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Sample records for bifunctional mitochondrial proteins

  1. Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Spinner, N B; King, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrially encoded proteins can be detected in human lymphocytes by sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Using an SDS-polyacrylamide 8 M urea system, 17 mitochondrially encoded proteins are distinguishable. Three of these (ME-6, ME-8, and ME-17) were polymorphic among 92 individuals screened, and these polymorphisms are reported here for the first time. With SDS-polyacrylamide electrophoresis without urea, 18 mitochondrial proteins are de...

  2. Hsp90 inhibition decreases mitochondrial protein turnover.

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    Daciana H Margineantu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells treated with hsp90 inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic changes, including an expansion of the mitochondrial compartment, accompanied by mitochondrial fragmentation and condensed mitochondrial morphology, with ultimate compromise of mitochondrial integrity and apoptosis. FINDINGS: We identified several mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits, including several encoded by mtDNA, that are upregulated by hsp90 inhibitors, without corresponding changes in mRNA abundance. Post-transcriptional accumulation of mitochondrial proteins observed with hsp90 inhibitors is also seen in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Detailed studies of the OSCP subunit of mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase revealed the presence of mono- and polyubiquitinated OSCP in mitochondrial fractions. We demonstrate that processed OSCP undergoes retrotranslocation to a trypsin-sensitive form associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. Inhibition of proteasome or hsp90 function results in accumulation of both correctly targeted and retrotranslocated mitochondrial OSCP. CONCLUSIONS: Cytosolic turnover of mitochondrial proteins demonstrates a novel connection between mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments through the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Analogous to defective protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, a mitochondrial unfolded protein response may play a role in the apoptotic effects of hsp90 and proteasome inhibitors.

  3. Sorting pathways of mitochondrial inner membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlke, Kerstin; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Martin, Jörg; Horwich, Arthur; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    Two distinct pathways of sorting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial inner membrane proteins are described. In the first pathway, precursor proteins that carry amino-terminal targeting signals are initially translocated via contact sites between both mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. They become proteolytically processed, interact with the 60-kDa heat-shock protein hsp60 in the matrix and are retranslocated to the inner membrane. The sorting of subunit 9 of Neur...

  4. Characterization of Afb, a novel bifunctional protein in Streptococcus agalactiae

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    Sanaz Dehbashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Streptococcus agalactiae is the leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in newborns and results in pneumonia and bacteremia in adults. A number of S. agalactiae components are involved in colonization of target cells. Destruction of peptidoglycan and division of covalently linked daughter cells is mediated by autolysins. In this study, autolytic activity and plasma binding ability of AFb novel recombinant protein of S. agalactiae was investigated.Materials and Methods: The gbs1805 gene was cloned and expressed. E. coli strains DH5α and BL21 were used as cloning and expression hosts, respectively. After purification, antigenicity and binding ability to plasma proteins of the recombinant protein was evaluated.Results: AFb, the 18KDa protein was purified successfully. The insoluble mature protein revealed the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This insoluble mature protein revealed that it has the ability to bind to fibrinogen and fibronectin plasma proteins. Furthermore, in silico analysis demonstrated the AFb has an autolytic activity.Conclusions: AFb is a novel protein capable of binding to fibrinogen and fibronectin. This findings lay a ground work for further investigation of the role of the bacteria in adhesion and colonization to the host. Keywords: Streptococcus agalactiae, Fibrinogen, Fibronectin, Autolysin

  5. Mitochondrial Protein Dynamics in Cardiac Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac mitochondrial proteome contains ~1,500 distinct proteins that carry out necessary metabolic and energetic processes in the heart. To sustain cardiac function, the mitochondrial proteome must be maintained in constant renewal, or turnover, especially under stress conditions. Disruptions of protein turnover can lead to protein damage and proteotoxicity, a hallmark of many heart disease etiologies. Current quantitative proteomics experiments largely focus on the measurement of the st...

  6. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

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    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  7. Legionella pneumophila Secretes a Mitochondrial Carrier Protein during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Pavel Dolezal; Margareta Aili; Janette Tong; Jhih-Hang Jiang; Marobbio, Carlo M.T.; Sau Fung Lee; Ralf Schuelein; Simon Belluzzo; Eva Binova; Aurelie Mousnier; Gad Frankel; Giulia Giannuzzi; Ferdinando Palmieri; Kipros Gabriel; Thomas Naderer

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary Mitochondrial carrier proteins evolved during endosymbiosis to transport substrates across the mitochondrial inner membrane. As such the proteins are associated exclusively with eukaryotic organisms. Despite this, we identified putative mitochondrial carrier proteins in the genomes of different intracellular bacterial pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. We named the mitochondrial carrier protein from L. pneumophila LncP and...

  8. On the molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein deficiency type III.

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    Maija L Mehtälä

    Full Text Available Molecular basis of D-bifunctional protein (D-BP deficiency was studied with wild type and five disease-causing variants of 3R-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase fragment of the human MFE-2 (multifunctional enzyme type 2 protein. Complementation analysis in vivo in yeast and in vitro enzyme kinetic and stability determinants as well as in silico stability and structural fluctuation calculations were correlated with clinical data of known patients. Despite variations not affecting the catalytic residues, enzyme kinetic performance (K(m, V(max and k(cat of the recombinant protein variants were compromised to a varying extent and this can be judged as the direct molecular cause for D-BP deficiency. Protein stability plays an additional role in producing non-functionality of MFE-2 in case structural variations affect cofactor or substrate binding sites. Structure-function considerations of the variant proteins matched well with the available data of the patients.

  9. Neurodegeneration in D-bifunctional protein deficiency: diagnostic clues and natural history using serial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report serial neurodegenerative changes on neuroimaging in a rare peroxisomal disease called D-bifunctional protein deficiency. The pattern of posterior to anterior demyelination with white matter disease resembles X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We feel this case is important to (1) highlight that D-bifunctional protein deficiency should be considered in cases where the neuroimaging resembles X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, (2) to show different stages of progression to help identify this disease using neuroimaging in children, and (3) to show that neuroimaging suggesting a leukodystrophy can warrant peroxisomal beta-oxidation studies in skin fibroblasts even when plasma very long chain fatty acids are normal. (orig.)

  10. Neurodegeneration in D-bifunctional protein deficiency: diagnostic clues and natural history using serial magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Aneal [University of Calgary, Department of Medical Genetics and Pediatrics, Alberta Children' s Hospital, Calgary, AB (Canada); Wei, Xing-Chang [University of Calgary, Department of Radiology, Alberta Children' s Hospital, Calgary, AB (Canada); Snyder, Floyd F. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Biochemical Genetics Laboratory, Calgary, AB (Canada); Mah, Jean K. [University of Calgary, Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Calgary, AB (Canada); Waterham, Hans; Wanders, Ronald J.A. [University of Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Lab Genetic Metabolic Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    We report serial neurodegenerative changes on neuroimaging in a rare peroxisomal disease called D-bifunctional protein deficiency. The pattern of posterior to anterior demyelination with white matter disease resembles X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. We feel this case is important to (1) highlight that D-bifunctional protein deficiency should be considered in cases where the neuroimaging resembles X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, (2) to show different stages of progression to help identify this disease using neuroimaging in children, and (3) to show that neuroimaging suggesting a leukodystrophy can warrant peroxisomal beta-oxidation studies in skin fibroblasts even when plasma very long chain fatty acids are normal. (orig.)

  11. Mitochondrial protein import under kinase surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Opalińska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the simplicity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,its basic cellular machinery tremendously mirrors that of higher eukaryotic counterparts. Thus, this unicellular organism turned out to be an invaluable model system to study the countless mechanisms that govern life of the cell. Recently, it has also enabled the deciphering of signalling pathways that control flux of mitochondrial proteins to the organelle according to metabolic requirements. For decades mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles that are only partially incorporated into cellular signalling networks. Consequently, only little has been known about the role of reversible phosphorylation as a meaningful mechanism that orchestrates mitochondrial biology accordingly to cellular needs. Therefore, research in this direction has been vastly neglected. However, findings over the past few years have changed this view and new exciting fields in mitochondrial biology have emerged. Here, we summarize recent discoveries in the yeast model system that point towards a vital role of reversible phosphorylation in regulation of mitochondrial protein import.

  12. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Gilad; Ziv, Tamar; Braten, Ori; Admon, Arie; Udasin, Ronald G; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems - at least partially - in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. PMID:27157140

  13. Efficient refolding of the bifunctional therapeutic fusion protein VAS-TRAIL by a triple agent solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiying; Wang, Zhanqing; Huang, Liying; Shen, Yaling

    2016-09-01

    VAS-TRAIL is a bifunctional fusion protein that combines anti-angiogenic activity with tumor-selective apoptotic activity for enhanced anti-tumor efficacy. VAS-TRAIL is expressed as inclusion body in Escherichia coli, but protein refolding is difficult to achieve and results in low yields of bioactive protein. In this study, we describe an efficient method for VAS-TRAIL refolding. The solubilization of aggregated VAS-TRAIL was achieved by a triple agent solution, which consists of an alkaline solution (pH 11.5) containing 0.4M l-arginine and 2M urea. The solubilized protein showed high purity and preserved secondary structure according to fluorescence properties. VAS-TRAIL refolding was performed through stepwise dialysis and resulted in more than 50% recovery of the soluble protein. The function of l-arginine was additive with alkaline pH, as shown by the significant improvement in refolding yield (≈30%) by l-arginine-containing solubilization solutions compared with alkaline solubilization solutions without l-arginine. The refolded VAS-TRAIL also showed β-sheet structures and the propensity for oligomerization. Bioassays showed that the refolded fusion protein exhibited the expected activities, including its apoptotic activities toward tumor and endothelial cells, which proposed its promising therapeutic potential. PMID:26358405

  14. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Neupert, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this...

  15. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and energy metabolism

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    Rosa Anna Busiello

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the metabolic factors that contribute to energy metabolism (EM is critical for the development of new treatments for obesity and related diseases. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is not perfectly coupled to ATP synthesis, and the process of proton-leak plays a crucial role. Proton-leak accounts for a significant part of the resting metabolic rate and therefore enhancement of this process represents a potential target for obesity treatment. Since their discovery, uncoupling proteins have stimulated great interest due to their involvement in mitochondrial-inducible proton-leak. Despite the widely accepted uncoupling/thermogenic effect of uncoupling protein one (UCP1, which was the first in this family to be discovered, the reactions catalyzed by its homologue UCP3 and the physiological role remain under debate.This review provides an overview of the role played by UCP1 and UCP3 in mitochondrial uncoupling/functionality as well as EM and suggests that they are a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and its related diseases such as type II diabetes mellitus.

  16. Mitochondrial genomes are retained by selective constraints on protein targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkholm, Patrik; Harish, Ajith; Hagström, Erik; Ernst, Andreas M; Andersson, Siv G E

    2015-08-18

    Mitochondria are energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells considered to be of bacterial origin. The mitochondrial genome has evolved under selection for minimization of gene content, yet it is not known why not all mitochondrial genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome. Here, we predict that hydrophobic membrane proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genomes would be recognized by the signal recognition particle and targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum if they were nuclear-encoded and translated in the cytoplasm. Expression of the mitochondrially encoded proteins Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, Apocytochrome b, and ATP synthase subunit 6 in the cytoplasm of HeLa cells confirms export to the endoplasmic reticulum. To examine the extent to which the mitochondrial proteome is driven by selective constraints within the eukaryotic cell, we investigated the occurrence of mitochondrial protein domains in bacteria and eukaryotes. The accessory protein domains of the oxidative phosphorylation system are unique to mitochondria, indicating the evolution of new protein folds. Most of the identified domains in the accessory proteins of the ribosome are also found in eukaryotic proteins of other functions and locations. Overall, one-third of the protein domains identified in mitochondrial proteins are only rarely found in bacteria. We conclude that the mitochondrial genome has been maintained to ensure the correct localization of highly hydrophobic membrane proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that selective constraints on the eukaryotic cell have played a major role in modulating the evolution of the mitochondrial genome and proteome. PMID:26195779

  17. Multiple proteins with essential mitochondrial functions have glycosylated isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R.; Berninsone, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleocytosolic and secreted proteins are commonly glycosylated. However, reports of glycosylated mitochondrial proteins are rare. Using lectin chromatography on bovine heart, we detected low-abundance glycoforms of nuclear-encoded proteins with well-established mitochondrial function: pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α, NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 3, ADP/ATP translocase, ATP synthase d and oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein. Notably, the latter two have been previously...

  18. The interplay between components of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor studied using purified components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Marom, Milit; Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Maoz, Sharon; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-11-23

    The final step of protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by a translocation motor composed of 1) the matrix-localized, ATP-hydrolyzing, 70-kDa heat shock protein mHsp70; 2) its anchor to the import channel, Tim44; 3) the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1; and 4) a J-domain-containing complex of co-chaperones, Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16. Despite its essential role in the biogenesis of mitochondria, the mechanism by which the translocation motor functions is still largely unknown. The goal of this work was to carry out a structure-function analysis of the mitochondrial translocation motor utilizing purified components, with an emphasis on the formation of the Tim44-mHsp70 complex. To this end, we purified Tim44 and monitored its interaction with other components of the motor using cross-linking with bifunctional reagents. The effects of nucleotides, the J-domain-containing components, and the P5 peptide (CALLSAPRR, representing part of the mitochondrial targeting signal of aspartate aminotransferase) on the formation of the translocation motor were examined. Our results show that only the peptide and nucleotides, but not J-domain-containing proteins, affect the Tim44-mHsp70 interaction. Additionally, binding of Tim44 to mHsp70 prevents the formation of a complex between the latter and Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16. Thus, mutually exclusive interactions between various components of the motor with mHsp70 regulate its functional cycle. The results are discussed in light of known models for the function of the mitochondrial translocation motor. PMID:17881357

  19. Inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis by oxazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, E E; Ferguson, M; Bentley, A T; Marks, T A

    2006-06-01

    The effects of a variety of oxazolidinones, with different antibacterial potencies, including linezolid, on mitochondrial protein synthesis were determined in intact mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and rabbit heart and bone marrow. The results demonstrate that a general feature of the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics is the inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis. Inhibition was similar in mitochondria from all tissues studied. Further, oxazolidinones that were very potent as antibiotics were uniformly potent in inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis. These results were compared to the inhibitory profiles of other antibiotics that function by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis. Of these, chloramphenicol and tetracycline were significant inhibitors of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis while the macrolides, lincosamides, and aminoglycosides were not. Development of future antibiotics from the oxazolidinone class will have to evaluate potential mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:16723564

  20. Yeast PPR proteins, watchdogs of mitochondrial gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert, Christopher J.; Golik, Pawel; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    PPR proteins are a family of ubiquitous RNA-binding factors, found in all the Eukaryotic lineages, and are particularly numerous in higher plants. According to recent bioinformatic analyses, yeast genomes encode from 10 (in S. pombe) to 15 (in S. cerevisiae) PPR proteins. All of these proteins are mitochondrial and very often interact with the mitochondrial membrane. Apart from the general factors, RNA polymerase and RNase P, most yeast PPR proteins are involved in the stability and/or transl...

  1. In vitro association of mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease with mitochondrial heat-shock proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific antibodies against the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease and heat-shock proteins were used to study the association of these proteins with an abnormal bacterial protein, CRAG. It was shown that the mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease from rat liver and Zajdela hepatoma bind to the CRAG protein and that this binding was mediated through the heat-shock proteins. It was also demonstrated that the protease associated with heat-shock proteins is capable of degrading large proteins as well as small peptides in an ATP-dependent fashion. Zajdela hepatoma mitochondria, with enhanced mitochondrial proteolysis, were shown to contain more ATP-dependent protease associated with heat-shock proteins. (author)

  2. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik;

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial...

  3. Linear Discriminant Analysis Identifies Mitochondrially Localized Proteins in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsing, Lisette; Klawonn, Frank; Sassen, Wiebke Anna; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Probst, Corinna; Hust, Michael; Mendel, Ralf R; Kruse, Tobias; Jänsch, Lothar

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role as powerhouses, mitochondria play a pivotal role in the spatial organization of numerous enzymatic functions. They are connected to the ER, and many pathways are organized through the mitochondrial membranes. Thus, the precise definition of mitochondrial proteomes remains a challenging task. Here, we have established a proteomic strategy to accurately determine the mitochondrial localization of proteins from the fungal model organism Neurospora crassa. This strategy relies on both highly pure mitochondria as well as the quantitative monitoring of mitochondrial components along their consecutive enrichment. Pure intact mitochondria were obtained by a multistep approach combining differential and density Percoll (ultra) centrifugations. When compared with three other intermediate enrichment stages, peptide sequencing and quantitative profiling of pure mitochondrial fractions revealed prototypic regulatory profiles of per se mitochondrial components. These regulatory profiles constitute a distinct cluster defining the mitochondrial compartment and support linear discriminant analyses, which rationalized the annotation process. In total, this approach experimentally validated the mitochondrial localization of 512 proteins including 57 proteins that had not been reported for N. crassa before. PMID:26215788

  4. Lipid droplet meets a mitochondrial protein to regulate adipocyte lipolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Andrew S.; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Soni, Krishnakant G.; Jedrychowski, Mark P.; Yan, Qing-Wu; Graham, Christine E.; Bowman, Thomas A.; Mansur, Ayla

    2011-01-01

    Optic Atrophy 1 (OPA1) is well known as a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. Now, a new function of OPA1 is uncovered: recruiting protein kinase A to lipid droplets, thereby controlling the activity of perilipin, and hence lipolysis.

  5. Inhibition of Mammalian Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis by Oxazolidinones

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, E. E.; Ferguson, M; Bentley, A T; Marks, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a variety of oxazolidinones, with different antibacterial potencies, including linezolid, on mitochondrial protein synthesis were determined in intact mitochondria isolated from rat heart and liver and rabbit heart and bone marrow. The results demonstrate that a general feature of the oxazolidinone class of antibiotics is the inhibition of mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis. Inhibition was similar in mitochondria from all tissues studied. Further, oxazolidinones that wer...

  6. The use of bifunctional polyethyleneglycol derivatives for coupling of proteins to and cross-linking of collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J-S; Noah, E M; Pallua, N; Steffens, G C M

    2002-11-01

    The realization of three-dimensional (3D) degradable matrices which slowly release bio-active components represents a major challenge in the field of tissue engineering. In this paper we report on the usage of commercially available bifunctional agents for both the covalent coupling of proteins to and the cross-linking of collagen matrices. Proteins - horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was used as a model protein - were cross-linked with either a homobifunctional (disuccinimidyldisuccinatepolyethylene-glycol) or a heterobifunctional (N-hydroxysuccinimidylvinylsulfonepolyethyleneglycol) agent. In the case of the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent the collagen matrices were previously modified with succinimidylacetylthioacetate in order to introduce sulfhydryl groups. As compared with control experiments a 10-fold and 50-fold increase of immobilized proteins were achieved with the homobifunctional and heterobifunctional cross-linker resp. The HRP-PEG conjugates demonstrated a better long-term stability as compared to the non-treated HRP. The effects of the cross-linking agents and the thiolation reagent succinimidylacetylthio acetate on the in vitro degradation of the collagen matrices by collagenase were also investigated. In particular the reaction with succinimidylacetylthio acetate appears to offer interesting opportunities both for coupling active proteins and modulating the degradation times of collagen matrices. PMID:15348172

  7. Genetics Home Reference: mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high risk for serious heart problems, breathing difficulties, coma, and sudden death. Signs and symptoms of mitochondrial ... management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related ...

  8. Functional Diversity of Human Mitochondrial J-proteins Is Independent of Their Association with the Inner Membrane Presequence Translocase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Devanjan; Srivastava, Shubhi; D'Silva, Patrick

    2016-08-12

    Mitochondrial J-proteins play a critical role in governing Hsp70 activity and, hence, are essential for organellar protein translocation and folding. In contrast to yeast, which has a single J-protein Pam18, humans involve two J-proteins, DnaJC15 and DnaJC19, associated with contrasting cellular phenotype, to transport proteins into the mitochondria. Mutation in DnaJC19 results in dilated cardiomyopathy and ataxia syndrome, whereas expression of DnaJC15 regulates the response of cancer cells to chemotherapy. In the present study we have comparatively assessed the biochemical properties of the J-protein paralogs in relation to their association with the import channel. Both DnaJC15 and DnaJC19 formed two distinct subcomplexes with Magmas at the import channel. Knockdown analysis suggested an essential role for Magmas and DnaJC19 in organellar protein translocation and mitochondria biogenesis, whereas DnaJC15 had dispensable supportive function. The J-proteins were found to have equal affinity for Magmas and could stimulate mitochondrial Hsp70 ATPase activity by equivalent levels. Interestingly, we observed that DnaJC15 exhibits bifunctional properties. At the translocation channel, it involves conserved interactions and mechanism to translocate the precursors into mitochondria. In addition to protein transport, DnaJC15 also showed a dual role in yeast where its expression elicited enhanced sensitivity of cells to cisplatin that required the presence of a functional J-domain. The amount of DnaJC15 expressed in the cell was directly proportional to the sensitivity of cells. Our analysis indicates that the differential cellular phenotype displayed by human mitochondrial J-proteins is independent of their activity and association with Magmas at the translocation channel. PMID:27330077

  9. Human Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein MRPL12 Interacts Directly with Mitochondrial RNA Polymerase to Modulate Mitochondrial Gene Expression*

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhibo; Cotney, Justin; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2007-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription machinery comprises a single subunit bacteriophage-related RNA polymerase, POLRMT, the high mobility group box DNA-binding protein h-mtTFA/TFAM, and two transcriptional co-activator proteins, h-mtTFB1 and h-mtTFB2 that also have rRNA methyltransferase activity. Recapitulation of specific initiation of transcription in vitro can be achieved by a complex of POLRMT, h-mtTFA, and either h-mtTFB1 or h-mtTFB2. However, the nature of mitochondrial transcrip...

  10. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simarro, Maria [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kedersha, Nancy [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A. [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhee, Kirsten [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika [Department of Cancer Biology at Dana Farber Institute, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Benarafa, Charaf [Theodor Kocher Institute, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Orduna, Anonio [Unidad de Investigacion, Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain); Anderson, Paul, E-mail: panderson@rics.bwh.harvard.edu [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  11. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. → The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. → Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  12. Axonal Protein Synthesis and the Regulation of Local Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  13. Axonal protein synthesis and the regulation of local mitochondrial function

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, B.B.; Gioio, A.E.; Hillefors, M.; Aschrafi, A.

    2009-01-01

    Axons and presynaptic nerve terminals of both invertebrate and mammalian SCG neurons contain a heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs and a local cytosolic protein synthetic system. Nearly one quarter of the total protein synthesized in these structural/functional domains of the neuron is destined for mitochondria. Acute inhibition of axonal protein synthesis markedly reduces the functional activity of mitochondria. The blockade of axonal protein into mitochondria had...

  14. Applied proteomics: mitochondrial proteins and effect on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mary F; Melov, Simon

    2002-03-01

    The identification of a majority of the polypeptides in mitochondria would be invaluable because they play crucial and diverse roles in many cellular processes and diseases. The endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major limiter of life as illustrated by studies in which the transgenic overexpression in invertebrates of catalytic antioxidant enzymes results in increased lifespans. Mitochondria have received considerable attention as a principal source---and target---of ROS. Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been implicated in heart disease including myocardial preconditioning, ischemia/reperfusion, and other pathologies. In addition, oxidative stress in the mitochondria is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, prion diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as well as aging itself. The rapidly emerging field of proteomics can provide powerful strategies for the characterization of mitochondrial proteins. Current approaches to mitochondrial proteomics include the creation of detailed catalogues of the protein components in a single sample or the identification of differentially expressed proteins in diseased or physiologically altered samples versus a reference control. It is clear that for any proteomics approach prefractionation of complex protein mixtures is essential to facilitate the identification of low-abundance proteins because the dynamic range of protein abundance within cells has been estimated to be as high as 10(7). The opportunities for identification of proteins directly involved in diseases associated with or caused by mitochondrial dysfunction are compelling. Future efforts will focus on linking genomic array information to actual protein levels in mitochondria. PMID:11884366

  15. Folding and Biogenesis of Mitochondrial Small Tim Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrain Ceh-Pavia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Correct and timely folding is critical to the function of all proteins. The importance of this is illustrated in the biogenesis of the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS “small Tim” proteins. Biogenesis of the small Tim proteins is regulated by dedicated systems or pathways, beginning with synthesis in the cytosol and ending with assembly of individually folded proteins into functional complexes in the mitochondrial IMS. The process is mostly centered on regulating the redox states of the conserved cysteine residues: oxidative folding is crucial for protein function in the IMS, but oxidized (disulfide bonded proteins cannot be imported into mitochondria. How the redox-sensitive small Tim precursor proteins are maintained in a reduced, import-competent form in the cytosol is not well understood. Recent studies suggest that zinc and the cytosolic thioredoxin system play a role in the biogenesis of these proteins. In the IMS, the mitochondrial import and assembly (MIA pathway catalyzes both import into the IMS and oxidative folding of the small Tim proteins. Finally, assembly of the small Tim complexes is a multistep process driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions; however, the chaperone function of the complex might require destabilization of these interactions to accommodate the substrate. Here, we review how folding of the small Tim proteins is regulated during their biogenesis, from maintenance of the unfolded precursors in the cytosol, to their import, oxidative folding, complex assembly and function in the IMS.

  16. Design of a bifunctional fusion protein for ovarian cancer drug delivery: single-chain anti-CA125 core-streptavidin fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Welson Wen-Shang; Das, Dipankar; McQuarrie, Stephen A; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a universal ovarian cancer cell targeting vehicle that can deliver biotinylated therapeutic drugs. A single-chain antibody variable domain (scFv) that recognizes the CA125 antigen of ovarian cancer cells was fused with a core-streptavidin domain (core-streptavidin-VL-VH and VL-VH-core-streptavidin orientations) using recombinant DNA technology and then expressed in Escherichia coli using the T7 expression system. The bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) was expressed in a shaker flask culture, extracted from the periplasmic soluble protein, and affinity purified using an IMAC column. The two distinct activities (biotin binding and anti-CA125) of the bfFp were demonstrated using ELISA, Western blot and confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). The ELISA method utilized human NIH OVCAR-3 cells along with biotinylated bovine serum albumin (B-BSA) or biotinylated liposomes, whereas, the Western blot involved probing with B-BSA. The CLSM study has shown specificity in binding to the OVCAR-3 cell-line. ELISA and Western blot studies have confirmed the bifunctional activity and specificity. In the presence of bfFp, there was enhanced binding of biotinylated antigen and liposome to OVCAR-3 cells. In contrast, the control EMT6 cells, which do not express the CA125 antigen, showed minimal binding of the bfFp. Consequently, bfFp based targeting of biotinylated therapeutic drugs, proteins, liposomes, or nanoparticles could be an alternative, convenient method to deliver effective therapy to ovarian cancer patients. Peritoneal infusion of the bfFp-therapeutic complex could also be effective in locally targeting the most common site of metastatic spread. PMID:17257818

  17. Conversion of β-carotene into astaxanthin: Two separate enzymes or a bifunctional hydroxylase-ketolase protein?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudiña Eduardo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Astaxanthin is a xanthophyll of great interest in animal nutrition and human health. The market prospect in the nutraceutics industries for this health-protective molecule is very promising. Astaxanthin is synthesized by several bacteria, algae and plants from β-carotene by the sequential action of two enzymes: a β-carotene, 3,3'-hydroxylase that introduces an hydroxyl group at the 3 (and 3' positions of each of the two β-ionone rings of β-carotene, and a β-carotene ketolase that introduces keto groups at carbons 4 and 4' of the β-ionone rings. Astaxanthin is also produced by the yeast-like basidiomycete Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. A gene crtS involved in the conversion of β-carotene to astaxanthin has been cloned simultaneously by two research groups. Complementation studies of X. dendrorhous mutants and expression analysis in Mucor circinelloides reveals that the CrtS enzyme is a β-carotene hydroxylase of the P-450 monooxygenase family that converts β-carotene to the hydroxylated derivatives β-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin, but it does not form astaxanthin or the ketolated intermediates in this fungus. A bifunctional β-carotene hydroxylase-ketolase activity has been proposed for the CrtS protein. The evidence for and against this hypothesis is analyzed in detail in this review.

  18. Targeting and plasticity of mitochondrial proteins revealed by proximity-specific ribosome profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Christopher C.; Jan, Calvin H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all mitochondrial proteins are nuclear-encoded and are targeted to their mitochondrial destination from the cytosol. Here, we used proximity-specific ribosome profiling to comprehensively measure translation at the mitochondrial surface in yeast. Most inner membrane proteins were co-translationally targeted to mitochondria, reminiscent of proteins entering the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Comparison between mitochondrial and ER localization demonstrated that the vast majority of protein...

  19. The mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP) coordinates mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis with iron sulfur cluster biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Jeong, Mi-Young; Wei, Peng; Chen, Yu-Chan; Gygi, Steven P; Winge, Dennis R; Rutter, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (FASII) and iron sulfur cluster (FeS) biogenesis are both vital biosynthetic processes within mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial acyl carrier protein (ACP), which has a well-known role in FASII, plays an unexpected and evolutionarily conserved role in FeS biogenesis. ACP is a stable and essential subunit of the eukaryotic FeS biogenesis complex. In the absence of ACP, the complex is destabilized resulting in a profound depletion of FeS throughout the cell. This role of ACP depends upon its covalently bound 4'-phosphopantetheine (4-PP)-conjugated acyl chain to support maximal cysteine desulfurase activity. Thus, it is likely that ACP is not simply an obligate subunit but also exploits the 4-PP-conjugated acyl chain to coordinate mitochondrial fatty acid and FeS biogenesis. PMID:27540631

  20. Protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated protein via bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiba, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are essential biological reactions occurring at inter- and intra-cellular levels. The analysis of their mechanism is generally required in order link to understand their various cellular functions. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), which is based on an enzymatic activity of luciferase, is a useful tool for investigating protein-protein interactions in live cells. The combination of the BRET system and biomolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) would provide us a better understanding of the hetero-oligomeric structural states of protein complexes. In this review, we discuss the application of BRET to the protein-protein interactions of mitochondrial-associated proteins and discuss its physiological relevance. PMID:27493852

  1. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  2. The Novel Tail-anchored Membrane Protein Mff Controls Mitochondrial and Peroxisomal Fission in Mammalian Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gandre-Babbe, Shilpa; van der Bliek, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    Few components of the mitochondrial fission machinery are known, even though mitochondrial fission is a complex process of vital importance for cell growth and survival. Here, we describe a novel protein that controls mitochondrial fission. This protein was identified in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen using Drosophila cells. The human homologue of this protein was named Mitochondrial fission factor (Mff). Mitochondria of cells transfected with Mff siRNA form a closed network similar t...

  3. Legionella pneumophila secretes a mitochondrial carrier protein during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Dolezal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mitochondrial Carrier Family (MCF is a signature group of integral membrane proteins that transport metabolites across the mitochondrial inner membrane in eukaryotes. MCF proteins are characterized by six transmembrane segments that assemble to form a highly-selective channel for metabolite transport. We discovered a novel MCF member, termed Legionellanucleotide carrier Protein (LncP, encoded in the genome of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease. LncP was secreted via the bacterial Dot/Icm type IV secretion system into macrophages and assembled in the mitochondrial inner membrane. In a yeast cellular system, LncP induced a dominant-negative phenotype that was rescued by deleting an endogenous ATP carrier. Substrate transport studies on purified LncP reconstituted in liposomes revealed that it catalyzes unidirectional transport and exchange of ATP transport across membranes, thereby supporting a role for LncP as an ATP transporter. A hidden Markov model revealed further MCF proteins in the intracellular pathogens, Legionella longbeachae and Neorickettsia sennetsu, thereby challenging the notion that MCF proteins exist exclusively in eukaryotic organisms.

  4. Mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is essential for assembly of proteins imported into yeast mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ming Yuan; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich; Martin, Jörg; Pollock, Robert A.; Kalousek, Frantisek; Neupert, Walter; Hallberg, Elisabeth M.; Hallberg, Richard L.; Horwich, Arthur

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear encoded mitochondrial heat-shock protein hsp60 is required for the assembly into oligomeric complexes of proteins imported into the mitochondrial matrix. hsp60 is a member of the 'chaperonin' class of protein factors, which include the Escherichia coli groEL protein and the Rubisco subunit-binding protein of chloroplasts

  5. The Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: The formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-01-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14–Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (Tm values of 16.5°C and 29°C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (Tm = 41°C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  6. The Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex of the mitochondrial translocation motor: the formation of a stable complex from marginally stable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Levy, Ran; Marom, Milit; Slutsky-Leiderman, Olga; Azem, Abdussalam

    2007-02-01

    The vast majority of mitochondrial proteins are imported from the cytosol. For matrix-localized proteins, the final step of translocation across the inner membrane is mediated by the mitochondrial translocation motor, of which mhsp70 is a key component. The ATP-dependent function of mhsp70 is regulated by a complex, composed of a J-protein (called Pam18 or Tim14) and a J-like protein (called Pam16 or Tim16), and the nucleotide exchange factor Mge1. In this study, we investigated the structural properties of a recombinant purified Pam18/Tim14-Pam16/Tim16 complex using cross-linking with the bifunctional reagent DSS and CD-spectroscopy. The results of the study show that both Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 are thermally unstable proteins that unfold at very low temperatures (T(m) values of 16.5 degrees C and 29 degrees C, respectively). Upon mixing the proteins in vitro, or when both proteins are co-overexpressed in bacteria, Pam18/Tim14 and Pam16/Tim16 form a heterodimer that is thermally more stable than the individual proteins (T(m) = 41 degrees C). Analysis of the properties of the complex in GdnHCl shows that dissociation of the heterodimer is the limiting step in achieving full denaturation. PMID:17242434

  7. Construction of bifunctional molecules specific to antigen and antibody’s Fc-fragment by fusion of scFv-antibodies with staphylococcal protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolibo D. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop approach for detection of scFv and their complexes with antigens. Methods. The fusion proteins, which include sequences of scFv and staphylococcal protein A, were constructed and the obtained bifunctional molecules were immunochemically analysed. Results. It was shown, that scFv fused with protein A and their complexes with antigens are effectively recognized by labelled immunoglobulins with unrestricted antigenic specificity. Conclusions. The fusion of scFv with protein A fragment is a perspective approach to increase the efficiency of application in ELISA. The obtained scFv, fused with protein A, could be used for development of test-systems for the detection of diphtheria toxin.

  8. Maintenance and propagation of a deleterious mitochondrial genome by the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Fan; Schulz, Anna M; Pellegrino, Mark W; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai; Haynes, Cole M

    2016-05-19

    Mitochondrial genomes (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA) encode essential oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) components. Because hundreds of mtDNAs exist per cell, a deletion in a single mtDNA has little impact. However, if the deletion genome is enriched, OXPHOS declines, resulting in cellular dysfunction. For example, Kearns-Sayre syndrome is caused by a single heteroplasmic mtDNA deletion. More broadly, mtDNA deletion accumulation has been observed in individual muscle cells and dopaminergic neurons during ageing. It is unclear how mtDNA deletions are tolerated or how they are propagated in somatic cells. One mechanism by which cells respond to OXPHOS dysfunction is by activating the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), a transcriptional response mediated by the transcription factor ATFS-1 that promotes the recovery and regeneration of defective mitochondria. Here we investigate the role of ATFS-1 in the maintenance and propagation of a deleterious mtDNA in a heteroplasmic Caenorhabditis elegans strain that stably expresses wild-type mtDNA and mtDNA with a 3.1-kilobase deletion (∆mtDNA) lacking four essential genes. The heteroplasmic strain, which has 60% ∆mtDNA, displays modest mitochondrial dysfunction and constitutive UPR(mt) activation. ATFS-1 impairment reduced the ∆mtDNA nearly tenfold, decreasing the total percentage to 7%. We propose that in the context of mtDNA heteroplasmy, UPR(mt) activation caused by OXPHOS defects propagates or maintains the deleterious mtDNA in an attempt to recover OXPHOS activity by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics. PMID:27135930

  9. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein is required for efficient photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sweetlove, Lee J.; Lytovchenko, Anna; Morgan, Megan; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Baxter, Charles J.; Eickmeier, Ira; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2006-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) occur in the inner mitochondrial membrane and dissipate the proton gradient across this membrane that is normally used for ATP synthesis. Although the catalytic function and regulation of plant UCPs have been described, the physiological purpose of UCP in plants has not been established. Here, biochemical and physiological analyses of an insertional knockout of one of the Arabidopsis UCP genes (AtUCP1) are presented that resolve this issue. Absence of UCP1 results i...

  10. NEW EMBO MEMBER’S REVIEW: Viral and bacterial proteins regulating apoptosis at the mitochondrial level

    OpenAIRE

    Boya, Patricia; Roques, Bernard,; Kroemer, Guido

    2001-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) is a critical step of several apoptotic pathways. Some infectious intracellular pathogens can regulate (induce or inhibit) apoptosis of their host cells at the mitochondrial level, by targeting proteins to mitochondrial membranes that either induce or inhibit MMP. Pathogen-encoded mitochondrion-targeted proteins may or may not show amino acid sequence homology to Bcl-2-like proteins. Among the Bcl-2-unrelated, mitochondrion-targeted proteins, seve...

  11. DNA Compaction by Yeast Mitochondrial Protein ABF2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friddle, R W; Klare, J E; Noy, A; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R; Baskin, R J; Martin, S S; Baldwin, E P

    2003-05-09

    We used high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image compaction of linear and circular DNA by the yeast mitochondrial protein ABF2p , which plays a major role in maintaining mitochondrial DNA. AFM images show that protein binding induces drastic bends in the DNA backbone for both linear and circular DNA. At high concentration of ABF2p DNA collapses into a tight globular structure. We quantified the compaction of linear DNA by measuring the end-to-end distance of the DNA molecule at increasing concentrations of ABF2p. We also derived a polymer statistical mechanics model that gives quantitative description of compaction observed in our experiments. This model shows that a number of sharp bends in the DNA backbone is often sufficient to cause DNA compaction. Comparison of our model with the experimental data showed excellent quantitative correlation and allowed us to determine binding characteristics for ABF2. Our studies indicate that ABF2 compacts DNA through a novel mechanism that involves bending of DNA backbone. We discuss the implications of such a mechanism for mitochondrial DNA maintenance.

  12. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas J. Motloch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC and the permeability transition pore (PTP. We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction.

  13. Insulin increases phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Bak, Steffen; Pedersen, Andreas James Thestrup;

    2014-01-01

    mitochondrial inner membrane organizing system (MINOS). In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that insulin increases the phosphorylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle in vivo and provides a first step in the understanding of how insulin potentially regulates mitochondrial...

  14. Construction and evaluation of a novel bifunctional phenylalanine-formate dehydrogenase fusion protein for bienzyme system with cofactor regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Fang, Bai-Shan

    2016-05-01

    Phenylalanine dehydrogenase (PheDH) plays an important role in enzymatic synthesis of L-phenylalanine for aspartame (sweetener) and detection of phenylketonuria (PKU), suggesting that it is important to obtain a PheDH with excellent characteristics. Gene fusion of PheDH and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was constructed to form bifunctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of L-phenylalanine coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Comparing with the PheDH monomer from Microbacterium sp., the bifunctional PheDH-FDH showed noteworthy stability under weakly acidic and alkaline conditions (pH 6.5-9.0). The bifunctional enzyme can produce 153.9 mM L-phenylalanine with remarkable performance of enantiomers choice by enzymatic conversion with high molecular conversion rate (99.87 %) in catalyzing phenylpyruvic acid to L-phenylalanine being 1.50-fold higher than that of the separate expression system. The results indicated the potential application of the PheDH and PheDH-FDH with coenzyme regeneration for phenylpyruvic acid analysis and L-phenylalanine biosynthesis in medical diagnosis and pharmaceutical field. PMID:26819086

  15. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L.; Losón, Oliver C.; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P.; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C.; Shaw, Reuben J.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA–linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission. PMID:26816379

  16. The general mitochondrial processing peptidase from potato is an integral part of cytochrome c reductase of the respiratory chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, H P; Emmermann, M; Kruft, V; Schmitz, U K

    1992-01-01

    The major mitochondrial processing activity removing presequences from nuclear encoded precursor proteins is present in the soluble fraction of fungal and mammalian mitochondria. We found that in potato, this activity resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Surprisingly, the proteolytic activity co-purifies with cytochrome c reductase, a protein complex of the respiratory chain. The purified complex is bifunctional, as it has the ability to transfer electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome...

  17. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. → Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. → Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. → Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. → Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy Δ12,14 prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  18. Characterization of the mitochondrial inner membrane protein translocator Tim17 from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Singha, Ujjal K; PEPRAH, EMMANUEL; Williams, Shuntae; Walker, Robert; Saha, Lipi; Chaudhuri, Minu

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein translocation machinery in the kinetoplastid parasites, like Trypanosoma brucei, has been characterized poorly. In T. brucei genome data base, one homolog for a protein translocator of mitochondrial inner membrane (Tim) has been found, which is closely related to Tim17 from other species. The T. brucei Tim17 (TbTim17) has a molecular mass 16.2 kDa and it possesses four characteristic transmembrane domains. The protein is localized in the mitochondrial inner membrane. The...

  19. α-Synuclein binds to TOM20 and inhibits mitochondrial protein import in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maio, Roberto; Barrett, Paul J; Hoffman, Eric K; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Zharikov, Alevtina; Borah, Anupom; Hu, Xiaoping; McCoy, Jennifer; Chu, Charleen T; Burton, Edward A; Hastings, Teresa G; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction have both been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and the two appear to be related. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to accumulation and oligomerization of α-synuclein, and increased levels of α-synuclein cause mitochondrial impairment, but the basis for this bidirectional interaction remains obscure. We now report that certain posttranslationally modified species of α-synuclein bind with high affinity to the TOM20 (translocase of the outer membrane 20) presequence receptor of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. This binding prevented the interaction of TOM20 with its co-receptor, TOM22, and impaired mitochondrial protein import. Consequently, there were deficient mitochondrial respiration, enhanced production of reactive oxygen species, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Examination of postmortem brain tissue from PD patients revealed an aberrant α-synuclein-TOM20 interaction in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons that was associated with loss of imported mitochondrial proteins, thereby confirming this pathogenic process in the human disease. Modest knockdown of endogenous α-synuclein was sufficient to maintain mitochondrial protein import in an in vivo model of PD. Furthermore, in in vitro systems, overexpression of TOM20 or a mitochondrial targeting signal peptide had beneficial effects and preserved mitochondrial protein import. This study characterizes a pathogenic mechanism in PD, identifies toxic species of wild-type α-synuclein, and reveals potential new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection. PMID:27280685

  20. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Heike Angerer

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have bee...

  1. Radiation-induced alterations in mitochondrial protein synthesis in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incorporation of 14C-labeled leucine into hepatic mitochondrial proteins in vivo is enhanced up to 48 hr following whole-body X irradiation. A similar increase in labeling is also observed with liver slices from irradiated rats, incubated in vitro, but not with isolated liver mitochondria. Evidence is presented to indicate that these divergent labeling data may be related to the dual origin of the mitochondrial proteins and differences in the radiation-induced effects on the synthesis of mitochondrial proteins of intra- and extra-mitochondrial origin. The increased labeling observed in vivo does not denote a stimulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis but merely reflects a contraction of the free leucine pool of mitochondria. The possible significance of the radiation-induced alterations in the pattern of mitochondrial protein synthesis to the reported morphological alterations of this organelle is discussed

  2. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine) motif proteins (LYRMs) of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6) or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1) of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM) independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria. PMID:25686363

  3. Eukaryotic LYR Proteins Interact with Mitochondrial Protein Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Angerer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria host ancient essential bioenergetic and biosynthetic pathways. LYR (leucine/tyrosine/arginine motif proteins (LYRMs of the Complex1_LYR-like superfamily interact with protein complexes of bacterial origin. Many LYR proteins function as extra subunits (LYRM3 and LYRM6 or novel assembly factors (LYRM7, LYRM8, ACN9 and FMC1 of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS core complexes. Structural insights into complex I accessory subunits LYRM6 and LYRM3 have been provided by analyses of EM and X-ray structures of complex I from bovine and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, respectively. Combined structural and biochemical studies revealed that LYRM6 resides at the matrix arm close to the ubiquinone reduction site. For LYRM3, a position at the distal proton-pumping membrane arm facing the matrix space is suggested. Both LYRMs are supposed to anchor an acyl-carrier protein (ACPM independently to complex I. The function of this duplicated protein interaction of ACPM with respiratory complex I is still unknown. Analysis of protein-protein interaction screens, genetic analyses and predicted multi-domain LYRMs offer further clues on an interaction network and adaptor-like function of LYR proteins in mitochondria.

  4. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt. PMID:27350246

  5. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3

  6. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Neto, Marinaldo P.C. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Sousa, Lucas O. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  7. Deletion of conserved protein phosphatases reverses defects associated with mitochondrial DNA damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Garipler, Görkem; Mutlu, Nebibe; Lack, Nathan; Dunn, Cory David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by signaling pathways sensitive to extracellular conditions and to the internal environment of the cell. Therefore, treatments for disease caused by mutation of mtDNA may emerge from studies of how signal transduction pathways command mitochondrial function. We have examined the role of phosphatases under the control of the conserved alpha 4/Tap42 protein in cells lacking a mitochondrial genome. We found that deletion of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) or o...

  8. Cockayne syndrome group B protein promotes mitochondrial DNA stability by supporting the DNA repair association with the mitochondrial membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; Sorensen, Martin M; Hvitby, Christina Poulsen;

    2010-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human premature aging disorder associated with severe developmental deficiencies and neurodegeneration, and phenotypically it resembles some mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases. Most patients belong to complementation group B, and the CS group B (CSB) protein plays a role...... in genomic maintenance and transcriptome regulation. By immunocytochemistry, mitochondrial fractionation, and Western blotting, we demonstrate that CSB localizes to mitochondria in different types of cells, with increased mitochondrial distribution following menadione-induced oxidative stress....... Moreover, our results suggest that CSB plays a significant role in mitochondrial base excision repair (BER) regulation. In particular, we find reduced 8-oxo-guanine, uracil, and 5-hydroxy-uracil BER incision activities in CSB-deficient cells compared to wild-type cells. This deficiency correlates with...

  9. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron (59Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca2+ uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca2+ uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by

  10. Selective sorting and destruction of mitochondrial membrane proteins in aged yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adam L; Hughes, Casey E; Henderson, Kiersten A; Yazvenko, Nina; Gottschling, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of aging, and underlies the development of many diseases. Cells maintain mitochondrial homeostasis through a number of pathways that remodel the mitochondrial proteome or alter mitochondrial content during times of stress or metabolic adaptation. Here, using yeast as a model system, we identify a new mitochondrial degradation system that remodels the mitochondrial proteome of aged cells. Unlike many common mitochondrial degradation pathways, this system selectively removes a subset of membrane proteins from the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes, while leaving the remainder of the organelle intact. Selective removal of preexisting proteins is achieved by sorting into a mitochondrial-derived compartment, or MDC, followed by release through mitochondrial fission and elimination by autophagy. Formation of MDCs requires the import receptors Tom70/71, and failure to form these structures exacerbates preexisting mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that the MDC pathway provides protection to mitochondria in times of stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13943.001 PMID:27097106

  11. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein hFis1 regulates mitochondrial morphology and fission through self-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial fission in mammals is mediated by at least two proteins, DLP1/Drp1 and hFis1. DLP1 mediates the scission of mitochondrial membranes through GTP hydrolysis, and hFis1 is a putative DLP1 receptor anchored at the mitochondrial outer membrane by a C-terminal single transmembrane domain. The cytosolic domain of hFis1 contains six α-helices (α1-α6) out of which α2-α5 form two tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) folds. In this study, by using chimeric constructs, we demonstrated that the cytosolic domain contains the necessary information for hFis1 function during mitochondrial fission. By using transient expression of different mutant forms of the hFis1 protein, we found that hFis1 self-interaction plays an important role in mitochondrial fission. Our results show that deletion of the α1 helix greatly increased the formation of dimeric and oligomeric forms of hFis1, indicating that α1 helix functions as a negative regulator of the hFis1 self-interaction. Further mutational approaches revealed that a tyrosine residue in the α5 helix and the linker between α3 and α4 helices participate in hFis1 oligomerization. Mutations causing oligomerization defect greatly reduced the ability to induce not only mitochondrial fragmentation by full-length hFis1 but also the formation of swollen ball-shaped mitochondria caused by α1-deleted hFis1. Our data suggest that oligomerization of hFis1 in the mitochondrial outer membrane plays a role in mitochondrial fission, potentially through participating in fission factor recruitment

  12. Mba1, a Novel Component of the Mitochondrial Protein Export Machinery of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Preuss, Marc; Leonhard, Klaus; Hell, Kai; Stuart, Rosemary A.; Neupert, Walter; Herrmann, Johannes M.

    2001-01-01

    The biogenesis of mitochondria requires the integration of many proteins into the inner membrane from the matrix side. The inner membrane protein Oxa1 plays an important role in this process. We identified Mba1 as a second mitochondrial component that is required for efficient protein insertion. Like Oxa1, Mba1 specifically interacts both with mitochondrial translation products and with conservatively sorted, nuclear-encoded proteins during their integration into the inner membrane. Oxa1 and ...

  13. Mitochondrial trafficking in neurons and the role of the Miro family of GTPase proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsa, Nicol; Norkett, Rosalind; Higgs, Nathalie; Lopez-Domenech, Guillermo; Kittler, Josef T

    2013-12-01

    Correct mitochondrial dynamics are essential to neuronal function. These dynamics include mitochondrial trafficking and quality-control systems that maintain a precisely distributed and healthy mitochondrial network, so that local energy demands or Ca2+-buffering requirements within the intricate architecture of the neuron can be met. Mitochondria make use of molecular machinery that couples these organelles to microtubule-based transport via kinesin and dynein motors, facilitating the required long-range movements. These motors in turn are associated with a variety of adaptor proteins allowing additional regulation of the complex dynamics demonstrated by these organelles. Over recent years, a number of new motor and adaptor proteins have been added to a growing list of components implicated in mitochondrial trafficking and distribution. Yet, there are major questions that remain to be addressed about the regulation of mitochondrial transport complexes. One of the core components of this machinery, the mitochondrial Rho GTPases Miro1 (mitochondrial Rho 1) and Miro2 have received special attention due to their Ca2+-sensing and GTPase abilities, marking Miro an exceptional candidate for co-ordinating mitochondrial dynamics and intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper, we discuss the wealth of literature regarding Miro-mediated mitochondrial transport in neurons and recently highlighted involvement of Miro proteins in mitochondrial turnover, emerging as a key process affected in neurodegeneration. PMID:24256248

  14. Mapping of Mitochondrial RNA-Protein Interactions by Digital RNase Footprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganqiang Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial DNA is transcribed as long polycistronic transcripts that encompass each strand of the genome and are processed subsequently into mature mRNAs, tRNAs, and rRNAs, necessitating widespread posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we establish methods for massively parallel sequencing and analyses of RNase-accessible regions of human mitochondrial RNA and thereby identify specific regions within mitochondrial transcripts that are bound by proteins. This approach provides a range of insights into the contribution of RNA-binding proteins to the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression.

