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Sample records for bifidobacterium lactis dn-173

  1. Fermented Milk Containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 in Childhood Constipation: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, Merit M.; Chmielewska, Ania; Roseboom, Maaike G.; Crastes, Nolwenn; Perrin, Catherine; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Norbruis, Obbe; Szajewska, Hania; Benninga, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Constipation is a frustrating symptom affecting 3% of children worldwide. A fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis strain DN-173 010 was effective in increasing stool frequency in constipated women. Our aim was to assess the effects of this product in constipated

  2. Effect of the consumption of a fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 on constipation in childhood: a multicentre randomised controlled trial (NTRTC: 1571).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbers, Merit M; Chmielewska, Ania; Roseboom, Maaike G; Boudet, Claire; Perrin, Catherine; Szajewska, Hania; Benninga, Marc A

    2009-03-18

    Constipation is a frustrating symptom affecting 3% of children worldwide. Randomised controlled trials show that both polyethylene glycol and lactulose are effective in increasing defecation frequency in children with constipation. However, in 30-50%, these children reported abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, diarrhoea, nausea and bad taste of the medication. Two recent studies have shown that the fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis strain DN-173 010 is effective in increasing stool frequency in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients with a defecation frequency fermented dairy product is effective in the treatment of constipated children with a defecation frequency fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 or a control product, twice a day, for 3 weeks. During the study all children are instructed to try to defecate on the toilet for 5-10 minutes after each meal (3 times a day) and daily complete a standardized bowel diary. Primary endpoint is stool frequency. Secondary endpoints are stool consistency, faecal incontinence frequency, pain during defecation, digestive symptoms (abdominal pain, flatulence), adverse effects (nausea, diarrhoea, bad taste) and intake of rescue medication (Bisacodyl). Rate of success and rate of responders are also evaluated, with success defined as > or = 3 bowel movements per week and or = 3 on the last week of product consumption. To demonstrate that the success percentage in the intervention group will be 35% and the success percentage in the control group (acidified milk without ferments, toilet training, bowel diary) will be 15%, with alpha 0.05 and power 80%, a total sample size of 160 patients was calculated. This study is aimed to show that the fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis strain DN-173 010 is effective in increasing stool frequency after 3 weeks of product consumption in children with functional constipation and a defecation

  3. Effect of the consumption of a fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 on constipation in childhood: a multicentre randomised controlled trial (NTRTC: 1571

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Catherine

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constipation is a frustrating symptom affecting 3% of children worldwide. Randomised controlled trials show that both polyethylene glycol and lactulose are effective in increasing defecation frequency in children with constipation. However, in 30–50%, these children reported abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, diarrhoea, nausea and bad taste of the medication. Two recent studies have shown that the fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis strain DN-173 010 is effective in increasing stool frequency in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients with a defecation frequency Methods/design It is a two nation (The Netherlands and Poland double-blind, placebo-controlled randomised multicentre trial in which 160 constipated children (age 3–16 years with a defecation frequency Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 or a control product, twice a day, for 3 weeks. During the study all children are instructed to try to defecate on the toilet for 5–10 minutes after each meal (3 times a day and daily complete a standardized bowel diary. Primary endpoint is stool frequency. Secondary endpoints are stool consistency, faecal incontinence frequency, pain during defecation, digestive symptoms (abdominal pain, flatulence, adverse effects (nausea, diarrhoea, bad taste and intake of rescue medication (Bisacodyl. Rate of success and rate of responders are also evaluated, with success defined as ≥ 3 bowel movements per week and ≤1 faecal incontinence episode over the last 2 weeks of product consumption and responder defined as a subject reporting a stool frequency ≥ 3 on the last week of product consumption. To demonstrate that the success percentage in the intervention group will be 35% and the success percentage in the control group (acidified milk without ferments, toilet training, bowel diary will be 15%, with alpha 0.05 and power 80%, a total sample size of 160 patients was calculated. Conclusion This

