ke; Fu, Xiaojian; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-10-03

    Metamaterials offer a powerful way to manipulate a variety of physical fields ranging from wave fields (electromagnetic field, acoustic field, elastic wave, etc.), static fields (static magnetic field, static electric field) to diffusive fields (thermal field, diffusive mass). However, the relevant reports and studies are usually limited to a single physical field or functionality. In this study, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a bifunctional metamaterial which could manipulate thermal and electric fields simultaneously and independently. Specifically, a composite with independently controllable thermal and electric conductivity was introduced, on the basis of which a bifunctional device capable of shielding thermal flux and concentrating electric current simultaneously was designed, fabricated and characterized. This work provides an encouraging example of metamaterials transcending their natural limitations, which offers a promising future in building a broad platform for the manipulation of multi-physics fields.

  20. Bifunctional Pt-Si Alloys for Small Organic Molecule Electro-oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Permyakova, Anastasia Aleksandrovna; Suntivich, Jin; Han, Binghong

    Designing highly active catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules can help to reduce the anodic overpotential for more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon fuels. The challenge in developing more active electrocatalysts for electro-oxidation reactions is to satisfy the stringent...... bifunctional requirement, which demands both adsorption and water oxidation sites. In this contribution, we explore the possibility of using Pt-Si alloys to fulfill this bifunctional requirement. Silicon, a highly oxophillic element, is alloyed into Pt as a site for water oxidation, while Pt serves as a CO...... adsorption site. We will discuss the enhanced activity of Pt-Si alloys for small organic molecule oxidation, which can be attributed to the improved CO electro-oxidation kinetics on Pt-Si....

  1. Tethering metal ions to photocatalyst particulate surfaces by bifunctional molecular linkers for efficient hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2014-08-19

    A simple and versatile method for the preparation of photocatalyst particulates modified with effective cocatalysts is presented; the method involves the sequential soaking of photocatalyst particulates in solutions containing bifunctional organic linkers and metal ions. The modification of the particulate surfaces is a universal and reproducible method because the molecular linkers utilize strong covalent bonds, which in turn result in modified monolayer with a small but controlled quantity of metals. The photocatalysis results indicated that the CdS with likely photochemically reduced Pd and Ni, which were initially immobilized via ethanedithiol (EDT) as a linker, were highly efficient for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from Na2S-Na2SO3-containing aqueous solutions. The method developed in this study opens a new synthesis route for the preparation of effective photocatalysts with various combinations of bifunctional linkers, metals, and photocatalyst particulate materials. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Increasing round trip efficiency of hybrid Li-air battery with bifunctional catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K; Li, YF; Xing, YC

    2013-07-30

    Previously it was shown that Pt as cathode catalyst ha's a large overpotential during charge in rechargeable hybrid Li-air battery with sulfuric acid catholyte. This article demonstrates that a bifunctional catalyst composed of Pt and IrO2 supported on carbon nanotubes can address this problem. The specially designed and synthesized bifunctional catalyst showed significant overpotential reduction and achieved a round trip energy efficiency of 81% after 10 cycles, higher than many achieved in aprotic Li-O-2 batteries. The hybrid Li-air battery was discharged and recharged for 20 cycles at 0.2 mA/cm(2), showing a fairly stable cell performance. A specific capacity of 306 mAh/g and a specific energy of 1110 Wh/kg were obtained for the hybrid Li-air battery in terms of acid weight. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bifunctional metamaterials with simultaneous and independent manipulation of thermal and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chuwen; Bi, Ke; Fu, Xiaojian; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2016-10-01

    Metamaterials offer a powerful way to manipulate a variety of physical fields ranging from wave fields (electromagnetic field, acoustic field, elastic wave, etc.), static fields (static magnetic field, static electric field) to diffusive fields (thermal field, diffusive mass). However, the relevant reports and studies are usually conducted on a single physical field or functionality. In this study, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a bifunctional metamaterial which can manipulate thermal and electric fields simultaneously and independently. Specifically, a composite with independently controllable thermal and electric conductivity was introduced, on the basis of which a bifunctional device capable of shielding thermal flux and concentrating electric current simultaneously was designed, fabricated and characterized. This work provides an encouraging example of metamaterials transcending their natural limitations, which offers a promising future in building a broad platform for manipulation of multi-physics field.

  4. First-Principles Study of Structure Property Relationships of Monolayer (Hydroxy)Oxide-Metal Bifunctional Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Kubal, Joseph; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, on the basis of detailed density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and using Ni hydroxy(oxide) films on Pt(111) and Au(111) electrodes as model systems, we describe a detailed structural and electrocatalytic analysis of hydrogen evolution (HER) at three-phase boundaries...... of information that is inaccessible by purely experimental means, and these structures, in turn, strongly suggest that a bifunctional reaction mechanism for alkaline HER will be operative at the interface between the films, the metal substrates, and the surrounding aqueous medium. This bifunctionality produces...... important changes in the calculated barriers of key elementary reaction steps, including water activation and dissociation, as compared to traditional monofunctional Pt surfaces. The successful identification of the structures of thin metal films and three-phase boundary catalysts is not only an important...

  5. Improving stability and biocompatibility of alginate/chitosan microcapsule by fabricating bi-functional membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoshuang; Liu, Xiudong; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Li; Xie, Hongguo; Wang, Feng; Zheng, Huizhen; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2014-05-01

    Cell encapsulation technology holds promise for the cell-based therapy. But poor mechanical strength and biocompatibility of microcapsule membrane are still obstacles for the clinical applications. A novel strategy is presented to prepare AC₁ C₂ A microcapsules with bi-functional membrane (that is, both desirable biocompatibility and membrane stability) by sequentially complexing chitosans with higher deacetylation degree (C₁) and lower deacetylation degree (C₂) on alginate (A) gel beads. Both in vitro and in vivo evaluation of AC₁C₂ A microcapsules demonstrate higher membrane stability and less cell adhesion, because the introduction of C₂ increases membrane strength and decreases surface roughness. Moreover, diffusion test of AC₁C₂ A microcapsules displays no inward permeation of IgG protein suggesting good immunoisolation function. The results demonstrate that AC₁C₂ A microcapsules with bi-functional membrane could be a promising candidate for microencapsulated cell implantation with cost effective usage of naturally biocompatible polysaccharides.

  6. 3D Ordered Mesoporous Bifunctional Oxygen Catalyst for Electrically Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moon Gyu; Lee, Dong Un; Seo, Min Ho; Cano, Zachary Paul; Chen, Zhongwei

    2016-05-01

    To enhance energy efficiency and durability, a highly active and durable 3D ordered mesoporous cobalt oxide framework has been developed for rechargeable zinc-air batteries. The bifunctional air electrode consisting of 3DOM Co3 O4 having high active surface area and robust structure, results in superior charge and discharge battery voltages, and durable performance for electrically rechargeable zinc-air batteries.

  7. Radiation Induced Crosslinking of Polyethylene in the Presence of Bifunctional Vinyl Monomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, M. S.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius; Silverman, J.

    1977-01-01

    Several reports have been published showing that the radiation induced grafting of bifunctional vinyl monomers to low density polyethylene results in a product with an unusually high density of crosslinks. The same grafting reactions are shown to reduce the incipient gel dose by more than a factor...... of fifty. This paper is concerned with the apparent crosslinking produced by the radiation grafting of two monomers to polyethylene: acrylic acid and acrylonitrile....

  8. Preliminary X-ray investigation of a bifunctional inhibitor from Indian finger millet (ragi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, A; Raman, A; Singh, T P

    1991-11-05

    A bifunctional alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor that has two binding sites has been purified from ragi. The inhibitor has been crystallized from its ammonium sulphate solution by the vapour diffusion method. The crystals belong to the orthogonal space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell dimensions a = 30.49 A, b = 56.30 A, c = 73.65 A and Z = 4.

  9. ZFN-Site searches genomes for zinc finger nuclease target sites and off-target sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs are man-made restriction enzymes useful for manipulating genomes by cleaving target DNA sequences. ZFNs allow therapeutic gene correction or creation of genetically modified model organisms. ZFN specificity is not absolute; therefore, it is essential to select ZFN target sites without similar genomic off-target sites. It is important to assay for off-target cleavage events at sites similar to the target sequence. Results ZFN-Site is a web interface that searches multiple genomes for ZFN off-target sites. Queries can be based on the target sequence or can be expanded using degenerate specificity to account for known ZFN binding preferences. ZFN off-target sites are outputted with links to genome browsers, facilitating off-target cleavage site screening. We verified ZFN-Site using previously published ZFN half-sites and located their target sites and their previously described off-target sites. While we have tailored this tool to ZFNs, ZFN-Site can also be used to find potential off-target sites for other nucleases, such as TALE nucleases. Conclusions ZFN-Site facilitates genome searches for possible ZFN cleavage sites based on user-defined stringency limits. ZFN-Site is an improvement over other methods because the FetchGWI search engine uses an indexed search of genome sequences for all ZFN target sites and possible off-target sites matching the half-sites and stringency limits. Therefore, ZFN-Site does not miss potential off-target sites.

  10. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedrowski, Megan R; Crosby, Heidi A; Hernandez, Frank J; Malone, Cheryl L; McNamara, James O; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc) enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2) that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  12. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Osiak

    Full Text Available Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6. In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs. Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  13. Selection-independent generation of gene knockout mouse embryonic stem cells using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiak, Anna; Radecke, Frank; Guhl, Eva; Radecke, Sarah; Dannemann, Nadine; Lütge, Fabienne; Glage, Silke; Rudolph, Cornelia; Cantz, Tobias; Schwarz, Klaus; Heilbronn, Regine; Cathomen, Toni

    2011-01-01

    Gene knockout in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has been an invaluable tool to study gene function in vitro or to generate animal models with altered phenotypes. Gene targeting using standard techniques, however, is rather inefficient and typically does not exceed frequencies of 10(-6). In consequence, the usage of complex positive/negative selection strategies to isolate targeted clones has been necessary. Here, we present a rapid single-step approach to generate a gene knockout in mouse ESCs using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Upon transient expression of ZFNs, the target gene is cleaved by the designer nucleases and then repaired by non-homologous end-joining, an error-prone DNA repair process that introduces insertions/deletions at the break site and therefore leads to functional null mutations. To explore and quantify the potential of ZFNs to generate a gene knockout in pluripotent stem cells, we generated a mouse ESC line containing an X-chromosomally integrated EGFP marker gene. Applying optimized conditions, the EGFP locus was disrupted in up to 8% of ESCs after transfection of the ZFN expression vectors, thus obviating the need of selection markers to identify targeted cells, which may impede or complicate downstream applications. Both activity and ZFN-associated cytotoxicity was dependent on vector dose and the architecture of the nuclease domain. Importantly, teratoma formation assays of selected ESC clones confirmed that ZFN-treated ESCs maintained pluripotency. In conclusion, the described ZFN-based approach represents a fast strategy for generating gene knockouts in ESCs in a selection-independent fashion that should be easily transferrable to other pluripotent stem cells.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Nuc2 is a functional, surface-attached extracellular nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan R Kiedrowski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent bacterial pathogen that causes a diverse range of acute and chronic infections. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the secreted nuclease (Nuc enzyme is a virulence factor in multiple models of infection, and in vivo expression of nuc has facilitated the development of an infection imaging approach based on Nuc-activatable probes. Interestingly, S. aureus strains encode a second nuclease (Nuc2 that has received limited attention. With the growing interest in bacterial nucleases, we sought to characterize Nuc2 in more detail through localization, expression, and biochemical studies. Fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase localization approaches using Nuc2-GFP and Nuc2-PhoA fusions, respectively, demonstrated that Nuc2 is membrane bound with the C-terminus facing the extracellular environment, indicating it is a signal-anchored Type II membrane protein. Nuc2 enzyme activity was detectable on the S. aureus cell surface using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay, and in time courses, both nuc2 transcription and enzyme activity peaked in early logarithmic growth and declined in stationary phase. Using a mouse model of S. aureus pyomyositis, Nuc2 activity was detected with activatable probes in vivo in nuc mutant strains, demonstrating that Nuc2 is produced during infections. To assess Nuc2 biochemical properties, the protein was purified and found to cleave both single- and double-stranded DNA, and it exhibited thermostability and calcium dependence, paralleling the properties of Nuc. Purified Nuc2 prevented biofilm formation in vitro and modestly decreased biomass in dispersal experiments. Altogether, our findings confirm that S. aureus encodes a second, surface-attached and functional DNase that is expressed during infections and displays similar biochemical properties to the secreted Nuc enzyme.

  15. Collagen/chitosan based two-compartment and bi-functional dermal scaffolds for skin regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng [Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Shenzhen Second People' s Hospital, Shenzhen 518035 (China); Wang, Mingbo [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Implants, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); She, Zhending [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Implants, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Shenzhen Lando Biomaterials Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China); Fan, Kunwu; Xu, Cheng [Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Shenzhen Second People' s Hospital, Shenzhen 518035 (China); Chu, Bin; Chen, Changsheng [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Implants, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Shi, Shengjun, E-mail: shengjunshi@yahoo.com [The Burns Department of Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510280 (China); Tan, Rongwei, E-mail: tanrw@landobiom.com [Key Laboratory of Biomedical Materials and Implants, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Shenzhen Lando Biomaterials Co., Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Inspired from the sophisticated bilayer structures of natural dermis, here, we reported collagen/chitosan based two-compartment and bi-functional dermal scaffolds. Two functions refer to mediating rapid angiogenesis based on recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) and antibacterial from gentamicin, which were encapsulated in PLGA microspheres. The gentamicin and rhVEGF encapsulated PLGA microspheres were further combined with collagen/chitosan mixtures in low (lower layer) and high (upper layer) concentrations, and molded to generate the two-compartment and bi-functional scaffolds. Based on morphology and pore structure analyses, it was found that the scaffold has a distinct double layered porous and connective structure with PLGA microspheres encapsulated. Statistical analysis indicated that the pores in the upper layer and in the lower layer have great variations in diameter, indicative of a two-compartment structure. The release profiles of gentamicin and rhVEGF exceeded 28 and 49 days, respectively. In vitro culture of mouse fibroblasts showed that the scaffold can facilitate cell adhesion and proliferation. Moreover, the scaffold can obviously inhibit proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus and Serratia marcescens, exhibiting its unique antibacterial effect. The two-compartment and bi-functional dermal scaffolds can be a promising candidate for skin regeneration. - Highlights: • The dermal scaffold is inspired from the bilayer structures of natural dermis. • The dermal scaffold has two-compartment structures. • The dermal scaffold containing VEGF and gentamicin encapsulated PLGA microspheres • The dermal scaffold can facilitate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  16. Bifunctional Catalysts for Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Oxygenates: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Allison M.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Medlin, J. Will

    2016-08-05

    Deoxygenation is an important reaction in the conversion of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuels and chemicals. A key route for biomass refining involves the production of pyrolysis oil through rapid heating of the raw biomass feedstock. Pyrolysis oil as produced is highly oxygenated, so the feasibility of this approach depends in large part on the ability to selectively deoxygenate pyrolysis oil components to create a stream of high-value finished products. Identification of catalytic materials that are active and selective for deoxygenation of pyrolysis oil components has therefore represented a major research area. One catalyst is rarely capable of performing the different types of elementary reaction steps required to deoxygenate biomass-derived compounds. For this reason, considerable attention has been placed on bifunctional catalysts, where two different active materials are used to provide catalytic sites for diverse reaction steps. Here, we review recent trends in the development of catalysts, with a focus on catalysts for which a bifunctional effect has been proposed. We summarize recent studies of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of pyrolysis oil and model compounds for a range of materials, including supported metal and bimetallic catalysts as well as transition-metal oxides, sulfides, carbides, nitrides, and phosphides. Particular emphasis is placed on how catalyst structure can be related to performance via molecular-level mechanisms. These studies demonstrate the importance of catalyst bifunctionality, with each class of materials requiring hydrogenation and C-O scission sites to perform HDO at reasonable rates.

  17. A New Synthesis of TE2A-a Potential Bifunctional Chelator for {sup 64}Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Darpan N.; Kwak, Won Jung; Park, Jeong Chan; Gawande, Manoj B.; Yoo, Jeong Soo [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Young; An, Gwang Il [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Eun Kyoung [Korea Basic Science Institute, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The development of a new bifunctional chelator, which holds radio metals strongly in living systems, is a prerequisite for the successful application of disease-specific biomolecules to medical diagnosis and therapy. Recently, TE2A was reported to make kinetically more stable Cu({Pi}) complexes than TETA. Herein, we report a new synthetic route to TE2A and explore its potential as a bifunctional chelator. TE2A was synthesized using the regioselective alkylation of benzyl bromoacetate and successive de protection of the methylene bridge and benzyl group. Salt-free TE2A was radiolabeled with {sup 64}Cu and micro PET imaging was performed to follow the clearance pattern of the {sup 64}Cu-TE2A complex. TE2A was conjugated with cyclic RGD peptide and the TE2A-c(RGDyK) conjugate was radiolabeled with {sup 64}Cu. TE2A was prepared in salt-free form cyclam in an overall yield of 74%. The micro PET images showed that {sup 64}Cu-TE2A is excreted rapidly from the body by the kidney and liver. TE2A was successfully conjugated with c(RGDyK) peptide through on carboxylate group and the TE2A-c(RGDyK) conjugate was radiolabeled with {sup 64}Cu in 94% yield within 30 min. TE2A can be used by itself as a bifunctional chelator without any further structural modification.

  18. Characterization of a bifunctional xylanase/endoglucanase from yak rumen microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lei; Ding, Mozhu; Bao, Lei; Chen, Yingzhi; Zhou, Jungang; Lu, Hong

    2011-06-01

    A new gene, RuCelA, encoding a bifunctional xylanase/endoglucanase, was cloned from a metagenomic library of yak rumen microorganisms. RuCelA showed activity against xylan and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), suggesting bifunctional xylanase/endoglucanase activity. The optimal conditions for xylanase and endoglucanase activities were 65°C, pH 7.0 and 50°C, pH 5.0, respectively. In addition, the presence of Co(+) and Co(2+) can greatly improve RuCelA's endoglucanase activity, while inhibits its xylanase activity. Further examination of substrate preference showed a higher activity against barley glucan and lichenin than against xylan and CMC. Using xylan and barley glucan as substrates, RuCelA displayed obvious synergistic effects with β-1,4-xylosidase and β-1,4-glucosidase. Generation of soluble oligosaccharides from lignocellulose is the key step in bioethanol production, and it is greatly notable that RuCelA can produce xylo-oligosaccharides and cello-oligosaccharides in the continuous saccharification of pretreated rice straw, which can be further degraded into fermentable sugars. Therefore, the bifunctional RuCelA distinguishes itself as an ideal candidate for industrial applications.

  19. Ultrafast solvation dynamics at internal site of staphylococcal nuclease investigated by site-directed mutagenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guang-yu, Gao; Wei, Wang; Shu-feng, Wang; Zhong, Dongping; Qi-huang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is essential for protein activities. To study internal solvation of protein, site-directed mutagenesis is applied. Intrinsic fluorescent probe, tryptophan, is inserted into desired position inside protein molecule for ultrafast spectroscopic study. Here we review this unique method for protein dynamics researches. We introduce the frontiers of protein solvation, site-directed mutagenesis, protein stability and characteristics, and the spectroscopic methods. Then we present time-resolved spectroscopic dynamics of solvation dynamics inside caves of active sites. The studies are carried out on a globular protein, staphylococcal nuclease. The solvation at internal sites of the caves indicate clear characteristics of local environment. These solvation behaviors correlated to the enzyme activity directly.

  20. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  1. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  2. Zinc finger nuclease technology: A stable tool for high efficiency transformation in bloodstream form T. brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Gabriela; Kangussu-Marcolino, Monica M; Doiron, Nicholas; Käser, Sandro; de Assis Burle-Caldas, Gabriela; DaRocha, Wanderson D; Teixeira, Santuza M; Roditi, Isabel

    2017-02-20

    In Trypanosoma brucei, the generation of knockout mutants is relatively easy compared to other organisms as transfection methods are well established. These methods have their limitations, however, when it comes to the generation of genome-wide libraries that require a minimum of several hundred thousand transformants. Double-strand breaks with the meganuclease ISce-I dramatically increase transformation efficiency, but are not widely in use as cell lines need to be generated de novo before each transfection. Here we show that zinc finger nucleases are a robust and stable tool that can enhance transformation in bloodstream forms by more than an order of magnitude.

  3. An Mrr-family nuclease motif in the single polypeptide restriction-modification enzyme LlaGI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel M; Josephsen, Jytte; Szczelkun, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    Bioinformatic analysis of the putative nuclease domain of the single polypeptide restriction-modification enzyme LlaGI reveals amino acid motifs characteristic of the Escherichia coli methylated DNA-specific Mrr endonuclease. Using mutagenesis, we examined the role of the conserved residues in both DNA translocation and cleavage. Mutations in those residues predicted to play a role in DNA hydrolysis produced enzymes that could translocate on DNA but were either unable to cleave the polynucleotide track or had reduced nuclease activity. Cleavage by LlaGI is not targeted to methylated DNA, suggesting that the conserved motifs in the Mrr domain are a conventional sub-family of the PD-(D/E)XK superfamily of DNA nucleases.

  4. TAL effector nucleases induce mutations at a pre-selected location in the genome of primary barley transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Toni; Holm, Preben Bach; Starker, Colby G; Christian, Michelle; Voytas, Daniel F; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holme, Inger Bæksted

    2013-10-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) enable targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. The primary advantage of TALENs over other sequence-specific nucleases, namely zinc finger nucleases and meganucleases, lies in their ease of assembly, reliability of function, and their broad targeting range. Here we report the assembly of several TALENs for a specific genomic locus in barley. The cleavage activity of individual TALENs was first tested in vivo using a yeast-based, single-strand annealing assay. The most efficient TALEN was then selected for barley transformation. Analysis of the resulting transformants showed that TALEN-induced double strand breaks led to the introduction of short deletions at the target site. Additional analysis revealed that each barley transformant contained a range of different mutations, indicating that mutations occurred independently in different cells.

  5. Characterization of S1 nuclease sensitive site at transcription initiation region of Attacus ricini rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明亮; 赵慕钧; 靳嘉瑞; 李载平

    1997-01-01

    A single-stranded S1 nuclease hypersensitive site which contains a d(AT)18 sequence structure locat-ed in the 5 -non transcription spacer of silkworm A . ricini ribosomal RNA gene has been reported[1] Using starved-refed silkworms, another S1 nuclease sensitive site was found existing in the rDNA chromatin, while under merely starving, this S1 sensitive site disappeared[2] . Recently this inducible S1 sensitive site has been further determined. It consists of a d(GT)10-d(AT)10 special DNA sequence at the transcription initiation region, and shows a behavior of ease in DNA-unwinding, indicating that S1 nuclease sensitive sites may have an important function in the regulation of rDNA transcription and replication.

  6. Medium optimization for nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum in solid-state fermentation using polyurethane foam as inert carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Y.; Knol, W.; Smits, J.P.; Bol, J.

    1996-01-01

    A solid-state fermentation system, using polyurethane foam as an inert carrier, was used for the production of nuclease P1 by Penicillium citrinum. Optimization of nuclease P1 production was carried out using a synthetic liquid medium. After a two-step medium optimization using a fractional factoria

  7. Targeted genome engineering using designer nucleases: State of the art and practical guidance for application in human pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the last years numerous publications successfully applied sequence specific designer nucleases for genome editing in human PSCs. However, despite this abundance of reports together with the rapid development and improvement accomplished with the technology, it is still difficult to choose the optimal methodology for a specific application of interest. With focus on the most suitable approach for specific applications, we present a practical guidance for successful gene editing in human PSCs using designer nucleases. We discuss experimental considerations, limitations and critical aspects which will guide the investigator for successful implementation of this technology.

  8. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  9. Zinc Finger Nuclease induced DNA double stranded breaks and rearrangements in MLL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, To Uyen [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Ho, Bay; Shih, Shyh-Jen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States); Vaughan, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.vaughan@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Graduate Group in Immunology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento CA 95817 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: ► A Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) targeting a leukemogenic hot spot for rearrangement in MLL is created. ► The novel ZFN efficiently cleaves MLL exon 13. ► Despite MLL cleavage and evidence of mis-repair, no leukemogenic translocations were produced. ► MLL cleavage alone is insufficient to generate leukemogenic translocations. - Abstract: Radiation treatment or chemotherapy has been linked with a higher risk of secondary cancers such as therapy related Acute Myeloid Leukemia (tAML). Several of these cancers have been shown to be correlated to the introduction of double stranded breaks (DSB) and rearrangements within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. We used Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) to introduce precise cuts within MLL to examine how a single DNA DSB might lead to chromosomal rearrangements. A ZFN targeting exon 13 within the Breakpoint Cluster Region of MLL was transiently expressed in a human lymphoblast cell line originating from a CML patient. Although FISH analysis showed ZFN DSB at this region increased the rate of MLL fragmentation, we were unable to detect leukemogenic rearrangements or translocations via inverse PCR. Interestingly, gene fragmentation as well as small interstitial deletions, insertions and base substitutions increased with the inhibition of DNA-PK, suggesting repair of this particular DSB is linked to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Although mis-repair of DSBs may be necessary for the initiation of leukemogenic translocations, a MLL targeted DNA break alone is insufficient.

  10. Targeted Mutagenesis in Plant Cells through Transformation of Sequence-Specific Nuclease mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Stoddard

    Full Text Available Plant genome engineering using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs promises to advance basic and applied plant research by enabling precise modification of endogenous genes. Whereas DNA is an effective means for delivering SSNs, DNA can integrate randomly into the plant genome, leading to unintentional gene inactivation. Further, prolonged expression of SSNs from DNA constructs can lead to the accumulation of off-target mutations. Here, we tested a new approach for SSN delivery to plant cells, namely transformation of messenger RNA (mRNA encoding TAL effector nucleases (TALENs. mRNA delivery of a TALEN pair targeting the Nicotiana benthamiana ALS gene resulted in mutation frequencies of approximately 6% in comparison to DNA delivery, which resulted in mutation frequencies of 70.5%. mRNA delivery resulted in three-fold fewer insertions, and 76% were 10bp. In an effort to increase mutation frequencies using mRNA, we fused several different 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs from Arabidopsis thaliana genes to the TALEN coding sequence. UTRs from an A. thaliana adenine nucleotide α hydrolases-like gene (At1G09740 enhanced mutation frequencies approximately two-fold, relative to a no-UTR control. These results indicate that mRNA can be used as a delivery vehicle for SSNs, and that manipulation of mRNA UTRs can influence efficiencies of genome editing.

  11. Dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided FokI nucleases for highly specific genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shengdar Q; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Foden, Jennifer A; Thapar, Vishal; Reyon, Deepak; Goodwin, Mathew J; Aryee, Martin J; Joung, J Keith

    2014-06-01

    Monomeric CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for targeted genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations with high frequencies. Here we describe dimeric RNA-guided FokI nucleases (RFNs) that can recognize extended sequences and edit endogenous genes with high efficiencies in human cells. RFN cleavage activity depends strictly on the binding of two guide RNAs (gRNAs) to DNA with a defined spacing and orientation substantially reducing the likelihood that a suitable target site will occur more than once in the genome and therefore improving specificities relative to wild-type Cas9 monomers. RFNs guided by a single gRNA generally induce lower levels of unwanted mutations than matched monomeric Cas9 nickases. In addition, we describe a simple method for expressing multiple gRNAs bearing any 5' end nucleotide, which gives dimeric RFNs a broad targeting range. RFNs combine the ease of RNA-based targeting with the specificity enhancement inherent to dimerization and are likely to be useful in applications that require highly precise genome editing.

  12. Nuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11 functions in targeted nucleotide alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Usher, Michael; Hu, Yiling; Kmiec, Eric B

    2003-10-01

    Oligonucleotides can be used to direct site-specific changes in genomic DNA through a process in which mismatched base pairs in the oligonucleotide and the target DNA are created. The mechanism by which these complexes are developed and resolved is being studied by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Genetic analyses have revealed that in all likelihood the reaction occurs in two phases: DNA pairing and DNA repair. While the former phase involves strand assimilation, the latter phase likely involves an endonucleolytic processing step that leads to joint resolution. In this study, we established the importance of a functioning MRE11 gene in the overall reaction, as yeast strains deficient in MRE11 exhibited severely reduced activity. The activity could be rescued by complementation with wild-type MRE11 genes but not with MRE11 alleles lacking the nuclease function. Taken together, the data suggest that Mre11 provides nuclease activity for targeted nucleotide exchange, a process that could be used to reengineer yeast genes.

  13. Improving nuclease activity of copper(II)-terpyridine complex through solubilizing and charge effects of glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Wang, Xiaoyong; Hu, Ming; Guo, Zijian

    2013-04-01

    Copper complexes are potential metallonucleases that may find application in biotechnology and molecular biology. In this study, a ternary copper-terpyridine complex [Cu(ttpy)(Gly)(NO3)](NO3)·H2O (1) (ttpy=4'-p-tolyl-2,2':6,2″-terpyridine) is synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and ESI-MS as an artificial nuclease. Glycine (Gly) is introduced into the complex to enhance the water-solubility and electrostatic affinity for the nucleic acid target. The interaction between complex 1 and DNA has been studied by spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis, using a structural analog [Cu(ttpy)(NO3)2] (2) as the reference. Complex 1 demonstrates an increased DNA binding ability and oxidative cleavage activity towards supercoiled pBR322 DNA as compared with complex 2. The enhanced water-solubility and positive charge of complex 1 may facilitate its access to DNA and formation of hydrogen bonds with the sugar-phosphate backbone. The results indicate that carefully positioned auxiliary groups in a copper complex can significantly affect the substrate binding or activation ability and consequently the nuclease efficiency of the complex.

  14. Leishmania infantum EndoG is an endo/exo-nuclease essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Rico

    Full Text Available EndoG, a member of the DNA/RNA non-specific ββα-metal family of nucleases, has been demonstrated to be present in many organisms, including Trypanosomatids. This nuclease participates in the apoptotic program in these parasites by migrating from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, where it takes part in the degradation of genomic DNA that characterizes this process. We now demonstrate that Leishmania infantum EndoG (LiEndoG is an endo-exonuclease that has a preferential 5' exonuclease activity on linear DNA. Regardless of its role during apoptotic cell death, this enzyme seems to be necessary during normal development of the parasites as indicated by the reduced growth rates observed in LiEndoG hemi-knockouts and their poor infectivity in differentiated THP-1 cells. The pro-life role of this protein is also corroborated by the higher survival rates of parasites that over-express this protein after treatment with the LiEndoG inhibitor Lei49. Taken together, our results demonstrate that this enzyme plays essential roles in both survival and death of Leishmania parasites.

  15. Simultaneous screening and validation of effective zinc finger nucleases in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs have been successfully used for genome modification in various cell types and species. However, construction of an effective ZFN remained challenging. Previous studies all focused on obtaining specific zinc finger proteins (ZFPs first via bacterial 2-hybrid approach, and then fusing selected ZFPs to FokI nuclease domain. These assembled ZFNs have high rate of failing to cleave target sites in vivo. In this study, we developed a simultaneous screening and validation system to obtain effective ZFNs directly in yeast AH109. This system is based on Gal4 reporter system carrying a unique intermediate reporter plasmid with two 30-bp Gal4 homology arms and a ZFN target site. DNA double strand breaks introduced on target sequence by ZFNs were repaired by single strand annealing (SSA mechanism, and the restored Gal4 drove reporter genes expression. Taking the advantage of OPEN (Oligomerized Pool ENgineering selection, we constructed 3 randomized ZFNs libraries and 9 reporter strains for each target gene. We tested this system by taking goat α s1-casein as target gene following three-step selection. Consequently, 3 efficient pairs of ZFNs were obtained from positive colonies on selective medium. The ZFNs achieved a 15.9% disruption frequency in goat mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, we created a novel system to obtain effective ZFNs directly with simultaneous screening and validation.

  16. SOME FEATURES OF HYDROLYSIS OF THE HYBRID B-Z-FORM DNA BY SERRATIA MARCESCENS NUCLEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filimonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly polymerized herring testis DNA of the random nucleotide sequence was used as a model of natural substrate to study some features of hydrolysis of the hybrid B-Z form with Serratia marcescens nuclease. The hybrid B-Z-form was formed upon addition of 1.15 M MgSO4 and 0.421 mM Co(NH36Cl3. The DNA transition from the right handed B-form to the hybrid B-Z-form caused a decrease in Vmax of DNA cleavage with the nuclease. The diminishing Vmax was consistent with diminishing values of Km and Kcat. The binding of Mg2+ or Co(NH363+ to highly polymerized DNA caused correspondingly about 80-or 7-fold decrease in Km and more than 1600 or 600 decrease in Kcat compared with that of Mg-DNA complex of B-form.

  17. Generation of myostatin B knockout yellow catfish (Tachysurus fulvidraco) using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhangji; Ge, Jiachun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Myostatin (Mstn), a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an inhibiting role in mammalian muscle growth. Mammals like human, cattle, mouse, sheep, and dog carrying null alleles of Mstn display a double-muscle phenotype. Mstn is conserved in fish; however, little is known whether the fish with mutated mstn display a similar phenotype to mammals because of the lack of mutant fish with mstn null alleles. Previously, we knocked out one of the duplicated copies of myostatin gene (mstna) in yellow catfish using zinc-finger nucleases. In this study, we report the identification of the second myostatin gene (mstnb) and knockout of mstnb in yellow catfish. The gene comprises three exons. It is predicted to encode 373 amino acid residues. The predicted protein exhibits 59.3% identity with yellow catfish Mstna and 57.3% identity with human MSTN. Employing TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases) technology, we obtained two founders (from four randomly selected founders) of yellow catfish carrying the mutated mstnb gene in their germ cells. Totally, six mutated alleles of mstnb were obtained from the founders. Among the six alleles, four are nonframeshift and two are frameshift mutation. The frameshift mutated alleles include mstnb(nju22), an 8 bp deletion, and mstnb(nju24), a complex type of mutation comprising a 7 bp deletion and a 12 bp insertion. They are predicted to encode function null Mstnb. Our results will help to understand the roles of mstn genes in fish growth.

  18. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  19. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Zhao, Xuefeng; Wright, David A; Carpenter, Susan; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  20. Modularly assembled designer TAL effector nucleases for targeted gene knockout and gene replacement in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T; Huang, S; Zhao, XF; Wright, DA; Carpenter, S; Spalding, MH; Weeks, DP; Yang, B

    2011-08-08

    Recent studies indicate that the DNA recognition domain of transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors can be combined with the nuclease domain of FokI restriction enzyme to produce TAL effector nucleases (TALENs) that, in pairs, bind adjacent DNA target sites and produce double-strand breaks between the target sequences, stimulating non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination. Here, we exploit the four prevalent TAL repeats and their DNA recognition cipher to develop a 'modular assembly' method for rapid production of designer TALENs (dTALENs) that recognize unique DNA sequence up to 23 bases in any gene. We have used this approach to engineer 10 dTALENs to target specific loci in native yeast chromosomal genes. All dTALENs produced high rates of site-specific gene disruptions and created strains with expected mutant phenotypes. Moreover, dTALENs stimulated high rates (up to 34%) of gene replacement by homologous recombination. Finally, dTALENs caused no detectable cytotoxicity and minimal levels of undesired genetic mutations in the treated yeast strains. These studies expand the realm of verified TALEN activity from cultured human cells to an intact eukaryotic organism and suggest that low-cost, highly dependable dTALENs can assume a significant role for gene modifications of value in human and animal health, agriculture and industry.

  1. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  2. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  3. Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Death by Repressing the Nuclease Activity of Mitochondrial Endonuclease G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L.J. Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Endonuclease G (EndoG is a mitochondrial protein that is released from mitochondria and relocated into the nucleus to promote chromosomal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis. Here, we show that oxidative stress causes cell-death defects in C. elegans through an EndoG-mediated cell-death pathway. In response to high reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, homodimeric CPS-6—the C. elegans homolog of EndoG—is dissociated into monomers with diminished nuclease activity. Conversely, the nuclease activity of CPS-6 is enhanced, and its dimeric structure is stabilized by its interaction with the worm AIF homolog, WAH-1, which shifts to disulfide cross-linked dimers under high ROS levels. CPS-6 thus acts as a ROS sensor to regulate the life and death of cells. Modulation of the EndoG dimer conformation could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of diseases resulting from oxidative stress.

  4. Highly efficient targeted mutagenesis in axolotl using Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, G Parker; Timberlake, Andrew T; McLean, Kaitlin C; Monaghan, James R; Crews, Craig M

    2014-05-01

    Among tetrapods, only urodele salamanders, such as the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum, can completely regenerate limbs as adults. The mystery of why salamanders, but not other animals, possess this ability has for generations captivated scientists seeking to induce this phenomenon in other vertebrates. Although many recent advances in molecular biology have allowed limb regeneration and tissue repair in the axolotl to be investigated in increasing detail, the molecular toolkit for the study of this process has been limited. Here, we report that the CRISPR-Cas9 RNA-guided nuclease system can efficiently create mutations at targeted sites within the axolotl genome. We identify individual animals treated with RNA-guided nucleases that have mutation frequencies close to 100% at targeted sites. We employ this technique to completely functionally ablate EGFP expression in transgenic animals and recapitulate developmental phenotypes produced by loss of the conserved gene brachyury. Thus, this advance allows a reverse genetic approach in the axolotl and will undoubtedly provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms of salamanders' unique regenerative ability.