  15. Sperm surface protein PH-20 is bifunctional: one activity is a hyaluronidase and a second, distinct activity is required in secondary sperm-zona binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, G R; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1996-07-01

    In previous studies, we have found that the sperm membrane protein PH-20 acts during two different stages of fertilization. On acrosome-intact sperm, PH-20 has a hyaluronidase activity that is required for sperm penetration through the cumulus cell layer that surrounds the oocyte. On acrosome-reacted sperm, PH-20 has a required function in sperm-zona binding (secondary binding). Because hyaluronic acid (HA) has been detected in the zona pellucida, secondary sperm-zona adhesion could depend on repetitive binding and hydrolysis of HA by PH-20 acting as a hyaluronidase. Alternatively, PH-20 may be bifunctional and have a second, different activity required for secondary binding. To distinguish between these two possibilities, in this study we used reagents that inhibit either PH-20's function in sperm-zona binding or its hyaluronidase activity. We found that an anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 90%) had no effect on hyaluronidase activity. Conversely, apigenin, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, blocked PH-20 hyaluronidase activity 93% without inhibiting sperm-zona binding. Similarly, another anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited hyaluronidase activity 95% only partially inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 45%). We also extensively pretreated oocytes with hyaluronidase to remove all accessible HA on or in the zona pellucida and found little or no effect on secondary sperm-zona binding. Our results suggest that PH-20 is bifunctional and has two activities: a hyaluronidase activity and a second, separate activity required for secondary sperm-zona binding. PMID:8793062

  16. Cross-linking with bifunctional reagents and its application to the study of the molecular symmetry and the arrangement of subunits in hexameric protein oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi; Hajouj, Omar; Shaked, Isabella; Daniel, Ezra

    2010-04-01

    Cross-linking with a bifunctional reagent and subsequent SDS gel electrophoresis is a simple but effective method to study the symmetry and arrangement of subunits in oligomeric proteins. In this study, theoretical expressions for the description of cross-linking patterns were derived for protein homohexamers through extension of the method used for tetramers by Hajdu et al. (1976). The derived equations were used for the analysis of cross-linking by glutardialdehyde of four protein hexamers: beef liver glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), jack bean urease, hemocyanin from the spiny lobster Panulirus pencillatus (PpHc), Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and for analysis of published data on the cross-linking of hexameric E. coli rho by dimethyl suberimidate. Best fit models showed that the subunits in the first four proteins are arranged according to D(3) symmetry in two layers, each subunit able to cross-link to three neighboring subunits for GDH and urease, or to four for PpHc and GDC. The findings indicate a dimer-of-trimers eclipsed arrangement of subunits for GDH and urease and a trimer-of-dimers staggered one for PpHc and GDC. In rho, the subunits are arranged according to D(3) symmetry in a trimer-of-dimers ring. The conclusions from cross-linking of GDH and GDC, PpHc and rho are consistent with results from X-ray crystal structure, those for urease with findings from electron microscopy. PMID:20005307

  17. Adiponectin Increases Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis by Suppressing Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Liping; Kinney, Brice; Yoo, Hyung sun; Lee, Bonggi; Schaack, Jerome; Shao, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle. This study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms through which adiponectin induces mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial contents, expression, and activation status of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) were compared between skeletal muscle samples from adiponectin gene knockout, adiponectin-reconstituted, and control mice. Adenovi...

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of two new bifunctional carboxymethylated tetraazamacrocyclic chelating agents for protein labeling with indium-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruser, G.; Ritter, W.; Maecke, H.R. (Univ. Hospital Basel (Switzerland))

    1990-09-01

    The synthesis of two new N- and C-functionalized tetraazamacrocyclic ligands intended to be covalently linked to biomolecules like monoclonal antibodies and to bind the gamma-emitting isotope indium-111 in a thermodynamically and/or kinetically inert way is described. 12-(p-Nitrobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotridecane-1,4,7,10-tetraa cetic acid (L1) was synthesized by means of bimolecular cyclization with the appropriate malonic acid diethyl ester and triethylenetetraamine, followed by reduction with diborane and alkylation of the cyclic tetraamine with bromoacetic acid. The corresponding triscarboxymethylated ligand L2 was made by statistical alkylation of the tetraamine. Both ligands fulfill the criteria for antibody labeling using the bifunctional chelate approach, namely fast chelate formation, high radiochemical yield, and high stability under physiological conditions. Surprisingly the heptadentate ligand L2 confers higher stability to In3+ and exhibits faster complex formation than octadentate L1. 13C NMR spectra in solution indicate that the difference in stability is not due to incomplete coordination of all four carboxylate groups in In-L1.

  19. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders

  20. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Junghwa [Chemical Genomics National Research Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hye Jin [Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Sun Moon University, Asansi, Chungnam 330-150 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin [National Research Laboratory for Mitochondrial Signaling, Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Center, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ho Jeong, E-mail: kwonhj@yonsei.ac.kr [Chemical Genomics National Research Lab., Department of Biotechnology, Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  1. Comparative study of human mitochondrial proteome reveals extensive protein subcellular relocalization after gene duplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene and genome duplication is the principle creative force in evolution. Recently, protein subcellular relocalization, or neolocalization was proposed as one of the mechanisms responsible for the retention of duplicated genes. This hypothesis received support from the analysis of yeast genomes, but has not been tested thoroughly on animal genomes. In order to evaluate the importance of subcellular relocalizations for retention of duplicated genes in animal genomes, we systematically analyzed nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in the human genome by reconstructing phylogenies of mitochondrial multigene families. Results The 456 human mitochondrial proteins selected for this study were clustered into 305 gene families including 92 multigene families. Among the multigene families, 59 (64% consisted of both mitochondrial and cytosolic (non-mitochondrial proteins (mt-cy families while the remaining 33 (36% were composed of mitochondrial proteins (mt-mt families. Phylogenetic analyses of mt-cy families revealed three different scenarios of their neolocalization following gene duplication: 1 relocalization from mitochondria to cytosol, 2 from cytosol to mitochondria and 3 multiple subcellular relocalizations. The neolocalizations were most commonly enabled by the gain or loss of N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signals. The majority of detected subcellular relocalization events occurred early in animal evolution, preceding the evolution of tetrapods. Mt-mt protein families showed a somewhat different pattern, where gene duplication occurred more evenly in time. However, for both types of protein families, most duplication events appear to roughly coincide with two rounds of genome duplications early in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we evaluated the effects of inaccurate and incomplete annotation of mitochondrial proteins and found that our conclusion of the importance of subcellular relocalization after gene duplication on

  2. Complementary RNA and Protein Profiling Identifies Iron as a Key Regulator of Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarred W. Rensvold

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are centers of metabolism and signaling whose content and function must adapt to changing cellular environments. The biological signals that initiate mitochondrial restructuring and the cellular processes that drive this adaptive response are largely obscure. To better define these systems, we performed matched quantitative genomic and proteomic analyses of mouse muscle cells as they performed mitochondrial biogenesis. We find that proteins involved in cellular iron homeostasis are highly coordinated with this process and that depletion of cellular iron results in a rapid, dose-dependent decrease of select mitochondrial protein levels and oxidative capacity. We further show that this process is universal across a broad range of cell types and fully reversed when iron is reintroduced. Collectively, our work reveals that cellular iron is a key regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, and provides quantitative data sets that can be leveraged to explore posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes that are essential for mitochondrial adaptation.

  3. Mutations in FBXL4, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Early-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gai, Xiaowu; Ghezzi, Daniele; Mark A Johnson; Biagosch, Caroline A.; Shamseldin, Hanan E; Haack, Tobias B.; Reyes, Aurelio; Tsukikawa, Mai; Sheldon, Claire A.; Srinivasan, Satish; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S.; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Polyak, Erzsebet

    2013-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing and autozygosity mapping studies, independently performed in subjects with defective combined mitochondrial OXPHOS-enzyme deficiencies, identified a total of nine disease-segregating FBXL4 mutations in seven unrelated mitochondrial disease families, composed of six singletons and three siblings. All subjects manifested early-onset lactic acidemia, hypotonia, and developmental delay caused by severe encephalomyopathy consistently associated with progressive cerebral atro...

  4. Resolving mitochondrial protein complexes using non-gradient blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Liang-Jun; Forster, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) is a powerful technique for separation and proteomic analysis of high molecular weight protein complexes. It is often performed on gradient gels and is widely used for studying mitochondrial membrane complexes involved in electron transportation and oxidative phosphorylation. In this paper, we present an alternative BN-PAGE method that uses highly porous, non-gradient polyacrylamide gels for separation of rat brain mitochondrial protein...

  5. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase α subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

  6. Calorie restriction and SIRT3 trigger global reprogramming of the mitochondrial protein acetylome

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Alexander S.; Dittenhafer-Reed, Kristin E.; Yu, Wei; Bailey, Derek J.; Selen, Ebru Selin; Boersma, Melissa D.; Carson, Joshua J.; Tonelli, Marco; Balloon, Allison; Higbee, Alan J.; Westphall, Michael S; Pagliarini, David J.; Prolla, Tomas A.; Assadi-Porter, Fariba; Roy, Sushmita

    2012-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) extends lifespan in diverse species. Mitochondria play a key role in CR adaptation, however, the molecular details remain elusive. We developed and applied a quantitative mass spectrometry method to probe the liver mitochondrial acetyl-proteome during CR vs. control diet in mice that were wild-type or lacked the protein deacetylase SIRT3. Quantification of 3,285 acetylation sites −2,193 from mitochondrial proteins rendered a comprehensive atlas of the acetyl-proteome ...

  7. The human mitochondrial genome may code for more than 13 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capt, Charlotte; Passamonti, Marco; Breton, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The human mitochondrial (mt) DNA is commonly described as a small, maternally inherited molecule that encodes 13 protein components of the oxidative phosphorylation system and 24 structural RNAs required for their translation. However, recent studies indicate that the human mtDNA has a larger functional repertoire than previously believed. This paper briefly summarizes these studies, which suggest to reconsider our way to describe the human mitochondrial DNA as it may code for more than 13 proteins. PMID:25630734

  8. A crucial role of the mitochondrial protein import receptor MOM19 for the biogenesis of mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Harkness, Troy A. A.; Nargang, Frank E.; van der Klei, Ida; Neupert, Walter; Lill, Roland

    1994-01-01

    The novel genetic method of "sheltered RIP" (repeat induced point mutation) was used to generate a Neurospora crassa mutant in which MOM19, a component of the protein import machinery of the mitochondrial outer membrane, can be depleted. Deficiency in MOM19 resulted in a severe growth defect, but the cells remained viable. The number of mitochondrial profiles was not grossly changed, but mutant mitochondria were highly deficient in cristae membranes, cytochromes, and protein synthesis activit...

  9. The presence of phosphate-binding protein in inner mitochondrial membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatase,Osamu

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate-binding protein(s was found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of calf heart by Sephadex G-200 and G-25 gel filtration. The binding activity was inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and competed by a large amount of cold phosphate. The amount of phosphate bound to the fraction was 29 nmoles per mg of protein. Affinity chromatography with phosphate-bound Sepharose 4B confirmed the presence of phosphate-binding protein(s in the active fraction of mitochondrial membrane fractionated by gel filtration.

  10. Inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis results in increased endothelial cell susceptibility to nitric oxide-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ramachandran, Anup; Moellering, Douglas R.; Ceaser, Erin; Shiva, Sruti; Xu, Jun; Darley-Usmar, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, affecting the activity of respiratory complexes, have been implicated in many chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial proteins coded for by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genes are known to have important signaling roles in apoptosis. However, the impact of the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis on apoptosis is largely unknown. This inhibition is particularly important in NO-dependent cytotoxicity, which is believed to have a significant mit...

  11. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  12. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial protein Tom70p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tom70p is an important translocase of the outer membrane complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tom70p is an important TOM-complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.89, b = 168.78, c = 83.41 Å, α = 90.00, β = 102.74, γ = 90.00°. There are two Tom70p molecules in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 51%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way

  13. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6322, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way

  14. Preliminary crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein Tim44p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josyula, Ratnakar [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Jin, Zhongmin [SER-CAT, APS, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McCombs, Deborah; DeLucas, Lawrence [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    2006-02-01

    Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tim44p is an essential mitochondrial peripheral membrane protein and a major component of the TIM23 translocon. To investigate the mechanism by which Tim44p functions in the TIM23 translocon to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the yeast Tim44p was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P6{sub 3}22, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.25, c = 77.83 Å. There is one Tim44p molecule in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 43%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  15. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of yeast mitochondrial protein Tom70p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yunkun [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); McCombs, Debbie; Nagy, Lisa; DeLucas, Lawrence [Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States); Sha, Bingdong, E-mail: bdsha@uab.edu [Department of Cell Biology, Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Tom70p is an important translocase of the outer membrane complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) has been crystallized. Protein translocations across mitochondrial membranes play critical roles in mitochondrion biogenesis. Protein transport from the cell cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix is carried out by the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex and the translocase of the inner membrane (TIM) complexes. Tom70p is an important TOM-complex member and a major surface receptor of the protein-translocation machinery in the outer mitochondrial membrane. To investigate the mechanism by which Tom70p functions to deliver the mitochondrial protein precursors, the cytosolic fragment of yeast Tom70p (cTom70p) was crystallized. The crystals diffract to 3.2 Å using a synchrotron X-ray source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 44.89, b = 168.78, c = 83.41 Å, α = 90.00, β = 102.74, γ = 90.00°. There are two Tom70p molecules in one asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a solvent content of approximately 51%. Structure determination by MAD methods is under way.

  16. Yeast mitochondrial HMG proteins: DNA-binding properties of the most evolutionarily divergent component of mitochondrial nucleoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkaiova, Jana; Marini, Victoria; Willcox, Smaranda; Nosek, Jozef; Griffith, Jack D; Krejci, Lumir; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2016-01-01

    Yeast mtDNA is compacted into nucleoprotein structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). The principal mediators of nucleoid formation are mitochondrial high-mobility group (HMG)-box containing (mtHMG) proteins. Although these proteins are some of the fastest evolving components of mt-nucleoids, it is not known whether the divergence of mtHMG proteins on the level of their amino acid sequences is accompanied by diversification of their biochemical properties. In the present study we performed a comparative biochemical analysis of yeast mtHMG proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScAbf2p), Yarrowia lipolytica (YlMhb1p) and Candida parapsilosis (CpGcf1p). We found that all three proteins exhibit relatively weak binding to intact dsDNA. In fact, ScAbf2p and YlMhb1p bind quantitatively to this substrate only at very high protein to DNA ratios and CpGcf1p shows only negligible binding to dsDNA. In contrast, the proteins exhibit much higher preference for recombination intermediates such as Holliday junctions (HJ) and replication forks (RF). Therefore, we hypothesize that the roles of the yeast mtHMG proteins in maintenance and compaction of mtDNA in vivo are in large part mediated by their binding to recombination/replication intermediates. We also speculate that the distinct biochemical properties of CpGcf1p may represent one of the prerequisites for frequent evolutionary tinkering with the form of the mitochondrial genome in the CTG-clade of hemiascomycetous yeast species. PMID:26647378

  17. The loss of LRPPRC function induces the mitochondrial unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Fabian; Müller-Rischart, Anne Kathrin; Conradt, Barbara; Rolland, Stéphane Guy

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of the LRPPRC gene, which has previously been associated with the neurodegenerative French Canadian Leigh Syndrome, results in a decrease in the production of mitochondria-encoded subunits of complex IV, thereby causing a reduction in complex IV activity. Previously we have shown that reducing complex IV activity triggers a compensatory and conserved mitochondrial hyperfusion response. We now demonstrate that LRPPRC knock-down in mammalian cells leads to an imbalance between mitochondria-encoded and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex IV and that this imbalance triggers the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)). The inactivation of the LRPPRC-like gene mma-1 in C. elegans also induces UPR(mt), which demonstrates that this response is conserved. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mitochondrial hyperfusion and UPR(mt) are coordinated but mediated by genetically distinct pathways. We propose that in the context of LRPPRC mma-1 knock-down, mitochondrial hyperfusion helps to transiently maintain mitochondrial ATP production while UPR(mt) participates in the restoration of mitochondrial proteostasis. Mitochondrial proteostasis is not only critical in pathophysiology but also during aging, as proteotoxic stress has been shown to increase with age. Therefore, we speculate that the coordination of these two mitochondrial stress responses plays a more global role in mitochondrial proteostasis. PMID:26412102

  18. Organelle RNA recognition motif-containing (ORRM) proteins are plastid and mitochondrial editing factors in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Bentolila, Stephane; Hanson, Maureen R

    2016-05-01

    Post-transcriptional C-to-U RNA editing occurs at specific sites in plastid and plant mitochondrial transcripts. Members of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif-containing protein family and RNA-editing factor Interacting Protein (RIP, also known as MORF) family have been characterized as essential components of the RNA editing apparatus. Recent studies reveal that several organelle-targeted RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing proteins are involved in either plastid or mitochondrial RNA editing. ORRM1 (Organelle RRM protein 1) is essential for plastid editing, whereas ORRM2, ORRM3 and ORRM4 are involved in mitochondrial RNA editing. The RRM domain of ORRM1, ORRM3 and ORRM4 is required for editing activity, whereas the auxiliary RIP and Glycine-Rich (GR) domains mediate the ORRM proteins' interactions with other editing factors. The identification of the ORRM proteins as RNA editing factors further expands our knowledge of the composition of the editosome. PMID:27082488

  19. Protein complexes in bacterial and yeast mitochondrial membranes differ in their sensitivity towards dissociation by SDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbens, Jacob; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2008-12-01

    Previously, a 2D gel electrophoresis approach was developed for the Escherichia coli inner membrane, which detects membrane protein complexes that are stable in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at room temperature, and dissociate under the influence of trifluoroethanol [R. E. Spelbrink et al., J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005), 28742-8]. Here, the method was applied to the evolutionarily related mitochondrial inner membrane that was isolated from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Surprisingly, only very few proteins were found to be dissociated by trifluoroethanol of which Lpd1p, a component of multiple protein complexes localized in the mitochondrial matrix, is the most prominent. Usage of either milder or more stringent conditions did not yield any additional proteins that were released by fluorinated alcohols. This strongly suggests that membrane protein complexes in yeast are less stable in SDS solution than their E. coli counterparts, which might be due to the overall reduced hydrophobicity of mitochondrial transmembrane proteins. PMID:18817900

  20. Loss of allosteric control but retention of the bifunctional catalytic competence of a fusion protein formed by excision of 260 base pairs from the 3' terminus of pheA from Erwinia herbicola.

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, T.; Zhao, G.; Jensen, R A

    1992-01-01

    A bifunctional protein denoted as the P protein and encoded by pheA is widely present in purple gram-negative bacteria. This P protein carries catalytic domains that specify chorismate mutase (CM-P) and prephenate dehydratase. The instability of a recombinant plasmid carrying a pheA insert cloned from Erwinia herbicola resulted in a loss of 260 bp plus the TAA stop codon from the 3' terminus of pheA. The plasmid carrying the truncated pheA gene (denoted pheA*) was able to complement an Escher...

  1. Prediction of mitochondrial protein function by comparative physiology and phylogenetic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiming; Perocchi, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    According to the endosymbiotic theory, mitochondria originate from a free-living alpha-proteobacteria that established an intracellular symbiosis with the ancestor of present-day eukaryotic cells. During the bacterium-to-organelle transformation, the proto-mitochondrial proteome has undergone a massive turnover, whereby less than 20 % of modern mitochondrial proteomes can be traced back to the bacterial ancestor. Moreover, mitochondrial proteomes from several eukaryotic organisms, for example, yeast and human, show a rather modest overlap, reflecting differences in mitochondrial physiology. Those differences may result from the combination of differential gain and loss of genes and retargeting processes among lineages. Therefore, an evolutionary signature, also called "phylogenetic profile", could be generated for every mitochondrial protein. Here, we present two evolutionary biology approaches to study mitochondrial physiology: the first strategy, which we refer to as "comparative physiology," allows the de novo identification of mitochondrial proteins involved in a physiological function; the second, known as "phylogenetic profiling," allows to predict protein functions and functional interactions by comparing phylogenetic profiles of uncharacterized and known components. PMID:25631025

  2. Circadian control of oscillations in mitochondrial rate-limiting enzymes and nutrient utilization by PERIOD proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld-Cohen, Adi; Robles, Maria S; Aviram, Rona; Manella, Gal; Adamovich, Yaarit; Ladeuix, Benjamin; Nir, Dana; Rousso-Noori, Liat; Kuperman, Yael; Golik, Marina; Mann, Matthias; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-22

    Mitochondria are major suppliers of cellular energy through nutrients oxidation. Little is known about the mechanisms that enable mitochondria to cope with changes in nutrient supply and energy demand that naturally occur throughout the day. To address this question, we applied MS-based quantitative proteomics on isolated mitochondria from mice killed throughout the day and identified extensive oscillations in the mitochondrial proteome. Remarkably, the majority of cycling mitochondrial proteins peaked during the early light phase. We found that rate-limiting mitochondrial enzymes that process lipids and carbohydrates accumulate in a diurnal manner and are dependent on the clock proteins PER1/2. In this conjuncture, we uncovered daily oscillations in mitochondrial respiration that peak during different times of the day in response to different nutrients. Notably, the diurnal regulation of mitochondrial respiration was blunted in mice lacking PER1/2 or on a high-fat diet. We propose that PERIOD proteins optimize mitochondrial metabolism to daily changes in energy supply/demand and thereby, serve as a rheostat for mitochondrial nutrient utilization. PMID:26862173

  3. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Horie, Toshiharu, E-mail: t.horie@thu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  4. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  5. Apolipoprotein E4 (1–272 fragment is associated with mitochondrial proteins and affects mitochondrial function in neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michikawa Makoto

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apolipoprotein E allele ε4 (apoE4 is a strong risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD. Secreted apoE has a critical function in redistributing lipids among central nervous system cells to maintain normal lipid homeostasis. In addition, previous reports have shown that apoE4 is cleaved by a protease in neurons to generate apoE4(1–272 fragment, which is associated with neurofibrillary tanglelike structures and mitochondria, causing mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it still remains unclear how the apoE fragment associates with mitochondria and induces mitochondrial dysfunction. Results To clarify the molecular mechanism, we carried out experiments to identify intracellular apoE-binding molecules and their functions in modulating mitochondria function. Here, we found that apoE4 binds to ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase core protein 2 (UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, both of which are components of mitochondrial respiratory complex III, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4 isoform 1 (COX IV 1, which is a component of complex IV, in Neuro-2a cells. Interestingly, these proteins associated with apoE4(1–272 more strongly than intact apoE4(1–299. Further analysis showed that in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–272, the enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV were significantly lower than those in Neuro-2a cells expressing apoE4(1–299. Conclusion ApoE4(1–272 fragment expressed in Neuro2a cells is associated with mitochondrial proteins, UQCRC2 and cytochrome C1, which are component of respiratory complex III, and with COX IV 1, which is a member of complex IV. Overexpression of apoE4(1–272 fragment impairs activities of complex III and IV. These results suggest that the C-terminal-truncated fragment of apoE4 binds to mitochondrial complexes and affects their activities, and thereby leading to neurodegeneration.

  6. Coupled aggregation of mitochondrial single-strand DNA-binding protein tagged with Eos fluorescent protein visualizes synchronized activity of mitochondrial nucleoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejár, Tomáš; Pajuelo-Reguera, David; Alán, Lukáš; Dlasková, Andrea; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2015), s. 5185-5190. ISSN 1791-2997 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial nucleoid * single-stranded DNA-binding protein * photoconvertible fluorescent protein Eos Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.554, year: 2014

  7. sCD4-17b bifunctional protein: Extremely broad and potent neutralization of HIV-1 Env pseudotyped viruses from genetically diverse primary isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Barna

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described a potent recombinant HIV-1 neutralizing protein, sCD4-17b, composed of soluble CD4 attached via a flexible polypeptide linker to an SCFv of the 17b human monoclonal antibody directed against the highly conserved CD4-induced bridging sheet of gp120 involved in coreceptor binding. The sCD4 moiety of the bifunctional protein binds to gp120 on free virions, thereby enabling the 17b SCFv moiety to bind and block the gp120/coreceptor interaction required for entry. The previous studies using the MAGI-CCR5 assay system indicated that sCD4-17b (in concentrated cell culture medium, or partially purified potently neutralized several genetically diverse HIIV-1 primary isolates; however, at the concentrations tested it was ineffective against several other strains despite the conservation of binding sites for both CD4 and 17b. To address this puzzle, we designed variants of sCD4-17b with different linker lengths, and tested the neutralizing activities of the immunoaffinity purified proteins over a broader concentration range against a large number of genetically diverse HIV-1 primary isolates, using the TZM-bl Env pseudotype assay system. We also examined the sCD4-17b sensitivities of isogenic viruses generated from different producer cell types. Results We observed that immunoaffinity purified sCD4-17b effectively neutralized HIV-1 pseudotypes, including those from HIV-1 isolates previously found to be relatively insensitive in the MAGI-CCR5 assay. The potencies were equivalent for the original construct and a variant with a longer linker, as observed with both pseudotype particles and infectious virions; by contrast, a construct with a linker too short to enable simultaneous binding of the sCD4 and 17b SCFv moieties was much less effective. sCD4-17b displayed potent neutralizing activity against 100% of nearly 4 dozen HIV-1 primary isolates from diverse genetic subtypes (clades A, B, C, D, F, and circulating

  8. Long noncoding RNAs are generated from the mitochondrial genome and regulated by nuclear-encoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Rackham, Oliver; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J.; Mercer, Tim R.; Davies, Stefan M. K.; Mattick, John S.; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Human mitochondrial long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have not been described to date. By analysis of deep-sequencing data, the authors identified three lncRNAs generated from the mitochondrial genome and confirmed their expression by northern blotting and strand-specific qRT-PCR. They show that the abundance of these lncRNAs is comparable to their complementary mRNAs and that nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins involved in RNA processing regulate their expression. Finally, they show that mito...

  9. Redox reactions induced by nitrosative stress mediate protein misfolding and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zezong; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A

    2010-06-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through beta-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  10. Mammalian sperm translate nuclear-encoded proteins by mitochondrial-type ribosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gur, Yael; Breitbart, Haim

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that spermatozoa are translationally silent. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, incorporation of labeled amino acids into polypeptides during sperm capacitation, which was completely inhibited by mitochondrial translation inhibitors but not by the cytoplasmic translation inhibitor. Unlike 80S cytoplasmic ribosomes, 55S mitochondrial ribosomes were present in polysomal fractions, indicating that these ribosomes are actively involved in protein translation...

  11. Effect of age on in vivo rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Rooyackers, Olav E.; Adey, Deborah B.; Ades, Philip A.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    1996-01-01

    A progressive decline in muscle performance in the rapidly expanding aging population is causing a dramatic increase in disability and health care costs. A decrease in muscle endurance capacity due to mitochondrial decay likely contributes to this decline in muscle performance. We developed a novel stable isotope technique to measure in vivo rates of mitochondrial protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle using needle biopsy samples and applied this technique to e...

  12. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: in search for new functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomáska, L; Nosek, J; Kucejová, B

    2001-02-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genes encoding proteins involved in the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been transferred from the endosymbiont into the host genome. Mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding (mtSSB) proteins serve as an excellent argument supporting this aspect of the endosymbiotic theory. The crystal structure of the human mtSSB, together with an abundance of biochemical and genetic data, revealed several exciting features of mtSSB proteins and enabled a detailed comparison with their prokaryotic counterparts. Moreover, identification of a novel member of the mtSSB family, mitochondrial telomere-binding protein of the yeast Candida parapsilosis, has raised interesting questions regarding mtDNA metabolism and evolution. PMID:11308016

  13. Tight bifunctional hierarchical catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højholt, Karen T; Vennestrøm, Peter N R; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; Beato, Pablo

    2011-12-28

    A new concept to prepare tight bifunctional catalysts has been developed, by anchoring CoMo(6) clusters on hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites for simultaneous use in HDS and hydrocracking catalysis. The prepared material displays a significant improved activity in HDS catalysis compared to the impregnated counterpart. PMID:22048337

  14. Defects in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 are linked to apoptotic resistance and autophagy in a lung cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jean Thomas

    Full Text Available Evasion of apoptosis is implicated in almost all aspects of cancer progression, as well as treatment resistance. In this study, resistance to apoptosis was identified in tumorigenic lung epithelial (A549 cells as a consequence of defects in mitochondrial and autophagic function. Mitochondrial function is determined in part by mitochondrial morphology, a process regulated by mitochondrial dynamics whereby the joining of two mitochondria, fusion, inhibits apoptosis while fission, the division of a mitochondrion, initiates apoptosis. Mitochondrial morphology of A549 cells displayed an elongated phenotype-mimicking cells deficient in mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. A549 cells had impaired Drp1 mitochondrial recruitment and decreased Drp1-dependent fission. Cytochrome c release and caspase-3 and PARP cleavage were impaired both basally and with apoptotic stimuli in A549 cells. Increased mitochondrial mass was observed in A549 cells, suggesting defects in mitophagy (mitochondrial selective autophagy. A549 cells had decreased LC3-II lipidation and lysosomal inhibition suggesting defects in autophagy occur upstream of lysosomal degradation. Immunostaining indicated mitochondrial localized LC3 punctae in A549 cells increased after mitochondrial uncoupling or with a combination of mitochondrial depolarization and ectopic Drp1 expression. Increased inhibition of apoptosis in A549 cells is correlated with impeded mitochondrial fission and mitophagy. We suggest mitochondrial fission defects contribute to apoptotic resistance in A549 cells.

  15. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  16. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. → Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. → Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. → Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that inhibition of complex

  17. Translocator Protein-Mediated Stabilization of Mitochondrial Architecture during Inflammation Stress in Colonic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issop, Leeyah; Ostuni, Mariano A.; Lee, Sunghoon; Laforge, Mireille; Péranzi, Gabriel; Rustin, Pierre; Benoist, Jean-François; Estaquier, Jérome; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Lacapère, Jean-Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract increasing the risk of cancer has been described to be linked to the high expression of the mitochondrial translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO). Accordingly, TSPO drug ligands have been shown to regulate cytokine production and to improve tissue reconstruction. We used HT-29 human colon carcinoma cells to evaluate the role of TSPO and its drug ligands in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced inflammation. TNF-induced interleukin (IL)-8 expression, coupled to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, was followed by TSPO overexpression. TNF also destabilized mitochondrial ultrastructure, inducing cell death by apoptosis. Treatment with the TSPO drug ligand PK 11195 maintained the mitochondrial ultrastructure, reducing IL-8 and ROS production and cell death. TSPO silencing and overexpression studies demonstrated that the presence of TSPO is essential to control IL-8 and ROS production, so as to maintain mitochondrial ultrastructure and to prevent cell death. Taken together, our data indicate that inflammation results in the disruption of mitochondrial complexes containing TSPO, leading to cell death and epithelia disruption. Significance: This work implicates TSPO in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane integrity and in the control of mitochondrial ROS production, ultimately favoring tissue regeneration. PMID:27054921

  18. [Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III)

  19. [Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III).

  20. (Bifunctional chelates of Rh-105, Au-199, and other metallic radionuclides as potential radiotherapeutic agents)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    Progress during this period is reported under the following headings: Diethylenetriamine based and related bifunctional chelating agents and their complexation with Rh-105, Au-198, Pd-109, cu-67, In-111, and Co-57; studies of Pd-109, Rh-105 and Tc-99m with bifunctional chelates based on phenylenediamine; establishment of an appropriate protein assay method for conjugated proteins; studies of new bifunctional Bi, Tri and tetradentate amine oxime ligands with Rh-105; IgG and antibody B72.3 conjugation studies by HPLC Techniques with bifunctional metal chelates; and progress on ligand systems for Au(III).

  1. The effect of aging on mitochondrial proteins in germinating soybean embryonic axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aging-induced deterioration is a major problem associated with seed storage. Impairment of mitochondrial function is one of the first effects of aging. The composition and synthesis of nuclear and mito-coded mitochondrial proteins from soybean (Glycine max. L. Merr.) embryonic axes were studied to elucidate the cause of impaired respiratory development during germination of aged seeds. Axes excised from high vigor (HV) seeds and aged or low vigor (LV) seeds were protected from imbibition injury and germinated for various times, or excised from developing seeds, and then radiolabeled for one hour in [35S]methionine. Mitochondria were then isolated and total mitochondrial protein was subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by quantitative staining and fluorography of labeled polypeptides. Alternatively, an original two-dimensional native-to-denaturing gel electrophoretic technique was used to analyze native protein associations and to purify a 23 kD polypeptide

  2. Azidopropylvinylsulfonamide as a New Bifunctional Click Reagent for Bioorthogonal Conjugations: Application for DNA-Protein Cross-Linking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daďová, Jitka; Vrábel, Milan; Adámik, Matěj; Brázdová, Marie; Pohl, Radek; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 45 (2015), s. 16091-16102. ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : biotransformations * click chemistry * conjugation * nucleic acids * proteins Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.731, year: 2014

  3. MitoNuc: a database of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins. Update 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attimonelli, Marcella; Catalano, Domenico; Gissi, Carmela; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Santamaria, Monica; Pesole, Graziano; Saccone, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria, besides their central role in energy metabolism, have recently been found to be involved in a number of basic processes of cell life and to contribute to the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. All functions of mitochondria depend on the interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes. Mitochondrial genomes have been extensively sequenced and analysed and data have been collected in several specialised databases. In order to collect information on nuclear coded mitochondrial proteins we developed MitoNuc, a database containing detailed information on sequenced nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in Metazoa. The MitoNuc database can be retrieved through SRS and is available via the web site http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/mitochondriome where other mitochondrial databases developed by our group, the complete list of the sequenced mitochondrial genomes, links to other mitochondrial sites and related information, are available. The MitoAln database, related to MitoNuc in the previous release, reporting the multiple alignments of the relevant homologous protein coding regions, is no longer supported in the present release. In order to keep the links among entries in MitoNuc from homologous proteins, a new field in the database has been defined: the cluster identifier, an alpha numeric code used to identify each cluster of homologous proteins. A comment field derived from the corresponding SWISS-PROT entry has been introduced; this reports clinical data related to dysfunction of the protein. The logic scheme of MitoNuc database has been implemented in the ORACLE DBMS. This will allow the end-users to retrieve data through a friendly interface that will be soon implemented. PMID:11752284

  4. Heinrich Wieland--prize lecture. Transport of proteins across mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W

    1994-03-01

    The vast majority of proteins comprising the mitochondrion are encoded by nuclear genes, synthesized on ribosomes in the cytosol, and translocated into the various mitochondrial subcompartments. During this process proteins must cross the lipid membranes of the mitochondrion without interfering with the integrity or functions of the organelle. In recent years an approach combining biochemical, molecular, genetic, and morphological methodology has provided insights into various aspects of this complex process of intracellular protein sorting. In particular, a greater understanding of the molecular specificity and mechanism of targeting of mitochondrial preproteins has been reached, as a protein complex of the outer membrane which facilitates recognition and initial membrane insertion has been identified and characterized. Furthermore, pathways and components involved in the translocation of pre-proteins across the two mitochondrial membranes are being dissected and defined. The energetics of translocation and the processes of unfolding and folding of proteins during transmembrane transfer are closely linked to the function of a host of proteins known as heat-shock proteins or molecular chaperones, present both outside and inside the mitochondrion. In addition, the analysis of the process of folding of polypeptides in the mitochondrial matrix has allowed novel and unexpected insights into general pathways of protein folding assisted by folding factors. Pathways of sorting of proteins to the four different mitochondrial subcompartments--the outer membrane (OM), intermembrane space, inner membrane (IM) and matrix--are only partly understood and reveal an amazing complexity and variation. Many additional protein factors are involved in these latter processes, a few of which have been analyzed, such as cytochrome c heme lyase and cytochrome c1 heme lyase, enzymes that catalyze the covalent addition of the heme group to cytochrome c and c1 preproteins, and the

  5. A genome wide study in fission yeast reveals nine PPR proteins that regulate mitochondrial gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kühl, Inge; Dujeancourt, Laurent; Gaisne, Mauricette; Herbert, Christopher J.; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are particularly numerous in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they are involved in different steps of RNA metabolism, probably due to the repeated 35 amino acid PPR motifs that are thought to mediate interactions with RNA. In non-photosynthetic eukaryotes only a handful of PPR proteins exist, for example the human LRPPRC, which is involved in a mitochondrial disease. We have conducted a systematic study of the PPR proteins in the fission yeast...

  6. Lack of the Mitochondrial Protein Acylglycerol Kinase Causes Sengers Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mayr, Johannes A.; Haack, Tobias B.; Graf, Elisabeth; Zimmermann, Franz A.; Wieland, Thomas; Haberberger, Birgit; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kirschner, Janbernd; Steinmann, Beat; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Moroni, Isabella; Lamantea, Eleonora; Zeviani, Massimo; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Smeitink, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Exome sequencing of an individual with congenital cataracts, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, skeletal myopathy, and lactic acidosis, all typical symptoms of Sengers syndrome, discovered two nonsense mutations in the gene encoding mitochondrial acylglycerol kinase (AGK). Mutation screening of AGK in further individuals with congenital cataracts and cardiomyopathy identified numerous loss-of-function mutations in an additional eight families, confirming the causal nature of AGK deficiency in Senge...

  7. Training intensity modulates changes in PGC-1α and p53 protein content and mitochondrial respiration, but not markers of mitochondrial content in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Little, Jonathan P; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J

    2016-02-01

    Exercise training has been associated with increased mitochondrial content and respiration. However, no study to date has compared in parallel how training at different intensities affects mitochondrial respiration and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis. Twenty-nine healthy men performed 4 wk (12 cycling sessions) of either sprint interval training [SIT; 4-10 × 30-s all-out bouts at ∼200% of peak power output (WPeak)], high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 4-7 × 4-min intervals at ∼90% WPeak), or sublactate threshold continuous training (STCT; 20-36 min at ∼65% WPeak). The STCT and HIIT groups were matched for total work. Resting biopsy samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before and after training. The maximal mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers increased significantly only after SIT (25%). Similarly, the protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, p53, and plant homeodomain finger-containing protein 20 (PHF20) increased only after SIT (60-90%). Conversely, citrate synthase activity, and the protein content of TFAM and subunits of the electron transport system complexes remained unchanged throughout. Our findings suggest that training intensity is an important factor that regulates training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and that there is an apparent dissociation between training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial content. Moreover, changes in the protein content of PGC-1α, p53, and PHF20 are more strongly associated with training-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration than mitochondrial content. PMID:26572168

  8. Specific combination of compound heterozygous mutations in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 (HSD17B4 defines a new subtype of D-bifunctional protein deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Hugh J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-bifunctional protein (DBP deficiency is typically apparent within the first month of life with most infants demonstrating hypotonia, psychomotor delay and seizures. Few children survive beyond two years of age. Among patients with prolonged survival all demonstrate severe gross motor delay, absent language development, and severe hearing and visual impairment. DBP contains three catalytically active domains; an N-terminal dehydrogenase, a central hydratase and a C-terminal sterol carrier protein-2-like domain. Three subtypes of the disease are identified based upon the domain affected; DBP type I results from a combined deficiency of dehydrogenase and hydratase activity; DBP type II from isolated hydratase deficiency and DBP type III from isolated dehydrogenase deficiency. Here we report two brothers (16½ and 14 years old with DBP deficiency characterized by normal early childhood followed by sensorineural hearing loss, progressive cerebellar and sensory ataxia and subclinical retinitis pigmentosa. Methods and results Biochemical analysis revealed normal levels of plasma VLCFA, phytanic acid and pristanic acid, and normal bile acids in urine; based on these results no diagnosis was made. Exome analysis was performed using the Agilent SureSelect 50Mb All Exon Kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 next-generation-sequencing (NGS platform. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed by Sanger sequencing within the dehydrogenase domain (c.101C>T; p.Ala34Val and hydratase domain (c.1547T>C; p.Ile516Thr of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 4 gene (HSD17B4. These mutations have been previously reported in patients with severe-forms of DBP deficiency, however each mutation was reported in combination with another mutation affecting the same domain. Subsequent studies in fibroblasts revealed normal VLCFA levels, normal C26:0 but reduced pristanic acid beta-oxidation activity. Both DBP

  9. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  10. The Phosphorylation-Dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Proteins in Stress Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kanamaru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To maintain cellular homeostasis, cells are equipped with precise systems that trigger the appropriate stress responses. Mitochondria not only provide cellular energy but also integrate stress response signaling pathways, including those regulating cell death. Several lines of evidence suggest that the mitochondrial proteins that function in this process, such as Bcl-2 family proteins in apoptosis and phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5 in necroptosis, are regulated by several kinases. It has also been suggested that the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mitochondrial fission machinery, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, facilitates appropriate cellular stress responses. However, mitochondria themselves are also damaged by various stresses. To avoid the deleterious effects exerted by damaged mitochondria, cells remove these mitochondria in a selective autophagic degradation process called mitophagy. Interestingly, several kinases, such as PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 in mammals and stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases in yeast, have recently been shown to be involved in mitophagy. In this paper, we focus on the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mitochondrial proteins and discuss the roles of this regulation in the mitochondrial and cellular stress responses.

  11. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22: a mitochondrial small heat shock protein influencing the aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve eMorrow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in many key cellular processes and therefore need to rely on good protein quality control (PQC. Three types of mechanisms are in place to insure mitochondrial protein integrity: reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging by anti-oxidant enzymes, protein folding/degradation by molecular chaperones and proteases and clearance of defective mitochondria by mitophagy. Drosophila melanogaster Hsp22 is part of the molecular chaperone axis of the PQC and is characterized by its intra-mitochondrial localization and preferential expression during aging. As a stress biomarker, the level of its expression during aging has been shown to partially predict the remaining lifespan of flies. Since over-expression of this small heat shock protein (sHSP increases lifespan and resistance to stress, Hsp22 most likely has a positive effect on mitochondrial integrity. Accordingly, Hsp22 has recently been implicated in the mitochondrial unfolding protein response (mtUPR of flies. This review will summarize the key findings on D. melanogaster Hsp22 and emphasis on its links with the aging process.

  12. Tissue specific phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins isolated from rat liver, heart muscle, and skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Steffen; León, Ileana R; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard;

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of mitochondrial proteins in a variety of biological processes is increasingly being recognized and may contribute to the differences in function and energy demands observed in mitochondria from different tissues such as liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. Here, we used a combination...... of TiO2 phosphopeptide-enrichment, HILIC fractionation, and LC-MS/MS on isolated mitochondria to investigate the tissue-specific mitochondrial phosphoproteomes of rat liver, heart, and skeletal muscle. In total, we identified 899 phosphorylation sites in 354 different mitochondrial proteins including...... enrichment for phosphoproteins involved in amino acid and fatty acid metabolism in liver mitochondria, whereas heart and skeletal muscle were enriched for phosphoproteins involved in energy metabolism, in particular, tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Multiple tissue...

  13. Mitochondrial localization of the low level p53 protein in proliferative cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    p53 protein plays a central role in suppressing tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle arrest or apoptosis through transcription-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Emerging publications suggest that following stress, a fraction of p53 translocates to mitochondria to induce cytochrome c release and apoptosis. However, the localization of p53 under unstressed conditions remains largely unexplored. Here we show that p53 is localized at mitochondria in absence of apoptotic stimuli, when cells are proliferating, localization observed in various cell types (rodent and human). This is also supported by acellular assays in which p53 bind strongly to mitochondria isolated from rat liver. Furthermore, the mitochondria subfractionation study and the alkaline treatment of the mitochondrial p53 revealed that the majority of mitochondrial p53 is present in the membranous compartments. Finally, we identified VDAC, a protein of the mitochondrial outer-membrane, as a putative partner of p53 in unstressed/proliferative cells.

  14. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Clémençon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp and inorganic phosphate (PiC carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1 under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003.

  15. Identification of antithrombin-modulating genes. Role of LARGE, a gene encoding a bifunctional glycosyltransferase, in the secretion of proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia de la Morena-Barrio

    Full Text Available The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families. Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02. Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins.

  16. The proapoptotic protein BNIP3 interacts with VDAC to induce mitochondrial release of endonuclease G.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosha Zhang

    Full Text Available BNIP3 is a proapoptotic protein that induces cell death through a mitochondria-mediated pathway. We reported previously that mitochondrial localization of BNIP3 and translocation of EndoG from mitochondria to the nucleus are critical steps of the BNIP3 pathway. It is not clear, however, that how BNIP3 interacts with mitochondria. Here we show that expression of BNIP3 resulted in mitochondrial release and nuclear translocation of EndoG. Incubation of a recombinant GST-BNIP3 protein with freshly isolated mitochondria led to the integration of BNIP3 into mitochondria, reduction in the levels of EndoG in mitochondria and the presence of EndoG in the supernatant that was able to cleave chromatin DNA. Co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis reveals that BNIP3 interacted with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC to increase opening probabilities of mitochondrial permeability transition (PT pores and induce mitochondrial release of EndoG. Blocking VDAC with a VDAC antibody largely abolished mitochondrial localization of BNIP3 and prevented EndoG release. Together, the data identify VDAC as an interacting partner of BNIP3 and support endonuclease G as a mediator of the BNIP3 pathway.

  17. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency due to HADHB gene mutation in a Chinese family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Fu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an 8-year-old girl with lower limb weakness since birth in whom mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP deficiency, an autosomal recessive fatty acid oxidation disorder caused by HADHA or HADHB mutations, had not been definitively diagnosed before she was referred to our hospital. Repeated blood acylcarnitine analysis revealed slightly increased long-chain 3-OH-acylcarnitine levels; electromyography (EMG suggested peripheral nerve injury; muscle biopsy confirmed a neurogenic lesion in muscle fibers, as shown by EMG. Analysis of the HADHB, which encodes long-chain 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, one of the enzymes constituting mitochondrial trifunctional protein, identified homozygous missense mutation c.739C > T (p.R247C. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency is an extremely rare disorder and has not been reported in Chinese people to date. It is likely that neonatal onset, as seen in our patient, has not been reported for the neuromyopathic phenotype of mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency.

  18. Effect of regional muscle location but not adiposity on mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Ara, Ignacio; Larsen, Steen; Guerra, Borja; Calbet, Jose A L; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine if the expression of the mitochondrial biogenesis-regulating proteins SIRT1, SIRT3 and PGC-1alpha in human skeletal muscle is influenced by adiposity. METHOD: Twenty-nine male subjects were recruited into three groups: control (n = 10), obese (n = 10...

  19. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in Trypanosoma brucei function in mitochondrial ribosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Pusnik, Mascha; Small, Ian; Read, Laurie K.; Fabbro, Thomas; Schneider, André

    2008-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a degenerate 35-amino-acid motif, defines a novel eukaryotic protein family. Plants have 400 to 500 distinct PPR proteins, whereas other eukaryotes generally have fewer than 5. The few PPR proteins that have been studied have roles in organellar gene expression, probably via direct interaction with RNA. Here we show that the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei encodes 28 distinct PPR proteins, an extraordinarily high number for a nonplant organism. A com...

  20. The mitochondrial chaperone protein TRAP1 mitigates α-Synuclein toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Butler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1 was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein-expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (nonneuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein-induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein.

  1. Discovery of Bifunctional Oncogenic Target Inhibitors against Allosteric Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MEK1) and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dort, Marcian E; Hong, Hao; Wang, Hanxiao; Nino, Charles A; Lombardi, Rachel L; Blanks, Avery E; Galbán, Stefanie; Ross, Brian D

    2016-03-24

    The synthesis of a series of single entity, bifunctional MEK1/PI3K inhibitors achieved by covalent linking of structural analogs of the ATP-competitive PI3K inhibitor ZSTK474 and the ATP-noncompetitive MEK inhibitor PD0325901 is described. Inhibitors displayed potent in vitro inhibition of MEK1 (0.015 strategy toward combined MEK1/PI3K inhibition. PMID:26943489

  2. Reactivation of protein aggregates by mortalin and Tid1--the human mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Sharon, Shelly; Goloubinoff, Pierre; Azem, Abdussalam

    2012-01-01

    The mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mtHsp70), also known in humans as mortalin, is a central component of the mitochondrial protein import motor and plays a key role in the folding of matrix-localized mitochondrial proteins. MtHsp70 is assisted by a member of the 40-kDa heat shock protein co-chaperone family named Tid1 and a nucleotide exchange factor. Whereas, yeast mtHsp70 has been extensively studied in the context of protein import in the mitochondria, and the bacterial 70-kDa heat shock protein was recently shown to act as an ATP-fuelled unfolding enzyme capable of detoxifying stably misfolded polypeptides into harmless natively refolded proteins, little is known about the molecular functions of the human mortalin in protein homeostasis. Here, we developed novel and efficient purification protocols for mortalin and the two spliced versions of Tid1, Tid1-S, and Tid1-L and showed that mortalin can mediate the in vitro ATP-dependent reactivation of stable-preformed heat-denatured model aggregates, with the assistance of Mge1 and either Tid1-L or Tid1-S co-chaperones or yeast Mdj1. Thus, in addition of being a central component of the protein import machinery, human mortalin together with Tid1, may serve as a protein disaggregating machine which, for lack of Hsp100/ClpB disaggregating co-chaperones, may carry alone the scavenging of toxic protein aggregates in stressed, diseased, or aging human mitochondria. PMID:21811887

  3. Glucocorticoids Suppress Mitochondrial Oxidant Production via Upregulation of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Hyperglycemic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerö, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Elevated blood glucose contributes to the development of endothelial and vascular dysfunction, and, consequently, to diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications, because it increases the mitochondrial proton gradient and mitochondrial oxidant production. Therapeutic approaches designed to counteract glucose-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the vasculature are expected to show efficacy against all diabetic complications, but direct pharmacological targeting (scavenging) of mitochondrial oxidants remains challenging due to the high reactivity of some of these oxidant species. In a recent study, we have conducted a medium-throughput cell-based screening of a focused library of well-annotated pharmacologically active compounds and identified glucocorticoids as inhibitors of mitochondrial superoxide production in microvascular endothelial cells exposed to elevated extracellular glucose. The goal of the current study was to investigate the mechanism of glucocorticoids' action. Our findings show that glucocorticoids induce the expression of the mitochondrial UCP2 protein and decrease the mitochondrial potential. UCP2 silencing prevents the protective effect of the glucocorticoids on ROS production. UCP2 induction also increases the oxygen consumption and the "proton leak" in microvascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, glutamine supplementation augments the effect of glucocorticoids via further enhancing the expression of UCP2 at the translational level. We conclude that UCP2 induction represents a novel experimental therapeutic intervention in diabetic vascular complications. While direct repurposing of glucocorticoids may not be possible for the therapy of diabetic complications due to their significant side effects that develop during chronic administration, the UCP2 pathway may be therapeutically targetable by other, glucocorticoid

  4. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P proteins (P muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16-26% (P skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  5. Dephosphorylation of the Rieske iron-sulfur protein after induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), MPT pores open to cause the mitochondrial inner membrane to become non-selectively permeable to molecules of mass up to 1500 Da. In this study, we used proteomics to investigate protein changes after MPT induction. Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with various MPT inducers, including CaCl2, tert-butylhydroperoxide, and phenylarsine oxide, in the presence and absence of the MPT inhibitor, cyclosporin A. MPT induction was confirmed by an absorbance swelling assay. Mitochondrial membrane proteins prepared from control and treated mitochondria were separated by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and stained with SyproRuby or Coomassie blue. Proteins of interest were further identified by mass spectrometry. 2D gel electrophoresis by isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE consistently showed a protein spot that shifted to a more basic isoelectric point after the MPT. This shift was prevented by CsA but did not occur after protonophoric uncoupling. Mass spectrometry identified this protein as the Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (Complex III). Phosphatase treatment of sonicated mitochondria caused the same shift in RISP as occurred in MPT inducer-treated mitochondria. 2D gel electrophoresis by blue-native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE showed that RISP existed as an apparent monomer in mitochondrial membranes in addition to forming a complex with ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase. These findings suggest that RISP may be part of MPT pores and that dephosphorylation of RISP may play a role in regulation of the MPT

  6. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, Rebekah K; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D; Roslin, Nicole M; Marshall, Christian R; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W; Rouleau, Guy A; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia; Delague, Valérie; Yoon, Grace

    2015-06-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  7. Compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in transgenic mice results in defective protein lipoylation and energy disequilibrium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Smith

    Full Text Available A mouse model with compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis has been engineered in order to assess the role of this pathway in mitochondrial function and overall health. Reduction in the expression of mitochondrial malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, a key enzyme in the pathway encoded by the nuclear Mcat gene, was achieved to varying extents in all examined tissues employing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox technology. Although affected mice consumed more food than control animals, they failed to gain weight, were less physically active, suffered from loss of white adipose tissue, reduced muscle strength, kyphosis, alopecia, hypothermia and shortened lifespan. The Mcat-deficient phenotype is attributed primarily to reduced synthesis, in several tissues, of the octanoyl precursors required for the posttranslational lipoylation of pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, resulting in diminished capacity of the citric acid cycle and disruption of energy metabolism. The presence of an alternative lipoylation pathway that utilizes exogenous free lipoate appears restricted to liver and alone is insufficient for preservation of normal energy metabolism. Thus, de novo synthesis of precursors for the protein lipoylation pathway plays a vital role in maintenance of mitochondrial function and overall vigor.