  4. Effect of a fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 on the health-related quality of life and symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome in adults in primary care: a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonnet, D; Chassany, O; Ducrotte, P; Picard, C; Mouret, M; Mercier, C-H; Matuchansky, C

    2007-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been rarely evaluated as a primary endpoint in the assessment of the effect of probiotics on the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To study the effects of fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium animalis DN-173 010 and yoghurt strains on the IBS in a multicentre, double-blind, controlled trial. A total of 274 primary care adults with constipation-predominant IBS (Rome II) were randomized to consume for 6 weeks either the test fermented milk or a heat-treated yoghurt (control). HRQoL and digestive symptoms were assessed after 3 and 6 weeks on an intention-to-treat population of 267 subjects. The HRQoL discomfort score, the primary endpoint, improved (P food on discomfort HRQoL score and bloating in constipation-predominant IBS, and on stool frequency in subjects with <3 stools/week.

  5. Study Protocol Effect of the consumption of a fermented dairy product containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173 010 on constipation in childhood: a multicentre randomised controlled trial (NTRTC: 1571)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, M.M.; Chmielewska, A.; Roseboom, M.G.; Boudet, C.; Perrin, C.; Szajewska, H.; Benninga, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Constipation is a frustrating symptom affecting 3% of children worldwide. Randomised controlled trials show that both polyethylene glycol and lactulose are effective in increasing defecation frequency in children with constipation. However, in 30-50%, these children reported

  6. Diversity of the subspecies Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunesova, Vera; Killer, Jiri; Javurkova, Barbora; Vlkova, Eva; Tejnecky, Vaclav; Musilova, Sarka; Rada, Vojtech

    2017-04-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are well-known health-promoting probiotics used commercially. B. animalis subsp. lactis has been isolated from different sources, and little is known about animal isolates of this taxon. The aim of this study was to examine the genotypic and phenotypic diversity between B. animalis subsp. lactis strains different animal hosts including Cameroon sheep, Barbary sheep, okapi, mouflon, German shepard and to compare to BB12, food isolates and the collection strain DSM 10140. Ten strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis from different sources were characterised by phenotyping, fingerprinting, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Regardless of origin, MLST and phylogenetic analyses revealed a close relationship between strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis with commercial and animal origin with the exception of isolates from ovine cheese, mouflon and German Shepard dog. Moreover, isolates from dog and mouflon showed significant differences in fermentation profiles and peptide mass fingerprints (MALDI-TOF). Results indicated phenotypic and genotypic diversity among strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis Subsp. Lactis (B. lactis) Strain BB-12-Supplemented Yogurt in Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tina P; Ba, Zhaoyong; Sanders, Mary E; D'Amico, Frank J; Roberts, Robert F; Smith, Keisha H; Merenstein, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that may provide health benefits to the individual when consumed in sufficient quantities. For studies conducted on health or disease endpoints on probiotics in the United States, the Food and Administration has required those studies to be conducted as investigational new drugs. This phase I, double-blinded, randomized, controlled safety study represents the first requirement of this pathway. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of children. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of BB-12-supplemented yogurt on the gut microbiota of the children. Sixty children ages 1 to 5 years were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12-supplemented yogurt or nonsupplemented control yogurt daily for 10 days. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, as determined by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 186 nonserious adverse events were reported, with no significant differences between the control and BB-12 groups. No significant changes due to probiotic treatment were observed in the gut microbiota of the study cohort. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well-tolerated when consumed by healthy children. The present study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in different disease states.

  8. Insights into physiological traits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 through membrane proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Hjernø, Karin; Østerlund, Eva Christina

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 is a widely used probiotic strain associated with a variety of health-promoting traits. There is, however, only limited knowledge available regarding the membrane proteome and the proteins involved in oligosaccharide transport in BB-12. We applied two ......, phosphate or exopolysaccharides, or to belong to the F1F0-ATP-synthetase complex and the protein translocation machinery, respectively....