  5. Surveyor nuclease detection of mutations and polymorphisms of mtDNA in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilch, Jacek; Asman, Marek; Jamroz, Ewa; Kajor, Maciej; Kotrys-Puchalska, Elżbieta; Goss, Małgorzata; Krzak, Maria; Witecka, Joanna; Gmiński, Jan; Sieroń, Aleksander L

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are complex disorders with wide range of clinical manifestations. Particularly time-consuming is the identification of mutations in mitochondrial DNA. A group of 20 children with clinical manifestations of mitochondrial encephalomyopathies was selected for molecular studies. The aims were (a) to identify mutations in mtDNA isolated from muscle and (b) to verify detected mutations in DNA isolated from blood, in order to assess the utility of a Surveyor nuclease assay kit for patient screening. The most common changes found were polymorphisms, including a few missense mutations altering the amino acid sequence of mitochondrial proteins. In two boys with MELAS (i.e., mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes), a mutation A→G3243 was detected in the tRNALeu gene of mtDNA isolated from muscle and blood. In one boy, the carrier status of his mother was confirmed, based on molecular analysis of DNA isolated from blood. A method using Surveyor nuclease allows systematic screening for small mutations in mtDNA, using as its source blood of the patients and asymptomatic carriers. The method still requires confirmation studying a larger group. In some patients, the use of this method should precede and might limit indications for traumatic muscle and skin biopsy.

  6. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Arildo Nerys-Junior; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias,Luciene P.; Márcia Oliveira; Rossi,Átila D.; Rodrigo Delvecchio da Cunha; Gonçalves,Gabriel S.; Amilcar Tanuri

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double- strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produc...

  7. Nanostructured Perovskite LaCo1-xMnxO3 as Bifunctional Catalysts for Rechargeable Metal-Air Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaoming; Li, Bing; Wuu, Delvin; Sumboja, Afriyanti; An, Tao; Hor, T. S. Andy; Zong, Yun; Liu, Zhaolin

    2015-09-01

    Bifunctional catalyst that is active for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is one of the most important components of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Nanostructured perovskite bifunctional catalysts comprising La, Co and Mn(LaCo1-xMnxO3, LCMO) are synthesized by hydrothermal methods. The morphology, structure and electrochemical activity of the perovskite bifunctional catalysts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. Nanorod, nanodisc and nanoparticle are typical morphologies of LCMO. The electrocatalytic activity of LCMO is significantly improved by the addition of conductive materials such as carbon nanotube. To demonstrate the practical utilization, LCMO in the composition of LaCo0.8Mn0.2O3(LCMO82) is used as air cathode catalysts for rechargeable zinc-air batteries. The battery prototype can sustain 470 h or 40 discharge-charge cycles equivalent.

  8. Probing isoform-specific functions of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases using zinc finger nuclease glycoengineered SimpleCells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Kong, Yun;

    2012-01-01

    NAc-Ts are largely unavailable. We recently introduced SimpleCells, i.e., human cell lines made deficient in O-glycan extension by zinc finger nuclease targeting of a key gene in O-glycan elongation (Cosmc), which allows for proteome-wide discovery of O-glycoproteins. Here we have extended the SimpleCell concept...

  9. Development of Cell Lines Stably Expressing Staphylococcal Nuclease Fused to Dengue 2 Virus Capsid Protein for CTVI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Feng QIN; E-De QIN

    2004-01-01

    To explore the potential application of capsid-targeted viral inactivation(CTVI)strategy in prophylactic model against dengue virus(DV)infection,here we fused a Ca2+-dependent nuclease,staphylococcal nuclease(SN),to the capsid protein of dengue 2 virus(D2C)at the carboxyl terminal,and constructed the desired expression plasmid pc/D2C-SN and control plasmids pc/D2C-SN* and pc/D2C.A mammalian cell line BHK-21 was transfected by electroporation with those plasmids and thereafter selected by 5 μg/ml blasticidin.The resistant cell clones were then expanding cultured and screened by RT-PCR and Western Blot assays.The nuclease activity of the expressed fusion protein D2C-SN was analyzed by in vitro DNA digestion assay.It was confirmed cell lines stably expressing D2C-SN and control constructs were obtained.The intracellular expressed fusion protein D2C-SN had ideal nuclease activity and no cytotoxicity on mammalian cells.Those engineered cell lines provided the experimental system for CTVI application in prophylactic model and paved the new road for combating DV infection with CTVI.

  10. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin e7 nuclease domain by systematic n-terminal mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Németh, Eszter; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Thulstrup, Peter W.;

    2014-01-01

    The nuclease domain of colicin E7 (NColE7) promotes the nonspecific cleavage of nucleic acids at its C-terminal HNH motif. Interestingly, the deletion of four N-terminal residues (446–449NColE75KRNK) resulted in complete loss of the enzyme activity. R447A mutation was reported to decrease the nuc...

  11. The C. elegans apoptotic nuclease NUC-1 is related in sequence and activity to mammalian DNase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, C J; Evans, C J; Bill, B R; Otsuka, A J; Aguilera, R J

    2000-07-11

    The Caenorhabditis elegans nuc-1 gene has previously been implicated in programmed cell death due to the presence of persistent undegraded apoptotic DNA in nuc-1 mutant animals. In this report, we describe the cloning and characterization of nuc-1, which encodes an acidic nuclease with significant sequence similarity to mammalian DNase II. Database searches performed with human DNase II protein sequence revealed a significant similarity with the predicted C. elegans C07B5.5 ORF. Subsequent analysis of crude C. elegans protein extracts revealed that wild-type animals contained a potent endonuclease activity with a cleavage preference similar to DNase II, while nuc-1 mutant worms demonstrated a marked reduction in this nuclease activity. Sequence analysis of C07B5.5 DNA and mRNA also revealed that nuc-1(e1392), but not wild-type animals contained a nonsense mutation within the CO7B5.5 coding region. Furthermore, nuc-1 transgenic lines carrying the wild-type C07B5.5 locus demonstrated a complete complementation of the nuc-1 mutant phenotype. Our results therefore provide compelling evidence that the C07B5.5 gene encodes the NUC-1 apoptotic nuclease and that this nuclease is related in sequence and activity to DNase II.

  12. A simple, high sensitivity mutation screening using Ampligase mediated T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease with microfluidic capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mo Chao; Cheong, Wai Chye; Lim, Li Shi; Li, Mo-Huang

    2012-03-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection is of increasing importance for a variety of medical applications, including identification of cancer biomarkers and genotyping for inherited genetic disorders. Among various mutation-screening technologies, enzyme mismatch cleavage (EMC) represents a great potential as an ideal scanning method for its simplicity and high efficiency, where the heteroduplex DNAs are recognized and cleaved into DNA fragments by mismatch-recognizing nucleases. Thereby, the enzymatic cleavage activities of the resolving nucleases play a critical role for the EMC sensitivity. In this study, we utilized the unique features of microfluidic capillary electrophoresis and de novo gene synthesis to explore the enzymatic properties of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease for EMC. Homoduplex and HE DNAs with specific mismatches at desired positions were synthesized using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) gene synthesis. The effects of nonspecific cleavage, preference of mismatches, exonuclease activity, incubation time, and DNA loading capability were systematically examined. In addition, the utilization of a thermostable DNA ligase for real-time ligase mediation was investigated. Analysis of the experimental results has led to new insights into the enzymatic cleavage activities of T7 endonuclease I and Surveyor nuclease, and aided in optimizing EMC conditions, which enhance the sensitivity and efficiency in screening of unknown DNA variations.

  13. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  14. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  15. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  16. Bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts from oil palm empty fruit bunches ash and alum for biodiesel synthesis simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astar, Ismail; Usman, Thamrin; Wahyuni, Nelly; Rudiyansyah, Alimuddin, Andi Hairil

    2017-03-01

    Free fatty acids (FFA) contained in crude palm oil (CPO) and sludge oil has been used as the base material of biodiesel with the aid of a catalyst in the transesterification and esterification reactions. This study aims to synthesize and characterize bifunctional catalysts were synthesized from the ashes of palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) and alum based on the analysis of XRD, XRF and acidity test. Bifunctional catalyst obtained was used as a catalyst to production of biodiesel with different levels of FFA. The optimum ratio alum added was 0.2 mol at 3 hours of reaction time and 3% of catalyst by the FFA samples were used 67,40%. The catalyst with optimum alum mole variations subsequently used on samples with varying levels of FFA, namely 1.29%, 4.98%, 29.21%, 67.40% and 74.47%. Optimum conversion of methyl ester in the esterification reaction occurs in the sample with 67.40% FFA content, which reached 86.17%, while the conversion of methyl ester transesterification process optimum amounted to 45.70% in the samples with 4.98% FFA content. Methyl ester produced has a refractive index of 1.448 (29.8 ° C), density of 0.883 g / mL (25 °C) and a viscosity of 8.933 cSt (25 ° C). The results of GC-MS analysis showed that the main composition of methyl ester result of esterification of sludge oil methyl palmitate (36.84%), while the CPO transesterification shows the main composition of methyl ester is methyl oleic (38.87%). Based on the research results, the catalyst synthesized from alum and EFB ash can be used as a Bifunctional catalysts for biodiesel synthesis.

  17. Isolation, characterization and molecular cloning of Duplex-Specific Nuclease from the hepatopancreas of the Kamchatka crab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Laura L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleases, which are key components of biologically diverse processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination, antiviral defense, apoptosis and digestion, have revolutionized the field of molecular biology. Indeed many standard molecular strategies, including molecular cloning, studies of DNA-protein interactions, and analysis of nucleic acid structures, would be virtually impossible without these versatile enzymes. The discovery of nucleases with unique properties has often served as the basis for the development of modern molecular biology methods. Thus, the search for novel nucleases with potentially exploitable functions remains an important scientific undertaking. Results Using degenerative primers and the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE procedure, we cloned the Duplex-Specific Nuclease (DSN gene from the hepatopancreas of the Kamchatka crab and determined its full primary structure. We also developed an effective method for purifying functional DSN from the crab hepatopancreas. The isolated enzyme was highly thermostable, exhibited a broad pH optimum (5.5 – 7.5 and required divalent cations for activity, with manganese and cobalt being especially effective. The enzyme was highly specific, cleaving double-stranded DNA or DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids, but not single-stranded DNA or single- or double-stranded RNA. Moreover, only DNA duplexes containing at least 9 base pairs were effectively cleaved by DSN; shorter DNA duplexes were left intact. Conclusion We describe a new DSN from Kamchatka crab hepatopancreas, determining its primary structure and developing a preparative method for its purification. We found that DSN had unique substrate specificity, cleaving only DNA duplexes longer than 8 base pairs, or DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids. Interestingly, the DSN primary structure is homologous to well-known Serratia-like non-specific nucleases structures, but the properties of DSN are distinct. The unique substrate

  18. Tunable catalytic properties of bi-functional mixed oxides in ethanol conversion to high value compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel J.; Job, Heather M.; Smith, Colin D.; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-10

    tA highly versatile ethanol conversion process to selectively generate high value compounds is pre-sented here. By changing the reaction temperature, ethanol can be selectively converted to >C2alcohols/oxygenates or phenolic compounds over hydrotalcite derived bi-functional MgO–Al2O3cata-lyst via complex cascade mechanism. Reaction temperature plays a role in whether aldol condensationor the acetone formation is the path taken in changing the product composition. This article containsthe catalytic activity comparison between the mono-functional and physical mixture counterpart to thehydrotalcite derived mixed oxides and the detailed discussion on the reaction mechanisms.

  19. Controlled Covalent Functionalization of Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide To Generate Defined Bifunctional 2D Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghani, Abbas; Donskyi, Ievgen S.; Fardin Gholami, Mohammad; Ziem, Benjamin; Lippitz, Andreas; Unger, Wolfgang E. S.; Böttcher, Christoph; Rabe, Jürgen P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A controlled, reproducible, gram‐scale method is reported for the covalent functionalization of graphene sheets by a one‐pot nitrene [2+1] cycloaddition reaction under mild conditions. The reaction between commercially available 2,4,6‐trichloro‐1,3,5‐triazine and sodium azide with thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO) results in defined dichlorotriazine‐functionalized sheets. The different reactivities of the chlorine substituents on the functionalized graphene allow stepwise post‐modification by manipulating the temperature. This new method provides unique access to defined bifunctional 2D nanomaterials, as exemplified by chiral surfaces and multifunctional hybrid architectures. PMID:28165179

  20. An efficient bifunctional electrocatalyst for water splitting based on cobalt phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Libin; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao; Sun, Xuping

    2016-06-01

    The development of highly efficient electrocatalysts for water splitting is critical for various renewable-energy technologies. In this letter, we demonstrate a cobalt phosphide nanowire array grown on a Ti mesh (CoP/TM) behaving as a bifunctional electrocatalyst for water splitting. The CoP/TM electrode delivers 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 72 mV for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and 310 mV for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 1.0 M KOH. Furthermore, its corresponding two-electrode alkaline electrolyzer displays 10 mA cm-2 at 1.64 V.

  1. MoO3 nanoparticle anchored graphene as bifunctional agent for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahan, Homen; Roy, Raju; Namsa, Nima D.; Das, Shyamal K.

    2016-10-01

    We report here a facile one step hydrothermal method to anchor MoO3 nanoparticles in graphene. The bifunctionality of graphene-MoO3 nanoparticles is demonstrated via dye adsorption and antibacterial activities. The nanocomposite showed excellent adsorption of methylene blue, a cationic dye, from water compared to pristine MoO3 and graphene. However, it showed negligible adsorption of methyl orange, an anionic dye. Again, the graphene-MoO3 nanoparticles exhibited bacteriostatic property against both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria.

  2. Mutability of bifunctional thigh muscle activity in pedaling due to contralateral leg force generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, S A; Brown, D A; Van der Loos, H F M; Zajac, F E

    2002-09-01

    Locomotion requires uninterrupted transitions between limb extension and flexion. The role of contralateral sensorimotor signals in executing smooth transitions is little understood even though their participation is crucial to bipedal walking. However, elucidating neural interlimb coordinating mechanisms in human walking is difficult because changes to contralateral sensorimotor activity also affect the ipsilateral mechanics. Pedaling, conversely, is ideal for studying bilateral coordination because ipsilateral mechanics can be independently controlled. In pedaling, the anterior and posterior bifunctional thigh muscles develop needed anterior and posterior crank forces, respectively, to dominate the flexion-to-extension and extension-to-flexion transitions. We hypothesized that contralateral sensorimotor activity substantially contributes to the appropriate activation of these bifunctional muscles during the limb transitions. Bilateral pedal forces and surface electromyograms (EMGs) from four thigh muscles were collected from 15 subjects who pedaled with their right leg against a right-crank servomotor, which emulated the mechanical load experienced in conventional two-legged coupled-crank pedaling. In one pedaling session, the contralateral (left) leg pseudo-pedaled (i.e., EMG activity and pedal forces were pedaling-like, but pedal force was not allowed to affect crank rotation). In other sessions, the mechanically decoupled contralateral leg was first relaxed and then produced rhythmic isometric force trajectories during either leg flexion or one of the two limb transitions of the pedaling leg. With contralateral force production in the extension-to-flexion transition (predominantly by the hamstrings), rectus femoris activity and work output increased in the pedaling leg during its flexion-to-extension transition, which occurs simultaneously with contralateral extension-to-flexion in conventional pedaling. Similarly, with contralateral force production in the

  3. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-01-24

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  4. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  5. Function of the N-terminal segment of the RecA-dependent nuclease Ref.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Angela J; Olsen, Tayla M; Dvorak, Rachel H; Cox, Michael M

    2015-02-18

    The bacteriophage P1 Ref (recombination enhancement function) protein is a RecA-dependent, HNH endonuclease. It can be directed to create targeted double-strand breaks within a displacement loop formed by RecA. The 76 amino acid N-terminal region of Ref is positively charged (25/76 amino acid residues) and inherently unstructured in solution. Our investigation of N-terminal truncation variants shows this region is required for DNA binding, contains a Cys involved in incidental dimerization and is necessary for efficient Ref-mediated DNA cleavage. Specifically, Ref N-terminal truncation variants lacking between 21 and 47 amino acids are more effective RecA-mediated targeting nucleases. We propose a more refined set of options for the Ref-mediated cleavage mechanism, featuring the N-terminal region as an anchor for at least one of the DNA strand cleavage events.

  6. Unidirectional cloning by cleaving heterogeneous sites with a single sandwiched zinc finger nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Kazuki; Mori, Tomoaki; Aoyama, Yasuhiro; Sera, Takashi

    2011-11-04

    We previously developed a novel type of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), sandwiched ZFNs that can discriminate DNA substrates from cleavage products and thus cleave DNA much more efficiently than conventional ZFNs as well as perform with multiple turnovers like restriction endonucleases. In the present study, we used the sandwiched ZFN to unidirectionally clone exogenous genes into target vectors by cleaving heterogeneous sites that contained heterogeneous spacer DNAs between two zinc-finger protein binding sites with a single sandwiched ZFN. We demonstrated that the sandwiched ZFN cleaved a 40-fold excess of both insert and vector plasmids within 1h and confirmed by sequencing that the resulting recombinants harbored the inserted DNA fragment in the desired orientation. Because sandwiched ZFNs can recognize and cleave a variety of long (≥ 26-bp) target DNAs, they may not only expand the utility of ZFNs for construction of recombinant plasmids, but also serve as useful meganucleases for synthesis of artificial genomes.

  7. Site-specific genome editing in Plasmodium falciparum using engineered zinc-finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Lee, Marcus C S; Lee, Andrew H; Zeitler, Bryan; Williams, April E; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Llinás, Manuel; Urnov, Fyodor D; Fidock, David A

    2012-10-01

    Malaria afflicts over 200 million people worldwide, and its most lethal etiologic agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is evolving to resist even the latest-generation therapeutics. Efficient tools for genome-directed investigations of P. falciparum-induced pathogenesis, including drug-resistance mechanisms, are clearly required. Here we report rapid and targeted genetic engineering of this parasite using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) that produce a double-strand break in a user-defined locus and trigger homology-directed repair. Targeting an integrated egfp locus, we obtained gene-deletion parasites with unprecedented speed (2 weeks), both with and without direct selection. ZFNs engineered against the parasite gene pfcrt, responsible for escape under chloroquine treatment, rapidly produced parasites that carried either an allelic replacement or a panel of specified point mutations. This method will enable a diverse array of genome-editing approaches to interrogate this human pathogen.

  8. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable tools to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.

  9. Germline-transmitted genome editing in Arabidopsis thaliana Using TAL-effector-nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Forner

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs are custom-made bi-partite endonucleases that have recently been developed and applied for genome engineering in a wide variety of organisms. However, they have been only scarcely used in plants, especially for germline-modification. Here we report the efficient creation of small, germline-transmitted deletions in Arabidopsis thaliana via TALENs that were delivered by stably integrated transgenes. Using meristem specific promoters to drive expression of two TALEN arms directed at the CLV3 coding sequence, we observed very high phenotype frequencies in the T2 generation. In some instances, full CLV3 loss-of-function was already observed in the T1 generation, suggesting that transgenic delivery of TALENs can cause highly efficient genome modification. In contrast, constitutive TALEN expression in the shoot apical meristem (SAM did not cause additional phenotypes and genome re-sequencing confirmed little off-target effects, demonstrating exquisite target specificity.

  10. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  11. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  12. Engineering designer transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) by REAL or REAL-Fast assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyon, Deepak; Khayter, Cyd; Regan, Maureen R; Joung, J Keith; Sander, Jeffry D

    2012-10-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are broadly useful tools for performing targeted genome editing in a wide variety of organisms and cell types including plants, zebrafish, C. elegans, rat, human somatic cells, and human pluripotent stem cells. Here we describe detailed protocols for the serial, hierarchical assembly of TALENs that require neither PCR nor specialized multi-fragment ligations and that can be implemented by any laboratory. These restriction enzyme and ligation (REAL)-based protocols can be practiced using plasmid libraries and user-friendly, Web-based software that both identifies target sites in sequences of interest and generates printable graphical guides that facilitate assembly of TALENs. With the described platform of reagents, protocols, and software, researchers can easily engineer multiple TALENs within 2 weeks using standard cloning techniques.

  13. Germline-transmitted genome editing in Arabidopsis thaliana Using TAL-effector-nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Anne; Langenecker, Tobias; Manavella, Pablo A; Manavella, Pablo; Lohmann, Jan U

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are custom-made bi-partite endonucleases that have recently been developed and applied for genome engineering in a wide variety of organisms. However, they have been only scarcely used in plants, especially for germline-modification. Here we report the efficient creation of small, germline-transmitted deletions in Arabidopsis thaliana via TALENs that were delivered by stably integrated transgenes. Using meristem specific promoters to drive expression of two TALEN arms directed at the CLV3 coding sequence, we observed very high phenotype frequencies in the T2 generation. In some instances, full CLV3 loss-of-function was already observed in the T1 generation, suggesting that transgenic delivery of TALENs can cause highly efficient genome modification. In contrast, constitutive TALEN expression in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) did not cause additional phenotypes and genome re-sequencing confirmed little off-target effects, demonstrating exquisite target specificity.

  14. Design, construction, and analysis of specific zinc finger nucleases for microphthalmia - associate transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the design, construction, and cleavage analysis of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that could cut the specific sequences within microphthalmia - associate transcription factor (mitfa of zebra fish. The target site and ZFPs were selected and designed with zinc finger tools, while the ZFPs were synthesized using DNAWorks and two-step PCR. The ZFNs were constructed, expressed, purified, and analyzed in vitro. As expected, the designed ZFNs could create a double-stand break (DSB at the target site in vitro. The DNAWorks, two-step PCR, and an optimized process of protein expression were firstly induced in the construction of ZFNs successfully, which was an effective and simplified protocol. These results could be useful for further application of ZFNs - mediated gene targeting.

  15. Indirect DNA Sequence Recognition and Its Impact on Nuclease Cleavage Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Abigail R; Hallinan, Jazmine P; Shen, Betty W; Chik, Jennifer K; Bolduc, Jill M; Kulshina, Nadia; Robins, Lori I; Kaiser, Brett K; Jarjour, Jordan; Havens, Kyle; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Stoddard, Barry L

    2016-06-07

    LAGLIDADG meganucleases are DNA cleaving enzymes used for genome engineering. While their cleavage specificity can be altered using several protein engineering and selection strategies, their overall targetability is limited by highly specific indirect recognition of the central four base pairs within their recognition sites. In order to examine the physical basis of indirect sequence recognition and to expand the number of such nucleases available for genome engineering, we have determined the target sites, DNA-bound structures, and central four cleavage fidelities of nine related enzymes. Subsequent crystallographic analyses of a meganuclease bound to two noncleavable target sites, each containing a single inactivating base pair substitution at its center, indicates that a localized slip of the mutated base pair causes a small change in the DNA backbone conformation that results in a loss of metal occupancy at one binding site, eliminating cleavage activity.

  16. Genetics and complementation of Haemophilus influenzae mutants deficient in adenosine 5'-triphosphate-dependent nuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooistra, J.; Small, G.D.; Setlow, J.K.; Shapanka, R.

    1976-04-01

    Eight different mutations in Haemophilus influenzae leading to deficiency in adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent nuclease have been investigated in strains in which the mutations of the originally mutagenized strains have been transferred into the wild type. Sensitivity to mitomycin C and deoxycholate and complementation between extracts and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-dependent ATPase activity have been measured. Genetic crosses have provided information on the relative position of the mutations on the genome. There are three complementation groups, corresponding to three genetic groups. The strains most sensitive to mitomycin and deoxycholate, derived from mutants originally selected on the basis of sensitivity to mitomycin C or methyl methanesulfonate, are in one group. Apparently all these sensitive strains lack DNA-dependent ATPase activity, as does a strain intermediate in sensitivity to deoxycholate, which is the sole representative of another group. There are four strains that are relatively resistant to deoxycholate and mitomycin C, and all of these contain the ATPase activity.

  17. Rapid and highly efficient construction of TALE-based transcriptional regulators and nucleases for genome modification

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lixin

    2012-01-22

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) can be used as DNA-targeting modules by engineering their repeat domains to dictate user-selected sequence specificity. TALEs have been shown to function as site-specific transcriptional activators in a variety of cell types and organisms. TALE nucleases (TALENs), generated by fusing the FokI cleavage domain to TALE, have been used to create genomic double-strand breaks. The identity of the TALE repeat variable di-residues, their number, and their order dictate the DNA sequence specificity. Because TALE repeats are nearly identical, their assembly by cloning or even by synthesis is challenging and time consuming. Here, we report the development and use of a rapid and straightforward approach for the construction of designer TALE (dTALE) activators and nucleases with user-selected DNA target specificity. Using our plasmid set of 100 repeat modules, researchers can assemble repeat domains for any 14-nucleotide target sequence in one sequential restriction-ligation cloning step and in only 24 h. We generated several custom dTALEs and dTALENs with new target sequence specificities and validated their function by transient expression in tobacco leaves and in vitro DNA cleavage assays, respectively. Moreover, we developed a web tool, called idTALE, to facilitate the design of dTALENs and the identification of their genomic targets and potential off-targets in the genomes of several model species. Our dTALE repeat assembly approach along with the web tool idTALE will expedite genome-engineering applications in a variety of cell types and organisms including plants. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Gene Editing With CRISPR/Cas9 RNA-Directed Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetschman, Thomas; Georgieva, Teodora

    2017-03-03

    Genetic engineering of model organisms and cultured cells has for decades provided important insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiovascular development and disease. In the past few years the development of several nuclease systems has broadened the range of model/cell systems that can be engineered. Of these, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system has become the favorite for its ease of application. Here we will review this RNA-guided nuclease system for gene editing with respect to its usefulness for cardiovascular studies and with an eye toward potential therapy. Studies on its off-target activity, along with approaches to minimize this activity will be given. The advantages of gene editing versus gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, including the breadth of species and cell types to which it is applicable, will be discussed. We will also cover its use in iPSC for research and possible therapeutic purposes; and we will review its use in muscular dystrophy studies where considerable progress has been made toward dystrophin correction in mice. The CRISPR/Ca9s system is also being used for high-throughput screening of genes, gene regulatory regions, and long noncoding RNAs. In addition, the CRISPR system is being used for nongene-editing purposes such as activation and inhibition of gene expression, as well as for fluorescence tagging of chromosomal regions and individual mRNAs to track their cellular location. Finally, an approach to circumvent the inability of post-mitotic cells to support homologous recombination-based gene editing will be presented. In conclusion, applications of the CRISPR/Cas system are expanding at a breath-taking pace and are revolutionizing approaches to gain a better understanding of human diseases.

  19. Rapid mutation of endogenous zebrafish genes using zinc finger nucleases made by Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Foley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Customized zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs form the basis of a broadly applicable tool for highly efficient genome modification. ZFNs are artificial restriction endonucleases consisting of a non-specific nuclease domain fused to a zinc finger array which can be engineered to recognize specific DNA sequences of interest. Recent proof-of-principle experiments have shown that targeted knockout mutations can be efficiently generated in endogenous zebrafish genes via non-homologous end-joining-mediated repair of ZFN-induced DNA double-stranded breaks. The Zinc Finger Consortium, a group of academic laboratories committed to the development of engineered zinc finger technology, recently described the first rapid, highly effective, and publicly available method for engineering zinc finger arrays. The Consortium has previously used this new method (known as OPEN for Oligomerized Pool ENgineering to generate high quality ZFN pairs that function in human and plant cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that OPEN can also be used to generate ZFNs that function efficiently in zebrafish. Using OPEN, we successfully engineered ZFN pairs for five endogenous zebrafish genes: tfr2, dopamine transporter, telomerase, hif1aa, and gridlock. Each of these ZFN pairs induces targeted insertions and deletions with high efficiency at its endogenous gene target in somatic zebrafish cells. In addition, these mutations are transmitted through the germline with sufficiently high frequency such that only a small number of fish need to be screened to identify founders. Finally, in silico analysis demonstrates that one or more potential OPEN ZFN sites can be found within the first three coding exons of more than 25,000 different endogenous zebrafish gene transcripts. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In summary, our study nearly triples the total number of endogenous zebrafish genes successfully modified using ZFNs (from three to eight and suggests that OPEN

  20. Molecular insights into DNA interference by CRISPR-associated nuclease-helicase Cas3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bei; Shin, Minsang; Sun, Jiali; Jung, Che-Hun; Bolt, Edward L; van der Oost, John; Kim, Jeong-Sun

    2014-11-18

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria are neutralized by a system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins. Type I CRISPR-Cas systems use a "Cascade" ribonucleoprotein complex to guide RNA specifically to complementary sequence in invader double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a process called "interference." After target recognition by Cascade, formation of an R-loop triggers recruitment of a Cas3 nuclease-helicase, completing the interference process by destroying the invader dsDNA. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of CRISPR interference, we analyzed crystal structures of Cas3 from the bacterium Thermobaculum terrenum, with and without a bound ATP analog. The structures reveal a histidine-aspartate (HD)-type nuclease domain fused to superfamily-2 (SF2) helicase domains and a distinct C-terminal domain. Binding of ATP analog at the interface of the SF2 helicase RecA-like domains rearranges a motif V with implications for the enzyme mechanism. The HD-nucleolytic site contains two metal ions that are positioned at the end of a proposed nucleic acid-binding tunnel running through the SF2 helicase structure. This structural alignment suggests a mechanism for 3' to 5' nucleolytic processing of the displaced strand of invader DNA that is coordinated with ATP-dependent 3' to 5' translocation of Cas3 along DNA. In agreement with biochemical studies, the presented Cas3 structures reveal important mechanistic details on the neutralization of genetic invaders by type I CRISPR-Cas systems.

  1. Knockout of exogenous EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nucleases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masahito [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Umeyama, Kazuhiro [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); International Cluster for Bio-Resource Research, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Matsunari, Hitomi [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Takayanagi, Shuko [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Haruyama, Erika; Nakano, Kazuaki; Fujiwara, Tsukasa; Ikezawa, Yuka [Department of Life Sciences, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashimita, Tama-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Nakauchi, Hiromitsu [Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), ERATO, Nakauchi Stem Cell and Organ Regeneration Project, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo University, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); and others

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} EGFP gene integrated in porcine somatic cells could be knocked out using the ZFN-KO system. {yields} ZFNs induced targeted mutations in porcine primary cultured cells. {yields} Complete absence of EGFP fluorescence was confirmed in ZFN-treated cells. -- Abstract: Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are expected as a powerful tool for generating gene knockouts in laboratory and domestic animals. Currently, it is unclear whether this technology can be utilized for knocking-out genes in pigs. Here, we investigated whether knockout (KO) events in which ZFNs recognize and cleave a target sequence occur in porcine primary cultured somatic cells that harbor the exogenous enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene. ZFN-encoding mRNA designed to target the EGFP gene was introduced by electroporation into the cell. Using the Surveyor nuclease assay and flow cytometric analysis, we confirmed ZFN-induced cleavage of the target sequence and the disappearance of EGFP fluorescence expression in ZFN-treated cells. In addition, sequence analysis revealed that ZFN-induced mutations such as base substitution, deletion, or insertion were generated in the ZFN cleavage site of EGFP-expression negative cells that were cloned from ZFN-treated cells, thereby showing it was possible to disrupt (i.e., knock out) the function of the EGFP gene in porcine somatic cells. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that the ZFN-KO system can be applied to pigs. These findings may open a new avenue to the creation of gene KO pigs using ZFN-treated cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  2. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    purification of proteins used in this study. Both wildtype (WT) and nuclease-dead mutant (MUT) of his-tagged FAN1 were expressed in sf9 cells and purified by...tagged FAN1 expressed in sf9 cells. Both wildtype (WT) and nuclease-dead mutant (MUT) FAN1 were purified in parallel. (b) Incision assay was performed...XPF-ERCC1 or MUS81-EME1 in sf9 cells and purified by anti-FLAG purification (Figure 3). Both WT and MUT nucleases (Figure 3a and 3b respectively

  3. A bifunctional spin label reports the structural topology of phospholamban in magnetically-aligned bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Jesse E; James, Zachary M; Svensson, Bengt; Binder, Benjamin P; Thomas, David D

    2016-01-01

    We have applied a bifunctional spin label and EPR spectroscopy to determine membrane protein structural topology in magnetically-aligned bicelles, using monomeric phospholamban (PLB) as a model system. Bicelles are a powerful tool for studying membrane proteins by NMR and EPR spectroscopies, where magnetic alignment yields topological constraints by resolving the anisotropic spectral properties of nuclear and electron spins. However, EPR bicelle studies are often hindered by the rotational mobility of monofunctional Cys-linked spin labels, which obscures their orientation relative to the protein backbone. The rigid and stereospecific TOAC label provides high orientational sensitivity but must be introduced via solid-phase peptide synthesis, precluding its use in large proteins. Here we show that a bifunctional methanethiosulfonate spin label attaches rigidly and stereospecifically to Cys residues at i and i+4 positions along PLB's transmembrane helix, thus providing orientational resolution similar to that of TOAC, while being applicable to larger membrane proteins for which synthesis is impractical. Computational modeling and comparison with NMR data shows that these EPR experiments provide accurate information about helix tilt relative to the membrane normal, thus establishing a robust method for determining structural topology in large membrane proteins with a substantial advantage in sensitivity over NMR.

  4. Conversion of cellulose into isosorbide over bifunctional ruthenium nanoparticles supported on niobium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Long, Xiangdong; He, Hao; Xia, Chungu; Li, Fuwei

    2013-11-01

    Considerable effort has been applied to the development of new processes and catalysts for cellulose conversion to valuable platform chemicals. Isosorbide is among the most interesting products as it can be applied as a monomer and building block for the future replacement of fossil resource-based products. A sustainable method of isosorbide production from cellulose is presented in this work. The strategy relies on a bifunctional Ru catalyst supported on mesoporous niobium phosphate in a H2 atmosphere under pressure without further addition of any soluble acid. Over 50 % yield of isosorbide with almost 100 % cellulose conversion can be obtained in 1 h. The large surface area, pore size, and strong acidity of mesoporous niobium phosphate promote the hydrolysis of cellulose and dehydration of sorbitol; additionally, the appropriate size of the supported Ru nanoparticles avoids unnecessary hydrogenolysis of sorbitol. Under a cellulose/catalyst mass ratio of 43.3, the present bifunctional catalyst could be stably used up to six times, with its mesoporous structure well preserved and without detectable Ru leaching into the reaction solution.

  5. Ternary NiCoP nanosheet arrays: An excellent bifunctional catalyst for alkaline overall water splitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingjie Li; Haichuan Zhang; Ming Jiang; Yun Kuang; Xiaoming Sun; Xue Duan

    2016-01-01

    Exploring bifunctional catalysts for the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions (HER and OER) with high efficiency,low cost,and easy integration is extremely crucial for future renewable energy systems.Herein,ternary NiCoP nanosheet arrays (NSAs) were fabricated on 3D Ni foam by a facile hydrothermal method followed by phosphorization.These arrays serve as bifunctional alkaline catalysts,exhibiting excellent electrocatalytic performance and good working stability for both the HER and OER.The overpotentials of the NiCoP NSA electrode required to drive a current density of 50 mA/cm2 for the HER and OER are as low as 133 and 308 mV,respectively,which is ascribed to excellent intrinsic electrocatalytic activity,fast electron transport,and a unique superaerophobic structure.When NiCoP was integrated as both anodic and cathodic material,the electrolyzer required a potential as low as ~1.77 V to drive a current density of 50 mA/cm2 for overall water splitting,which is much smaller than a reported electrolyzer using the same kind of phosphide-based material and is even better than the combination of Pt/C and Ir/C,the best known noble metal-based electrodes.Combining satisfactory working stability and high activity,this NiCoP electrode paves the way for exploring overall water splitting catalysts.

  6. Bifunctional Ag/C3N4.5 composite nanobelts for photocatalysis and antibacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Renbo; Jian, Jikang; Zhang, Zhihua; Song, Bo; Wu, Rong

    2016-09-01

    Multiple functions can be achieved in carbon nitride-based composite nanomaterials by tuning their components and structures. Here, we report on a large-scale synthesis of novel bifunctional Ag/C3N4.5 composite nanobelts (CNBs) with efficient photocatalytic and antibacterial activity. The Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs were synthesized in high yield by a two-step route including a homogeneous precipitation process and a subsequent calcination treatment. The structural, morphological, compositional, and spectroscopic characterizations revealed that the Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs are composed of N-deficient melem ultrathin nanobelts and crystalline Ag nanoparticles attached to the surface of the nanobelts with good contact. The band gap of the Ag/C3N4.5 CNBs is determined to be about 3.04 eV. The efficient photocatalytic and antibacterial activities of the composite nanomaterials are verified by testing the degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) and the inhibition zone to bacterium E. coli. The work provides a facile route to bifunctional carbon nitride-based composites with potential applications in the fields of the environment and biology.