  8. High throughput gene complementation screening permits identification of a mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis (ρ(-)) mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potluri, Prasanth; Procaccio, Vincent; Scheffler, Immo E; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    To identify nuclear DNA (nDNA) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene mutations using cultured cells, we have developed a complementation system based on retroviral transduction with a full length cDNA expression library and selection for OXHOS function by growth in galactose. We have used this system to transduce the Chinese hamster V79-G7 OXPHOS mutant cell line with a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The complemented cells were found to have acquired the cDNA for the bS6m polypeptide of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. bS6m is a 14 kDa polypeptide located on the outside of the mitochondrial 28S ribosomal subunit and interacts with the rRNA. The V79-G7 mutant protein was found to harbor a methionine to threonine missense mutation at codon 13. The hamster bS6m null mutant could also be complemented by its orthologs from either mouse or human. bS6m protein tagged at its C-terminus by HA, His or GFP localized to the mitochondrion and was fully functional. Through site-directed mutagenesis we identified the probable RNA interacting residues of the bS6m peptide and tested the functional significance of mammalian specific C-terminal region. The N-terminus of the bS6m polypeptide functionally corresponds to that of the prokaryotic small ribosomal subunit, but deletion of C-terminal residues along with the zinc ion coordinating cysteine had no functional effect. Since mitochondrial diseases can result from hundreds to thousands of different nDNA gene mutations, this one step viral complementation cloning may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a range of nDNA mitochondrial disease mutations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26946086

  9. Translocator Protein (TSPO) Affects Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Steroidogenic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Lan N; Zhao, Amy H; Hussein, Mahmoud; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2016-03-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein present in specific subpopulations of cells within different tissues. In recent studies, the presumptive model depicting mammalian TSPO as a critical cholesterol transporter for steroidogenesis has been refuted by studies examining effects of Tspo gene deletion in vivo and in vitro, biochemical testing of TSPO cholesterol transport function, and specificity of TSPO-mediated pharmacological responses. Nevertheless, high TSPO expression in steroid-producing cells seemed to indicate an alternate function for this protein in steroidogenic mitochondria. To seek an explanation, we used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated TSPO knockout steroidogenic MA-10 Leydig cell (MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ) clones to examine changes to core mitochondrial functions resulting from TSPO deficiency. We observed that 1) MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ cells had a shift in substrate utilization for energy production from glucose to fatty acids with significantly higher mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increased reactive oxygen species production; and 2) oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, and proton leak were not different between MA-10:TspoΔ/Δ and MA-10:Tspo+/+ control cells. Consistent with this finding, TSPO-deficient adrenal glands from global TSPO knockout (Tspo(-/-)) mice also showed up-regulation of genes involved in FAO compared with the TSPO floxed (Tspo(fl/fl)) controls. These results demonstrate the first experimental evidence that TSPO can affect mitochondrial energy homeostasis through modulation of FAO, a function that appears to be consistent with high levels of TSPO expression observed in cell types active in lipid storage/metabolism. PMID:26741196

  10. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27016377

  11. Lipid droplet meets a mitochondrial protein to regulate adipocyte lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to adrenergic stimulation, adipocytes undergo protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated lipolysis. A key PKA target in this context is perilipin 1, a major regulator of lipolysis on lipid droplets (LDs). A study published in this issue of The EMBO Journal (Pidoux et al, 2011) identifies optic at...

  12. Differential Effect of Endurance Training on Mitochondrial Protein Damage, Degradation, and Acetylation in the Context of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew L; Irving, Brian A; Lanza, Ian R; Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Konopka, Adam R; Robinson, Matthew M; Henderson, Gregory C; Klaus, Katherine A; Morse, Dawn M; Heppelmann, Carrie; Bergen, H Robert; Dasari, Surendra; Schimke, Jill M; Jakaitis, Daniel R; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2015-11-01

    Acute aerobic exercise increases reactive oxygen species and could potentially damage proteins, but exercise training (ET) enhances mitochondrial respiration irrespective of age. Here, we report a differential impact of ET on protein quality in young and older participants. Using mass spectrometry we measured oxidative damage to skeletal muscle proteins before and after 8 weeks of ET and find that young but not older participants reduced oxidative damage to both total skeletal muscle and mitochondrial proteins. Young participants showed higher total and mitochondrial derived semitryptic peptides and 26S proteasome activity indicating increased protein degradation. ET however, increased the activity of the endogenous antioxidants in older participants. ET also increased skeletal muscle content of the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 in both groups. A reduction in the acetylation of isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 was observed following ET that may counteract the effect of acute oxidative stress. In conclusion aging is associated with an inability to improve skeletal muscle and mitochondrial protein quality in response to ET by increasing degradation of damaged proteins. ET does however increase muscle and mitochondrial antioxidant capacity in older individuals, which provides increased buffering from the acute oxidative effects of exercise. PMID:25504576

  13. Increased uncoupling protein 3 content does not affect mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselink, M.K.C.; Greenhaff, P L; Constantin-Teodosu, D.; Hultman, E; Saris, W. H. M.; Nieuwlaat, R.; Schaart, G.; Kornips, C.F.P.; P. Schrauwen

    2003-01-01

    Phosphocreatine (PCr) resynthesis rate following intense anoxic contraction can be used as a sensitive index of in vivo mitochondrial function. We examined the effect of a diet-induced increase in uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) expression on postexercise PCr resynthesis in skeletal muscle. Nine healthy male volunteers undertook 20 one-legged maximal voluntary contractions with limb blood flow occluded to deplete muscle PCr stores. Exercise was performed following 7 days consumption of low-fat (L...

  14. Mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins: Novel therapeutic targets for combating cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, A.; Burke, N; Dongworth, R.; Hausenloy, D.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are no longer considered to be solely the static powerhouses of the cell. While they are undoubtedly essential to sustaining life and meeting the energy requirements of the cell through oxidative phosphorylation, they are now regarded as highly dynamic organelles with multiple funtions, playing key roles in cell survival and death. In this review, we discuss the emerging role of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, as novel therapeutic targets for treating a wide range of c...

  15. Complete nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of cDNA encoding the mitochondrial uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue: lack of a mitochondrial targeting presequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Ridley, R. G.; Patel, H. V.; Gerber, G E; Morton, R C; Freeman, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone spanning the entire amino acid sequence of the nuclear-encoded uncoupling protein of rat brown adipose tissue mitochondria has been isolated and sequenced. With the exception of the N-terminal methionine the deduced N-terminus of the newly synthesized uncoupling protein is identical to the N-terminal 30 amino acids of the native uncoupling protein as determined by protein sequencing. This proves that the protein contains no N-terminal mitochondrial targeting prepiece and that a t...

  16. Amino acid starvation has opposite effects on mitochondrial and cytosolic protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Johnson

    Full Text Available Amino acids are essential for cell growth and proliferation for they can serve as precursors of protein synthesis, be remodelled for nucleotide and fat biosynthesis, or be burnt as fuel. Mitochondria are energy producing organelles that additionally play a central role in amino acid homeostasis. One might expect mitochondrial metabolism to be geared towards the production and preservation of amino acids when cells are deprived of an exogenous supply. On the contrary, we find that human cells respond to amino acid starvation by upregulating the amino acid-consuming processes of respiration, protein synthesis, and amino acid catabolism in the mitochondria. The increased utilization of these nutrients in the organelle is not driven primarily by energy demand, as it occurs when glucose is plentiful. Instead it is proposed that the changes in the mitochondrial metabolism complement the repression of cytosolic protein synthesis to restrict cell growth and proliferation when amino acids are limiting. Therefore, stimulating mitochondrial function might offer a means of inhibiting nutrient-demanding anabolism that drives cellular proliferation.

  17. Possible physiological roles of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins-UCPn

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 10 (2002), s. 1190-1206. ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5011106; GA ČR GA301/02/1215; GA MŠk ME 389 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : uncoupling proteins * diabetes * obesity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.044, year: 2002

  18. Regulation of mitochondrial functions by protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sangbin; Smith, Kelly R.; Lim, Ssang-Taek Steve; Tian, Rong; Lu, Jianrong; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria are double membrane-bound organelles found in most eukaryotic cells. They generate most of the cell’s energy supply of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are critical mechanisms in the regulation of cell signaling networks and are essential for almost all the cellular functions. For many decades, mitochondria were considered autonomous organelles merely functioning to generate energy for cells to survive and proliferate, and were thoug...

  19. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  20. Effect of vitamin D status on chick kidney proteins: detection of a 45-kilodalton mitochondrial protein suppressed by vitamin D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis along with L-[35S]methionine radiolabeling studies were used to examine the effect of chronic vitamin D status on the composition and relative abundance of chick kidney proteins. Comparison of silver-stained gels revealed no extensive differences in either the electrophoretic mobility or the amounts of kidney proteins present in the mitochondrial fraction from vitamin D-replete and vitamin D-deficient chicks. A similar result was obtained in studies with L-[35S]methionine-labeled proteins. Vitamin D deficiency specifically elevated levels of a 45-kilodalton mitochondrial protein (pI 5.0 to 5.5) by approximately 5- to 12-fold relative to amounts present in vitamin D-replete tissue. This protein could not be detected in postmitochondrial supernatant fractions and was only faintly visible in crude kidney homogenates. The specificity of the observed suppression of this 45-kilodalton protein by vitamin D suggests that it may play an important role in renal functions influenced by the vitamin D endocrine system

  1. The Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response Protects against Anoxia in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Salvador; Sherman, Teresa; Brookes, Paul S.; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) is a surveillance pathway that defends proteostasis in the “powerhouse” of the cell. Activation of the UPRmt protects against stresses imposed by reactive oxygen species, respiratory chain deficits, and pathologic bacteria. Consistent with the UPRmt’s role in adaption, we found that either its pharmacological or genetic activation by ethidium bromide (EtBr) or RNAi of the mitochondrial AAA-protease spg-7 was sufficient to reduce death in an anoxia-based Caenorhabditis elegans model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. The UPRmt-specific transcription factor atfs-1 was necessary for protection and atfs-1 gain-of-function (gf) mutants were endogenously protected from both death and dysfunction. Neurons exhibited less axonal degeneration following non-lethal anoxia-reperfusion (A-R) when the UPRmt was pre-activated, and consistent with the concept of mitochondrial stress leading to cell non-autonomous (ie. “remote”) effects, we found that restricted activation of the UPRmt in neurons decreased A-R death. However, expression of the atfs-1(gf) mutant in neurons, which resulted in a robust activation of a neuronal UPRmt, did not upregulate the UPRmt in distal tissues, nor did it protect the worms from A-R toxicity. These findings suggest that remote signaling requires additional component(s) acting downstream of de facto mitochondrial stress. PMID:27459203

  2. Regulation of Thermogenesis In Plants: The Interaction of Alternative Oxidase and Plant Uncoupling Mitochondrial Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhu; Jianfei Lu; Jing Wang; Fu Chen; Feifan Leng; Hongyu Li

    2011-01-01

    Thermogenesis is a process of heat production in living organisms.It is rare in plants,but it does occur in some species of angiosperm.The heat iS generated via plant mitochondrial respiration.As possible Involvement in thermogenesis of mitochondrial factors,alternative oxidases(AOXs)and plant uncoupling mitochondrial proteins(PUMPs)have been well studied.AOXs and PUMPs are ubiquitously present in the inner membrane of plant mitochondria.They serve as two major energy dissipation systems that balance mitochondrial respiration and uncoupled phosphorylation by dissipating the H+ redox energy and proton electrochemical gradient(△μH+)as heat,respectively.AOXs and PUMPs exert similar physiological functions during homeothermic heat production in thermogenic plants.AOXs have five isoforms,while PUMPs have six.Both AOXS and PUMPS are encoded by small nuclear multigene families.Multiple isoforms are expressed in different tissues or organs.Extensive studies have been done in the area of thermogenesis in higher plants.In this review,we focus on the involvement and regulation of AOXs and PUMPs in thermogenesis.

  3. Mitochondrial Hormesis in Pancreatic β Cells: Does Uncoupling Protein 2 Play a Role?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In pancreatic β cells, mitochondrial metabolism translates glucose sensing into signals regulating insulin secretion. Chronic exposure of β cells to excessive nutrients, namely, glucolipotoxicity, impairs β-cell function. This is associated with elevated ROS production from overstimulated mitochondria. Mitochondria are not only the major source of cellular ROS, they are also the primary target of ROS attacks. The mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2, even though its uncoupling properties are debated, has been associated with protective functions against ROS toxicity. Hormesis, an adaptive response to cellular stresses, might contribute to the protection against β-cell death, possibly limiting the development of type 2 diabetes. Mitochondrial hormesis, or mitohormesis, is a defense mechanism observed in ROS-induced stress-responses by mitochondria. In β cells, mitochondrial damages induced by sublethal exogenous H2O2 can induce secondary repair and defense mechanisms. In this context, UCP2 is a marker of mitohormesis, being upregulated following stress conditions. When overexpressed in nonstressed naïve cells, UCP2 confers resistance to oxidative stress. Whether treatment with mitohormetic inducers is sufficient to restore or ameliorate secretory function of β cells remains to be determined.

  4. Mutations in the substrate binding glycine-rich loop of the mitochondrial processing peptidase-α protein (PMPCA) cause a severe mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mugdha; Anselm, Irina; Shi, Jiahai; Bale, Tejus A; Towne, Meghan; Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Crowley, Laura; Giani, Felix C; Kazerounian, Shideh; Markianos, Kyriacos; Lidov, Hart G; Folkerth, Rebecca; Sankaran, Vijay G; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2016-05-01

    We describe a large Lebanese family with two affected members, a young female proband and her male cousin, who had multisystem involvement including profound global developmental delay, severe hypotonia and weakness, respiratory insufficiency, blindness, and lactic acidemia-findings consistent with an underlying mitochondrial disorder. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on DNA from the proband and both parents. The proband and her cousin carried compound heterozygous mutations in the PMPCA gene that encodes for α-mitochondrial processing peptidase (α-MPP), a protein likely involved in the processing of mitochondrial proteins. The variants were located close to and postulated to affect the substrate binding glycine-rich loop of the α-MPP protein. Functional assays including immunofluorescence and western blot analysis on patient's fibroblasts revealed that these variants reduced α-MPP levels and impaired frataxin production and processing. We further determined that those defects could be rescued through the expression of exogenous wild-type PMPCA cDNA. Our findings link defective α-MPP protein to a severe mitochondrial disease. PMID:27148589

  5. Isolation and characterization of bifunctional Escherichia coli TatA mutant proteins that allow efficient Tat-dependent protein translocation in the absence of TatB

    OpenAIRE

    Blaudeck, N.; Kreutzenbeck, P.; Müller, M; Sprenger, G.; Freudl, R

    2005-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the Tat system promotes the membrane translocation of a subset of exported proteins across the cytoplasmic membrane. Four genes (tatA, tatB, tatC, and tatE) have been identified that encode the components of the E. coli Tat translocation apparatus. Whereas TatA and TatE can functionally substitute for each other, the TatB and the TatC proteins have been shown to perform distinct functions. In contrast to Tat systems of the ABC(E) type found in E. coli and many other bacte...

  6. Gestational diabetes is characterized by reduced mitochondrial protein expression and altered calcium signaling proteins in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen E Boyle

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT. Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2 and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4 in OGDM (n = 6 vs. ONGT (n = 6. Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (-60-75% in the OGDM (n = 8 compared with ONGT (n = 10 subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum.

  7. Structural analysis of mitochondrial mutations reveals a role for bigenomic protein interactions in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon E Lloyd

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the energy producing organelles of the cell, and mutations within their genome can cause numerous and often severe human diseases. At the heart of every mitochondrion is a set of five large multi-protein machines collectively known as the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC. This cellular machinery is central to several processes important for maintaining homeostasis within cells, including the production of ATP. The MRC is unique due to the bigenomic origin of its interacting proteins, which are encoded in the nucleus and mitochondria. It is this, in combination with the sheer number of protein-protein interactions that occur both within and between the MRC complexes, which makes the prediction of function and pathological outcome from primary sequence mutation data extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate how 3D structural analysis can be employed to predict the functional importance of mutations in mtDNA protein-coding genes. We mined the MITOMAP database and, utilizing the latest structural data, classified mutation sites based on their location within the MRC complexes III and IV. Using this approach, four structural classes of mutation were identified, including one underexplored class that interferes with nuclear-mitochondrial protein interactions. We demonstrate that this class currently eludes existing predictive approaches that do not take into account the quaternary structural organization inherent within and between the MRC complexes. The systematic and detailed structural analysis of disease-associated mutations in the mitochondrial Complex III and IV genes significantly enhances the predictive power of existing approaches and our understanding of how such mutations contribute to various pathologies. Given the general lack of any successful therapeutic approaches for disorders of the MRC, these findings may inform the development of new diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as new drugs and targets for

  8. Carboxyl-terminal sequences influence the import of mitochondrial protein precursors in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large subunit of carbamoyl phosphate synthase A from Neurospora crassa is encoded by a nuclear gene but is localized in the mitochondrial matrix. The authors have utilized N. crassa strains that produce both normal and carboxyl-terminal-truncated forms of carbamoyl phosphate synthase A to ask whether the carboxyl terminus affects import of the carbamoyl phosphate synthase A precursor. They found that carboxyl-terminal-truncated precursors were directed to mitochondria but that they were imported less efficiently than full-length proteins that were synthesized in the same cytoplasm. The results suggest that effective import of proteins into mitochondria requires appropriate combinations of targeting sequences and three-dimensional structure

  9. Mitochondrial protein-derived cryptides: Are endogenous N-formylated peptides including mitocryptide-2 components of mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marutani, Takayuki; Hattori, Tatsuya; Tsutsumi, Koki; Koike, Yusuke; Harada, Akihiko; Noguchi, Kosuke; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Mukai, Hidehito

    2016-11-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to "nonclassical" bioactive peptides, which are fragmented peptides simultaneously produced during maturation and degradation of various functional proteins. We identified many fragmented peptides derived from various mitochondrial proteins including mitocryptide-1 and mitocryptide-2 that efficiently activate neutrophils. These endogenous, functionally active, fragmented peptides are referred to as "cryptides." Among them, mitocryptide-2 is an N-formylated cryptide cleaved from mitochondrial cytochrome b that is encoded in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is known that 13 proteins encoded in mtDNA are translated in mitochondria as N-formylated forms, suggesting the existence of endogenous N-formylated peptides other than mitocryptide-2. Here, we investigated the effects of N-formylated peptides presumably cleaved from mtDNA-encoded proteins other than cytochrome b on the functions of neutrophilic cells to elucidate possible regulation by endogenous N-formylated cryptides. Four N-formylated cryptides derived from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and NADH dehydrogenase subunits 4, 5, and 6 among 12 peptides from mtDNA-encoded proteins efficiently induced not only migration but also β-hexosaminidase release, which is an indicator of neutrophilic phagocytosis, in HL-60 cells differentiated into neutrophilic cells. These activities were comparable to or higher than those induced by mitocryptide-2. Although endogenous N-formylated peptides that are contained in mitochondrial damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) have yet to be molecularly identified, they have been implicated in innate immunity. Thus, N-formylated cryptides including mitocryptide-2 are first-line candidates for the contents of mitochondrial DAMPs to promote innate immune responses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 580-587, 2016. PMID:26600263

  10. The presence of disulfide bonds reveals an evolutionarily conserved mechanism involved in mitochondrial protein translocase assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Lidia; Sokol, Anna M.; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation is crucial for the biogenesis and structure of many proteins that are localized in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. The importance of disulfide bond formation within mitochondrial proteins was extended beyond soluble intermembrane space proteins. Tim22, a membrane protein and core component of the mitochondrial translocase TIM22, forms an intramolecular disulfide bond in yeast. Tim22 belongs to the Tim17/Tim22/Tim23 family of protein translocases. Here, we present evidence of the high evolutionary conservation of disulfide bond formation in Tim17 and Tim22 among fungi and metazoa. Topological models are proposed that include the location of disulfide bonds relative to the predicted transmembrane regions. Yeast and human Tim22 variants that are not oxidized do not properly integrate into the membrane complex. Moreover, the lack of Tim17 oxidation disrupts the TIM23 translocase complex. This underlines the importance of disulfide bond formation for mature translocase assembly through membrane stabilization of weak transmembrane domains. PMID:27265872

  11. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein in brown adipocytes differentiated in cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to characterize the biogenesis of unique thermogenic mitochondria of brown adipose tissue, differentiation of precursor cells isolated from mouse brown adipose tissue was studied in cell culture. Synthesis of mitochondrial uncoupling protein (UCP), F1-ATPase, and cytochrome oxidase was examined by L-[35S]methionine labeling and immunoblotting. For the first time, synthesis of physiological amounts of the UCP, a key and tissue-specific component of thermogenic mitochondria, was observed in cultures at about confluence (day 6), indicating that a complete differentiation of brown adipocytes was achieved in vitro. In postconfluent cells (day 8) the content of UCP decreased rapidly, in contrast to some other mitochondrial proteins (beta subunit of F1-ATPase, cytochrome oxidase). In these cells, it was possible, by using norepinephrine, to induce specifically the synthesis of the UCP but not of F1-ATPase or cytochrome oxidase. The maximal response was observed at 0.1 microM norepinephrine and the synthesis of UCP remained activated for at least 24 h. Detailed analysis revealed a major role of the beta-adrenergic receptors and elevated intracellular concentration of cAMP in stimulation of UCP synthesis. A quantitative recovery of the newly synthesized UCP in the mitochondrial fraction indicated completed biogenesis of functionally competent thermogenic mitochondria

  12. Interaction of glutaric aciduria type 1-related glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase with mitochondrial matrix proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Schmiesing

    Full Text Available Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1 is an inherited neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the GCDH gene encoding glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH, which forms homo- and heteromeric complexes in the mitochondrial matrix. GA1 patients are prone to the development of encephalopathic crises which lead to an irreversible disabling dystonic movement disorder. The clinical and biochemical manifestations of GA1 vary considerably and lack correlations to the genotype. Using an affinity chromatography approach we report here for the first time on the identification of mitochondrial proteins interacting directly with GCDH. Among others, dihydrolipoamide S-succinyltransferase (DLST involved in the formation of glutaryl-CoA, and the β-subunit of the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETFB serving as electron acceptor, were identified as GCDH binding partners. We have adapted the yellow fluorescent protein-based fragment complementation assay and visualized the oligomerization of GCDH as well as its direct interaction with DLST and ETFB in mitochondria of living cells. These data suggest that GCDH is a constituent of multimeric mitochondrial dehydrogenase complexes, and the characterization of their interrelated functions may provide new insights into the regulation of lysine oxidation and the pathophysiology of GA1.

  13. Precursor Oxidation by Mia40 and Erv1 Promotes Vectorial Transport of Proteins into the Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Judith M.; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Guiard, Bernard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrial intermembrane space contains chaperone complexes that guide hydrophobic precursor proteins through this aqueous compartment. The chaperones consist of hetero-oligomeric complexes of small Tim proteins with conserved cysteine residues. The precursors of small Tim proteins are synthesized in the cytosol. Import of the precursors requires the essential intermembrane space proteins Mia40 and Erv1 that were proposed to form a relay for disulfide formation in the precursor protein...

  14. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. ► We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. ► We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. ► Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. ► Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 μg/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 ± 113%, mean ± SEM) and 0.1 μg/ml twofold (178 ± 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 ± 11%) as well as D-[U-14C]-glucose oxidation (+5 ± 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-14C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/μg prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p 14C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the positive findings. A fourfold induction of UCP-2 was required to exert minor metabolic effects. These findings question an impact of moderately elevated UCP-2 levels in beta cells as

  15. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hals, Ingrid K., E-mail: ingrid.hals@ntnu.no [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpen, Frank [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Grill, Valdemar [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  16. Toxic response caused by a misfolding variant of the mitochondrial protein short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stinne P; Corydon, Thomas J; Pedersen, Christina B;

    2011-01-01

    disease-associated misfolding variant of SCAD protein, p.Arg107Cys, disturbs mitochondrial function. METHODS: We have developed a cell model system, stably expressing either the SCAD wild-type protein or the misfolding SCAD variant protein, p.Arg107Cys (c.319 C > T). The model system was used for......BACKGROUND: Variations in the gene ACADS, encoding the mitochondrial protein short-chain acyl CoA-dehydrogenase (SCAD), have been observed in individuals with clinical symptoms. The phenotype of SCAD deficiency (SCADD) is very heterogeneous, ranging from asymptomatic to severe, without a clear...... increased demand for the mitochondrial antioxidant SOD2. In addition, we found markers of apoptotic activity in the p.Arg107Cys expressing cells, which points to a possible pathophysiological role of this variant protein....

  17. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O2), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm-2. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes

  18. Differential expression of cardiac muscle mitochondrial matrix proteins in broilers from ascites-resistant and susceptible lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2005-05-01

    Ascites is a metabolic disorder of modern broilers that is distinguished by cardiopulmonary insufficiency in the face of intense oxygen demands of rapidly growing tissues. Broilers with ascites exhibit sustained elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy, the end result of which is heart failure. It has been shown that mitochondrial function is impaired in broilers with ascites. In the current study, mitochondrial matrix protein levels were compared between ascites-resistant line broilers and ascites-susceptible line broilers with and without ascites using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. One hundred seventy-two protein spots were detected on the gels, and 9 of the spots were present at different levels in the 4 groups of broilers. These 9 protein spots were selected for identification by mass spectrometry. Two of the spots were found to contain single mitochondrial matrix proteins. Both mitochondrial matrix proteins, the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional enzyme, were present at higher levels in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites in the present study. The elevated levels of 2 key proteins in aerobic metabolism in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites observed in the present study suggests that the mitochondria of broilers with this disease may respond inappropriately to hypoxia. PMID:15913181

  19. Global Protein Oxidation Profiling Suggests Efficient Mitochondrial Proteome Homeostasis During Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo Guevara, Carina; Philipp, Oliver; Hamann, Andrea; Werner, Alexandra; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Rexroth, Sascha; Rögner, Matthias; Poetsch, Ansgar

    2016-05-01

    The free radical theory of aging is based on the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to the accumulation of age-related protein oxidation. Because themajority of cellular ROS is generated at the respiratory electron transport chain, this study focuses on the mitochondrial proteome of the aging model Podospora anserina as target for ROS-induced damage. To ensure the detection of even low abundant modified peptides, separation by long gradient nLC-ESI-MS/MS and an appropriate statistical workflow for iTRAQ quantification was developed. Artificial protein oxidation was minimized by establishing gel-free sample preparation in the presence of reducing and iron-chelating agents. This first large scale, oxidative modification-centric study for P. anserina allowed the comprehensive quantification of 22 different oxidative amino acid modifications, and notably the quantitative comparison of oxidized and nonoxidized protein species. In total 2341 proteins were quantified. For 746 both protein species (unmodified and oxidatively modified) were detected and the modification sites determined. The data revealed that methionine residues are preferably oxidized. Further prominent identified modifications in decreasing order of occurrence were carbonylation as well as formation of N-formylkynurenine and pyrrolidinone. Interestingly, for the majority of proteins a positive correlation of changes in protein amount and oxidative damage were noticed, and a general decrease in protein amounts at late age. However, it was discovered that few proteins changed in oxidative damage in accordance with former reports. Our data suggest that P. anserina is efficiently capable to counteract ROS-induced protein damage during aging as long as protein de novo synthesis is functioning, ultimately leading to an overall constant relationship between damaged and undamaged protein species. These findings contradict a massive increase in protein oxidation during aging and rather suggest a

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  1. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  2. A novel class of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles modifies mitochondrial proteins and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells through redox mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K Vayalil

    Full Text Available Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes UCP2 and UCP3 affect mitochondrial metabolism and healthy aging in female nonagenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangkyu; Myers, Leann; Ravussin, Eric; Cherry, Katie E; Jazwinski, S Michal

    2016-08-01

    Energy expenditure decreases with age, but in the oldest-old, energy demand for maintenance of body functions increases with declining health. Uncoupling proteins have profound impact on mitochondrial metabolic processes; therefore, we focused attention on mitochondrial uncoupling protein genes. Alongside resting metabolic rate (RMR), two SNPs in the promoter region of UCP2 were associated with healthy aging. These SNPs mark potential binding sites for several transcription factors; thus, they may affect expression of the gene. A third SNP in the 3'-UTR of UCP3 interacted with RMR. This UCP3 SNP is known to impact UCP3 expression in tissue culture cells, and it has been associated with body weight and mitochondrial energy metabolism. The significant main effects of the UCP2 SNPs and the interaction effect of the UCP3 SNP were also observed after controlling for fat-free mass (FFM) and physical-activity related energy consumption. The association of UCP2/3 with healthy aging was not found in males. Thus, our study provides evidence that the genetic risk factors for healthy aging differ in males and females, as expected from the differences in the phenotypes associated with healthy aging between the two sexes. It also has implications for how mitochondrial function changes during aging. PMID:26965008

  4. Inhibition of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response by acetylcholine alleviated hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Bi, Xueyuan; He, Xi; Yu, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Ming; Zang, Weijin

    2016-05-18

    The mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) is involved in numerous diseases that have the common feature of mitochondrial dysfunction. However, its pathophysiological relevance in the context of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in endothelial cells remains elusive. Previous studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine (ACh) protects against cardiomyocyte injury by suppressing generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS). This study aimed to explore the role of UPR(mt) in endothelial cells during H/R and to clarify the beneficial effects of ACh. Our results demonstrated that H/R triggered UPR(mt) in endothelial cells, as evidenced by the elevation of heat shock protein 60 and LON protease 1 protein levels, and resulted in release of mitochondrial pro-apoptotic proteins, including cytochrome C, Omi/high temperature requirement protein A 2 and second mitochondrial activator of caspases/direct inhibitor of apoptosis-binding protein with low PI, from the mitochondria to cytosol. ACh administration markedly decreased UPR(mt) by inhibiting mtROS and alleviating the mitonuclear protein imbalance. Consequently, ACh alleviated the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and restored mitochondrial ultrastructure and function, thereby reducing the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. Intriguingly, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide, a type-3 muscarinic ACh receptor (M3AChR) inhibitor, abolished the ACh-elicited attenuation of UPR(mt) and TUNEL positive cells, indicating that the salutary effects of ACh were likely mediated by M3AChR in endothelial cells. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that UPR(mt) might be essential for triggering the mitochondrion-associated apoptotic pathway during H/R. ACh markedly suppressed UPR(mt) by inhibiting mtROS and alleviating the mitonuclear protein imbalance, presumably through M3AChR. PMID:27111378

  5. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiori Sekine

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5 is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT, a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria.

  6. The Ablation of Mitochondrial Protein Phosphatase Pgam5 Confers Resistance Against Metabolic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shiori; Yao, Akari; Hattori, Kazuki; Sugawara, Sho; Naguro, Isao; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Takeda, Kohsuke; Ichijo, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase family member 5 (PGAM5) is a mitochondrial protein phosphatase that has been reported to be involved in various stress responses from mitochondrial quality control to cell death. However, its roles in vivo are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to several metabolic insults. Under cold stress combined with fasting, Pgam5-deficient mice better maintained body temperature than wild-type mice and showed an extended survival rate. Serum triglycerides and lipid content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), a center of adaptive thermogenesis, were severely reduced in Pgam5-deficient mice. Moreover, although Pgam5 deficiency failed to maintain proper mitochondrial integrity in BAT, it reciprocally resulted in the dramatic induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) that activates various functions of BAT including thermogenesis. Thus, the enhancement of lipid metabolism and FGF21 may contribute to the cold resistance of Pgam5-deficient mice under fasting condition. Finally, we also found that Pgam5-deficient mice are resistant to high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Our study uncovered that PGAM5 is involved in the whole-body metabolism in response to stresses that impose metabolic challenges on mitochondria. PMID:27077115

  7. Influence of aerobic exercise intensity on myofibrillar and mitochondrial protein synthesis in young men during early and late postexercise recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Di Donato, Danielle M.; Daniel W D West; Churchward-Venne, Tyler A.; Breen, Leigh; Baker, Steven K.; Phillips, Stuart M.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is typically associated with expansion of the mitochondrial protein pool and improvements in muscle oxidative capacity. The impact of aerobic exercise intensity on the synthesis of specific skeletal muscle protein subfractions is not known. We aimed to study the effect of aerobic exercise intensity on rates of myofibrillar (MyoPS) and mitochondrial (MitoPS) protein synthesis over an early (0.5–4.5 h) and late (24–28 h) period during postexercise recovery. Using a within-subje...

  8. Identification of mitochondrial proteins and some of their precursors in two-dimensional electrophoretic maps of human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, L.

    1981-01-01

    A set of at least 30 proteins disappears from the two-dimensional electrophoretic pattern of human lymphoid cells treated with various antimitochondrial agents. This set is similar to the set of proteins found in isolated mitochondria (except for the presence of action in the latter group), indicating that the inhibitor effect stops production of a majority of mature mitochondrial proteins. Several proteins having the characteristics of precursors to the major cytoplasmically synthesized mito...

  9. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael N. Davies

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation (AcK, a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT, an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK.

  10. The Acetyl Group Buffering Action of Carnitine Acetyltransferase Offsets Macronutrient-Induced Lysine Acetylation of Mitochondrial Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael N; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Thompson, J Will; Dubois, Laura G; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Brosnan, M Julia; Rolph, Timothy P; Grimsrud, Paul A; Muoio, Deborah M

    2016-01-12

    Lysine acetylation (AcK), a posttranslational modification wherein a two-carbon acetyl group binds covalently to a lysine residue, occurs prominently on mitochondrial proteins and has been linked to metabolic dysfunction. An emergent theory suggests mitochondrial AcK occurs via mass action rather than targeted catalysis. To test this hypothesis, we performed mass spectrometry-based acetylproteomic analyses of quadriceps muscles from mice with skeletal muscle-specific deficiency of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT), an enzyme that buffers the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA pool by converting short-chain acyl-CoAs to their membrane permeant acylcarnitine counterparts. CrAT deficiency increased tissue acetyl-CoA levels and susceptibility to diet-induced AcK of broad-ranging mitochondrial proteins, coincident with diminished whole body glucose control. Sub-compartment acetylproteome analyses of muscles from obese mice and humans showed remarkable overrepresentation of mitochondrial matrix proteins. These findings reveal roles for CrAT and L-carnitine in modulating the muscle acetylproteome and provide strong experimental evidence favoring the nonenzymatic carbon pressure model of mitochondrial AcK. PMID:26748706

  11. The mitochondrial quality control protein Yme1 is necessary to prevent defective mitophagy in a yeast model of Barth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Gerard J; McMaster, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae TAZ1 gene is an orthologue of human TAZ; both encode the protein tafazzin. Tafazzin is a transacylase that transfers acyl chains with unsaturated fatty acids from phospholipids to monolysocardiolipin to generate cardiolipin with unsaturated fatty acids. Mutations in human TAZ cause Barth syndrome, a fatal childhood cardiomyopathy biochemically characterized by reduced cardiolipin mass and increased monolysocardiolipin levels. To uncover cellular processes that require tafazzin to maintain cell health, we performed a synthetic genetic array screen using taz1Δ yeast cells to identify genes whose deletion aggravated its fitness. The synthetic genetic array screen uncovered several mitochondrial cellular processes that require tafazzin. Focusing on the i-AAA protease Yme1, a mitochondrial quality control protein that degrades misfolded proteins, we determined that in cells lacking both Yme1 and Taz1 function, there were substantive mitochondrial ultrastructural defects, ineffective superoxide scavenging, and a severe defect in mitophagy. We identify an important role for the mitochondrial protease Yme1 in the ability of cells that lack tafazzin function to maintain mitochondrial structural integrity and mitochondrial quality control and to undergo mitophagy. PMID:25688091

  12. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Eslava, Arturo P; van Kan, Jan A L; Benito, Ernesto P

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor. PMID:26952144

  13. Melatonin prevents the dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission and oxidative insult in the cortical neurons after 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jih-Ing; Pan, I-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Yun; Huang, Chiu-Ying; Chen, Pei-Chun; Shin, Jyh Wei

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Mitochondrial morphology is dynamic and precisely regulated by the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery. Aberrant mitochondrial fragmentation controlled by the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), may result in cell death. Our previous results showed that melatonin protected neurons by inhibiting oxidative stress in a 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) )-induced PD model. However, the effect of melatonin on mitochondrial dynamics remains uncharacterized. Herein, we investigated the effect of melatonin and the role of Drp1 on MPP(+) -induced mitochondrial fission in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that MPP(+) induced a rapid increase in the ratio of GSSG:total glutathione (a marker of oxidative stress) and mitochondrial fragmentation, Drp1 upregulation within 4 hours, and finally resulted in neuron loss 48 hours after the treatment. Neurons overexpressing wild-type Drp1 promoted mitochondrial and nuclear fragmentation; however, neurons overexpressing dominant-negative Drp1(K38A) or cotreated with melatonin exhibited significantly reduced MPP(+) -induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuron death. Moreover, melatonin cotreatment prevented an MPP(+) -induced high ratio of GSSG and mitochondrial Drp1 upregulation. The prevention of mitochondrial fission by melatonin was not found in neurons transfected with wild-type Drp1. These results provide a new insight that the neuroprotective effect of melatonin against MPP(+) toxicity is mediated by inhibiting the oxidative stress and Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation. PMID:27159033

  14. 'Sheltered disruption' of Neurospora crassa MOM22, an essential component of the mitochondrial protein import complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Nargang, F E; Künkele, K P; Mayer, A.; Ritzel, R G; Neupert, W; Lill, R

    1995-01-01

    MOM22 is a component of the protein import complex of the mitochondrial outer membrane of Neurospora crassa. Using the newly developed procedure of 'sheltered disruption', we created a heterokaryotic strain harboring two nuclei, one with a null allele of the mom-22 gene and the other with a wild-type allele. Homokaryons bearing the mom-22 disruption could not be isolated, suggesting that mom-22 is an essential gene. The mutant nucleus can be forced to predominate in the heterokaryon through t...

  15. FTSJ2, a heat shock-inducible mitochondrial protein, suppresses cell invasion and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Lai

    Full Text Available Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ, an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2'-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5 of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1 compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0, and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671. In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  16. Mutations in APOPT1, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Cavitating Leukoencephalopathy with Cytochrome c Oxidase Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, Laura; Haack, Tobias B.; Hardy, Steven; Abbink, Truus E.M.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Lamantea, Eleonora; Marchet, Silvia; Morandi, Lucia; Moggio, Maurizio; Carrozzo, Rosalba; Torraco, Alessandra; Diodato, Daria; Strom, Tim M.; Meitinger, Thomas; Tekturk, Pinar; Yapici, Zuhal; Al-Murshedi, Fathiya; Stevens, René; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Lamperti, Costanza; Ardissone, Anna; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Prokisch, Holger; Taylor, Robert W.; Bertini, Enrico; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent biochemical abnormality in mitochondrial disorders, but a large fraction of cases remains genetically undetermined. Whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of APOPT1 mutations in two Italian sisters and in a third Turkish individual presenting severe COX deficiency. All three subjects presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern characterized by cavitating leukodystrophy, predominantly in the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. We then found APOPT1 mutations in three additional unrelated children, selected on the basis of these particular MRI features. All identified mutations predicted the synthesis of severely damaged protein variants. The clinical features of the six subjects varied widely from acute neurometabolic decompensation in late infancy to subtle neurological signs, which appeared in adolescence; all presented a chronic, long-surviving clinical course. We showed that APOPT1 is targeted to and localized within mitochondria by an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is eventually cleaved off from the mature protein. We then showed that APOPT1 is virtually absent in fibroblasts cultured in standard conditions, but its levels increase by inhibiting the proteasome or after oxidative challenge. Mutant fibroblasts showed reduced amount of COX holocomplex and higher levels of reactive oxygen species, which both shifted toward control values by expressing a recombinant, wild-type APOPT1 cDNA. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of APOPT1 in myoblasts and fibroblasts caused dramatic decrease in cell viability. APOPT1 mutations are responsible for infantile or childhood-onset mitochondrial disease, hallmarked by the combination of profound COX deficiency with a distinctive neuroimaging presentation. PMID:25175347

  17. Ethanol influences on Bax associations with mitochondrial membrane proteins in neonatal rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2013-02-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure and focused on interactions between proapoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that, following ethanol exposure, Bax proapoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least 2 h postexposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at 2 h postexposure and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that, at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. PMID:22767450

  18. MitoNuc and MitoAln: two related databases of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesole, Graziano; Gissi, Carmela; Catalano, Domenico; Grillo, Giorgio; Licciulli, Flavio; Liuni, Sabino; Attimonelli, Marcella; Saccone, Cecilia

    2000-01-01

    Mitochondria, besides their central role in energy metabolism, have recently been found to be involved in a number of basic processes of cell life and to contribute to the pathogenesis of many degenerative diseases. All functions of mitochondria depend on the interaction of nuclear and organellar genomes. Mitochondrial genomes have been extensively sequenced and analysed and the data collected in several specialised databases. In order to collect information on nuclear coded mitochondrial proteins we developed MitoNuc and MitoAln, two related databases containing, respectively, detailed information on sequenced nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in Metazoa and yeast, and the multiple alignments of the relevant homologous protein coding regions. MitoNuc and MitoAln retrieval through SRS at http://bio-www.ba.cnr.it:8000/srs6/ can easily allow the extraction of sequence data, subsequences defined by specific features and nucleotide or amino acid multiple alignments. PMID:10592211

  19. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein S18-2 evokes chromosomal instability and transforms primary rat skin fibroblasts

    KAUST Repository

    Kashuba, Elena

    2015-05-12

    We have shown earlier that overexpression of the human mitochondrial ribosomal protein MRPS18-2 (S18-2) led to immortalization of primary rat embryonic fibroblasts. The derived cells expressed the embryonic stem cell markers, and cellular pathways that control cell proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation, cellular respiration, and other redox reactions were activated in the immortalized cells. Here we report that, upon overexpression of S18-2 protein, primary rat skin fibroblasts underwent cell transformation. Cells passed more than 300 population doublings, and two out of three tested clones gave rise to tumors in experimental animals. Transformed cells showed anchorage-independent growth and loss of contact inhibition; they expressed epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and β-catenin. Transformed cells showed increased telomerase activity, disturbance of the cell cycle, and chromosomal instability. Taken together, our data suggest that S18-2 is a newly identified oncoprotein that may be involved in cancerogenesis.

  20. Mitochondrial ascorbate-glutathione cycle and proteomic analysis of carbonylated proteins during tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vidal, O; Camejo, D; Rivera-Cabrera, F; Konigsberg, M; Villa-Hernández, J M; Mendoza-Espinoza, J A; Pérez-Flores, L J; Sevilla, F; Jiménez, A; Díaz de León-Sánchez, F

    2016-03-01

    In non-photosynthetic tissues, mitochondria are the main source of energy and of reactive oxygen species. Accumulation of high levels of these species in the cell causes damage to macromolecules including several proteins and induces changes in different metabolic processes. Fruit ripening has been characterized as an oxidative phenomenon; therefore, control of reactive oxygen species levels by mitochondrial antioxidants plays a crucial role on this process. In this work, ascorbate-glutathione cycle components, hydrogen peroxide levels and the proteomic profile of carbonylated proteins were analyzed in mitochondria isolated from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit at two ripening stages. A significant increase on most ascorbate-glutathione cycle components and on carbonylated proteins was observed in mitochondria from breaker to light red stage. Enzymes and proteins involved in diverse cellular and mitochondrial metabolic pathways were identified among the carbonylated proteins. These results suggest that protein carbonylation is a post-translational modification involved in tomato fruit ripening regulation. PMID:26471654

  1. Insulin fails to enhance mTOR phosphorylation, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and ATP production in human skeletal muscle without amino acid replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Short, Kevin R.; Asmann, Yan; Coenen-Schimke, Jill M.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic insulin administration causes hypoaminoacidemia by inhibiting protein degradation, which may in turn inhibit muscle protein synthesis (PS). Insulin enhances muscle mitochondrial PS and ATP production when hypoaminoacidemia is prevented by exogenous amino acid (AA) replacement. We determined whether insulin would stimulate mitochondrial PS and ATP production in the absence of AA replacement. Using l-[1,2-13C]leucine as a tracer, we measured the fractional synthetic rate of mitochondri...

  2. Regulation of mitochondrial and nuclear effect of thyroid hormones by cytoplasmic/protein /components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific T4-binding protein (T4 effect modulator, T4EM), mediating a number of significant hormone effects in nucleus and mitochondria have been discovered in liver and brain cytoplasm. It is a glycoprotein with molecular mass of 24 kDa, consisting of 200 amino acid residues with alanine in N-terminal. T4EM is revealed to bind extremely low concentration of T4 (Ka=1, 3?109M-1). In liver cells alterations in organism thyroid status have been established to effect the modulator's activity greatly. T4EM isolated from the liver of hyperthyroid rats stimulated mitochondrial protein biosynthesis significantly as compared to the modulator isolated from the lever of intact and thyroidectomized rats. The modulator's activity has been revealed to be subjected to significant variations depending not only on functional state of thyroid gland, but on animal's age as well, changing in liver and brain differently. In liver gradual increase of the modulator's activity correlating to the animal's age and reaching its maximum in 3-month rats has been observed, to be in compliance with calorigenic effect of T4 in this organ. In brain cells T4EM activity increase has been revealed in late embryonic and early postnatal period of rat life. Beside stimulation of mitochondrial protein biosynthesis in rat lever T4EM increases protein phosphorylation, nuclear RNA polymerize activity and mitochondria respiration. Similar studies on brain cells show that adult brain the modulator does not cause confident alteration in any of studied parameters. On the basis of findings T4EM is suggested to be necessary the formation of age and tissue responsiveness to thyroxine. (author)

  3. In vitro binding of selenium by rat liver mitochondrial selenium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last year the authors reported that upon freezing and thawing mitochondria from rats injected with [75Se]Na2SeO3 (75Se-selenite), a 75Se-binding protein (SeBP) was released. They have studied further in vitro labelling of SeBP. This matrix protein was labelled in vitro when lysed mitochondria (containing non-matrix material) were incubated with 75Se-selenite but not when matrix material alone was incubated with 75Se-selenite. Thus, there are one or more promoters of in vitro SeBP labelling in the non-matrix fraction. SeBP was also labelled in vitro when 75Se-selenite was added to matrix alone and dialyzed. Dialysis tubing, and not the dialysis process, promoted labelling by affecting SeBP and not by affecting 75Se-selenite. Labelling did not occur when matrix alone and 75Se-selenite were incubated (not dialyzed) in a glass test tube but did occur in a polystyrene test tube. They hypothesize that non-covalent interactions occur between SeBP and dialysis tubing or polystyrene that expose Se binding sites on the protein. A similar mechanism involving mitochondrial non-matrix material may function in vivo. Non-denaturing disc gel electrophoresis of partially purified SeBP labelled in vivo or in vitro suggested that the same protein was labelled in both conditions. Using in vitro binding techniques, SeBP was also found in sheep liver mitochondrial matrix. This supports the theory that SeBP is important in Se metabolism

  4. Ribosomal protein L10 is encoded in the mitochondrial genome of many land plants and green algae

    OpenAIRE

    Bonen Linda; Mower Jeffrey P

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The mitochondrial genomes of plants generally encode 30-40 identified protein-coding genes and a large number of lineage-specific ORFs. The lack of wide conservation for most ORFs suggests they are unlikely to be functional. However, an ORF, termed orf-bryo1, was recently found to be conserved among bryophytes suggesting that it might indeed encode a functional mitochondrial protein. Results From a broad survey of land plants, we have found that the orf-bryo1 gene is also ...

  5. Interactions among three proteins that specifically activate translation of the mitochondrial COX3 mRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, N.G.; Costanzo, M. C.; Fox, T D

    1994-01-01

    The PET54, PET122, and PET494 proteins, which are associated with the yeast inner mitochondrial membrane, specifically activate translation of the mitochondrially encoded COX3 mRNA. We used the two-hybrid system to test whether pairs of these proteins, when fused to either the GAL4 DNA-binding or transcriptional activating domain, can physically associate as measured by the expression of the GAL4-dependent reporter, lacZ. PET54 and PET122 interacted in this system, and an amino-terminally tru...

  6. Targeting of a Tail-anchored Protein to Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane by Independent but Competing Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Borgese, Nica; Gazzoni, Ilaria; Barberi, Massimo; Colombo, Sara; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2001-01-01

    Many mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) proteins have a transmembrane domain near the C terminus and an N-terminal cytosolic moiety. It is not clear how these tail-anchored (TA) proteins posttranslationally select their target, but C-terminal charged residues play an important role. To investigate how discrimination between MOM and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) occurs, we used mammalian cytochrome b5, a TA protein existing in two, MOM or ER localized, versions. Substi...