  9. Consumption of Yogurt Containing Probiotic Bifidobacterium Lactis Reduces Streptococcus mutans in Orthodontic Patients

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    Armelia Sari Widyarman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Probiotic bacteria is commonly used as a food supplement intended to benefit the host by improving intestinal bacterial balance. Probiotics have also been investigated from the perspective of oral health. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of daily intake of yogurt containing probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (B. lactis on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans counts in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods: Saliva samples were collected from each subject (n = 7; mean age, 21 years using spitting method in centrifuge tubes at baseline and two weeks after daily probiotic yogurt consumption. B. lactis BB-12 and S. mutans ATCC 25175 were cultured in BHI-broth (37ºC, anaerobic conditions. After 48-h incubation, the number of colonies on each dilution plate was used to extrapolate a standard curve. The total number of target DNA molecules were identified using real-time PCR followed by SYBR Green reagents and 16S rRNA gene specific primers S. mutans and B. lactis BB-12. Data were analyzed statistically using paired-sample t-tests. Results: Statistical evaluation indicated that there was a significant reduction in the presence of S. mutans before probiotic yogurt consumption, (4.73 ± 1.43 log10 CFU/mL and after two weeks of daily consumption of probiotic yogurt, (4.03 ± 0.77 log10 CFU/mL, p=0.001. Moreover, no B. lactis was found in the saliva of any of the subjects before probiotic consumption, but after two weeks of consumption, B. lactis was found in the saliva of four subjects. Conclusions: Consuming probiotic yogurt containing B. lactis reduced the quantity of S. mutans in the saliva of subjects during fixed orthodontic treatment. Thus, the probiotic bacteria could be beneficial in improving oral health.

  10. The anti-diabetic activity of Bifidobacterium lactis HY8101 in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-H; Huh, C-S; Choi, I-D; Jeong, J-W; Ku, H-K; Ra, J-H; Kim, T-Y; Kim, G-B; Sim, J-H; Ahn, Y-T

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Bifidobacterium lactis HY8101 on insulin resistance induced using tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in rat L6 skeletal muscle cells and on the KK-A(Y) mouse noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) model. The treatment using HY8101 improved the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and translocation of GLUT4 via the insulin signalling pathways AKT and IRS-1(Tyr) in TNF-α-treated L6 cells. HY8101 increased the mRNA levels of GLUT4 and several insulin sensitivity-related genes (PPAR-γ) in TNF-α-treated L6 cells. In KK-A(Y) mice, HY8101 decreased fasting insulin and blood glucose and significantly improved insulin tolerance. HY8101 improved diabetes-induced plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels and increased the muscle glycogen content. We observed concurrent transcriptional changes in the skeletal muscle tissue and the liver. In the skeletal muscle tissue, the glycogen synthesis-related gene pp-1 and GLUT4 were up-regulated in mice receiving HY8101 treatment. In the liver, the hepatic gluconeogenesis-regulated genes (PCK1 and G6PC) were down-regulated in mice receiving HY8101 treatment. Bifidobacterium lactis HY8101 can be used to moderate glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity in mice and in cells. Bifidobacterium lactis HY8101 might have potential as a probiotic candidate for alleviating metabolic syndromes such as diabetes. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Prebiotic Effects of Agave salmiana Fructans in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis Cultures.

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    Castro-Zavala, Adriana; Juárez-Flores, Bertha I; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Delgado-Portales, Rosa E; Aguirre-Rivera, Juan R; Alcocer-Gouyonnet, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Agave salmiana is a fructan rich species that is widely distributed in Mexico. The aim of this investigation was to extract the fructans of A. salmiana and evaluate their prebiotic effect in 48 hours in vitro cultures of Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus and to compare this effect with other available fructan sources. A significant difference in pH, optical density and biomass was found in the cultures depending on the source of fructans and the type of bacteria. It was possible to determine a dose-response effect of the A. salmiana fructans and the growth of the studied strains.