  7. Cell Growth on ("Janus") Density Gradients of Bifunctional Zeolite L Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, Nermin Seda; Motealleh, Andisheh; Schäfer, Andreas H

    2016-12-28

    Nanoparticle density gradients on surfaces have attracted interest as two-dimensional material surfaces that can mimic the complex nano-/microstructure of the native extracellular matrix, including its chemical and physical gradients, and can therefore be used to systematically study cell-material interactions. In this respect, we report the preparation of density gradients made of bifunctional zeolite L crystals on glass surfaces and the effects of the density gradient and biopolymer functionalization of zeolite L crystals on cell adhesion. We also describe how we created "Janus" density gradient surfaces by gradually depositing two different types of zeolite L crystals that were functionalized and loaded with different chemical groups and guest molecules onto the two distinct sides of the same glass substrate. Our results show that more cells adhered on the density gradient of biopolymer-coated zeolites than on uncoated ones. The number of adhered cells increased up to a certain surface coverage of the glass by the zeolite L crystals, but then it decreased beyond the zeolite density at which a higher surface coverage decreased fibroblast cell adhesion and spreading. Additionally, cell experiments showed that cells gradually internalized the guest-molecule-loaded zeolite L crystals from the underlying density gradient containing bifunctional zeolite L crystals.

  8. Cyclic isoDGR and RGD peptidomimetics containing bifunctional diketopiperazine scaffolds are integrin antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzeri, Silvia; Zanella, Simone; Arosio, Daniela; Vahdati, Leila; Dal Corso, Alberto; Pignataro, Luca; Paolillo, Mayra; Schinelli, Sergio; Belvisi, Laura; Gennari, Cesare; Piarulli, Umberto

    2015-04-13

    The cyclo[DKP-isoDGR] peptidomimetics 2-5, containing bifunctional diketopiperazine (DKP) scaffolds that differ in the configuration of the two DKP stereocenters and in the substitution at the DKP nitrogen atoms, were prepared and examined in vitro in competitive binding assays with purified αv β3 and αv β5 integrin receptors. IC50 values ranged from low nanomolar (ligand 3) to submicromolar with αv β3 integrin. The biological activities of ligands cyclo[DKP3-RGD] 1 and cyclo[DKP3-isoDGR] 3, bearing the same bifunctional DKP scaffold and showing similar αV β3 integrin binding values, were compared in terms of their cellular effects in human U373 glioblastoma cells. Compounds 1 and 3 displayed overlapping inhibitory effects on the FAK/Akt integrin activated transduction pathway and on integrin-mediated cell infiltration processes, and qualify therefore, despite the different RGD and isoDGR sequences, as integrin antagonists. Both compounds induced apoptosis in glioma cells after 72 hour treatment.

  9. Bifunctional composite microspheres of silica/lanthanide-polyoxometalates/Au: Study on luminescence and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun, E-mail: junwang924@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Fan, Shaohua; Zhao, Weiqian; Lu, Xuelian; Li, Wuke

    2013-12-02

    In this paper, the synthesis and properties of composite silica microspheres grafted with gold nanoparticles and lanthanide-polyoxometalates are described. This synthesis employs polyethyleneimine as the crosslink polymer to immobilize the Au nanoparticles and lanthanide-polyoxometalates on silica spheres, which results in the formation of bifunctional composite microspheres of silica/lanthanide-polyoxometalates/Au. The composite material was found to be catalytically active in the oxidation of styrene, and benzaldehyde and styrene oxide were the main products. Catalyzed oxidation of styrene demonstrates the size-dependent activity of catalysts and the smaller catalyst shows the higher selectivity. Moreover, the composite particles show bright red luminescence under UV light, which could be seen by naked eyes. The luminescence properties of composite material and the effect of Au nanoparticles on the luminescence of Eu ion were investigated, and energy could be more effectively transferred from ligand to lanthanide ion when Au nanoparticles were grafted on silica spheres. The integration of luminescent components and Au particles makes it possible to label catalyst and monitor the catalyzed reactions. - Highlights: • The bifunctional composite microspheres were fabricated. • Both polyoxometalates and Au nanoparticles could be grafted on silica spheres. • The composite particles exhibit the excellent luminescence and catalytic activity. • The Au nanoparticles affect the luminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} ions.

  10. Characterization of a bifunctional enzyme with (p)ppGpp-hydrolase/synthase activity in Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Deng, Cong; Liu, Boyu; Zeng, LingBing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, XuCheng; Guo, XiaoKui; Qin, JinHong

    2013-11-01

    Alarmone Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (or 5'-triphosphate) 3'-diphosphate [(p)ppGpp] is the key component that globally regulates stringent control in bacteria. There are two homologous enzymes, RelA and SpoT in Escherichia coli, which are responsible for fluctuations in (p)ppGpp concentration inside the cell, whereas there exists only a single RelA/SpoT enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria. We have identified a bifunctional enzyme with (p)ppGpp-hydrolase/synthase activity in Leptospira interrogans. We show that the relLin gene (LA_3085) encodes a protein that fully complements the relA/spoT double mutants in E. coli. The protein functions as a (p)ppGpp degradase as well as a (p)ppGpp synthase when the cells encounter amino acid stress and deprivation of carbon sources. N-terminus HD and RSD domains of relLin (relLinN ) were observed to restore growth of double mutants of E. coli. Finally, We demonstrate that purified RelLin and RelLinN show high (p)ppGpp synthesis activity in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that L. interrogans contain a single Rel-like bifunctional protein, RelLin , which plays an important role in maintaining the basal level of (p)ppGpp in the cell potentially contributing to the regulation of bacterial stress response.

  11. Mechanish of dTTP Inhibition of the Bifunctional dCTP Deaminase:dUTPase Encoded by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt, Signe Smedegaard; Thymark, Majbritt; Harris, Pernille;

    2008-01-01

    to be characterised and provides evidence for bifunctionality of dCTP deaminase occurring outside the Archaea kingdom. A steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that the affinity for dCTP and deoxyuridine triphosphate as substrates for the synthesis of deoxyuridine monophosphate were very similar, a result...

  12. Pyrrolidinyl-sulfamide derivatives as a new class of bifunctional organocatalysts for direct asymmetric Michael addition of cyclohexanone to nitroalkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Rong; Fu, Liang; Zou, You-Quan; Chang, Ning-Jie; Rong, Jian; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2011-07-21

    A series of chiral pyrrolidinyl-sulfamide derivatives have been identified as efficient bifunctional organocatalysts for the direct Michael addition of cyclohexanone to a wide range of nitroalkenes. The desired Michael adducts were obtained in high chemical yields and excellent stereoselectivities (up to 99/1 dr and 95% ee).

  13. 203 SINGLE-STEP GENE EDITING OF 3 XENOANTIGENS IN PORCINE FIBROBLASTS USING PROGRAMMABLE NUCLEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perota, A; Lagutina, I; Quadalti, C; Duchi, R; Turini, P; Crotti, G; Colleoni, S; Conchon, S; Concordet, J-P; Lazzari, G; Soulillou, J-P; Galli, C

    2016-01-01

    Programmable nucleases (ZFN, Tal Effector Nucleases, and CRISPR) opened a new era for mammal genome editing, in particular for the pigs used for xenotransplantation. Multiple gene editing events are required both for knockout (KO) of xenoantigens and for targeted integration of human protective genes (Perota et al. 2016 J. Genet. Genomics 43, 233-23). The objective of the present work was to edit selected pig lines to KO the enzymes coding for the most relevant xenoantigens (i.e. GGTA1, CMAH, and B4GalNT2), combining Talens and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies to magnetic beads selection (Li et al. 2013 Xenotransplantation 22, 20-31). Primary porcine adult fibroblasts were transfected using Nucleofector (V-024 program). In a single reaction 2×10(6) fibroblasts were co-transfected using 2 different sets of TALENS (4μg/set) specific for CMAH (Conchon et al., 2013) and GGTA1 (Perota et al., 2015) genes together with B4GalNT2-specific CRISPR/Cas9 expression vector (2μg; pX330-B4GalNT2; Estrada et al., 2015). Eight days post-transfection (DPT), Gal-/- cells were selected initially using biotin-conjugated IB4 lectin (Sigma, St. Louis, MO, USA) and magnetic beads (Dynabeads M-280, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The selected cells were then plated on 150-mm Petri dishes (200 cells/dish) and cultured for 10 days. Selected colonies were expanded for PCR analysis and cryopreserved for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). All colonies were analysed by PCR for CMAH gene and their resulting products were digested with HindIII (HindIII-RFLP). Colonies that lost wild-type HindIII as a consequence of Talens effected deletion were PCR characterised for GGTA1, selecting those that had detectable Indels after gel electrophoresis and finally analysed by PCR for B4GalNT2. All PCR products were validated by sequencing for all the 3 genes of interest (TopoTA, Thermo Fisher Scientific). Selected colonies were used as nuclear donors for SCNT (Lagutina et al., 2006). Eight DPT we

  14. Reciprocal regulation as a source of ultrasensitivity in two-component systems with a bifunctional sensor kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Straube

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, where the phosphorylation state of a regulator protein is modulated by a sensor kinase, are common in bacteria and other microbes. In many of these systems, the sensor kinase is bifunctional catalyzing both, the phosphorylation and the dephosphorylation of the regulator protein in response to input signals. Previous studies have shown that systems with a bifunctional enzyme can adjust the phosphorylation level of the regulator protein independently of the total protein concentrations--a property known as concentration robustness. Here, I argue that two-component systems with a bifunctional enzyme may also exhibit ultrasensitivity if the input signal reciprocally affects multiple activities of the sensor kinase. To this end, I consider the case where an allosteric effector inhibits autophosphorylation and, concomitantly, activates the enzyme's phosphatase activity, as observed experimentally in the PhoQ/PhoP and NRII/NRI systems. A theoretical analysis reveals two operating regimes under steady state conditions depending on the effector affinity: If the affinity is low the system produces a graded response with respect to input signals and exhibits stimulus-dependent concentration robustness--consistent with previous experiments. In contrast, a high-affinity effector may generate ultrasensitivity by a similar mechanism as phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles with distinct converter enzymes. The occurrence of ultrasensitivity requires saturation of the sensor kinase's phosphatase activity, but is restricted to low effector concentrations, which suggests that this mode of operation might be employed for the detection and amplification of low abundant input signals. Interestingly, the same mechanism also applies to covalent modification cycles with a bifunctional converter enzyme, which suggests that reciprocal regulation, as a mechanism to generate ultrasensitivity, is not restricted to two

  15. Arabidopsis cysteine proteinase inhibitor AtCYSb interacts with a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease, AtCaN2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kunyuan; Bu, Yuanyuan; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    Plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors (cystatins) play important roles in plant defense mechanisms. Some proteins that interact with cystatins may defend against abiotic stresses. Here, we showed that AtCaN2, a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease in Arabidopsis, is transcribed in senescent leaves and stems and interacts with an Arabidopsis cystatin (AtCYSb) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction between AtCYSb and AtCaN2 was confirmed by in vitro pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the nuclease activity of AtCaN2 against λDNA was inhibited by AtCYSb, which suggests that AtCYSb regulates nucleic acid degradation in cells.

  16. Mre11 nuclease and C-terminal tail-mediated DDR functions are required for initiating yeast telomere healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, M K; Matthews, K M; Lustig, A J

    2008-08-01

    Mre11 is a central factor in creating an optimal substrate for telomerase loading and elongation. We have used a G2/M synchronized telomere-healing assay as a tool to separate different functions of Mre11 that are not apparent in null alleles. An analysis of healing efficiencies of several mre11 alleles revealed that both nuclease and C-terminal mutations led to a loss of healing. Interestingly, trans-complementation of the 49 amino acid C-terminal deletion (DeltaC49) and the D16A mutant, deficient in nuclease activity and partially defective in MRX complex formation, restores healing. DeltaC49 provokes Rad53 phosphorylation after treatment with the radiomimetic agent MMS exclusively through the Tel1 pathway, suggesting that a Tel1-mediated function is initiated through the C-terminal tail.

  17. Characterization of the residual structure in the unfolded state of the Delta 131 Delta fragment of staphylococcal nuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, C. J.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, R. B.;

    2006-01-01

    The determination of the conformational preferences in unfolded states of proteins constitutes an important challenge in structural biology. We use inter-residue distances estimated from site-directed spin-labeling NMR experimental measurements as ensemble-averaged restraints in all-atom molecular...... dynamics simulations to characterise the residual structure of the 131 fragment of staphylococcal nuclease under physiological conditions. Our findings indicate that 131 under these conditions shows a tendency to form transiently hydrophobic clusters similar to those present in the native state of wild......-type staphylococcal nuclease. Only rarely, however, all these interactions are simultaneously realized to generate conformations with an overall native topology. Proteins 2006. © 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  18. Simultaneous Gene Editing by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases into Mouse Zygotes

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunliang; Qi, Rong; Singleterry, Rebecca; Hyle, Judith; Balch, Amanda; Li, Xiuling; Sublett, Jack; Berns, Hartmut; Valentine, Marcus; Valentine, Virginia; Sherr, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mRNAs into mouse zygotes transferred into foster mothers efficiently generated founder mice with heritable mutations in targeted genes. Immunofluorescence visualization of phosphorylated histone 2A (γH2AX) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TALEN pairs targeting the Agouti locus induced site-directed DNA breaks in zygotes within 6 h of injection, an activity that continued at reduced efficiency in...

  19. Inactivation of Hepatitis B Virus Replication in Cultured Cells and In Vivo with Engineered Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-...

  20. Genome Editing with Engineered Nucleases in Economically Important Animals and Plants: State of the Art in the Research Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovová, Tereza; Kerins, Gerard; Demnerová, Kateřina; Ovesná, Jaroslava

    2017-01-01

    After induced mutagenesis and transgenesis, genome editing is the next step in the development of breeding techniques. Genome editing using site-directed nucleases - including meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system - is based on the mechanism of double strand breaks. The nuclease is directed to cleave the DNA at a specific place of the genome which is then repaired by natural repair mechanisms. Changes are introduced during the repair that are either accidental or can be targeted if a DNA template with the desirable sequence is provided. These techniques allow making virtually any change to the genome including specific DNA sequence changes, gene insertion, replacements or deletions with unprecedented precision and specificity while being less laborious and more straightforward compared to traditional breeding techniques or transgenesis. Therefore, the research in this field is developing quickly and, apart from model species, multiple studies have focused on economically important species and agronomically important traits that were the key subjects of this review. In plants, studies have been undertaken on disease resistance, herbicide tolerance, nutrient metabolism and nutritional value. In animals, the studies have mainly focused on disease resistance, meat production and allergenicity of milk. However, none of the promising studies has led to commercialization despite several patent applications. The uncertain legal status of genome-editing methods is one of the reasons for poor commercial development, as it is not clear whether the products would fall under the GMO regulation. We believe this issue should be clarified soon in order to allow promising methods to reach their full potential.

  1. A model for transition of 5'-nuclease domain of DNA polymerase I from inert to active modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xie

    Full Text Available Bacteria contain DNA polymerase I (PolI, a single polypeptide chain consisting of ∼930 residues, possessing DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, 3'-5' proofreading and 5'-3' exonuclease (also known as flap endonuclease activities. PolI is particularly important in the processing of Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand replication and must ultimately produce a double-stranded substrate with a nick suitable for DNA ligase to seal. PolI's activities must be highly coordinated both temporally and spatially otherwise uncontrolled 5'-nuclease activity could attack a nick and produce extended gaps leading to potentially lethal double-strand breaks. To investigate the mechanism of how PolI efficiently produces these nicks, we present theoretical studies on the dynamics of two possible scenarios or models. In one the flap DNA substrate can transit from the polymerase active site to the 5'-nuclease active site, with the relative position of the two active sites being kept fixed; while the other is that the 5'-nuclease domain can transit from the inactive mode, with the 5'-nuclease active site distant from the cleavage site on the DNA substrate, to the active mode, where the active site and substrate cleavage site are juxtaposed. The theoretical results based on the former scenario are inconsistent with the available experimental data that indicated that the majority of 5'-nucleolytic processing events are carried out by the same PolI molecule that has just extended the upstream primer terminus. By contrast, the theoretical results on the latter model, which is constructed based on available structural studies, are consistent with the experimental data. We thus conclude that the latter model rather than the former one is reasonable to describe the cooperation of the PolI's polymerase and 5'-3' exonuclease activities. Moreover, predicted results for the latter model are presented.

  2. Oxygen electrode bifunctional electrocatalyst NiCo2O4 spinel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, William L.; Singer, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A significant increase in energy density may be possible if a two-unit alkaline regenerative H2-O2 fuel cell is replaced with a single-unit system that uses passive means for H2O transfer and thermal control. For this single-unit system, new electrocatalysts for the O2 electrode will be required which are not only bifunctionally active but also chemically and electrochemically stable between the voltage range of about 0.7 and 1.5 V. NiCo2O4 spinel is reported to have certain characteristics that make it useful for a study of electrode fabrication techniques. High surface area NiCo2O4 powder was fabricated into unsupported, bifunctional, PTFE-bonded, porous gas fuel cell electrodes by commercial sources using varying PTFE contents and sintering temperatures. The object of this study is to measure the bifunctional activities of these electrodes and to observe what performance differences might result from different commercial electrode fabricators. O2 evolution and O2 reduction data were obtained at 80 C (31 percent KOH). An irreversible reaction (i.e., aging) occurred during O2 evolution at potentials greater than about 1.5 V. Anodic Tafel slopes of 0.06 and 0.12 V/decade were obtained for the aged electrodes. Within the range of 15 to 25 percent, the PTFE content was not a critical parameter for optimizing the electrode for O2 evolution activity. Sintering temperatures between 300 and 340 C may be adequate but heating at 275 C may not be sufficient to properly sinter the PTFE-NiCo2O4 mixture. Electrode disintegration was observed during O2 reduction. Transport of O2 to the NiCo2O4 surface became prohibitive at greater than about -0.02 A/sq cm. Cathodic Tafel slopes of -0.6 and -0.12 V/decade were assumed for the O2 reduction process. A PTFE content of 25 percent (or greater) appears to be preferable for sintering the PTFE-NiCo2O4 mixture.

  3. Oxygen electrode bifunctional electrocatalyst NiCo/sub 2/O/sub 4/ spinel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielder, W.L.; Singer, J.

    1988-09-01

    A significant increase in energy density may be possible if a two-unit alkaline regenerative H2-O2 fuel cell is replaced with a single-unit system that uses passive means for H2O transfer and thermal control. For this single-unit system, new electrocatalysts for the O2 electrode will be required which are not only bifunctionally active but also chemically and electrochemically stable between the voltage range of about 0.7 and 1.5 V. NiCo2O4 spinel is reported to have certain characteristics that make it useful for a study of electrode fabrication techniques. High surface area NiCo2O4 powder was fabricated into unsupported, bifunctional, PTFE-bonded, porous gas fuel cell electrodes by commercial sources using varying PTFE contents and sintering temperatures. The object of this study is to measure the bifunctional activities of these electrodes and to observe what performance differences might result from different commercial electrode fabricators. O2 evolution and O2 reduction data were obtained at 80 C (31 percent KOH). An irreversible reaction (i.e., aging) occurred during O2 evolution at potentials greater than about 1.5 V. Anodic Tafel slopes of 0.06 and 0.12 V/decade were obtained for the aged electrodes. Within the range of 15 to 25 percent, the PTFE content was not a critical parameter for optimizing the electrode for O2 evolution activity. Sintering temperatures between 300 and 340 C may be adequate but heating at 275 C may not be sufficient to properly sinter the PTFE-NiCo2O4 mixture. Electrode disintegration was observed during O2 reduction. Transport of O2 to the NiCo2O4 surface became prohibitive at greater than about -0.02 A/sq cm. Cathodic Tafel slopes of -0.6 and -0.12 V/decade were assumed for the O2 reduction process. A PTFE content of 25 percent (or greater) appears to be preferable for sintering the PTFE-NiCo2O4 mixture.

  4. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  5. Localization of the Arabidopsis Senescence- and Cell Death-Associated BFN1 Nuclease: From the ER to Fragmented Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarit Farage-Barhom; Shaul Burd; Lilian Sonego; Ana Mett; Eduard Belausov; David Gidoni; Amnon Lers

    2011-01-01

    Plant senescence- or PCD-associated nucleases share significant homology with nucleases from different organisms.However,knowledge of their function is limited.Intracellular localization of the Arabidopsis senescenceand PCD-associated nuclease BFN1 was investigated.Analysis of BFN1-GFP localization in transiently transformed tobacco protoplasts revealed initial localization in filamentous structures spread throughout the cytoplasm,which then clustered around the nuclei as the protoplasts senesced.These filamentous structures were identified as being of ER origin.In BFN1GFP-transgenic Arabidopsis plants,similar localization of BFN1-GFP was observed in young leaves,that is,in filamentous structures that reorganized around the nuclei only in senescing cells.In late senescence,BFN1-GFP was localized with fragmented nuclei in membrane-wrapped vesicles.BFN1's postulated function as a nucleic acid-degrading enzyme in senescence and PCD is supported by its localization pattern.Our results suggest the existence of a dedicated compartment mediating nucleic acid degradation in senescence and PCD processes.

  6. Design, evaluation, and screening methods for efficient targeted mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases in medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Inohaya, Keiji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Schartl, Manfred; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has become a powerful technology for reverse genetics. In this study, we have described efficient detection methods for TALEN-induced mutations at endogenous loci and presented guidelines of TALEN design for efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka, Oryzias latipes. We performed a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) using an automated microchip electrophoresis system, which is a simple and high-throughput method for evaluation of in vivo activity of TALENs and for genotyping mutant fish of F1 or later generations. We found that a specific pattern of mutations is dominant for TALENs harboring several base pairs of homologous sequences in target sequence. Furthermore, we found that a 5' T, upstream of each TALEN-binding sequence, is not essential for genomic DNA cleavage. Our findings provide information that expands the potential of TALENs and other engineered nucleases as tools for targeted genome editing in a wide range of organisms, including medaka.

  7. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo with engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-specific sites within the viral genome. TALENs with cognate sequences in the S or C open-reading frames (ORFs) efficiently disrupted sequences at the intended sites and suppressed markers of viral replication. Following triple transfection of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells under mildly hypothermic conditions, the S TALEN caused targeted mutation in ~35% of cccDNA molecules. Markers of viral replication were also inhibited in vivo in a murine hydrodynamic injection model of HBV replication. HBV target sites within S and C ORFs of the injected HBV DNA were mutated without evidence of toxicity. These findings are the first to demonstrate a targeted nuclease-mediated disruption of HBV cccDNA. Efficacy in vivo also indicates that these engineered nucleases have potential for use in treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  8. Pasteurella multocida detection by 5' Taq nuclease assay: a new tool for use in diagnosing fowl cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corney, B G; Diallo, I S; Wright, L L; Hewitson, G R; De Jong, A J; Burrell, P C; Duffy, P F; Stephens, C P; Rodwell, B J; Boyle, D B; Blackall, P J

    2007-05-01

    A 5' Taq nuclease assay utilising minor groove binder technology and targeting the 16S rRNA gene was designed to detect Pasteurella multocida (the causative agent of fowl cholera) in swabs collected from poultry. The assay was first evaluated using pure cultures. The assay correctly identified four P. multocida taxonomic type strains, 18 P. multocida serovar reference strains and 40 Australian field isolates (17 from poultry, 11 from pigs and 12 from cattle). Representatives of nine other Pasteurella species, 26 other bacterial species (18 being members of the family Pasteurellaceae) and four poultry virus isolates did not react in the assay. The assay detected a minimum of approximately 10 cfu of P. multocida per reaction. Of 79 poultry swabs submitted to the laboratory for routine bacteriological culture, 17 were positive in the 5' Taq nuclease assay, but only 10 were positive by culture. The other 62 swabs were negative for P. multocida by both 5' Taq nuclease assay and culture. The assay is suitable for use in diagnosing fowl cholera, is more rapid than bacteriological culture, and may also have application in diagnosing P. multocida infections in cattle and pigs.

  9. Functional genetics for all: engineered nucleases, CRISPR and the gene editing revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Anna F; Averof, Michalis

    2014-01-01

    Developmental biology, as all experimental science, is empowered by technological advances. The availability of genetic tools in some species - designated as model organisms - has driven their use as major platforms for understanding development, physiology and behavior. Extending these tools to a wider range of species determines whether (and how) we can experimentally approach developmental diversity and evolution. During the last two decades, comparative developmental biology (evo-devo) was marked by the introduction of gene knockdown and deep sequencing technologies that are applicable to a wide range of species. These approaches allowed us to test the developmental role of specific genes in diverse species, to study biological processes that are not accessible in established models and, in some cases, to conduct genome-wide screens that overcome the limitations of the candidate gene approach. The recent discovery of CRISPR/Cas as a means of precise alterations into the genome promises to revolutionize developmental genetics. In this review we describe the development of gene editing tools, from zinc-finger nucleases to TALENs and CRISPR, and examine their application in gene targeting, their limitations and the opportunities they present for evo-devo. We outline their use in gene knock-out and knock-in approaches, and in manipulating gene functions by directing molecular effectors to specific sites in the genome. The ease-of-use and efficiency of CRISPR in diverse species provide an opportunity to close the technology gap that exists between established model organisms and emerging genetically-tractable species.

  10. Broad specificity profiling of TALENs results in engineered nucleases with improved DNA-cleavage specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilinger, John P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Reyon, Deepak; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Sander, Jeffry D; Joung, J Keith; Liu, David R

    2014-04-01

    Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) can be designed to cleave chosen DNA sequences, TALENs have activity against related off-target sequences. To better understand TALEN specificity, we profiled 30 unique TALENs with different target sites, array length and domain sequences for their abilities to cleave any of 10(12) potential off-target DNA sequences using in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing. Computational analysis of the selection results predicted 76 off-target substrates in the human genome, 16 of which were accessible and modified by TALENs in human cells. The results suggest that (i) TALE repeats bind DNA relatively independently; (ii) longer TALENs are more tolerant of mismatches yet are more specific in a genomic context; and (iii) excessive DNA-binding energy can lead to reduced TALEN specificity in cells. Based on these findings, we engineered a TALEN variant that exhibits equal on-target cleavage activity but tenfold lower average off-target activity in human cells.

  11. Detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense using sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; ZHEN Yu; MI Tiezhu; YU Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is an important harmful algae bloom (HAB) causing creature in China's seas, and the conventional visual detection can not cope with long-term monitoring and highthroughput sampling projects. An assay for P. donghaiense with sandwich hybridization integrated with nuclease protection assay (NPA-SH) was established. Tests with mixed samples and spiked field ones confirmed its good specificity and sensitivity. The cell number of P. donghaiense correlated well with the optical density, and the regression equation is y=4×10-6x+ 0.694 9, in which x is the cell number, and y is the optical density, with r2=0.953 5. These results show that the NPA-SH method has good feasibility in the detection of P. donghaiense. Results of NPA-SH and microscopy are excellent for each sample. The NPA-SH method was a simple way in quantitative detection of P. donghaiense, and the whole process could be finished in about six hours, which provided a new approach in high-throughput sampling and long-term monitoring of P. donghaiense.

  12. High-efficiency targeted editing of large viral genomes by RNA-guided nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Bi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile and efficient method for the precise editing of large viral genomes is required for the selection of attenuated vaccine strains and the construction of gene therapy vectors. The type II prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-associated (Cas RNA-guided nuclease system can be introduced into host cells during viral replication. The CRISPR-Cas9 system robustly stimulates targeted double-stranded breaks in the genomes of DNA viruses, where the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ and homology-directed repair (HDR pathways can be exploited to introduce site-specific indels or insert heterologous genes with high frequency. Furthermore, CRISPR-Cas9 can specifically inhibit the replication of the original virus, thereby significantly increasing the abundance of the recombinant virus among progeny virus. As a result, purified recombinant virus can be obtained with only a single round of selection. In this study, we used recombinant adenovirus and type I herpes simplex virus as examples to demonstrate that the CRISPR-Cas9 system is a valuable tool for editing the genomes of large DNA viruses.

  13. Genome editing with RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease in Zebrafish embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nannan Chang; Changhong Sun; Lu Gao; Dan Zhu; Xiufei Xu; Xiaojun Zhu; Jing-Wei Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances with the type Ⅱ clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system promise an improved approach to genome editing.However,the applicability and efficiency of this system in model organisms,such as zebrafish,are little studied.Here,we report that RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease efficiently facilitates genome editing in both mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos in a simple and robust manner.Over 35% of sitespecific somatic mutations were found when specific Cas/gRNA was used to target either etsrp,gata4 or gata5 in zebrafish embryos in vivo.The Cas9/gRNA efficiently induced biallelic conversion of etsrp or gata5 in the resulting somatic cells,recapitulating their respective vessel phenotypes in etsrpy11 mutant embryos or cardia bifida phenotypes in fautm236a mutant embryos.Finally,we successfully achieved site-specific insertion of mloxP sequence induced by Cas9/gRNA system in zebrafish embryos.These results demonstrate that the Cas9/gRNA system has the potential of becoming a simple,robust and efficient reverse genetic tool for zebrafish and other model organisms.Together with other genome-engineering technologies,the Cas9 system is promising for applications in biology,agriculture,environmental studies and medicine.

  14. DNA replication restart and cellular dynamics of Hef helicase/nuclease protein in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Roxane; Delpech, Floriane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how frequently spontaneous replication arrests occur and how archaea deal with these arrests are very interesting and challenging research topics. Here we will described how genetic and imaging studies have revealed the central role of the archaeal helicase/nuclease Hef belonging to the XPF/MUS81/FANCM family of endonucleases in repair of arrested replication forks. Special focus will be on description of a recently developed combination of genetic and imaging tools to study the dynamic localization of a functional Hef::GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) fusion protein in the living cells of halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii. As Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding how DNA replication is regulated to allow replication of a circular DNA molecule either from single or multiple replication origins, we will also summarize recent studies that have revealed peculiar features regarding DNA replication, particularly in halophilic archaea. We strongly believe that fundamental knowledge of our on-going studies will shed light on the evolutionary history of the DNA replication machinery and will help to establish general rules concerning replication restart and the key role of recombination proteins not only in bacteria, yeast and higher eukaryotes but also in archaea.

  15. LEM-3 - A LEM domain containing nuclease involved in the DNA damage response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Dittrich

    Full Text Available The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a spectrum of DNA damage responses similar to humans. In order to identify new DNA damage response genes, we isolated in a forward genetic screen 14 new mutations conferring hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. We present here our characterization of lem-3, one of the genes identified in this screen. LEM-3 contains a LEM domain and a GIY nuclease domain. We confirm that LEM-3 has DNase activity in vitro. lem-3(lf mutants are hypersensitive to various types of DNA damage, including ionizing radiation, UV-C light and crosslinking agents. Embryos from irradiated lem-3 hermaphrodites displayed severe defects during cell division, including chromosome mis-segregation and anaphase bridges. The mitotic defects observed in irradiated lem-3 mutant embryos are similar to those found in baf-1 (barrier-to-autointegration factor mutants. The baf-1 gene codes for an essential and highly conserved protein known to interact with the other two C. elegans LEM domain proteins, LEM-2 and EMR-1. We show that baf-1, lem-2, and emr-1 mutants are also hypersensitive to DNA damage and that loss of lem-3 sensitizes baf-1 mutants even in the absence of DNA damage. Our data suggest that BAF-1, together with the LEM domain proteins, plays an important role following DNA damage - possibly by promoting the reorganization of damaged chromatin.

  16. Oligonucleotide-Mediated Genome Editing Provides Precision and Function to Engineered Nucleases and Antibiotics in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Noel J; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Mozoruk, Jerry; Miller, Ryan B; Warburg, Zachary J; Woodward, Melody J; Mihiret, Yohannes A; Lincoln, Tracey A; Segami, Rosa E; Sanders, Steven L; Walker, Keith A; Beetham, Peter R; Schöpke, Christian R; Gocal, Greg F W

    2016-04-01

    Here, we report a form of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis for precision genome editing in plants that uses single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODNs) to precisely and efficiently generate genome edits at DNA strand lesions made by DNA double strand break reagents. Employing a transgene model in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we obtained a high frequency of precise targeted genome edits when ssODNs were introduced into protoplasts that were pretreated with the glycopeptide antibiotic phleomycin, a nonspecific DNA double strand breaker. Simultaneous delivery of ssODN and a site-specific DNA double strand breaker, either transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9), resulted in a much greater targeted genome-editing frequency compared with treatment with DNA double strand-breaking reagents alone. Using this site-specific approach, we applied the combination of ssODN and CRISPR/Cas9 to develop an herbicide tolerance trait in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by precisely editing the 5'-ENOLPYRUVYLSHIKIMATE-3-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE (EPSPS) genes. EPSPS edits occurred at sufficient frequency that we could regenerate whole plants from edited protoplasts without employing selection. These plants were subsequently determined to be tolerant to the herbicide glyphosate in greenhouse spray tests. Progeny (C1) of these plants showed the expected Mendelian segregation of EPSPS edits. Our findings show the enormous potential of using a genome-editing platform for precise, reliable trait development in crop plants.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus nuclease is an SaeRS-dependent virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael E; Nygaard, Tyler K; Ackermann, Laynez; Watkins, Robert L; Zurek, Oliwia W; Pallister, Kyler B; Griffith, Shannon; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Flack, Caralyn E; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Horswill, Alexander R; Voyich, Jovanka M

    2013-04-01

    Several prominent bacterial pathogens secrete nuclease (Nuc) enzymes that have an important role in combating the host immune response. Early studies of Staphylococcus aureus Nuc attributed its regulation to the agr quorum-sensing system. However, recent microarray data have indicated that nuc is under the control of the SaeRS two-component system, which is a major regulator of S. aureus virulence determinants. Here we report that the nuc gene is directly controlled by the SaeRS two-component system through reporter fusion, immunoblotting, Nuc activity measurements, promoter mapping, and binding studies, and additionally, we were unable identify a notable regulatory link to the agr system. The observed SaeRS-dependent regulation was conserved across a wide spectrum of representative S. aureus isolates. Moreover, with community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA MRSA) in a mouse model of peritonitis, we observed in vivo expression of Nuc activity in an SaeRS-dependent manner and determined that Nuc is a virulence factor that is important for in vivo survival, confirming the enzyme's role as a contributor to invasive disease. Finally, natural polymorphisms were identified in the SaeRS proteins, one of which was linked to Nuc regulation in a CA MRSA USA300 endocarditis isolate. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that Nuc is an important S. aureus virulence factor and part of the SaeRS regulon.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN-mediated targeted DNA Insertion in potato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Forsyth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines TALEN-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  19. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus.

  20. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Nuclease Is an SaeRS-Dependent Virulence Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Michael E.; Nygaard, Tyler K.; Ackermann, Laynez; Watkins, Robert L.; Zurek, Oliwia W.; Pallister, Kyler B.; Griffith, Shannon; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Flack, Caralyn E.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2013-01-01

    Several prominent bacterial pathogens secrete nuclease (Nuc) enzymes that have an important role in combating the host immune response. Early studies of Staphylococcus aureus Nuc attributed its regulation to the agr quorum-sensing system. However, recent microarray data have indicated that nuc is under the control of the SaeRS two-component system, which is a major regulator of S. aureus virulence determinants. Here we report that the nuc gene is directly controlled by the SaeRS two-component system through reporter fusion, immunoblotting, Nuc activity measurements, promoter mapping, and binding studies, and additionally, we were unable identify a notable regulatory link to the agr system. The observed SaeRS-dependent regulation was conserved across a wide spectrum of representative S. aureus isolates. Moreover, with community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA MRSA) in a mouse model of peritonitis, we observed in vivo expression of Nuc activity in an SaeRS-dependent manner and determined that Nuc is a virulence factor that is important for in vivo survival, confirming the enzyme's role as a contributor to invasive disease. Finally, natural polymorphisms were identified in the SaeRS proteins, one of which was linked to Nuc regulation in a CA MRSA USA300 endocarditis isolate. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that Nuc is an important S. aureus virulence factor and part of the SaeRS regulon. PMID:23381999

  2. Mutational and Biochemical Analysis of the DNA-entry Nuclease EndA from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Midon; P Schafer; A Pingoud; M Ghosh; A Moon; M Cuneo; R London; G Meiss

    2011-12-31

    EndA is a membrane-attached surface-exposed DNA-entry nuclease previously known to be required for genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae. More recent studies have shown that the enzyme also plays an important role during the establishment of invasive infections by degrading extracellular chromatin in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), enabling streptococci to overcome the innate immune system in mammals. As a virulence factor, EndA has become an interesting target for future drug design. Here we present the first mutational and biochemical analysis of recombinant forms of EndA produced either in a cell-free expression system or in Escherichia coli. We identify His160 and Asn191 to be essential for catalysis and Asn182 to be required for stability of EndA. The role of His160 as the putative general base in the catalytic mechanism is supported by chemical rescue of the H160A variant of EndA with imidazole added in excess. Our study paves the way for the identification and development of protein or low-molecular-weight inhibitors for EndA in future high-throughput screening assays.