  7. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L41 Suppresses Cell Growth in Association with p53 and p27Kip1

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Young A; Kim, Mi Jin; Park, Jong Kuk; Chung, Young Min; Lee, Jong Hyeok; Chi, Sung-Gil; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoo, Young Do

    2005-01-01

    The p53 protein arrests the cell cycle at the G1 phase when stabilized by the interaction between ribosomal proteins and HDM2 under growth-inhibitory conditions. Meanwhile, p53, when translocated to the mitochondria in response to cell death signals, induces apoptosis via transcription-independent mechanisms. In this report, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial ribosomal protein L41 (MRPL41) enhances p53 stability and contributes to p53-induced apoptosis in response to growth-inhibitory cond...

  8. Mitochondrial morphology and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic and are able to interchange their morphology between elongated interconnected mitochondrial networks and a fragmented disconnected arrangement by the processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission, respectively. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are regulated by the mitochondrial fusion proteins (mitofusins 1 and 2, and optic atrophy 1) and the mitochondrial fission proteins (dynamin-related peptide 1 and mitochondrial fission protein 1) and have been implicated in a...

  9. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether injures cell viability and mitochondrial function of mouse spermatocytes by decreasing mitochondrial proteins Atp5b and Uqcrc1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shaoping; Wang, Jing; Cui, Yiqiang

    2016-09-01

    Our object was to explore direct effects and mechanism of BDE47 on GC2 (immortalized mouse spermatocyte). GC2 were exposed to DMSO, 0.1, 1, 10, 100μM BDE47 for 48h. Cell viability was detected by trypan-blue exclusion; ultrastructure by electron-microscopy; cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane motential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) by flow-cytometry; ATP production by luminometer; Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 level by WB. To explore whether the decreased mitochondrial proteins play an important role in apoptosis, MMP and apoptosis were detected after Atp5b or Uqcrc1 knockdown in GC2. Results showed BDE47 reduced cell viability, caused condensation of nuclear and vacuolated mitochondria, decreased MMP and ATP, induced ROS, cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phase, reduced Atp5b, Uqcrc1, Bcl-2 in GC2. Knockdown of Atp5b or Uqcrc1 decreased MMP, induced apoptosis in GC2. Results suggested that BDE47 reduced cell viability, injured mitochondria in spermatocytes probably by decreasing mitochondrial protein Atp5b and Uqcrc1. PMID:27525561

  10. Nucleocytoplasmic human O-GlcNAc transferase is sufficient for O-GlcNAcylation of mitochondrial proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapannone, Riccardo; Mariappa, Daniel; Ferenbach, Andrew T.; vanAalten, Daan M.F.

    2016-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification (O-GlcNAcylation) is a nutrient-dependent protein post-translational modification (PTM), dynamically and reversibly driven by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that catalyse the addition and the removal of the O-GlcNAc moieties to/from serine and threonine residues of target proteins respectively. Increasing evidence suggests involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in many biological processes, including transcription, signalling, neuronal development and mitochondrial function. The presence of a mitochondrial O-GlcNAc proteome and a mitochondrial OGT (mOGT) isoform has been reported. We explored the presence of mOGT in human cell lines and mouse tissues. Surprisingly, analysis of genomic sequences indicates that this isoform cannot be expressed in most of the species analysed, except some primates. In addition, we were not able to detect endogenous mOGT in a range of human cell lines. Knockdown experiments and Western blot analysis of all the predicted OGT isoforms suggested the expression of only a single OGT isoform. In agreement with this, we demonstrate that overexpression of the nucleocytoplasmic OGT (ncOGT) isoform leads to increased O-GlcNAcylation of mitochondrial proteins, suggesting that ncOGT is necessary and sufficient for the generation of the O-GlcNAc mitochondrial proteome. PMID:27048592

  11. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  12. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  13. Hepatitis C virus NS5A protein cooperates with phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα to induce mitochondrial fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Gavin Ka Yu; Zhou, Fan; Yu, Mei Kuen; Zhang, Leiliang; Wang, Tuanlao; Liang, Yongheng; Chen, Yangchao; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yu, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has long been observed to take advantage of the host mitochondria to support viral replication and assembly. The HCV core protein has been implicated to fragment host mitochondria. In this report, we have discovered that the non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) plays an instructive role in attaching ER with mitochondria, causing mitochondrial fragmentation. Dynamin-related protein 1(Drp1), a host protein essential to mitochondrial membrane fission, does not play a role in NS5A-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. Instead, phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA), which has been demonstrated to bind to NS5A and is required to support HCV life cycle, is required for NS5A to induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Both NS5A and core are required by HCV to fragment the mitochondria, as inhibiting either of their respective downstream proteins, PI4KA or Drp1, resulted in lengthening of mitochondria tubules in HCVcc-infected cells. By fragmenting the mitochondria, NS5A renders the cells more resistant to mitochondria mediated apoptosis. This finding indicates previously-ignored contribution of NS5A in HCV-induced mitochondria dysfunction. PMID:27010100

  14. An in silico analysis of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whelan James

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An in silico analysis of the mitochondrial protein import apparatus from a variety of species; including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella variabilis, Ectocarpus siliculosus, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, Physcomitrella patens, Selaginella moellendorffii, Picea glauca, Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana was undertaken to determine if components differed within and between plant and non-plant species. Results The channel forming subunits of the outer membrane components Tom40 and Sam50 are conserved between plant groups and other eukaryotes. In contrast, the receptor component(s in green plants, particularly Tom20, (C. reinhardtii, C. variabilis, P. patens, S. moellendorffii, P. glauca, O. sativa and A. thaliana are specific to this lineage. Red algae contain a Tom22 receptor that is orthologous to yeast Tom22. Furthermore, plant mitochondrial receptors display differences between various plant lineages. These are evidenced by distinctive motifs in all plant Metaxins, which are absent in red algae, and the presence of the outer membrane receptor OM64 in Angiosperms (rice and Arabidopsis, but not in lycophytes (S. moellendorffii and gymnosperms (P. glauca. Furthermore, although the intermembrane space receptor Mia40 is conserved across a wide phylogenetic range, its function differs between lineages. In all plant lineages, Tim17 contains a C-terminal extension, which may act as a receptor component for the import of nucleic acids into plant mitochondria. Conclusions It is proposed that the observed functional divergences are due to the selective pressure to sort proteins between mitochondria and chloroplasts, resulting in differences in protein receptor components between plant groups and other organisms. Additionally, diversity of receptor components is observed within the plant kingdom. Even when receptor components are orthologous across plant and non-plant species, it appears that the functions of these have expanded or

  15. Spring Viremia of Carp Virus N Protein Suppresses Fish IFNφ1 Production by Targeting the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Long-Feng; Li, Shun; Lu, Xiao-Bing; LaPatra, Scott E; Zhang, Nu; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Chen, Dan-Dan; Nie, Pin; Zhang, Yong-An

    2016-05-01

    For a virus to replicate efficiently, it must try and inhibit host IFN expression because IFN is an important host defense at early stages after viral infection. For aquatic viruses, the mechanisms used to escape the hosts IFN system are still unclear. In this study, we show that the N protein of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) inhibits zebrafish IFNφ1 production by degrading the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS). First, the upregulation of IFNφ1 promoter activity stimulated by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) or MAVS was suppressed by the SVCV infection. However, the upregulation by the downstream factor of the RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway, TANK-binding kinase 1, was not affected. Notably, at the protein level, MAVS decreased remarkably when cells were infected with SVCV. Second, consistent with the result of the SVCV infection, overexpression of the N protein of SVCV blocked the IFNφ1 transcription activated by MAVS and downregulated MAVS expression at the protein level but not at the mRNA level. Further analysis demonstrated that the N protein targeted MAVS for K48-linked ubiquitination, which promoted the degradation of MAVS. These data indicated that fish MAVS could be degraded by the N protein of SVCV through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first article of a fish RIG-I-like receptor pathway interfered by an aquatic virus in an ubiquitin-proteasome manner, suggesting that immune evasion of a virus also exists in lower vertebrates. PMID:26994222

  16. The force exerted by the membrane potential during protein import into the mitochondrial matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Ghosal, Sandip; Matouschek, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The force exerted on a targeting sequence by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane is calculated on the basis of continuum electrostatics. The force is found to vary from 3.0 pN to 2.2 pN (per unit elementary charge) as the radius of the inner membrane pore (assumed aqueous) is varied from 6.5 to 12 A, its measured range. In the present model, the decrease in force with increasing pore width arises from the shielding effect of water. Since the pore is not very much wider than the distance between water molecules, the full shielding effect of water may not be present; the extreme case of a purely membranous pore without water gives a force of 3.2 pN per unit charge, which should represent an upper limit. When applied to mitochondrial import experiments on the protein barnase, these results imply that forces between 11 +/- 2 pN and 13.5 +/- 2.5 pN catalyze the unfolding of barnase in those experiments. A comparison of these results with unfolding forces measured using atomic force microscopy is made.

  17. Mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform a variety of essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Most of mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear DNA (nDNA) whereas a very small fraction is encoded by the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes can result in mitochondrial dysfunction which leads to a wide range of cellular perturbations including aberrant calcium homeostasis, excessive reactive oxygen species production, dysregulated apoptosis, and insufficient energy generation to meet the needs of various organs, particularly those with high energy demand. Impaired mitochondrial function in various tissues and organs results in the multi-organ manifestations of mitochondrial diseases including epilepsy, intellectual disability, skeletal and cardiac myopathies, hepatopathies, endocrinopathies, and nephropathies. Defects in nDNA genes can be inherited in an autosomal or X-linked manners, whereas, mtDNA is maternally inherited. Mitochondrial diseases can result from mutations of nDNA genes encoding subunits of the electron transport chain complexes or their assembly factors, proteins associated with the mitochondrial import or networking, mitochondrial translation factors, or proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. MtDNA defects can be either point mutations or rearrangements. The diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders can be challenging in many cases and is based on clinical recognition, biochemical screening, histopathological studies, functional studies, and molecular genetic testing. Currently, there are no satisfactory therapies available for mitochondrial disorders that significantly alter the course of the disease. Therapeutic options include symptomatic treatment, cofactor supplementation, and exercise. PMID:26996063

  18. Early changes in costameric and mitochondrial protein expression with unloading are muscle specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flück, Martin; Li, Ruowei; Valdivieso, Paola; Linnehan, Richard M; Castells, Josiane; Tesch, Per; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesised that load-sensitive expression of costameric proteins, which hold the sarcomere in place and position the mitochondria, contributes to the early adaptations of antigravity muscle to unloading and would depend on muscle fibre composition and chymotrypsin activity of the proteasome. Biopsies were obtained from vastus lateralis (VL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of eight men before and after 3 days of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) and subjected to fibre typing and measures for costameric (FAK and FRNK), mitochondrial (NDUFA9, SDHA, UQCRC1, UCP3, and ATP5A1), and MHCI protein and RNA content. Mean cross-sectional area (MCSA) of types I and II muscle fibres in VL and type I fibres in SOL demonstrated a trend for a reduction after ULLS (0.05 ≤ P < 0.10). FAK phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 showed a 20% reduction in VL muscle (P = 0.029). SOL muscle demonstrated a specific reduction in UCP3 content (-23%; P = 0.012). Muscle-specific effects of ULLS were identified for linear relationships between measured proteins, chymotrypsin activity and fibre MCSA. The molecular modifications in costamere turnover and energy homoeostasis identify that aspects of atrophy and fibre transformation are detectable at the protein level in weight-bearing muscles within 3 days of unloading. PMID:25313365

  19. Development of passive CLARITY and immunofluorescent labelling of multiple proteins in human cerebellum: understanding mechanisms of neurodegeneration in mitochondrial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Laude, Alex; Lightowlers, Robert; Morris, Chris M.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Lax, Nichola Z.

    2016-01-01

    CLARITY enables immunofluorescent labelling and imaging of large volumes of tissue to provide a better insight into the three dimensional relationship between cellular morphology and spatial interactions between different cell types. In the current study, we optimise passive CLARITY and immunofluorescent labelling of neurons and mitochondrial proteins in mouse and human brain tissues to gain further insights into mechanisms of neurodegeneration occurring in mitochondrial disease. This is the first study to utilise human cerebellum fixed in paraformaldehyde and cryoprotected in conjunction with formalin-fixed tissues opening up further avenues for use of archived tissue. We optimised hydrogel-embedding and passive clearance of lipids from both mouse (n = 5) and human (n = 9) cerebellum as well as developing an immunofluorescent protocol that consistently labels different neuronal domains as well as blood vessels. In addition to visualising large structures, we were able to visualise mitochondrial proteins in passively cleared tissues to reveal respiratory chain deficiency associated with mitochondrial disease. We also demonstrate multiple use of tissues by stripping antibodies and re-probing the cerebellum. This technique allows interrogation of large volumes intact brain samples for better understanding of the complex pathological changes taking place in mitochondrial disease. PMID:27181107

  20. The Human Mitochondrial DEAD-Box Protein DDX28 Resides in RNA Granules and Functions in Mitoribosome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ting Tu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial ribosomes are specialized in the synthesis of 13 proteins, which are fundamental components of the oxidative phosphorylation system. The pathway of mitoribosome biogenesis, the compartmentalization of the process, and factors involved remain largely unknown. Here, we have identified the DEAD-box protein DDX28 as an RNA granule component essential for the biogenesis of the mitoribosome large subunit (mt-LSU. DDX28 interacts with the 16S rRNA and the mt-LSU. RNAi-mediated DDX28 silencing in HEK293T cells does not affect mitochondrial mRNA stability or 16S rRNA processing or modification. However, it leads to reduced levels of 16S rRNA and mt-LSU proteins, impaired mt-LSU assembly, deeply attenuated mitochondrial protein synthesis, and consequent failure to assemble oxidative phosphorylation complexes. Our findings identify DDX28 as essential during the early stages of mitoribosome mt-LSU biogenesis, a process that takes place mainly near the mitochondrial nucleoids, in the compartment defined by the RNA granules.

  1. MORPHOLOGY OF THE MITOCHONDRIA IN HEAT-SHOCK-PROTEIN-60 DEFICIENT FIBROBLASTS FROM MITOCHONDRIAL MYOPATHY PATIENTS - EFFECTS OF STRESS CONDITIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUCKRIEDE, A; HEIKEMA, A; SJOLLEMA, K; BRIONES, P; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1995-01-01

    We have described two mitochondrial (mt) myopathy patients with reduced activities of various mt enzymes associated with significantly decreased amounts of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60). Experimental evidence suggested that the lack of hsp60 was the primary defect. Since hsp60 is essential for the p

  2. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) Regulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Number and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnstable, Colin J; Reddy, Rajini; Li, Hong; Horvath, Tamas L

    2016-04-01

    In the brain, mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) has emerged as a stress signal associated with neuronal survival. In the retina, UCP2 is expressed primarily by retinal ganglion cells. Here, we investigated the functional relevance of UCP2 in the mouse retina. Increased expression of UCP2 significantly reduced apoptosis during the critical developmental period resulting in elevated numbers of retinal ganglion cells in the adult. Elevated UCP2 levels also protected against excitotoxic cell death induced by intraocular injection of either NMDA or kainic acid. In monolayer cultures of retinal cells, elevated UCP2 levels increased cell survival and rendered the cells independent of the survival-promoting effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF and CNTF. Taken together, these data implicate UCP2 as an important regulator of retinal neuron survival both during development and in adult animals. PMID:26846222

  3. Biochemical, clinical and molecular findings in LCHAD and general mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olpin, S E; Clark, S; Andresen, B S;

    2005-01-01

    General mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency leads to a wide clinical spectrum of disease ranging from severe neonatal/infantile cardiomyopathy and early death to mild chronic progressive sensorimotor poly-neuropathy with episodic rhabdomyolysis. Isolated long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl...... from an early age. We present biochemical, clinical and mutation data in 9 patients spanning the full spectrum of disease. Fibroblast acylcarnitine profiling shows good correlation with clinical phenotype using the ratio C18(OH)/(C14(OH)+C12(OH)). This ratio shows a gradation of values, from high in...... four patients with severe neonatal disease (2.5+/-0.8), to low in two neuromyopathic patients (0.35, 0.2). Fibroblast fatty acid oxidation flux assays also show correlation with the patient phenotype, when expressed either as percentage residual activity with palmitate or as a ratio of percentage...

  4. Mitochondrial-encoded membrane protein transcripts are pyrimidine-rich while soluble protein transcripts and ribosomal RNA are purine-rich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuels David C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic organisms contain mitochondria, organelles capable of producing large amounts of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation. Each cell contains many mitochondria with many copies of mitochondrial DNA in each organelle. The mitochondrial DNA encodes a small but functionally critical portion of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery, a few other species-specific proteins, and the rRNA and tRNA used for the translation of these transcripts. Because the microenvironment of the mitochondrion is unique, mitochondrial genes may be subject to different selectional pressures than those affecting nuclear genes. Results From an analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of a wide range of eukaryotic species we show that there are three simple rules for the pyrimidine and purine abundances in mitochondrial DNA transcripts. Mitochondrial membrane protein transcripts are pyrimidine rich, rRNA transcripts are purine-rich and the soluble protein transcripts are purine-rich. The transitions between pyrimidine and purine-rich regions of the genomes are rapid and are easily visible on a pyrimidine-purine walk graph. These rules are followed, with few exceptions, independent of which strand encodes the gene. Despite the robustness of these rules across a diverse set of species, the magnitude of the differences between the pyrimidine and purine content is fairly small. Typically, the mitochondrial membrane protein transcripts have a pyrimidine richness of 56%, the rRNA transcripts are 55% purine, and the soluble protein transcripts are only 53% purine. Conclusion The pyrimidine richness of mitochondrial-encoded membrane protein transcripts is partly driven by U nucleotides in the second codon position in all species, which yields hydrophobic amino acids. The purine-richness of soluble protein transcripts is mainly driven by A nucleotides in the first codon position. The purine-richness of rRNA is also due to an abundance of A nucleotides. Possible

  5. Morphine-Induced Preconditioning: Involvement of Protein Kinase A and Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, Marianne; Behmenburg, Friederike; Raible, Miriam; Blase, Dominic; Grievink, Hilbert; Hollmann, Markus W.; Heinen, André; Huhn, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Background Morphine induces myocardial preconditioning (M-PC) via activation of mitochondrial large conductance Ca2+-sensitive potassium (mKCa) channels. An upstream regulator of mKCa channels is protein kinase A (PKA). Furthermore, mKCa channel activation regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics and thereby prevents opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Here, we investigated in the rat heart in vivo whether 1) M-PC is mediated by activation of PKA, and 2) pharmacological opening of the mPTP abolishes the cardioprotective effect of M-PC and 3) M-PC is critically dependent on STAT3 activation, which is located upstream of mPTP within the signalling pathway. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomised to six groups (each n = 6). All animals underwent 25 minutes of regional myocardial ischemia and 120 minutes of reperfusion. Control animals (Con) were not further treated. Morphine preconditioning was initiated by intravenous administration of 0.3 mg/kg morphine (M-PC). The PKA blocker H-89 (10 μg/kg) was investigated with and without morphine (H-89+M-PC, H-89). We determined the effect of mPTP opening with atractyloside (5 mg/kg) with and without morphine (Atr+M-PC, Atr). Furthermore, the effect of morphine on PKA activity was tested in isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes. In further experiments in isolated hearts we tested the protective properties of morphine in the presence of STAT3 inhibition, and whether pharmacological prevention of the mPTP-opening by cyclosporine A (CsA) is cardioprotective in the presence of STAT3 inhibition. Results Morphine reduced infarct size from 64±5% to 39±9% (P0.05 vs. Con). Also, atractyloside abolished infarct size reduction of morphine completely (65±9%; P0.05 vs. Con). In isolated hearts STAT3 inhibitor Stattic completely abolished morphine-induced preconditioning. Administration of Stattic and mPTP inhibitor cyclosporine A reduced infarct size to 31±6% (Stat+CsA, P<0.05 vs. Con). Cyclosporine A alone

  6. Mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative status disruption in brainstem of weaned rats: Immediate response to maternal protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Diorginis José Soares; da Silva Pedroza, Anderson Apolônio; Braz, Glauber Ruda Feitoza; da Silva-Filho, Reginaldo Correia; Lima, Talitta Arruda; Fernandes, Mariana Pinheiro; Doi, Sonia Q; Lagranha, Claudia Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetics dysfunction has been postulated as an important mechanism associated to a number of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. One of the hypotheses is that this is caused by the metabolic challenge generated by the mismatch between prenatal predicted and postnatal reality. Perinatal low-protein diet produces several effects that are manifested in the adult animal, including altered sympathetic tone, increased arterial blood pressure and oxidative stress in the brainstem. The majority of the studies related to nutritional programming postulates that the increased risk levels for non-communicable diseases are associated with the incompatibility between prenatal and postnatal environment. However, little is known about the immediate effects of maternal protein restriction on the offspring's brainstem. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that a maternal low-protein diet causes tissue damage immediately after exposure to the nutritional insult that can be assessed in the brainstem of weaned offspring. In this regard, a series of assays was conducted to measure the mitochondrial bioenergetics and oxidative stress biomarkers in the brainstem, which is the brain structure responsible for the autonomic cardiovascular control. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed ad libitum with normoprotein (NP; 17% casein) or low-protein (LP; 8% casein) diet throughout pregnancy and lactation periods. At weaning, the male offsprings were euthanized and the brainstem was quickly removed to assess the mitochondria function, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane electric potential (ΔΨm), oxidative biomarkers, antioxidant defense and redox status. Our data demonstrated that perinatal LP diet induces an immediate mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the protein restriction induced a marked increase in ROS production, with a decrease in antioxidant defense and redox status. Altogether, our findings suggest that LP-fed animals may be at

  7. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ryan Smith; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Fen Zhou; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R.; Hafez Golzarian; Bhavitavya Nijampatnam; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Aimee Landar

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compo...

  8. Direct interaction of mitochondrial targeting presequences with purified components of the TIM23 protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Dayan, Dana; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-12-23

    Precursor proteins that are imported from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria carry positively charged amphipathic presequences and cross the inner membrane with the help of vital components of the TIM23 complex. It is currently unclear which subunits of the TIM23 complex recognize and directly bind to presequences. Here we analyzed the binding of presequence peptides to purified components of the TIM23 complex. The interaction of three different presequences with purified soluble domains of yeast Tim50 (Tim50IMS), Tim23 (Tim23IMS), and full-length Tim44 was examined. Using chemical cross-linking and surface plasmon resonance we demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of purified Tim50IMS and Tim44 to interact directly with the yeast Hsp60 presequence. We also analyzed their interaction with presequences derived from precursors of yeast mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp70) and of bovine cytochrome P450SCC. Moreover, we characterized the nature of the interactions and determined their KDs. On the basis of our results, we suggest a mechanism of translocation where stronger interactions of the presequences on the trans side of the channel support the import of precursor proteins through TIM23 into the matrix. PMID:21969381

  9. Direct Interaction of Mitochondrial Targeting Presequences with Purified Components of the TIM23 Protein Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Dayan, Dana; Demishtein-Zohary, Keren; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam

    2011-01-01

    Precursor proteins that are imported from the cytosol into the matrix of mitochondria carry positively charged amphipathic presequences and cross the inner membrane with the help of vital components of the TIM23 complex. It is currently unclear which subunits of the TIM23 complex recognize and directly bind to presequences. Here we analyzed the binding of presequence peptides to purified components of the TIM23 complex. The interaction of three different presequences with purified soluble domains of yeast Tim50 (Tim50IMS), Tim23 (Tim23IMS), and full-length Tim44 was examined. Using chemical cross-linking and surface plasmon resonance we demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of purified Tim50IMS and Tim44 to interact directly with the yeast Hsp60 presequence. We also analyzed their interaction with presequences derived from precursors of yeast mitochondrial 70-kDa heat shock protein (mHsp70) and of bovine cytochrome P450SCC. Moreover, we characterized the nature of the interactions and determined their KDs. On the basis of our results, we suggest a mechanism of translocation where stronger interactions of the presequences on the trans side of the channel support the import of precursor proteins through TIM23 into the matrix. PMID:21969381

  10. Mitochondrial trifunctional protein deficiency in human cultured fibroblasts: effects of bezafibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djouadi, Fatima; Habarou, Florence; Le Bachelier, Carole; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Schlemmer, Dimitri; Benoist, Jean François; Boutron, Audrey; Andresen, Brage S; Visser, Gepke; de Lonlay, Pascale; Olpin, Simon; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Strauss, Arnold W; Wanders, Ronald J A; Bastin, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial trifunctional protein (MTP) deficiency caused by HADHA or HADHB gene mutations exhibits substantial molecular, biochemical, and clinical heterogeneity and ranks among the more severe fatty acid oxidation (FAO) disorders, without pharmacological treatment. Since bezafibrate has been shown to potentially correct other FAO disorders in patient cells, we analyzed its effects in 26 MTP-deficient patient fibroblasts representing 16 genotypes. Overall, the patient cell lines exhibited variable, complex, biochemical profiles and pharmacological responses. HADHA-deficient fibroblasts showed markedly reduced alpha subunit protein levels together with decreased beta-subunit abundance, exhibited a -86 to -96% defect in LCHAD activity, and produced large amounts of C14 and C16 hydroxyacylcarnitines. In control fibroblasts, exposure to bezafibrate (400 μM for 48 h) increased the abundance of HADHA and HADHB mRNAs, immune-detectable alpha and beta subunit proteins, activities of LCHAD and LCKAT, and stimulated FAO capacities, clearly indicating that MTP is pharmacologically up-regulated by bezafibrate in human fibroblasts. In MTP-deficient patient fibroblasts, which were found markedly FAO-deficient, bezafibrate improved FAO capacities in six of 26 (23%) cases, including three cell lines heterozygous for the common c1528G > C mutation. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that, due to variable effects of HADHA and HADHB mutations on MTP abundance and residual activity, improvement of MTP deficiency in response to bezafibrate was achieved in a subset of responsive genotypes. PMID:26109258

  11. Insertion into the mitochondrial inner membrane of a polytopic protein, the nuclear-encoded Oxa1p.

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, J M; Neupert, W; Stuart, R A

    1997-01-01

    Oxa1p, a nuclear-encoded protein of the mitochondrial inner membrane with five predicted transmembrane (TM) segments is synthesized as a precursor (pOxa1p) with an N-terminal presequence. It becomes imported in a process requiring the membrane potential, matrix ATP, mt-Hsp70 and the mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP). After processing, the negatively charged N-terminus of Oxa1p (approximately 90 amino acid residues) is translocated back across the inner membrane into the intermembrane s...

  12. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Jauh, Guang-Yuh

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg(300)-to-Trp(300) and Pro(313)-to-Ser(313) amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  13. Relationship between residual feed intake and lymphocyte mitochondrial complex protein concentration and ratio in crossbred steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M P; Brooks, M A; Kerley, M S

    2016-04-01

    Rate of oxygen uptake by muscle mitochondria and respiratory chain protein concentrations differed between high- and low-residual feed intake (RFI) animals. The hypothesis of this research was that complex I (CI), II (CII), and III (CIII) mitochondria protein concentrations in lymphocyte (blood) mitochondria were related to the RFI phenotype of beef steers. Daily feed intake (ADFI) was individually recorded for 92 Hereford-crossbreed steers over 63 d using GrowSafe individual feed intake system. Predicted ADFI was calculated as the regression of ADFI on ADG and midtest BW. Difference between ADFI and predicted ADFI was RFI. Lymphocytes were isolated from low-RFI (-1.32 ± 0.11 kg/d; = 10) and high-RFI (1.34 ± 0.18 kg/d; = 8) steers. Immunocapture of CI, CII, and CIII proteins from the lymphocyte was done using MitoProfile CI, CII, and CIII immunocapture kits (MitoSciences Inc., Eugene, OR). Protein concentrations of CI, CII, and CIII and total protein were quantified using bicinchoninic acid colorimetric procedures. Low-RFI steers consumed 30% less ( = 0.0004) feed and had a 40% improvement ( RFI steers with similar growth ( = 0.78) and weight measurements ( > 0.65). High- and low-RFI steers did not differ in CI ( = 0.22), CII ( = 0.69), and CIII ( = 0.59) protein concentrations. The protein concentration ratios for CI to CII ( = 0.03) were 20% higher and the ratios of CI to CIII ( = 0.01) were 30% higher, but the ratios of CII to CIII ( = 0.89) did not differ when comparing low-RFI steers with high-RFI steers. The similar magnitude difference in feed intake, feed efficiency measurements, and CI-to-CIII ratio between RFI phenotypes provides a plausible explanation for differences between the phenotypes. We also concluded that mitochondria isolated from lymphocytes could be used to study respiratory chain differences among differing RFI phenotypes. Further research is needed to determine if lymphocyte mitochondrial complex proteins can be used for identification of

  14. Control of mitochondrial pH by uncoupling protein 4 in astrocytes promotes neuronal survival

    KAUST Repository

    Lambert, Hélène Perreten

    2014-09-18

    Brain activity is energetically costly and requires a steady and highly regulated flow of energy equivalents between neural cells. It is believed that a substantial share of cerebral glucose, the major source of energy of the brain, will preferentially be metabolized in astrocytes via aerobic glycolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether uncoupling proteins (UCPs), located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, play a role in setting up the metabolic response pattern of astrocytes. UCPs are believed to mediate the transmembrane transfer of protons, resulting in the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production. UCPs are therefore potentially important regulators of energy fluxes. The main UCP isoforms expressed in the brain are UCP2, UCP4, and UCP5. We examined in particular the role of UCP4 in neuron-astrocyte metabolic coupling and measured a range of functional metabolic parameters including mitochondrial electrical potential and pH, reactive oxygen species production, NAD/NADH ratio, ATP/ADP ratio, CO2 and lactate production, and oxygen consumption rate. In brief, we found that UCP4 regulates the intramitochondrial pH of astrocytes, which acidifies as a consequence of glutamate uptake, with the main consequence of reducing efficiency of mitochondrial ATP production. The diminished ATP production is effectively compensated by enhancement of glycolysis. This nonoxidative production of energy is not associated with deleterious H2O2 production. We show that astrocytes expressing more UCP4 produced more lactate, which is used as an energy source by neurons, and had the ability to enhance neuronal survival.

  15. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by low pH is associated with less extensive membrane protein thiol oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, B M; Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Vercesi, A E

    1999-12-01

    Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate-induced mitochondrial swelling and membrane protein thiol oxidation, which are associated with mitochondrial permeability transition, are inhibited by progressively decreasing the incubation medium pH between 7.2 and 6.0. Nevertheless, the detection of mitochondrial H2O2 production under these conditions is increased. Permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide, which promotes membrane protein thiol cross-linkage in a process independent of Ca2+ or reactive oxygen species, is also strongly inhibited in acidic incubation media. In addition, we observed that the decreased protein thiol reactivity with phenylarsine oxide or phenylarsine oxide-induced swelling at pH 6.0 is reversed by diethyl pyrocarbonate, in a hydroxylamine-sensitive manner. These results provide evidence that the inhibition of mitrochondrial permeability transition observed at lower incubation medium pH is mediated by a decrease in membrane protein thiol reactivity, related to the protonation of protein histidyl residues. PMID:10841269

  16. Using increment of diversity to predict mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite: integrating pseudo-amino acid composition and structural alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Li; Li, Qian-Zhong; Zhang, Li-Qing

    2012-04-01

    Due to the complexity of Plasmodium falciparum (PF) genome, predicting mitochondrial proteins of PF is more difficult than other species. In this study, using the n-peptide composition of reduced amino acid alphabet (RAAA) obtained from structural alphabet named Protein Blocks as feature parameter, the increment of diversity (ID) is firstly developed to predict mitochondrial proteins. By choosing the 1-peptide compositions on the N-terminal regions with 20 residues as the only input vector, the prediction performance achieves 86.86% accuracy with 0.69 Mathew's correlation coefficient (MCC) by the jackknife test. Moreover, by combining with the hydropathy distribution along protein sequence and several reduced amino acid alphabets, we achieved maximum MCC 0.82 with accuracy 92% in the jackknife test by using the developed ID model. When evaluating on an independent dataset our method performs better than existing methods. The results indicate that the ID is a simple and efficient prediction method for mitochondrial proteins of malaria parasite. PMID:21191803

  17. PHOSPHORYLATION/DEPHOSPHORYLATION OF MITOCHONDRIAL PROTEINS IN REDOX-SIGNALLING OF HIGHER PLANTS UNDER ABIOTIC STRESS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subota I.Yu.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We studied an impact of the widely spread intra-cellular signals Ca2+ and сAMP on activity of the protein phosphorylation in maize mitochondria. The use of the isolated mitochondria is a convenient model system for investigation of the different physiological processes, for example for simulation of the different stress conditions. The treatment of maize mitochondria with high concentration of calcium ions which mimics the initial stage of apoptosis led to an increase of the phosphorylation level of some proteins and to an additional phosphorylation of the 59 and 66 kDa proteins. The treatment of the mitoplasts, i.e., the mitochondria devoid of the outer membrane with calcium ions insignificantly induced the activity of protein phosphorylation. It is assumed that the outer membrane is essential for Ca2+ signal transduction to plant mitochondria. We also identified a 94 kDa protein involved in phosphorylation of the mitochondrial proteins. This protein might be a single-subunit protein kinase or one of the subunits of the protein kinase complex. Antimycin A and KCN which are the inhibitors of mitochondria respiration increased the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial polypeptides. The effect of this inhibitors was similar both in in organello system and at the level of the whole plant. It should be noticed that at the level of the whole plant the effect of KCN on activity of the mitochondrial protein phosphorylation was more essential. Some considerable differences were found both at the level of protein phosphorylation and in electrophoresis patterns representing the intact mitochondria, the mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction. The activity of protein phosphorylation in mitoplasts and the outer membrane fraction was extremely high compared to the phosphorylation activity of the mitochondrial proteins. This could be explained by the higher level of “substrate phosphoprotein phosphatase” in the outer membrane of mitochondria

  18. Glom is a novel mitochondrial DNA packaging protein in Physarum polycephalum and causes intense chromatin condensation without suppressing DNA functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Narie; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Nishitani, Chikako; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shirai, Yuki; Sakai, Atsushi; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is packed into highly organized structures called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids). To understand the organization of mtDNA and the overall regulation of its genetic activity within the mt-nucleoids, we identified and characterized a novel mtDNA packaging protein, termed Glom (a protein inducing agglomeration of mitochondrial chromosome), from highly condensed mt-nucleoids of the true slime mold, Physarum polycephalum. This protein could bind to the entire mtDNA and package mtDNA into a highly condensed state in vitro. Immunostaining analysis showed that Glom specifically localized throughout the mt-nucleoid. Deduced amino acid sequence revealed that Glom has a lysine-rich region with proline-rich domain in the N-terminal half and two HMG boxes in C-terminal half. Deletion analysis of Glom revealed that the lysine-rich region was sufficient for the intense mtDNA condensation in vitro. When the recombinant Glom proteins containing the lysine-rich region were expressed in Escherichia coli, the condensed nucleoid structures were observed in E. coli. Such in vivo condensation did not interfere with transcription or replication of E. coli chromosome and the proline-rich domain was essential to keep those genetic activities. The expression of Glom also complemented the E. coli mutant lacking the bacterial histone-like protein HU and the HMG-boxes region of Glom was important for the complementation. Our results suggest that Glom is a new mitochondrial histone-like protein having a property to cause intense DNA condensation without suppressing DNA functions. PMID:12960433

  19. A chemical screen to identify inducers of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauthan, Manish; Pilon, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that inhibition of the mevalonate pathway in C. elegans causes inhibition of protein prenylation, developmental arrest and lethality. We also showed that constitutive activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, UPR(mt), is an effective way for C. elegans to become resistant to the negative effects of mevalonate pathway inhibition. This was an important finding since statins, a drug class prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in patients, act by inhibiting the mevalonate pathway, and it is therefore possible that some of their undesirable side effects could be alleviated by activating the UPR(mt). Here, we screened a chemical library and identified 4 compounds that specifically activated the UPR(mt). One of these compounds, methacycline hydrochloride (a tetracycline antibiotic) also protected C. elegans and mammalian cells from statin toxicity. Methacycline hydrochloride and ethidium bromide, a known UPR(mt) activator, were also tested in mice: only ethidium bromide significantly activate the UPR(mt) in skeletal muscles. PMID:27123370

  20. Impaired mitochondrial metabolism and protein synthesis in streptozotocin diabetic rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated hepatocytes prepared from control, streptozotocin diabetic rats were incubated at 30 degrees C in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer, pH 7.4, containing 0.5 mM concentration of each of the 20 natural amino acids. Effect of insulin on the oxidation of 2,3-14C and 1,4-14C succinate (suc) carbons and their incorporation into hepatocyte protein, lipid and various metabolic intermediates was studied. Mitochondrial oxidation of suc carbons and their incorporation into protein and lipid was significantly lower in diabetic and insulin treated diabetic rats. Diabetic rats failed to exhibit any significant insulin effect on the oxidation of either 2,3 or 1,4-14C suc carbons. Amphibolic channeling of 2,3-14C suc carbons into amino acids was significantly reduced in hepatocytes of diabetic rats, however, more of these carbons were diverted into the gluconeogenesis pathway. Diabetes caused a far greater decrease in the oxidation of 2,3-14C suc carbons as compared to 1,4-14C suc. Based on an earlier report that insulin stimulates only the intramitochondrial Krebs cycle reactions, the authors conclude that the diminished level of anabolic activities in the diabetic rat hepatocytes is due to the subsequent reduction in amphibolic channeling of metabolic intermediates

  1. Bi-allelic CLPB mutations cause cataract, renal cysts, nephrocalcinosis and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, a novel disorder of mitochondrial protein disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanabus, Marta; Shahni, Rojeen; Saldanha, José W; Murphy, Elaine; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoff, William Van't; Heales, Simon; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic cause of mitochondrial disease in two siblings with a syndrome of congenital lamellar cataracts associated with nephrocalcinosis, medullary cysts and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Autosomal recessive inheritance in a gene encoding a mitochondrially targeted protein was assumed; the only variants which satisfied these criteria were c.1882C>T (p.Arg628Cys) and c.1915G>A (p.Glu639Lys) in the CLPB gene, encoding a heat shock protein/chaperonin responsible for disaggregating mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. Functional studies, including quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot, support pathogenicity of these mutations. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that the mutations disrupt interactions between subunits so that the CLPB hexamer cannot form or is unstable, thus impairing its role as a protein disaggregase. We conclude that accumulation of protein aggregates underlies the development of cataracts and nephrocalcinosis in CLPB deficiency, which is a novel genetic cause of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. A common mitochondrial cause for 3-methylglutaconic aciduria appears to be disruption of the architecture of the mitochondrial membranes, as in Barth syndrome (tafazzin deficiency), Sengers syndrome (acylglycerol kinase deficiency) and MEGDEL syndrome (impaired remodelling of the mitochondrial membrane lipids because of SERAC1 mutations). We now propose that perturbation of the mitochondrial membranes by abnormal protein aggregates leads to 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in CLPB deficiency. PMID:25595726

  2. Partial Support Ventilation and Mitochondrial-Targeted Antioxidants Protect against Ventilator-Induced Decreases in Diaphragm Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Hudson

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life-saving intervention in patients in respiratory failure. Unfortunately, prolonged MV results in the rapid development of diaphragm atrophy and weakness. MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness is significant because inspiratory muscle dysfunction is a risk factor for problematic weaning from MV. Therefore, developing a clinical intervention to prevent MV-induced diaphragm atrophy is important. In this regard, MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy occurs due to both increased proteolysis and decreased protein synthesis. While efforts to impede MV-induced increased proteolysis in the diaphragm are well-documented, only one study has investigated methods of preserving diaphragmatic protein synthesis during prolonged MV. Therefore, we evaluated the efficacy of two therapeutic interventions that, conceptually, have the potential to sustain protein synthesis in the rat diaphragm during prolonged MV. Specifically, these experiments were designed to: 1 determine if partial-support MV will protect against the decrease in diaphragmatic protein synthesis that occurs during prolonged full-support MV; and 2 establish if treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant will maintain diaphragm protein synthesis during full-support MV. Compared to spontaneously breathing animals, full support MV resulted in a significant decline in diaphragmatic protein synthesis during 12 hours of MV. In contrast, diaphragm protein synthesis rates were maintained during partial support MV at levels comparable to spontaneous breathing animals. Further, treatment of animals with a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant prevented oxidative stress during full support MV and maintained diaphragm protein synthesis at the level of spontaneous breathing animals. We conclude that treatment with mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants or the use of partial-support MV are potential strategies to preserve diaphragm protein synthesis during prolonged MV.

  3. Understanding the molecular mechanism of protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane: still a long way to go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2011-03-01

    In order to reach the final place of their function, approximately half of the proteins in any eukaryotic cell have to be transported across or into one of the membranes in the cell. In this article, we present an overview of our current knowledge concerning the structural properties of the TIM23 complex and their relationship with the molecular mechanism of protein transport across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Protein translocation across or insertion into membranes. PMID:20646995

  4. Puf3p, a Pumilio family RNA binding protein, localizes to mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and motility in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; Gay, Anna Card; Pon, Liza A.

    2007-01-01

    Puf3p binds preferentially to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. We find that Puf3p localizes to the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Overexpression of PUF3 results in reduced mitochondrial respiratory activity and reduced levels of Pet123p, a protein encoded by a Puf3p-binding mRNA. Puf3p levels are reduced during the diauxic shift and growth on a nonfermentable carbon source, conditions that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings support a role for Puf3p in mitochondrial biogenesis through effects on mRNA interactions. In addition, Puf3p links the mitochore, a complex required for mitochondrial–cytoskeletal interactions, to the Arp2/3 complex, the force generator for actin-dependent, bud-directed mitochondrial movement. Puf3p, the mitochore, and the Arp2/3 complex coimmunoprecipitate and have two-hybrid interactions. Moreover, deletion of PUF3 results in reduced interaction between the mitochore and the Arp2/3 complex and defects in mitochondrial morphology and motility similar to those observed in Arp2/3 complex mutants. Thus, Puf3p is a mitochondrial protein that contributes to the biogenesis and motility of the organelle. PMID:17210948

  5. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Jun; Nakatsuka, Atsuko

    2016-06-01

    The mitochondria are involved in active and dynamic processes, such as mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy to maintain mitochondrial and cellular functions. In obesity and type 2 diabetes, impaired oxidation, reduced mitochondrial contents, lowered rates of oxidative phosphorylation and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production have been reported. Mitochondrial biogenesis is regulated by various transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and nuclear respiratory factors (NRFs). Mitochondrial fusion is promoted by mitofusin 1 (MFN1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2) and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), while fission is governed by the recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by adaptor proteins such as mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), mitochondrial dynamics proteins of 49 and 51 kDa (MiD49 and MiD51), and fission 1 (FIS1). Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and PARKIN promote DRP1-dependent mitochondrial fission, and the outer mitochondrial adaptor MiD51 is required in DRP1 recruitment and PARKIN-dependent mitophagy. This review describes the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial dynamics, its abnormality in diabetes and obesity, and pharmaceuticals targeting mitochondrial biogenesis, fission, fusion and mitophagy. PMID:27339203

  6. Inner-membrane proteins PMI/TMEM11 regulate mitochondrial morphogenesis independently of the DRP1/MFN fission/fusion pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Rival, Thomas; Macchi, Marc; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laetitia; Poidevin, Mickael; Maillet, Frédéric; Richard, Fabrice; Fatmi, Ahmed; Belenguer, Pascale; Royet, Julien

    2011-01-01

    This report identifies Drosophila PMI and its human ortholog TMEM11 as novel regulators of mitochondrial morphogenesis. PMI and TMEM11 are inner membrane proteins that control mitochondria dynamics independently of the DRP-1/MFN-1 pathways.

  7. Crocodilian phylogeny inferred from twelve mitochondrial protein-coding genes, with new complete mitochondrial genomic sequences for Crocodylus acutus and Crocodylus novaeguineae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zhang; Yishu, Wang; Peng, Yan; Xiaobing, Wu

    2011-07-01

    We report complete mitochondrial genomic sequences for Crocodylus acutus and Crocodylus novaeguineae, whose gene orders match those of other crocodilians. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences of 12 mitochondrial protein-coding genes support monophyly of two crocodilian taxonomic families, Alligatoridae (genera Alligator, Caiman, and Paleosuchus) and Crocodylidae (genera Crocodylus, Gavialis, Mecistops, Osteolaemus, and Tomistoma). Our results are consistent with monophyly of all crocodilian genera. Within Alligatoridae, genus Alligator is the sister taxon of a clade comprising Caiman and Paleosuchus. Within Crocodylidae, the basal phylogenetic split separates a clade comprising Gavialis and Tomistoma from a clade comprising Crocodylus, Mecistops, and Osteolaemus. Mecistops and Osteolaemus form the sister taxon to Crocodylus. Within Crocodylus, we sampled five Indopacific species, whose phylogenetic ordering is ((C. mindorensis, C. novaeguineae), (C. porosus, (C. siamensis, C. palustris))). The African species C. niloticus and New World species C. acutus form the sister taxon to the Indopacific species, although our sampling lacks three other New World species and an Australian species of Crocodylus. PMID:21463698

  8. Nitric Oxide-associated Protein 1 (NOA1) Is Necessary for Oxygen-dependent Regulation of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complexes*

    OpenAIRE

    Heidler, Juliana; Al-Furoukh, Natalie; Kukat, Christian; Salwig, Isabelle; Ingelmann, Marie-Elisabeth; Seibel, Peter; Krüger, Marcus; Holtz, Jürgen; Wittig, Ilka; Braun, Thomas; Szibor, Marten

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, maintenance of cellular ATP stores depends mainly on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which in turn requires sufficient cellular oxygenation. The crucial role of proper oxygenation for cellular viability is reflected by involvement of several mechanisms, which sense hypoxia and regulate activities of respiratory complexes according to available oxygen concentrations. Here, we focus on mouse nitric oxide-associated protein 1 (mNOA1), which has been identif...

  9. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  10. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  11. Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 Increases Lipolysis, UCP1 Protein Expression and Mitochondrial Activity in Brown Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon-Dominguez, María; Sebastián, David; Fucho, Raquel; Weber, Minéia; Mir, Joan F.; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Obregón, María Jesús; Zorzano, Antonio; Valverde, Ángela M.; Serra, Dolors

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of active brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans and the fact that it is reduced in obese and diabetic patients have put a spotlight on this tissue as a key player in obesity-induced metabolic disorders. BAT regulates energy expenditure through thermogenesis; therefore, harnessing its thermogenic fat-burning power is an attractive therapeutic approach. We aimed to enhance BAT thermogenesis by increasing its fatty acid oxidation (FAO) rate. Thus, we expressed carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1AM (CPT1AM), a permanently active mutant form of CPT1A (the rate-limiting enzyme in FAO), in a rat brown adipocyte (rBA) cell line through adenoviral infection. We found that CPT1AM-expressing rBA have increased FAO, lipolysis, UCP1 protein levels and mitochondrial activity. Additionally, enhanced FAO reduced the palmitate-induced increase in triglyceride content and the expression of obese and inflammatory markers. Thus, CPT1AM-expressing rBA had enhanced fat-burning capacity and improved lipid-induced derangements. This indicates that CPT1AM-mediated increase in brown adipocytes FAO may be a new approach to the treatment of obesity-induced disorders. PMID:27438137

  12. Analysis of differentially expressed mitochondrial proteins in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas and renal oncocytomas by 2-D gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. Yusenko, Thomas Ruppert, Gyula Kovacs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal oncocytomas (RO and chromophobe renal cell carcinomas (RCC display morphological and functional alterations of the mitochondria. Previous studies showed that accumulation of mitochondria in ROs is associated with somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA resulting in decreased activity of the respiratory chain complex I, whereas in chromophobe RCC only heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations were found. To identify proteins associated with these changes, for the first time we have compared the mitochondrial proteomes of mitochondria isolated from ROs and chromophobe RCCs as well as from normal kidney tissues by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteome profiles were reproducible within the same group of tissues in subsequent experiments. The expression patterns within each group of samples were compared and 81 in-gel digested spots were subjected to nanoLC-MS/MS-based identification of proteins. Although the list of mitochondrial proteins identified in this study is incomplete, we identified the downregulation of NDUFS3 from complex I of the respiratory chain and upregulation of COX5A, COX5B, and ATP5H from complex IV and V in ROs. In chromophobe RCCs downregulation of ATP5A1, the alpha subunit of complex V, has been observed, but no changes in expression of other complexes of the respiratory chain were detected. To confirm the role of respiratory chain complex alterations in the morphological and/or functional changes in chromophobe RCCs and ROs, further studies will be necessary.