  12. Fermentation of protopanaxadiol type ginsenosides (PD) with probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Joanne Sh; Yeo, Chia-Rou; Popovich, David G

    2017-07-01

    Ginsenosides are believed to be the principal components behind the pharmacological actions of ginseng, and their bioactive properties are closely related to the type, position, and number of sugar moieties attached to the aglycone; thus, modification of the sugar chains may markedly change their biological activities. In this study, major protopanaxadiol type ginsenosides (PD) Rb1, Rc, and Rb2 were isolated from Panax ginseng and were transformed using two probiotic strains namely Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001 to obtain specific deglycosylated ginsenosides. It was demonstrated that B. lactis transformed ginsenosides Rb1, Rc, and Rb2 to Rd within 1 h of fermentation and rare ginsenoside F2 by the conversion of Rd after 12-h fermentation. The maximum Rd concentration was 147.52 ± 1.45 μg/mL after 48-h fermentation as compared to 45.85 ± 0.71 μg/mL before fermentation. In contrast, L. rhamnosus transformed Rb1, Rc, and Rb2 into Rd as the final metabolite after 72-h fermentation. B. lactis displayed significantly (p fermentation. The present study suggests that the fermentation of major PD type ginsenosides with B. lactis Bi-07 may serve as an effective means to afford bioactive deglycosylated ginsenosides and to create novel ginsenoside extracts.

  13. Selective enumeration and viability of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis in a new fermented milk product Enumeração seletiva e viabilidade de Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis em um novo produto lácteo fermentado

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    Adriane Elisabete Costa Antunes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the key focuses of today's dairy industry worldwide is the continued development of new products, especially probiotic-based products. Buttermilk is originally a by-product of butter making fermented by Mesophilic Aromatic Cultures (MAC. It can also be made by fermentation of pasteurized whole milk or skimmed milk. This product is not marketed in Brazil. The objectives of this work were: (1 to develop a selective medium for Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis enumeration and (2 to determine the viability of this microorganism during the shelf life of the buttermilk. Skim milk added with 10% sucrose or 0.03% sucralose was pasteurized and inoculated with a composite starter culture consisting of 1% MAC (containing Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 2% Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To attain selective counts of Bif. animalis subsp. lactis the MRS agar supplemented with 0.5% L-cysteine hydrochloride at 10%, 1% lithium chloride at 10%, 0.01% aniline blue and 0.5% dicloxacillin at 0.1% was modified by increasing the antibiotic concentration, addition of NaCl, adjusting pH to 4.8 or increasing the incubation temperature (from 37 to 45ºC. Raising the incubation temperature to 45ºC was found to be efficient in inhibiting the MAC cultures, even in media not added with dicloxacillin. Bif. animalis subsp. lactis exhibited high viability in the product. The buttermilk product prepared with sucrose and sweetener contained in excess of 10(8 cfu.ml-1 bifidobacteria throughout the shelf life of the product (28 days.Atualmente, um dos principais focos da indústria de laticínios em todo o mundo é o desenvolvimento de novos produtos, especialmente probióticos. Buttermilk é originalmente um sub-produto do processamento da manteiga fermentado por Culturas Aromáticas Mesofílicas (MAC. Pode também ser

  14. EFFECT OF THE CONSUMPTION OF A CHEESE ENRICHED WITH PROBIOTIC ORGANISMS (BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS BI-07 IN IMPROVING SYMPTOMS OF CONSTIPATION