  3. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-06

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  4. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Hainer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs, we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  5. Copper-nuclease efficiency correlates with cytotoxicity for the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, M S; Wooton, K E; Rich, C C; Saluta, G R; Kucera, G L; Lindquist, N; Manderville, R A

    2001-12-01

    The DNA-targeting activities of the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products, that include prodigiosin (1), tambjamine E (2), and the blue pigment (3), have been compared using fluorescence spectroscopy to study DNA binding and agarose gel electrophoresis to assess their ability to facilitate oxidative copper-promoted DNA cleavage. Fluorescence emission titration of 3 with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) shows that the natural product occupies a site size (n) of ca. two base pairs and possesses an affinity constant (K) of approximately 6x10(5) x M(-1). Similar to prodigiosin (1), the blue pigment 3 was found to facilitate oxidative double-strand DNA (dsDNA) cleavage without the aid of an external reducing agent. Quantitation of ds- (n2) and ss- (n1) breaks provided n1:n2 ratios of approximately 8-12, which were significantly greater than the number expected from the accumulation of ss-breaks (approximately 120). This was contrasted by the nicking activity of tambjamine E (2), which only generates ss-breaks in the presence of copper. The superior copper-nuclease activity of 1 and 3 also correlated with their superior anticancer properties against leukemia (HL-60) cells. These results are discussed with respect to the mode of cytotoxicity by the 4-methoxypyrrolic natural products.

  6. Targeting human microRNA genes using engineered Tal-effector nucleases (TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruozhen Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have quickly emerged as important regulators of mammalian physiology owing to their precise control over the expression of critical protein coding genes. Despite significant progress in our understanding of how miRNAs function in mice, there remains a fundamental need to be able to target and edit miRNA genes in the human genome. Here, we report a novel approach to disrupting human miRNA genes ex vivo using engineered TAL-effector (TALE proteins to function as nucleases (TALENs that specifically target and disrupt human miRNA genes. We demonstrate that functional TALEN pairs can be designed to enable disruption of miRNA seed regions, or removal of entire hairpin sequences, and use this approach to successfully target several physiologically relevant human miRNAs including miR-155*, miR-155, miR-146a and miR-125b. This technology will allow for a substantially improved capacity to study the regulation and function of miRNAs in human cells, and could be developed into a strategic means by which miRNAs can be targeted therapeutically during human disease.

  7. Formation of linear amplicons with inverted duplications in Leishmania requires the MRE11 nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude N Laffitte

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extrachromosomal DNA amplification is frequent in the protozoan parasite Leishmania selected for drug resistance. The extrachromosomal amplified DNA is either circular or linear, and is formed at the level of direct or inverted homologous repeated sequences that abound in the Leishmania genome. The RAD51 recombinase plays an important role in circular amplicons formation, but the mechanism by which linear amplicons are formed is unknown. We hypothesized that the Leishmania infantum DNA repair protein MRE11 is required for linear amplicons following rearrangements at the level of inverted repeats. The purified LiMRE11 protein showed both DNA binding and exonuclease activities. Inactivation of the LiMRE11 gene led to parasites with enhanced sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. The MRE11(-/- parasites had a reduced capacity to form linear amplicons after drug selection, and the reintroduction of an MRE11 allele led to parasites regaining their capacity to generate linear amplicons, but only when MRE11 had an active nuclease activity. These results highlight a novel MRE11-dependent pathway used by Leishmania to amplify portions of its genome to respond to a changing environment.

  8. Differential integrity of TALE nuclease genes following adenoviral and lentiviral vector gene transfer into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkers, Maarten; Maggio, Ignazio; Liu, Jin; Janssen, Josephine M; Miselli, Francesca; Mussolino, Claudio; Recchia, Alessandra; Cathomen, Toni; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2013-03-01

    The array of genome editing strategies based on targeted double-stranded DNA break formation have recently been enriched through the introduction of transcription activator-like type III effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs). To advance the testing of TALE-based approaches, it will be crucial to deliver these custom-designed proteins not only into transformed cell types but also into more relevant, chromosomally stable, primary cells. Viral vectors are among the most effective gene transfer vehicles. Here, we investigated the capacity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1- and adenovirus-based vectors to package and deliver functional TALEN genes into various human cell types. To this end, we attempted to assemble particles of these two vector classes, each encoding a monomer of a TALEN pair targeted to a bipartite sequence within the AAVS1 'safe harbor' locus. Vector DNA analyses revealed that adenoviral vectors transferred intact TALEN genes, whereas lentiviral vectors failed to do so, as shown by their heterogeneously sized proviruses in target cells. Importantly, adenoviral vector-mediated TALEN gene delivery resulted in site-specific double-stranded DNA break formation at the intended AAVS1 target site at similarly high levels in both transformed and non-transformed cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that adenoviral, but not lentiviral, vectors constitute a valuable TALEN gene delivery platform.

  9. Experimental verifications on chemical carcinogenesis, a bifunctional alkylation between DNA interstrands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is evidenced by the filter elution method that two carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, two carcinogenic metal salts, beryllium chloride and cadmium chloride, four carcinogenic aromatic amines, 2-aminofluorene, β-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine, can all induce DNA interstrand and DNA-protein cross-link in L1210 culture. However, under the same condition, the corresponding non-carcinogenic compounds, including benzo[k]fluorancene, anthracene, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, a -naphthylamine, 2-aminobiphenyl and m-toluidine, cannot produce any cross-link adducts. All these results are consistent with the di-region theory that carcinogens are bio-bifunctional alkylation agents. This method can also be used to discriminate carcinogens and non-carcinogens.

  10. Dyes as bifunctional markers of DNA hybridization on surfaces and mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mendiola, Tania; Cerro, María Ramos; López-Moreno, José María; Pariente, Félix; Lorenzo, Encarnación

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA has found diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we propose the use of two different dyes, in particular Azure A and Safranine, as bifunctional markers of on-surface DNA hybridization and potent tools for screening of specific gene mutations directly in real DNA PCR amplicons extracted from blood cells. By combining spectroscopic and electrochemical methods we demonstrate that both dyes can interact with single and double stranded DNA to a different extent, allowing reliable hybridization detection. From these data, we have also elucidated the nature of the interaction. We conclude that the binding mode is fundamentally intercalative with an electrostatic component. The dye fluorescence allows their use as nucleic acid stains for the detection of on-surfaces DNA hybridization. Its redox activity is exploited in the development of selective electrochemical DNA biosensors.

  11. The fabrication of a bifunctional oxygen electrode without carbon components for alkaline secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Thompson, Stephen J.; Li, Xiaohong; Gorman, Scott F.; Pletcher, Derek; Russell, Andrea E.; Walsh, Frank C.; Wills, Richard G. A.

    2014-08-01

    The fabrication of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) without carbon components is described. It is therefore suitable for use as a bifunctional oxygen electrode in alkaline secondary batteries. The electrode is fabricated in two stages (a) the formation of a PTFE-bonded nickel powder layer on a nickel foam substrate and (b) the deposition of a NiCo2O4 spinel electrocatalyst layer by dip coating in a nitrate solution and thermal decomposition. The influence of modifications to the procedure on the performance of the GDEs in 8 M NaOH at 333 K is described. The GDEs can support current densities up to 100 mA cm-2 with state-of-the-art overpotentials for both oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction. Stable performance during >50 successive, 1 h oxygen reduction/evolution cycles at a current density of 50 mA cm-2 has been achieved.

  12. Synthesis of acrylic and allylic bifunctional cross-linking monomers derived from PET waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Aguilar, A.; Herrera-González, A. M.; Vázquez-García, R. A.; Navarro-Rodríguez, D.; Coreño, J.

    2013-06-01

    An acrylic and two novel allylic monomers synthesized from bis (hydroxyethyl) terephthalate, BHET, are reported. This was obtained by glycolysis of post-consumer PET with boiling ethylene glycol. The bifunctional monomer bis(2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl) terephthalate was obtained from acryloyl chloride, while the allylic monomers 2-(((allyloxi)carbonyl)oxy) ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalate and bis(2-(((allyloxi)carbonyl)oxy)ethyl) terephthalate, from allyl chloroformate. Cross-linking was studied in bulk polymerization using two different thermal initiators. Monomers were analyzed by means of 1H NMR and the cross-linked polymers by infrared spectroscopy. Gel content higher than 90% was obtained for the acrylic monomer. In the case of the mixture of the allylic monomers, the cross-linked polymer was 80 % using BPO initiator, being this mixture 24 times less reactive than the acrylic monomer.

  13. Mono- and bi-functional arenethiols as surfactants for gold nanoparticles: synthesis and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fratoddi Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stable gold nanoparticles stabilized by different mono and bi-functional arenethiols, namely, benzylthiol and 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol, have been prepared by using a modified Brust's two-phase synthesis. The size, shape, and crystalline structure of the gold nanoparticles have been determined by high-resolution electron microscopy and full-pattern X-ray powder diffraction analyses. Nanocrystals diameters have been tuned in the range 2 ÷ 9 nm by a proper variation of Au/S molar ratio. The chemical composition of gold nanoparticles and their interaction with thiols have been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In particular, the formation of networks has been observed with interconnected gold nanoparticles containing 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol as ligand.

  14. Bi-functional biobased packing of the cassava starch, glycerol, licuri nanocellulose and red propolis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Serra Costa

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4% and glycerol (1.0%, reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0-1% and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%. The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage.

  15. "Click" chemistry mildly stabilizes bifunctional gold nanoparticles for sensing and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Zhao, Pengxiang; Liu, Na; Echeverria, María; Moya, Sergio; Salmon, Lionel; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2014-07-01

    A large family of bifunctional 1,2,3-triazole derivatives that contain both a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain and another functional fragment (e.g., a polymer, dendron, alcohol, carboxylic acid, allyl, fluorescence dye, redox-robust metal complex, or a β-cyclodextrin unit) has been synthesized by facile "click" chemistry and mildly coordinated to nanogold particles, thus providing stable water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the size range 3.0-11.2 nm with various properties and applications. In particular, the sensing properties of these AuNPs are illustrated through the detection of an analogue of a warfare agent (i.e., sulfur mustard) by means of a fluorescence "turn-on" assay, and the catalytic activity of the smallest triazole-AuNPs (core of 3.0 nm) is excellent for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol in water.

  16. Aldo-X Bifunctional Building Blocks for the Synthesis of Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandiran, Palanisamy; Lai, Bingbing; Gu, Yanlong

    2017-02-01

    Compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur atoms inside the rings are attracting much attention and interest due to their biological importance. In recent years, several methods for the synthesis of such molecules have been reported by using aldo-X bifunctional building blocks (AXB3 s) as substrates; these are a wide class of organic molecules that contain at least two reactive sites, among them, one aldehyde, acetal, or semiacetal group was involved. Because of the multiple reactivities, AXB3 s are widely used in the one-pot synthesis of biologically important heterocycles. This review summarizes the synthesis of important heterocycles by using AXB3 s as pivotal components in establishing multicomponent reactions, tandem reactions, and so forth. In many cases, the established reaction systems with AXB3 s were characterized by some green properties, such as easy access to the substrate, mild and environmentally benign conditions, and wide scope of the substrate.

  17. Development and computational modeling of novel bifunctional organophosphorus extractants for lanthanoid separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uezu, Kazuya; Nakashio, Fumiyuki [Kyushu Univ., Hakozaki, Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Science and Technology; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Inoue, Katsutoshi [Saga Univ., Honjyo, Saga (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-08-01

    Novel organophosphorus extractants, which have two functional groups in the molecular structure, have been developed for the separation of lanthanoids using the liquid-liquid extraction technique. The separation efficiency and extractability of the novel extractants were investigated for nine lanthanoids. These bifunctional extractants have an extremely high extractability to all the lanthanoids compared to those of commercially available organophosphorus extractants. Two isomers having an identical chemical formulation show significantly different behaviors in lanthanoid extraction. This means that the extraction and separation abilities are quite sensitive to the structure of the spacer connecting the two functional groups. The authors also discuss the experimental results with a computational modeling by means of molecular mechanics and semiempirical molecular orbital methods. The novel molecular mechanics (MM) calculation program MOMEC enables them to analyze the stable conformation of a series of lanthanoid complexes. The calculation suggests that the structural effect of the spacer is one of the decisive factors for enhancing selectivity and extractability in lanthanoid extraction.

  18. Bi-functional biobased packing of the cassava starch, glycerol, licuri nanocellulose and red propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Samantha Serra; Druzian, Janice Izabel; Machado, Bruna Aparecida Souza; de Souza, Carolina Oliveira; Guimarães, Alaíse Gil

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the bi-functional efficacy of active packaging films produced with starch (4%) and glycerol (1.0%), reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (0-1%) and activated with alcoholic extracts of red propolis (0.4 to 1.0%). The cellulose nanocrystals used in this study were extracted from licuri leaves. The films were characterized using moisture, water-activity analyses and water vapor-permeability tests and were tested regarding their total phenolic compounds and mechanical properties. The antimicrobial and antioxidant efficacy of the films were evaluated by monitoring the use of the active films for packaging cheese curds and butter, respectively. The cellulose nanocrystals increased the mechanical strength of the films and reduced the water permeability and water activity. The active film had an antimicrobial effect on coagulase-positive staphylococci in cheese curds and reduced the oxidation of butter during storage.

  19. Hydroisomerization of Ethylbenzene on Mordenite-Based Bifunctional Catalysts with Different Platinum Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes L.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial Na-mordenite sample underwent ion exchange with HCl. The ion-exchanged sample was sequentially submitted to hydrothermal treatments at 823, 873 and 923 K, each followed by acid leaching of the extraframework alumina (EFAL generated. Six mordenite samples, presenting different framework and extraframework compositions, were obtained. These samples were used to prepare bifunctional catalysts by mixing them with Pt/Al2O3 in different proportions. The generated samples presented distinct platinum contents and were tested in the hydroisomerization reaction of ethylbenzene. A maximum xylene selectivity at about 0.45 wt% of platinum was observed. Normally, the total activity increased as the platinum content increased; this effect was more pronounced in the samples which presented lower mesoporosity. The most dealuminated sample, which presented a high mesoporosity, did not show any change in activity with the increase in platinum content.

  20. Bifunctional enzyme FBPase/SBPase is essential for photoautotrophic growth in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunlan Yan; Xudong Xu

    2008-01-01

    From a random insertion mutant library of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a mutant defective in photoautotrophic growth was obtained. The interrupted gene was identified to be sir2094 (fbpl), which encodes the fructose-l,6-biphosphatase (FBPase)/sedoheptu-lose-1,7-biphosphatase (SBPase) bifunctional enzyme (F-I). Two other independently constructed slr2094 mutants showed an identical phenotype. The FBPase activity was found to be virtually lacking in an sir2094 mutant, which was sensitive to light under mixotrophic growth conditions. These results indicate that sir2094 is the only active FBPase-encoding gene in this cyanobacterium. Inactivation of photosystem 11 by interrupting psbB in sir2094 mutant alleviated the sensitiveness to light. This report provides the direct genetic evi-dence for the essential role of F-I in the photosynthesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  1. New Tailor-Made Alkyl-Aldehyde Bifunctional Supports for Lipase Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Carlos Alnoch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized and stabilized lipases are important biocatalytic tools. In this paper, different tailor-made bifunctional supports were prepared for the immobilization of a new metagenomic lipase (LipC12. The new supports contained hydrophobic groups (different alkyl groups to promote interfacial adsorption of the lipase and aldehyde groups to react covalently with the amino groups of side chains of the adsorbed lipase. The best catalyst was 3.5-fold more active and 5000-fold more stable than the soluble enzyme. It was successfully used in the regioselective deacetylation of peracetylated d-glucal. The PEGylated immobilized lipase showed high regioselectivity, producing high yields of the C-3 monodeacetylated product at pH 5.0 and 4 °C.

  2. Stable expression of a bifunctional diterpene synthase in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedler, Julie A Z; Gangl, Doris; Hamberger, Björn Robert;

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been shown to hold significant promise as a production platform for recombinant proteins, but transformation of the nuclear genome is still a non-trivial process due to random gene insertion and frequent silencing. Insertion of transgenes into the chloroplasts...... is an alternative strategy, and we report here the stable expression of a large (91 kDa) protein in the chloroplast using a recently developed low-cost transformation protocol. Moreover, selection of transformants is based on restoration of prototrophy using an endogenous gene (psbH) as the marker, thereby allowing...... the generation of transgenic lines without the use of antibiotic-resistance genes. Here, we have expressed a bifunctional diterpene synthase in C. reinhardtii chloroplasts. Homoplasmic transformants were obtained with the expressed enzyme accounting for 3.7 % of total soluble protein. The enzyme was purified...

  3. On the molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein deficiency type III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija L Mehtälä

    Full Text Available Molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein (D-BP deficiency was studied with wild type and five disease-causing variants of 3R-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase fragment of the human MFE-2 (multifunctional enzyme type 2 protein. Complementation analysis in vivo in yeast and in vitro enzyme kinetic and stability determinants as well as in silico stability and structural fluctuation calculations were correlated with clinical data of known patients. Despite variations not affecting the catalytic residues, enzyme kinetic performance (K(m, V(max and k(cat of the recombinant protein variants were compromised to a varying extent and this can be judged as the direct molecular cause for D-BP deficiency. Protein stability plays an additional role in producing non-functionality of MFE-2 in case structural variations affect cofactor or substrate binding sites. Structure-function considerations of the variant proteins matched well with the available data of the patients.

  4. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  5. Hydrogen bonding in transient bifunctional hypervalent radicals by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, S A; Tureček, F

    1995-11-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry is used to generate hypervalent 9-N-4 (ammonium) and 9-O-3 (oxonium) radicals derived from protonated α,ω-bis-(dimethylamino)alkanes and α,ω-dimethoxyalkanes, which exist as cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures in the gas phase. Collisional neutralization with dimethyl disulfide, trimethylamine, and xenon of the hydrogen-bonded onium cations followed by reionization with oxygen results in complete dissociation. Bond cleavages at the hypervalent nitrogen atoms are found to follow the order CH2-N>CH3-N>N-H, which differs from that in the monofunctional hydrogen-n-heptyldimethylammonium radical, which gives CH2-N>N-H>CH3-N. No overall stabilization through hydrogen bonding of the bifunctional hypervalent ammonium and oxonium radicals is observed. Subtle effects of ring size are found that tend to stabilize large ring structures and are attributed to intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  6. Recent Development of Bifunctional Small Molecules to Study Metal-Amyloid-β Species in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymer, Joseph J; Detoma, Alaina S; Choi, Jung-Suk; Ko, Kristin S; Lim, Mi Hee

    2010-12-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease related to the deposition of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. It has been proposed that metal ion dyshomeostasis and miscompartmentalization contribute to AD progression, especially as metal ions (e.g., Cu(II) and Zn(II)) found in Aβ plaques of the diseased brain can bind to Aβ and be linked to aggregation and neurotoxicity. The role of metal ions in AD pathogenesis, however, is uncertain. To accelerate understanding in this area and contribute to therapeutic development, recent efforts to devise suitable chemical reagents that can target metal ions associated with Aβ have been made using rational structure-based design that combines two functions (metal chelation and Aβ interaction) in the same molecule. This paper presents bifunctional compounds developed by two different design strategies (linkage or incorporation) and discusses progress in their applications as chemical tools and/or potential therapeutics.

  7. Bifunctional Nanoparticle-SILP Catalysts (NPs@SILP) for the Selective Deoxygenation of Biomass Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luska, Kylie L. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Julis, Jennifer [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany); Stavitski, Eli [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zakharov, Dmitri N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, Alina [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Leitner, Walter [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Coal Research, Ruhr (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    We immobilized ruthenium nanoparticles onto an acidic supported ionic liquid phase (RuNPs@SILP) in the development of bifunctional catalysts for the selective deoxygenation of biomass substrates. RuNPs@SILPs possessed high catalytic activities, selectivities and recyclabilities in the hydrogenolytic deoxygenation and ring opening of C8- and C9-substrates derived from furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetone. When we tailor the acidity of the SILP through the ionic liquid loading provided a molecular parameter by which the catalytic activity and selectivity of the RuNPs@SILPs were controlled to provide a flexible catalyst system toward the formation of different classes of value-added products: cyclic ethers, primary alcohols or aliphatic ethers.

  8. AmpH, a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Leiza, Silvia M; de Pedro, Miguel A; Ayala, Juan A

    2011-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (LMM PBPs) are important for correct cell morphogenesis. These enzymes display DD-carboxypeptidase and/or dd-endopeptidase activities associated with maturation and remodeling of peptidoglycan (PG). AmpH has been classified as an AmpH-type class C LMM PBP, a group closely related to AmpC β-lactamases. AmpH has been associated with PG recycling, although its enzymatic activity remained uncharacterized until now. Construction and purification of His-tagged AmpH from E. coli permitted a detailed study of its enzymatic properties. The N-terminal export signal of AmpH is processed, but the protein remains membrane associated. The PBP nature of AmpH was demonstrated by its ability to bind the β-lactams Bocillin FL (a fluorescent penicillin) and cefmetazole. In vitro assays with AmpH and specific muropeptides demonstrated that AmpH is a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase. Indeed, the enzyme cleaved the cross-linked dimers tetrapentapeptide (D45) and tetratetrapeptide (D44) with efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of 1,200 M(-1) s(-1) and 670 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, and removed the terminal D-alanine from muropeptides with a C-terminal D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptide. Both DD-peptidase activities were inhibited by 40 μM cefmetazole. AmpH also displayed a weak β-lactamase activity for nitrocefin of 1.4 × 10(-3) nmol/μg protein/min, 1/1,000 the rate obtained for AmpC under the same conditions. AmpH was also active on purified sacculi, exhibiting the bifunctional character that was seen with pure muropeptides. The wide substrate spectrum of the DD-peptidase activities associated with AmpH supports a role for this protein in PG remodeling or recycling.

  9. Bifunctional Effect of Human IFN-γ on Cultured Human Fibroblasts from Tenon‘s Capsule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YanGuo; JianGe; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To study the effect of human IFN-γ on in ivtro cultured human fibroblasts from Tenon's capsule.Materials and methods:The effect of different concentrations of human IFN-γand mitomycin-C (MMC),5-fluorouracil(5-Fu) on cultured human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts(HTCF) was measured using a MTT[3-(4,5-dimethylthiazo-2-yI)]-2,5-diphenylterazolium bromide;Thiazolyl blue) colorimetric assay.The results were analyzed using ANOVA of the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 9.0 version.The difference was considered to be significant if P<0.05.Results:The effects of MMC and 5-Fu on the growth of HTCF were negative,while the effects of IFN-γon the growth of HTCF were both negative(102-104 units/ml in two experiments)and positive(106,105,10 units /ml in two experiments).The inhibition rate of MMC ranged from 5.73% to 46.9% ,which was similar to the inhibition rate of 5-Fu ranged from 12.49% to 38.92%(P=0.351).The inhibition rate of IFN-γ in two experiments was smaller than MMC and 5-Fu (P<0.05).Conclusion: IFN-γ has bifunctional effect (both enhancement and inhibition)on proliferation of cultured HTCF.The antiproliferative effect of IFN-γ was weaker than MMC and 5-Fu.Further study has to be carried out to document theinhibition of scar formation of filtration bleb by IFN-γ and the molecular mechanisms of its bifunctional effect on HTCF proliferation.Eye Science 2000;16:43-47.

  10. Bifunctional Effect of Human IFN-γon Cultured Human Fibroblasts from Tenon's Capsule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Guo; Jian Ge; Haiquan Liu; Yanyan Li; Jianliang Zheng; Xiangkun Huang; Yuqing Lan

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of human IFN-γ on in vitro cultured human fibroblasts from Tenon's capsuleMaterials and methods: The effect of different concentrations of human IFN-γ and mitomycin-C (MMC), 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on cultured human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTCF) was measured using a MIT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazo-2-yl)] -2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide; Thiazolyl blue) colorimetric assay. The results were analyzed using ANOVA of the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) 9.0version. The difference was considered to be significant if P < 0. 05.Results: The effects of MMC and 5-Fu on the growth of HTCF were negative, while the effects of IFN-γ on the growth of HTCF were both negative (102 ~ l04 units/ml in two experiments) and positive (106, 105, 10 units/ml in two experiments) . The inhibition rate of MMC ranged from 5.73% to 46. 9%, which was similar to the inhibition rate of 5-Fu ranged from 12.49% to 38.92% ( P= 0. 351) . The inhibition rate of IFN-γ in two experiments was smaller than MMC and 5-Fu ( P < 0.05).Conclusion: IFN-γ has bifunctional effect (both enhancement and inhibition) on proliferation of cultured HTCF. The antiproliferative effect of IFN-γ was weaker than MMC and 5-Fu. Further study has to be carried out to document the inhibition of scar formation of filtration bleb by IFN-γ and the molecular mechanisms of its bifunctional effect on HTCF proliferation. Eye Science 2000; 16: 43~ 47.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Silica-Coated Magnetic–Fluorescent Bifunctional Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bifunctional magnetic–fluorescent composite nanoparticles (MPQDs with Fe3O4MPs and Mn:ZnS/ZnS core–shell quantum dots (QDs encapsulated in silica spheres were synthesized through reverse microemulsion method and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, vibration sample magnetometer, and photoluminescence (PL spectra. Our strategy could offer the following features: (1 the formation of Mn:ZnS/ZnS core/shell QDs resulted in enhancement of the PL intensity with respect to that of bare Mn:ZnS nanocrystals due to the effective elimination of the surface defects; (2 the magnetic nanoparticles were coated with silica, in order to reduce any detrimental effects on the QD PL by the magnetic cores; and (3 both Fe3O4MPs and Mn:ZnS/ZnS core–shell QDs were encapsulated in silica spheres, and the obtained MPQDs became water soluble. The experimental conditions for the silica coating on the surface of Fe3O4nanoparticles, such as the ratio of water to surfactant (R, the amount of ammonia, and the amount of tetraethoxysilane, on the photoluminescence properties of MPQDs were studied. It was found that the silica coating on the surface of Fe3O4could effectively suppress the interaction between the Fe3O4and the QDs under the most optimal parameters, and the emission intensity of MPQDs showed a maximum. The bifunctional MPQDs prepared under the most optimal parameters have a typical diameter of 35 nm and a saturation magnetization of 4.35 emu/g at room temperature and exhibit strong photoluminescence intensity.

  12. Electrochemical formation of transparent nanostructured TiO2 film as an effective bifunctional layer for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Tsai, Chen-Hsiu; Wei, Tzu-Chien

    2011-03-14

    A bifunctional TiO(2) layer having an inner compact layer and an outer anchoring layer coated on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass could reduce the charge recombination and interfacial contact resistance between FTO and the main TiO(2) layer; photoelectron conversion efficiency of cell was increased from 7.31 to 8.04% by incorporating the bifunctional layer.

  13. The nuiA gene from Anabaena sp. encoding an inhibitor of the NucA sugar-non-specific nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro-Pastor, A M; Herrero, A; Flores, E

    1997-05-01

    Many filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria express a sugar-non-specific nuclease of about 29 kDa that can be detected in DNA-containing SDS-PAGE gels. The nucA gene encoding this nuclease has previously been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The NucA protein bears a putative signal peptide close to its N-terminal end and, in Anabaena cultures, is present in both the cells and the extracellular medium. Cell-free extracts of different cyanobacteria producing NucA-like nucleases exhibited an inhibitory activity on NucA. In Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, this inhibition was exerted by protein(s) or protein-containing molecule(s) that were heat resistant. Immediately downstream from the nucA gene, in the complementary strand, we have identified an open reading frame composed of 135 codons, that we have named nuiA, whose expression in E. coli conferred heat-resistant NucA-inhibitory activity to cell-free extracts. The NuiA protein was purified to homogeneity, and purified NuiA inhibited the nuclease activity of NucA. Sequences hybridizing with the nuiA gene have been found in all the tested cyanobacterial strains that express a NucA-like nuclease. Whereas the NucA protein is homologous to endonuclease G from vertebrates and to nucleases from Serratia marcescens and yeast, no protein homologous to NuiA was found in the available databases. Therefore, nuiA represents a novel gene encoding a nuclease inhibitor.

  14. Dynamics of tropomyosin in muscle fibers as monitored by saturation transfer EPR of bi-functional probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni F Rayes

    Full Text Available The dynamics of four regions of tropomyosin was assessed using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance in the muscle fiber. In order to fully immobilize the spin probe on the surface of tropomyosin, a bi-functional spin label was attached to i,i+4 positions via cysteine mutagenesis. The dynamics of bi-functionally labeled tropomyosin mutants decreased by three orders of magnitude when reconstituted into "ghost muscle fibers". The rates of motion varied along the length of tropomyosin with the C-terminus position 268/272 being one order of magnitude slower then N-terminal domain or the center of the molecule. Introduction of troponin decreases the dynamics of all four sites in the muscle fiber, but there was no significant effect upon addition of calcium or myosin subfragment-1.

  15. Studies towards the development of lipophilic bifunctional N{sub 3}S{sub 3} chelators for {sup 68}Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riss, P.J.; Hanik, N.; Roesch, F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    The present study is concerned with a concept of charge-neutral, lipophilic, macrocyclic bifunctional chelators, suitable for the introduction of a gallium-68 label into small molecules. The synthesis of a novel bifunctional N{sub 3}S{sub 3}-type chelator, derived from 1,4,7-triazacyclononane, initial {sup 68}Ga-radiolabelling and the determination of stability and calculated lipophilicity of the compound are described. The {sup 68}Ga-labelled chelate was obtained in a maximum radiochemical yield of 93{+-}5% after a reaction time of 2 min. It remained intact over 3 h in a DTPA-challenge and a transferrin challenge experiment, indicating sufficient stability for PET studies. (orig.)

  16. In situ labeling and imaging of cellular protein via a bi-functional anticancer aptamer and its fluorescent ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jun; Li, Tao; Li, Bingling; Xu, Yuanhong; Li, Dan; Liu, Zuojia; Wang, Erkang

    2012-09-05

    In this article, we reported a novel approach for in situ labeling and imaging HeLa cancer cells utilizing a bifunctional aptamer (AS1411) and its fluorescent ligand, protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). In the presence of potassium ion, AS1411 folded to G-quadruplex structure, binded fluorescent ligand (PPIX) with fluorescent enhancement, and targeted the nucleolin overexpressed by cancer cells. Consequently, bioimaging of cancer cells specifically were realized by laser scanning confocal microscope. The bioimaging strategy with AS1411-PPIX complex was capable to distinguish HeLa cancer cells from normal cells unambiguously, and fluorescence imaging of cancer cells was also realized in human serum. Moreover, the bioimaging method was very facile, effective and need not any covalent modification. These results illustrated that the useful approach can provide a novel clue for bioimaging based on non-covalent bifunctional aptamer in clinic diagnosis.

  17. Rational design of micro-RNA-like bifunctional siRNAs targeting HIV and the HIV coreceptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Ali; Saetrom, Pål; Zhang, Jane; Alluin, Jessica; Li, Haitang; Snøve, Ola; Aagaard, Lars; Rossi, John J

    2010-04-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultaneously direct cleavage and translational suppression of HIV RNAs, or cleavage of the mRNA encoding the HIV coreceptor CCR5 and suppression of translation of HIV. These bifunctional siRNAs trigger inhibition of HIV infection and replication in cell culture. The design principles have wide applications throughout the genome, as about 90% of genes harbor sites that make the design of bifunctional siRNAs possible.

  18. Dual-Doped Molybdenum Trioxide Nanowires: A Bifunctional Anode for Fiber-Shaped Asymmetric Supercapacitors and Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Minghao; Cheng, Xinyu; Zeng, Yinxiang; Wang, Zilong; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    A novel in situ N and low-valence-state Mo dual doping strategy was employed to significantly improve the conductivity, active-site accessibility, and electrochemical stability of MoO3 , drastically boosting its electrochemical properties. Consequently, our optimized N-MoO3-x nanowires exhibited exceptional performances as a bifunctional anode material for both fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The flexible fiber-shaped ASC and MFC device based on the N-MoO3-x anode could deliver an unprecedentedly high energy density of 2.29 mWh cm(-3) and a remarkable power density of 0.76 μW cm(-1) , respectively. Such a bifunctional fiber-shaped N-MoO3-x electrode opens the way to integrate the electricity generation and storage for self-powered sources.

  19. "Bis-Click" Ligation of DNA: Template-Controlled Assembly, Circularisation and Functionalisation with Bifunctional and Trifunctional Azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank

    2017-03-08

    Ligation and circularisation of oligonucleotides containing terminal triple bonds was performed with bifunctional or trifunctional azides. Both reactions are high yielding. Template-assisted bis-click ligation of two individual non-complementary oligonucleotide strands was accomplished to yield heterodimers exclusively. In this context, the template fulfils two functions: it accelerates the ligation reaction and controls product assembly (heterodimer vs. homodimer formation). Intermolecular bis-click circularisation of one oligonucleotide strand took place without template assistance. For construction of oligonucleotides with terminal triple bonds in the nucleobase side chain, 7- or 5-functionalised 7-deaza-dA and dU residues were used. These oligonucleotides are directly accessible by solid-phase synthesis. When trifunctional azides were employed instead of bifunctional linkers, functionalisation of the remaining azido group was performed with small molecules such as 1-ethynyl pyrene, biotin propargyl amide or with ethynylated oligonucleotides. By this means, branched DNA was constructed.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of rice bifunctional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor from Oryza sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Hung [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Peng, Wen-Yan [Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China); Huang, Yen-Chieh [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ying-Cheng [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China); Liu, Ming-Yih [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Chang, Tschining [Department of Hospitality Management, Nan Jeon Institute of Technology, Yen-Shui, Tainan 73746,Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Jung, E-mail: cjchen@nsrrc.org.tw [Life Science Group, Research Division, National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076,Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013,Taiwan (China)

    2006-08-01

    The crystallization of rice α-amylase/subtilisin bifunctional inhibitor is reported. Rice bifunctional α-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (RASI) can inhibit both α-amylase from larvae of the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and subtilisin from Bacillus subtilis. The synthesis of RASI is up-regulated during the late milky stage in developing seeds. The 8.9 kDa molecular-weight RASI from rice has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. According to 1.81 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data from rice RASI crystals, the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.99, b = 62.95, c = 66.70 Å. Preliminary analysis indicates two RASI molecules in an asymmetric unit with a solvent content of 44%.

  1. Processing of 3'-Phosphoglycolate-Terminated DNA Double-StrandBreaks by Artemis Nuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povrik, Lawrence F.; Zhou, Tong; Zhou, Ruizhe; Cowan, Morton J.; Yannone, Steven M.

    2005-10-01

    The Artemis nuclease is required for V(D)J recombination and for repair of an as yet undefined subset of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. To assess the possibility that Artemis functions on oxidatively modified double-strand break termini, its activity toward model DNA substrates, bearing either 3{prime}-hydroxyl or 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate moieties, was examined. A 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate had little effect on Artemis-mediated trimming of long 3{prime} overhangs (>9 nucleotides), which were efficiently trimmed to 4-5 nucleotides. However, 3{prime}-phosphoglycolates on overhangs of 4-5 bases promoted selective Artemis-mediated trimming of a single 3{prime}-terminal nucleotide, while at least 2 nucleotides were trimmed from identical hydroxyl-terminated substrates. Artemis also efficiently removed a single nucleotide from a phosphoglycolate-terminated 3-base 3{prime} overhang, while leaving an analogous hydroxyl-terminated overhang largely intact. Such removal was dependent upon Ku, DNA-dependent protein kinase, and ATP. Together, these data suggest that Artemis-mediated cleavage of 3{prime} overhangs requires a minimum of 2 nucleotides, or a nucleotide plus a phosphoglycolate, 3{prime} to the cleavage site. Shorter 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated overhangs and blunt ends were also processed by Artemis, but much less efficiently. Consistent with the in vitro substrate specificity of Artemis, human cells lacking Artemis exhibited hypersensitivity to X-rays, bleomycin and neocarzinostatin, which all induce 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate-terminated double-strand breaks. Collectively, these results suggest that 3{prime}-phosphoglycolate termini and/or specific classes of DNA ends that arise from such blocked termini are relevant Artemis substrates in vivo.