  13. A protein binding site in the M mitochondrial genome of Mytilus galloprovincialis may be responsible for its paternal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Eleni; Kravariti, Lara; Vasilopoulos, Themistoklis; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2015-05-10

    Sea mussels (genus Mytilus) have two mitochondrial genomes in obligatory co-existence, one that is transmitted through the egg and the other through the sperm. The phenomenon, known as Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), is presently known to occur in more than 40 molluscan bivalve species. Females and the somatic tissues of males contain mainly the maternal (F) genome. In contrast, the sperm contains only the paternal (M) genome. Through electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) experiments we have identified a sequence element in the control region (CR) of the M genome that acts as a binding site for the formation of a complex with a protein factor that occurs in the male gonad. An adenine tract upstream to the element is also essential for the formation of the complex. The reaction is highly specific. It does not occur with protein extracts from the female gonad or from a male or female somatic tissue. Further experiments showed that the interaction takes place in mitochondria surrounding the nucleus of the cells of male gonads, suggesting a distinct role of perinuclear mitochondria. We propose that at a certain point during spermatogenesis mitochondria are subject to degradation and that perinuclear mitochondria with the M mtDNA-protein complex are protected from this degradation with the result that mature spermatozoa contain only the paternal mitochondrial genome. PMID:25701604

  14. Mitochondrial Inhibitory Factor Protein 1 Functions as an Endogenous Inhibitor for Coupling Factor 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Misato; Osanai, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Makoto; Magota, Koji; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2016-07-01

    Coupling factor 6 (CF6) forces a counter-clockwise rotation of plasma membrane F1 Fo complex unlike a proton-mediated clockwise rotation in the mitochondria, resulting in ATP hydrolysis, proton import, and apoptosis. Inhibitory peptide 1 (IF1) inhibits a unidirectional counter-clockwise rotation of F1 Fo complex without affecting ATP synthesis by a clockwise rotation. We tested the hypothesis that IF1 may antagonize the biological action of CF6 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We generated mature and immature IF1 expression vectors and those labeled with GFP at the C-terminus. In the immature IF1-GFP overexpressing cells, the mitochondrial network of IF1-GFP was newly found at the plasma membrane after peripheral translocation, whereas in mature IF1-GFP transfected cells, a less punctuate rather homogenous pattern was found in the cytoplasm. IF1 protein was detected in the exosome fraction of culture media, and it was enhanced by mature or immature IF1 transfection. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis was enhanced by CF6, whereas immature or mature IF1 transfection suppressed ATP hydrolysis in response to CF6. Intracellular pH was decreased by CF6 but was unchanged after immature IF1 transfection. CF6-induced increase in apoptotic cells was blocked by immature or mature IF1, being accompanied by protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. IF1 antagonizes the pro-apoptotic action of CF6 by relief of intracellular acidification and resultant phosphorylation of PKB. Given the widespread biological actions of CF6, the physiological and pathological functions of IF1 may be expected to be complex. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1680-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659871

  15. The mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxin S15 is essential for iron-sulfur protein maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseler, Anna; Aller, Isabel; Wagner, Stephan; Nietzel, Thomas; Przybyla-Toscano, Jonathan; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Berndt, Carsten; Rouhier, Nicolas; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    The iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) is an ancient and essential cofactor of many proteins involved in electron transfer and metabolic reactions. In Arabidopsis, three pathways exist for the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins in the cytosol, plastids, and mitochondria. We functionally characterized the role of mitochondrial glutaredoxin S15 (GRXS15) in biogenesis of ISC containing aconitase through a combination of genetic, physiological, and biochemical approaches. Two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants were identified as null mutants with early embryonic lethal phenotypes that could be rescued by GRXS15. Furthermore, we showed that recombinant GRXS15 is able to coordinate and transfer an ISC and that this coordination depends on reduced glutathione (GSH). We found the Arabidopsis GRXS15 able to complement growth defects based on disturbed ISC protein assembly of a yeast Δgrx5 mutant. Modeling of GRXS15 onto the crystal structures of related nonplant proteins highlighted amino acid residues that after mutation diminished GSH and subsequently ISC coordination, as well as the ability to rescue the yeast mutant. When used for plant complementation, one of these mutant variants, GRXS15K83/A, led to severe developmental delay and a pronounced decrease in aconitase activity by approximately 65%. These results indicate that mitochondrial GRXS15 is an essential protein in Arabidopsis, required for full activity of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26483494

  16. The mitochondrial 60-kDa heat shock protein in marine invertebrates: biochemical purification and molecular characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choresh, Omer; Loya, Yossi; Müller, Werner E.G.; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Azem, Abdussalam

    2004-01-01

    Sessile marine invertebrates undergo constant direct exposure to the surrounding environmental conditions, including local and global environmental fluctuations that may lead to fatal protein damage. Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps) constitutes an important defense mechanism that protects these organisms from deleterious stress conditions. In a previous study, we reported the immunological detection of a 60-kDa Hsp (Hsp60) in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (formerly called Anemonia sulcata) and studied its expression under a variety of stress conditions. In the present study, we show that the sponge Tetilla sp. from tidal habitats with a highly variable temperature regime is characterized by an increased level of Hsp60. Moreover, we show the expression of Hsp60 in various species among Porifera and Cnidaria, suggesting a general importance of this protein among marine invertebrates. We further cloned the hsp60 gene from A viridis, using a combination of conventional protein isolation methods and screening of a complementary deoxyribonucleic acid library by polymerase chain reaction. The cloned sequence (1764 bp) encodes for a protein of 62.8 kDa (588 amino acids). The 62.8-kDa protein, which contains an amino terminal extension that may serve as a mitochondrial targeting signal, shares a significant identity with mitochondrial Hsp60s from several animals but less identity with Hsp60s from either bacteria or plants. PMID:15270076

  17. Accumulation of small heat shock proteins, including mitochondrial HSP22, induced by oxidative stress and adaptive response in tomato cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in gene expression, by application of H2O2, O2.- generating agents (methyl viologen, digitonin) and gamma irradiation to tomato suspension cultures, were investigated and compared to the well-described heat shock response. Two-dimensional gel protein mapping analyses gave the first indication that at least small heat shock proteins (smHSP) accumulated in response to application of H2O2 and gamma irradiation, but not to O2.- generating agents. While some proteins seemed to be induced specifically by each treatment, only part of the heat shock response was observed. On the basis of Northern hybridization experiments performed with four heterologous cDNA, corresponding to classes I-IV of pea smHSP, it could be concluded that significant amounts of class I and II smHSP mRNA are induced by H2O2 and by irradiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in plants some HSP genes are inducible by oxidative stresses, as in micro-organisms and other eukaryotic cells. HSP22, the main stress protein that accumulates following H2O2 action or gamma irradiation, was also purified. Sequence homology of amino terminal and internal sequences, and immunoreactivity with Chenopodium rubrum mitochondrial smHSP antibody, indicated that the protein belongs to the recently discovered class of plant mitochondrial smHSP. Heat shock or a mild H2O2 pretreatment was also shown to lead to plant cell protection against oxidative injury. Therefore, the synthesis of these stress proteins can be considered as an adaptive mechanism in which mitochondrial protection could be essential

  18. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatenay-Lapointe, Marc; Shadel, Gerald S

    2011-01-01

    Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity. PMID:21655263

  19. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  20. Genes of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins: evidence for a variant of the 3' splice-site consensus sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Juretić, N; Jaussi, R; Mattes, U; Christen, P

    1987-01-01

    The introns of animal nuclear genes and of viral genes encoding protein possess at their 3' splice-site the consensus sequence (CT)11NTCAG (Mount, S.M. (1982) Nucl. Acids Res. 10, 459-472; Green, M.R. (1986) Ann. Rev. Genet. 20, 671-708). However, the total 39 introns of the 5 imported mitochondrial proteins of higher eucaryotes whose gene structure has been determined to date show a predominance of 44% for base T at position -4. Apparently, a variant consensus sequence, i.e. (CT)11TTCAG, cha...

  1. Reconstitution of the mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin)-p53 interaction using purified proteins--identification of additional interacting regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosefson, Ohad; Azem, Abdussalam

    2010-03-19

    Previous studies have shown that the mammalian mitochondrial 70 kDa heat-shock protein (mortalin) can also be detected in the cytosol. Cytosolic mortalin binds p53 and by doing so, prevents translocation of the tumor suppressor into the nucleus. In this study, we developed a novel binding assay, using purified proteins, for tracking the interaction between p53 and mortalin. Our results reveal that: (i) P53 binds to the peptide-binding site of mortalin which enhances the ability of the former to bind DNA. (ii) An additional previously unknown binding site for mortalin exists within the C-terminal domain of p53. PMID:20153329

  2. Copper deficiency decreases the protein expression of Complex IV but not Complex I, II, III, or V in mitochondrial respiratory chain in rat heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been documented that dietary copper (Cu) deficiency impairs mitochondrial respiratory function which is catalyzed by five membrane-bound multiple protein complexes. However, there are few reports on the simultaneous analysis of Cu effect on the subunit protein expression on all five protein c...

  3. A disulfide bond in the TIM23 complex is crucial for voltage gating and mitochondrial protein import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Ajay; Peleh, Valentina; Martinez-Caballero, Sonia; Wollweber, Florian; Sommer, Frederik; van der Laan, Martin; Schroda, Michael; Alexander, R Todd; Campo, María Luisa; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2016-08-15

    Tim17 is a central, membrane-embedded subunit of the mitochondrial protein import machinery. In this study, we show that Tim17 contains a pair of highly conserved cysteine residues that form a structural disulfide bond exposed to the intermembrane space (IMS). This disulfide bond is critical for efficient protein translocation through the TIM23 complex and for dynamic gating of its preprotein-conducting channel. The disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed during insertion of the protein into the inner membrane. Whereas the import of Tim17 depends on the binding to the IMS protein Mia40, the oxidoreductase activity of Mia40 is surprisingly dispensable for Tim17 oxidation. Our observations suggest that Tim17 can be directly oxidized by the sulfhydryl oxidase Erv1. Thus, import and oxidation of Tim17 are mediated by the mitochondrial disulfide relay, though the mechanism by which the disulfide bond in Tim17 is formed differs considerably from that of soluble IMS proteins. PMID:27502485

  4. Mcp3 is a novel mitochondrial outer membrane protein that follows a unique IMP-dependent biogenesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinzel, Monika; Tan, Tao; Wendling, Philipp; Kalbacher, Hubert; Özbalci, Cagakan; Chelius, Xenia; Westermann, Benedikt; Brügger, Britta; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are separated from the remainder of the eukaryotic cell by the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). The MOM plays an important role in different transport processes like lipid trafficking and protein import. In yeast, the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) has a central, but poorly defined role in both activities. To understand the functions of the ERMES, we searched for suppressors of the deficiency of one of its components, Mdm10, and identified a novel mitochondrial protein that we named Mdm10 complementing protein 3 (Mcp3). Mcp3 partially rescues a variety of ERMES-related phenotypes. We further demonstrate that Mcp3 is an integral protein of the MOM that follows a unique import pathway. It is recognized initially by the import receptor Tom70 and then crosses the MOM via the translocase of the outer membrane. Mcp3 is next relayed to the TIM23 translocase at the inner membrane, gets processed by the inner membrane peptidase (IMP) and finally integrates into the MOM. Hence, Mcp3 follows a novel biogenesis route where a MOM protein is processed by a peptidase of the inner membrane. PMID:27226123

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome DNA sequence for two ophiuroids and a holothuroid: the utility of protein gene sequence and gene maps in the analyses of deep deuterostome phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scouras, Andrea; Beckenbach, Karen; Arndt, Allan; Smith, Michael J

    2004-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been determined for the holothuroid Cucumaria miniata and two ophiuroid species Ophiopholis aculeata and Ophiura lütkeni. In addition, the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial protein-coding genes for the asteroid Pisaster ochraceus has been completed. Maximum-likelihood and LogDet distance analyses of concatenated protein-coding sequences produced a series of trees that did not conclusively support generally accepted models of echinoderm phylogeny. The ophiuroid data consistently demonstrated accelerated nucleotide divergence rates and lack of stationarity. This confounds the phylogenetic analyses. Molecular investigations using individual protein-coding gene alignments demonstrated that the cytochrome b gene exhibits the least deviation in rate and stationarity and generated some trees consistent with proposed echinoderm phylogenies. Phylogenies based on echinoderm mitochondrial gene rearrangements also proved problematic because of extensive variation in gene order between and within classes. A comparison of the two distinctive ophiuroid mitochondrial gene orders supports the hypothesis that O. lütkeni has a more derived mitochondrial gene order versus O. aculeata. The variation in the echinoderm mitochondrial gene maps reinforces the limitations of the application of mitochondrial gene rearrangements as a global phylogenetic tool. PMID:15019608

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury by alcohol, high fat, nonalcoholic substances and pathological conditions through post-translational protein modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Joon Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are critically important in providing cellular energy ATP as well as their involvement in anti-oxidant defense, fat oxidation, intermediary metabolism and cell death processes. It is well-established that mitochondrial functions are suppressed when living cells or organisms are exposed to potentially toxic agents including alcohol, high fat diets, smoking and certain drugs or in many pathophysiological states through increased levels of oxidative/nitrative stress. Under elevated nitroxidative stress, cellular macromolecules proteins, DNA, and lipids can undergo different oxidative modifications, leading to disruption of their normal, sometimes critical, physiological functions. Recent reports also indicated that many mitochondrial proteins are modified via various post-translation modifications (PTMs and primarily inactivated. Because of the recently-emerging information, in this review, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and roles of five major PTMs (namely oxidation, nitration, phosphorylation, acetylation, and adduct formation with lipid-peroxides, reactive metabolites, or advanced glycation end products in experimental models of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as acute hepatic injury caused by toxic compounds. We also highlight the role of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1 in some of these PTM changes. Finally, we discuss translational research opportunities with natural and/or synthetic anti-oxidants, which can prevent or delay the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, fat accumulation and tissue injury.

  7. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVenco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA, a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane, while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls.C19orf12 protein is a 17kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologues to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction.

  8. Mitochondrial protein oxidation in yeast mutants lacking manganese-(MnSOD) or copper- and zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD): evidence that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in protecting mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kristin M; Dirmeier, Reinhard; Engle, Marcella; Poyton, Robert O

    2004-12-10

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae expresses two forms of superoxide dismutase (SOD): MnSOD, encoded by SOD2, which is located within the mitochondrial matrix, and CuZnSOD, encoded by SOD1, which is located in both the cytosol and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Because two different SOD enzymes are located in the mitochondrion, we examined the relative roles of each in protecting mitochondria against oxidative stress. Using protein carbonylation as a measure of oxidative stress, we have found no correlation between overall levels of respiration and the level of oxidative mitochondrial protein damage in either wild type or sod mutant strains. Moreover, mitochondrial protein carbonylation levels in sod1, sod2, and sod1sod2 mutants are not elevated in cells harvested from mid-logarithmic and early stationary phases, suggesting that neither MnSOD nor CuZnSOD is required for protecting the majority of mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage during these early phases of growth. During late stationary phase, mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases in all strains, particularly in sod1 and sod1sod2 mutants. By using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have found that specific proteins become carbonylated in sod1 and sod2 mutants. We identified six mitochondrial protein spots representing five unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod1 mutant and 19 mitochondrial protein spots representing 11 unique proteins that become carbonylated in a sod2 mutant. Although some of the same proteins are carbonylated in both mutants, other proteins are not. These findings indicate that MnSOD and CuZnSOD have both unique and overlapping functions in the mitochondrion. PMID:15385544

  9. Mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins as novel therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, S. B.; Kalkhoran, S B; Cabrera-Fuentes, H A; Hausenloy, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a number of exciting developments in the field of mitochondrial dynamics – a phenomenon in which changes in mitochondrial shape and movement impact on cellular physiology and pathology. By undergoing fusion and fission, mitochondria are able to change their morphology between elongated interconnected networks and discrete fragmented structures, respectively. The cardiac mitochondria, in particular, have garnered much interest due to their unique spatial arrangeme...

  10. Mitochondrial Quality Control in the Myocardium: Cooperation between Protein Degradation and Mitophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Hammerling, Babette C.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for cardiomyocyte survival and maintenance of normal cardiac function. However, changes in the extra- or intracellular environments during stress can cause excessive damage to mitochondria and lead to activation of cell death. In fact, there is evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction is an important contributor to both development of heart failure and the aging process. To counteract the adverse effects resulting from mitochondrial damage, cells have evolved mitochon...

  11. The use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes as a model system to study the interaction between proteins and the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with biological membranes is a key factor in their biogenesis and proper function. Hence, unraveling the properties of this interaction is very important and constitutes an essential step in deciphering the structural and functional characteristics of a membrane protein. Here we describe the use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes to analyze the interaction of the import protein Tim44 with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Using this system we showed that Tim44 is peripherally attached to the membrane and we detected the membrane binding site of the protein. The cardiolipin-containing liposomes serve as an excellent in vitro model system to the inner mitochondrial membrane and thus provide a good tool to analyze the interaction of various mitochondrial proteins with the inner membrane. PMID:23996176

  12. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Inhibition Mitigates Bisphenol A-mediated Alterations in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Khare, Puneet; Ray, Ratan Singh; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2016-07-29

    The regulatory dynamics of mitochondria comprises well orchestrated distribution and mitochondrial turnover to maintain the mitochondrial circuitry and homeostasis inside the cells. Several pieces of evidence suggested impaired mitochondrial dynamics and its association with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. We found that chronic exposure of synthetic xenoestrogen bisphenol A (BPA), a component of consumer plastic products, impaired autophagy-mediated mitochondrial turnover, leading to increased oxidative stress, mitochondrial fragmentation, and apoptosis in hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). It also inhibited hippocampal derived NSC proliferation and differentiation, as evident by the decreased number of BrdU- and β-III tubulin-positive cells. All these effects were reversed by the inhibition of oxidative stress using N-acetyl cysteine. BPA up-regulated the levels of Drp-1 (dynamin-related protein 1) and enhanced its mitochondrial translocation, with no effect on Fis-1, Mfn-1, Mfn-2, and Opa-1 in vitro and in the hippocampus. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy studies suggested increased mitochondrial fission and accumulation of fragmented mitochondria and decreased elongated mitochondria in the hippocampus of the rat brain. Impaired mitochondrial dynamics by BPA resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde levels, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP decline. Pharmacological (Mdivi-1) and genetic (Drp-1siRNA) inhibition of Drp-1 reversed BPA-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions, fragmentation, and apoptosis. Interestingly, BPA-mediated inhibitory effects on NSC proliferation and neuronal differentiations were also mitigated by Drp-1 inhibition. On the other hand, Drp-1 inhibition blocked BPA-mediated Drp-1 translocation, leading to decreased apoptosis of NSC. Overall, our studies implicate Drp-1 as a potential therapeutic target against BPA-mediated impaired mitochondrial dynamics and

  13. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L12 Is Required for POLRMT Stability and Exists as Two Forms Generated by Alternative Proteolysis during Import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouws, Jessica; Goswami, Arvind V; Bestwick, Megan; McCann, Beverly Jo; Surovtseva, Yulia V; Shadel, Gerald S

    2016-01-01

    To translate the 13 mtDNA-encoded mRNAs involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mammalian mitochondria contain a dedicated set of ribosomes comprising rRNAs encoded by the mitochondrial genome and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) that are encoded by nuclear genes and imported into the matrix. In addition to their role in the ribosome, several MRPs have auxiliary functions or have been implicated in other cellular processes like cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. For example, we have shown that human MRPL12 binds and activates mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), and hence has distinct functions in the ribosome and mtDNA transcription. Here we provide concrete evidence that there are two mature forms of mammalian MRPL12 that are generated by a two-step cleavage during import, involving efficient cleavage by mitochondrial processing protease and a second inefficient or regulated cleavage by mitochondrial intermediate protease. We also show that knock-down of MRPL12 by RNAi results in instability of POLRMT, but not other primary mitochondrial transcription components, and a corresponding decrease in mitochondrial transcription rates. Knock-down of MRPL10, the binding partner of MRPL12 in the ribosome, results in selective degradation of the mature long form of MRPL12, but has no effect on POLRMT. We propose that the two forms of MRPL12 are involved in homeostatic regulation of mitochondrial transcription and ribosome biogenesis that likely contribute to cell cycle, growth regulation, and longevity pathways to which MRPL12 has been linked. PMID:26586915

  14. Downregualtion of dynamin-related protein 1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity via regulating mitochondrial function in a calcium dependent manner in HT22 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chi; Yuan, Xian-rui; Li, Hao-yu; Zhao, Zi-jin; Liao, Yi-wei; Wang, Xiang-yu; Su, Jun; Sang, Shu-shan; Liu, Qing, E-mail: xiangyaliuqing@163.com

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Downregulation of Drp-1 attenuates glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. •Downregulation of Drp-1 inhibits glutamate-induced apoptosis. •Downregulation of Drp-1 reduces glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. •Downregulation of Drp-1 preserves intracellular calcium homeostasis. -- Abstract: Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is involved in many acute and chronic brain diseases. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp-1), one of the GTPase family of proteins that regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, is associated with apoptotic cell death in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we investigated the effect of downregulating Drp-1 on glutamate excitotoxicity-induced neuronal injury in HT22 cells. We found that downregulation of Drp-1 with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased cell viability and inhibited lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Drp-1 also inhibited an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Drp-1 siRNA transfection preserved the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reduced cytochrome c release, enhanced ATP production, and partly prevented mitochondrial swelling. In addition, Drp-1 knockdown attenuated glutamate-induced increases of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+}, and preserved the mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} buffering capacity after excitotoxicity. Taken together, these results suggest that downregulation of Drp-1 protects HT22 cells against glutamate-induced excitatory damage, and this neuroprotection may be dependent at least in part on the preservation of mitochondrial function through regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis.

  15. Antioxidant activity by a synergy of redox-sensitive mitochondrial phospholipase A2 and uncoupling protein-2 in lung and spleen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Ježek, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2013), s. 816-825. ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GPP303/11/P320; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09018 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 * mitochondrial phospholipase A(2) isoform gamma * mitochondrial oxidative stress attenuation * fatty acid * antioxidant mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.240, year: 2013

  16. [Mutation process in the protein-coding genes of human mitochondrial genome in context of evolution of the genus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliarchuk, B A

    2013-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome, although it has a small size, is characterized by high level of variation, non-uniformly distributed in groups of nucleotide positions that differ in the degree of variability. Considering the mutation process in human mtDNA relative to the mitochondrial genomes of the genus Homo-neandertals, denisova hominin and other primate species, it appears that more than half (56.5%) variable positions in the human mtDNA protein-coding genes are characterized by back (reverse) mutations to the pre-H. sapiens state of mitochondrial genome. It has been found that hypervariable nucleotide positions show a minimal proportion of specific to H. sapiens mutations, and, conversely, a high proportion of mutations (both nucleotide and amino acid substitutions), leading to the loss of Homo-specific variants of polymorphisms. Most often, polymorphisms specific to H. sapiens arise in result of single forward mutations and disappear mainly due to multiple back mutations, including those in the mutational "hotspots". PMID:25509854

  17. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Shearn, Alisabeth H; Saba, Laura M; Mercer, Kelly E; Engi, Bridgette; Galligan, James J; Zimniak, Piotr; Orlicky, David J; Ronis, Martin J; Petersen, Dennis R

    2016-04-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH)-fed GSTA4(-/-) mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4(-/-) mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4(-)(/-) mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4(-/-) mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4(-/-) PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST isoform plays an important

  18. Deletion of GSTA4-4 results in increased mitochondrial post-translational modification of proteins by reactive aldehydes following chronic ethanol consumption in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin T. Shearn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption induces hepatic oxidative stress resulting in production of highly reactive electrophilic α/β-unsaturated aldehydes that have the potential to modify proteins. A primary mechanism of reactive aldehyde detoxification by hepatocytes is through GSTA4-driven enzymatic conjugation with GSH. Given reports that oxidative stress initiates GSTA4 translocation to the mitochondria, we hypothesized that increased hepatocellular damage in ethanol (EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice is due to enhanced mitochondrial protein modification by reactive aldehydes. Chronic ingestion of EtOH increased hepatic protein carbonylation in GSTA4−/− mice as evidenced by increased 4-HNE and MDA immunostaining in the hepatic periportal region. Using mass spectrometric analysis of biotin hydrazide conjugated carbonylated proteins, a total of 829 proteins were identified in microsomal, cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions. Of these, 417 were novel to EtOH models. Focusing on mitochondrial fractions, 1.61-fold more carbonylated proteins were identified in EtOH-fed GSTA4−/− mice compared to their respective WT mice ingesting EtOH. Bioinformatic KEGG pathway analysis of carbonylated proteins from the mitochondrial fractions revealed an increased propensity for modification of proteins regulating oxidative phosphorylation, glucose, fatty acid, glutathione and amino acid metabolic processes in GSTA4−/− mice. Additional analysis revealed sites of reactive aldehyde protein modification on 26 novel peptides/proteins isolated from either SV/GSTA4−/− PF or EtOH fed mice. Among the peptides/proteins identified, ACSL, ACOX2, MTP, and THIKB contribute to regulation of fatty acid metabolism and ARG1, ARLY, and OAT, which regulate nitrogen and ammonia metabolism having direct relevance to ethanol-induced liver injury. These data define a role for GSTA4-4 in buffering hepatic oxidative stress associated with chronic alcohol consumption and that this GST

  19. Alzheimer's Proteins, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Interplay in a Neuronal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Antonella; Petragallo, Vito A.; Marra, Ersilia; Atlante, Anna

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the interplay between beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, Tau fragments, oxidative stress, and mitochondria in the neuronal model of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) in which the molecular events reminiscent of AD are activated. The identification of the death route and the cause/effect relationships between the events leading to death could be helpful to manage the progression of apoptosis in neurodegeneration and to define antiapoptotic treatments acting on precocious steps of the death process. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the earliest events linked to AD and might play a causative role in disease onset and progression. Recent studies on CGNs have shown that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) impairment, due to interaction with toxic N-ter Tau fragment, contributes in a significant manner to bioenergetic failure and mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings open a window for new therapeutic strategies aimed at preserving and/or improving mitochondrial function. PMID:20862336

  20. Alzheimer's Proteins, Oxidative Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Interplay in a Neuronal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Bobba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the interplay between beta-amyloid (A peptide, Tau fragments, oxidative stress, and mitochondria in the neuronal model of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs in which the molecular events reminiscent of AD are activated. The identification of the death route and the cause/effect relationships between the events leading to death could be helpful to manage the progression of apoptosis in neurodegeneration and to define antiapoptotic treatments acting on precocious steps of the death process. Mitochondrial dysfunction is among the earliest events linked to AD and might play a causative role in disease onset and progression. Recent studies on CGNs have shown that adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT impairment, due to interaction with toxic N-ter Tau fragment, contributes in a significant manner to bioenergetic failure and mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings open a window for new therapeutic strategies aimed at preserving and/or improving mitochondrial function.

  1. Cockayne syndrome group B protein prevents the accumulation of damaged mitochondria by promoting mitochondrial autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating autosomal recessive disease characterized by neurodegeneration, cachexia, and accelerated aging. 80% of the cases are caused by mutations in the CS complementation group B (CSB) gene known to be involved in DNA repair and transcription. Recent evidence...... indicates that CSB is present in mitochondria, where it associates with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We report an increase in metabolism in the CSB(m/m) mouse model and CSB-deficient cells. Mitochondrial content is increased in CSB-deficient cells, whereas autophagy is down-regulated, presumably as a result...... of defects in the recruitment of P62 and mitochondrial ubiquitination. CSB-deficient cells show increased free radical production and an accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Accordingly, treatment with the autophagic stimulators lithium chloride or rapamycin reverses the bioenergetic phenotype of...

  2. Decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and altered autophagy in human cells harboring A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Chen, Hsueh-Fu; Gi, Siao-Jhen; Chi, Tang-Hao; Cheng, Che-Kun; Hsu, Chi-Fu; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wei, Yau-Huei; Liu, Chin-Shan; Hsieh, Mingli

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are responsible for human neuromuscular diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in protein synthesis. This defect impairs assembly of complexes in electron transport chain and results in decreased respiratory function of mitochondria. In this study, we showed a significant decrease of the heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a MERRF patient and in cybrid cells harboring MERRF A8344G mutation. However, normal cytoplasmic distributions of Hsp27 and normal heat shock responses were observed in both wild type and mutant cybrids. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type Hsp27 in mutant MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death under staurosporine (STS) treatment, suggesting a protective function of Hsp27 in cells harboring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Meanwhile, reverse transcriptase PCR showed no difference in the mRNA level between normal and mutant cybrids, indicating that alterations may occur at the protein level. Evidenced by the decreased levels of Hsp27 upon treatment with proteasome inhibitor, starvation and rapamycin and the accumulation of Hsp27 upon lysosomal inhibitor treatment; Hsp27 may be degraded by the autophagic pathway. In addition, the increased formation of LC3-II and autophagosomes was found in MERRF cybrids under the basal condition, indicating a constitutively-activated autophagic pathway. It may explain, at least partially, the faster turnover of Hsp27 in MERRF cybrids. This study provides information for us to understand that Hsp27 is degraded through the autophagic pathway and that Hsp27 may have a protective role in MERRF cells. Regulating Hsp27 and the autophagic pathway

  3. Endogenous 3, 4- Dihydroxyphenylalanine and Dopaquinone Modifications on Protein Tyrosine: links to mitochondrially derived oxidative stress via hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chen, Baowei; Chin, Mark H.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Petritis, Brianne O.; Camp, David G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Desmond J.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2010-06-02

    Oxidative modifications of protein tyrosines have been implicated in multiple human diseases. Among these modifications, elevations in levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), a major product of hydroxyl radical addition to tyrosine, has been observed in a number of pathologies. Here we report the first global proteome survey of endogenous site-specific modifications, i.e, DOPA and its further oxidation product dopaquinone (DQ) in mouse brain and heart tissues. Results from LC-MS/MS analyses included 203 and 71 DOPA-modified tyrosine sites identified from brain and heart, respectively, with a false discovery rate of ~1%; while only a few nitrotyrosine containing peptides, a more commonly studied marker of oxidative stress, were detectable, suggesting the much higher abundance for DOPA modification as compared with tyrosine nitration. Moreover, 57 and 29 DQ modified peptides were observed from brain and heart, respectively; nearly half of these peptides were also observed with DOPA modification on the same sites. For both tissues, these modifications are preferentially found in mitochondrial proteins with metal-binding properties, consistent with metal catalyzed hydroxyl radical formation from mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These modifications also link to a number of mitochondria-associated and other signaling pathways. Furthermore, many of the modification sites were common sites of previously reported tyrosine phosphorylation suggesting potential disruption of signaling pathways. Structural aspects of DOPA-modified tyrosine sequences are distinct from those of nitrotyrosines suggesting that each type of modifications provides a marker for different in vivo reactive chemistries and can be used to predict sensitive protein targets. Collectively, the results suggest that these modifications are linked with mitochondrially-derived oxidative stress, and may serve as sensitive markers for disease pathologies.

  4. Cloning and characterisation of mtDBP, a DNA-binding protein which binds two distinct regions of sea urchin mitochondrial DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Loguercio Polosa, P; Roberti, M; Musicco, C; Gadaleta, M N; Quagliariello, E.; Cantatore, P

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA for the sea urchin mitochondrial D-loop-binding protein (mtDBP), a 40 kDa protein which binds two homologous regions of mitochondrial DNA (the D-loop region and the boundary between the oppositely transcribed ND5 and ND6 genes), has been cloned. Four different 3'-untranslated regions have been detected that are related to each other in pairs and do not contain the canonical polyadenylation signal. The in vitro synthesised mature protein (348 amino acids), deprived of the putative sig...

  5. Primary structure of dihydrofolate reductase and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L36 genes from the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aimi, Tadanori; Fukuhara, Shoji; Ishiguro, Maki; Kitamoto, Yutaka; Morinaga, Tsutomu

    2004-08-01

    We amplified and sequenced the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. Downstream of the DHFR coding region, a mitochondrial (mt) ribosomal protein L36 (RPL36) gene was discovered in the opposite orientation to DHFR gene. Putative polyadenylation signals of the two genes overlapped, both containing the 8-bp palindrome 5'-aatatatt-3'. The finding that C. cinereus DHFR gene is closely clustered with a mt protein gene strongly suggests that C. cinereus DHFR is closely related to mt function and evolution. The amino acid sequence of C. cinereus DHFR is most homologous to eukaryotic proteins such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Pneumocystis carinii DHFRs. However, the sequence of C. cinereus mt RPL36 closely resembles RPL36 of bacteria and cyanobacteria such as Synechocystis sp. and Escherichia coli. This result strongly supports the serial endosymbiotic theory of the development of ancestral eukaryotes, and suggests that C. cinereus mt RPL36 gene originated from the ancestral eubacterial genome. PMID:15620217

  6. Differential expression of glycosomal and mitochondrial proteins in the two major life-cycle stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertommen, Didier; Van Roy, Joris; Szikora, Jean-Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Michels, Paul A M; Opperdoes, Fred R

    2008-04-01

    Label-free semi-quantitative differential three-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (3D-LC-MS/MS) was used to compare the glycosomal and mitochondrial proteomes of the bloodstream- and insect-form of Trypanosoma brucei. The abundance of glycosomal marker proteins identified in the two life-cycle stages corresponded well with the relative importance of biochemical pathways present in the glycosomes of the two stages and the peptide spectral count ratios of selected enzymes were in good agreement with published data about their enzymatic specific activities. This approach proved extremely useful for the generation of large scale proteomics data for the comparison of different life-cycle stages. Several proteins involved in oxidative stress protection, sugar-nucleotide synthesis, purine salvage, nucleotide-monophosphate formation and purine-nucleotide cycle were identified as glycosomal proteins. PMID:18242729

  7. Protein kinase CK2 inhibition induces cell death via early impact on mitochondrial function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiser, Fatima; Trembley, Janeen H.; Kren, Betsy T.; Wu, Jing-Jiang; Naveed, A. Khaliq; Ahmed, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    CK2 (official acronym for casein kinase 2 or II) is a potent suppressor of apoptosis in response to diverse apoptotic stimuli —thus its molecular downregulation or activity inhibition results in potent induction of cell death. CK2 downregulation is known to impact mitochondrial apoptotic circuitry but the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. Utilizing prostate cancer cell lines subjected to CK2-specific inhibitors which cause loss of cell viability, we have found that CK2 inhibition in cells causes rapid early decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). Cells treated with the CK2 inhibitors TBB (4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole) or TBCA (tetrabromocinnamic acid) demonstrate changes in Δψm which become apparent within 2 h, i.e., significantly prior to evidence of activation of other mitochondrial apoptotic signals whose temporal expression ensues subsequent to loss of Δψm. Further, we have demonstrated the presence of CK2 in purified mitochondria and it appears that the effect on Δψm evoked by inhibition of CK2 may involve mitochondrial localized CK2. Results also suggest that alterations in Ca2+ signaling may be involved in the CK2 mediated regulation of Δψm and mitochondrial permeability. Thus, we propose that a key mechanism of CK2 impact on mitochondrial apoptotic circuitry and cell death involves early loss of Δψm which may be a primary trigger for apoptotic signaling and cell death resulting from CK2 inhibition. PMID:25043911

  8. PGC-1{alpha} is required for AICAR induced expression of GLUT4 and mitochondrial proteins in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Fentz, Joachim; Biensø, Rasmus S;

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that repeated activation of AMPK induces mitochondrial and glucose membrane transporter gene/protein expression via a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor Upsilon co-activator (PGC)-1alpha dependent mechanism. Whole body PGC-1alpha knockout (KO) and littermate wild ...... in both WT and PGC-1alpha KO mice. In conclusion, we here provide genetic evidence for a major role of PGC-1alpha in AMPK mediated regulation of mitochondrial and glucose membrane transport protein expression in skeletal muscle....... type (WT) mice were given either a single or repeated subcutaneous injection of the AMPK activator AICAR or saline. Skeletal muscles were dissected either 1h or 4h after the single AICAR treatment or 24h after the last injection following the repeated AICAR treatment. Repeated AICAR treatment increased...... GLUT4, cytochrome c oxidase (COX)I and cytochrome (cyt) c protein expression ~10-40% relative to saline in white muscles of the WT mice, but not of the PGC-1alpha KO mice. In line, GLUT4 and cyt c mRNA content increased 30-60% 4h after a single AICAR injection relative to saline only in WT mice. One...

  9. C11orf83, a mitochondrial cardiolipin-binding protein involved in bc1 complex assembly and supercomplex stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmurs, Marjorie; Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos; Lane, Lydie

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  10. C11orf83, a Mitochondrial Cardiolipin-Binding Protein Involved in bc1 Complex Assembly and Supercomplex Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Michelangelo; Raemy, Etienne; Vaz, Frédéric Maxime; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian mitochondria may contain up to 1,500 different proteins, and many of them have neither been confidently identified nor characterized. In this study, we demonstrated that C11orf83, which was lacking experimental characterization, is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein facing the intermembrane space. This protein is specifically associated with the bc1 complex of the electron transport chain and involved in the early stages of its assembly by stabilizing the bc1 core complex. C11orf83 displays some overlapping functions with Cbp4p, a yeast bc1 complex assembly factor. Therefore, we suggest that C11orf83, now called UQCC3, is the functional human equivalent of Cbp4p. In addition, C11orf83 depletion in HeLa cells caused abnormal crista morphology, higher sensitivity to apoptosis, a decreased ATP level due to impaired respiration and subtle, but significant, changes in cardiolipin composition. We showed that C11orf83 binds to cardiolipin by its α-helices 2 and 3 and is involved in the stabilization of bc1 complex-containing supercomplexes, especially the III2/IV supercomplex. We also demonstrated that the OMA1 metalloprotease cleaves C11orf83 in response to mitochondrial depolarization, suggesting a role in the selection of cells with damaged mitochondria for their subsequent elimination by apoptosis, as previously described for OPA1. PMID:25605331

  11. Ceramide induces release of mitochondrial proapop-totic proteins in caspase-dependent and -independent manner in HT-29 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the release of mitochondrial proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins induced by ex-ogenous C2-ceramide in human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cell line was investigated. HT-29 cells were treated with 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide in vitro. Flow cytometer was used to detect the mito-chondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Subcellular fractions were extracted by Mitochondrial/Cytosol Fractionation Kit after C2-ceramide treatment for 24 h. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the level of cytochrome c (Cyt c), high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2) and second mitochondrial-derived ac-tivator of caspases (Smac) released from mitochondria, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apop-tosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-3 for 24 h. The results showed that ΔΨm began to decrease from 6 h after 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide treatment (P<0.05) and cyclosporin A (CsA) could inhibit the col-lapse of ΔΨm through regulating mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore. There was no effect of C2-ceramide on the expression of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac in the total levels. 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide could induce Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac to release from mitochondria to cytosol and down-regulate the expression of XIAP (P<0.05). Also there was expression of cleaved caspase-3 with C2-ceramide treatment. After the treatment with caspase inhibitor, C2-ceramide still induced the release of Cyt c and HtrA2, but Smac did not. Therefore, C2-ceramide could induce apoptosis of HT-29 cells through the mitochondria pathway. The release of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac from mitochondria did not occur via the same mechanism, the release of Cyt c and HtrA2 was caspase-independent and the re-lease of Smac was caspase-dependent.

  12. Ceramide induces release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins in caspase-dependent and -independent manner in HT-29 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the release of mitochondrial proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins induced by exogenous C2-ceramide in human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cell line was investigated. HT-29 cells were treated with 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide in vitro. Flow cytometer was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψm). Subcellular fractions were extracted by Mitochondrial/Cytosol Fractionation Kit after C2-ceramide treatment for 24 h. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the level of cytochrome c (Cyt c), high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (Smac) released from mitochondria, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-3 for 24 h. The results showed that △Ψm began to decrease from 6 h after 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide treatment (P<0.05) and cyclosporin A (CsA) could inhibit the collapse of △Ψm through regulating mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore. There was no effect of C2-ceramide on the expression of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac in the total levels. 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide could induce Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac to release from mitochondria to cytosol and down-regulate the expression of XIAP (P<0.05). Also there was expression of cleaved caspase-3 with C2-ceramide treatment. After the treatment with caspase inhibitor, C2-ceramide still induced the release of Cyt c and HtrA2, but Smac did not. Therefore, C2-ceramide could induce apoptosis of HT-29 cells through the mitochondria pathway. The release of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac from mitochondria did not occur via the same mechanism, the release of Cyt c and HtrA2 was caspase-independent and the release of Smac was caspase-dependent.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Mitochondrial Heat Shock Protein 70 of Trypanosoma congolense and Potential Use as a Diagnostic Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Bannai, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Inoue, Noboru; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2003-01-01

    The ability to use mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 (MTP) of Trypanosoma congolense as a diagnostic antigen was examined. One cDNA clone was obtained by immunoscreening of a T. congolense procyclic form (PCF) cDNA library with monoclonal antibody (MAb) 10F9. The cDNA clone contained an open reading frame of 1,977 bp encoding a polypeptide consisting of 659 amino acids. Southern blotting analysis indicated that there were at least three copies of the MTP gene in the haploid genome. Interfer...

  14. Oxidative Stress in Cardiac Mitochondria Caused by Copper Deficiency May Be Insufficient to Damage Mitochondrial Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper (Cu) deficiency may promote the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the mitochondrial electron transport chain through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) and increased reduction of respiratory complexes upstream from CCO. In the present study, respiration, H2O2 production and...

  15. Cloning and functional analysis of human mTERFL encoding a novel mitochondrial transcription termination factor-like protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum plays an important role in the regulation of cell cycle and cell growth. To identify novel serum-inhibitory factors and study their roles in cell cycle regulation, we performed mRNA differential display analysis of U251 cells in the presence or absence of serum and cloned a novel gene encoding the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor-like protein (mTERFL). The full-length mTERFL cDNA has been isolated and the genomic structure determined. The mTERFL gene consists of three exons and encodes 385 amino acids with 52% sequence similarity to the human mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF). However, mTERFL and mTERF have an opposite expression pattern in response to serum. The expression of mTERFL is dramatically inhibited by the addition of serum in serum-starved cells while the mTERF is rather induced. Northern blot analysis detected three mTERFL transcripts of 1.7, 3.2, and 3.5 kb. Besides the 3.2 kb transcript that is unique to skeletal muscle, other two transcripts express predominant in heart, liver, pancreas, and skeletal muscle. Expression of the GFP-mTERFL fusion protein in HeLa cells localized it to the mitochondria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of mTERFL suppresses cell growth and arrests cells in the G1 stage demonstrated by MTT and flow cytometry analysis. Collectively, our data suggest that mTERFL is a novel mTERF family member and a serum-inhibitory factor probably participating in the regulation of cell growth through the modulation of mitochondrial transcription

  16. The Non-structural Protein of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Disrupts the Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and Induces Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Bhaskar; Karlberg, Helen; Mirazimi, Ali; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have developed distinct strategies to overcome the host defense system. Regulation of apoptosis in response to viral infection is important for virus survival and dissemination. Like other viruses, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is known to regulate apoptosis. This study, for the first time, suggests that the non-structural protein NSs of CCHFV, a member of the genus Nairovirus, induces apoptosis. In this report, we demonstrated the expression of CCHFV NSs, which contains 150 amino acid residues, in CCHFV-infected cells. CCHFV NSs undergoes active degradation during infection. We further demonstrated that ectopic expression of CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis, as reflected by caspase-3/7 activity and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, in different cell lines that support CCHFV replication. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that CCHFV NSs induces apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. The minimal active region of the CCHFV NSs protein was determined to be 93-140 amino acid residues. Using alanine scanning, we demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are the key residues for NSs-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, CCHFV NSs co-localizes in mitochondria and also disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential. We also demonstrated that Leu-127 and Leu-135 are important residues for disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential by NSs. Therefore, these results indicate that the C terminus of CCHFV NSs triggers mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, leading to activation of caspases, which, ultimately, leads to apoptosis. Given that multiple factors contribute to apoptosis during CCHFV infection, further studies are needed to define the involvement of CCHFV NSs in regulating apoptosis in infected cells. PMID:26574543

  17. (−)-EPICATECHIN IMPROVES MITOCHONDRIAL RELATED PROTEIN LEVELS AND AMELIORATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DYSTROPHIC DELTA SARCOGLYCAN NULL MOUSE STRIATED MUSCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; De los Santos, Sergio; Gonzalez-Basurto, Silvia; Canto, Patricia; Mendoza-Lorenzo, Patricia; Palma-Flores, Carlos; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Coral-Vazquez, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders characterized by progressive striated muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for disease pathogenesis remains unclear. The presence of oxidative stress (OS) is known to contribute to the pathophysiology and severity of the MD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in MD and likely represents an important determinant of increased OS. Experimental antioxidant therapies have been implemented with the aim of protecting against disease progression, but results from clinical trials have been disappointing. In this study, we explored the capacity of the cacao flavonoid (−)-epicatechin (Epi) to mitigate OS by acting as a positive regulator of mitochondrial structure/function endpoints and redox balance control systems in skeletal and cardiac muscles of dystrophic, δ-sarcoglycan (δ-SG) null mice. Wild type or δ-SG null 2.5 month old male mice were treated via oral gavage with either water (control animals) or Epi (1 mg/kg, twice/day) for 2 weeks. Results evidence a significant normalization of total protein carbonylation, recovery of reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio) and enhanced superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and citrate synthase activities with Epi treatment. These effects were accompanied by increases in protein levels for thiolredoxin, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and mitochondrial endpoints. Furthermore, we evidence decreases in heart and skeletal muscle fibrosis, accompanied with an improvement in skeletal muscle function with treatment. These results warrant the further investigation of Epi as a potential therapeutic agent to mitigate MD associated muscle degeneration. PMID:25284161

  18. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  19. Nitric oxide protects the heart from ischemia-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial damage via protein kinase G mediated blockage of permeability transition and cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jekabsone Aiste

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart ischemia can rapidly induce apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction via mitochondrial permeability transition-induced cytochrome c release. We tested whether nitric oxide (NO can block this damage in isolated rat heart, and, if so, by what mechanisms. Methods Hearts were perfused with 50 μM DETA/NO (NO donor, then subjected to 30 min stop-flow ischemia or ischemia/reperfusion. Isolated heart mitochondria were used to measure the rate of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and membrane potential using oxygen and tetraphenylphosphonium-selective electrodes. Mitochondrial and cytosolic cytochrome c levels were measured spectrophotometrically and by ELISA. The calcium retention capacity of isolated mitochondria was measured using the fluorescent dye Calcium Green-5N. Apoptosis and necrosis were evaluated by measuring the activity of caspase-3 in cytosolic extracts and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in perfusate, respectively. Results 30 min ischemia caused release of mitochondrial cytochrome c to the cytoplasm, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and stimulation of mitochondrial proton permeability. 3 min perfusion with 50 μM DETA/NO of hearts prior to ischemia decreased this mitochondrial damage. The DETA/NO-induced blockage of mitochondrial cytochrome c release was reversed by a protein kinase G (PKG inhibitor KT5823, or soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ or protein kinase C inhibitors (Ro 32-0432 and Ro 31-8220. Ischemia also stimulated caspase-3-like activity, and this was substantially reduced by pre-perfusion with DETA/NO. Reperfusion after 30 min of ischemia caused no further caspase activation, but was accompanied by necrosis, which was completely prevented by DETA/NO, and this protection was blocked by the PKG inhibitor. Incubation of isolated heart mitochondria with activated PKG blocked calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition and cytochrome c release. Perfusion of non

  20. The human MSH5 (MutSHomolog 5) protein localizes to mitochondria and protects the mitochondrial genome from oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Figueroa, Alexia; Fragaki, Konstantina; Destroismaisons, Laurie; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Lespinasse, Françoise; Vandenbos, Fanny; Pradelli, Ludivine A; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Rötig, Agnès; Michiels, Jean-François; Vande Velde, Christine; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2012-11-01

    MutS homologs play a central role in maintaining genetic stability. We show that MSH5 (MutSHomolog 5) is localized into the mitochondria of germ and somatic cells. This protein binds to mtDNA and interacts with the Twinkle helicase and the DNA polymerase gamma. hMSH5 stimulates mtDNA repair in response to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. Furthermore, we observed a subsarcolemmal accumulation of hMSH5 in COX negative muscle fibers of patients presenting a mitochondrial myopathy. We report a novel localization for hMSH5 suggesting that this protein may have functions other than those known in meiotic recombination. PMID:22917773

  1. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix is sensed by PINK1 to induce PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitophagy of polarized mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Seok Min; Youle, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Defective mitochondria exert deleterious effects on host cells. To manage this risk, mitochondria display several lines of quality control mechanisms: mitochondria-specific chaperones and proteases protect against misfolded proteins at the molecular level, and fission/fusion and mitophagy segregate and eliminate damage at the organelle level. An increase in unfolded proteins in mitochondria activates a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to increase chaperone production, while the...

  2. Cleavage by Caspase 8 and Mitochondrial Membrane Association Activate the BH3-only Protein Bid during TRAIL-induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Zhang, Jingjing; O'Neill, Katelyn L; Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Quadros, Rolen M; Tu, Yaping; Luo, Xu

    2016-05-27

    The BH3-only protein Bid is known as a critical mediator of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis following death receptor activation. However, since full-length Bid possesses potent apoptotic activity, the role of a caspase-mediated Bid cleavage is not established in vivo In addition, due to the fact that multiple caspases cleave Bid at the same site in vitro, the identity of the Bid-cleaving caspase during death receptor signaling remains uncertain. Moreover, as Bid maintains its overall structure following its cleavage by caspase 8, it remains unclear how Bid is activated upon cleavage. Here, Bid-deficient (Bid KO) colon cancer cells were generated by gene editing, and were reconstituted with wild-type or mutants of Bid. While the loss of Bid blocked apoptosis following treatment by TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), this blockade was relieved by re-introduction of the wild-type Bid. In contrast, the caspase-resistant mutant Bid(D60E) and a BH3 defective mutant Bid(G94E) failed to restore TRAIL-induced apoptosis. By generating Bid/Bax/Bak-deficient (TKO) cells, we demonstrated that Bid is primarily cleaved by caspase 8, not by effector caspases, to give rise to truncated Bid (tBid) upon TRAIL treatment. Importantly, despite the presence of an intact BH3 domain, a tBid mutant lacking the mitochondrial targeting helices (α6 and α7) showed diminished apoptotic activity. Together, these results for the first time establish that cleavage by caspase 8 and the subsequent association with the outer mitochondrial membrane are two critical events that activate Bid during death receptor-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27053107

  3. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. ► C/EBPβ−/− mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. ► C/EBPβ deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. ► Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. ► C/EBPβ inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBPβ expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBPβ deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBPβ−/− mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBPβ−/− mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBPβ in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBPβ might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR activation-mediated adverse effects on liver TG metabolism without disrupting its beneficial effects on cholesterol metabolism.

  4. The novel 2Fe–2S outer mitochondrial protein mitoNEET displays conformational flexibility in its N-terminal cytoplasmic tethering domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the anti-diabetic drug target mitoNEET obtained from a GFP fusion construct (1.4 Å resolution, R factor = 20.2%) shows that the CDGSH 2Fe–2S binding domains are superimposable with previously determined non-fused constructs. However, there is considerable flexibility in the position of the outer mitochondrial tethering arms resulting in two different conformations in the crystal structure. A primary role for mitochondrial dysfunction is indicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. A widely used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes is pioglitazone, a member of the thiazolidinedione class of molecules. MitoNEET, a 2Fe–2S outer mitochondrial membrane protein, binds pioglitazone [Colca et al. (2004 ▶), Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.286, E252–E260]. The soluble domain of the human mitoNEET protein has been expressed C-terminal to the superfolder green fluorescent protein and the mitoNEET protein has been isolated. Comparison of the crystal structure of mitoNEET isolated from cleavage of the fusion protein (1.4 Å resolution, R factor = 20.2%) with other solved structures shows that the CDGSH domains are superimposable, indicating proper assembly of mitoNEET. Furthermore, there is considerable flexibility in the position of the cytoplasmic tethering arms, resulting in two different conformations in the crystal structure. This flexibility affords multiple orientations on the outer mitochondrial membrane

  5. Identification of novel oxidized protein substrates and physiological partners of the mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon-like protease Pim1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayot, Aurélien; Gareil, Monique; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter; Friguet, Bertrand; Bulteau, Anne-Laure

    2010-01-01

    ATP-dependent proteases are currently emerging as key regulators of mitochondrial functions. Among these proteolytic systems, Pim1, a Lon-like serine protease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is involved in the control of selective protein turnover in the mitochondrial matrix. In the absence of Pim1......, yeast cells have been shown to accumulate electron-dense inclusion bodies in the matrix space, to lose integrity of mitochondrial genome, and to be respiration-deficient. Because of the severity of phenotypes associated with the depletion of Pim1, this protease appears to be an essential component of...... the protein quality control machinery in mitochondria and to exert crucial functions during the biogenesis of this organelle. Nevertheless, its physiological substrates and partners are not fully characterized. Therefore, we used the combination of different proteomic techniques to assess the nature...

  6. GST-TAT-SOD: Cell Permeable Bifunctional Antioxidant Enzyme—A Potential Selective Radioprotector

    OpenAIRE

    Jianru Pan; Huocong He; Ying Su; Guangjin Zheng; Junxin Wu; Shutao Liu; Pingfan Rao

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) fusion of TAT was proved to be radioprotective in our previous work. On that basis, a bifunctional recombinant protein which was the fusion of glutathione S-transferase (GST), SOD, and TAT was constructed and named GST-TAT-SOD. Herein we report the investigation of the cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating activity, and in vitro radioprotective effect of GST-TAT-SOD compared with wild SOD, single-function recombinant protein SOD-TAT, and amifostine. We demonstrated that wi...