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    Diane Cassia FAVRETTO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Constipation is a very common symptom in the general population. One way of non-pharmacological treatment of constipation is through the addition of probiotics to food. Obectives The aim of this study was to evaluate de effect of the consumption of a fresh cheese, enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the symptoms of constipated women. Methods A randomized controlled trial, carried out in the Basic Health Units of Guaporé's City – RS/Brazil, between january and may 2012, with 30 constipated women. The patients were randomized into two groups whom received, for 30 days, 30 g of fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 (n = 15 or regular fresh cheese (n = 15. Constipation symptoms were evaluated according to ROMA III Consensus, before and after the nutritional intervention. Also, data of clinical and anthropometric characteristics of the individuals were collected. Accepted level of significance 5% (P≤0,05. Results The medium age of the studied population was 37,5±14,4 years in the intervention group and 40,8±12,8 years in the control group. After 30 days we observed that the ingestion of fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 promoted benefic effects on the symptoms of strength to evacuate. Conclusion The consumption of 30g/day of a fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 has beneficial effects on constipation symptoms.

  15. Stimulation of the growth of two probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus Acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium Lactis BL-04, by selected prebiotic canditates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zanten, Gabriella Christina; Knudsen, Anne; Bandsholm, O.

    2009-01-01

    Prebiotics have been shown to support the growth of probiotic bacteria thereby having a beneficial effect on human health. The aim of this work was to evaluate selected and structurally different carbohydrate prebiotic candidate by measuring their capability to stimulate the growth of the two pro...... probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acdophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis BL-04....

  16. Effect of the consumption of a cheese enriched with probiotic organisms (Bifidobacterium lactis bi-07) in improving symptoms of constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Diane Cássia; Pontin, Bruna; Moreira, Thaís Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Constipation is a very common symptom in the general population. One way of non-pharmacological treatment of constipation is through the addition of probiotics to food. The aim of this study was to evaluate de effect of the consumption of a fresh cheese, enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the symptoms of constipated women. A randomized controlled trial, carried out in the Basic Health Units of Guaporé's City - RS/Brazil, between January and May 2012, with 30 constipated women. The patients were randomized into two groups whom received, for 30 days, 30 g of fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 (n = 15) or regular fresh cheese (n = 15). Constipation symptoms were evaluated according to ROMA III Consensus, before and after the nutritional intervention. Also, data of clinical and anthropometric characteristics of the individuals were collected. Accepted level of significance 5% (P≤0,05). The medium age of the studied population was 37,5±14,4 years in the intervention group and 40,8±12,8 years in the control group. After 30 days we observed that the ingestion of fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 promoted benefic effects on the symptoms of strength to evacuate. The consumption of 30g/day of a fresh cheese enriched with Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 has beneficial effects on constipation symptoms.

  17. Use of traditional African fermented beverages as delivery vehicles for Bifidobacterium lactis DSM 10140.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, L D; Kokott, S A; Reid, S J; Abratt, V R

    2005-07-15

    A microencapsulation delivery system for Bifidobacterium lactis, a possible probiotic suited for use by the rural population of South Africa, was evaluated using two existing traditional fermented foods, amasi and mahewu. Gellan/xanthan microcapsules containing viable B. lactis, were tested under simulated physiological conditions, and added to pasteurized beverages. The capsules protected the organism under simulated low pH conditions associated with the stomach and from the biocidal activity of pancreatic and bile acids. For mahewu, microencapsulation of B. lactis with storage aerobically at 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C enhanced survival over a 21-day period as compared to free cells. In amasi, differences in viability between immobilized and free cells were less noticeable. An analytically trained taste panel was unable to detect a significant difference in texture in any of the samples fortified with microcapsules. Although flavour differences were noted for mahewu containing either free or immobilized cells, after 14 days refrigerated storage, these were not disliked. No significant flavour difference was noted between amasi containing immobilized cells and untreated controls over the period tested.