  2. Generation and genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells using designed zinc finger nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Sivaprakash; London, Viktoriya; Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William; Civin, Curt; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    2013-02-15

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) have become powerful tools to deliver a targeted double-strand break at a pre-determined chromosomal locus in order to insert an exogenous transgene by homology-directed repair. ZFN-mediated gene targeting was used to generate both single-allele chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 5 (CCR5)-modified human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and biallele CCR5-modified hiPSCs from human lung fibroblasts (IMR90 cells) and human primary cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMNCs) by site-specific insertion of stem cell transcription factor genes flanked by LoxP sites into the endogenous CCR5 locus. The Oct4 and Sox2 reprogramming factors, in combination with valproic acid, induced reprogramming of human lung fibroblasts to form CCR5-modified hiPSCs, while 5 factors, Oct4/Sox2/Klf4/Lin28/Nanog, induced reprogramming of CBMNCs. Subsequent Cre recombinase treatment of the CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs resulted in the removal of the Oct4 and Sox2 transgenes. Further genetic engineering of the single-allele CCR5-modified IMR90 hiPSCs was achieved by site-specific addition of the large CFTR transcription unit to the remaining CCR5 wild-type allele, using CCR5-specific ZFNs and a donor construct containing tdTomato and CFTR transgenes flanked by CCR5 homology arms. CFTR was expressed efficiently from the endogenous CCR5 locus of the CCR5-modified tdTomato/CFTR hiPSCs. These results suggest that it might be feasible to use ZFN-evoked strategies to (1) generate precisely targeted genetically well-defined patient-specific hiPSCs, and (2) then to reshape their function by targeted addition and expression of therapeutic genes from the CCR5 chromosomal locus for autologous cell-based transgene-correction therapy to treat various recessive monogenic human diseases in the future.

  3. Nuclease activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 promotes intracellular infection of amoebal host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Felizza F; Mallama, Celeste A; Fairbairn, Stephanie G; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts.

  4. Factors influencing the DNA nuclease activity of iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Reichfield, Jared; Cowan, J A

    2011-10-05

    A library of complexes that included iron, cobalt, nickel, and copper chelates of cyclam, cyclen, DOTA, DTPA, EDTA, tripeptide GGH, tetrapeptide KGHK, NTA, and TACN was evaluated for DNA nuclease activity, ascorbate consumption, superoxide and hydroxyl radical generation, and reduction potential under physiologically relevant conditions. Plasmid DNA cleavage rates demonstrated by combinations of each complex and biological co-reactants were quantified by gel electrophoresis, yielding second-order rate constants for DNA(supercoiled) to DNA(nicked) conversion up to 2.5 × 10(6) M(-1) min(-1), and for DNA(nicked) to DNA(linear) up to 7 × 10(5) M(-1) min(-1). Relative rates of radical generation and characterization of radical species were determined by reaction with the fluorescent radical probes TEMPO-9-AC and rhodamine B. Ascorbate turnover rate constants ranging from 3 × 10(-4) to 0.13 min(-1) were determined, although many complexes demonstrated no measurable activity. Inhibition and Freifelder-Trumbo analysis of DNA cleavage supported concerted cleavage of dsDNA by a metal-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the case of Cu(2+)(aq), Cu-KGHK, Co-KGHK, and Cu-NTA and stepwise cleavage for Fe(2+)(aq), Cu-cyclam, Cu-cyclen, Co-cyclen, Cu-EDTA, Ni-EDTA, Co-EDTA, Cu-GGH, and Co-NTA. Reduction potentials varied over the range from -362 to +1111 mV versus NHE, and complexes demonstrated optimal catalytic activity in the range of the physiological redox co-reactants ascorbate and peroxide (-66 to +380 mV).

  5. Zinc-finger nuclease mediated disruption of Rag1 in the LEW/Ztm rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zschemisch Nils-Holger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN represented an innovative method for the genome manipulation in vertebrates. ZFN introduced targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSB and initiated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ after pronuclear or cytoplasmatic microinjection into zygotes. Resulting frame shift mutations led to functional gene ablations in zebra fish, mice, pigs and also in laboratory rats. Therefore, we targeted the rat Rag1 gene essential for the V(DJ recombination within the immunoglobulin production process and for the differentiation of mature B and T lymphocytes to generate an immunodeficient rat model in the LEW/Ztm strain. Results After microinjection of Rag1 specific ZFN mRNAs in 623 zygotes of inbred LEW/Ztm rats 59 offspring were born from which one carried a 4 bp deletion. This frame shift mutation led to a premature stop codon and a subsequently truncated Rag1 protein confirmed by the loss of the full-length protein in Western Blot analysis. Truncation of the Rag1 protein was characterized by the complete depletion of mature B cells. The remaining T cell population contained mature CD4+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ as well as CD8+/CD3+/TCRαβ+ positive lymphocytes accompanied by a compensatory increase of natural killer cells in the peripheral blood. Reduction of T cell development in Rag1 mutant rats was associated with a hypoplastic thymus that lacked follicular structures. Histological evaluation also revealed the near-complete absence of lymphocytes in spleen and lymph nodes in the immunodeficient Rag1 mutant rat. Conclusion The Rag1 mutant rat will serve as an important model for transplantation studies. Furthermore, it may be used as a model for reconstitution experiments related to the immune system, particularly with respect to different populations of human lymphocytes, natural killer cells and autoimmune phenomena.

  6. Zebrafish foxP2 zinc finger nuclease mutant has normal axon pathfinding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyan Xing

    Full Text Available foxP2, a forkhead-domain transcription factor, is critical for speech and language development in humans, but its role in the establishment of CNS connectivity is unclear. While in vitro studies have identified axon guidance molecules as targets of foxP2 regulation, and cell culture assays suggest a role for foxP2 in neurite outgrowth, in vivo studies have been lacking regarding a role for foxP2 in axon pathfinding. We used a modified zinc finger nuclease methodology to generate mutations in the zebrafish foxP2 gene. Using PCR-based high resolution melt curve analysis (HRMA of G0 founder animals, we screened and identified three mutants carrying nonsense mutations in the 2(nd coding exon: a 17 base-pair (bp deletion, an 8bp deletion, and a 4bp insertion. Sequence analysis of cDNA confirmed that these were frameshift mutations with predicted early protein truncations. Homozygous mutant fish were viable and fertile, with unchanged body morphology, and no apparent differences in CNS apoptosis, proliferation, or patterning at embryonic stages. There was a reduction in expression of the known foxP2 target gene cntnap2 that was rescued by injection of wild-type foxP2 transcript. When we examined axon pathfinding using a pan-axonal marker or transgenic lines, including a foxP2-neuron-specific enhancer, we did not observe any axon guidance errors. Our findings suggest that foxP2 is not necessary for axon pathfinding during development.

  7. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  8. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases enable efficient plant genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiaohong; Baller, Joshua A; Qi, Yiping; Starker, Colby G; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely engineer plant genomes offers much potential for advancing basic and applied plant biology. Here, we describe methods for the targeted modification of plant genomes using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Methods were optimized using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts and TALENs targeting the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene. Optimal TALEN scaffolds were identified using a protoplast-based single-strand annealing assay in which TALEN cleavage creates a functional yellow fluorescent protein gene, enabling quantification of TALEN activity by flow cytometry. Single-strand annealing activity data for TALENs with different scaffolds correlated highly with their activity at endogenous targets, as measured by high-throughput DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products encompassing the TALEN recognition sites. TALENs introduced targeted mutations in ALS in 30% of transformed cells, and the frequencies of targeted gene insertion approximated 14%. These efficiencies made it possible to recover genome modifications without selection or enrichment regimes: 32% of tobacco calli generated from protoplasts transformed with TALEN-encoding constructs had TALEN-induced mutations in ALS, and of 16 calli characterized in detail, all had mutations in one allele each of the duplicate ALS genes (SurA and SurB). In calli derived from cells treated with a TALEN and a 322-bp donor molecule differing by 6 bp from the ALS coding sequence, 4% showed evidence of targeted gene replacement. The optimized reagents implemented in plant protoplasts should be useful for targeted modification of cells from diverse plant species and using a variety of means for reagent delivery.

  9. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Flisikowska

    Full Text Available Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+ and IgG(+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  10. Stability of zinc finger nuclease protein is enhanced by the proteasome inhibitor MG132.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Ramakrishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs are powerful tools for gene therapy and genetic engineering. The characterization of ZFN protein stability and the development of simple methods to improve ZFN function would facilitate the application of this promising technology. However, the factors that affect ZFN protein stability and function are not yet clear. Here, we determined the stability and half-life of two ZFN proteins and examined the effect of MG132 (carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal-Hl, a proteasome inhibitor, on ZFN-mediated gene modifications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ZFN proteins were expressed in 293T cells after transfection of ZFN-encoding plasmids. We studied two ZFN pairs: Z-224, which targets the CCR5 gene, and K-230, which targets a region 230 kbp upstream of CCR5. Western blotting after treatment with cycloheximide showed that the half-life of these ZFN proteins was around two hours. An immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the ZFN interacts with ubiquitin molecules and undergoes polyubiquitination in vivo. Western blotting showed that the addition of MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, increased ZFN protein levels. Finally, a surrogate reporter assay and a T7E1 assay revealed that MG132 treatment enhanced ZFN-directed gene editing. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate ZFN protein stability and to show that a small molecule can increase ZFN activity. Our protein stability study should lay the foundation for further improvement of ZFN technology; as a first step, the use of the small molecule MG132 can enhance the efficiency of ZFN-mediated gene editing.

  11. Efficacy of a marine bacterial nuclease against biofilm forming microorganisms isolated from chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Shields

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The persistent colonization of paranasal sinus mucosa by microbial biofilms is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS. Control of microorganisms within biofilms is hampered by the presence of viscous extracellular polymers of host or microbial origin, including nucleic acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular DNA in biofilm formation by bacteria associated with CRS. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Obstructive mucin was collected from patients during functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Examination of the mucous by transmission electron microscopy revealed an acellular matrix punctuated occasionally with host cells in varying states of degradation. Bacteria were observed in biofilms on mucosal biopsies, and between two and six different species were isolated from each of 20 different patient samples. In total, 16 different bacterial genera were isolated, of which the most commonly identified organisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and α-haemolytic streptococci. Twenty-four fresh clinical isolates were selected for investigation of biofilm formation in vitro using a microplate model system. Biofilms formed by 14 strains, including all 9 extracellular nuclease-producing bacteria, were significantly disrupted by treatment with a novel bacterial deoxyribonuclease, NucB, isolated from a marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis. Extracellular biofilm matrix was observed in untreated samples but not in those treated with NucB and extracellular DNA was purified from in vitro biofilms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that bacteria associated with CRS form robust biofilms which can be reduced by treatment with matrix-degrading enzymes such as NucB. The dispersal of bacterial biofilms with NucB may offer an additional therapeutic target for CRS sufferers.

  12. A bifunctional palladium-acid solid catalyst performs the direct synthesis of cyclohexylanilines and dicyclohexylamines from nitrobenzenes

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio Marqués, Paula; Leyva Perez, Antonio; Corma Canós, Avelino

    2013-01-01

    Nitroderivatives are transformed to cyclohexylanilines at room temperature in good yields and selectivity via a hydrogenation-amine coupling cascade reaction using Pd nanoparticles on carbon as a catalyst and a Bronsted acid. Consolider-Ingenio MULTICAT subprograma de Apoyo a Centros y Universidades de Excelencia Severo Ochoa SEV 2012 0267 MICINN MAT2009-00889 FPU contract ITQ Rubio Marqués, P.; Leyva Perez, A.; Corma Canós, A. (2013). A bifunctional palladium-acid solid ca...

  13. Highly active and durable core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu; Yu, Aiping; Higgins, Drew; Li, Hui; Wang, Haijiang; Chen, Zhongwei

    2012-04-11

    A new class of core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (CCBC) consisting of lanthanum nickelate centers supporting nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) has been developed for rechargeable metal-air battery application. The nanostructured design of the catalyst allows the core and corona to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), respectively. These materials displayed exemplary OER and ORR activity through half-cell testing, comparable to state of the art commercial lanthanum nickelate (LaNiO(3)) and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C), with added bifunctional capabilities allowing metal-air battery rechargeability. LaNiO(3) and Pt/C are currently the most accepted benchmark electrocatalyst materials for the OER and ORR, respectively; thus with comparable activity toward both of these reactions, CCBC are presented as a novel, inexpensive catalyst component for the cathode of rechargeable metal-air batteries. Moreover, after full-range degradation testing (FDT) CCBC retained excellent activity, retaining 3 and 13 times greater ORR and OER current upon comparison to state of the art Pt/C. Zinc-air battery performances of CCBC is in good agreement with the half-cell experiments with this bifunctional electrocatalyst displaying high activity and stability during battery discharge, charge, and cycling processes. Owing to its outstanding performance toward both the OER and ORR, comparable with the highest performing commercial catalysts to date for each of the respective reaction, coupled with high stability and rechargeability, CCBC is presented as a novel class of bifunctional catalyst material that is very applicable to future generation rechargeable metal-air batteries.

  14. Synergistic bifunctional catalyst design based on perovskite oxide nanoparticles and intertwined carbon nanotubes for rechargeable zinc-air battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Un; Park, Hey Woong; Park, Moon Gyu; Ismayilov, Vugar; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-01-14

    Advanced morphology of intertwined core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (IT-CCBC) is introduced where perovskite lanthanum nickel oxide nanoparticles (LaNiO3 NP) are encapsulated by high surface area network of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) to produce highly active and durable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications. The unique composite morphology of IT-CCBC not only enhances the charge transport property by providing rapid electron-conduction pathway but also facilitates in diffusion of hydroxyl and oxygen reactants through the highly porous framework. Confirmed by electrochemical half-cell testing, IT-CCBC in fact exhibits very strong synergy between LaNiO3 NP and NCNT demonstrating bifunctionality with significantly improved catalytic activities of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Furthermore, when compared to the state-of-art catalysts, IT-CCBC outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C in terms of ORR and OER, respectively, and shows improved electrochemical stability compared to them after cycle degradation testing. The practicality of the catalyst is corroborated by testing in a realistic rechargeable zinc-air battery utilizing atmospheric air in ambient conditions, where IT-CCBC demonstrates superior charge and discharge voltages and long-term cycle stability with virtually no battery voltage fading. These improved electrochemical properties of the catalyst are attributed to the nanosized dimensions of LaNiO3 NP controlled by simple hydrothermal technique, which enables prolific growth of and encapsulation by highly porous NCNT network. The excellent electrochemical results presented in this study highlight IT-CCBC as highly efficient and commercially viable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications.

  15. L-Threonine-derived novel bifunctional phosphine-sulfonamide catalyst-promoted enantioselective aza-morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Zhong, Fangrui

    2011-03-18

    A series of novel bifunctional phosphine-sulfonamide organic catalysts were designed and readily prepared from natural amino acids, and they were utilized to promote enantioselective aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reactions. l-Threonine-derived phosphine-sulfonamide 9b was found to be the most efficient catalyst, affording the desired aza-MBH adducts in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  16. Bifunctional TiO2 Catalysts for Efficient Cr(Ⅵ) Photoreduction Under Solar Light Irradiation Without Addition of Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-cheng Shi; Wen-dong Wang; Wei-xin Huang

    2012-01-01

    Bifunctional Ti02 photocatalysts co-doped with nitrogen and sulfur were prepared by the controlled thermal decomposition of ammonium titanyl sulfate precursor.They have both photocatalytic activity and Brφnsted acidity,and thus are active in the photoreduction of Cr(VI) under solar light irradiation without the addition of acids.The activity is superior to that of Degussa P25 in the acidified suspension at the same pH adjusted by H2SO4.

  17. Morphology-controlled growth of magnetic iron oxide components on gold nanoparticles as bi-functional agents

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Summary form only given. Hybrid nanostructure can inherit the physiochemical properties of its individual components to realize its multi-functionality. The coupling of plasmonic effect of gold nanoparticles with magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles has shown great promise as bi-functional agents allowing simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT) imaging and magnetic/photonic thermal therapy. However, since gold and iron oxide are two dissimilar materia...

  18. Bifunctional chimeric SuperCD suicide gene -YCD: YUPRT fusion is highly effective in a rat hepatoma model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian Graepler; Ulrike A Lauer; Reinhard Vonthein; Michael Gregor; Sorin Armeanu; Michael Bitzer; Ulrich M. Lauer; Marie-Luise Lemken; Wolfgang A Wybranietz; Ulrike Schmidt; Irina Smirnow; Christine D Groβ; Martin Spiegel; Andrea Schenk; Hansj(o)rg Graf

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of catalytically superior gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy systems on a rat hepatoma model.METHODS: To increase hepatoma cell chemosensitivity for the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), we generated a chimeric bifunctional SuperCD suicide gene, a fusion of the yeast cytosine deaminase (YCD) and the yeast uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (YUPRT) gene.RESULTS: In vitro stably transduced Morris rat hepatoma cells (MH) expressing the bifunctional SuperCD suicide gene (MH SuperCD) showed a clearly marked enhancement in cell killing when incubated with 5-FC as compared with MH ceils stably expressing YCD solely (MH YCD) or the cytosine deaminase gene of bacterial origin(MH BCD), respectively. In vivo, MH SuperCD tumors implanted both subcutaneously as well as orthotopically into the livers of syngeneic ACI rats demonstrated significant tumor regressions (P<0.01) under both high dose as well as low dose systemic 5-FC application,whereas MH tumors without transgene expression (MH naive) showed rapid progression. For the first time, an order of in vivo suicide gene effectiveness (SuperCD>>YCD > > BCD > > > negative control) was defi ned as a result of a directin vivo comparison of all three suicide genes.CONCLUSION: Bifunctional SuperCD suicide gene expression is highly effective in a rat hepatoma model,thereby significantly improving both the therapeutic index and the efficacy of hepatocellular carcinoma killing by fluorocytosine.

  19. Theoretical Study on Highly Active Bifunctional Metalloporphyrin Catalysts for the Coupling Reaction of Epoxides with Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Jun-Ya; Miyazaki, Ray; Maeda, Chihiro; Ema, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    Highly active bifunctional metalloporphyrin catalysts were developed for the coupling reaction of epoxides with CO2 to produce cyclic carbonates. The bifunctional catalysts have both quaternary ammonium halide groups and a metal center. To elucidate the roles of these catalytic groups, DFT calculations were performed. Control reactions using tetrabutylammonium halide as a catalyst were also investigated for comparison. In the present article, the results of our computational studies are overviewed. The computational results are consistent with the experimental data and are useful for elucidating the structure-activity relationship. The key features responsible for the high catalytic activity of the bifunctional catalysts are as follows: 1) the cooperative action of the halide anion (nucleophile) and the metal center (Lewis acid); 2) the near-attack conformation, leading to the efficient opening of the epoxide ring in the rate-determining step; and 3) the conformational change of the quaternary ammonium cation to stabilize various anionic species generated during catalysis, in addition to the robustness (thermostability) of the catalysts.

  20. Molecular and biochemical characterization of bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylases and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductases from Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eram, Mohammad S; Wong, Alton; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2015-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima and Thermotoga hypogea produce ethanol as a metabolic end product, which is resulted from acetaldehyde reduction catalysed by an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, the enzyme that is involved in the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate is not well characterized. An oxygen sensitive and coenzyme A-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) activity was found to be present in cell free extracts of T. maritima and T. hypogea. Both enzymes were purified and found to have pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activity, indicating their bifunctionality. Both PDC and POR activities from each of the purified enzymes were characterized in regards to their optimal assay conditions including pH dependency, oxygen sensitivity, thermal stability, temperature dependency and kinetic parameters. The close relatedness of the PORs that was shown by sequence analysis could be an indication of the presence of such bifunctionality in other hyperthermophilic bacteria. This is the first report of a bifunctional PDC/POR enzyme in hyperthermophilic bacteria. The PDC and the previously reported ADHs are most likely the key enzymes catalysing the production of ethanol from pyruvate in bacterial hyperthermophiles.

  1. pH-Sensitive, N-ethoxybenzylimidazole (NEBI) bifunctional crosslinkers enable triggered release of therapeutics from drug delivery carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Alice; Issarapanichkit, Tawny; Kong, Seong Deok; Fong, Rina; Yang, Jerry

    2010-11-21

    This paper presents a pH-sensitive bifunctional crosslinker that enables facile conjugation of small molecule therapeutics to macromolecular carriers for use in drug delivery systems. This N-ethoxybenzylimidazole (NEBI) bifunctional crosslinker was designed to exploit mildly acidic, subcellular environments to trigger the release of therapeutics upon internalization in cells. We demonstrate that an analog of doxorubicin (a representative example of an anticancer therapeutic) conjugated to human serum albumin (HSA, a representative example of a macromolecular carrier) via this NEBI crosslinker can internalize and localize into acidic lysosomes of ovarian cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging and cell viability studies demonstrate that the HSA-NEBI-doxorubicin conjugate exhibited improved uptake and cytotoxic activity compared to the unconjugated doxorubicin analog. The pH-sensitive NEBI group was also shown to be relatively stable to biologically-relevant metal Lewis acids and to serum proteins, supporting that these bifunctional crosslinkers may be useful for constructing drug delivery systems that will be stable in biological fluids such as blood.

  2. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sather, Blythe D; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Rawlings, David J

    2015-09-30

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4(+) T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP-modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34(+) cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties.

  3. Synthesis, X-ray crystal structure, DNA binding and Nuclease activity of lanthanide(III) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine acetylhydrazone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARREDDULA RAJA; AKKILI SUSEELAMMA; KATREDDI HUSSAIN REDDY

    2016-08-01

    Lanthanide(III) complexes of general formula [La(BPAH)₂(NO₃)₃] and [Ce(BPAH)₂(NO₃)(H₂O)₂] 2NO₃.H₂O (where, BPAH = 2-benzoylpyridine acetyl hydrazone), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction and Hirschfeld studies. The central metal ion is 12-coordinate in lanthanum complex and 10-coordinated in the cerium complex. The coordination polyhedra around the lanthanum and cerium were found to have distorted icosahedron and distorted bicapped square antiprism respectively. DNA binding and nuclease activity of these complexes were also investigated in the present work.

  4. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2540c DNA sequence encodes a bifunctional chorismate synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Diógenes S

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of multi- and extensively-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains has created an urgent need for new agents to treat tuberculosis (TB. The enzymes of shikimate pathway are attractive targets to the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential for M. tuberculosis and is absent from humans. Chorismate synthase (CS is the seventh enzyme of this route and catalyzes the NADH- and FMN-dependent synthesis of chorismate, a precursor of aromatic amino acids, naphthoquinones, menaquinones, and mycobactins. Although the M. tuberculosis Rv2540c (aroF sequence has been annotated to encode a chorismate synthase, there has been no report on its correct assignment and functional characterization of its protein product. Results In the present work, we describe DNA amplification of aroF-encoded CS from M. tuberculosis (MtCS, molecular cloning, protein expression, and purification to homogeneity. N-terminal amino acid sequencing, mass spectrometry and gel filtration chromatography were employed to determine identity, subunit molecular weight and oligomeric state in solution of homogeneous recombinant MtCS. The bifunctionality of MtCS was determined by measurements of both chorismate synthase and NADH:FMN oxidoreductase activities. The flavin reductase activity was characterized, showing the existence of a complex between FMNox and MtCS. FMNox and NADH equilibrium binding was measured. Primary deuterium, solvent and multiple kinetic isotope effects are described and suggest distinct steps for hydride and proton transfers, with the former being more rate-limiting. Conclusion This is the first report showing that a bacterial CS is bifunctional. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects show that C4-proS hydrogen is being transferred during the reduction of FMNox by NADH and that hydride transfer contributes significantly to the rate-limiting step of FMN reduction reaction. Solvent kinetic isotope effects and

  5. Dual apoptotic DNA fragmentation system in the fly: Drep2 is a novel nuclease of which activity is inhibited by Drep3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ok Kyeung; Park, Hyun Ho

    2012-09-21

    DNA fragmentation is the hallmark of apoptotic cells and mainly mediated by the DNA fragmentation factor DFF40(CAD)/DFF45(ICAD). DFF40 is a novel nuclease, whereas DFF45 is an inhibitor that can suppress the nuclease activity. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation in the fly is controlled by four DFF-related proteins, known as Drep1, 2, 3 and 4. However, the functions of Drep2 and Drep3 are totally unknown. Here, we found that Drep2 is a novel nuclease whose activity is inhibited by Drep3 through a tight interaction with the CIDE domain. Our results suggest that the fly has dual apoptotic DNA fragmentation systems: Drep1: Drep4 and Drep2: Drep3 complexes.

  6. ZFNGenome: A comprehensive resource for locating zinc finger nuclease target sites in model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voytas Daniel F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs have tremendous potential as tools to facilitate genomic modifications, such as precise gene knockouts or gene replacements by homologous recombination. ZFNs can be used to advance both basic research and clinical applications, including gene therapy. Recently, the ability to engineer ZFNs that target any desired genomic DNA sequence with high fidelity has improved significantly with the introduction of rapid, robust, and publicly available techniques for ZFN design such as the Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN method. The motivation for this study is to make resources for genome modifications using OPEN-generated ZFNs more accessible to researchers by creating a user-friendly interface that identifies and provides quality scores for all potential ZFN target sites in the complete genomes of several model organisms. Description ZFNGenome is a GBrowse-based tool for identifying and visualizing potential target sites for OPEN-generated ZFNs. ZFNGenome currently includes a total of more than 11.6 million potential ZFN target sites, mapped within the fully sequenced genomes of seven model organisms; S. cerevisiae, C. reinhardtii, A. thaliana, D. melanogaster, D. rerio, C. elegans, and H. sapiens and can be visualized within the flexible GBrowse environment. Additional model organisms will be included in future updates. ZFNGenome provides information about each potential ZFN target site, including its chromosomal location and position relative to transcription initiation site(s. Users can query ZFNGenome using several different criteria (e.g., gene ID, transcript ID, target site sequence. Tracks in ZFNGenome also provide "uniqueness" and ZiFOpT (Zinc Finger OPEN Targeter "confidence" scores that estimate the likelihood that a chosen ZFN target site will function in vivo. ZFNGenome is dynamically linked to ZiFDB, allowing users access to all available information about zinc finger reagents, such as the

  7. High-efficiency genome editing via 2A-coupled co-expression of fluorescent proteins and zinc finger nucleases or CRISPR/Cas9 nickase pairs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duda, Katarzyna; Lonowski, Lindsey A; Kofoed-Nielsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Targeted endonucleases including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/Cas9 are increasingly being used for genome editing in higher species. We therefore devised a broadly applicable and versatile method for increasing editing...... were minimal, and when occurring, our data suggest that they may be counteracted by selecting intermediate nuclease levels where off-target mutagenesis is low, but on-target mutagenesis remains relatively high. The method was also applicable to the CRISPR/Cas9 system, including CRISPR/Cas9 mutant...

  8. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV (‘Berlin patient’). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by m...

  9. Highly Active and Durable Nanocrystal-Decorated Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Un; Park, Moon Gyu; Park, Hey Woong; Seo, Min Ho; Wang, Xiaolei; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-09-21

    A highly active and durable bifunctional electrocatalyst that consists of cobalt oxide nanocrystals (Co3 O4 NC) decorated on the surface of N-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNT) is introduced as effective electrode material for electrically rechargeable zinc-air batteries. This active hybrid catalyst is synthesized by a facile surfactant-assisted method to produce Co3 O4 NC that are then decorated on the surface of N-CNT through hydrophobic attraction. Confirmed by half-cell testing, Co3 O4 NC/N-CNT demonstrates superior oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution catalytic activities and has a superior electrochemical stability compared to Pt/C and Ir/C. Furthermore, rechargeable zinc-air battery testing of Co3 O4 NC/N-CNT reveals superior galvanodynamic charge and discharge voltages with a significantly extended cycle life of over 100 h, which suggests its potential as a replacement for precious-metal-based catalysts for electric vehicles and grid energy storage applications.

  10. Enhanced phytoremediation of toxic metals by inoculating endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 expressing bifunctional glutathione synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-02-28

    To engineer plant-bacteria symbionts for remediating complex sites contaminated with multiple metals, the bifunctional glutathione (GSH) synthase gene gcsgs was introduced into endophytic Enterobacter sp. CBSB1 to improve phytoremediation efficiency of host plant Brassica juncea. The GSH contents of shoots inoculated with CBSB1 is 0.4μMg(-1) fresh weight. However, the GSH concentration of shoots with engineered CBSB1-GCSGS increased to 0.7μMg(-1) fresh weight. The shoot length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings inoculated with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 67%, 123%, and 160%, compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The Cd and Pb concentration in shoots with CBSB1-GCSGS increased 48% and 59% compared with seedlings without inoculation, respectively. The inoculation of CBSB1 and CBSB1-GCSGS could increase the Cd and Pb extraction amounts of seedlings significantly compared with those without inoculation (PEnterobacter sp. CBSB1 upgraded the phytoremediation efficacy of B. juncea. So the engineered Enterobacter sp. CBSB1-GCSGS showed potentials in remediation sites contaminated with complex contaminants by inoculating into remediating plants.

  11. Development of a spectroscopic assay for bifunctional ligand-protein conjugates based on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Erik D. E-mail: bradye@mail.nih.gov; Chong, Hyun-Soon; Milenic, Diane E.; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2004-08-01

    A simple, non-radioactive method for the determination of ligand-to-protein ratio (L/P) for novel ligand-antibody conjugates has been developed based on an exchange equilibrium with the purple Cu(II) complex of arsenazo III. The method requires a UV/Vis spectrometer and has been verified for monoclonal antibody Herceptin conjugates of a variety of ligand modalities, including common macrocyclic compounds NOTA and TETA, and with a new bifunctional tachpyridine (1H-Pyrrole-1-butanamide,N-[4-[[(1{alpha},3{alpha},5{alpha})-3,5-bis[(2-pyridi= nylmethyl) amino]cyclohexyl](2-pyridinylmethyl)amino]butyl]-2,5-dihydro-2, 5-dioxo-(9CI)). The spectroscopically derived values for L/P were verified by titration of the ligand-antibody conjugate with {sup 64}Cu. In each case, the value obtained by UV/Vis spectroscopy matches that found by radiolabeling. The method is rapid, taking less than 30 minutes with each ligand in this study.

  12. Colorimetric and luminescent bifunctional iridium(III) complexes for the sensitive recognition of cyanide ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiudan; Wang, Huili; Li, Jing; Hu, Wenqin; Li, Mei-Jin

    2017-02-01

    Two new cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl (1) and [(ppy)2Irbppz]Cl (2) (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, ppz = 4,7-phenanthrolino-5,6:5,6-pyrazine, bppz = 2.3-di-2-pyridylpyrazine), were designed and synthesized. The structure of [(ppy)2Irppz]Cl was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Their photophysical properties were also studied. This kind of complexes could coordinate with Cu2 +, the photoluminescence (PL) of the complex was quenched, and the color changed from orange-red to green. The forming M-Cu (M: complexes 1 and 2) ensemble could be further utilized as a colorimetric and emission "turn-on" bifunctional detection for CN-, especially for complex 1-Cu2 + showed a high sensitivity toward CN- with a limit of diction is 97 nM. Importantly, this kind of iridium(III) complexes shows a unique recognition of cyanide ions over other anions which makes it an eligible sensing probe for cyanide ions.

  13. Bifunctional redox flow battery - 2. V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O{sub 2}) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.H.; Xun, Y. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Cheng, J.; Yang, Y.S. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, P.H. [Full Cell R and D Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China)

    2008-08-20

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II) - L-cystine(O{sub 2}), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2}. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes. (author)

  14. Heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 cause juvenile peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, David J.; Marsh, Ashley P.L.; Storey, Elsdon; Tankard, Rick; Gillies, Greta; Delatycki, Martin B.; Pope, Kate; Bromhead, Catherine; Leventer, Richard J.; Bahlo, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic cause of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, sensorineural deafness, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism in 5 patients from 3 different families. Methods: The patients comprised 2 sib pairs and 1 sporadic patient. Clinical assessment included history, physical examination, and brain MRI. Linkage analysis was performed separately on the 2 sets of sib pairs using single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays, followed by analysis of the intersection of the regions. Exome sequencing was performed on 1 affected patient with variant filtering and prioritization undertaken using these intersected regions. Results: Using a combination of sequencing technologies, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in HSD17B4 in all 5 affected patients. In all 3 families, peroxisomal D-bifunctional protein (DBP) deficiency was caused by compound heterozygosity for 1 nonsense/deletion mutation and 1 missense mutation. Conclusions: We describe 5 patients with juvenile DBP deficiency from 3 different families, bringing the total number of reported patients to 14, from 8 families. This report broadens and consolidates the phenotype associated with juvenile DBP deficiency.

  15. Highly stable acyclic bifunctional chelator for {sup 64}Cu PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abada, S.; Lecointre, A.; Christine, C.; Charbonniere, L. [CNRS/UDS, EPCM, Strasbourg (France). Lab. d' Ingenierie Appliquee a l' Analyse; Dechamps-Olivier, I. [Univ. de Reims Champagne Ardenne, Reims (France). Group Chimie de Coordination; Platas-Iglesias, C. [Univ. da Coruna (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental; Elhabiri, M. [CNRS/UDS, EPCM, Strasbourg (France). Lab. de Physico-Chimie Bioinorganique

    2011-07-01

    Ligand L{sup 1}, based on a pyridine scaffold, functionalized by two bis(methane phosphonate)aminomethyl groups, was shown to display a very high affinity towards Cu(II) (log K{sub CuL}=22.7) and selectivity over Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II) and Ga(III) ({delta} log K{sub ML}>4) as shown by the values of the stability constants obtained from potentiometric measurements. Insights into the coordination mode of the ligand around Cu(II) cation were obtained by UV-Vis absorption and EPR spectroscopies as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP model) performed in aqueous solution. The results point to a pentacoordination pattern of the metal ion in the fully deprotonated [CuL{sup 1}]{sup 6-} species. Considering the beneficial thermodynamic parameters of this ligand, kinetic experiments were run to follow the formation of the copper(II) complexes, indicating a very rapid formation of the complex, appropriate for {sup 64}Cu complexation. As L{sup 1} represents a particularly interesting target within the frame of {sup 64}Cu PET imaging, a synthetic protocol was developed to introduce a labeling function on the pyridyl moiety of L{sup 1}, thereby affording L{sup 2}, a potential bifunctional chelator (BFC) for PET imaging.

  16. Structure of a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase involved in bioethanol generation in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extance, Jonathan; Crennell, Susan J; Eley, Kirstin; Cripps, Roger; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADHE) enzymes are found within many fermentative microorganisms. They catalyse the conversion of an acyl-coenzyme A to an alcohol via an aldehyde intermediate; this is coupled to the oxidation of two NADH molecules to maintain the NAD(+) pool during fermentative metabolism. The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) domain of an ADHE protein from the ethanol-producing thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has been determined to 2.5 Å resolution. This is the first structure to be reported for such a domain. In silico modelling has been carried out to generate a homology model of the aldehyde dehydrogenase domain, and this was subsequently docked with the ADH-domain structure to model the structure of the complete ADHE protein. This model suggests, for the first time, a structural mechanism for the formation of the large multimeric assemblies or `spirosomes' that are observed for this ADHE protein and which have previously been reported for ADHEs from other organisms.

  17. The Golgi localized bifunctional UDP-rhamnose/UDP-galactose transporter family of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Moreno, Ignacio; Temple, Henry; Herter, Thomas; Link, Bruce; Doñas-Cofré, Daniela; Moreno, Adrián; Saéz-Aguayo, Susana; Blanco, Francisca; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Schultink, Alex; Reiter, Wolf-Dieter; Dupree, Paul; Pauly, Markus; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Scheller, Henrik V; Orellana, Ariel

    2014-08-05

    Plant cells are surrounded by a cell wall that plays a key role in plant growth, structural integrity, and defense. The cell wall is a complex and diverse structure that is mainly composed of polysaccharides. The majority of noncellulosic cell wall polysaccharides are produced in the Golgi apparatus from nucleotide sugars that are predominantly synthesized in the cytosol. The transport of these nucleotide sugars from the cytosol into the Golgi lumen is a critical process for cell wall biosynthesis and is mediated by a family of nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs). Numerous studies have sought to characterize substrate-specific transport by NSTs; however, the availability of certain substrates and a lack of robust methods have proven problematic. Consequently, we have developed a novel approach that combines reconstitution of NSTs into liposomes and the subsequent assessment of nucleotide sugar uptake by mass spectrometry. To address the limitation of substrate availability, we also developed a two-step reaction for the enzymatic synthesis of UDP-l-rhamnose (Rha) by expressing the two active domains of the Arabidopsis UDP-l-Rha synthase. The liposome approach and the newly synthesized substrates were used to analyze a clade of Arabidopsis NSTs, resulting in the identification and characterization of six bifunctional UDP-l-Rha/UDP-d-galactose (Gal) transporters (URGTs). Further analysis of loss-of-function and overexpression plants for two of these URGTs supported their roles in the transport of UDP-l-Rha and UDP-d-Gal for matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and in Vitro Evaluation of a New TSPO-Selective Bifunctional Chelate Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denora, Nunzio; Margiotta, Nicola; Laquintana, Valentino; Lopedota, Angela; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Losacco, Maurizio; Franco, Massimo; Natile, Giovanni

    2014-06-12

    The 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is overexpressed in many types of cancers and is also abundant in activated microglial cells occurring in inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, TSPO has become an extremely attractive subcellular target not only for imaging disease states overexpressing this protein, but also for a selective mitochondrial drug delivery. In this work we report the synthesis, the characterization, and the in vitro evaluation of a new TSPO-selective ligand, 2-(8-(2-(bis(pyridin-2-yl)methyl)amino)acetamido)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)H-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl)-N,N-dipropylacetamide (CB256), which fulfils the requirements for a bifunctional chelate approach. The goal was to provide a new TSPO ligand that could be used further to prepare coordination complexes of a metallo drug to be used in diagnosis and therapy. However, the ligand itself proved to be a potent tumor cell growth inhibitor and DNA double-strand breaker.