  7. Effect of the ATPase inhibitor protein IF1 on H+ translocation in the mitochondrial ATP synthase complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H+ FoF1-ATP synthase complex of coupling membranes converts the proton-motive force into rotatory mechanical energy to drive ATP synthesis. The F1 moiety of the complex protrudes at the inner side of the membrane, the Fo sector spans the membrane reaching the outer side. The IF1 component of the mitochondrial complex is a basic 10 kDa protein, which inhibits the FoF1-ATP hydrolase activity. The mitochondrial matrix pH is the critical factor for the inhibitory binding of the central segment of IF1 (residue 42-58) to the F1-α/β subunits. We have analyzed the effect of native purified IF1 the IF1-(42-58) synthetic peptide and its mutants on proton conduction, driven by ATP hydrolysis or by [K+] gradients, in bovine heart inside-out submitochondrial particles and in liposome-reconstituted FoF1 complex. The results show that IF1, and in particular its central 42-58 segment, displays different inhibitory affinity for proton conduction from the F1 to the Fo side and in the opposite direction. Cross-linking of IF1 to F1-α/β subunits inhibits the ATP-driven H+ translocation but enhances H+ conduction in the reverse direction. These observation are discussed in terms of the rotary mechanism of the FoF1 complex.

  8. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S R; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  9. Domestication process of the goat revealed by an analysis of the nearly complete mitochondrial protein-encoding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Nomura

    Full Text Available Goats (Capra hircus are one of the oldest domesticated species, and they are kept all over the world as an essential resource for meat, milk, and fiber. Although recent archeological and molecular biological studies suggested that they originated in West Asia, their domestication processes such as the timing of population expansion and the dynamics of their selection pressures are little known. With the aim of addressing these issues, the nearly complete mitochondrial protein-encoding genes were determined from East, Southeast, and South Asian populations. Our coalescent time estimations suggest that the timing of their major population expansions was in the Late Pleistocene and significantly predates the beginning of their domestication in the Neolithic era (≈10,000 years ago. The ω (ratio of non-synonymous rate/synonymous substitution rate for each lineage was also estimated. We found that the ω of the globally distributed haplogroup A which is inherited by more than 90% of goats examined, turned out to be extremely low, suggesting that they are under severe selection pressure probably due to their large population size. Conversely, the ω of the Asian-specific haplogroup B inherited by about 5% of goats was relatively high. Although recent molecular studies suggest that domestication of animals may tend to relax selective constraints, the opposite pattern observed in our goat mitochondrial genome data indicates the process of domestication is more complex than may be presently appreciated and cannot be explained only by a simple relaxation model.

  10. Shortened leukocyte telomere length in type 2 diabetes mellitus: genetic polymorphisms in mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and telomeric pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuling; Ning, Zhixin; Lee, Yvonne; Hambly, Brett D; McLachlan, Craig S

    2016-12-01

    Current debate in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) has focused on shortened leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as the result of a number of possible causes, including polymorphisms in mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) leading to oxidative stress, telomere regulatory pathway gene polymorphisms, or as a direct result of associated cardiovascular complications inducing tissue organ inflammation and oxidative stress. There is evidence that a heritable shorter telomere trait is a risk factor for development of T2DM. This review discusses the contribution and balance of genetic regulation of UCPs and telomere pathways in the context of T2DM. We discuss genotypes that are well known to influence the shortening of LTL, in particular OBFC1 and telomerase genotypes such as TERC. Interestingly, the interaction between short telomeres and T2DM risk appears to involve mitochondrial dysfunction as an intermediate process. A hypothesis is presented that genetic heterogeneity within UCPs may directly affect oxidative stress that feeds back to influence the fine balance of telomere regulation, cell cycle regulation and diabetes risk and/or metabolic disease progression. PMID:26951191

  11. Transcranial laser therapy alters amyloid precursor protein processing and improves mitochondrial function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Thomas; Yu, Jin; El-Amouri, Salim; Gattoni-Celli, Sebastiano; Richieri, Steve; De Taboada, Luis; Streeter, Jackson; Kindy, Mark S.

    2011-03-01

    Transcranial laser therapy (TLT) using a near-infrared energy laser system was tested in the 2x Tg amyloid precursor protein (APP) mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TLT was administered 3 times/week at escalating doses, starting at 3 months of age, and was compared to a control group which received no laser treatment. Treatment sessions were continued for a total of six months. The brains were examined for amyloid plaque burden, Aβ peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 ), APP cleavage products (sAPPα, CTFβ) and mitochondrial activity. Administration of TLT was associated with a significant, dose-dependent reduction in amyloid load as indicated by the numbers of Aβ plaques. Levels of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 levels were likewise reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. All TLT doses produced an increase in brain sAPPα and a decrease in CTFβ levels consistent with an increase in α-secretase activity and a decrease in β-secretase activity. In addition, TLT increased ATP levels and oxygen utilization in treated animals suggesting improved mitochondrial function. These studies suggest that TLT is a potential candidate for treatment of AD.

  12. Effects of rosiglitazone on global ischemia-induced hippocampal injury and expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the effect of rosiglitazone, a ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative actions, on hippocampal injury and its roles in mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) expression caused by transient global ischemia (TGI) in rats. Increased UCP2 expression was observed in mitochondria of hippocampal CA1 2-24 h after TGI/reperfusion, with maximal expression levels at 6-18 h. Administration of rosiglitazone to hippocampus 30 min prior to the onset of TGI further enhanced mitochondrial UCP2 expression 2-6 h following TGI/reperfusion. Rats subjected to TGI/reperfusion displayed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, based on increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, in hippocampal CA1 mitochondria 2-6 h after reperfusion. Rosiglitazone significantly attenuated TGI/reperfusion-induced lipid peroxidation and suppressed hippocampal CA1 neuronal death based on the surviving neuronal counts. In conclusion, our results provide correlative evidence for the 'PPARγ → UCP2 → neuroprotection' cascade in ischemic brain injury

  13. HIV and Cocaine Impact Glial Metabolism: Energy Sensor AMP-activated protein kinase Role in Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Epigenetic Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF. Results showed that cocaine exposure during HIV infection significantly increased the level of p24, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP-utilization and upregulated energy sensor AMPKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau and Wee1 protein expression. Increased ROS production subsequently inhibits OCR/ECAR ratio and OXPHOS, and eventually upregulate epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF in CHME-5 cells. These results suggest that HIV infection induced energy deficit and metabolic dysfunction is accelerated by cocaine inducing energy sensor AMPKs, mitochondrial biogenesis and chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF activation, which may lead to neuroAIDS disease progression. PMID:27535703

  14. The Effect on Cognition of Mitochondrial Respiratory System Proteins in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in the Course of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, S; Rybacka-Mossakowska, J; Gazdulska, J; Gołda-Gocka, I; Ramlau, R

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent an easily available population of cells for the studies on remote effects of lung cancer. NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein-1 (Ndufs1), a marker of mitochondrial complex I, and mitochondrially encoded cytochrome c oxidase 1 (MTCO1), a marker of complex IV, may participate in cognitive decline during the course of lung cancer. In this study, Ndufs1 and MTCO1 expression in PBMC was evaluated by means of ELISA in 80 lung cancer patients. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were conducted Trail Making Tests (TMT-A and TMT-B) at baseline and after the 6 months' follow-up. Autoantibodies were identified by means of indirect immunofluorescence and line blot. We found that enhanced levels of Ndufs1 in PBMC were related to impaired cognitive performance; TMT-A of 13.6 ± 3.1 s and TMT-B of 162.5 ± 46.4 s compared with 8.6 ± 4.5 s (p = 0.003) and 124.8 ± 51.8 s (p TMT-A - τb = 0.30; p = 0.001), and TMT-B - τb = 0.199; p = 0.012) after the 6 months' follow-up. Higher MTCO1 expression was accompanied by worse TMT-A results than in case of inhibited MTCO1; 11.1 ± 5.8 s vs. 8.5 ± 4.1 s; respectively; p = 0.048. MTCO1 expression was correlated with TMT-A results (τb = 0.17; p = 0.034) at baseline. We conclude that stimulation of PBMC mitochondrial function in lung cancer patients is associated with cognitive impairment. Mitochondrial dysfunction in PBMC may reflect cytotoxicity responsible for neurological deficits. PMID:26987334

  15. Interaction of Tim23 with Tim50 Is essential for protein translocation by the mitochondrial TIM23 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan-Airapetov, Lada; Zohary, Keren; Popov-Celeketic, Dusan; Mapa, Koyeli; Hell, Kai; Neupert, Walter; Azem, Abdussalam; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2009-02-20

    The TIM23 complex is the major translocase of the mitochondrial inner membrane responsible for the import of essentially all matrix proteins and a number of inner membrane proteins. Tim23 and Tim50, two essential proteins of the complex, expose conserved domains into the intermembrane space that interact with each other. Here, we describe in vitro reconstitution of this interaction using recombinantly expressed and purified intermembrane space domains of Tim50 and Tim23. We established two independent methods, chemical cross-linking and surface plasmon resonance, to track their interaction. In addition, we identified mutations in Tim23 that abolish its interaction with Tim50 in vitro. These mutations also destabilized the interaction between the two proteins in vivo, leading to defective import of preproteins via the TIM23 complex and to cell death at higher temperatures. This is the first study to describe the reconstitution of the Tim50-Tim23 interaction in vitro and to identify specific residues of Tim23 that are vital for the interaction with Tim50. PMID:19017642

  16. Errantum: Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai JCK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lai JCK, Ananthakrishnan G, Jandhyam S, et al. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins. Int J Nanomedicine. 2010;5:715–723.The wrong image was used in Figure 5 on page 719.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yisang; Galloway, Chad A.; Jhun, Bong Sook; Yu, Tianzheng

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are at the center of cellular energy metabolism and regulate cell life and death. The cell biological aspect of mitochondria, especially mitochondrial dynamics, has drawn much attention through implications in human pathology, including neurological disorders and metabolic diseases. Mitochondrial fission and fusion are the main processes governing the morphological plasticity and are controlled by multiple factors, including mechanochemical enzymes and accessory proteins. Emergin...

  18. Oxidative modifications, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired protein degradation in Parkinson's disease: how neurons are lost in the Bermuda triangle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malkus Kristen A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While numerous hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, the theory of oxidative stress has received considerable support. Although many correlations have been established and encouraging evidence has been obtained, conclusive proof of causation for the oxidative stress hypothesis is lacking and potential cures have not emerged. Therefore it is likely that other factors, possibly in coordination with oxidative stress, contribute to neuron death. Using Parkinson's disease (PD as the paradigm, this review explores the hypothesis that oxidative modifications, mitochondrial functional disruption, and impairment of protein degradation constitute three interrelated molecular pathways that execute neuron death. These intertwined events are the consequence of environmental exposure, genetic factors, and endogenous risks and constitute a "Bermuda triangle" that may be considered the underlying cause of neurodegenerative pathogenesis.

  19. Diabetes and activation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha increases mitochondrial thioesterase I protein expression and activity in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial thioesterase-I (MTE-I) catalyzes the de-esterification of fattyacyl-CoAs to fatty acid anions in the mitochondrial matrix, which are extruded to the cytosol, thus preventing the accumulation of toxic mitochondrial fattyacyl-CoAs. MTE-I mRNA expression in the heart is regulated by perox...

  20. Promoter polymorphisms in two overlapping 6p25 genes implicate mitochondrial proteins in cognitive deficit in schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jablensky, A

    2011-10-04

    In a previous study, we detected a 6p25-p24 region linked to schizophrenia in families with high composite cognitive deficit (CD) scores, a quantitative trait integrating multiple cognitive measures. Association mapping of a 10 Mb interval identified a 260 kb region with a cluster of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with CD scores and memory performance. The region contains two colocalising genes, LYRM4 and FARS2, both encoding mitochondrial proteins. The two tagging SNPs with strongest evidence of association were located around the overlapping putative promoters, with rs2224391 predicted to alter a transcription factor binding site (TFBS). Sequencing the promoter region identified 22 SNPs, many predicted to affect TFBSs, in a tight linkage disequilibrium block. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed promoter activity in the predicted promoter region, and demonstrated marked downregulation of expression in the LYRM4 direction under the haplotype comprising the minor alleles of promoter SNPs, which however is not driven by rs2224391. Experimental evidence from LYRM4 expression in lymphoblasts, gel-shift assays and modelling of DNA breathing dynamics pointed to two adjacent promoter SNPs, rs7752203-rs4141761, as the functional variants affecting expression. Their C-G alleles were associated with higher transcriptional activity and preferential binding of nuclear proteins, whereas the G-A combination had opposite effects and was associated with poor memory and high CD scores. LYRM4 is a eukaryote-specific component of the mitochondrial biogenesis of Fe-S clusters, essential cofactors in multiple processes, including oxidative phosphorylation. LYRM4 downregulation may be one of the mechanisms involved in inefficient oxidative phosphorylation and oxidative stress, increasingly recognised as contributors to schizophrenia pathogenesis.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 4 October 2011; doi:10.1038\\/mp.2011.129.

  1. Tim50a, a nuclear isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, interacts with proteins involved in snRNP biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Melvin L

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cajal body (CB is a nuclear suborganelle involved in the biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs, which are vital for pre-mRNA splicing. Newly imported Sm-class snRNPs traffic through CBs, where the snRNA component of the snRNP is modified, and then target to other nuclear domains such as speckles and perichromatin fibrils. It is not known how nascent snRNPs localize to the CB and are released from this structure after modification. The marker protein for CBs, coilin, may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given that it can interact with snRNPs and SMN, the protein mutated in Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Loss of coilin function in mice leads to significant viability and fertility problems and altered CB formation. Results In this report, we identify a minor isoform of the mitochondrial Tim50, Tim50a, as a coilin interacting protein. The Tim50a transcript can be detected in some cancer cell lines and normal brain tissue. The Tim50a protein differs only from Tim50 in that it contains an additional 103 aa N-terminal to the translation start of Tim50. Importantly, a putative nuclear localization signal is found within these 103 residues. In contrast to Tim50, which localizes to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, Tim50a is strictly nuclear and is enriched in speckles with snRNPs. In addition to coilin, Tim50a interacts with snRNPs and SMN. Competition binding experiments demonstrate that coilin competes with Sm proteins of snRNPs and SMN for binding sites on Tim50a. Conclusion Tim50a may play a role in snRNP biogenesis given its cellular localization and protein interaction characteristics. We hypothesize that Tim50a takes part in the release of snRNPs and SMN from the CB.

  2. Dual Targeting of the Protein Methyltransferase PrmA Contributes to Both Chloroplastic and Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L11 Methylation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoleni, Meryl; Figuet, Sylvie; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Mininno, Morgane; Gilgen, Annabelle; Leroux, Mélanie; Brugière, Sabine; Tardif, Marianne; Alban, Claude; Ravanel, Stéphane

    2015-09-01

    Methylation of ribosomal proteins has long been described in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, but our knowledge about the enzymes responsible for these modifications in plants is scarce. The bacterial protein methyltransferase PrmA catalyzes the trimethylation of ribosomal protein L11 (RPL11) at three distinct sites. The role of these modifications is still unknown. Here, we show that PrmA from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPrmA) is dually targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria. Mass spectrometry and enzymatic assays indicated that the enzyme methylates RPL11 in plasto- and mitoribosomes in vivo. We determined that the Arabidopsis and Escherichia coli PrmA enzymes share similar product specificity, making trimethylated residues, but, despite an evolutionary relationship, display a difference in substrate site specificity. In contrast to the bacterial enzyme that trimethylates the ε-amino group of two lysine residues and the N-terminal α-amino group, AtPrmA methylates only one lysine in the MAFCK(D/E)(F/Y)NA motif of plastidial and mitochondrial RPL11. The plant enzyme possibly methylates the N-terminus of plastidial RPL11, whereas mitochondrial RPL11 is N-α-acetylated by an unknown acetyltransferase. Lastly, we found that an Arabidopsis prma-null mutant is viable in standard environmental conditions and no molecular defect could be associated with a lack of RPL11 methylation in leaf chloroplasts or mitochondria. However, the conservation of PrmA during the evolution of photosynthetic eukaryotes together with the location of methylated residues at the binding site of translation factors to ribosomes suggests that RPL11 methylation in plant organelles could be involved, in combination with other post-translational modifications, in optimizing ribosome function. PMID:26116422

  3. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABPPM) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABPPM have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABPPM reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of [3H]oleate but not that of [35S]sulfobromophthalein or [14C]taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABPPM can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABPPM and mGOT are closely related

  4. Treatment of human astrocytoma U87 cells with silicon dioxide nanoparticles lowers their survival and alters their expression of mitochondrial and cell signaling proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James CK Lai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available James CK Lai1, Gayathri Ananthakrishnan1,2, Sirisha Jandhyam1, Vikas V Dukhande1, Alok Bhushan1, Mugdha Gokhale1, Christopher K Daniels1, Solomon W Leung31Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy and Biomedical Research Institute, 2Department of Health and Nutrition Sciences, Kasiska College of Health Professions, 3Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, College of Engineering and Biomedical Research Institute, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID, USAAbstract: Recent evidence suggests silicon dioxide micro- and nanoparticles induce cytotoxic effects on lung cells. Thus, there is an increasing concern regarding their potential health hazard. Nevertheless, the putative toxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells has not yet been systematically investigated. We previously noted that several metallic oxide nanoparticles exert differential cytotoxic effects on human neural and nonneural cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that silicon dioxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in U87 cells by lowering their survival by decreasing cell survival signaling and disturbing mitochondrial function. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the activities of the key mitochondrial enzymes, citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase, in astrocytoma U87 cells treated with silicon dioxide nanoparticles. In addition, we studied the expression of the mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins, cytochrome C oxidase II and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH dehydrogenase subunit 6, and cell signaling pathway protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphorylated ERK in treated U87 cells. The activated form of ERK controls cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. In parallel, we determined survival of U87 cells after treating them with various concentrations of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. Our results indicated that treatment with silicon dioxide nanoparticles induced decreases in U87 cell survival

  5. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter-Dennerlein, R.; Dennerlein Sven, S.; Rehling, P

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial- encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisin...

  6. Mitochondrial uncoupler carbonyl cyanide M-chlorophenylhydrazone induces the multimer assembly and activity of repair enzyme protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanélus, Irvens; Desrosiers, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    The protein L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) repairs damaged aspartyl residues in proteins. It is commonly described as a cytosolic protein highly expressed in brain tissues. Here, we report that PIMT is an active monomeric as well as a multimeric protein in mitochondria isolated from neuroblastoma cells. Upon treatments with mitochondrial uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), PIMT monomers level decreased by half while that of PIMT multimers was higher. Gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions of CCCP-induced PIMT multimers led to PIMT monomers accumulation, indicating that multimers resulted from disulfide-linked PIMT monomers. The antioxidant ascorbic acid significantly lowered CCCP-induced formation of PIMT multimers, suggesting that reactive oxygen species contributed to PIMT multimerization. In addition, the elevation of PIMT multimers catalytic activity upon treatments with CCCP was severely inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. This indicated that PIMT monomers have lower enzymatic activity following CCCP treatments and that activation of PIMT multimers is essentially dependent on the formation of disulfide-linked monomers of PIMT. Furthermore, the perturbation of mitochondrial function by CCCP promoted the accumulation of damaged aspartyl residues in proteins with high molecular weights. Thus, this study demonstrates the formation of active PIMT multimers associated with mitochondria that could play a key role in repairing damaged proteins accumulating during mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23319267

  7. G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a novel regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis in heart

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Jinjiang; Xu, Xiangbin; Getman, Michael R.; Shi, Xi; Belmonte, Stephen L.; Michaloski, Heidi; Mohan, Amy; Blaxall, Burns C.; Berk, Bradford C.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-kinase interacting protein-1 (GIT1) is a multi-function scaffold protein. However, little is known about its physiological role in the heart. Here we sought to identify the cardiac function of GIT1. Global GIT1 knockout (KO) mice were generated and exhibited significant cardiac hypertrophy that progressed to heart failure. Electron microscopy revealed that the hearts of GIT1 KO mice demonstrated significant morphological abnormities in mitochondria, including...

  8. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  9. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  10. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria. PMID:26537562

  11. Skeletal muscle Sirt3 expression and mitochondrial respiration are regulated by a prenatal low protein diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnutrition during the fetal growth period increases risk for later obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have shown that a prenatal low protein (8% protein; LP) diet followed by postnatal high fat (45% fat; HF) diet results in offspring propensity for adipose tissue catch-up growth, obes...

  12. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Der-Fen; Norris, Kristi L.; Youle, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy cells, mitochondria continually divide and fuse to form a dynamic interconnecting network. The molecular machinery that mediates this organelle fission and fusion is necessary to maintain mitochondrial integrity, perhaps by facilitating DNA or protein quality control. This network disintegrates during apoptosis at the time of cytochrome c release and prior to caspase activation, yielding more numerous and smaller mitochondria. Recent work shows that proteins involved in mitochondri...

  14. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.;

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  15. Boymaw, overexpressed in brains with major psychiatric disorders, may encode a small protein to inhibit mitochondrial function and protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohu; Kim, Minjung; Higa, Kerin K; Zhou, Xianjin

    2015-06-01

    The t(1,11) chromosome translocation co-segregates with major psychiatric disorders in a large Scottish family. The translocation disrupts the DISC1and Boymaw (DISC1FP1) genes on chromosomes 1 and 11, respectively. After translocation, two fusion genes are generated. Our recent studies found that the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein is localized in mitochondria and inhibits oxidoreductase activity, rRNA expression, and protein translation. Mice carrying the DISC1-Boymaw fusion genes display intermediate behavioral phenotypes related to major psychiatric disorders. Here, we report that the Boymaw gene may encode a small protein predominantly localized in mitochondria. The Boymaw protein inhibits oxidoreductase activity, rRNA expression, and protein translation in the same way as the DISC1-Boymaw fusion protein. Interestingly, Boymaw expression is up-regulated by different stressors at RNA and/or protein translational levels. In addition, we found that Boymaw RNA expression is significantly increased in the postmortem brains of patients with major psychiatric disorders. Our studies therefore suggest that the Boymaw gene could potentially be a susceptibility gene for major psychiatric disorders in both the Scottish t(1,11) family and the general population of patients. PMID:25943690

  16. Mitochondrial localization, ELK-1 transcriptional regulation and Growth inhibitory functions of BRCA1, BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, Anna W; Lewis, Catherine; Begum, Nurjahan; Xu, Jingyao; Cui, Jianqi; Chipitsyna, Galina; Aysola, Kartik; Reddy, Vaishali; Bhat, Ganapathy; Fujimura, Yasuo; Henderson, Beric; Reddy, E. Shyam P.; Rao, Veena N.

    2009-01-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated in families with breast and ovarian cancer. Several BRCA1 splice variants are found in different tissues, but their subcellular localization and functions are poorly understood at the moment. We previously described BRCA1 splice variant BRCA1a to induce apoptosis and function as a tumor suppressor of triple negative breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this study we have analyzed the function of BRCA1 isoforms (BRCA1a and BRCA1b) and compared them to the wild type BRCA1 protein using several criteria like studying expression in normal and tumor cells by RNase protection assays, sub cellular localization/fractionation by immunofluorescence microscopy and western blot analysis, transcription regulation of biological relevant proteins and growth suppression in breast cancer cells. We are demonstrating for the first time that ectopically expressed GFP-tagged BRCA1, BRCA1a, and BRCA1b proteins are localized to the mitochondria, repress ELK-1 transcriptional activity and possess antiproliferative activity on breast cancer cells. These results suggest that the exon 9,10 and 11 sequences (aa 263 – 1365) which contain two nuclear localization signals, p53, Rb, c-Myc, γ- tubulin, Stat, Rad 51, Rad 50 binding domains, angiopoietin-1 repression domain are not absolutely required for mitochondrial localization and growth suppressor function of these proteins. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of cancer, we can speculate that the mitochondrial localization of BRCA1 proteins may be functionally significant in regulating both the mitochondrial DNA damage as well as apoptotic activity of BRCA1 proteins and mislocalization causes cancer. PMID:19170108

  17. Variability within a pea core collection of LEAM and HSP22, two mitochondrial seed proteins involved in stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Payet, Nicole; Lalanne, David; Neveu, Martine; Tolleter, Dimitri; Burstin, Judith; Macherel, David

    2015-07-01

    LEAM, a late embryogenesis abundant protein, and HSP22, a small heat shock protein, were shown to accumulate in the mitochondria during pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed development, where they are expected to contribute to desiccation tolerance. Here, their expression was examined in seeds of 89 pea genotypes by Western blot analysis. All genotypes expressed LEAM and HSP22 in similar amounts. In contrast with HSP22, LEAM displayed different isoforms according to apparent molecular mass. Each of the 89 genotypes harboured a single LEAM isoform. Genomic and RT-PCR analysis revealed four LEAM genes differing by a small variable indel in the coding region. These variations were consistent with the apparent molecular mass of each isoform. Indels, which occurred in repeated domains, did not alter the main properties of LEAM. Structural modelling indicated that the class A α-helix structure, which allows interactions with the mitochondrial inner membrane in the dry state, was preserved in all isoforms, suggesting functionality is maintained. The overall results point out the essential character of LEAM and HSP22 in pea seeds. LEAM variability is discussed in terms of pea breeding history as well as LEA gene evolution mechanisms. PMID:25367071

  18. γ-Synuclein antibodies have neuroprotective potential on neuroretinal cells via proteins of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Wilding

    Full Text Available The family of synuclein proteins (α, β and γ are related to neurodegenerative disease e.g. Parkinson disease and Morbus Alzheimer. Additionally, a connection between γ-synuclein and glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, which finally leads to blindness, exists. The reason for the development of glaucoma is still unknown. Recent studies evaluating the participation of immunological components, demonstrate complex changed antibody reactivities in glaucoma patients in comparison to healthy people, showing not only up-regulations (e.g. alpha-fodrin antibody but also down-regulations (e.g. γ-synuclein antibody of antibodies in glaucoma patients. Up-regulated antibodies could be auto-aggressive, but the role of down-regulated antibodies is still unclear. Previous studies show a significant influence of the serum and the antibodies of glaucoma patients on protein expression profiles of neuroretinal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of γ-synuclein antibody on the viability and reactive oxygen species levels of a neuroretinal cell line (RGC-5 as well as their interaction with cellular proteins. We found a protective effect of γ-synuclein antibody resulting in an increased viability (up to 15% and decreased reactive oxygen species levels (up to -12% of glutamate and oxidative stressed RGC-5. These can be traced back to anti-apoptotic altered protein expressions in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway indicated by mass spectrometry and validated by microarray analysis such as active caspase 3, bcl-2 associated-x-protein, S100A4, voltage-dependent anion channel, extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (down-regulated and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 6, phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (up-regulated. These changed protein expression are triggered by the γ-synuclein antibody internalization of RGC-5 we could see in immunohistochemical

  19. γ-Synuclein antibodies have neuroprotective potential on neuroretinal cells via proteins of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Corina; Bell, Katharina; Beck, Sabine; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H

    2014-01-01

    The family of synuclein proteins (α, β and γ) are related to neurodegenerative disease e.g. Parkinson disease and Morbus Alzheimer. Additionally, a connection between γ-synuclein and glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, which finally leads to blindness, exists. The reason for the development of glaucoma is still unknown. Recent studies evaluating the participation of immunological components, demonstrate complex changed antibody reactivities in glaucoma patients in comparison to healthy people, showing not only up-regulations (e.g. alpha-fodrin antibody) but also down-regulations (e.g. γ-synuclein antibody) of antibodies in glaucoma patients. Up-regulated antibodies could be auto-aggressive, but the role of down-regulated antibodies is still unclear. Previous studies show a significant influence of the serum and the antibodies of glaucoma patients on protein expression profiles of neuroretinal cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of γ-synuclein antibody on the viability and reactive oxygen species levels of a neuroretinal cell line (RGC-5) as well as their interaction with cellular proteins. We found a protective effect of γ-synuclein antibody resulting in an increased viability (up to 15%) and decreased reactive oxygen species levels (up to -12%) of glutamate and oxidative stressed RGC-5. These can be traced back to anti-apoptotic altered protein expressions in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway indicated by mass spectrometry and validated by microarray analysis such as active caspase 3, bcl-2 associated-x-protein, S100A4, voltage-dependent anion channel, extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (down-regulated) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing protein 6, phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase (up-regulated). These changed protein expression are triggered by the γ-synuclein antibody internalization of RGC-5 we could see in immunohistochemical stainings

  20. Bax/Bak-dependent, Drp1-independent Targeting of X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP) into Inner Mitochondrial Compartments Counteracts Smac/DIABLO-dependent Effector Caspase Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Brady, Nathan Ryan

    2015-09-01

    Efficient apoptosis requires Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), which releases death-promoting proteins cytochrome c and Smac to the cytosol, which activate apoptosis and inhibit X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) suppression of executioner caspases, respectively. We recently identified that in response to Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins and mitochondrial depolarization, XIAP can permeabilize and enter mitochondria. Consequently, XIAP E3 ligase activity recruits endolysosomes into mitochondria, resulting in Smac degradation. Here, we explored mitochondrial XIAP action within the intrinsic apoptosis signaling pathway. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that mitochondrial XIAP entry requires Bax or Bak and is antagonized by pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins. Moreover, intramitochondrial Smac degradation by XIAP occurs independently of Drp1-regulated cytochrome c release. Importantly, mitochondrial XIAP actions are activated cell-intrinsically by typical apoptosis inducers TNF and staurosporine, and XIAP overexpression reduces the lag time between the administration of an apoptotic stimuli and the onset of mitochondrial permeabilization. To elucidate the role of mitochondrial XIAP action during apoptosis, we integrated our findings within a mathematical model of intrinsic apoptosis signaling. Simulations suggest that moderate increases of XIAP, combined with mitochondrial XIAP preconditioning, would reduce MOMP signaling. To test this scenario, we pre-activated XIAP at mitochondria via mitochondrial depolarization or by artificially targeting XIAP to the intermembrane space. Both approaches resulted in suppression of TNF-mediated caspase activation. Taken together, we propose that XIAP enters mitochondria through a novel mode of mitochondrial permeabilization and through Smac degradation can compete with canonical MOMP to act as an anti-apoptotic tuning mechanism, reducing the mitochondrial contribution to the

  1. Rhein Protects Pancreatic β-Cells From Dynamin-Related Protein-1–Mediated Mitochondrial Fission and Cell Apoptosis Under Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhaohong; Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Mingchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Fan, Yun; Shi, Shaolin; Zen, Ke; Liu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Rhein, an anthraquinone compound isolated from rhubarb, has been shown to improve glucose metabolism disorders in diabetic mice. The mechanism underlying the protective effect of rhein, however, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that rhein can protect the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced cell apoptosis through stabilizing mitochondrial morphology. Oral administration of rhein for 8 or 16 weeks in db/db mice significantly reduced fasting blood glucose (FBG) level and improved glucose tolerance. Cell apoptosis assay using both pancreatic sections and cultured pancreatic β-cells indicated that rhein strongly inhibited β-cell apoptosis. Morphological study showed that rhein was mainly localized at β-cell mitochondria and rhein could preserve mitochondrial ultrastructure by abolishing hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) expression. Western blot and functional analysis confirmed that rhein protected the pancreatic β-cells against hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis via suppressing mitochondrial Drp1 level. Finally, mechanistic study further suggested that decreased Drp1 level by rhein might be due to its effect on reducing cellular reactive oxygen species. Taken together, our study demonstrates for the first time that rhein can serve as a novel therapeutic agent for hyperglycemia treatment and rhein protects pancreatic β-cells from apoptosis by blocking the hyperglycemia-induced Drp1 expression. PMID:23919963

  2. Purification of Mitochondrial Proteins HSP60 and ATP Synthase from Ascidian Eggs: Implications for Antibody Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Chenevert, Janet; Pruliere, Gerard; Ishii, Hirokazu; Sardet, Christian; Nishikata, Takahito

    2013-01-01

    Use of antibodies is a cornerstone of biological studies and it is important to identify the recognized protein with certainty. Generally an antibody is considered specific if it labels a single band of the expected size in the tissue of interest, or has a strong affinity for the antigen produced in a heterologous system. The identity of the antibody target protein is rarely confirmed by purification and sequencing, however in many cases this may be necessary. In this study we sought to chara...

  3. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  4. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  5. Reverse transcription of the pFOXC mitochondrial retroplasmids of Fusarium oxysporum is protein primed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan Jeffrey T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pFOXC retroplasmids are small, autonomously replicating DNA molecules found in mitochondria of certain strains of the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and are among the first linear genetic elements shown to replicate via reverse transcription. The plasmids have a unique clothespin structure that includes a 5'-linked protein and telomere-like terminal repeats, with pFOXC2 and pFOXC3 having iterative copies of a 5 bp sequence. The plasmids contain a single large open reading frame (ORF encoding an active reverse transcriptase (RT. The pFOXC-RT is associated with the plasmid transcript in a ribonucleoprotein (RNP complex and can synthesize full-length (- strand cDNA products. In reactions containing partially purified RT preparations with exogenous RNAs, the pFOXC3-RT has been shown to initiate cDNA synthesis by use of snapped-back RNAs, as well as loosely associated DNA primers. Results The complete sequence of the distantly related pFOXC1 plasmid was determined and found to terminate in 3-5 copies of a 3 bp sequence. Unexpectedly, the majority of (- strand cDNA molecules produced from endogenous pFOXC1 transcripts were attached to protein. In vitro experiments using partially purified pFOXC3-RT preparations having a single radiolabeled deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP generated a nucleotide-labeled protein that migrated at the size of the pFOXC-RT. The nucleotide preference of deoxynucleotidylation differed between pFOXC3 and pFOXC1 and showed complementarity to the respective 3' terminal repeats. In reactions that include exogenous RNA templates corresponding to the 3' end of pFOXC1, a protein-linked cDNA product was generated following deoxynucleotidylation, suggesting that reverse transcription initiates with a protein primer. Conclusions The finding that reverse transcription is protein primed suggests the pFOXC retroplasmids may have an evolutionary relationship with hepadnaviruses, the only other

  6. Formation of a Stabilized Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Is Critical for the Mitochondrial Function of the Parkinsonism Protein DJ-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackinton, Jeff; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Thomas, Kelly J.; Ahmad, Rili; Greggio, Elisa; Raza, Ashraf S.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.; (NIH); (UNL)

    2009-03-02

    The formation of cysteine-sulfinic acid has recently become appreciated as a modification that links protein function to cellular oxidative status. Human DJ-1, a protein associated with inherited parkinsonism, readily forms cysteine-sulfinic acid at a conserved cysteine residue (Cys{sup 106} in human DJ-1). Mutation of Cys{sup 106} causes the protein to lose its normal protective function in cell culture and model organisms. However, it is unknown whether the loss of DJ-1 protective function in these mutants is due to the absence of Cys{sup 106} oxidation or the absence of the cysteine residue itself. To address this question, we designed a series of substitutions at a proximal glutamic acid residue (Glu{sup 18}) in human DJ-1 that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys{sup 106} through changes in hydrogen bonding. We show that two mutations, E18N and E18Q, allow Cys{sup 106} to be oxidized to Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid under mild conditions. In contrast, the E18D mutation stabilizes a cysteine-sulfenic acid that is readily reduced to the thiol in solution and in vivo. We show that E18N and E18Q can both partially substitute for wild-type DJ-1 using mitochondrial fission and cell viability assays. In contrast, the oxidatively impaired E18D mutant behaves as an inactive C106A mutant and fails to protect cells. We therefore conclude that formation of Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid is a key modification that regulates the protective function of DJ-1.

  7. Bifunctional Chelates for Metal Nuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    The use of “non-standard” metallic radionuclides continues to be an expanding field of investigation. Radiolabeling small molecules, peptides, proteins, and up to nano-particles are all areas of active investigation for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. All require a common variable – the need for appropriate chelation chemistry for adequate sequestration of the metallic radionuclide that is equal to the intended application. A brief overview of the array of the chelation chemistr...

  8. Alterations in expression levels of deafness dystonia protein 1 affect mitochondrial morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engl, Gertraud; Florian, Stefan; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Deafness-Dystonia-Optic Neuropathy (DDON) Syndrome is a rare X-linked progressive neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in the TIMM8A gene encoding for the deafness dystonia protein 1 (DDP1). Despite important progress in identifying and characterizing novel mutations in this gene...

  9. Identification of stress-induced mitochondrial proteins in cultured tobacco cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, Tomáš; Honys, David; Witters, E.; Čapková, Věra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 124, č. 1 (2005), s. 12-24. ISSN 0031-9317 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK5052113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : HEAT-SHOCK-PROTEIN * ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA L * POLYACRYLAMIDE -GELS Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.112, year: 2005

  10. Mitochondrial ADCK3 employs an atypical protein kinase-like fold to enable coenzyme Q biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefely, Jonathan A.; Reidenbach, Andrew G.; Ulbrich, Arne; Oruganty, Krishnadev; Floyd, Brendan J.; Jochem, Adam; Saunders, Jaclyn M.; Johnson, Isabel E.; Minogue, Catherine E.; Wrobel, Russell L.; Barber, Grant E.; Lee, David; Li, Sheng; Kannan, Natarajan; Coon, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Pagliarini, David J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ancient UbiB protein kinase-like family is involved in isoprenoid lipid biosynthesis and is implicated in human diseases, but demonstration of UbiB kinase activity has remained elusive for unknown reasons. Here, we quantitatively define UbiB-specific sequence motifs and reveal their positions within the crystal structure of a UbiB protein, ADCK3. We find that multiple UbiB-specific features are poised to inhibit protein kinase activity, including an N-terminal domain that occupies the typical substrate binding pocket and a unique A-rich loop that limits ATP binding by establishing an unusual selectivity for ADP. A single alanine-to-glycine mutation of this loop flips this coenzyme selectivity and enables autophosphorylation, but inhibits coenzyme Q biosynthesis in vivo, demonstrating functional relevance for this unique feature. Our work provides mechanistic insight into UbiB enzyme activity and establishes a molecular foundation for further investigation of how UbiB family proteins affect diseases and diverse biological pathways. PMID:25498144

  11. Co-ordinate control of synthesis of mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial hemoproteins: a binding site for the HAP1 (CYP1) protein in the UAS region of the yeast catalase T gene (CTT1).

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, H.; Adam, G.; Mattes, E; Schanz, M.; Hartig, A; Ruis, H

    1988-01-01

    Control of expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTT1 (catalase T) gene by the HAP1 (CYP1) gene, a mediator of heme control of mitochondrial cytochromes, was studied. Expression of a CTT1-lacZ fusion in a hap1 mutant showed that the CTT1 promoter is under HAP1 control. As demonstrated by a gel retardation assay, the HAP1 protein binds to a heme control region of the CTT1 gene. This binding in vitro is stimulated by hemin. The HAP1-binding sequence was localized by using DNA fragments spa...

  12. The effects of aging, physical training, and a single bout of exercise on mitochondrial protein expression in human skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Bori, Zoltan; Zhao, Zhongfu; Koltai, Erika; Fatouros, Ioannis G.; JAMURTAS, ATHANASIOS Z.; Douroudos, Ioannis I.; Terzis, Gerasimos; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Sovatzidis, Apostolos; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Aging results in a significant decline in aerobic capacity and impaired mitochondrial function. We have tested the effects of moderate physical activity on aerobic capacity and a single bout of exercise on the expression profile of mitochondrial biogenesis, and fusion and fission related genes in skeletal muscle of human subjects. Physical activity attenuated the aging-associated decline in VO2 max (p

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 μM concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTPγS or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  14. Inhibition of mitochondrial division through covalent modification of Drp1 protein by 15 deoxy-{Delta}{sup 12,14}-prostaglandin J2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Nandita [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Kar, Rekha [Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Singha, Prajjal K. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Venkatachalam, Manjeri A. [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); McEwen, Donald G. [Greehey Children' s Cancer Research Institute, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Saikumar, Pothana, E-mail: saikumar@uthscsa.edu [Department of Pathology, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2010-04-23

    Arachidonic acid derived endogenous electrophile 15d-PGJ2 has gained much attention in recent years due to its potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions mediated through thiol modification of cysteine residues in its target proteins. Here, we show that 15d-PGJ2 at 1 {mu}M concentration converts normal mitochondria into large elongated and interconnected mitochondria through direct binding to mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and partial inhibition of its GTPase activity. Mitochondrial elongation induced by 15d-PGJ2 is accompanied by increased assembly of Drp1 into large oligomeric complexes through plausible intermolecular interactions. The role of decreased GTPase activity of Drp1 in the formation of large oligomeric complexes is evident when Drp1 is incubated with a non-cleavable GTP analog, GTP{gamma}S or by a mutation that inactivated GTPase activity of Drp1 (K38A). The mutation of cysteine residue (Cys644) in the GTPase effector domain, a reported target for modification by reactive electrophiles, to alanine mimicked K38A mutation induced Drp1 oligomerization and mitochondrial elongation, suggesting the importance of cysteine in GED to regulate the GTPase activity and mitochondrial morphology. Interestingly, treatment of K38A and C644A mutants with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in super oligomerization of both mutant Drp1s indicating that 15d-PGJ2 may further stabilize Drp1 oligomers formed by loss of GTPase activity through covalent modification of middle domain cysteine residues. The present study documents for the first time the regulation of a mitochondrial fission activity by a prostaglandin, which will provide clues for understanding the pathological and physiological consequences of accumulation of reactive electrophiles during oxidative stress, inflammation and degeneration.

  15. PI3K inhibitors prime neuroblastoma cells for chemotherapy by shifting the balance towards pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and enhanced mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, A; Opel, D; Naumann, I; Kappler, R; Friedman, L; von Schweinitz, D; Debatin, K-M; Fulda, S

    2011-01-27

    We recently identified activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/Akt as a novel predictor of poor outcome in neuroblastoma. Here, we investigated the effect of small-molecule PI3K inhibitors on chemosensitivity. We provide first evidence that PI3K inhibitors, for example PI103, synergize with various chemotherapeutics (Doxorubicin, Etoposide, Topotecan, Cisplatin, Vincristine and Taxol) to trigger apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells (combination index: high synergy). Mechanistic studies reveal that PI103 cooperates with Doxorubicin to reduce Mcl-1 expression and Bim(EL) phosphorylation and to upregulate Noxa and Bim(EL) levels. This shifted ratio of pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins results in increased Bax/Bak conformational change, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, caspase activation and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Although Mcl-1 knockdown enhances Doxorubicin- and PI103-induced apoptosis, silencing of Noxa, Bax/Bak or p53 reduces apoptosis, underscoring the functional relevance of the Doxorubicin- and PI103-mediated modulation of these proteins for chemosensitization. Bcl-2 overexpression inhibits Bax activation, mitochondrial perturbations, cleavage of caspases and Bid, and apoptosis, confirming the central role of the mitochondrial pathway for chemosensitization. Interestingly, the broad-range caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk does not interfere with Bax activation or mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, whereas it blocks caspase activation and apoptosis, thus placing mitochondrial events upstream of caspase activation. Importantly, PI103 and Doxorubicin cooperate to induce apoptosis and to suppress tumor growth in patients' derived primary neuroblastoma cells and in an in vivo neuroblastoma model, underlining the clinical relevance of the results. Thus, targeting PI3K presents a novel and promising strategy to sensitize neuroblastoma cells for chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, which has important implications for the

  16. Crystallization of Mitochondrial Respiratory Complex II fromChicken Heart: A Membrane-Protein Complex Diffracting to 2.0Angstrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Borders, Toni M.; Shen, John T.; Wang, Chung-Jen; Berry, Edward A.

    2004-12-17

    Procedure is presented for preparation of diffraction-quality crystals of a vertebrate mitochondrial respiratory Complex II. The crystals have the potential to diffract to at least 2.0 Angstrom with optimization of post-crystal-growth treatment and cryoprotection. This should allow determination of the structure of this important and medically relevant membrane protein complex at near-atomic resolution and provide great detail of the mode of binding of substrates and inhibitors at the two substrate-binding sites.

  17. Revealing pancrustacean relationships: Phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal protein genes places Collembola (springtails) in a monophyletic Hexapoda and reinforces the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mariën J; Roelofs D; Timmermans MJTN; Straalen NM van

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent years, several new hypotheses on phylogenetic relations among arthropods have been proposed on the basis of DNA sequences. One of the challenged hypotheses is the monophyly of hexapods. This discussion originated from analyses based on mitochondrial DNA datasets that, due to an unusual positioning of Collembola, suggested that the hexapod body plan evolved at least twice. Here, we re-evaluate the position of Collembola using ribosomal protein gene sequences. Resu...

  18. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species enhance AMP-activated protein kinase activation in the endothelium of patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, Ruth M.; Salt, Ian P.; Miller, William H.; et al.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the endothelial dysfunction associated with CAD (coronary artery disease) and T2D (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) is concomitant with elevated mtROS (mitochondrial reactive oxygen species) production in the endothelium and establish if this, in turn, regulates the activity of endothelial AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). We investigated endothelial function, mtROS production and AMPK activation in saphenous veins from patients with advanced ...

  19. The effect of down-regulation of mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 on respiratory complexes in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zíková, Alena; Horáková, Eva; Jirků, Milan; Dunajčíková, P.; Lukeš, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2006), s. 65-73. ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5022302; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Grant ostatní: National Institutes of Health(US) 5R03TW6445-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA -binding protein * RNA interference * mitochondrial respiratory chain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2006

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 392180 [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_07113914.1 1117:24513 1150:7038 1158:3915 272129:3709 Bifunctional protein birA (Includes: Biotin ... otin operon repressor; Biotin --(acetyl-CoA-carboxylase) synthetase (Biotin --prot ...

  1. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper;

    ) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber...

  2. Mitochondrial transcript maturation and its disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Van Haute, Lindsey; Pearce, Sarah F.; Powell, Christopher A.; D’Souza, Aaron R.; Nicholls, Thomas J.; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical presentations owing to defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrially-targeted proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial biology including expression of mtDNA-encoded genes. Expression of the mi...

  3. Reverse transcription of the pFOXC mitochondrial retroplasmids of Fusarium oxysporum is protein primed

    OpenAIRE

    Galligan Jeffrey T; Marchetti Sarah E; Kennell John C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The pFOXC retroplasmids are small, autonomously replicating DNA molecules found in mitochondria of certain strains of the filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and are among the first linear genetic elements shown to replicate via reverse transcription. The plasmids have a unique clothespin structure that includes a 5'-linked protein and telomere-like terminal repeats, with pFOXC2 and pFOXC3 having iterative copies of a 5 bp sequence. The plasmids contain a single large op...

  4. Mitochondrial and Nucleolar Localization of Cysteine Desulfurase Nfs and the Scaffold Protein Isu in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Julie; Horáková, Eva; Changmai, Piya; Vancová, Marie; Lukeš, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2014), s. 353-362. ISSN 1535-9778 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : transfer RNA * iron sulfur protein * blood stream forms Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.820, year: 2014

  5. NOA1 is an essential GTPase required for mitochondrial protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kolanczyk, M; Pech, M.; Zemojtel, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Mikula, I.; Calvaruso, M.A.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; R. Richter; Fischer, B.; Ritz, A.; Kossler, N.; Thurisch, B; Spoerle, R.; Smeitink, J A; Kornak, U.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide associated-1 (NOA1) is an evolutionarily conserved guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding protein that localizes predominantly to mitochondria in mammalian cells. On the basis of bioinformatic analysis, we predicted its possible involvement in ribosomal biogenesis, although this had not been supported by any experimental evidence. Here we determine NOA1 function through generation of knockout mice and in vitro assays. NOA1-deficient mice exhibit midgestation lethality associated wi...

  6. Augmenting energy expenditure by mitochondrial uncoupling: a role of AMP-activated protein kinase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klaus, S.; Keipert, S.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecký, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2012), s. 369-386. ISSN 1555-8932 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS10528; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10059; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * skeletal muscle * uncoupling protein * transgenic mice * insulin sensitivity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.329, year: 2012

  7. A properly configured ring structure is critical for the function of the mitochondrial DNA recombination protein, Mgm101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardozzi, Jonathan D; Wang, Xiaowen; Mbantenkhu, MacMillan; Wilkens, Stephan; Chen, Xin Jie

    2012-10-26

    Mgm101 is a Rad52-type recombination protein of bacteriophage origin required for the repair and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It forms large oligomeric rings of ∼14-fold symmetry that catalyze the annealing of single-stranded DNAs in vitro. In this study, we investigated the structural elements that contribute to this distinctive higher order structural organization and examined its functional implications. A pair of vicinal cysteines, Cys-216 and Cys-217, was found to be essential for mtDNA maintenance. Mutations to the polar serine, the negatively charged aspartic and glutamic acids, and the hydrophobic amino acid alanine all destabilize mtDNA in vivo. The alanine mutants have an increased propensity of forming macroscopic filaments. In contrast, mutations to aspartic acid drastically destabilize the protein and result in unstructured aggregates with severely reduced DNA binding activity. Interestingly, the serine mutants partially disassemble the Mgm101 rings into smaller oligomers. In the case of the C216S mutant, a moderate increase in DNA binding activity was observed. By using small angle x-ray scattering analysis, we found that Mgm101 forms rings of ∼200 Å diameter in solution, consistent with the structure previously established by transmission electron microscopy. We also found that the C216A/C217A double mutant tends to form broken rings, which likely provide free ends for seeding the growth of the super-stable but functionally defective filaments. Taken together, our data underscore the importance of a delicately maintained ring structure critical for Mgm101 activity. We discuss a potential role of Cys-216 and Cys-217 in regulating Mgm101 function and the repair of damaged mtDNA under stress conditions. PMID:22948312

  8. Effects of carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII on human cells harbouring an A8344G mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tze-Kai; Cheng, Che-Kun; Chi, Tang-Hao; Ma, Yi-Shing; Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei; Hsieh, Mingli

    2014-04-01

    MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged-red fibres) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with various syndromes involving both muscular and nervous systems. The most common mutation in MERRF syndrome, the A8344G mutation in mtDNA, has been associated with severe defects in the respiratory function of mitochondria. In the present study, we show that there is a significant decrease in CA8 (carbonic anhydrase-related protein VIII) in cybrids harbouring the MERRF A8344G mutation. CA8 deficiency and mutations were found to be associated with a distinctive lifelong gait disorder in wdl (Waddles) mice and novel syndromes characterized by cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in humans. The results of the present study showed that overexpression of CA8 in MERRF cybrids significantly decreased cell death induced by STS (staurosporine) treatment, suggesting a protective function of CA8 in cells harbouring the A8344G mutation of mtDNA. Interestingly, an increase in the formation of LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II) was found in the cybrids with down-regulated CA8 expression, suggesting that reduced expression of CA8 leads to autophagy activation. Furthermore, cybrids exhibiting down-regulated CA8 showed increased cytosolic Ca2+ signals and reduced levels of phospho-Akt compared with those in the cybrids with overexpressed CA8, indicating that phospho-Akt is involved in the protection of cells by CA8. Our findings suggest that CA8 is involved in the autophagic pathway and may have a protective role in cultured cells from patients with MERRF. Targeting CA8 and the downstream autophagic pathway might help develop therapeutic agents for treatment of MERRF syndrome in the future. PMID:24476000

  9. Uncoupling protein-2 attenuates palmitoleate protection against the cytotoxic production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in INS-1E insulinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Barlow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High glucose and fatty acid levels impair pancreatic beta cell function. We have recently shown that palmitate-induced loss of INS-1E insulinoma cells is related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production as both toxic effects are prevented by palmitoleate. Here we show that palmitate-induced ROS are mostly mitochondrial: oxidation of MitoSOX, a mitochondria-targeted superoxide probe, is increased by palmitate, whilst oxidation of the equivalent non-targeted probe is unaffected. Moreover, mitochondrial respiratory inhibition with antimycin A stimulates palmitate-induced MitoSOX oxidation. We also show that palmitate does not change the level of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 and that UCP2 knockdown does not affect palmitate-induced MitoSOX oxidation. Palmitoleate does not influence MitoSOX oxidation in INS-1E cells ±UCP2 and largely prevents the palmitate-induced effects. Importantly, UCP2 knockdown amplifies the preventive effect of palmitoleate on palmitate-induced ROS. Consistently, viability effects of palmitate and palmitoleate are similar between cells ±UCP2, but UCP2 knockdown significantly augments the palmitoleate protection against palmitate-induced cell loss at high glucose. We conclude that UCP2 neither mediates palmitate-induced mitochondrial ROS generation and the associated cell loss, nor protects against these deleterious effects. Instead, UCP2 dampens palmitoleate protection against palmitate toxicity.

  10. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Mitchell R; Williams, C David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:22980195

  11. G Proteins and their regulators in EGF receptor trafficking and mitochondrial functions

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Tingdong

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms involving heterotrimeric G proteins in the regulation of membrane trafficking are not well understood. Here, we reported G\\[alpha\\]s overexpression promotes ligand-dependent degradation of EGFR and G\\[alpha\\]s knockdown delays receptor degradation through interaction with RGS-PX1 and Hrs on early endosomes. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the function of G\\[alpha\\]s, RGS-PX1 and Hrs in endocytic sorting. To further understand RGS-PX1's role in EGFR trafficking ...

  12. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 gene transcript levels are elevated in maturating erythroid cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flachs, Pavel; Šponarová, Jana; Kopecký, P.; Horváth, Ondřej; Šedivá, A.; Nibbelink, M.; Casteilla, L.; Medříková, Daša; Neckář, Jan; Kolář, František; Kopecký, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 581, č. 6 (2007), s. 1093-1097. ISSN 0014-5793 Grant ostatní: the Wellcome Trust(XE) 070821/Z/03/Z; EARNEST(XE) FOOD-CT-2005-007036 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Source of funding: N - neverejné zdroje ; R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : uncoupling protein 2 * erythropoiesis * hypoxia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.263, year: 2007

  13. Antioxidant and regulatory role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2 in pancreatic beta-cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Petr; Olejár, Tomáš; Smolková, Katarína; Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Špaček, Tomáš; Engstová, Hana; Reguera Pajuelo, David; Jabůrek, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S73-S91. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/1247; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/10/P204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondria * uncoupling protein UCP2 * pancreatic beta-cells * reactive oxygen species * glucose-stimulated insulin secretion Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  14. The mitochondrial protein translocation motor: structural conservation between the human and yeast Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 co-chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Shira; Simian, Dana; Iosefson, Ohad; Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam

    2009-05-01

    Most of our knowledge regarding the process of protein import into mitochondria has come from research employing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Recently, several mammalian homologues of the mitochondrial motor proteins were identified. Of particular interest for us is the human Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 complex. We chose a structural approach in order to examine the evolutionary conservation between yeast Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 proteins and their human homologues. For this purpose, we examined the structural properties of the purified human proteins and their interaction with their yeast homologues, in vitro. Our results show that the soluble domains of the human Tim14/Pam18 and Tim16/Pam16 proteins interact with their yeast counterparts, forming heterodimeric complexes and that these complexes interact with yeast mtHsp70. PMID:19564938

  15. The Mitochondrial Protein Translocation Motor: Structural Conservation between the Human and Yeast Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 co-Chaperones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Elsner

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge regarding the process of protein import into mitochondria has come from research employing Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Recently, several mammalian homologues of the mitochondrial motor proteins were identified. Of particular interest for us is the human Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 complex. We chose a structural approach in order to examine the evolutionary conservation between yeast Tim14/Pam18-Tim16/Pam16 proteins and their human homologues. For this purpose, we examined the structural properties of the purified human proteins and their interaction with their yeast homologues, in vitro. Our results show that the soluble domains of the human Tim14/Pam18 and Tim16/Pam16 proteins interact with their yeast counterparts, forming heterodimeric complexes and that these complexes interact with yeast mtHsp70.

  16. Functional roles of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos T Oliveira

    Full Text Available Biochemical studies of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replisome demonstrate that the mtDNA polymerase and the mtDNA helicase are stimulated by the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB. Unlike Escherichia coli SSB, bacteriophage T7 gp2.5 and bacteriophage T4 gp32, mtSSBs lack a long, negatively charged C-terminal tail. Furthermore, additional residues at the N-terminus (notwithstanding the mitochondrial presequence are present in the sequence of species across the animal kingdom. We sought to analyze the functional importance of the N- and C-terminal regions of the human mtSSB in the context of mtDNA replication. We produced the mature wild-type human mtSSB and three terminal deletion variants, and examined their physical and biochemical properties. We demonstrate that the recombinant proteins adopt a tetrameric form, and bind single-stranded DNA with similar affinities. They also stimulate similarly the DNA unwinding activity of the human mtDNA helicase (up to 8-fold. Notably, we find that unlike the high level of stimulation that we observed previously in the Drosophila system, stimulation of DNA synthesis catalyzed by human mtDNA polymerase is only moderate, and occurs over a narrow range of salt concentrations. Interestingly, each of the deletion variants of human mtSSB stimulates DNA synthesis at a higher level than the wild-type protein, indicating that the termini modulate negatively functional interactions with the mitochondrial replicase. We discuss our findings in the context of species-specific components of the mtDNA replisome, and in comparison with various prokaryotic DNA replication machineries.

  17. Dual Targeting of a Mitochondrial Protein: The Case Study of Cytochrome C1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anja R(o)diger; Bianca Baudisch; Uwe Langner; Ralf Bernd Kl(o)sgen

    2011-01-01

    As a result of the endosymbiotic gene transfer, the majority of proteins of mitochondria and chloroplasts is encoded in the nucleus and synthesized in the cytosol as precursor molecules carrying N-terminal transit peptides for the transport into the respective target organelle. In most instances, transport takes place into either mitochondria or chlor-oplasts, although a few examples of dual targeting into both organelles have been described. Here, we show by a com-bination of three different experimental strategies that also cytochrome c of potato, a component of the respiratory electron transport chain, is imported not only into mitochondria, but also into plastids. In organello import experiments with isolated mitochondria and chloroplasts, which were analyzed in both single and mixed organelle assays, demonstrate that the processing products accumulating after import within the two endosymbiotic organelles are different in size. Dual targeting of cytochrome c is observed also in vivo, after biolistic transformation of leaf epidermal cells with suitable reporter constructions. Finally, Western analyses employing cytochrome c-specific antiserum provide evidence that the protein accumulates in significant amounts in mitochondria and chloroplasts of both pea and spinach. The possible consequences of our findings on the relevance of the dual targeting phenomenon are discussed.

  18. Congenital deficiency of two polypeptide subunits of the iron-protein fragment of mitochondrial complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Cleeter, M W; Ragan, C I; Batshaw, M L; Lehninger, A L

    1987-02-01

    Recently, we described a patient with severe lactic acidosis due to congenital complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) deficiency. We now report further enzymatic and immunological characterizations. Both NADH and ferricyanide titrations of complex I activity (measured as NADH-ferricyanide reductase) were distinctly altered in the mitochondria from the patient's tissues. In addition, antisera against complex I immunoprecipitated NADH-ferricyanide reductase from the control but not the patient's mitochondria. However, immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of complex I polypeptides demonstrated that the majority of the 25 polypeptides comprising complex I were present in the affected mitochondria. A more detailed analysis using subunit selective antisera against the main polypeptides of the iron-protein fragments of complex I revealed a selective absence of the 75- and 13-kD polypeptides. These findings suggest that the underlying basis for this patient's disease was a congenital deficiency of at least two polypeptides comprising the iron-protein fragment of complex I, which resulted in the inability to correctly assemble a functional enzyme complex. PMID:3100577

  19. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  20. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggiano E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Viggiano,1,2 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Fiorenzo Moscatelli,3 Anna Valenzano,3 Domenico Tafuri,4 Giuseppe Cibelli,3 Bruno De Luca,1 Giovanni Messina,1,3 Marcellino Monda1 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, 4Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD, which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. Keywords: cortical spreading depression, neuroprotective effect, uncoupling protein-5

  1. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A 2H and 31P NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-[2-2H1]serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-[11,11-2H2]dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. 2H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed

  2. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in higher brain functions, neuronal plasticity and network oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Hermes

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that disruptions in mitochondrial function may play a critical role in pathophysiology of mental illness. Specifically, we have shown that NMDA driven behavioral, synaptic, and brain oscillatory functions are impaired in UCP2 knockout mice.

  3. Bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen/air electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nano-Silver powder was prepared by chemical method. • Ag catalyst was characterized by SEM and XRD studies. • Ag was investigated as bi-functional electrocatalyst for oxygen/air electrodes. • Ag shows good electrochemical activity towards OER and ORR reactions. - Abstract: Nano-Silver powder has been studied as bi-functional electrocatalyst for both oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline medium. Ag nano-powder has been prepared by a simple wet chemical method with Silver nitrate as precursor and Glucose as reducing agent. X-ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy studies were carried out to characterize the Silver catalyst. Electrochemical oxygen evolution characterization shows anodic peak typically at the range between 0.350 and 0.514 V Vs Hg/HgO corresponding to Silver oxidation followed by the onset of oxygen evolution at 0.706 V. Oxygen reduction reaction studies carried out using Rotating Disc Electrode (RDE) confirm the four electron reaction mechanism. Ag catalyst shows promising characteristics for oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction

  4. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  5. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species are scavenged by Cockayne syndrome B protein in human fibroblasts without nuclear DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaver, James E.; Brennan-Minnella, Angela M.; Swanson, Raymond A.; Fong, Ka-wing; Chen, Junjie; Chou, Kai-ming; Chen, Yih-wen; Revet, Ingrid; Bezrookove, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are often considered a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause damage to cellular components including nuclear DNA. This endogenous damage is thought to underlie neurodegeneration, especially in diseases such as Cockayne syndrome (CS) that lack transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). We find no evidence, however, for any nuclear DNA damage from increased mitochondrial ROS. Our results indicate that the neurodegenerative symptoms in CS may be mitochondrial in origin, in...

  6. The Zinc Finger Protein Mig1 Regulates Mitochondrial Function and Azole Drug Susceptibility in the Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Caza, Mélissa; Hu, Guanggan; Price, Michael; Perfect, John R.; Kronstad, James W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans causes fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. In previous studies, we found that the Hap complex in this pathogen represses genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory functions and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components under low-iron conditions. The orthologous Hap2/3/4/5 complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae exerts a regulatory influence on mitochondrial functions, and Hap4 is subject to glucose repression via ...

  7. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology. PMID:25425472

  8. Serum levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1, leptin, and lipids during late pregnancy and the early postpartum period in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfuso, F; Giannetto, C; Rizzo, M; Fazio, F; Giudice, E; Piccione, G

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and leptin levels as well as of lipid and lipoprotein profiles in mares during the peripartum period. Ten pregnant mares (group A) were monitored from 15 ± 3 days of pregnancy until 15 days after foaling, and 10 nonpregnant nonlactating mares constituted the control (group B). In group A, blood sampling was performed on Days 15 ± 3 and 7 ± 3 before foaling, on the day of foaling, and on Days 7 and 15 after foaling. In group B, blood sampling was performed on the same days as in group A. Serum levels were determined for UCP1, leptin, total lipids, phospholipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol (Total-Chol), high-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs). Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA was applied to evaluate the effects of peripartum period and group membership. All studied parameters except phospholipid levels (P > 0.05) showed significant changes in group A over the peripartum period (P leptin and total lipids, triglycerides, VLDLs, Total-Chol, and LDLs. These changes observed in mares during the peripartum period could represent a response to hormonal and metabolic adaptations occurring during specific physiological conditions such as late pregnancy and early postpartum. These changes should compensate for the energy loss occurring during these particular life phases and ensure a good body condition to protect mares against negative energy balance. PMID:27165993

  9. FoxO proteins' nuclear retention and BH3-only protein Bim induction evoke mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Rizvi, Fatima; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian forkhead-box family members belonging to the 'O' category (FoxO) manipulate a plethora of genes modulating a wide array of cellular functions including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage repair, and energy metabolism. FoxO overexpression and nuclear accumulation have been reported to show correlation with hindered tumor growth in vitro and size in vivo, while FoxO's downregulation via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway has been linked with tumor promotion. In this study, we have explored for the first time intervention of berberine, a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid, with FoxO family proteins in hepatoma cells. We observed that berberine significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of both FoxO1 and FoxO3a. Their phosphorylation-mediated cytoplasmic sequestration followed by degradation was prevented by berberine-induced downmodulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway which promoted FoxO nuclear retention. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene and negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt axis, was upregulated while phosphorylation of its Ser380 residue (possible mechanism of PTEN degradation) was significantly decreased in treated HepG2 cells. Exposure to berberine induced a significant increase in transcriptional activity of FoxO, as shown by GFP reporter assay. FoxO transcription factors effectively heightened BH3-only protein Bim expression, which in turn, being a direct activator of proapoptotic protein Bax, altered Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, culminating into mitochondrial dysfunction, caspases activation, and DNA fragmentation. The pivotal role of Bim in berberine-mediated cytotoxicity was further corroborated by knockdown experiments where Bim-silencing partially restored HepG2 cell viability during berberine exposure. In addition, a correlation between oxidative overload and FoxO's nuclear accumulation via JNK activation was evident as berberine treatment led to a pronounced increase in JNK phosphorylation together with enhanced

  10. cDNA cloning, functional expression and cellular localization of rat liver mitochondrial electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shengbing; SONG Wei; LIN Qishui

    2005-01-01

    A membrane-bound protein was purified from rat liver mitochondria. After being digested with V8 protease, two peptides containing identical 14 amino acid residue sequences were obtained. Using the 14 amino acid peptide derived DNA sequence as gene specific primer, the cDNA of correspondent gene 5'-terminal and 3'-terminal were obtained by RACE technique. The full-length cDNA that encoded a protein of 616 amino acids was thus cloned, which included the above mentioned peptide sequence. The full length cDNA was highly homologous to that of human ETF-QO, indicating that it may be the cDNA of rat ETF-QO. ETF-QO is an iron sulfur protein located in mitochondria inner membrane containing two kinds of redox center: FAD and [4Fe-4S] center. After comparing the sequence from the cDNA of the 616 amino acids protein with that of the mature protein of rat liver mitochondria, it was found that the N terminal 32 amino acid residues did not exist in the mature protein, indicating that the cDNA was that of ETF-Qop. When the cDNA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inducible vectors, the protein product was enriched in mitochondrial fraction and exhibited electron transfer activity (NBT reductase activity) of ETF-QO. Results demonstrated that the 32 amino acid peptide was a mitochondrial targeting peptide, and both FAD and iron-sulfur cluster were inserted properly into the expressed ETF-QO. ETF-QO had a high level expression in rat heart, liver and kidney. The fusion protein of GFP-ETF-QO co-localized with mitochondria in COS-7 cells.

  11. The DYW Subgroup PPR Protein MEF35 Targets RNA Editing Sites in the Mitochondrial rpl16, nad4 and cob mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Brehme

    Full Text Available RNA editing in plant mitochondria and plastids alters specific nucleotides from cytidine (C to uridine (U mostly in mRNAs. A number of PLS-class PPR proteins have been characterized as RNA recognition factors for specific RNA editing sites, all containing a C-terminal extension, the E domain, and some an additional DYW domain, named after the characteristic C-terminal amino acid triplet of this domain. Presently the recognition factors for more than 300 mitochondrial editing sites are still unidentified. In order to characterize these missing factors, the recently proposed computational prediction tool could be of use to assign target RNA editing sites to PPR proteins of yet unknown function. Using this target prediction approach we identified the nuclear gene MEF35 (Mitochondrial Editing Factor 35 to be required for RNA editing at three sites in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana. The MEF35 protein contains eleven PPR repeats and E and DYW extensions at the C-terminus. Two T-DNA insertion mutants, one inserted just upstream and the other inside the reading frame encoding the DYW domain, show loss of editing at a site in each of the mRNAs for protein 16 in the large ribosomal subunit (site rpl16-209, for cytochrome b (cob-286 and for subunit 4 of complex I (nad4-1373, respectively. Editing is restored upon introduction of the wild type MEF35 gene in the reading frame mutant. The MEF35 protein interacts in Y2H assays with the mitochondrial MORF1 and MORF8 proteins, mutation of the latter also influences editing at two of the three MEF35 target sites. Homozygous mutant plants develop indistinguishably from wild type plants, although the RPL16 and COB/CYTB proteins are essential and the amino acids encoded after the editing events are conserved in most plant species. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the computational target prediction to screen for target RNA editing sites of E domain containing PLS-class PPR proteins.

  12. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-r...

  13. Aconitum carmichaelii protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity via B-cell lymphoma-2 protein-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ki Mo; Choi, Songie; Oh, Dal-Seok

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported the clinical profile of processed Aconitum carmichaelii (AC, Aconibal(®)), which included inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activity in healthy male adults. CYP2E1 is recognized as the enzyme that initiates the cascade of events leading to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced toxicity. However, no studies have characterized its role in APAP-induced hepatic injury. Here, we investigated the protective effects of AC on APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via mitochondrial dysfunction. AC (5-500μg/mL) significantly inhibited APAP-induced reduction of glutathione. In addition, AC decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein levels (% change 46.63) in mitochondria. Moreover, it increased Bcl-2 (% change 55.39) and cytochrome C levels (% change 38.33) in mitochondria, measured using immunofluorescence or a commercial kit. Furthermore, cell membrane integrity was preserved and nuclear fragmentation inhibited by AC. These results demonstrate that AC protects hepatocytes against APAP-induced toxicity by inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26895385

  14. Silibinin modulates UVB-induced apoptosis via mitochondrial proteins, caspases activation, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several recent studies by us have shown the strong chemopreventive efficacy of silibinin against both ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation and chemical carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis in mouse skin models. The molecular mechanisms underlying silibinin protective efficacy, however, are not completely known. Here, we examined the effect of silibinin on UVB-caused apoptosis in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Irradiation of cells with different doses of UVB (5-100 mJ/cm2) and different time periods (0.5-24 h) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in apoptosis (P<0.05-0.001). Silibinin (100-200 μM) pre-treatment, however, resulted in an increase in UVB-induced apoptosis (P<0.05-0.001); interestingly, its post-treatment caused a decrease in UVB-induced apoptosis (P<0.05-0.001). A similar pattern in the activation of caspases-9, -3, and -7 was observed with these silibinin treatments. Further, silibinin treatment prior to or immediately after UVB exposure altered Bcl-2, Bax, Bak, and cytochrome c levels in mitochondria and cytosol in favor of or against apoptosis, respectively. Silibinin treatment prior to UVB also increased the activation of mitogen/stress activated protein kinases Erk1/2, JNK, and p38 kinase as compared to its post-treatment. Together, for the first time, our results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial apoptotic machinery and MAPK signaling cascade in silibinin-caused increase as well as protection in UVB-induced apoptosis in A431 cells, and suggest that similar mechanisms might be involved in preventive efficacy of silibinin against UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis

  15. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  16. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to precisely control nanoscale features is increasingly exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts1–4. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which play an important role in hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel5–7. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called ‘intimacy criterion’8 has dictated the ...

  17. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    OpenAIRE

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32–42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP product...

  18. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara Charlotte; Poulsen, Jon Wriedt; Andersen, Marianne Agerholm; Palmqvist, Eva A; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael Lund

    2015-01-01

    deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p...... cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin...

  19. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  20. Phylogenetic performance of mitochondrial protein-coding genes of Oncomelania hupensis in resolving relationships between landscape populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Zhu LI; Li ZHANG; Lin MA; Wei HU; Shan LV; Qin LIU; Ying-Jun QIAN

    2013-01-01

    Oncomelania hupensis is the unique intermediate host of Schistosomajaponicum,which plays a key role in the transmission of human blood fluke Schistosoma.The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of O.hupensis has been characterized; however,the phylogenetic performance of mt protein-coding genes (PCGs) of the snail remain unclear.In this study,11 whole mt genomes of snails collected from four different ecological settings in China and the Philippines were sequenced.The mt genome sizes ranged from 15 183 to 15 216 bp,with the G + C contents from 32.4% to 33.4%.A total of 15 251 characters were generated from the multiple sequence alignment.Of 2711 (17.8%)polymorphic sites,56.22% (1524) were parsimony sites.The mt genomes' phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using minimum evolution,neighbor joining,maximum likelihood,maximum parsimony,and Bayesian tree estimate methods,and two main distinct clades were identified:(i) the isolate from mountainous regions; (ii) the remaining isolate which included three inner branches.All phylogenetic trees of the 13 PCGs were generated by running 1000 bootstrap replicates and compared with the complete mtDNA tree,the classification accuracy ranging from 21.23% to 87.87%,the topological distance of phylogenetic trees between PCGs ranging from 5 to 14.Therefore,the performance of PCGs can be divided into good condition (COⅠ,ND2,ND5,and ND3),medium (COⅡ,ATP6,ND1,ND6,Cytb,ND4,and COⅢ),poor (ATP8 and ND4L).This study represents the first analysis ofmt genome diversity of the O.hupensis snail and phylogenetic performance of mt PCGs.It presents clear evidence that the snail populations can be separated into four landscape genetic populations in mainland China based on whole mt genomes.The identification of the phylogenetic performance of PCGs provides new insight into the intensive genetic diversity study using mtDNA markers for the snail.

  1. Nanoparticle Superlattices as Efficient Bifunctional Electrocatalysts for Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Wang, Yongcheng; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Tang, Jing; Zhang, Lijuan; Al-Enizi, Abdullah M; Yang, Zhongqin; Zheng, Gengfeng

    2015-11-18

    The solar-driven water splitting process is highly attractive for alternative energy utilization, while developing efficient, earth-abundant, bifunctional catalysts for both oxygen evolution reaction and hydrogen evolution reaction has remained as a major challenge. Herein, we develop an ordered CoMnO@CN superlattice structure as an efficient bifunctional water-splitting electrocatalyst, in which uniform Co-Mn oxide (CoMnO) nanoparticles are coated with a thin, continuous nitrogen-doped carbon (CN) framework. The CoMnO nanoparticles enable optimized OER activity with effective electronic structure configuration, and the CN framework serves as an excellent HER catalyst. Importantly, the ordered superlattice structure is beneficial for enhanced reactive sites, efficient charge transfer, and structural stability. This bifunctional superlattice catalyst manifests optimized current densities and electrochemical stability in overall water splitting, outperforming most of the previously reported single- or bifunctional electrocatalysts. Combining with a silicon photovoltaic cell, this CoMnO@CN superlattice bifunctional catalyst enables unassisted solar water splitting continuously for ∼5 days with a solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of ∼8.0%. Our discovery suggests that these transition metal oxide-based superlattices may serve as a unique structure modality for efficient bifunctional water splitting electrocatalysts with scale-up potentials. PMID:26496655

  2. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) in higher brain functions, neuronal plasticity and network oscillation

    OpenAIRE

    Gretchen Hermes; David Nagy; Michael Waterson; Attila Zsarnovszky; Luis Varela; Mihaly Hajos; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Major psychiatric illnesses, affecting 36% of the world's population, are profound disorders of thought, mood and behavior associated with underlying impairments in synaptic plasticity and cellular resilience. Mitochondria support energy demanding processes like neural transmission and synaptogenesis and are thus points of broadening interest in the energetics underlying the neurobiology of mental illness. These experiments interrogated the importance of mitochondrial flex...

  3. Proteomic alterations of distinct mitochondrial subpopulations in the type 1 diabetic heart: contribution of protein import dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Baseler, Walter A.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Williamson, Courtney L.; Croston, Tara L.; Thapa, Dharendra; Powell, Matthew J.; Razunguzwa, Trust T.; Hollander, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is associated with increased risk of heart failure in type 1 diabetic patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction is suggested as an underlying contributor to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Cardiac mitochondria are characterized by subcellular spatial locale, including mitochondria located beneath the sarcolemma, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM), and mitochondria situated between the myofibrils, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM). The goal of this study was to determine whether type...

  4. Vitamin E and vitamin C do not reduce insulin sensitivity but inhibit mitochondrial protein expression in exercising obese rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controversy exists as to whether supplementation with the antioxidants vitamin E (VE) and vitamin C (VC) blocks adaptation to exercise. Exercise is a first-line means to treat obesity and its complications. While diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial (MT) function and induces insulin resistance ...

  5. Generation and characterization of transgenic mice expressing mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein selectively in neurons: modeling mitochondriopathy in excitotoxicity and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria have roles or appear to have roles in the pathogenesis of several chronic age-related and acute neurological disorders, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cerebral ischemia, and could be critical targets for development of rational mechanism-based, disease-modifying therapeutics for treating these disorders effectively. A deeper understanding of neural tissue mitochondria pathobiologies as definitive mediators of neural injury, disease, and cell death merits further study, and the development of additional tools to study neural mitochondria will help achieve this unmet need. Results We created transgenic mice that express the coral (Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein DsRed2 specifically in mitochondria of neurons using a construct engineered with a Thy1 promoter, specific for neuron expression, to drive expression of a fusion protein of DsRed2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence. The biochemical and histological characterization of these mice shows the expression of mitochondrial-targeted DsRed2 to be specific for mitochondria and concentrated in distinct CNS regions, including cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, brainstem, and spinal cord. Red fluorescent mitochondria were visualized in cerebral cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons, ventrobasal thalamic neurons, subthalamic neurons, and spinal motor neurons. For the purpose of proof of principle application, these mice were used in excitotoxicity paradigms and double transgenic mice were generated by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice with transgenic mice expressing enhanced-GFP (eGFP under the control of the Hlxb9 promoter that drives eGFP expression specifically in motor neurons and by crossing Thy1-mitoDsRed2 mice to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mice expressing human mutant superoxide dismutase-1. Conclusions These novel transgenic mice will be a useful tool for better understanding

  6. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227. ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  7. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NINDS supports research focused on effective treatments and cures for mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases. Scientists are investigating the possible benefits of exercise programs and nutritional supplements, primarily natural and synthetic versions of CoQ10. While CoQ10 has ...

  8. Whole body metabolism, muscle and mitochondrial function, and the role of uncoupling protein-3 in a mouse model of sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    Zolfaghari, P. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sepsis, the exaggerated systemic inflammatory response to infection, often leads to multi-organ failure (MOF) and death. Skeletal muscle function is often profoundly affected, with patients requiring prolonged ventilatory support and rehabilitation. The pathophysiology underlying MOF and muscle failure in sepsis remains poorly understood. Recent evidence points to mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular energetic down-regulation, related in part to excess generation of reacti...

  9. The J-protein AtDjB1 is required for mitochondrial complex I activity and regulates growth and development through ROS-mediated auxin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ning; Lv, Ting-Ting; Li, Mi-Xin; Wei, Shan-Shan; Li, Yan-Yi; Zhao, Chun-Lan; Li, Bing

    2016-05-01

    AtDjB1 is a mitochondria-located J-protein in Arabidopsis thaliana It is involved in the regulation of plant growth and development; however, the exact mechanisms remain to be determined. We performed comparison analyses of phenotypes, auxin signalling, redox status, mitochondrial structure and function using wild-type plants, AtDjB1 mutants, rescued AtDjB1 mutants by AtDjB1 or YUCCA2 (an auxin synthesis gene), and AtDjB1 overexpression plants. AtDjB1 mutants (atj1-1 or atj1-4) exhibited inhibition of growth and development and reductions in the level of IAA and the expression of YUCCA genes compared to wild-type plants. The introduction of AtDjB1 or YUCCA2 into atj1-1 largely rescued phenotypic defects and the IAA level, indicating that AtDjB1 probably regulates growth and development via auxin. Furthermore, atj1-1 plants displayed a significant reduction in amount/activity of mitochondrial complex I compared to wild-type plants; this resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, exogenous H2O2 markedly inhibited the expression of YUCCA genes in wild-type plants. In contrast, the reducing agent ascorbate increased the expression of YUCCA genes and IAA level in atj1-1 plants, indicating that the low auxin level observed in atj1-1 was probably due to the high oxidation status. Overall, the data presented here suggest that AtDjB1 is required for mitochondrial complex I activity and regulates growth and development through ROS-mediated auxin signalling in Arabidopsis. PMID:27117341

  10. Overexpression of human SOD1 in VDAC1-less yeast restores mitochondrial functionality modulating beta-barrel outer membrane protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrì, Andrea; Di Rosa, Maria Carmela; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Guarino, Francesca; Reina, Simona; Messina, Angela; De Pinto, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1), the most important antioxidant defense against ROS in eukaryotic cells, localizes in cytosol and intermembrane space of mitochondria (IMS). Several evidences show a SOD1 intersection with both fermentative and respiratory metabolism. The Voltage Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC) is the main pore-forming protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), and is considered the gatekeeper of mitochondrial metabolism. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking VDAC1 (Δpor1) is a very convenient model system, since it shows an impaired growth rate on non-fermentable carbon source. Transformation of Δpor1 yeast with human SOD1 completely restores the cell growth deficit in non-fermentative conditions and re-establishes the physiological levels of ROS, as well as the mitochondrial membrane potential. No similar result was found upon yeast SOD1 overexpression. A previous report highlighted the action of SOD1 as a transcription factor. Quantitative Real-Time PCR showed that β-barrel outer-membrane encoding-genes por2, tom40, sam50 are induced by hSOD1, but the same effect was not obtained in Δpor1Δpor2 yeast, indicating a crucial function for yVDAC2. Since the lack of VDAC1 in yeast can be considered a stress factor for the cell, hSOD1 could relieve it stimulating the expression of genes bringing to the recovery of the MOM function. Our results suggest a direct influence of SOD1 on VDAC. PMID:26947057

  11. Influence of protein-micelle ratios and cysteine residues on the kinetic stability and unfolding rates of human mitochondrial VDAC-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Rajkumar Maurya

    Full Text Available Delineating the kinetic and thermodynamic factors which contribute to the stability of transmembrane β-barrels is critical to gain an in-depth understanding of membrane protein behavior. Human mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel isoform 2 (hVDAC-2, one of the key anti-apoptotic eukaryotic β-barrel proteins, is of paramount importance, owing to its indispensable role in cell survival. We demonstrate here that the stability of hVDAC-2 bears a strong kinetic contribution that is dependent on the absolute micellar concentration used for barrel folding. The refolding efficiency and ensuing stability is sensitive to the lipid-to-protein (LPR ratio, and displays a non-linear relationship, with both low and high micellar amounts being detrimental to hVDAC-2 structure. Unfolding and aggregation process are sequential events and show strong temperature dependence. We demonstrate that an optimal lipid-to-protein ratio of 2600∶1 - 13,000∶1 offers the highest protection against thermal denaturation. Activation energies derived only for lower LPRs are ∼17 kcal mol(-1 for full-length hVDAC-2 and ∼23 kcal mol(-1 for the Cys-less mutant, suggesting that the nine cysteine residues of hVDAC-2 impart additional malleability to the barrel scaffold. Our studies reveal that cysteine residues play a key role in the kinetic stability of the protein, determine barrel rigidity and thereby give rise to strong micellar association of hVDAC-2. Non-linearity of the Arrhenius plot at high LPRs coupled with observation of protein aggregation upon thermal denaturation indicates that contributions from both kinetic and thermodynamic components stabilize the 19-stranded β-barrel. Lipid-protein interaction and the linked kinetic contribution to free energy of the folded protein are together expected to play a key role in hVDAC-2 recycling and the functional switch at the onset of apoptosis.

  12. Cytotoxicity of carteolol to human corneal epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis via triggering the Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pro-apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ming; Fan, Ting-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Carteolol is a frequently used nonselective β-adrenoceptor antagonist for glaucoma and ocular hypertension treatment, and its repeated/prolonged usage might be cytotoxic to the cornea, especially the outmost human corneal epithelium (HCEP). The aim of the present study was to characterize the cytotoxicity of carteolol to HCEP and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms using an in vitro model of HCEP cells. After HCEP cells were treated with carteolol at concentrations varying from 2% to 0.015625%, the cytotoxicity, apoptosis-inducing effect and pro-apoptotic pathway was investigated, respectively. Our results showed that carteolol at concentrations above 0.03125% induced time- and dose-dependent growth retardation, cytopathic morphological changes and viability decline of HCEP cells. Moreover, carteolol induced G1 phase arrest, plasma membrane permeability elevation, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic body formation of HCEP cells. Furthermore, carteolol also induced activation of caspase-9 and -3, disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, up-regulation the cytoplasmic amount of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor, and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bad, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In conclusion, carteolol above 1/64 of its clinical therapeutic dosage has a time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity to HCEP cells, which is achieved by inducing apoptosis via triggering Bcl-2 family protein-mediated mitochondrial pro-apoptotic pathway. PMID:27216471

  13. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the RNase HI domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein Rv2228c as a maltose-binding protein fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Baker, Edward N.

    2008-01-01

    The ribonuclease HI domain of a bifunctional protein Rv2228c-CobC from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized as a fusion protein with maltose-binding protein in a form suitable for high-resolution crystallographic analysis.

  14. Novel Bifunctional Natriuretic Peptides as Potential Therapeutics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Burnett, John C.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  15. Novel bifunctional natriuretic peptides as potential therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Deborah M; Burnett, John C; Potter, Lincoln R

    2008-12-12

    Synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (carperitide) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; nesiritide) are used to treat congestive heart failure. However, despite beneficial cardiac unloading properties, reductions in renal perfusion pressures limit their clinical effectiveness. Recently, CD-NP, a chimeric peptide composed of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) fused to the C-terminal tail of Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP), was shown to be more glomerular filtration rate-enhancing than BNP in dogs. However, the molecular basis for the increased responsiveness was not determined. Here, we show that the DNP tail has a striking effect on CNP, converting it from a non-agonist to a partial agonist of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A while maintaining the ability to activate NPR-B. This effect is specific for human receptors because CD-NP was only a slightly better activator of rat NPR-A due to the promiscuous nature of CNP in this species. Interesting, the DNP tail alone had no effect on any NPR even though it is effective in vivo. To further increase the potency of CD-NP for NPR-A, we converted two different triplet sequences within the CNP ring to their corresponding residues in BNP. Both variants demonstrated increased affinity and full agonist activity for NPR-A, whereas one was as potent as any NPR-A activator known. In contrast to a previous report, we found that DNP binds the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C). However, none of the chimeric peptides bound NPR-C with significantly higher affinity than endogenous ligands. We suggest that bifunctional chimeric peptides represent a new generation of natriuretic peptide therapeutics. PMID:18940797

  16. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in your body tissues. If you have a metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of metabolic disorders. Mitochondria are small structures that produce energy in ...

  17. A Trypanosomal Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Stabilizes the Mitochondrial mRNAs of Cytochrome Oxidase Subunits 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Pusnik, Mascha; Schneider, André

    2012-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family consists of organellar proteins predicted to bind to specific RNA sequences. Plants have hundreds of distinct PPR proteins, whereas other eukaryotes generally have many fewer. The genome of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei is predicted to encode more than 30 different PPR proteins, which is an extraordinarily high number for a nonplant organism. Here we report the characterization T. brucei PPR9 (TbPPR9). Epitope tagging shows that t...

  18. Robust Control of PEP Formation Rate in the Carbon Fixation Pathway of C4 Plants by a Bi-functional Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hart Yuval

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C4 plants such as corn and sugarcane assimilate atmospheric CO2 into biomass by means of the C4 carbon fixation pathway. We asked how PEP formation rate, a key step in the carbon fixation pathway, might work at a precise rate, regulated by light, despite fluctuations in substrate and enzyme levels constituting and regulating this process. Results We present a putative mechanism for robustness in C4 carbon fixation, involving a key enzyme in the pathway, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, which is regulated by a bifunctional enzyme, Regulatory Protein (RP. The robust mechanism is based on avidity of the bifunctional enzyme RP to its multimeric substrate PPDK, and on a product-inhibition feedback loop that couples the system output to the activity of the bifunctional regulator. The model provides an explanation for several unusual biochemical characteristics of the system and predicts that the system's output, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP formation rate, is insensitive to fluctuations in enzyme levels (PPDK and RP, substrate levels (ATP and pyruvate and the catalytic rate of PPDK, while remaining sensitive to the system's input (light levels. Conclusions The presented PPDK mechanism is a new way to achieve robustness using product inhibition as a feedback loop on a bifunctional regulatory enzyme. This mechanism exhibits robustness to protein and metabolite levels as well as to catalytic rate changes. At the same time, the output of the system remains tuned to input levels.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis reveals a novel mitochondrial isoform of human rTS protein and unusual phylogenetic distribution of the rTS gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGuire John J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rTS gene (ENOSF1, first identified in Homo sapiens as a gene complementary to the thymidylate synthase (TYMS mRNA, is known to encode two protein isoforms, rTSα and rTSβ. The rTSβ isoform appears to be an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of signaling molecules involved in the down-regulation of thymidylate synthase, but the exact cellular functions of rTS genes are largely unknown. Results Through comparative genomic sequence analysis, we predicted the existence of a novel protein isoform, rTS, which has a 27 residue longer N-terminus by virtue of utilizing an alternative start codon located upstream of the start codon in rTSβ. We observed that a similar extended N-terminus could be predicted in all rTS genes for which genomic sequences are available and the extended regions are conserved from bacteria to human. Therefore, we reasoned that the protein with the extended N-terminus might represent an ancestral form of the rTS protein. Sequence analysis strongly predicts a mitochondrial signal sequence in the extended N-terminal of human rTSγ, which is absent in rTSβ. We confirmed the existence of rTS in human mitochondria experimentally by demonstrating the presence of both rTSγ and rTSβ proteins in mitochondria isolated by subcellular fractionation. In addition, our comprehensive analysis of rTS orthologous sequences reveals an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this gene, which suggests the occurrence of one or more horizontal gene transfer events. Conclusion The presence of two rTS isoforms in mitochondria suggests that the rTS signaling pathway may be active within mitochondria. Our report also presents an example of identifying novel protein isoforms and for improving gene annotation through comparative genomic analysis.

  20. Mitochondrial Stress: A Bridge between Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Metabolic Diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Under pathophysiological conditions such as obesity, excessive oxidation of nutrients may induce mitochondrial stress, leading to mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) and initiation of a retrograde stress signaling pathway. Defects in the UPRmt and the retrograde signaling pathways may disrupt the integrity and homeostasis of the mitochondria, resulting endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance. Improving the capacity of mitochondria to reduce stress may be an effective a...

  1. Bifunctional mesoporous silicas with clearly distinguished localization of grafted groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roik, N. V.; Belyakova, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bifunctional mesoporous silicas with clearly distinguished localization of grafted groups on the surface of particles and inside their pores were obtained by means of sol-gel synthesis with postsynthetic vapor-phase treatment in vacuum. It was found that the synthesized materials have the hexagonally ordered porous structure typical of MCM-41 type silica.

  2. Single flexible nanofiber to simultaneously realize electricity-magnetism bifunctionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop new-typed multifunctional composite nanofibers, PANI/Fe3O4/PVP flexible bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous electrical conduction and magnetism have been successfully fabricated via a facile electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of polyaniline (PANI) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10-3 S·cm-1. The electrical conductivity and saturation magnetization of the composite nanofibers can be respectively tuned by adding various amounts of PANI and Fe3O4 NPs. The obtained electricity-magnetism bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as electromagnetic interference shielding, special coating, microwave absorption, molecular electronics and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construct technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional nanostructures. (author)

  3. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts(1-4). Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon source

  4. Single flexible nanofiber to simultaneously realize electricity-magnetism bifunctionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Sheng, Shujuan; Ma, Qianli; Lv, Nan; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Dong, Xiangting; Liu, Guixia, E-mail: wenshengyu2009@sina.com, E-mail: dongxiangting888@163.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry and Nanotechnology at Universities of Jilin Province, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun (China)

    2016-03-15

    In order to develop new-typed multifunctional composite nanofibers, PANI/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PVP flexible bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous electrical conduction and magnetism have been successfully fabricated via a facile electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of polyaniline (PANI) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10{sup -3} S·cm{sup -1}. The electrical conductivity and saturation magnetization of the composite nanofibers can be respectively tuned by adding various amounts of PANI and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. The obtained electricity-magnetism bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as electromagnetic interference shielding, special coating, microwave absorption, molecular electronics and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construct technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional nanostructures. (author)

  5. Active-site remodelling in the bifunctional fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Say, Rafael F; Lü, Wei; Fuchs, Georg; Einsle, Oliver

    2011-10-27

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) aldolase/phosphatase is a bifunctional, thermostable enzyme that catalyses two subsequent steps in gluconeogenesis in most archaea and in deeply branching bacterial lineages. It mediates the aldol condensation of heat-labile dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to FBP, as well as the subsequent, irreversible hydrolysis of the product to yield the stable fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and inorganic phosphate; no reaction intermediates are released. Here we present a series of structural snapshots of the reaction that reveal a substantial remodelling of the active site through the movement of loop regions that create different catalytic functionalities at the same location. We have solved the three-dimensional structures of FBP aldolase/phosphatase from thermophilic Thermoproteus neutrophilus in a ligand-free state as well as in complex with the substrates DHAP and FBP and the product F6P to resolutions up to 1.3 Å. In conjunction with mutagenesis data, this pinpoints the residues required for the two reaction steps and shows that the sequential binding of additional Mg(2+) cations reversibly facilitates the reaction. FBP aldolase/phosphatase is an ancestral gluconeogenic enzyme optimized for high ambient temperatures, and our work resolves how consecutive structural rearrangements reorganize the catalytic centre of the protein to carry out two canonical reactions in a very non-canonical type of bifunctionality. PMID:21983965

  6. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  7. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei, E-mail: wshlei@aliyun.com; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-05

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect.

  8. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca2+ into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca2+ homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca2+ transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect

  9. The amino acid sequence of a 20 kDa bifunctional subtilisin/alpha-amylase inhibitor from bran [correction of brain] of rice (Oryza sativa L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsubo, K; Richardson, M

    1992-08-31

    A 20 kDa bifunctional inhibitor of the microbial proteinase, subtilisin, and the alpha-amylase from the larvae of the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) was purified from bran of rice seeds by saline extraction, precipitation with ammonium sulphate, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Cellulose and Toyopearl CM-650, and preparative HPLC on Vydac C18. The complete primary structure was determined by automatic degradation of the intact, reduced and S-alkylated protein, and by manual DABITC/PITC micro-sequencing of peptides obtained from the protein following separate enzymic digestions with trypsin, pepsin, chymotrypsin, elastase and the protease from S. aureus V8. The protein sequence, which contained 176 residues, showed strong homology with similar bifunctional inhibitors previously isolated from wheat and barley which are related to the Kunitz family of proteinase inhibitors from legume seeds. PMID:1511747

  10. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  11. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Cardiovascular Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Sang-Bing; Andrew R. Hall; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of changing their shape and distribution by undergoing either fission or fusion. Changes in mitochondrial dynamics, which is under the control of specific mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, have been implicated in cell division, embryonic development, apoptosis, autophagy, and metabolism. Although the machinery for modulating mitochondrial dynamics is present in the cardiovascular system, its function there has only recently be...

  12. Mitochondrial transcript maturation and its disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Lindsey; Pearce, Sarah F; Powell, Christopher A; D'Souza, Aaron R; Nicholls, Thomas J; Minczuk, Michal

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies exhibit a wide spectrum of clinical presentations owing to defective mitochondrial energy production through oxidative phosphorylation. These defects can be caused by either mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or mutations in nuclear genes coding for mitochondrially-targeted proteins. The underlying pathomechanisms can affect numerous pathways involved in mitochondrial biology including expression of mtDNA-encoded genes. Expression of the mitochondrial genes is extensively regulated at the post-transcriptional stage and entails nucleolytic cleavage of precursor RNAs, RNA nucleotide modifications, RNA polyadenylation, RNA quality and stability control. These processes ensure proper mitochondrial RNA (mtRNA) function, and are regulated by dedicated, nuclear-encoded enzymes. Recent growing evidence suggests that mutations in these nuclear genes, leading to incorrect maturation of RNAs, are a cause of human mitochondrial disease. Additionally, mutations in mtDNA-encoded genes may also affect RNA maturation and are frequently associated with human disease. We review the current knowledge on a subset of nuclear-encoded genes coding for proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA maturation, for which genetic variants impacting upon mitochondrial pathophysiology have been reported. Also, primary pathological mtDNA mutations with recognised effects upon RNA processing are described. PMID:26016801

  13. Lipid metabolism in mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Johannes A

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial membranes have a unique lipid composition necessary for proper shape and function of the organelle. Mitochondrial lipid metabolism involves biosynthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine, cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, the latter is a precursor of the late endosomal lipid bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. It also includes mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis necessary for the formation of the lipid cofactor lipoic acid. Furthermore the synthesis of coenzyme Q takes place in mitochondria as well as essential parts of the steroid and vitamin D metabolism. Lipid transport and remodelling, which are necessary for tailoring and maintaining specific membrane properties, are just partially unravelled. Mitochondrial lipids are involved in organelle maintenance, fission and fusion, mitophagy and cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis. Mutations in TAZ, SERAC1 and AGK affect mitochondrial phospholipid metabolism and cause Barth syndrome, MEGDEL and Sengers syndrome, respectively. In these disorders an abnormal mitochondrial energy metabolism was found, which seems to be due to disturbed protein-lipid interactions, affecting especially enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation. Since a growing number of enzymes and transport processes are recognised as parts of the mitochondrial lipid metabolism, a further increase of lipid-related disorders can be expected. PMID:25082432

  14. Functional characterization of two paralogs that are novel RNA binding proteins influencing mitochondrial transcripts of Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kafková, Lucie; Ammerman, M. L.; Faktorová, D.; Fisk, J. C.; Zimmer, S.L.; Sobotka, Roman; Read, L. K.; Lukeš, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 10 (2012), s. 1846-1861. ISSN 1355-8382 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : RNA editing * RNA binding protein * ribonuclear protein (RNP) * mitochondria * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.088, year: 2012 http:// rna journal.cshlp.org/content/18/10/1846

  15. Trypanosoma brucei has a canonical mitochondrial processing peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy, Silvia; Schneider, André; Mani, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Most mitochondrial matrix and inner membrane proteins have N-terminal presequences which serve as import signals. After import these presequences are cleaved by the heterodimeric mitochondrial processing peptidase. In the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial protein import relies on presequences that are much shorter than in other eukaryotes. How they are processed is unknown. The trypansomal genome encodes four open reading frames that are annotated as mitochondrial processing peptidase. Here we show that RNAi-mediated ablation of two of these proteins leads to a growth arrest and a concomitant accumulation of mitochondrial precursor proteins inside mitochondria. Import experiments using isolated mitochondria from RNAi cell lines reveals that both proteins are required for efficient import and processing of the tested precursor protein. Reciprocal immunoprecipitation demonstrates that the proteins interact with each other. In summary these results show that we have identified the two subunits of the trypanosomal mitochondrial processing peptidase. PMID:22841752

  16. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents ultraviolet-B-induced photodamage: a role for mitogen-activated protein kinases, nuclear factor kappa B and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, Quadri; Kaiser, Peerzada J; Rafiq, Rather A; Nazir, Lone A; Bhushan, Shashi; Bhardwaj, Subhash C; Sandhir, Rajat; Tasduq, Sheikh A

    2016-06-01

    Glycyrrhizic acid (GA), a natural triterpene, has received attention as an agent that has protective effects against chronic diseases including ultraviolet UV-B-induced skin photodamage. However, the mechanism of its protective effect remains elusive. Here, we used an immortalized human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) and a small animal model (BALB/c mice), to investigate the protective effects of GA against UV-B-induced oxidative damage, and additionally, delineated the molecular mechanisms involved in the UV-B-mediated inflammatory and apoptotic response. In the HaCaT cells, GA inhibited the UV-B-mediated increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulated the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, -1β and -6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). GA inhibited UV-B-mediated activation of p38 and JNK MAP kinases, COX-2 expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Furthermore, GA inhibited UV-B-mediated apoptosis by attenuating translocation of Bax from the cytosol to mitochondria, thus preserving mitochondrial integrity. GA-treated HaCaT cells also exhibited elevated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein, concomitant with reduced caspase-3 cleavage and decreased PARP-1 protein. In BALB/c mice, topical application of GA on dorsal skin exposed to UV-B irradiation protected against epidermal hyperplasia, lymphocyte infiltration and expression of several inflammatory proteins, p38, JNK, COX-2, NF-κB and ICAM-1. Based on the above findings, we conclude that GA protects against UV-B-mediated photodamage by inhibiting the signalling cascades triggered by oxidative stress, including MAPK/NF-κB activation, as well as apoptosis. Thus, GA has strong potential to be used as a therapeutic/cosmeceutical agent against photodamage. PMID:26836460

  17. Proteins interacting with mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease (MAP1) in Magnaporthe oryzae are involved in rice blast disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiao; Wei, Yi; Wang, Yu-Han; Li, Jian; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Zheng, Ya-Jie; Yan, Hai; Liu, Shao-Shuai; Liu, Jin-Liang; Jia, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Shi-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The ATP-dependent Lon protease is involved in many physiological processes. In bacteria, Lon regulates pathogenesis and, in yeast, Lon protects mitochondia from oxidative damage. However, little is known about Lon in fungal phytopathogens. MAP1, a homologue of Lon in Magnaporthe oryzae, was recently identified to be important for stress resistance and pathogenesis. Here, we focus on a novel pathogenic pathway mediated by MAP1. Based on an interaction system between rice and a tandem affinity purification (TAP)-tagged MAP1 complementation strain, we identified 23 novel fungal proteins from infected leaves using a TAP approach with mass spectrometry, and confirmed that 14 of these proteins physically interact with MAP1 in vivo. Among these 14 proteins, 11 candidates, presumably localized to the mitochondria, were biochemically determined to be substrates of MAP1 hydrolysis. Deletion mutants were created and functionally analysed to further confirm the involvement of these proteins in pathogenesis. The results indicated that all mutants showed reduced conidiation and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Appressorial formations were not affected, although conidia from certain mutants were morphologically altered. In addition, virulence was reduced in four mutants, enhanced (with lesions forming earlier) in two mutants and remained unchanged in one mutant. Together with the known virulence-related proteins alternative oxidase and enoyl-CoA hydratase, we propose that most of the Lon-interacting proteins are involved in the pathogenic regulation pathway mediated by MAP1 in M. oryzae. Perturbation of this pathway may represent an effective approach for the inhibition of rice blast disease. PMID:25605006

  18. Towards a functional definition of the mitochondrial human proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Fasano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial human proteome project (mt-HPP was initiated by the Italian HPP group as a part of both the chromosome-centric initiative (C-HPP and the “biology and disease driven” initiative (B/D-HPP. In recent years several reports highlighted how mitochondrial biology and disease are regulated by specific interactions with non-mitochondrial proteins. Thus, it is of great relevance to extend our present view of the mitochondrial proteome not only to those proteins that are encoded by or transported to mitochondria, but also to their interactors that take part in mitochondria functionality. Here, we propose a graphical representation of the functional mitochondrial proteome by retrieving mitochondrial proteins from the NeXtProt database and adding to the network their interactors as annotated in the IntAct database. Notably, the network may represent a reference to map all the proteins that are currently being identified in mitochondrial proteomics studies.