  19. Site-specific conjugation of bifunctional chelator BAT to mouse IgG1 Fab' fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun LI; Xue-hao WANG; Xiao-ming WANG; Zhao-lai CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To perform a site-specific conjugation of Fab' fragments of a mouse monoclonal antibody(MoAb) B43(of IgG1 subtype) to a bifunctional chelator 6-[p-(bromoacetamido) benzyl]-l,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid (BAT) via the thiol groups in the hinge distal to the antigenbinding site of the Fab'. Methods: B43 was cleaved using a simple 2-step method.First, stable F(ab')2 was produced by pepsin treatment. Fab' with free thiol in the hinge region was then obtained by cysteine reduction of F(ab')2. Second, a sitespecific conjugation of Fab' to thiol-specific BAT was performed in a one-step reaction. Results: The Fab' fragment had approximately 1.8 free thiol groups per molecule after cysteine reduction. The conjugation efficiency and the chemical yield were approximately 1.28 moles chelator/Fab' and 74% of the initial concentration of Fab', respectively. The F(ab')2, Fab' and Fab'-BAT all maintained reasonable antigen-binding properties. 67Cu labeling of the conjugate under standard conditions did not impair the immunoreactivity of Fab'-BAT. Conclusion: This is a simple and efficient method for producing immunoreactive conjugates of Fab'-BAT, which can be used to make radiometal-labeled conjugates for further diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  20. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd–Mg–Al layered double hydroxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N N Das; S C Srivastava

    2002-08-01

    Hydrotalcite like precursors containing PdII–MgII–AlIII with varying molar ratios, (Pd + Mg)/Al ≈ 3 and Mg/Pd ≈ 750 to 35, were prepared by coprecipitation of metal nitrates at constant pH. Characterization of samples as synthesized and their calcined products by elemental analyses, powder XRD, TG–DTA, FT–IR spectroscopy, TPR and N2 physisorption indicated a well crystalline hydrotalcite like structure with incorporation of Pd2+ in the brucite layers. Thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite precursors at intermediate temperatures led to amorphous mixed oxides, Pd/MgAl(O), which on reduction yielded bi-functional catalyst, Pd°/MgAl(O). The resultant catalysts with acid, base and hydrogenating sites, were highly active and selective for one-step synthesis of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from acetone and hydrogen. The results showed an optimal balance between acid-base and metallic sites were required to increase the selectivity of MIBK and stability of the catalysts.

  1. Designing calcium phosphate-based bifunctional nanocapsules with bone-targeting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khung, Yit-Lung; Bastari, Kelsen; Cho, Xing Ling; Yee, Wu Aik; Loo, Say Chye Joachim, E-mail: joachimloo@ntu.edu.sg [Nanyang Technological University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (Singapore)

    2012-06-15

    Using sodium dodecyl sulphate micelles as template, hollow-cored calcium phosphate nanocapsules were produced. The surfaces of the nanocapsule were subsequently silanised by a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based silane with an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester end groups which permits for further attachment with bisphosphonates (BP). Characterisations of these nanocapsules were investigated using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering. To further validate the bone-targeting potential, dentine discs were incubated with these functionalised nanocapsules. FESEM analysis showed that these surface-modified nanocapsules would bind strongly to dentine surfaces compared to non-functionalised nanocapsules. We envisage that respective components would give this construct a bifunctional attribute, whereby (1) the shell of the calcium phosphate nanocapsule would serve as biocompatible coating aiding in gradual osteoconduction, while (2) surface BP moieties, acting as targeting ligands, would provide the bone-targeting potential of these calcium phosphate nanocapsules.

  2. Evolution of the Bifunctional Lead μ Agonist / δ Antagonist Containing the Dmt-Tic Opioid Pharmacophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Peng, Xuemei; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-02-17

    Based on a renewed importance recently attributed to bi- or multifunctional opioids, we report the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of some analogues derived from our lead μ agonist / δ antagonist, H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Bzl. Our previous studies focused on the importance of the C-teminal benzyl function in the induction of such bifunctional activity. The introduction of some substituents in the para position of the phenyl ring (-Cl, -CH(3), partially -NO(2), inactive -NH(2)) was found to give a more potent μ agonist / antagonist effect associated with a relatively unmodified δ antagonist activity (pA(2) = 8.28-9.02). Increasing the steric hindrance of the benzyl group (using diphenylmethyl and tetrahydroisoquinoline functionalities) substantially maintained the μ agonist and δ antagonist activities of the lead compound. Finally and quite unexpectedly D-Tic2, considered as a wrong opioid message now; inserted into the reference compound in lieu of L-Tic, provided a μ agonist / δ agonist better than our reference ligand (H-Dmt-Tic-Gly-NH-Ph) and was endowed with the same pharmacological profile.

  3. Bifunctional apoptosis inhibitor (BAR) protects neurons from diverse cell death pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, W; Kermer, P; Krajewska, M; Welsh, K; Davis, S; Krajewski, S; Reed, J C

    2003-10-01

    The bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BAR) is a multidomain protein that was originally identified as an inhibitor of Bax-induced apoptosis. Immunoblot analysis of normal human tissues demonstrated high BAR expression in the brain, compared to low or absent expression in other organs. Immunohistochemical staining of human adult tissues revealed that the BAR protein is predominantly expressed by neurons in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that BAR localizes mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells. Overexpression of BAR in CSM 14.1 neuronal cells resulted in significant protection from a broad range of cell death stimuli, including agents that activate apoptotic pathways involving mitochondria, TNF-family death receptors, and ER stress. Downregulation of BAR by antisense oligonucleotides sensitized neuronal cells to induction of apoptosis. Moreover, the search for novel interaction partners of BAR identified several candidate proteins that might contribute to the regulation of neuronal apoptosis (HIP1, Hippi, and Bap31). Taken together, the expression pattern and functional data suggest that the BAR protein is involved in the regulation of neuronal survival.

  4. Employing bifunctional enzymes for enhanced extraction of bioactives from plants: flavonoids as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-Shu; Chen, Shuo; Wang, Wen-Quan; Liu, Si-Qin

    2013-08-21

    A cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach was developed to improve the extraction of active ingredients from plants, in which a bifunctional enzyme was employed for not only facilitating cell wall degradation but also increasing the bioactivity of target compounds in the extract. In the aqueous extraction of flavonoids from Glycyrrhizae radix, Trichoderma viride cellulase, a commercial cell-wall-degrading enzyme, was found to efficiently deglycosylate liquiritin and isoliquiritin, which are of high content but low bioactivity, into their aglycones that have much higher physiological activities for dietary and medicinal uses. Under optimized conditions, the extraction yield of liquiritigenin and isoliquiritigenin aglycones reached 4.23 and 0.39 mg/g of dry weight (dw) with 6.51- and 3.55-fold increases, respectively. The same approach was expanded to the extraction of flavonoids from Scutellariae radix using Penicillium decumbens naringinase, where enhanced production of more bioactive bacalein and wogonin was achieved via enzymatic deglycosylation of bacalin and wogonoside.

  5. Characterization of a bifunctional glyoxylate cycle enzyme, malate synthase/isocitrate lyase, of Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Nishimura, Masaaki; Inoue, Kengo; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Inui, Hiroshi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle is a modified form of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which enables organisms to synthesize carbohydrates from C2 compounds. In the protozoan Euglena gracilis, the key enzyme activities of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), are conferred by a single bifunctional protein named glyoxylate cycle enzyme (Euglena gracilis glyoxylate cycle enzyme [EgGCE]). We analyzed the enzymatic properties of recombinant EgGCE to determine the functions of its different domains. The 62-kDa N-terminal domain of EgGCE was sufficient to provide the MS activity as expected from an analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence. In contrast, expression of the 67-kDa C-terminal domain of EgGCE failed to yield ICL activity even though this domain was structurally similar to ICL family enzymes. Analyses of truncation mutants suggested that the N-terminal residues of EgGCE are critical for both the ICL and MS activities. The ICL activity of EgGCE increased in the presence of micro-molar concentrations of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Acetyl-CoA also increased the activity in a mutant type EgGCE with a mutation at the acetyl-CoA binding site in the MS domain of EgGCE. This suggests that acetyl-CoA regulates the ICL reaction by binding to a site other than the catalytic center of the MS reaction.

  6. Bifunctional Luminomagnetic Rare-Earth Nanorods for High-Contrast Bioimaging Nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Lee, Yean; Kedawat, Garima; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.; Vithayathil, Sajna Antony; Ge, Liehui; Zhan, Xiaobo; Gupta, Sarika; Martí, Angel A.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles exhibiting both magnetic and luminescent properties are need of the hour for many biological applications. A single compound exhibiting this combination of properties is uncommon. Herein, we report a strategy to synthesize a bifunctional luminomagnetic Gd2‑xEuxO3 (x = 0.05 to 0.5) nanorod, with a diameter of ~20 nm and length in ~0.6 μm, using hydrothermal method. Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods have been characterized by studying its structural, optical and magnetic properties. The advantage offered by photoluminescent imaging with Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods is that this ultrafine nanorod material exhibits hypersensitive intense red emission (610 nm) with good brightness (quantum yield more than 90%), which is an essential parameter for high-contrast bioimaging, especially for overcoming auto fluorescent background. The utility of luminomagnetic nanorods for biological applications in high-contrast cell imaging capability and cell toxicity to image two human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MDA-MB-231 are also evaluated. Additionally, to understand the significance of shape of the nanostructure, the photoluminescence and paramagnetic characteristic of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanorods were compared with the spherical nanoparticles of Gd2O3:Eu3+.

  7. The rigid bi-functional sail, new concept concerning the reduction of the drag of ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Țicu, I.; Popa, I.; Ristea, M.

    2015-11-01

    The policy of the European Union in the energy field, for the period to follow until 2020, is based on three fundamental objectives: sustainability, competitiveness and safety in energy supply. The “Energy - Climate Changes” program sets out a number of objectives for the EU for the year 2020, known as the “20-20-20 objectives”, namely: the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by at least 20% from the level of those of 1990, a 20% increase in the share of renewable energy sources out of the total energy consumption as well as a target of 10% biofuels in the transports energy consumption. In this context, in order to produce or save a part of the propulsive power produced by the main propulsion machinery, by burning fossil fuels, we suggest the equipping of vessels designed for maritime transport with a bi-functional rigid sail. We consider that this device may have both the role of trapping wind energy and the role of acting as a deflector for reducing the resistance of the vessel's proceeding through the water by conveniently using the bow air current, as a result of the vessel's heading through the water with significant advantage in reducing the energy consumption for propulsion insurance.

  8. Bifunctional compounds for controlling metal-mediated aggregation of the aβ42 peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj K; Pavlova, Stephanie T; Kim, Jaekwang; Finkelstein, Darren; Hawco, Nicholas J; Rath, Nigam P; Kim, Jungsu; Mirica, Liviu M

    2012-04-18

    Abnormal interactions of Cu and Zn ions with the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide are proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Disruption of these metal-peptide interactions using chemical agents holds considerable promise as a therapeutic strategy to combat this incurable disease. Reported herein are two bifunctional compounds (BFCs) L1 and L2 that contain both amyloid-binding and metal-chelating molecular motifs. Both L1 and L2 exhibit high stability constants for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) and thus are good chelators for these metal ions. In addition, L1 and L2 show strong affinity toward Aβ species. Both compounds are efficient inhibitors of the metal-mediated aggregation of the Aβ(42) peptide and promote disaggregation of amyloid fibrils, as observed by ThT fluorescence, native gel electrophoresis/Western blotting, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Interestingly, the formation of soluble Aβ(42) oligomers in the presence of metal ions and BFCs leads to an increased cellular toxicity. These results suggest that for the Aβ(42) peptide-in contrast to the Aβ(40) peptide-the previously employed strategy of inhibiting Aβ aggregation and promoting amyloid fibril dissagregation may not be optimal for the development of potential AD therapeutics, due to formation of neurotoxic soluble Aβ(42) oligomers.

  9. Structure and Function of Fusicoccadiene Synthase, a Hexameric Bifunctional Diterpene Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mengbin; Chou, Wayne K W; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2016-04-15

    Fusicoccin A is a diterpene glucoside phytotoxin generated by the fungal pathogen Phomopsis amygdali that causes the plant disease constriction canker, first discovered in New Jersey peach orchards in the 1930s. Fusicoccin A is also an emerging new lead in cancer chemotherapy. The hydrocarbon precursor of fusicoccin A is the tricyclic diterpene fusicoccadiene, which is generated by a bifunctional terpenoid synthase. Here, we report X-ray crystal structures of the individual catalytic domains of fusicoccadiene synthase: the C-terminal domain is a chain elongation enzyme that generates geranylgeranyl diphosphate, and the N-terminal domain catalyzes the cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate to form fusicoccadiene. Crystal structures of each domain complexed with bisphosphonate substrate analogues suggest that three metal ions and three positively charged amino acid side chains trigger substrate ionization in each active site. While in vitro incubations reveal that the cyclase domain can utilize farnesyl diphosphate and geranyl diphosphate as surrogate substrates, these shorter isoprenoid diphosphates are mainly converted into acyclic alcohol or hydrocarbon products. Gel filtration chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments indicate that full-length fusicoccadiene synthase adopts hexameric quaternary structure, and small-angle X-ray scattering data yield a well-defined molecular envelope illustrating a plausible model for hexamer assembly.

  10. Bifunctional separator as a polysulfide mediator for highly stable Li-S batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Syed Ali

    2016-05-24

    The shuttling process involving lithium polysulfides is one of the major factors responsible for the degradation in capacity of lithium–sulfur batteries (LSBs). Herein, we demonstrate a novel and simple strategy—using a bifunctional separator, prepared by spraying poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) on pristine separator—to obtain long-cycle LSBs. The negatively charged SO3– groups present in PSS act as an electrostatic shield for soluble lithium polysulfides through mutual coulombic repulsion, whereas PEDOT provides chemical interactions with insoluble polysulfides (Li2S, Li2S2). The dual shielding effect can provide an efficient protection from the shuttling phenomenon by confining lithium polysulfides to the cathode side of the battery. Moreover, coating with PEDOT:PSS transforms the surface of the separator from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, thereby improving the electrochemical performance. We observed an ultralow decay of 0.0364% per cycle when we ran the battery for 1000 cycles at 0.25 C—far superior to that of the pristine separator and one of the lowest recorded values reported at a low current density. We examined the versatility of our separator by preparing a flexible battery that functioned well under various stress conditions; it displayed flawless performance. Accordingly, this economical and simple strategy appears to be an ideal platform for commercialization of LSBs.

  11. Mutations induced by monofunctional and bifunctional phosphoramide mustards in supF tRNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudipalli, A; Maccubbin, A E; Nadadur, S S; Struck, R F; Gurtoo, H L

    1997-11-19

    The relative mutagenicity, nature of the mutations and the sequence specificity of mutations induced by the bifunctional alkylating agent, phosphoramide mustard (PM) and a monofunctional derivative, dechloroethyl phosphoramide mustard (dePM), were analyzed by the Ames test and by an in vitro shuttle vector mutagenesis assay. Both PM and dePM increased the mutation frequency above background in either assay. However, on an equimolar basis, dePM was less mutagenic than PM. In the in vitro shuttle vector mutagenesis assay, sequencing demonstrated that about 40% of the mutant plasmids contained more than one mutation in the supF tRNA gene segment of the plasmid. About 70% of the mutations observed in dePM-treated plasmids were single base substitutions with A:T and G:C base pairs being mutated at equivalent rates. In contrast, only about 50% of the mutations observed in PM-treated plasmids were single base substitutions, 80% of which involved G:C base pairs. Single base deletions and insertions were found in approximately equal proportions with both compounds; however, these lesions were in greater abundance in PM-treated plasmids. Putative hot-spots for mutation in the supF tRNA gene included base pairs at position 102 and 110 for PM and positions 170 and 171 for dePM.

  12. Bifunctional Crosslinking Agents Enhance Anion Exchange Membrane Efficacy for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenpin; Xu, Min; Wang, Shubo; Xie, Xiaofeng; Lv, Yafei; Ramani, Vijay K

    2014-06-01

    A series of cross-linked fluorinated poly (aryl ether oxadiazole) membranes (FPAEOM) derivatized with imidazolium groups were prepared. Poly (N-vinylimidazole) (PVI) was used as the bifunctional cross-linking agent to: a) lower vanadium permeability, b) enhance dimensional stability, and c) concomitantly provide added ion exchange capacity in the resultant anion exchange membranes. At a molar ratio of PVI to FPAEOM of 1.5, the resultant membrane (FPAEOM-1.5 PVI) had an ion exchange capacity of 2.2 meq g-1, a vanadium permeability of 6.8×10-7 cm2 min-1, a water uptake of 68 wt.%, and an ionic conductivity of 22.0 mS cm-1, all at 25°C. Single cells prepared with the FPAEOM-1.5 PVI membrane exhibited a higher coulombic efficiency (> 92%) and energy efficiency (> 86%) after 40 test cycles in vanadium redox flow battery. The imidazolium cation showed high chemical stability in highly acidic and oxidizing vanadium solution as opposed to poor stability in alkaline solutions. Based on our DFT studies, this was attributed to the lower HOMO energy (-7.265 eV) of the HSO4- ion (compared to the OH- ion; -5.496 eV) and the larger HOMO-LUMO energy gap (6.394 eV) of dimethylimidazolium bisulfate ([DMIM] [HSO4]) as compared to [DMIM] [OH] (5.387 eV).

  13. Modification of a bi-functional diguanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase to efficiently produce cyclic diguanylate monophosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M. Nesbitt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic-diGMP is a bacterial messenger that regulates many physiological processes, including many attributed to pathogenicity. Bacteria synthesize cyclic-diGMP from GTP using diguanylate cyclases; its hydrolysis is catalyzed by phosphodiesterases. Here we report the over-expression and purification of a bi-functional diguanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase from Agrobacterium vitis S4. Using homology modeling and primary structure alignment, we identify several amino acids predicted to participate in the phosphodiesterase reaction. Upon altering selected residues, we obtain variants of the enzyme that efficiently and quantitatively catalyze the synthesis of cyclic-diGMP from GTP without hydrolysis to pGpG. Additionally, we identify a variant that produces cyclic-diGMP while immobilized to NiNTA beads and can catalyze the conversion of [α-32P]-GTP to [32P]-cyclic-diGMP. In short, we characterize a novel cyclic-diGMP processing enzyme and demonstrate its utility for efficient and cost-effective production of cyclic-diGMP, as well as modified cyclic-diGMP molecules, for use as probes in studying the many important biological processes mediated by cyclic-diGMP.

  14. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao; Stoopen, Geert; Wang, Caiyun; Jongsma, Maarten A

    2014-12-26

    Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase (CDS) is the first pathway-specific enzyme in the biosynthesis of pyrethrins, the most widely used plant-derived pesticide. CDS catalyzes c1'-2-3 cyclopropanation reactions of two molecules of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) to yield chrysanthemyl diphosphate (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only the prenyltransferase step. Here we show that the NDXXD catalytic motif of CDS, under the lower substrate conditions prevalent in plants, also catalyzes the next step, converting CPP into chrysanthemol by hydrolyzing the diphosphate moiety. The enzymatic hydrolysis reaction followed conventional Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km value for CPP of 196 μm. For the chrysanthemol synthase activity, DMAPP competed with CPP as substrate. The DMAPP concentration required for half-maximal activity to produce chrysanthemol was ∼100 μm, and significant substrate inhibition was observed at elevated DMAPP concentrations. The N-terminal peptide of CDS was identified as a plastid-targeting peptide. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing CDS emitted chrysanthemol at a rate of 0.12-0.16 μg h(-1) g(-1) fresh weight. We propose that CDS should be renamed a chrysanthemol synthase utilizing DMAPP as substrate.

  15. A novel genetic system based on zinc finger nucleases for the identification of interactions between proteins in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H methods are powerful tools for detecting protein-protein interactions. The traditional Y2H method has been widely applied to screen novel protein interactions since it was established two decades ago. The high false-positive rate of the traditional method drove the development of modified Y2H systems. Here, we describe a novel Y2H system using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs. ZFNs contain two functional domains, a zinc-finger DNA-binding domain (ZFP and a non-specific nuclease domain (FokI. In this system, the bait is expressed as a fusion protein with a specific ZFP, and the prey is fused to the FokI. A reporter vector is designed such that the ZFN target site disrupts the Gal4 open reading frame. By transforming the three plasmids into a yeast strain (AH109, the interaction between the bait and prey proteins reconstitutes ZFN function and generates the double-strand break (DSB on its target site. The DNA DSB repair restores Gal4 function, which activates the expression of the four reporter genes. We used p53-SV40LT interacting proteins to prove the concept. In addition, 80% positive rate was observed in a cDNA screening test against WDSV orfA protein. Our results strongly suggested that this Y2H system could increase screening reliability and reproducibility, and provide a novel approach for interactomics research.

  16. Differential nuclease sensitivity profiling of chromatin reveals biochemical footprints coupled to gene expression and functional DNA elements in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Daniel L; Madzima, Thelma F; Labonne, Jonathan D; Alam, Mohammad P; Hoffman, Gregg G; Girimurugan, S B; Zhang, Jinfeng; McGinnis, Karen M; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bass, Hank W

    2014-10-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into nucleosomes, the fundamental units of chromatin. The positions of nucleosomes on DNA regulate protein-DNA interactions and in turn influence DNA-templated events. Despite the increasing number of genome-wide maps of nucleosome position, how global changes in gene expression relate to changes in nucleosome position is poorly understood. We show that in nucleosome occupancy mapping experiments in maize (Zea mays), particular genomic regions are highly susceptible to variation introduced by differences in the extent to which chromatin is digested with micrococcal nuclease (MNase). We exploited this digestion-linked variation to identify protein footprints that are hypersensitive to MNase digestion, an approach we term differential nuclease sensitivity profiling (DNS-chip). Hypersensitive footprints were enriched at the 5' and 3' ends of genes, associated with gene expression levels, and significantly overlapped with conserved noncoding sequences and the binding sites of the transcription factor KNOTTED1. We also found that the tissue-specific regulation of gene expression was linked to tissue-specific hypersensitive footprints. These results reveal biochemical features of nucleosome organization that correlate with gene expression levels and colocalize with functional DNA elements. This approach to chromatin profiling should be broadly applicable to other species and should shed light on the relationships among chromatin organization, protein-DNA interactions, and genome regulation.

  17. High-fidelity CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with no detectable genome-wide off-target effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Pattanayak, Vikram; Prew, Michelle S; Tsai, Shengdar Q; Nguyen, Nhu T; Zheng, Zongli; Joung, J Keith

    2016-01-28

    CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing but can induce unwanted off-target mutations. Existing strategies for reducing genome-wide off-target effects of the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) are imperfect, possessing only partial or unproven efficacies and other limitations that constrain their use. Here we describe SpCas9-HF1, a high-fidelity variant harbouring alterations designed to reduce non-specific DNA contacts. SpCas9-HF1 retains on-target activities comparable to wild-type SpCas9 with >85% of single-guide RNAs (sgRNAs) tested in human cells. Notably, with sgRNAs targeted to standard non-repetitive sequences, SpCas9-HF1 rendered all or nearly all off-target events undetectable by genome-wide break capture and targeted sequencing methods. Even for atypical, repetitive target sites, the vast majority of off-target mutations induced by wild-type SpCas9 were not detected with SpCas9-HF1. With its exceptional precision, SpCas9-HF1 provides an alternative to wild-type SpCas9 for research and therapeutic applications. More broadly, our results suggest a general strategy for optimizing genome-wide specificities of other CRISPR-RNA-guided nucleases.

  18. Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated female-specific sterility in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Wang, Y; Li, Z; Ling, L; Zeng, B; James, A A; Tan, A; Huang, Y

    2014-12-01

    Engineering sex-specific sterility is critical for developing transgene-based sterile insect technology. Targeted genome engineering achieved by customized zinc-finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) or clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems has been exploited extensively in a variety of model organisms; however, screening mutated individuals without a detectable phenotype is still challenging. In addition, genetically recessive mutations only detectable in homozygotes make the experiments time-consuming. In the present study, we model a novel genetic system in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, that results in female-specific sterility by combining transgenesis with TALEN technologies. This system induces sex-specific sterility at a high efficiency by targeting the female-specific exon of the B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) gene, which has sex-specific splicing isoforms regulating somatic sexual development. Transgenic animals co-expressing TALEN left and right arms targeting the female-specific Bmdsx exon resulted in somatic mutations and female mutants lost fecundity because of lack of egg storage and abnormal external genitalia. The wild-type sexual dimorphism of abdominal segment was not evident in mutant females. In contrast, there were no deleterious effects in mutant male moths. The current somatic TALEN technologies provide a promising approach for future insect functional genetics, thus providing the basis for the development of attractive genetic alternatives for insect population management.

  19. Engineering HIV-resistant human CD4+ T cells with CXCR4-specific zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig B Wilen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 entry requires the cell surface expression of CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptors on host cells. Individuals homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 polymorphism do not express CCR5 and are protected from infection by CCR5-tropic (R5 virus strains. As an approach to inactivating CCR5, we introduced CCR5-specific zinc-finger nucleases into human CD4+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer, but the need to protect cells from virus strains that use CXCR4 (X4 in place of or in addition to CCR5 (R5X4 remains. Here we describe engineering a pair of zinc finger nucleases that, when introduced into human T cells, efficiently disrupt cxcr4 by cleavage and error-prone non-homologous DNA end-joining. The resulting cells proliferated normally and were resistant to infection by X4-tropic HIV-1 strains. CXCR4 could also be inactivated in ccr5Δ32 CD4+ T cells, and we show that such cells were resistant to all strains of HIV-1 tested. Loss of CXCR4 also provided protection from X4 HIV-1 in a humanized mouse model, though this protection was lost over time due to the emergence of R5-tropic viral mutants. These data suggest that CXCR4-specific ZFNs may prove useful in establishing resistance to CXCR4-tropic HIV for autologous transplant in HIV-infected individuals.

  20. p53 Gene repair with zinc finger nucleases optimised by yeast 1-hybrid and validated by Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Herrmann

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs. We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation 'hotspots'. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci.

  1. p53 Gene Repair with Zinc Finger Nucleases Optimised by Yeast 1-Hybrid and Validated by Solexa Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Frank; Garriga-Canut, Mireia; Baumstark, Rebecca; Fajardo-Sanchez, Emmanuel; Cotterell, James; Minoche, André; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Isalan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene p53 is mutated or deleted in over 50% of human tumors. As functional p53 plays a pivotal role in protecting against cancer development, several strategies for restoring wild-type (wt) p53 function have been investigated. In this study, we applied an approach using gene repair with zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). We adapted a commercially-available yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) selection kit to allow rapid building and optimization of 4-finger constructs from randomized PCR libraries. We thus generated novel functional zinc finger nucleases against two DNA sites in the human p53 gene, near cancer mutation ‘hotspots’. The ZFNs were first validated using in vitro cleavage assays and in vivo episomal gene repair assays in HEK293T cells. Subsequently, the ZFNs were used to restore wt-p53 status in the SF268 human cancer cell line, via ZFN-induced homologous recombination. The frequency of gene repair and mutation by non-homologous end-joining was then ascertained in several cancer cell lines, using a deep sequencing strategy. Our Y1H system facilitates the generation and optimisation of novel, sequence-specific four- to six-finger peptides, and the p53-specific ZFN described here can be used to mutate or repair p53 in genomic loci. PMID:21695267

  2. Site-Specific Gene Targeting Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE)-Based Nuclease in Brassica oleracea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zijian Sun; Nianzu Li; Guodong Huang; Junqiang Xu; Yu Pan; Zhimin Wang; Qinglin Tang; Ming Song; Xiaojia Wang

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called“unit assembly”, specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  3. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  4. Zinc finger nucleases and their application%锌指核酶技术的原理及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓珊珊; 王颖芝; 马端

    2010-01-01

    锌指核酶(zinc finger nucleases,ZFNs)是将锌指蛋白的DNA识别域和非特异性核酸内切酶FokⅠ人工连接而构成的一种核酶.1对ZFNs能在DNA上产生双链断裂(double-strand breaks,DSB),诱导细胞发生同源重组(homology recombination,HR)或非同源末端连接(nonhomologous end joining,NHEJ).最近锌指核酶技术在基因功能的研究中受到重视.作者就ZFNs的作用原理、关键技术及其应用领域进行介绍.%Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), which is a chimeric fusion structure between a Cys2-His2 zinc-finger protein (ZFP) and the cleavage domain of Fok Ⅰ endonuclease,can be used to introduce targeted double-stranded breaks (DSBs). ZFN-mediated cleavage leads to mutations when double-stranded breaks are repaired by homologous recombination (HR) or nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). In recent years, ZFNs are widely used in the fields of genetic research. In this review, the methodology and technical advantages of ZFNs were briefly discussed.

  5. Use of physiological information and process optimisation enhances production of extracellular nuclease by a marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajan, Nithyalakshmy; Ward, Alan C; Burgess, J Grant; Glassey, Jarka

    2013-02-01

    The extracellular nuclease, NucB, from Bacillus licheniformis, can digest extracellular DNA in biofilms, causing biofilm dispersal, and may therefore be used commercially to remove biofilms. However, producing quantities of this secreted peptide is difficult and our aim was therefore to improve its laboratory scale production. This study builds on our understanding of B. licheniformis physiology to enhance NucB production. The addition of manganese, which triggers sporulation and enhances NucB expression, lead to a 5-fold increase in NucB production. Optimisation via Placket-Burman design of experiments identified 3 significant medium components and a subsequent Central Composite Design, to determine the optimum levels of these components, resulted in a 10-fold increase to 471U/ml. The optimal phosphate concentration was less than 0.3mM as this is known to inhibit nuclease production. The use of physiologically relevant information combined with optimisation represents a promising approach to increased enzyme production, which may also be widely applicable.

  6. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arildo Nerys-Junior

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double- strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  7. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity.

  8. Bifunctional Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase: Mechanism and Proof-of-Concept as a Novel Therapeutic Design Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Christopher M.; Sullivan, Todd J.; Iyidogan, Pinar; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Chung, Raymond; Ruiz-Caro, Juliana; Mohamed, Ebrahim; Jorgensen, William; Hunter, Roger; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is a major target for currently approved anti-HIV drugs. These drugs are divided into two classes: nucleoside and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NNRTIs). This study illustrates the synthesis and biochemical evaluation of a novel bifunctional RT inhibitor utilizing d4T (NRTI) and a TMC-derivative (a diarylpyrimidine NNRTI) linked via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linker. HIV-1 RT successfully incorporates the triphosphate of d4T-4PEG-TMC bifunctional inhibitor in a base-specific manner. Moreover, this inhibitor demonstrates low nanomolar potency that has 4.3-fold and 4300-fold enhancement of polymerization inhibition in vitro relative to the parent TMC-derivative and d4T, respectively. This study serves as a proof-of-concept for the development and optimization of bifunctional RT inhibitors as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 viral replication. PMID:23659183

  9. A Brassica cDNA clone encoding a bifunctional hydroxymethylpyrimidine kinase/thiamin-phosphate pyrophosphorylase involved in thiamin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Nosaka, K; Downs, D M; Kwak, J M; Park, D; Chung, I K; Nam, H G

    1998-08-01

    We report the characterization of a Brassica napus cDNA clone (pBTHI) encoding a protein (BTHI) with two enzymatic activities in the thiamin biosynthetic pathway, thiamin-phosphate pyrophosphorylase (TMP-PPase) and 2-methyl-4-amino-5-hydroxymethylpyrimidine-monophosphate kinase (HMP-P kinase). The cDNA clone was isolated by a novel functional complementation strategy employing an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the TMP-PPase activity. A biochemical assay showed the clone to confer recovery of TMP-PPase activity in the E. coli mutant strain. The cDNA clone is 1746 bp long and contains an open reading frame encoding a peptide of 524 amino acids. The C-terminal part of BTH1 showed 53% and 59% sequence similarity to the N-terminal TMP-PPase region of the bifunctional yeast proteins Saccharomyces THI6 and Schizosaccharomyces pombe THI4, respectively. The N-terminal part of BTH1 showed 58% sequence similarity to HMP-P kinase of Salmonella typhimurium. The cDNA clone functionally complemented the S. typhimurium and E. coli thiD mutants deficient in the HMP-P kinase activity. These results show that the clone encodes a bifunctional protein with TMP-PPase at the C-terminus and HMP-P kinase at the N-terminus. This is in contrast to the yeast bifunctional proteins that encode TMP-PPase at the N-terminus and 4-methyl-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)thiazole kinase at the C-terminus. Expression of the BTH1 gene is negatively regulated by thiamin, as in the cases for the thiamin biosynthetic genes of microorganisms. This is the first report of a plant thiamin biosynthetic gene on which a specific biochemical activity is assigned. The Brassica BTH1 gene may correspond to the Arabidopsis TH-1 gene.

  10. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  11. Creating Directed Double-strand Breaks with the Ref Protein: A Novel Rec A-Dependent Nuclease from Bacteriophage P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenig, Marielle C.; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L.; Manlick, Angela J.; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M. (UW)

    2012-03-16

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded {beta}-hairpin that is sandwiched between several {alpha}-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  12. Creating directed double-strand breaks with the Ref protein: a novel RecA-dependent nuclease from bacteriophage P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenig, Marielle C; Lu, Duo; Won, Sang Joon; Dulberger, Charles L; Manlick, Angela J; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2011-03-11

    The bacteriophage P1-encoded Ref protein enhances RecA-dependent recombination in vivo by an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that Ref is a new type of enzyme; that is, a RecA-dependent nuclease. Ref binds to ss- and dsDNA but does not cleave any DNA substrate until RecA protein and ATP are added to form RecA nucleoprotein filaments. Ref cleaves only where RecA protein is bound. RecA functions as a co-nuclease in the Ref/RecA system. Ref nuclease activity can be limited to the targeted strands of short RecA-containing D-loops. The result is a uniquely programmable endonuclease activity, producing targeted double-strand breaks at any chosen DNA sequence in an oligonucleotide-directed fashion. We present evidence indicating that cleavage occurs in the RecA filament groove. The structure of the Ref protein has been determined to 1.4 Å resolution. The core structure, consisting of residues 77-186, consists of a central 2-stranded β-hairpin that is sandwiched between several α-helical and extended loop elements. The N-terminal 76 amino acid residues are disordered; this flexible region is required for optimal activity. The overall structure of Ref, including several putative active site histidine residues, defines a new subclass of HNH-family nucleases. We propose that enhancement of recombination by Ref reflects the introduction of directed, recombinogenic double-strand breaks.

  13. Label-Free Fluorescence Assay of S1 Nuclease and Hydroxyl Radicals Based on Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers and WS2 Nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junting Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We developed a new method for detecting S1 nuclease and hydroxyl radicals based on the use of water-soluble conjugated poly[9,9-bis(6,6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium-fluorene-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-2,5-dicyano-1,4-phenylene] (PFVCN and tungsten disulfide (WS2 nanosheets. Cationic PFVCN is used as a signal reporter, and single-layer WS2 is used as a quencher with a negatively charged surface. The ssDNA forms complexes with PFVCN due to much stronger electrostatic interactions between cationic PFVCN and anionic ssDNA, whereas PFVCN emits yellow fluorescence. When ssDNA is hydrolyzed by S1 nuclease or hydroxyl radicals into small fragments, the interactions between the fragmented DNA and PFVCN become weaker, resulting in PFVCN being adsorbed on the surface of WS2 and the fluorescence being quenched through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The new method based on PFVCN and WS2 can sense S1 nuclease with a low detection limit of 5 × 10−6 U/mL. Additionally, this method is cost-effective by using affordable WS2 as an energy acceptor without the need for dye-labeled ssDNA. Furthermore, the method provides a new platform for the nuclease assay and reactive oxygen species, and provides promising applications for drug screening.

  14. Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cells differentiation using quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigation of a redox-sensitive predictive model of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation via quantitative nuclease protection assays and glutathione redox status Chandler KJ,Hansen JM, Knudsen T,and Hunter ES 1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  15. Reseach Progress on Serratia marcescens Non-specific Nuclease%Serratia marcescens 非特异性核酸酶研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑜; 郑伟; 顾剑飞; 石陆娥

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens nuclease is a non-specific endonuclease, which is able to cleave different forms of DNA and RNA.The cleavage sites and the catalytic mechanism of the non-specific nuclease of Serratia marcescen, its characteristics of the degrade substrate were mainly summarized.In addition, the research on prokaryotic expression and application of this nuclease was briefly introduced in order to provide the theoretical basis for further research of Serratia marcescens non-specific nuclease.%Serratia marcescens 核酸酶是一种非特异性核酸内切酶,可降解不同形式的 DNA 和 RNA。本文综合国内外的研究概况,主要介绍了 Serratia marcescens 非特异性核酸酶的水解位点、催化机制及其降解底物的特点,另外也阐述了 Serratia marcescens 非特异性核酸酶的原核表达的研究以及其应用现状,为 Serratia marcescens 非特异性核酸酶更深层次的研究提供理论基础。

  16. A new insight into the zinc-dependent DNA-cleavage by the colicin E7 nuclease: a crystallographic and computational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czene, Aniko; Tóth, Eszter; Németh, Eszter;

    2014-01-01

    The nuclease domain of colicin E7 metallonuclease (NColE7) contains its active centre at the C-terminus. The mutant ΔN4-NColE7-C* - where the four N-terminal residues including the positively charged K446, R447 and K449 are replaced with eight residues from the GST tag - is catalytically inactive...

  17. Label-Free Fluorescence Assay of S1 Nuclease and Hydroxyl Radicals Based on Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers and WS₂ Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junting; Zhao, Qi; Tang, Yanli

    2016-06-13

    We developed a new method for detecting S1 nuclease and hydroxyl radicals based on the use of water-soluble conjugated poly[9,9-bis(6,6-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)-fluorene)-2,7-ylenevinylene-co-alt-2,5-dicyano-1,4-phenylene)] (PFVCN) and tungsten disulfide (WS₂) nanosheets. Cationic PFVCN is used as a signal reporter, and single-layer WS₂ is used as a quencher with a negatively charged surface. The ssDNA forms complexes with PFVCN due to much stronger electrostatic interactions between cationic PFVCN and anionic ssDNA, whereas PFVCN emits yellow fluorescence. When ssDNA is hydrolyzed by S1 nuclease or hydroxyl radicals into small fragments, the interactions between the fragmented DNA and PFVCN become weaker, resulting in PFVCN being adsorbed on the surface of WS₂ and the fluorescence being quenched through fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The new method based on PFVCN and WS₂ can sense S1 nuclease with a low detection limit of 5 × 10(-6) U/mL. Additionally, this method is cost-effective by using affordable WS₂ as an energy acceptor without the need for dye-labeled ssDNA. Furthermore, the method provides a new platform for the nuclease assay and reactive oxygen species, and provides promising applications for drug screening.

  18. Azidopropylvinylsulfonamide as a New Bifunctional Click Reagent for Bioorthogonal Conjugations: Application for DNA-Protein Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadová, Jitka; Vrábel, Milan; Adámik, Matej; Brázdová, Marie; Pohl, Radek; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2015-11-01

    N-(3-Azidopropyl)vinylsulfonamide was developed as a new bifunctional bioconjugation reagent suitable for the cross-linking of biomolecules through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition and thiol Michael addition reactions under biorthogonal conditions. The reagent is easily clicked to an acetylene-containing DNA or protein and then reacts with cysteine-containing peptides or proteins to form covalent cross-links. Several examples of bioconjugations of ethynyl- or octadiynyl-modified DNA with peptides, p53 protein, or alkyne-modified human carbonic anhydrase with peptides are given.

  19. Opportunities and challenges in the electrocatalysis of CO2 and CO reduction using bifunctional surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanov, Zarko; Hansen, Heine A.; Varela Gasque, Ana Sofia;

    2016-01-01

    "bifunctional" catalysts using Au-Cd based alloys inspired by theoretical modelling. Density functional theory calculations suggest more favourable thermodynamics for CO2 reduction to CO and methanol on mixed Au-Cd sites on Au3Cd relative to similar values on Au. We use various tools to test the bulk......Electrolysis could enable the large-scale conversion of CO2 to fuels and small molecules. This perspective discusses the state-of-the-art understanding of CO2 and CO reduction electrocatalysis and provides an overview of the most promising approaches undertaken thus far. We set to explore...

  20. Novel configuration of bifunctional air electrodes for rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Po-Chieh; Chien, Yu-Ju; Hu, Chi-Chang

    2016-05-01

    A novel configuration of two electrodes containing electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) pressed into a bifunctional air electrode is designed for rechargeable Zn-air batteries. MOC/25BC carbon paper (MOC consisting of α-MnO2 and XC-72 carbon black) and Fe0.1Ni0.9Co2O4/Ti mesh on this air electrode mainly serve as the cathode for the ORR and the anode for the OER, respectively. The morphology and physicochemical properties of Fe0.1Ni0.9Co2O4 are investigated through scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and X-ray diffraction. Electrochemical studies comprise linear sweep voltammetry, rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry, and the full-cell charge-discharge-cycling test. The discharge peak power density of the Zn-air battery with the unique air electrode reaches 88.8 mW cm-2 at 133.6 mA cm-2 and 0.66 V in an alkaline electrolyte under an ambient atmosphere. After 100 charge-discharge cycles at 10 mA cm-2, an increase of 0.3 V between charge and discharge cell voltages is observed. The deep charge-discharge curve (10 h in each step) indicates that the cell voltages of discharge (1.3 V) and charge (1.97 V) remain constant throughout the process. The performance of the proposed rechargeable Zn-air battery is superior to that of most other similar batteries reported in recent studies.

  1. Rice bifunctional phytocystatin is a dual modulator of legumain and papain-like proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoff, Ana Paula; Passaia, Gisele; Salvati, Caroline; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Margis, Rogerio

    2016-09-01

    Phytocystatins are well-known inhibitors of C1A cysteine proteinases. However, previous research has revealed legumain (C13) protease inhibition via a carboxy-extended phytocystatin. Among the 12 phytocystatins genes in rice, OcXII is the only gene possessing this carboxy-terminal extension. The specific legumain inhibition activity was confirmed, in our work, using a recombinant OcXII harboring only the carboxy-terminal domain and this part did not exhibit any effect on papain-like activities. Meanwhile, rice plants silenced at the whole OcXII gene presented higher legumain and papain-like proteolytic activities, resulting in a faster initial seedling growth. However, when germinated under stressful alkaline conditions, OcXII-silenced plants exhibited impaired root formation and delayed shoot growth. Interestingly, the activity of OcXII promoter gene was detected in the rice seed scutellum region, and decreases with seedling growth. Seeds from these plants also exhibited slower growth at germination under ABA or alkaline conditions, while maintaining very high levels of OcXII transcriptional activation. This likely reinforces the proteolytic control necessary for seed germination and growth. In addition, increased legumain activity was detected in OcXII RNAi plants subjected to a fungal elicitor. Overall, the results of this study highlight the association of OcXII with not only plant development processes, but also with stress response pathways. The results of this study reinforce the bifunctional ability of carboxy-extended phytocystatins in regulating legumain proteases via its carboxy-extended domain and papain-like proteases by its amino-terminal domain.

  2. Fast and reliable production, purification and characterization of heat-stable, bifunctional enzyme chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neddersen, Mara; Elleuche, Skander

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of complex plant biomass demands a fine-regulated portfolio of glycoside hydrolases. The LE (LguI/Eco81I)-cloning approach was used to produce two enzyme chimeras CB and BC composed of an endoglucanase Cel5A (C) from the extreme thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium gondwanense and an archaeal β-glucosidase Bgl1 (B) derived from a hydrothermal spring metagenome. Recombinant chimeras and parental enzymes were produced in Escherichia coli and purified using a two-step affinity chromatography approach. Enzymatic properties revealed that both chimeras closely resemble the parental enzymes and physical mixtures, but Cel5A displayed lower temperature tolerance at 100°C when fused to Bgl1 independent of the conformational order. Moreover, the determination of enzymatic performances resulted in the detection of additive effects in case of BC fusion chimera. Kinetic measurements in combination with HPLC-mediated product analyses and site-directed mutation constructs indicated that Cel5A was strongly impaired when fused at the N-terminus, while activity was reduced to a slighter extend as C-terminal fusion partner. In contrast to these results, catalytic activity of Bgl1 at the N-terminus was improved 1.2-fold, effectively counteracting the slightly reduced activity of Cel5A by converting cellobiose into glucose. In addition, cellobiose exhibited inhibitory effects on Cel5A, resulting in a higher yield of cellobiose and glucose by application of an enzyme mixture (53.1%) compared to cellobiose produced from endoglucanase alone (10.9%). However, the overall release of cellobiose and glucose was even increased by catalytic action of BC (59.2%). These results indicate possible advantages of easily produced bifunctional fusion enzymes for the improved conversion of complex polysaccharide plant materials.

  3. CIA, a novel estrogen receptor coactivator with a bifunctional nuclear receptor interacting determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, F; McBroom, L D; Gallant, J; Moraitis, A N; Labrie, F; Giguère, V

    2001-01-01

    Coregulators for nuclear receptors (NR) are factors that either enhance or repress their transcriptional activity. Both coactivators and corepressors have been shown to use similar but functionally distinct NR interacting determinants containing the core motifs LxxLL and PhixxPhiPhi, respectively. These interactions occur through a hydrophobic cleft located on the surface of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the NR and are regulated by ligand-dependent activation function 2 (AF-2). In an effort to identify novel coregulators that function independently of AF-2, we used the LBD of the orphan receptor RVR (which lacks AF-2) as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen. This strategy led to the cloning of a nuclear protein referred to as CIA (coactivator independent of AF-2 function) that possesses both repressor and activator functions. Strikingly, we observed that CIA not only interacts with RVR and Rev-ErbAalpha in a ligand-independent manner but can also form complexes with estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta in vitro and enhances ERalpha transcriptional activity in the presence of estradiol (E(2)). CIA-ERalpha interactions were found to be independent of AF-2 and enhanced by the antiestrogens EM-652 and ICI 182,780 but not by 4-hydroxytamoxifen and raloxifene. We further demonstrate that CIA-ERalpha interactions require the presence within CIA of a novel bifunctional NR recognition determinant containing overlapping LxxLL and PhixxPhiPhi motifs. The identification and functional characterization of CIA suggest that hormone binding can create a functional coactivator interaction interface in the absence of AF-2.

  4. Isomerism in benzyl-DOTA derived bifunctional chelators: implications for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katherine M; Woods, Mark

    2015-02-18

    The bifunctional chelator IB-DOTA has found use in a range of biomedical applications given its ability to chelate many metal ions, but in particular the lanthanide(III) ions. Gd(3+) in particular is of interest in the development of new molecular imaging agents for MRI and is highly suitable for chelation by IB-DOTA. Given the long-term instability of the aryl isothiocyanate functional group we have used the more stable nitro derivative (NB-DOTA) to conduct a follow-up study of some of our previous work on the coordination chemistry of chelates of these BFCs. Using a combination of NMR and HPLC to study the Eu(3+) and Yb(3+) chelates of NB-DOTA, we have demonstrated that this ligand will produce two discrete regioisomeric chelates at the point at which the metal ion is introduced into the BFC. These regioisomers are defined by the position of the benzylic substituent on the macrocyclic ring: adopting an equatorial position either at the corner or the side of the [3333] ring conformation. These regioisomers are incapable of interconversion and are distinct, separate structures with different SAP/TSAP ratios. The side isomer exhibits an increased population of the TSAP isomer, pointing to more rapid water exchange kinetics in this regioisomer. This has potential ramifications for the use of these two regioisomers of Gd(3+)-BFC chelates in MRI applications. We have also found that, remarkably, there is little or no freedom of rotation about the first single bond extending from the macrocyclic ring to the benzylic substituent. Since this is the linkage through which the chelate is conjugated to the remainder of the molecular imaging probe, this result implies that there may be reduced local rotation of the Gd(3+) chelate within a molecular imaging probe. This implies that this type of BFC could exhibit higher relaxivities than other types of BFC.

  5. Modification of bifunctional epoxy resin using CO{sub 2} fixation process and nanoclay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoshkish, Morteza; Bouhendi, Hosein, E-mail: H.boohendi@ippi.ac.ir; Vafayan, Mehdi

    2014-10-15

    A bifunctional epoxy resin was modified by using a CO{sub 2} fixation solution process in the presence of tetra n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) as catalyst and the modified treated resin was treated by cloisite 30B as nano additive. The Unmodified epoxy resin (UME), CO{sub 2} fixated modified epoxy resin (CFME), and CFME/clay nano composite (CFMEN), were cured by diethylenetriamine (DETA). A cycloaliphatic compound as a reactive diluent was used to control the viscosity of high viscose CFME. The exfoliation of organoclay in UME and CFME was investigated by X-ray diffraction and activation energy was computed using the advanced integral isoconversional method. The activation energy dependency demonstrated that the mechanism of UME curing did not change in the presence of nanoclay. In contrast, the CO{sub 2} fixation results showed a significant change in the activation energy dependency. The Thermal stability parameters include the initial degradation temperature (IDT), the temperature at the maximum rate of weight loss (T{sub max}), and the decomposition activation energy (E{sub d}) were determined by thermal gravimetry analysis. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis measurements showed that the presence of organoclay in CFME increases the T{sub g} of nano composite in contrast to UME. The fracture roughness of UME, CFME and CFNE were determined by scanning electron microscope. The exfoliated UME/1%clay nanocomposite was confirmed by TEM image. - Highlights: • A new epoxy resin was synthesized using CO{sub 2} fixation reaction. • The synthesized epoxy resin was modified by an organo nano-clay. • CO{sub 2} fixation noticeably changed the curing mechanism. • CO{sub 2} fixation reaction consumes CO{sub 2} which is a harmful greenhouse gas.

  6. Function and localization dynamics of bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Wolfgang; Möll, Andrea; Kiekebusch, Daniela; Klein, Kathrin E; Thanbichler, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall of bacteria is a complex macromolecule composed of glycan strands that are cross-linked by short peptide bridges. Its biosynthesis involves a conserved group of enzymes, the bifunctional penicillin-binding proteins (bPBPs), which contain both a transglycosylase and a transpeptidase domain, thus being able to elongate the glycan strands and, at the same time, generate the peptide cross-links. The stalked model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses five bPBP paralogs, named Pbp1A, PbpC, PbpX, PbpY, and PbpZ, whose function is still incompletely understood. In this study, we show that any of these proteins except for PbpZ is sufficient for growth and normal morphogenesis when expressed at native or elevated levels, whereas inactivation of all five paralogs is lethal. Growth analyses indicate a central role of PbpX in the resistance of C. crescentus against the noncanonical amino acid d-alanine. Moreover, we show that PbpX and PbpY localize to the cell division site. Their recruitment to the divisome is dependent on the essential cell division protein FtsN and likely involves interactions with FtsL and the putative peptidoglycan hydrolase DipM. The same interaction pattern is observed for Pbp1A and PbpC, although these proteins do not accumulate at midcell. Our findings demonstrate that the bPBPs of C. crescentus are, to a large extent, redundant and have retained the ability to interact with the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machineries responsible for cell elongation, cytokinesis, and stalk growth. Nevertheless, they may preferentially act in specific peptidoglycan biosynthetic complexes, thereby facilitating the independent regulation of distinct growth processes.

  7. A metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out with noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO2 and MnO2) as catalysts, respectively. However, these metal-based catalysts often suffer from multiple disadvantages, including high cost, low selectivity, poor stability and detrimental environmental effects. Here, we describe a mesoporous carbon foam co-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus that has a large surface area of ˜1,663 m2 g-1 and good electrocatalytic properties for both ORR and OER. This material was fabricated using a scalable, one-step process involving the pyrolysis of a polyaniline aerogel synthesized in the presence of phytic acid. We then tested the suitability of this N,P-doped carbon foam as an air electrode for primary and rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Primary batteries demonstrated an open-circuit potential of 1.48 V, a specific capacity of 735 mAh gZn-1 (corresponding to an energy density of 835 Wh kgZn-1), a peak power density of 55 mW cm-2, and stable operation for 240 h after mechanical recharging. Two-electrode rechargeable batteries could be cycled stably for 180 cycles at 2 mA cm-2. We also examine the activity of our carbon foam for both OER and ORR independently, in a three-electrode configuration, and discuss ways in which the Zn-air battery can be further improved. Finally, our density functional theory calculations reveal that the N,P co-doping and graphene edge effects are essential for the bifunctional electrocatalytic activity of our material.

  8. The Expression and Characterization of a Bifunctional Protein in E. coli for Autologous Erythrocyte Agglutination Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changli Shao; Jingang Zhang

    2008-01-01

    H antigen, the precursor of A and B antigens, belongs to Hh blood system in which it is the only antigen. H antigen distributes on all the human RBC surface except for Bombay phenotype and the copy number of H antigen on the surface of an adult RBC is approximately 1.7 x 106. These characteristics made H antigen the potential target molecule for the immunoassay and immunotherapy. A monoclonal antibody 2E8 against H antigen on the surface of erythrocyte had been prepared in previous work. Based on this antibody, the variable region genes of heavy and light chains (VH and VL) from 2E8 had been cloned by 5' RACE. The two variable region genes were spliced by overlap extension and assembled ScFv (VH-linker-VL) gene encoding the anti-H antigen named ScFv2EB. According to the prediction of the three-dimension structure of ScFv2EB and CH1 fragment from 2E8 and HIV-1 gp41 antigen peptide, we further constructed the ScFv2EBCH1-gp41 fusion molecule. The recombinant ScFv2EB-CH1-gp41 gene was cloned into pET-his vector and expressed in BL21(DE3)plysS cells. The fusion protein was purified from the inclusion bodies. In a series of subsequent analyses, this fusion protein showed identical antigen binding site and activity with the parent antibody. Meanwhile, in mimic test, as the main ingredient of reagent for autologous erythrocyte agglutination test, the bifunctional protein could agglutinate the RBCs in the presence of HIV-1 gp41 antibodies using sera from HIV-infected individuals. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(4):299-306.

  9. Cloning and Functional Analysis of the Bifunctional Agglutinin/Trypsin Inhibitor from Helianthus tuberosus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tuanjie Chang; Hongli Zhai; Songbiao Chen; Guisheng Song; Honglin Xu; Xiaoli Wei; Zhen Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to find new insect resistance genes, four homologous cDNAs, hta-a, hta-b, hta-c and hta-d with lengths of 775, 718, 784 and 752 bp, respectively (GenBank accession numbers AF477031-AF477034), were isolated from a tuber cDNA expression library of Helianthus tuberosus L. Sequence analysis revealed that all four cDNAs contain an open reading frame of 444 bp, coding a polypeptide of 147 amino acid residues, and that the sequences of the cDNAs are very similar to those of the mannose-binding agglutinin genes of the jacalin-related family. In hemagglutination reactions and hapten inhibition assays, affinity-purified HTA (Helianthus tuberosus agglutinin) from induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing GST-HTA shows hemagglutination ability and a higher carbohydrate-binding ability for mannose than other tested sugars.Trypsin inhibitory activity was detected in the crude extracts of induced E. coli BL21(DE3)expressing HTA,and was further verified by trypsin inhibitory activity staining on native polyacrylamide gel. The mechanism of interaction between HTA and trypsin was studied by molecular modeling. We found that plenty of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions can be formed between the supposed binding sites of HTA-b and the active site of trypsin, and that a stable HTA/trypsin complex can be formed. The results above imply that HTA might be a bifunctional protein with carbohydrate-binding activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Moreover,Northern blotting analysis demonstrated that hta is predominantly expressed in tubers of H. tuberosus, very weakly expressed in stems, but not expressed at all in other tissues. Southern blotting analysis indicated that hta is encoded by a multi-gene family. The insect resistance traits have been described in another paper.

  10. Bifunctional bioceramics stimulating osteogenic differentiation of a gingival fibroblast and inhibiting plaque biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ya; Wang, Zhejun; Wang, Jiao; Zhou, Yinghong; Chen, Hui; Wu, Chengtie; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Gingival recession is a common clinical problem that results in esthetic deficiencies and poor plaque control and predominantly occurs in aged patients. In order to restore the cervical region, ideal biomaterials should possess the ability to stimulate proliferation and osteogenesis/cementogenesis of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and have a strong antibiofilm effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions of HGF and oral multispecies biofilms with Ca, Mg and Si-containing bredigite (BRT, Ca7MgSi4O16) bioceramics. BRT extract induced osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of HGF and its inhibition of plaque biofilm formation were systematically studied. BRT extract in concentrations lower than <200 mg mL(-1) presented high biocompatibility to HGF cells in 3 days. Ion extracts from BRT also stimulated a series of bone-related gene and protein expressions in HGF cells. Furthermore, BRT extract significantly inhibited oral multispecies plaque biofilm growth on its surface and contributed to over 30% bacterial cell death without additional antibacterial agents in two weeks. A planktonic killing test showed that BRT suppressed 98% plaque bacterial growth compared to blank control in 3 days. The results also revealed that BRT extract has an osteostimulation effect on HGF. The suppression effect on plaque biofilms suggested that BRT might be used as a bioactive material for cervical restoration and that the synergistic effect of bioactive ions, such as Ca, Mg and Si ions, played an important role in the design and construction of bifunctional biomaterials in combination with tissue regeneration and antibiofilm activity.

  11. Structure and activity of the Cas3 HD nuclease MJ0384, an effector enzyme of the CRISPR interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F. (Toronto)

    2012-03-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and Cas proteins represent an adaptive microbial immunity system against viruses and plasmids. Cas3 proteins have been proposed to play a key role in the CRISPR mechanism through the direct cleavage of invasive DNA. Here, we show that the Cas3 HD domain protein MJ0384 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii cleaves endonucleolytically and exonucleolytically (3'-5') single-stranded DNAs and RNAs, as well as 3'-flaps, splayed arms, and R-loops. The degradation of branched DNA substrates by MJ0384 is stimulated by the Cas3 helicase MJ0383 and ATP. The crystal structure of MJ0384 revealed the active site with two bound metal cations and together with site-directed mutagenesis suggested a catalytic mechanism. Our studies suggest that the Cas3 HD nucleases working together with the Cas3 helicases can completely degrade invasive DNAs through the combination of endo- and exonuclease activities.

  12. Improved Genome Editing Efficiency and Flexibility Using Modified Oligonucleotides with TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Boix, Charlotte; Charpentier, Marine; De Cian, Anne; Cochennec, Julien; Duvernois-Berthet, Evelyne; Perrouault, Loïc; Tesson, Laurent; Edouard, Joanne; Thinard, Reynald; Cherifi, Yacine; Menoret, Séverine; Fontanière, Sandra; de Crozé, Noémie; Fraichard, Alexandre; Sohm, Frédéric; Anegon, Ignacio; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Giovannangeli, Carine

    2016-03-08

    Genome editing has now been reported in many systems using TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases. Precise mutations can be introduced during homology-directed repair with donor DNA carrying the wanted sequence edit, but efficiency is usually lower than for gene knockout and optimal strategies have not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that using phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides strongly enhances genome editing efficiency of single-stranded oligonucleotide donors in cultured cells. In addition, it provides better design flexibility, allowing insertions more than 100 bp long. Despite previous reports of phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotide toxicity, clones of edited cells are readily isolated and targeted sequence insertions are achieved in rats and mice with very high frequency, allowing for homozygous loxP site insertion at the mouse ROSA locus in particular. Finally, when detected, imprecise knockin events exhibit indels that are asymmetrically positioned, consistent with genome editing taking place by two steps of single-strand annealing.

  13. Consequences of normalizing transcriptomic and genomic libraries of plant genomes using a duplex-specific nuclease and tetramethylammonium chloride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Matvienko

    Full Text Available Several applications of high throughput genome and transcriptome sequencing would benefit from a reduction of the high-copy-number sequences in the libraries being sequenced and analyzed, particularly when applied to species with large genomes. We adapted and analyzed the consequences of a method that utilizes a thermostable duplex-specific nuclease for reducing the high-copy components in transcriptomic and genomic libraries prior to sequencing. This reduces the time, cost, and computational effort of obtaining informative transcriptomic and genomic sequence data for both fully sequenced and non-sequenced genomes. It also reduces contamination from organellar DNA in preparations of nuclear DNA. Hybridization in the presence of 3 M tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC, which equalizes the rates of hybridization of GC and AT nucleotide pairs, reduced the bias against sequences with high GC content. Consequences of this method on the reduction of high-copy and enrichment of low-copy sequences are reported for Arabidopsis and lettuce.

  14. Consequences of normalizing transcriptomic and genomic libraries of plant genomes using a duplex-specific nuclease and tetramethylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matvienko, Marta; Kozik, Alexander; Froenicke, Lutz; Lavelle, Dean; Martineau, Belinda; Perroud, Bertrand; Michelmore, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Several applications of high throughput genome and transcriptome sequencing would benefit from a reduction of the high-copy-number sequences in the libraries being sequenced and analyzed, particularly when applied to species with large genomes. We adapted and analyzed the consequences of a method that utilizes a thermostable duplex-specific nuclease for reducing the high-copy components in transcriptomic and genomic libraries prior to sequencing. This reduces the time, cost, and computational effort of obtaining informative transcriptomic and genomic sequence data for both fully sequenced and non-sequenced genomes. It also reduces contamination from organellar DNA in preparations of nuclear DNA. Hybridization in the presence of 3 M tetramethylammonium chloride (TMAC), which equalizes the rates of hybridization of GC and AT nucleotide pairs, reduced the bias against sequences with high GC content. Consequences of this method on the reduction of high-copy and enrichment of low-copy sequences are reported for Arabidopsis and lettuce.

  15. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases%转录激活因子样效应物核酸酶

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟文鹏; 夏海滨

    2013-01-01

    人工设计的核酸酶是目前进行精确基因组修饰的有效工具之一,在生命科学基础研究和人类遗传疾病的治疗研究领域有着广泛的应用价值.有必要综述转录激活因子样效应物核酸酶(transcription activator-like effector nucleases,TALEN)的技术背景,以及其应用研究基础上的核酸酶活性和特异性,并探讨TALEN用于靶向基因组修饰过程中所存在的一些问题.

  16. Generation of GFP Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using AAVS1 Safe Harbor Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongquan; Rao, Mahendra; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-05-16

    Generation of a fluorescent GFP reporter line in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides enormous potentials in both basic stem cell research and regenerative medicine. A protocol for efficiently generating such an engineered reporter line by gene targeting is highly desired. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a new class of artificial restriction enzymes that have been shown to significantly promote homologous recombination by >1000-fold. The AAVS1 (adeno-associated virus integration site 1) locus is a "safe harbor" and has an open chromatin structure that allows insertion and stable expression of transgene. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol from determination of TALENs activity, hiPSC culture, and delivery of a donor into AAVS1 targeting site, to validation of targeted integration by PCR and Southern blot analysis using hiPSC line, and a pair of open-source AAVS1 TALENs.

  17. Dual nuclease activity of a Cas2 protein in CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B of Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Bhuvan; Ghosh, Karukriti Kaushik; Fernandes, Gary; Kumar, Pankaj; Gogoi, Prerana; Kumar, Manish

    2016-04-01

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 carries a set of cas genes associated with CRISPR-Cas subtype I-B. Herein, we report for the first time active transcription of a set of cas genes (cas1 to cas8) of L. interrogans where cas4, cas1, cas2 and cas6, cas3, cas8, cas7, cas5 are clustered together in two independent operons. As an initial step toward comprehensive understanding of CRISPR-Cas system in spirochete, the biochemical study of one of the core Leptospira Cas2 proteins (Lep_Cas2) showed nuclease activity on both DNA and RNA in a nonspecific manner. Additionally, unlike other known Cas2 proteins, Lep_Cas2 showed metal-independent RNase activity and preferential activity on RNA over DNA. These results provide insight for understanding Cas2 diversity existing in the prokaryotic adaptive immune system.

  18. Tsetse salivary gland proteins 1 and 2 are high affinity nucleic acid binding proteins with residual nuclease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Caljon

    Full Text Available Analysis of the tsetse fly salivary gland EST database revealed the presence of a highly enriched cluster of putative endonuclease genes, including tsal1 and tsal2. Tsal proteins are the major components of tsetse fly (G. morsitans morsitans saliva where they are present as monomers as well as high molecular weight complexes with other saliva proteins. We demonstrate that the recombinant tsetse salivary gland proteins 1&2 (Tsal1&2 display DNA/RNA non-specific, high affinity nucleic acid binding with K(D values in the low nanomolar range and a non-exclusive preference for duplex. These Tsal proteins exert only a residual nuclease activity with a preference for dsDNA in a broad pH range. Knockdown of Tsal expression by in vivo RNA interference in the tsetse fly revealed a partially impaired blood digestion phenotype as evidenced by higher gut nucleic acid, hematin and protein contents.

  19. Isolating DNA from sexual assault cases: a comparison of standard methods with a nuclease-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garvin Alex M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profiling sperm DNA present on vaginal swabs taken from rape victims often contributes to identifying and incarcerating rapists. Large amounts of the victim’s epithelial cells contaminate the sperm present on swabs, however, and complicate this process. The standard method for obtaining relatively pure sperm DNA from a vaginal swab is to digest the epithelial cells with Proteinase K in order to solubilize the victim’s DNA, and to then physically separate the soluble DNA from the intact sperm by pelleting the sperm, removing the victim’s fraction, and repeatedly washing the sperm pellet. An alternative approach that does not require washing steps is to digest with Proteinase K, pellet the sperm, remove the victim’s fraction, and then digest the residual victim’s DNA with a nuclease. Methods The nuclease approach has been commercialized in a product, the Erase Sperm Isolation Kit (PTC Labs, Columbia, MO, USA, and five crime laboratories have tested it on semen-spiked female buccal swabs in a direct comparison with their standard methods. Comparisons have also been performed on timed post-coital vaginal swabs and evidence collected from sexual assault cases. Results For the semen-spiked buccal swabs, Erase outperformed the standard methods in all five laboratories and in most cases was able to provide a clean male profile from buccal swabs spiked with only 1,500 sperm. The vaginal swabs taken after consensual sex and the evidence collected from rape victims showed a similar pattern of Erase providing superior profiles. Conclusions In all samples tested, STR profiles of the male DNA fractions obtained with Erase were as good as or better than those obtained using the standard methods.

  20. TAL nucleases (TALNs): hybrid proteins composed of TAL effectors and FokI DNA-cleavage domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Huang, Sheng; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Wright, David; Spalding, Martin H; Weeks, Donald P; Yang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks enhance homologous recombination in cells and have been exploited for targeted genome editing through use of engineered endonucleases. Here we report the creation and initial characterization of a group of rare-cutting, site-specific DNA nucleases produced by fusion of the restriction enzyme FokI endonuclease domain (FN) with the high-specificity DNA-binding domains of AvrXa7 and PthXo1. AvrXa7 and PthXo1 are members of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector family whose central repeat units dictate target DNA recognition and can be modularly constructed to create novel DNA specificity. The hybrid FN-AvrXa7, AvrXa7-FN and PthXo1-FN proteins retain both recognition specificity for their target DNA (a 26 bp sequence for AvrXa7 and 24 bp for PthXo1) and the double-stranded DNA cleaving activity of FokI and, thus, are called TAL nucleases (TALNs). With all three TALNs, DNA is cleaved adjacent to the TAL-binding site under optimal conditions in vitro. When expressed in yeast, the TALNs promote DNA homologous recombination of a LacZ gene containing paired AvrXa7 or asymmetric AvrXa7/PthXo1 target sequences. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of creating a tool box of novel TALNs with potential for targeted genome modification in organisms lacking facile mechanisms for targeted gene knockout and homologous recombination.

  1. Surveyor Nuclease: a new strategy for a rapid identification of heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations in patients with respiratory chain defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique

    2005-06-01

    Molecular analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a critical step in diagnosis and genetic counseling of respiratory chain defects. No fast method is currently available for the identification of unknown mtDNA point mutations. We have developed a new strategy based on complete mtDNA PCR amplification followed by digestion with a mismatch-specific DNA endonuclease, Surveyor Nuclease. This enzyme, a member of the CEL nuclease family of plant DNA endonucleases, cleaves double-strand DNA at any mismatch site including base substitutions and small insertions/deletions. After digestion, cleavage products are separated and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The size of the digestion products indicates the location of the mutation, which is then confirmed and characterized by sequencing. Although this method allows the analysis of 2 kb mtDNA amplicons and the detection of multiple mutations within the same fragment, it does not lead to the identification of homoplasmic base substitutions. Homoplasmic pathogenic mutations have been described. Nevertheless, most homoplasmic base substitutions are neutral polymorphisms while deleterious mutations are typically heteroplasmic. Here, we report that this method can be used to detect mtDNA mutations such as m.3243A>G tRNA(Leu) and m.14709T>C tRNA(Glu) even when they are present at levels as low as 3% in DNA samples derived from patients with respiratory chain defects. Then, we tested five patients suffering from a mitochondrial respiratory chain defect and we identified a variant (m.16189T>C) in two of them, which was previously associated with susceptibility to diabetes and cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, this method can be effectively used to rapidly and completely screen the entire human mitochondrial genome for heteroplasmic mutations and in this context represents an important advance for the diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases.

  2. Bifunctional carbohydrate biopolymers entrapped lipase as catalyst for the two consecutive conversions of α-pinene to oxy-derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, Madalina; Gheorghe, Andreea; Negoi, Alina; Enache, Madalin; Maria, Gabriel-Mihai; Parvulescu, Vasile I

    2016-11-01

    Bifunctional catalysts designed as carbohydrate biopolymers entrapping lipase have been investigated for the biotransformation of a natural compound (α-pinene) to oxy-derivatives. Lipases assisted the epoxidation of α-pinene using H2O2 as oxidation reagent and ethyl acetate as both acetate-supplier and solvent affording α-pinene oxide as the main product. Further, the biopolymer promoted the isomerization of α-pinene oxide to campholenic aldehyde and trans-carenol. In this case, the biopolymers played double roles of the support and also active part of the bifunctional catalyst. Screening of enzymes and their entrapping in a biopolymeric matrix (e.g. Ca-alginate and κ-carrageenan) indicated the lipase extracted from Aspergillus niger as the most efficient. In addition, the presence of biopolymers enhanced the catalytic activity of the immobilized lipase (i.e. 13.39×10(3), 19.76×10(3)and 26.46×10(3) for the free lipase, lipase-carrageenan and lipase-alginate, respectively). The catalysts stability and reusability were confirmed in eight consecutively reaction runs.

  3. Efficient bifunctional catalyst lipase/organophosphonic acid-functionalized silica for biodiesel synthesis by esterification of oleic acid with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Chen, Wen; Liu, Wei; Chen, Hou; Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Tang, Qinghua; Xu, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    An efficient bifunctional catalyst lipase/organophosphonic acid-functionalized silica (SG-T-P-LS) has been successfully developed, and biodiesel production of fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) from free fatty acid (FFA) oleic acid with short-chain alcohol ethanol catalyzed by SG-T-P-LS was investigated. The process optimization using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed and the interactions between the operational variables were elucidated, and it was found that the molar ratio of alcohol to acid was the most significant factor. The optimum values for maximum conversion ratio can be obtained by using a Box-Behnken center-united design, and the conversion ratio could reach 89.94 ± 0.42% under the conditions that ethanol/acid molar ratio was 1.05:1 and SG-T-P-LS to FFA weight ratio was 14.9 wt.% at 28.6°C. The research results show that SG-T-P and LS-20 could work cooperatively to promote the esterification reaction, and the bifunctional catalyst SG-T-P-LS is a potential catalyst for biodiesel production.

  4. Preparation of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template and its supported Pt nanocomposite as bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Liu, Jing; Ling, Ai-Xia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Hui-Yun; Kong, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, we report the syntheses of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template (s-IrO2), and s-IrO2 supported Pt nanocomposite (Pt/s-IrO2) as bifunctional oxygen catalyst. Physical characterizations including X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that s-IrO2 catalyst has excellent uniformity and regularity in particle shape and much ordered distribution in geometric space, and Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst shows a uniform Pt dispersion on the surface of the s-IrO2 particles. Electrochemical analyses prove that s-IrO2 catalyst possesses superior OER activity at operating potentials; and that Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst, in comparison to Pt/commercial IrO2, has higher ESA value and ORR catalytic performance with a mechanism of four-electron pathway and a high ORR efficiency. And as a bifunctional oxygen catalyst, Pt/s-IrO2 also exhibits more remarkable OER performance than the commercial one. The s-IrO2 nanoparticles will be a promising active component (for OER), and suitable for Pt support (for ORR).

  5. A systematic comparative evaluation of 90Y-labeled bifunctional chelators for their use in targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Rubel; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Dash, Ashutosh

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes a systematic comparative evaluation of five commonly used bifunctional chelators, namely,p-isothiocyanato benzyl derivatives of diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid (DTPA-NCS), trans-cyclohexyl diethylenetriaminepentaceticacid (CHX-A″-DTPA-NCS), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA-NCS), 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA-NCS), and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo [9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic acid (PCTA-NCS), on the basis of their ability to complex 90Y at room temperature, in vitro and in vivo stability and clearance pattern in biological system. The results of the experiments carried out revealed that CHX-A″-DTPA-NCS was the most promising option as it could be radiolabeled with 90Y at room temperature with highest specific activity and demonstrated high in vitro stability in human serum and in presence of challenging metal ions commonly present inhuman plasma. The clearance pattern in Swiss mice revealed that 90Y-CHX- A″-DTPA-NCS cleared through the kidneys with minimum retention in any other major organ. Thus, the use of cyclohexyl-DTPA based bifunctional chelators would increase the scope of making 90Y-labeled agents suitable for targeted therapy.