  19. The Potato Tuber Mitochondrial Proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper F; Chen, Mingjie;

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are called the powerhouses of the cell. To better understand the role of mitochondria in maintaining and regulating metabolism in storage tissues, highly purified mitochondria were isolated from dormant potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum ‘Folva’) and their proteome investigated. Proteins...... that more than 50% of the identified proteins harbor at least one modification. The most prominently observed class of posttranslational modifications was oxidative modifications. This study reveals approximately 500 new or previously unconfirmed plant mitochondrial proteins and outlines a facile strategy...

  20. Maternal low protein diet induces muscle mitochondrial respiration impairment, catch-up growth and PGC-1a expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnutrition during the fetal growth period followed by postnatal catch-up growth results in obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). To determine whether a prenatal low protein diet followed by postnatal high fat diet increase offspring’s propensity to obesity and T2D, obese-prone fema...

  1. 关于阿尔茨海默病中Tau蛋白导致的线粒体功能障碍的研究进展%Research progress of mitochondrial dysfunction caused by the tau protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄强; 李琼; 李清华

    2014-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein,and plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases.The hyperphosphorylationg of Tau protein is considered as a characteristic pathogenic change,especially in Alzheimer' s disease.Though the hyperphosphorylated Tau protein can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction followed by corresponding diseases,the mechanism of mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Tau protein is unclear.More and more researchers have attempted to confirm that the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Tau protein is not a single process.The study of mitochondrial dysfunction caused by Tau protein may provide a better understanding on the mechanism of neurodegeneration with important clues,though the role in neurodegeneration still remain unclear.In this paper,we make a brief review about the research progress of mitochondrial dysfunction caused by tau protein in AD.%Tau蛋白是一种微管相关性蛋白,在神经变性疾病中扮演着重要角色,尤其在阿尔茨海默病(AD)中,Tau蛋白的过度磷酸化被视为特征性的病理学表现.尽管过度磷酸化Tau蛋白能够导致线粒体功能障碍进而引起了相应的临床疾病,但其导致线粒体功能障碍的具体机制尚不明确,越来越多的学者认为Tau蛋白导致线粒体功能障碍并不是通过一个单一的过程,虽然在神经变性中的作用还存在一些争议,但是对Tau蛋白导致线粒体功能障碍的探讨可能对神经变性机制的研究提供重要的线索,该文主要就AD中Tau蛋白导致线粒体功能障碍的可能机制作一简单综述.

  2. High performance bi-functional quantum cascade laser and detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Benedikt; Ristanic, Daniela; Reininger, Peter; Zederbauer, Tobias; MacFarland, Donald; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2015-08-01

    An improved bi-functional quantum cascade laser and detector emitting and detecting around 6.8 μ m is demonstrated. The design allows a significantly higher laser performance, showing that bi-functional designs can achieve a comparable pulsed performance to conventional quantum cascade lasers. In particular, the device has a threshold current density of 3 kA / cm 2 , an output power of 0.47 W , and a total wall-plug efficiency of 4.5% in pulsed mode. Optimized electron extraction and the prevention of thermal backfilling allow higher duty cycles, operation up to 10%, with 15 mW average output power at room temperature without optimization of the laser cavity or coatings. At zero bias, the device has a responsivity of around 40 mA / W and a noise equivalent power of 80 pW / √{ Hz } at room temperature, which in on-chip configuration outperforms conventional uncooled discrete detectors.

  3. Investigation of new bifunctional agents. D-Penicillamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatin inhibits the release of growth hormone (somatotropin) from the Anterior Pituitary. The main use of derivatives of somatostatin is to diagnose growth hormone problems and to use against some forms of cancer which involve growth hormone. Also somatostatin suppresses gastric acid secretion, gallbladder contractions, and pancreatic enzyme secretion. The aim of the current study is to investigate new bifunctional agents for labeling with 99mTc. Therefore D-Penicillamine was used as a bifunctional agent and compared to DTPA in the labeling with 99mTc. Quality controls were established using thin layer radio chromatography (TLRC) and electrophoresis techniques. In addition, high performance liquid radio chromatography (HPLRC) was also performed for elimination of possible uncertainties. The radiolabeled complexes maintained their stabilities throughout the study. The results obtained showed that 99mTc-D-Penicillamine-somatostatin is a promising potential radiopharmaceutical and an alternative of 99mTc-DTPA-somatostatin for in vivo and in vitro applications. (author)

  4. Experimental verifications on chemical carcinogenesis, a bifunctional alkylation between DNA interstrands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is evidenced by the filter elution method that two carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, two carcinogenic metal salts, beryllium chloride and cadmium chloride, four carcinogenic aromatic amines, 2-aminofluorene, β-naphthylamine, 4-aminobiphenyl and benzidine, can all induce DNA interstrand and DNA-protein cross-link in L1210 culture. However, under the same condition, the corresponding non-carcinogenic compounds, including benzo[k]fluorancene, anthracene, magnesium chloride, zinc chloride, a -naphthylamine, 2-aminobiphenyl and m-toluidine, cannot produce any cross-link adducts. All these results are consistent with the di-region theory that carcinogens are bio-bifunctional alkylation agents. This method can also be used to discriminate carcinogens and non-carcinogens.

  5. A haplotype variation affecting the mitochondrial transportation of hMYH protein could be a risk factor for colorectal cancer in Chinese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human MutY homolog (hMYH), a DNA glycolsylase involved in the excision repair of oxidative DNA damage, is currently studied in colorectal cancer (CRC). We previously demonstrated a haplotype variant c.53C>T/c.74G>A of hMYH (T/A) increasing the risk for gastric cancer in Chinese. However, most investigations on correlation between hMYH and CRC are conducted in Western countries and the underlying mechanism has been poorly understood. To determine whether the haplotype T/A variant of hMYH was related to colorectal carcinogenesis, we performed a case-control study in 138 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and 343 healthy controls in a Chinese population. Furthermore, the C/G for wild-type, C/A or T/G for single base variant and T/A for haplotype variant hMYH cDNAs with a flag epitope tag were cloned into pcDNA3.1+ vector and transfected into cos-7 cell line. Their subcellular localizations were determined by immunofluorescence assay. It was found that the frequency of haplotype variant allele was statistically higher in CRC patients than that in controls (P = 0.02, odds ratio = 5.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.26 – 20.4). Similarly, significant difference of heterozygote frequency was indicated between the two groups (P = 0.019), while no homozygote was found. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis showed that hMYH protein with haplotype T/A variation presented in both nucleus and mitochondria, in contrast to the wild-type protein only converging in mitochondria. However, neither of the single missense mutations alone changed the protein subcelluar localization. Although preliminarily, these results suggest that: the haplotype variant allele of hMYH leads to a missense protein, which partly affects the protein mitochondrial transportation and results as nuclear localization. This observation might be responsible for the increased susceptibility to cancers, including CRC, in Chinese

  6. Mitochondrial Cristae: Where Beauty Meets Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogliati, Sara; Enriquez, Jose A; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial cristae are dynamic bioenergetic compartments whose shape changes under different physiological conditions. Recent discoveries have unveiled the relation between cristae shape and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) function, suggesting that membrane morphology modulates the organization and function of the OXPHOS system, with a direct impact on cellular metabolism. As a corollary, cristae-shaping proteins have emerged as potential modulators of mitochondrial bioenergetics, a concept confirmed by genetic experiments in mouse models of respiratory chain deficiency. Here, we review our knowledge of mitochondrial ultrastructural organization and how it impacts mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:26857402

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiongbin; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Zhen; Yang, Junqing; Bi, Guiqi

    2016-09-01

    Drosophila albomicans has been widely used as an important animal model for chromosome evolution. In this study, the mitochondrial genome sequence of this species is determined and described for the first time. The mitochondrial genome (15 849 bp) encompasses two rRNA, 22 tRNA, and 13 protein-coding genes. Genome content and structure are similar to those reported from other Drosophila mitochondrial genomes. Phylogeny analysis indicates that D. albomicans have a closer genetic relationship with Drosophil aincompta and Drosophil alittoralis. This mitochondrial genome is potentially important for studying molecular evolution and conservation genetics in Drosophila genus. PMID:26358579

  8. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zečević, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely control nanoscale features is increasingly exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts1–4. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which play an important role in hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel5–7. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called ‘intimacy criterion’8 has dictated the maximum distance between the two site types beyond which catalytic activity decreases. The lack of synthesis and material characterization methods with nanometer precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites8–11. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst, comprised of an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder and with platinum (Pt) metal controllably deposited20,21 on either the zeolite or the binder, that close proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental: the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains Pt on the binder, i.e. with a larger distance between metal and acid sites. Cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules typically derived from alternative sources such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil6–7 should thus benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating Pt on the zeolite as the traditionally assumed optimal location. More generally, we anticipate that the ability to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale demonstrated here will benefit the further development and optimization of the newly emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts12–15. PMID:26659185

  9. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst—comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder—that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  10. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. RESULTS NADH- and FADH2-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-dl-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20682693

  11. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Larissa Balabanova; Vasily Golotin; Svetlana Kovalchuk; Alexander Bulgakov; Galina Likhatskaya; Oksana Son; Valery Rasskazov

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa...

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the land snail Cornu aspersum (Helicidae: Mollusca: intra-specific divergence of protein-coding genes and phylogenetic considerations within Euthyneura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Gaitán-Espitia

    Full Text Available The complete sequences of three mitochondrial genomes from the land snail Cornu aspersum were determined. The mitogenome has a length of 14050 bp, and it encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and two ribosomal RNA genes. It also includes nine small intergene spacers, and a large AT-rich intergenic spacer. The intra-specific divergence analysis revealed that COX1 has the lower genetic differentiation, while the most divergent genes were NADH1, NADH3 and NADH4. With the exception of Euhadra herklotsi, the structural comparisons showed the same gene order within the family Helicidae, and nearly identical gene organization to that found in order Pulmonata. Phylogenetic reconstruction recovered Basommatophora as polyphyletic group, whereas Eupulmonata and Pulmonata as paraphyletic groups. Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood analyses showed that C. aspersum is a close relative of Cepaea nemoralis, and with the other Helicidae species form a sister group of Albinaria caerulea, supporting the monophyly of the Stylommatophora clade.

  13. Comparative genomic analysis of mitochondrial protein-coding genes in Veneroida clams: Analysis of superfamily-specific genomic and evolutionary features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Heebal; Nam, Bo-Hye; An, Cheul Min; Park, Jung Youn; Park, Kyu-Hyun; Huh, Chul-Sung; Kim, Eun Bae

    2015-12-01

    Veneroida is the largest order of bivalves, and these clams are commercially important in Asian countries. Although numerous studies have focused on the genomic characters of individual species or genera in Veneroida, superfamily-specific genomic characters have not been determined. In this study, we performed a comparative genomic analysis of 12 mitochondrial protein coding genes (PCGs) from 25 clams in six Veneroida superfamilies to determine genomic and evolutionary features of each superfamily. Length and distribution of nucleotides encoding the PCGs were too variable to define superfamily-specific genomic characters. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PCGs are suitable for classification of species in three superfamilies: Cardioidea, Mactroidea, and Veneroidea. However, one species classified in Tellinoidea, Sinonovacula constricta, was evolutionarily closer to Solenoidea clams than Tellinoidea clams. dN/dS analysis showed that positively selected sites in NADH dehydrogenase subunit, nd4 and subunit of ATP synthase, atp6 were present in Mactroidea. Differences in selected sites in the nd4 and atp6 could be caused by superfamily-level differences in sodium transport or ATP synthesis functions, respectively. These differences in selected sites in NADH may have conferred these animals, which have low motility and do not generally move, with increased flexibility to maintain homeostasis in the face of osmotic pressure. Our study provides insight into evolutionary traits as well as facilitates identification of veneroids. PMID:26343338

  14. Bee pollen improves muscle protein and energy metabolism in malnourished old rats through interfering with the Mtor signaling pathway and mitochondrial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Jérôme; Cardinault, Nicolas; Patrac, Véronique; Berry, Alexandre; Giraudet, Christophe; Collin, Marie-Laure; Chanet, Audrey; Tagliaferri, Camille; Denis, Philippe; Pouyet, Corinne; Boirie, Yves; Walrand, Stéphane

    2014-12-01

    Although the management of malnutrition is a priority in older people, this population shows a resistance to refeeding. Fresh bee pollen contains nutritional substances of interest for malnourished people. The aim was to evaluate the effect of fresh bee pollen supplementation on refeeding efficiency in old malnourished rats. Male 22-month-old Wistar rats were undernourished by reducing food intake for 12 weeks. The animals were then renourished for three weeks with the same diet supplemented with 0%, 5% or 10% of fresh monofloral bee pollen. Due to changes in both lean mass and fat mass, body weight decreased during malnutrition and increased after refeeding with no between-group differences (p < 0.0001). Rats refed with the fresh bee pollen-enriched diets showed a significant increase in muscle mass compared to restricted rats (p < 0.05). The malnutrition period reduced the muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR/p70S6kinase/4eBP1 activation, and only the 10%-pollen diet was able to restore these parameters. Mitochondrial activity was depressed with food restriction and was only improved by refeeding with the fresh bee pollen-containing diets. In conclusion, refeeding diets that contain fresh monofloral bee pollen improve muscle mass and metabolism in old, undernourished rats. PMID:25470375

  15. Bee Pollen Improves Muscle Protein and Energy Metabolism in Malnourished Old Rats through Interfering with the Mtor Signaling Pathway and Mitochondrial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Salles

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the management of malnutrition is a priority in older people, this population shows a resistance to refeeding. Fresh bee pollen contains nutritional substances of interest for malnourished people. The aim was to evaluate the effect of fresh bee pollen supplementation on refeeding efficiency in old malnourished rats. Male 22-month-old Wistar rats were undernourished by reducing food intake for 12 weeks. The animals were then renourished for three weeks with the same diet supplemented with 0%, 5% or 10% of fresh monofloral bee pollen. Due to changes in both lean mass and fat mass, body weight decreased during malnutrition and increased after refeeding with no between-group differences (p < 0.0001. Rats refed with the fresh bee pollen-enriched diets showed a significant increase in muscle mass compared to restricted rats (p < 0.05. The malnutrition period reduced the muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR/p70S6kinase/4eBP1 activation, and only the 10%-pollen diet was able to restore these parameters. Mitochondrial activity was depressed with food restriction and was only improved by refeeding with the fresh bee pollen-containing diets. In conclusion, refeeding diets that contain fresh monofloral bee pollen improve muscle mass and metabolism in old, undernourished rats.

  16. Human mitochondrial diseases caused by lack of taurine modification in mitochondrial tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tsutomu; Nagao, Asuteka; Suzuki, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations that cause mitochondrial dysfunction are responsible for a wide spectrum of human diseases, referred to as mitochondrial diseases. Pathogenic point mutations are found frequently in genes encoding mitochondrial (mt) tRNAs, indicating that impaired functioning of mutant mt tRNAs is the primary cause of mitochondrial dysfunction. Our previous studies revealed the absence of posttranscriptional taurine modification at the anticodon wobble uridine in mutant mt tRNAs isolated from cells derived from patients with two major classes of mitochondrial diseases, MELAS (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes) and MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy associated with ragged red fibers). Defective taurine modification of the mutant mt tRNAs results in a deficiency in protein synthesis as the cognate codons of the mutant mt tRNA cannot be decoded. These findings represent the first evidence of a molecular pathogenesis caused by an RNA modification disorder. PMID:21957023

  17. Bifunctional RNAs Targeting the Intronic Splicing Silencer N1 Increase SMN Levels and Reduce Disease Severity in an Animal Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Erkan Y; Yen, Pei-Fen; Lorson, Christian L.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by loss of survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1). A nearly identical copy gene, SMN2, is present in all SMA patients. Although the SMN2 coding sequence has the potential to produce full-length SMN, nearly 90% of SMN2-derived transcripts are alternatively spliced and encode a truncated protein. SMN2, however, is an excellent therapeutic target. Previously, we developed antisense-based oligonucleotides (bifunctional RNAs) that specifi...

  18. MARCH5 inactivation supports mitochondrial function during neurodegenerative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction with mitochondrial maintenance critical to neuronal survival. The mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MARCH5 has dual roles in the upkeep of mitochondrial function. MARCH5 is involved in targeted degradation of proteins harmful to mitochondria and impacts mitochondrial morphology upstream of the fission protein Drp1. In a neuronal cell model, dominant-negative MARCH5 prevents mitochondrial fragmentation during neurodegenerative stress induced by the neuron-specific reactive oxygen generator 6 hydroxydopamine, the complex I inhibitor rotenone or Alzheimer’s-releated Aβ peptide. In addition, preservation of mitochondrial function in terms of membrane potential and lower reactive oxygen generation was observed following inactivation of MARCH5. Our findings connect MARCH5 to neuronal stress responses and further emphasize the link between mitochondrial dynamics and function.

  19. γ-Synuclein Antibodies Have Neuroprotective Potential on Neuroretinal Cells via Proteins of the Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Corina Wilding; Katharina Bell; Sabine Beck; Sebastian Funke; Norbert Pfeiffer; Grus, Franz H.

    2014-01-01

    The family of synuclein proteins (α, β and γ) are related to neurodegenerative disease e.g. Parkinson disease and Morbus Alzheimer. Additionally, a connection between γ-synuclein and glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells, which finally leads to blindness, exists. The reason for the development of glaucoma is still unknown. Recent studies evaluating the participation of immunological components, demonstrate complex changed antibody ...

  20. Mitochondrial Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Michael W

    2012-01-01

    Viewed through the lens of the genome it contains, the mitochondrion is of unquestioned bacterial ancestry, originating from within the bacterial phylum α-Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria). Accordingly, the endosymbiont hypothesis—the idea that the mitochondrion evolved from a bacterial progenitor via symbiosis within an essentially eukaryotic host cell—has assumed the status of a theory. Yet mitochondrial genome evolution has taken radically different pathways in diverse eukaryotic lineag...

  1. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a purported inhibitor of chaperone protein GRP78, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simmy; Sharma, Natasha; Gonzalez, Reyna; Pao, Peng-Wen; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Louie, Stan G; Pirrung, Michael C; Schönthal, Axel H

    2013-01-01

    Verrucosidin (VCD) belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78) expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD's anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose), but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin). However, VCD's strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin) might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed. PMID:23755268

  2. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a purported inhibitor of chaperone protein GRP78, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmy Thomas

    Full Text Available Verrucosidin (VCD belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78 expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD's anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin. However, VCD's strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed.

  3. Titration of mitochondrial fusion rescues Mff-deficient cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hsiuchen; Ren, Shuxun; Clish, Clary; Jain, Mohit; Mootha, Vamsi; McCaffery, J. Michael; Chan, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial fusion or fission are associated with many pathologies, raising the hope that pharmacological manipulation of mitochondrial dynamics may have therapeutic benefit. This approach assumes that organ physiology can be restored by rebalancing mitochondrial dynamics, but this concept remains to be validated. We addressed this issue by analyzing mice deficient in Mff, a protein important for mitochondrial fission. Mff mutant mice die at 13 wk as a result of severe dilated ca...

  4. CFTR activity and mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Gabriel Valdivieso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease, caused by mutations in the gene encoding the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. Before the discovery of the CFTR gene, several hypotheses attempted to explain the etiology of this disease, including the possible role of a chloride channel, diverse alterations in mitochondrial functions, the overexpression of the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase and a deficiency in the cytosolic enzyme glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the diverse mitochondrial changes found, some authors proposed that the affected gene should codify for a mitochondrial protein. Later, the CFTR cloning and the demonstration of its chloride channel activity turned the mitochondrial, lysosomal and cytosolic hypotheses obsolete. However, in recent years, using new approaches, several investigators reported similar or new alterations of mitochondrial functions in Cystic Fibrosis, thus rediscovering a possible role of mitochondria in this disease. Here, we review these CFTR-driven mitochondrial defects, including differential gene expression, alterations in oxidative phosphorylation, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress, apoptosis and innate immune response, which might explain some characteristics of the complex CF phenotype and reveals potential new targets for therapy.

  5. Mitochondrial efficiency and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance, "a relative impairment in the ability of insulin to exert its effects on glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in target tissues," has many detrimental effects on metabolism and is strongly correlated to deposition of lipids in non-adipose tissues. Mitochondria are the main cellular sites devoted to ATP production and fatty acid oxidation. Therefore, a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the onset of skeletal muscle insulin resistance has been proposed and many studies have dealt with possible alteration in mitochondrial function in obesity and diabetes, both in humans and animal models. Data reporting evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in type two diabetes mellitus are numerous, even though the issue that this reduced mitochondrial function is causal in the development of the disease is not yet solved, also because a variety of parameters have been used in the studies carried out on this subject. By assessing the alterations in mitochondrial efficiency as well as the impact of this parameter on metabolic homeostasis of skeletal muscle cells, we have obtained results that allow us to suggest that an increase in mitochondrial efficiency precedes and therefore can contribute to the development of high-fat-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. PMID:25601841

  6. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    OpenAIRE

    Takasugi Masaki; Yagi Shintaro; Hirabayashi Keiji; Shiota Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA), and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes) has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the...

  7. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A reduction and mitochondrial dysfunction in Hashimoto's hypothyroid myopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Siciliano, Gabriele; Monzani, Fabio; Manca, Maria Laura; Tessa, Alessandra; Caraccio, Nadia; Tozzi, Giulia; Piemonte, Fiorella; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Ferrannini, Eleuterio; Murri, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial changes have been described in muscle tissue in acquired hypothyroidism. Among the molecular mechanisms by which thyroid hormones regulate expression of nuclear genes encoding for regulatory proteins of mitochondrial respiratory function, the mitochondrial transcription factor A (h-mtTFA) has been proposed to be a target of thyroid hormone action. The aim of this study has been to relate h-mtTFA levels in the skeletal muscle of patients affected by Hashimoto's hypoth...

  8. H2O2-Activated Mitochondrial Phospholipase iPLA2 gamma Prevents Lipotoxic Oxidative Stress in Synergy with UCP2, Amplifies Signaling via G-Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR40, and Regulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic beta-Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Zelenka, Jaroslav; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2015), s. 958-972. ISSN 1523-0864 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP303/11/P320; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-02033S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06666S; GA ČR GA15-02051S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : mitochondrial phospholipase iPLA2 gamma * uncoupling protein UCP2 * G-protein coupled receptor - 40 * glucose -stimulated insulin secretion * pancreatic beta cells Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 7.407, year: 2014

  9. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  10. The Mitochondrial RNA Landscape of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Edward M.; Das, Vaijayanti; Seibert, Ryan D.; Andrulis, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that harbor a reduced genome, and expression of that genome requires regulated metabolism of its transcriptome by nuclear-encoded proteins. Despite extensive investigation, a comprehensive map of the yeast mitochondrial transcriptome has not been developed and all of the RNA-metabolizing proteins have not been identified, both of which are prerequisites to elucidating the basic RNA biology of mitochondria. Here, we present a mitochondrial transcriptome ma...

  11. Genetic Variants in Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes Influence AIDS Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Lautenberger, James A; Chinn, Leslie Wei; Malasky, Michael; Sezgin, Efe; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 9...

  12. Dynamin-related protein 1-mediated mitochondrial fission and cerebral ischemia%发动蛋白相关蛋白1介导的线粒体分裂与脑缺血

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢志伟; 朱新永; 徐恩

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drpl) is a major protein for regulating mitochondrial fission.Its activity is associated with the post-translational modification,mainly including phosphorylation,ubiquitination,sumoylation,and S-nitrosylation.During the cerebral ischemia,Drpl is activated and translocates from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial outer membrane,mediates mitochondrial fission and eliminates damaged mitochondria.Drpl plays the important roles in the pathological processes of ischemic neuronal apoptosis,necrotic apoptosis,and mitophagy.Excessive mitochondria fission or accumulation of damaged mitochondria will aggravate neuronal injury.%发动蛋白相关蛋白1(dynamin-related proteinl,Drpl)是调节线粒体分裂的主要蛋白,其活性与翻译后修饰有关,主要包括磷酸化、泛素化、类泛素化以及S-硝基化.在脑缺血时,Drp1被激活并从细胞质向线粒体外膜转位,介导线粒体分裂及受损线粒体的清除,在缺血神经元凋亡、坏死性凋亡、线粒体自噬等病理学过程中起重要作用.线粒体过度分裂或受损线粒体的积聚都会加重神经元损伤.

  13. The mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c strongly influences the order of the headgroup and acyl chains of phosphatidylserine dispersions. A sup 2 H and sup 31 P NMR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordi, W.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, A.; de Kruijff, B. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-03-06

    Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance techniques were used to study the interaction of the mitochondrial precursor protein apocytochrome c with headgroup-deuterated (dioleoylphosphatidyl-L-(2-{sup 2}H{sub 1})serine) and acyl chain deuterated (1,2-(11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})dioleoylphosphatidylserine) dispersions. Binding of the protein to dioleoylphosphatidylserine liposomes results in phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectra typical of phospholipids undergoing fast axial rotation in extended liquid-crystalline bilayers with a reduced residual chemical shift anisotropy and an increased line width. {sup 2}H NMR spectra on headgroup-deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions showed a decrease in quadrupolar splitting and a broadening of the signal on interaction with apocytochrome c. Addition of increasing amounts of apocytochrome c to the acyl chain deuterated dioleoylphosphatidylserine dispersions results in the gradual appearance of a second component in the spectra with a 44% reduced quadrupolar splitting. Such large reduction of the quadrupolar splitting has never been observed for any protein studied yet. The induction of a new spectral component with a well-defined reduced quadrupolar splitting seems to be confined to the N-terminus since addition of a small hydrophilic amino-terminal peptide (residues 1-38) also induces a second component with a strongly reduced quadrupolar splitting. A chemically synthesized peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 2-17 of the presequence of the mitochondrial protein cytochrome oxidase subunit IV also has a large perturbing effect on the order of the acyl chains, indicating that the observed effects may be a property shared by many mitochondrial precursor proteins. Implications of these data for the import of apocytochrome c into mitochondria will be discussed.

  14. Dimerization and Bifunctionality Confer Robustness to the Isocitrate Dehydrogenase Regulatory System in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Joseph P.; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    An important goal of systems biology is to develop quantitative models that explain how specific molecular features give rise to systems-level properties. Metabolic and regulatory pathways that contain multifunctional proteins are especially interesting to study from this perspective because they have frequently been observed to exhibit robustness: the ability for a system to perform its proper function even as levels of its components change. In this study, we use extensive biochemical data and algebraic modeling to develop and analyze a model that shows how robust behavior arises in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) regulatory system of Escherichia coli, which was shown in 1985 to experimentally exhibit robustness. E. coli IDH is regulated by reversible phosphorylation catalyzed by the bifunctional isocitrate dehydrogenase kinase/phosphatase (IDHKP), and the level of IDH activity determines whether carbon flux is directed through the glyoxylate bypass (for growth on two-carbon substrates) or the full tricarboxylic acid cycle. Our model, which incorporates recent structural data on IDHKP, identifies several specific biochemical features of the system (including homodimerization of IDH and bifunctionality of IDHKP) that provide a potential explanation for robustness. Using algebraic techniques, we derive an invariant that summarizes the steady-state relationship between the phospho-forms of IDH. We use the invariant in combination with kinetic data on IDHKP to calculate IDH activity at a range of total IDH levels and find that our model predicts robustness. Our work unifies much of the known biochemistry of the IDH regulatory system into a single quantitative framework and highlights the importance of constructing biochemically realistic models in systems biology. PMID:23192354

  15. Synchronization of cytoplasmic and transferred mitochondrial ribosomal protein gene expression in land plants is linked to Telo-box motif enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xin-Guang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroplasts and mitochondria evolved from the endosymbionts of once free-living eubacteria, and they transferred most of their genes to the host nuclear genome during evolution. The mechanisms used by plants to coordinate the expression of such transferred genes, as well as other genes in the host nuclear genome, are still poorly understood. Results In this paper, we use nuclear-encoded chloroplast (cpRPGs, as well as mitochondrial (mtRPGs and cytoplasmic (euRPGs ribosomal protein genes to study the coordination of gene expression between organelles and the host. Results show that the mtRPGs, but not the cpRPGs, exhibit strongly synchronized expression with euRPGs in all investigated land plants and that this phenomenon is linked to the presence of a telo-box DNA motif in the promoter regions of mtRPGs and euRPGs. This motif is also enriched in the promoter regions of genes involved in DNA replication. Sequence analysis further indicates that mtRPGs, in contrast to cpRPGs, acquired telo-box from the host nuclear genome. Conclusions Based on our results, we propose a model of plant nuclear genome evolution where coordination of activities in mitochondria and chloroplast and other cellular functions, including cell cycle, might have served as a strong selection pressure for the differential acquisition of telo-box between mtRPGs and cpRPGs. This research also highlights the significance of physiological needs in shaping transcriptional regulatory evolution.

  16. DECREASED SYNTHESIS AND INEFFICIENT MITOCHONDRIAL IMPORT OF HSP60 IN A PATIENT WITH A MITOCHONDRIAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUCKRIEDE, A; AGSTERIBBE, E

    1994-01-01

    In a recent paper (Agsteribbe et al. (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 193, 146-154) we suggested deficiency of heat shock protein 60 (hsp60) as the possible cause of a systemic mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with multiple deficiency of mitochondrial enzymes. In this paper we present new data w

  17. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. PMID:27181353

  18. Specific deletion of AMP-activated protein kinase (α1AMPK in murine oocytes alters junctional protein expression and mitochondrial physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Bertoldo

    Full Text Available Oogenesis and folliculogenesis are dynamic processes that are regulated by endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals. These signals are exchanged between the oocyte and the somatic cells of the follicle. Here we analyzed the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis, by using transgenic mice deficient in α1AMPK specifically in the oocyte. We found a decrease of 27% in litter size was observed in ZP3-α1AMPK-/- (ZP3-KO female mice. Following in vitro fertilization, where conditions are stressful for the oocyte and embryo, ZP3-KO oocytes were 68% less likely to pass the 2-cell stage. In vivo and in cumulus-oocyte complexes, several proteins involved in junctional communication, such as connexin37 and N-cadherin were down-regulated in the absence of α1AMPK. While the two signalling pathways (PKA and MAPK involved in the junctional communication between the cumulus/granulosa cells and the oocyte were stimulated in control oocytes, ZP3-KO oocytes exhibited only low phosphorylation of MAPK or CREB proteins. In addition, MII oocytes deficient in α1AMPK had a 3-fold lower ATP concentration, an increase in abnormal mitochondria, and a decrease in cytochrome C and PGC1α levels, suggesting perturbed energy production by mitochondria. The absence of α1AMPK also induced a reduction in histone deacetylase activity, which was associated with an increase in histone H3 acetylation (K9/K14 residues. Together, the results of the present study suggest that absence of AMPK, modifies oocyte quality through energy processes and oocyte/somatic cell communication. The limited effect observed in vivo could be partly due to a favourable follicle microenvironment where nutrients, growth factors, and adequate cell interaction were present. Whereas in a challenging environment such as that of in vitro culture following IVF, the phenotype is revealed.

  19. Natural Compounds Modulating Mitochondrial Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Gibellini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles responsible for several crucial cell functions, including respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of apoptosis; they are also the main intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the last years, a particular interest has been devoted to studying the effects on mitochondria of natural compounds of vegetal origin, quercetin (Qu, resveratrol (RSV, and curcumin (Cur being the most studied molecules. All these natural compounds modulate mitochondrial functions by inhibiting organelle enzymes or metabolic pathways (such as oxidative phosphorylation, by altering the production of mitochondrial ROS and by modulating the activity of transcription factors which regulate the expression of mitochondrial proteins. While Qu displays both pro- and antioxidant activities, RSV and Cur are strong antioxidant, as they efficiently scavenge mitochondrial ROS and upregulate antioxidant transcriptional programmes in cells. All the three compounds display a proapoptotic activity, mediated by the capability to directly cause the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria or indirectly by upregulating the expression of proapoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 family and downregulating antiapoptotic proteins. Interestingly, these effects are particularly evident on proliferating cancer cells and can have important therapeutic implications.

  20. Structural analysis of a recombinant plant bifunctional nuclease TBN1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovaľ, Tomáš; Lipovová, P.; Podzimek, Tomáš; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Dušková, Jarmila; Skálová, Tereza; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    Vol. no 1. Praha : Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association, 2011. s. 29. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology /9./. 24.03.2011-26.03.2011, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0757; GA ČR GA310/09/1407; GA ČR GA521/09/1214 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : bifunctional nuclease * cancer * x-ray analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Bifunctional chelating agents for targeted α-particle radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An α-emitting radionuclide is proposed as a better choice for application in radiotherapy of either leukemias or lymphomas due to very high cytotoxicity, short emission path length, and immediate energy deposition minimizing collateral cytotoxicity. Metallic α-emitters that have been studied are 212Bi and 213Bi. Bifunctional derivatives of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) were found to form Bi(III) complexes that were labile in vivo. Pre-clinical experiments confirmed both the stability of the CHX-DTPA ligands for the Bi(III) isotopes and the therapeutic applicability of these α-emitting isotopes

  2. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes

  3. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus;

    2014-01-01

    determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  4. A mitochondrial import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier

    OpenAIRE

    Söllner, Thomas; Griffiths, Gareth; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Neupert, Walter

    1990-01-01

    We have identified a mitochondrial outer membrane protein of 72 kd (MOM72) that exhibits the properties of an import receptor for the ADP/ATP carrier (AAC), the most abundant mitochondrial protein. Monospecific antibodies and Fab fragments against MOM72 selectively inhibit import of AAC at the level of specific binding to the mitochondria. AAC bound to the mitochondrial surface is coprecipitated with antibodies against MOM72 after lysis of mitochondria with detergent. MOM72 thus has a complem...

  5. [Exercise and aging: regulation of mitochondrial function and redox system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian-Kang

    2014-10-01

    Evidence shows that aging is closely related to mitochondrial decay and redox imbalance. With aging, both mitochondrial content and protein synthesis declined and free radicals, the by-products of mitochondrial metabolism and their oxidation to lipids, proteins and nuclear acids increased. The age-related declines in mitochondrial function and redox imbalance affect physical function, induce insulin resistance and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, thus, play a major role in regulation of life span. Therefore, mitochondrion may be the most important determinant of life span. Increasing evidence demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise could prevent age-related diseases and improve life quality of aged people. Exercise may possibly stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II antioxidant defense system to regulate mitochondrial function and balance of redox system. Therefore, regular aerobic exercise may prevent age-related diseases, increase life quality and prolong life span through regulation of mitochondrial function and redox balance. PMID:25764789

  6. Improved homing of endothelial progenitor cells by the bispecific protein GPVI-CD133

    OpenAIRE

    Schönberger, T.; H. Langer; Gauß, A; Hafner, R; von der Ruhr, J; Schumm, M.; Bühring, HJ; van Zandvoort, M; Jung, G; Skutella, T.; Gawaz, M

    2011-01-01

    We designed a bifunctional protein, capable of capturing circulating endothelial progenitor cells to collagen-rich vascular lesions. The protein consists of the soluble platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and an antibody to CD133. This construct substantially mediates EPC homing to vascular lesions. Furthermore, it augments reendothelialization of vascular lesions and reduces the extent of myocardial infarction. Therefore, this bifunctional protein could be a potential new therapeutic ...

  7. GST-TAT-SOD: Cell Permeable Bifunctional Antioxidant Enzyme-A Potential Selective Radioprotector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianru; He, Huocong; Su, Ying; Zheng, Guangjin; Wu, Junxin; Liu, Shutao; Rao, Pingfan

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) fusion of TAT was proved to be radioprotective in our previous work. On that basis, a bifunctional recombinant protein which was the fusion of glutathione S-transferase (GST), SOD, and TAT was constructed and named GST-TAT-SOD. Herein we report the investigation of the cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating activity, and in vitro radioprotective effect of GST-TAT-SOD compared with wild SOD, single-function recombinant protein SOD-TAT, and amifostine. We demonstrated that wild SOD had little radioprotective effect on irradiated L-02 and Hep G2 cells while amifostine was protective to both cell lines. SOD-TAT or GST-TAT-SOD pretreatment 3 h prior to radiation protects irradiated normal liver cells against radiation damage by eliminating intracellular excrescent superoxide, reducing cellular MDA level, enhancing cellular antioxidant ability and colony formation ability, and reducing apoptosis rate. Compared with SOD-TAT, GST-TAT-SOD was proved to have better protective effect on irradiated normal liver cells and minimal effect on irradiated hepatoma cells. Besides, GST-TAT-SOD was safe for normal cells and effectively transduced into different organs in mice, including the brain. The characteristics of this protein suggest that it may be a potential radioprotective agent in cancer therapy better than amifostine. Fusion of two antioxidant enzymes and cell-penetrating peptides is potentially valuable in the development of radioprotective agent. PMID:27313832

  8. GST-TAT-SOD: Cell Permeable Bifunctional Antioxidant Enzyme—A Potential Selective Radioprotector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianru; He, Huocong; Su, Ying; Zheng, Guangjin; Wu, Junxin; Liu, Shutao; Rao, Pingfan

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) fusion of TAT was proved to be radioprotective in our previous work. On that basis, a bifunctional recombinant protein which was the fusion of glutathione S-transferase (GST), SOD, and TAT was constructed and named GST-TAT-SOD. Herein we report the investigation of the cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating activity, and in vitro radioprotective effect of GST-TAT-SOD compared with wild SOD, single-function recombinant protein SOD-TAT, and amifostine. We demonstrated that wild SOD had little radioprotective effect on irradiated L-02 and Hep G2 cells while amifostine was protective to both cell lines. SOD-TAT or GST-TAT-SOD pretreatment 3 h prior to radiation protects irradiated normal liver cells against radiation damage by eliminating intracellular excrescent superoxide, reducing cellular MDA level, enhancing cellular antioxidant ability and colony formation ability, and reducing apoptosis rate. Compared with SOD-TAT, GST-TAT-SOD was proved to have better protective effect on irradiated normal liver cells and minimal effect on irradiated hepatoma cells. Besides, GST-TAT-SOD was safe for normal cells and effectively transduced into different organs in mice, including the brain. The characteristics of this protein suggest that it may be a potential radioprotective agent in cancer therapy better than amifostine. Fusion of two antioxidant enzymes and cell-penetrating peptides is potentially valuable in the development of radioprotective agent. PMID:27313832

  9. GST-TAT-SOD: Cell Permeable Bifunctional Antioxidant Enzyme—A Potential Selective Radioprotector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianru Pan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD fusion of TAT was proved to be radioprotective in our previous work. On that basis, a bifunctional recombinant protein which was the fusion of glutathione S-transferase (GST, SOD, and TAT was constructed and named GST-TAT-SOD. Herein we report the investigation of the cytotoxicity, cell-penetrating activity, and in vitro radioprotective effect of GST-TAT-SOD compared with wild SOD, single-function recombinant protein SOD-TAT, and amifostine. We demonstrated that wild SOD had little radioprotective effect on irradiated L-02 and Hep G2 cells while amifostine was protective to both cell lines. SOD-TAT or GST-TAT-SOD pretreatment 3 h prior to radiation protects irradiated normal liver cells against radiation damage by eliminating intracellular excrescent superoxide, reducing cellular MDA level, enhancing cellular antioxidant ability and colony formation ability, and reducing apoptosis rate. Compared with SOD-TAT, GST-TAT-SOD was proved to have better protective effect on irradiated normal liver cells and minimal effect on irradiated hepatoma cells. Besides, GST-TAT-SOD was safe for normal cells and effectively transduced into different organs in mice, including the brain. The characteristics of this protein suggest that it may be a potential radioprotective agent in cancer therapy better than amifostine. Fusion of two antioxidant enzymes and cell-penetrating peptides is potentially valuable in the development of radioprotective agent.

  10. Excessive reactive oxygen species induces apoptosis in fibroblasts: Role of mitochondrially accumulated hyaluronic acid binding protein 1 (HABP1/p32/gC1qR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constitutively expressed HABP1 in normal murine fibroblast cell line induces growth perturbation, morphological abnormalities alongwith initiation of apoptosis. Here, we demonstrate that though HABP1 accumulation started in mitochondria from 48 hr of growth, induction of apoptosis with the release of cytochrome c and apoptosome complex formation occurred only after 60 hr. This mitochondrial dysfunction was due to gradual increase in ROS generation in HABP1 overexpressing cells. Along with ROS generation, increased Ca2+ influx in mitochondria leading to drop in membrane potential was evident. Interestingly, upon expression of HABP1, the respiratory chain complex I was shown to be significantly inhibited. Electronmicrograph confirmed defective mitochondrial ultrastructure. The reduction in oxidant generation and drop in apoptotic cell population accomplished by disruption of HABP1 expression, corroborating the fact that excess ROS generation in HABP1 overexpressing cells leading to apoptosis was due to mitochondrial HABP1 accumulation

  11. The Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins TANG2 and ORGANELLE TRANSCRIPT PROCESSING439 Are Involved in the Splicing of the Multipartite nad5 Transcript Encoding a Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Falcon de Longevialle, Andéol; Li, Yunhai; Lowe, Elizabeth; Tanz, Sandra K; Smith, Caroline; Bevan, Michael W; Small, Ian

    2014-06-23

    Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins constitute a large family of RNA-binding proteins in higher plants (around 450 genes in Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]), mostly targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria. Many of them are involved in organelle posttranscriptional processes, in a very specific manner. Splicing is necessary to remove the group II introns, which interrupt the coding sequences of several genes encoding components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The nad5 gene is fragmented in five exons, belonging to three distinct transcription units. Its maturation requires two cis- and two trans-splicing events. These steps need to be performed in a very precise order to generate a functional transcript. Here, we characterize two pentatricopeptide repeat proteins, ORGANELLE TRANSCRIPT PROCESSING439 and TANG2, and show that they are involved in the removal of nad5 introns 2 and 3, respectively. To our knowledge, they are the first two specific nad5 splicing factors found in plants so far. PMID:24958715

  12. The Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins TANG2 and ORGANELLE TRANSCRIPT PROCESSING439 Are Involved in the Splicing of the Multipartite nad5 Transcript Encoding a Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Falcon de Longevialle, Andéol; Li, Yunhai; Lowe, Elizabeth; Tanz, Sandra K.; Smith, Caroline; Bevan, Michael W.; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins constitute a large family of RNA-binding proteins in higher plants (around 450 genes in Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana]), mostly targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria. Many of them are involved in organelle posttranscriptional processes, in a very specific manner. Splicing is necessary to remove the group II introns, which interrupt the coding sequences of several genes encoding components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The nad5 gene is fragmented in five exons, belonging to three distinct transcription units. Its maturation requires two cis- and two trans-splicing events. These steps need to be performed in a very precise order to generate a functional transcript. Here, we characterize two pentatricopeptide repeat proteins, ORGANELLE TRANSCRIPT PROCESSING439 and TANG2, and show that they are involved in the removal of nad5 introns 2 and 3, respectively. To our knowledge, they are the first two specific nad5 splicing factors found in plants so far. PMID:24958715

  13. Ablation of the mitochondrial complex IV assembly protein Surf1 leads to increased expression of the UPR(MT) and increased resistance to oxidative stress in primary cultures of fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaoh, Gavin; Pulliam, Daniel; Hill, Shauna; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-08-01

    Mice deficient in the electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV assembly protein SURF1 have reduced assembly and activity of cytochrome c oxidase that is associated with an upregulation of components of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(MT)) and increased mitochondrial number. We hypothesized that the upregulation of proteins associated with the UPR(MT) in response to reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity in Surf1(-/-) mice might contribute to increased stress resistance. To test this hypothesis we asked whether primary cultures of fibroblasts from Surf1(-/-) mice exhibit enhanced resistance to stressors compared to wild-type fibroblasts. Here we show that primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Surf1(-/-) mice have increased expression of UPR(MT) components ClpP and Hsp60, and increased expression of Lon protease. Fibroblasts from Surf1(-/-) mice are significantly more resistant to cell death caused by oxidative stress induced by paraquat or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide compared to cells from wild-type mice. In contrast, Surf1(-/-) fibroblasts show no difference in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide stress. The enhanced cell survival in response to paraquat or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide in Surf1(-/-) fibroblasts compared to wild-type fibroblasts is associated with induced expression of Lon, ClpP, and Hsp60, increased maximal respiration, and increased reserve capacity as measured using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Overall these data support a protective role for the activation of the UPR(MT) in cell survival. PMID:27208630

  14. An advanced system of the mitochondrial processing peptidase and core protein family in Trypanosoma brucei and multiple origins of the core I subunit in eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mach, J.; Poliak, Pavel; Matušková, Anna; Žárský, V.; Janata, Jiří; Lukeš, Julius; Tachezy, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2013), s. 860-875. ISSN 1759-6653 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/1061; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021620858 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : bc1 complex * evolution * mitochondrial processing peptidase * mitochondrial targeting sequence * trypanosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.532, year: 2013

  15. Type I interferon production during herpes simplex virus infection is controlled by cell-type-specific viral recognition through Toll-like receptor 9, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway, and novel recognition systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Brandtoft; Sørensen, Louise Nørgaard; Malmgaard, Lene; Ank, Nina; Baines, JD; Chen, ZJ; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2007-01-01

    Recognition of viruses by germ line-encoded pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system is essential for rapid production of type I interferon (IFN) and early antiviral defense. We investigated the mechanisms of viral recognition governing production of type I IFN during herpes...... fibroblasts, where the virus was able to replicate, HSV-induced IFN-alpha/beta production was dependent on both viral entry and replication, and ablated in cells unable to signal through the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein pathway. Thus, during an HSV infection in vivo, multiple mechanisms of...

  16. Effect of p53 on mitochondrial morphology, import, and assembly in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem, Ayesha; Iqbal, Sobia; Zhang, Yuan; Hood, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether p53 regulates mitochondrial function via changes in mitochondrial protein import, complex IV (COX) assembly, or the expression of key proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics and degradation. Mitochondria from p53 KO mice displayed ultra-structural alterations and were more punctate in appearance. This was accompanied by protein-specific alterations in fission, fusion, and mitophagy-related proteins. However, matrix-destined protein impo...

  17. Lipid Biosynthesis Coordinates a Mitochondrial-to-Cytosolic Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Eui; Grant, Ana Rodrigues; Simic, Milos S; Kohnz, Rebecca A; Nomura, Daniel K; Durieux, Jenni; Riera, Celine E; Sanchez, Melissa; Kapernick, Erik; Wolff, Suzanne; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Defects in mitochondrial metabolism have been increasingly linked with age-onset protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's. In response to protein-folding stress, compartment-specific unfolded protein responses (UPRs) within the ER, mitochondria, and cytosol work in parallel to ensure cellular protein homeostasis. While perturbation of individual compartments can make other compartments more susceptible to protein stress, the cellular conditions that trigger cross-communication between the individual UPRs remain poorly understood. We have uncovered a conserved, robust mechanism linking mitochondrial protein homeostasis and the cytosolic folding environment through changes in lipid homeostasis. Metabolic restructuring caused by mitochondrial stress or small-molecule activators trigger changes in gene expression coordinated uniquely by both the mitochondrial and cytosolic UPRs, protecting the cell from disease-associated proteins. Our data suggest an intricate and unique system of communication between UPRs in response to metabolic changes that could unveil new targets for diseases of protein misfolding. PMID:27610574

  18. A Novel Bifunctional Hybrid with Marine Bacterium Alkaline Phosphatase and Far Eastern Holothurian Mannan-Binding Lectin Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasily; Kovalchuk, Svetlana; Bulgakov, Alexander; Likhatskaya, Galina; Son, Oksana; Rasskazov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP) and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ) was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25±5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens. PMID:25397876

  19. A novel bifunctional hybrid with marine bacterium alkaline phosphatase and Far Eastern holothurian mannan-binding lectin activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Balabanova

    Full Text Available A fusion between the genes encoding the marine bacterium Cobetia marina alkaline phosphatase (CmAP and Far Eastern holothurian Apostichopus japonicus mannan-binding C-type lectin (MBL-AJ was performed. Expression of the fusion gene in E. coli cells resulted in yield of soluble recombinant chimeric protein CmAP/MBL-AJ with the high alkaline phosphatase activity and specificity of the lectin MBL-AJ. The bifunctional hybrid CmAP/MBL-AJ was produced as a dimer with the molecular mass of 200 kDa. The CmAP/MBL-AJ dimer model showed the two-subunit lectin part that is associated with two molecules of alkaline phosphatase functioning independently from each other. The highly active CmAP label genetically linked to MBL-AJ has advantaged the lectin-binding assay in its sensitivity and time. The double substitution A156N/F159K in the lectin domain of CmAP/MBL-AJ has enhanced its lectin activity by 25 ± 5%. The bifunctional hybrid holothurian's lectin could be promising tool for developing non-invasive methods for biological markers assessment, particularly for improving the MBL-AJ-based method for early detection of a malignant condition in cervical specimens.

  20. Exercise training improves vascular mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Rossman, Matthew J; Gifford, Jayson R; Bharath, Leena P; Bauersachs, Johann; Richardson, Russell S; Abel, E Dale; Symons, J David; Riehle, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Exercise training is recognized to improve cardiac and skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity; however, the impact of chronic exercise on vascular mitochondrial respiratory function is unknown. We hypothesized that exercise training concomitantly increases both vascular mitochondrial respiratory capacity and vascular function. Arteries from both sedentary (SED) and swim-trained (EX, 5 wk) mice were compared in terms of mitochondrial respiratory function, mitochondrial content, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, redox balance, nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and vessel function. Mitochondrial complex I and complex I + II state 3 respiration and the respiratory control ratio (complex I + II state 3 respiration/complex I state 2 respiration) were greater in vessels from EX relative to SED mice, despite similar levels of arterial citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, compared with the SED mice, arteries from EX mice displayed elevated transcript levels ofperoxisome proliferative activated receptor-γ coactivator-1αand the downstream targetscytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1,isocitrate dehydrogenase(Idh)2, andIdh3a, increased manganese superoxide dismutase protein expression, increased endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation (Ser(1177)), and suppressed reactive oxygen species generation (allPrespiratory capacity and evidence of improved redox balance, which may, at least in part, be attributable to elevated NO bioavailability, have the potential to protect against age- and disease-related challenges to arterial function. PMID:26825520