  6. Carbon Nanotube/Boron Nitride Nanocomposite as a Significant Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction and Oxygen Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Indrajit M; Lokanathan, Moorthi; Ganesan, Balakrishnan; Swami, Anita; Kakade, Bhalchandra

    2017-01-12

    It is an immense challenge to develop bifunctional electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and oxygen evolution reactions (OER) in low temperature fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Herein, a simple and cost-effective approach is developed to prepare novel materials based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanocomposite (CNT/BN) through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structural analysis and morphology study confirms the formation of a homogeneous composite and merging of few exfoliated graphene layers of CNTs on the graphitic planes of h-BN, respectively. Moreover, the electrochemical study implies that CNT/BN nanocomposite shows a significantly higher ORR activity with a single step 4-electron transfer pathway and an improved onset potential of +0.86 V versus RHE and a current density of 5.78 mA cm(-2) in alkaline conditions. Interestingly, it exhibits appreciably better catalytic activity towards OER at low overpotential (η=0.38 V) under similar conditions. Moreover, this bifunctional catalyst shows substantially higher stability than a commercial Pt/C catalyst even after 5000 cycles. Additionally, this composite catalyst does not show any methanol oxidation reactions that nullify the issues due to fuel cross-over effects in direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of bifunctional isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase in complex with its substrate, isocitrate dehydrogenase, from Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The protein complex of bifunctional isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase with its substrate, isocitrate dehydrogenase, has been crystallized for structural analysis. A complete data set was collected from the complex crystal and processed to 2.9 Å resolution.

  8. Robust Control of PEP Formation Rate in the Carbon Fixation Pathway of C4 Plants by a Bi-functional Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Yuval

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C4 plants such as corn and sugarcane assimilate atmospheric CO2 into biomass by means of the C4 carbon fixation pathway. We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process. Results We present a putative mechanism for robustness in C4 carbon fixation, involving a key enzyme in the pathway, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, which is regulated by a bifunctional enzyme, Regulatory Protein (RP. The robust mechanism is based on avidity of the bifunctional enzyme RP to its multimeric substrate PPDK, and on a product-inhibition feedback loop that couples the system output to the activity of the bifunctional regulator. The model provides an explanation for several unusual biochemical characteristics of the system and predicts that the system's output, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP formation rate, is insensitive to fluctuations in enzyme levels (PPDK and RP, substrate levels (ATP and pyruvate and the catalytic rate of PPDK, while remaining sensitive to the system's input (light levels. Conclusions The presented PPDK mechanism is a new way to achieve robustness using product inhibition as a feedback loop on a bifunctional regulatory enzyme. This mechanism exhibits robustness to protein and metabolite levels as well as to catalytic rate changes. At the same time, the output of the system remains tuned to input levels.

  9. Monofunctionalization of Calix[4]arene Tetracarboxylic Acid at the Upper Rim with Isothiocyanate Group: First Bifunctional Chelating Agent for Alpha-Emitter Ac-225.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ji, Min; Fisher, Darrell R; Wai, Chien M

    1999-09-01

    A procedure is reported for synthesizing a novel, water-soluble bifunctional chelating agent derived from calix[4]arene. This chelate features tetracarboxylic acid groups at the lower rim as an actinium-225 ionophore, and an isothiocyanate functional group at the upper rim for labeling of the N-terminus of monoclonal antibodies through thiourea linkage.

  10. CXCL10 Acts as a Bifunctional Antimicrobial Molecule against Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie R. Margulieux

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is killed by the interferon-inducible, ELR(− CXC chemokine CXCL10. Previous studies showed that disruption of the gene encoding FtsX, a conserved membrane component of the ATP-binding cassette transporter-like complex FtsE/X, resulted in resistance to CXCL10. FtsX exhibits some sequence similarity to the mammalian CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, suggesting that the CXCL10 N-terminal region that interacts with CXCR3 may also interact with FtsX. A C-terminal truncated CXCL10 was tested to determine if the FtsX-dependent antimicrobial activity is associated with the CXCR3-interacting N terminus. The truncated CXCL10 exhibited antimicrobial activity against the B. anthracis parent strain but not the ΔftsX mutant, which supports a key role for the CXCL10 N terminus. Mutations in FtsE, the conserved ATP-binding protein of the FtsE/X complex, resulted in resistance to both CXCL10 and truncated CXCL10, indicating that both FtsX and FtsE are important. Higher concentrations of CXCL10 overcame the resistance of the ΔftsX mutant to CXCL10, suggesting an FtsX-independent killing mechanism, likely involving its C-terminal α-helix, which resembles a cationic antimicrobial peptide. Membrane depolarization studies revealed that CXCL10 disrupted membranes of the B. anthracis parent strain and the ΔftsX mutant, but only the parent strain underwent depolarization with truncated CXCL10. These findings suggest that CXCL10 is a bifunctional molecule that kills B. anthracis by two mechanisms. FtsE/X-dependent killing is mediated through an N-terminal portion of CXCL10 and is not reliant upon the C-terminal α-helix. The FtsE/X-independent mechanism involves membrane depolarization by CXCL10, likely because of its α-helix. These findings present a new paradigm for understanding mechanisms by which CXCL10 and related chemokines kill bacteria.

  11. Enantiopure bifunctional chelators for copper radiopharmaceuticals--does chirality matter in radiotracer design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay N; Dakanali, Marianna; Hao, Guiyang; Ramezani, Saleh; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Xiankai

    2014-06-10

    It is well recognized that carbon chirality plays a critical role in the design of drug molecules. However, very little information is available regarding the effect of stereoisomerism of macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (BFC) on biological behaviors of the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals. To evaluate such effects, three enantiopure stereoisomers of a copper radiopharmaceutical BFC bearing two chiral carbon atoms were synthesized in forms of R,R-, S,S-, and R,S-. Their corresponding peptide conjugates were prepared by coupling with a model peptide sequence, c(RGDyK), which targets the αvβ3 integrin for in vitro and in vivo evaluation of their biological behaviors as compared to the racemic conjugate. Despite the chirality differences, all the conjugates showed a similar in vitro binding affinity profile to the αvβ3 integrin (106, 108, 85 and 100 nM for rac-H2-1, RR-H2-1, SS-H2-1, and RS-H2-1 respectively with all p values > 0.05) and a similar level of in vivo tumor uptake (2.72 ± 0.45, 2.60 ± 0.52, 2.45 ± 0.48 and 2.88 ± 0.59 for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 at 1 h p.i. respectively). Furthermore, they demonstrated a nearly identical biodistribution pattern in major organs (e.g. 2.07 ± 0.21, 2.13 ± 0.58, 1.70 ± 0.20 and 1.90 ± 0.46 %ID/g at 24 h p.i. in liver for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively; 1.80 ± 0.46, 2.30 ± 1.49, 1.73 ± 0.31 and 2.23 ± 0.71 at 24 h p.i. in kidneys for rac-(64)Cu-1, RR-(64)Cu-1, SS-(64)Cu-1, and RS-(64)Cu-1 respectively). Therefore we conclude that the chirality of BFC plays a negligible role in αvβ3-targeted copper radiopharmaceuticals. However, we believe it is still worthwhile to consider the chirality effects of BFCs on other targeted imaging or therapeutic agents.

  12. Evaluation of novel bifunctional chelates for the development of Cu-64-based radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L. [MDS Nordion, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)], E-mail: cara.ferreira@mdsinc.com; Yapp, Donald T. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L3 (Canada); Lamsa, Eric [MDS Nordion, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostrate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3Z6 (Canada); Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocylics Inc., Dallas, Texas, 75235 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Background: Currently available bifunctional chelates (BFCs) for attaching Cu-64 to a targeting molecule are limited by either their radiolabeling conditions or in vivo stability. With the goal of identifying highly effective BFCs, we compared the properties of two novel BFCs, 1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-S-5-(4-nitrobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-Oxo) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-S-4- (4-nitrobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-PCTA), with the commonly used S-2-(4-nitrobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-DOTA). Methods: p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-DOTA, p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-Oxo and p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-PCTA were each radiolabeled with Cu-64 under various conditions to assess the reaction kinetics and robustness of the radiolabeling. Stability of each Cu-64 BFC complex was evaluated at low pH and in serum. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and biodistribution studies in mice were undertaken. Results: p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-Oxo and p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-PCTA possessed superior reaction kinetics compared to p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-DOTA under all radiolabeling conditions; >98% radiochemical yields were achieved in <5 min at room temperature even when using near stoichiometric amounts of BFC. Under nonideal conditions, such as low or high pH, high radiochemical yields were still achievable with the novel BFCs. The radiolabeled compounds were stable in serum and at pH 2 for 48 h. The imaging and biodistribution of the Cu-64-radiolabeled BFCs illustrated differences between the BFCs, including preferential clearance via the kidneys for the p-NO{sub 2}-Bn-PCTA Cu-64 complex. Conclusions: The novel BFCs facilitated efficient Cu-64 radiolabeling under mild conditions to produce stable complexes at potentially high specific activities. These BFCs may find wide utility in the development of Cu-64-based radiopharmaceuticals.

  13. Acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterial with large surface area: Preparation, characterization, and adsorption properties for cationic and anionic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kai; Ma, Chun–Fang; Ling, Yuan; Li, Meng [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gao, Qiang, E-mail: gaoqiang@cug.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geo Materials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Luo, Wen–Jun, E-mail: heartnohome@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured carbonaceous materials are extremely important in the nano field, yet developing simple, mild, and “green” methods that can make such materials possess large surface area and rich functional groups on their surfaces still remains a considerable challenge. Herein, a one-pot and environment-friendly method, i.e., thermal treatment (180 °C; 18 h) of water mixed with glucose and chitosan (CTS), has been proposed. The resultant carbonaceous nanomaterials were characterized by field emitting scanning electron microscope, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and zeta-potential analysis. It was found that, in contrast to the conventional hydrothermally carbonized product from pure glucose, with low surface area (9.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and pore volume (0.016 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}), the CTS-added carbonaceous products showed satisfactory textural parameters (surface area and pore volume up to 254 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 0.701 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, respectively). Moreover, it was also interestingly found that these CTS-added carbonaceous products possessed both acidic (–COOH) and basic (–NH{sub 2}) groups on their surfaces. Taking the advantages of large surface area and –COOH/–NH{sub 2} bifunctional surface, the carbonaceous nanomaterials exhibited excellent performance for adsorptions of cationic compound (i.e., methylene blue) at pH 10 and anionic compound (i.e., acid red 18) at pH 2, respectively. This work not only provides a simple and green route to prepare acid/base bifunctional carbonaceous nanomaterials with large surface area but also well demonstrates their potential for application in adsorption. - Highlights: • A simple and green method was proposed to prepare carbon nanomaterials. • The carbon product showed acid/base bifunctional surface with large surface area. • The carbon material could efficiently adsorb both cationic and anionic compounds.

  14. Facile synthesis of flower like FePt@ZnO core–shell structure and its bifunctional properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majeed, Jerina [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Jayakumar, O.D., E-mail: ddjaya@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mandal, B.P. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Salunke, H.G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Naik, R. [Department of Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tyagi, A.K., E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Flower shaped FePt and ZnO coated FePt with core–shell nanostructures are synthesized by a facile solvothermal procedure. Shell thickness of ZnO over FePt core was tuned by varying FePt concentration with respect to ZnO. Hybrid structure with lower FePt concentration exhibited bifunctionality such as near room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence. Pristine FePt crystallize in the fct (L1{sub 0}) phase whereas it converts into fcc phase in presence of ZnO. - Highlights: • FePt@ZnO hybrid core–shell particles, with unique flower shape morphology have been prepared by solvothermal method. • Phase transition of fct-FePt to fcc-FePt has been found in presence of ZnO nanoparticles. • Plausible mechanism for growth of flowershaped nanoparticle is in accordance with energy minimization principle. • The core shell structure (FePt@ZnO) exhibits bi-functional properties. - Abstract: Flower shaped FePt and ZnO coated FePt (FePt@ZnO) core–shell nanostructures are synthesized by a facile solvothermal procedure. Two different compositions (molar ratio) of FePt and ZnO (FePt:ZnO = 1:3 and FePt:ZnO = 1:6) core–shells with different thicknesses of ZnO shells were synthesized. Hybrid FePt@ZnO core–shell flower structure with lower FePt concentration (FePt:ZnO = 1:6) exhibited bifunctionality including near room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction patterns of pristine FePt showed partially ordered face centred tetragonal (fct) L1{sub 0} phase whereas ZnO coated FePt (FePt@ZnO) nanostructures showed hexagonal ZnO and disordered phase of FePt with fcc structure. The phase transition of fct FePt to fcc phase occurring in presence of ZnO is further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and magnetic measurement studies. The formation of the nanoflowers was possibly due to growth along the [0 1 1] or [0 0 1] direction, keeping the core nearly spherical in accordance with the

  15. A quantitative multiplex nuclease protection assay reveals immunotoxicity gene expression profiles in the rabbit model for vaginal drug safety evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichorova, Raina N., E-mail: rfichorova@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mendonca, Kevin; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Murray, Ryan [Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Chandra, Neelima; Doncel, Gustavo F. [CONRAD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Any vaginal product that alters the mucosal environment and impairs the immune barrier increases the risk of sexually transmitted infections, especially HIV infection, which thrives on mucosal damage and inflammation. The FDA-recommended rabbit vaginal irritation (RVI) model serves as a first line selection tool for vaginal products; however, for decades it has been limited to histopathology scoring, insufficient to select safe anti-HIV microbicides. In this study we incorporate to the RVI model a novel quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to quantify mRNA levels of 25 genes representing leukocyte differentiation markers, toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokines, chemokines, epithelial repair, microbicidal and vascular markers, by designing two multiplex arrays. Tissue sections were obtained from 36 rabbits (6 per treatment arm) after 14 daily applications of a placebo gel, saline, 4% nonoxynol-9 (N-9), and three combinations of the anti-HIV microbicides tenofovir (TFV) and UC781 in escalating concentrations (highest: 10% TFV + 2.5%UC781). Results showed that increased expression levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, interleukin (IL)-1β, CXCL8, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 (P < 0.05), and decreased levels of TLR2 (P < 0.05), TLR3 and bactericidal permeability increasing protein (BPI) (P < 0.001) were associated with cervicovaginal mucosal alteration (histopathology). Seven markers showed a significant linear trend predicting epithelial damage (up with CD4, IL-1β, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL21, EMP1 and down with BPI). Despite the low tissue damage RVI scores, the high-dose microbicide combination gel caused activation of HIV host cells (SLC and CD4) while N-9 caused proinflammatory gene upregulation (IL-8 and TLR4) suggesting a potential for increasing risk of HIV via different mechanisms depending on the chemical nature of the test product. - Highlights: • A transcriptome nuclease protection assay assessed microbicides for vaginal safety. • Biomarkers were

  16. Generation of mastitis resistance in cows by targeting human lysozyme gene to β-casein locus using zinc-finger nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xu; Wang, Yongsheng; Tian, Yuchen; Yu, Yuan; Gao, Mingqing; Hu, Guangdong; Su, Feng; Pan, Shaohui; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis costs the dairy industry billions of dollars annually and is the most consequential disease of dairy cattle. Transgenic cows secreting an antimicrobial peptide demonstrated resistance to mastitis. The combination of somatic cell gene targeting and nuclear transfer provides a powerful method to produce transgenic animals. Recent studies found that a precisely placed double-strand break induced by engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) stimulated the integration of exogenous DNA stret...

  17. Interference of Co-Amplified Nuclear Mitochondrial DNA Sequences on the Determination of Human mtDNA Heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR Nuclease and the WAVE HS System

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiu-Chuan Yen; Shiue-Li Li; Wei-Chien Hsu; Petrus Tang

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS) for detectin...

  18. Highly efficient production of the staphylococcal nuclease reporter in Lactobacillus bulgaricus governed by the promoter of the hlbA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouayekh, Hichem; Serror, Pascale; Boudebbouze, Samira; Maguin, Emmanuelle

    2009-04-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus) genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of two genes that encode histone-like HU proteins (hlbA and hlbB) showing extensive similarity to other bacterial homologues. These genes were found to be extremely conserved among several L. bulgaricus strains. The hlbA gene was shown to be constitutively transcribed from a unique promoter (phlbA) during normal growth, whereas hlbB did not seem to be expressed under usual laboratory conditions. Using a reporter cassette in which the staphylococcal nuclease was fused at its N-terminus to the lactococcal signal peptide Usp45 (SP Usp45), we have demonstrated that phlbA promotes high expression of the reporter in L. bulgaricus, which correlated with an abundant secretion of the mature nuclease in the supernatant fraction. Quantification of the exported enzyme reveals a secretion level approximately threefold higher when the expression of the reporter was under the control of phlbA compared with the lactococcal usp45 promoter. Together, these results indicate that phlbA is suitable for gene expression in L. bulgaricus, that SP Usp45 is functionally recognized and processed by the L. bulgaricus secretion machinery and that the nuclease reporter gene can be used for the identification of exported products in this bacterium.

  19. DHPLC/SURVEYOR nuclease: a sensitive, rapid and affordable method to analyze BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilato, Brunella; De Summa, Simona; Danza, Katia; Papadimitriou, Stavros; Zaccagna, Paolo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for about 10% of all breast cancers and BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified as validated susceptibility genes for this pathology. Testing for BRCA gene mutations is usually based on a pre-screening approach, such as the partial denaturation DHPLC method, and capillary direct sequencing. However, this approach is time consuming due to the large size of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Recently, a new low cost and time saving DHPLC protocol has been developed to analyze gene mutations by using SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease digestion and DHPLC analysis. A subset of 90 patients, enrolled in the Genetic Counseling Program of the National Cancer Centre of Bari (Italy), was performed to validate this approach. Previous retrospective analysis showed that 9/90 patients (10%) were mutated in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and these data were confirmed by the present approach. DNA samples underwent touchdown PCR and, subsequently, SURVEYOR(®) nuclease digestion. BRCA1 and BRCA2 amplicons were divided into groups depending on amplicon size to allow multiamplicon digestion. The product of this reaction were analyzed on Transgenomic WAVE Nucleic Acid High Sensitivity Fragment Analysis System. The operator who performed the DHPLC surveyor approach did not know the sequencing results at that time. The SURVEYOR(®) Nuclease DHPLC approach was able to detect all alterations with a sensitivity of 95%. Furthermore, in order to save time and reagents, a multiamplicon setting preparation was validated.

  20. Identification and Overexpression of a Bifunctional Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Ethanol Production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Just Mikkelsen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii contains four genes, adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE, predicted to code for alcohol dehydrogenases involved in ethanol metabolism. These alcohol dehydrogenases were characterized as NADP(H)-dependent primary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA), secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh......B), butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and NAD(H)-dependent bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE), respectively. Here we observed that AdhE is an important enzyme responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii based on the constructed adh knockout strains. An adhE knockout strain fails to produce...... ethanol as a fermentation product, while other adh knockout strains showed no significant difference from the wild type. Further analysis revealed that the ΔadhE strain was defective in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, but still maintained alcohol dehydrogenase activity. This showed that AdhE is the major...

  1. Preparation of highly hydrophobic cotton fabrics by modification with bifunctional silsesquioxanes in the sol-gel process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylak, Marcin; Maciejewski, Hieronim; Dutkiewicz, Agnieszka

    2016-11-01

    The surface modification of cotton fabrics was carried out using two types of bifunctional fluorinated silsesquioxanes with different ratios of functional groups. The modification was performed either by one- or two-step process. Two methods, the sol-gel and the dip coating method were used in different configurations. The heat treatment and the washing process were applied after modification. The wettability of cotton fabric was evaluated by measuring water contact angles (WCA). Changes in the surface morphology were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, SEM-LFD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Moreover, the modified fabrics were subjected to analysis of elemental composition of the applied coatings using SEM-EDS techniques. Highly hydrophobic textiles were obtained in all cases studied and one of the modifications resulted in imparting superhydrophobic properties. Most of impregnated textiles remained hydrophobic even after multiple washing process which shows that the studied modification is durable.

  2. The bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase of Tetrahymena thermophila provides a tool for molecular and biotechnology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiedtke Arno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and thymidylate synthase (TS are crucial enzymes in DNA synthesis. In alveolata both enzymes are expressed as one bifunctional enzyme. Results Loss of this essential enzyme activities after successful allelic assortment of knock out alleles yields an auxotrophic marker in ciliates. Here the cloning, characterisation and functional analysis of Tetrahymena thermophila's DHFR-TS is presented. A first aspect of the presented work relates to destruction of DHFR-TS enzyme function in an alveolate thereby causing an auxotrophy for thymidine. A second aspect is to knock in an expression cassette encoding for a foreign gene with subsequent expression of the target protein. Conclusion This system avoids the use of antibiotics or other drugs and therefore is of high interest for biotechnological applications.

  3. The cation channel mucolipin-1 is a bifunctional protein that facilitates membrane remodeling via its serine lipase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPlante, Janice M; Falardeau, John L; Brown, Edward M; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Vassilev, Peter M

    2011-04-01

    Phospholipase modulators have been shown to affect the topology of lipid bilayers and the formation of tubulo-vesicular structures, but the specific endogenous phospholipases involved have yet to be identified. Here we show that TRPML1 (MLN1), a Ca(2+)-permeable channel, contributes to membrane remodeling through a serine lipase consensus domain, and thus represents a novel type of bifunctional protein. Remarkably, this serine lipase active site determines the ability of MLN1 to generate tubulo-vesicular extensions in mucolipin-1-expressing oocytes, human fibroblasts and model membrane vesicles. Our demonstration that MLN1 is involved in membrane remodeling and the formation of extensions suggests that it may play a role in the formation of cellular processes linked to the late endosome/lysosome (LE/L) pathway. MLN1 is absent or mutated in patients with mucolipidosis IV (MLIV), a lysosomal disorder with devastating neurological and other consequences. This study provides potential insight into the pathophysiology of MLIV.

  4. A bi-functional device for self-powered electrochromic window and self-rechargeable transparent battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinmin; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Le; Jiao, Zhihui; Xie, Huaqing; Lou, Xiong Wen (David); Wei Sun, Xiao

    2014-09-01

    Electrochromic smart windows are regarded as a good choice for green buildings. However, conventional devices need external biases to operate, which causes additional energy consumption. Here we report a self-powered electrochromic window, which can be used as a self-rechargeable battery. We use aluminium to reduce Prussian blue (PB, blue in colour) to Prussian white (PW, colourless) in potassium chloride electrolyte, realizing a device capable of self-bleaching. Interestingly, the device can be self-recovered (gaining blue appearance again) by simply disconnecting the aluminium and PB electrodes, which is due to the spontaneous oxidation of PW to PB by the dissolved oxygen in aqueous solution. The self-operated bleaching and colouration suggest another important function of the device: a self-rechargeable transparent battery. Thus the PB/aluminium device we report here is bifunctional, that is, it is a self-powered electrochromic window as well as a self-rechargeable transparent battery.

  5. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP’s Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Kenny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%–60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP’s interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10, which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex.

  6. Synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative and its conjugation to RNA for in vitro selection of a cytidine deaminase ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rublack, Nico; Müller, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the generation of functional RNAs by in vitro selection has become a standard technique. Apart from aptamers for simple binding of defined ligands, also RNAs for catalysis of chemical reactions have been selected. In the latter case, a key step often is the conjugation of one of the two reactants to the library, requiring suitable strategies for terminal or internal RNA functionalization. With the aim of selecting a ribozyme for deamination of cytidine, we have set up a selection scheme involving the attachment of the cytidine acting as deamination substrate to the 3'-terminus of the RNAs in the library, and library immobilization. Here, we report the synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative suitable for conjugation to RNA and linkage of the conjugated library to a streptavidine-coated surface. Successful conjugation of the cytidine derivative to the 3'-terminus of a model RNA is demonstrated.

  7. Synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative and its conjugation to RNA for in vitro selection of a cytidine deaminase ribozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Rublack

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, the generation of functional RNAs by in vitro selection has become a standard technique. Apart from aptamers for simple binding of defined ligands, also RNAs for catalysis of chemical reactions have been selected. In the latter case, a key step often is the conjugation of one of the two reactants to the library, requiring suitable strategies for terminal or internal RNA functionalization. With the aim of selecting a ribozyme for deamination of cytidine, we have set up a selection scheme involving the attachment of the cytidine acting as deamination substrate to the 3'-terminus of the RNAs in the library, and library immobilization. Here, we report the synthesis of a bifunctional cytidine derivative suitable for conjugation to RNA and linkage of the conjugated library to a streptavidine-coated surface. Successful conjugation of the cytidine derivative to the 3'-terminus of a model RNA is demonstrated.

  8. Evaluation of 64Cu-labeled bifunctional chelate-bombesin conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Mohand, Samia; Fournier, Patrick; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Kiefer, Garry E; Jurek, Paul; Ferreira, Cara L; Bénard, François; Guérin, Brigitte

    2011-08-17

    Several bifunctional chelates (BFCs) were investigated as carriers of (64)Cu for PET imaging. The most widely used chelator for (64)Cu labeling of BFCs is DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N'''-tretraacetic acid), even though this complex exhibits only moderate in vivo stability. In this study, we prepared a series of alternative chelator-peptide conjugates labeled with (64)Cu, measured in vitro receptor binding affinities in human breast cancer T47D cells expressing the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and compared their in vivo stability in mice. DOTA-, NOTA-(1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid), PCTA-(3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic acid), and Oxo-DO3A-(1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-4,7,10-triacetic acid) peptide conjugates were prepared using H(2)N-Aoc-[d-Tyr(6),βAla(11),Thi(13),Nle(14)]bombesin(6-14) (BBN) as a peptide template. The BBN moiety was selected since it binds with high affinity to the GRPR, which is overexpressed on human breast cancer cells. A convenient synthetic approach for the attachment of aniline-BFC to peptides on solid support is also presented. To facilitate the attachment of the aniline-PCTA and aniline-Oxo-DO3A to the peptide via an amide bond, a succinyl spacer was introduced at the N-terminus of BBN. The partially protected aniline-BFC (p-H(2)N-Bn-PCTA(Ot-Bu)(3) or p-H(2)N-Bn-DO3A(Ot-Bu)(3)) was then coupled to the resulting N-terminal carboxylic acid preactivated with DEPBT/ClHOBt on resin. After cleavage and purification, the peptide-conjugates were labeled with (64)Cu using [(64)Cu]Cu(OAc)(2) in 0.1 M ammonium acetate buffer at 100 °C for 15 min. Labeling efficacy was >90% for all peptides; Oxo-DO3A-BBN was incubated an additional 150 min at 100 °C to achieve this high yield. Specific activities varied from 76 to 101 TBq/mmol. Competition assays on T47D cells showed that all BFC-BBN complexes retained high affinity for the GRPR. All BFC-BBN (64)Cu

  9. Structure of the phosphotransferase domain of the bifunctional aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyde A; Toth, Marta; Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Frase, Hilary; Vakulenko, Sergei B

    2014-06-01

    The bifunctional acetyltransferase(6')-Ie-phosphotransferase(2'')-Ia [AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia] is the most important aminoglycoside-resistance enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, conferring resistance to almost all known aminoglycoside antibiotics in clinical use. Owing to its importance, this enzyme has been the focus of intensive research since its isolation in the mid-1980s but, despite much effort, structural details of AAC(6')-Ie-APH(2'')-Ia have remained elusive. The structure of the Mg2GDP complex of the APH(2'')-Ia domain of the bifunctional enzyme has now been determined at 2.3 Å resolution. The structure of APH(2'')-Ia is reminiscent of the structures of other aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, having a two-domain architecture with the nucleotide-binding site located at the junction of the two domains. Unlike the previously characterized APH(2'')-IIa and APH(2'')-IVa enzymes, which are capable of utilizing both ATP and GTP as the phosphate donors, APH(2'')-Ia uses GTP exclusively in the phosphorylation of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, and in this regard closely resembles the GTP-dependent APH(2'')-IIIa enzyme. In APH(2'')-Ia this GTP selectivity is governed by the presence of a `gatekeeper' residue, Tyr100, the side chain of which projects into the active site and effectively blocks access to the adenine-binding template. Mutation of this tyrosine residue to a less bulky phenylalanine provides better access for ATP to the NTP-binding template and converts APH(2'')-Ia into a dual-specificity enzyme.

  10. A Nanostructured Bifunctional platform for Sensing of Glucose Biomarker in Artificial Saliva: Synergy in hybrid Pt/Au surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo-Pereira, Paulo A; Shimizu, Flávio M; Coelho, Dyovani; Piazzeta, Maria H O; Gobbi, Angelo L; Machado, Sergio A S; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2016-12-15

    We report on a bimetallic, bifunctional electrode where a platinum (Pt) surface was patterned with nanostructured gold (Au) fingers with different film thicknesses, which was functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOx) to yield a highly sensitive glucose biosensor. This was achieved by using selective adsorption of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) onto Au fingers, which allowed GOx immobilization only onto the Au-SAM surface. This modified electrode was termed bifunctional because it allowed to simultaneously immobilize the biomolecule (GOx) on gold to catalyze glucose, and detect hydrogen peroxide on Pt sites. Optimized electrocatalytic activity was reached for the architecture Pt/Au-SAM/GOx with 50nm thickness of Au, where synergy between Pt and Au allowed for detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at a low applied potential (0V vs. Ag/AgCl). Detection was performed for H2O2 in the range between 4.7 and 102.7 nmol L(-1), with detection limit of 3.4×10(-9) mol L(-1) (3.4 nmol L(-1)) and an apparent Michaelis-Menten rate constant of 3.2×10(-6)molL(-1), which is considerably smaller than similar devices with monometallic electrodes. The methodology was validated by measuring glucose in artificial saliva, including in the presence of interferents. The synergy between Pt and Au was confirmed in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements with an increased electron transfer, compared to bare Pt and Au electrodes. The approach for fabricating the reproducible bimetallic Pt/Au electrodes is entirely generic and may be explored for other types of biosensors and biodevices where advantage can be taken of the combination of the two metals.

  11. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Comeron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1 genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2 identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3 screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  12. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2015-04-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S.cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S.cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production. © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.

  13. Dissection of splicing regulation at an endogenous locus by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated gene editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cristea

    Full Text Available Sequences governing RNA splicing are difficult to study in situ due to the great difficulty of traditional targeted mutagenesis. Zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN technology allows for the rapid and efficient introduction of site-specific mutations into mammalian chromosomes. Using a ZFN pair along with a donor plasmid to manipulate the outcomes of DNA repair, we introduced several discrete, targeted mutations into the fourth intron of the endogenous BAX gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Putative lariat branch points, the polypyrimidine tract, and the splice acceptor site were targeted. We recovered numerous otherwise isogenic clones carrying the intended mutations and analyzed the effect of each on BAX pre-mRNA splicing. Mutation of one of three possible branch points, the polypyrimidine tract, and the splice acceptor site all caused exclusion of exon five from BAX mRNA. Interestingly, these exon-skipping mutations allowed usage of cryptic splice acceptor sites within intron four. These data demonstrate that ZFN-mediated gene editing is a highly effective tool for dissection of pre-mRNA splicing regulatory sequences in their endogenous context.

  14. Efficient Designer Nuclease-Based Homologous Recombination Enables Direct PCR Screening for Footprintless Targeted Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Sylvia Merkert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic engineering of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs via customized designer nucleases has been shown to be significantly more efficient than conventional gene targeting, but still typically depends on the introduction of additional genetic selection elements. In our study, we demonstrate the efficient nonviral and selection-independent gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Our high efficiencies of up to 1.6% of gene-targeted hiPSCs, accompanied by a low background of randomly inserted transgenes, eliminated the need for antibiotic or fluorescence-activated cell sorting selection, and allowed the use of short donor oligonucleotides for footprintless gene editing. Gene-targeted hiPSC clones were established simply by direct PCR screening. This optimized approach allows targeted transgene integration into safe harbor sites for more predictable and robust expression and enables the straightforward generation of disease-corrected, patient-derived iPSC lines for research purposes and, ultimately, for future clinical applications.

  15. Evaluation of TCR Gene Editing Achieved by TALENs, CRISPR/Cas9, and megaTAL Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Mark J; Webber, Beau R; Knipping, Friederike; Lonetree, Cara-lin; Tennis, Nicole; DeFeo, Anthony P; McElroy, Amber N; Starker, Colby G; Lee, Catherine; Merkel, Sarah; Lund, Troy C; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C; Voytas, Daniel F; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Gabriel, Richard; Hippen, Keli L; Miller, Jeffrey S; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Tolar, Jakub; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-03-01

    Present adoptive immunotherapy strategies are based on the re-targeting of autologous T-cells to recognize tumor antigens. As T-cell properties may vary significantly between patients, this approach can result in significant variability in cell potency that may affect therapeutic outcome. More consistent results could be achieved by generating allogeneic cells from healthy donors. An impediment to such an approach is the endogenous T-cell receptors present on T-cells, which have the potential to direct dangerous off-tumor antihost reactivity. To address these limitations, we assessed the ability of three different TCR-α-targeted nucleases to disrupt T-cell receptor expression in primary human T-cells. We optimized the conditions for the delivery of each reagent and assessed off-target cleavage. The megaTAL and CRISPR/Cas9 reagents exhibited the highest disruption efficiency combined with low levels of toxicity and off-target cleavage, and we used them for a translatable manufacturing process to produce safe cellular substrates for next-generation immunotherapies.

  16. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  17. Generation of Knockout Rats with X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (X-SCID) Using Zinc-Finger Nucleases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashimo, Tomoji; Takizawa, Akiko; Voigt, Birger; Yoshimi, Kazuto; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kuramoto, Takashi; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES) cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. Methodology/Principal Findings We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg) locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID). Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. Conclusions and Significance The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies. PMID:20111598

  18. Generation of knockout rats with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID using zinc-finger nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoji Mashimo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the rat is extensively used as a laboratory model, the inability to utilize germ line-competent rat embryonic stem (ES cells has been a major drawback for studies that aim to elucidate gene functions. Recently, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs were successfully used to create genome-specific double-stranded breaks and thereby induce targeted gene mutations in a wide variety of organisms including plants, drosophila, zebrafish, etc. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here on ZFN-induced gene targeting of the rat interleukin 2 receptor gamma (Il2rg locus, where orthologous human and mouse mutations cause X-linked severe combined immune deficiency (X-SCID. Co-injection of mRNAs encoding custom-designed ZFNs into the pronucleus of fertilized oocytes yielded genetically modified offspring at rates greater than 20%, which possessed a wide variety of deletion/insertion mutations. ZFN-modified founders faithfully transmitted their genetic changes to the next generation along with the severe combined immune deficiency phenotype. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The efficient and rapid generation of gene knockout rats shows that using ZFN technology is a new strategy for creating gene-targeted rat models of human diseases. In addition, the X-SCID rats that were established in this study will be valuable in vivo tools for evaluating drug treatment or gene therapy as well as model systems for examining the treatment of xenotransplanted malignancies.

  19. Evaluation of OPEN zinc finger nucleases for direct gene targeting of the ROSA26 locus in mouse embryos.

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    Mario Hermann

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs enable precise genome modification in a variety of organisms and cell types. Commercial ZFNs were reported to enhance gene targeting directly in mouse zygotes, whereas similar approaches using publicly available resources have not yet been described. Here we report precise targeted mutagenesis of the mouse genome using Oligomerized Pool Engineering (OPEN ZFNs. OPEN ZFN can be constructed using publicly available resources and therefore provide an attractive alternative for academic researchers. Two ZFN pairs specific to the mouse genomic locus gt(ROSA26Sor were generated by OPEN selections and used for gene disruption and homology-mediated gene replacement in single cell mouse embryos. One specific ZFN pair facilitated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ-mediated gene disruption when expressed in mouse zygotes. We also observed a single homologous recombination (HR-driven gene replacement event when this ZFN pair was co-injected with a targeting vector. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of achieving both gene ablation through NHEJ and gene replacement by HR by using the OPEN ZFN technology directly in mouse zygotes.

  20. Improved Genome Editing Efficiency and Flexibility Using Modified Oligonucleotides with TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Renaud

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing has now been reported in many systems using TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases. Precise mutations can be introduced during homology-directed repair with donor DNA carrying the wanted sequence edit, but efficiency is usually lower than for gene knockout and optimal strategies have not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that using phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotides strongly enhances genome editing efficiency of single-stranded oligonucleotide donors in cultured cells. In addition, it provides better design flexibility, allowing insertions more than 100 bp long. Despite previous reports of phosphorothioate-modified oligonucleotide toxicity, clones of edited cells are readily isolated and targeted sequence insertions are achieved in rats and mice with very high frequency, allowing for homozygous loxP site insertion at the mouse ROSA locus in particular. Finally, when detected, imprecise knockin events exhibit indels that are asymmetrically positioned, consistent with genome editing taking place by two steps of single-strand annealing.