  18. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12®-supplemented yogurt in healthy children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tina P.; Ba, Zhaoyong; Sanders, Mary Ellen; D’Amico, Frank J.; Roberts, Robert F.; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Merenstein, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Probiotics are live microorganisms that may provide health benefits to the individual when consumed in sufficient quantities. For studies conducted on health or disease endpoints on probiotics in the United States, the Food and Administration (FDA) has required those studies to be conducted as investigational new drugs. This phase I, double-blinded, randomized, controlled safety study represents the first requirement of this pathway. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12® (BB-12®)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of children. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of BB-12®-supplemented yogurt on the gut microbiota of the children. Methods Sixty children aged 1–5 years were randomly assigned to consume four ounces of either BB-12®-supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 days. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, as determined by the number of reported adverse events. Results A total of 186 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no significant differences between the control and BB-12® groups. No significant changes due to probiotic treatment were observed in the gut microbiota of the study cohort. Conclusions BB-12®-supplemented yogurt is safe and well-tolerated when consumed by healthy children. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential effects of BB-12®-supplemented yogurt in different disease states. PMID:28114246

  19. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Nordgaard, Inge; Hansen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis.......To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis....

  20. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-03-28

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12(®) (BB-12(®)), which is the world's most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12(®) has been determined and published. BB-12(®) originates from Chr. Hansen's collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12(®) have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12(®) exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12(®). BB-12(®) has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12(®) through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12(®) has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12(®) has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12(®) increases the body's resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections.

  1. Effect of a fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173010 on Chinese constipated women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue-Xin; He, Mei; Hu, Gang; Wei, Jie; Pages, Philippe; Yang, Xian-Hua; Bourdu-Naturel, Sophie

    2008-10-28

    To investigate the effect of a fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium lactis DN-173010 and yogurt strains (BIO(R)) on adult women with constipation in Beijing. A total of 135 adult females with constipation were randomly allocated to consume for 2 wk either 100 g of the test fermented milk or 100 g of an acidified milk containing non-living bacteria (control). Stool frequency, defecation condition scores, stool consistency and food intake were recorded at baseline and after 1 and 2 wk in an intention-to-treat population of 126 subjects. In parallel, safety evaluation parameters were performed. At baseline, no differences were found between groups. Following consumption of test product, stool frequency was significantly increased after 1 wk (3.5 +/- 1.5 vs 2.4 +/- 0.6, P food intake did not change between the two groups, and safety parameters of the subjects were within normal ranges. This study suggests a beneficial effect of a fermented milk containing B. lactis DN-173010 on stool frequency, defecation condition and stool consistency in adult women with constipation constipated women after 1 and 2 wk of consumption.

  2. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at −18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

  3. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L. Pedroso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04 were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (10³ CFU/g. The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at -18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved.

  4. Impact of coculturing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis HN019 with yeasts on microbial viability and metabolite formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, M; Liu, S-Q

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the impact of coculturing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis HN019 with yeasts on microbial viability and metabolite production. Monocultures and bacteria-yeast cocultures of B. lactis HN019 and 10 different yeast strains belonging to different species in skim milk media were fermented at 37°C. The presence of yeasts enhanced the growth rate and metabolic activities of B. lactis HN019, which might be attributed to their antioxidative properties. The viability of yeasts, when cocultured with bifidobacteria, was either unaffected or suppressed, depending on the strain. When the B. lactis HN019 monoculture and cocultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC-1118, Pichia kluyveri FrootZen and Kluyveromyces lactis KL71 were fermented to pH 4·7, there were no significant differences in their organic acid composition. On the other hand, cocultures produced significantly higher quantities of alcohols and/or esters than the monoculture. Coculturing B. lactis HN019 with yeasts did not improve the viability of the probiotic during storage at 10°C for 8 weeks, as the bifidobacteria itself demonstrated satisfactory survival in the fermented SMM. Coculturing B. lactis HN019 with yeasts accelerated the growth of the bifidobacteria and increased the production aroma-active volatile metabolites. This study demonstrates the potential of utilizing specific yeast species as starter or adjunct cultures to simultaneously improve the growth of fastidious bifidobacteria and modulate the organoleptic properties of fermented food products. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®), which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12® have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12® exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12®. BB-12® has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12® through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12® has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12® has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12® increases the body’s resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:27682233

  6. ELABORACIÓN DE QUESITO ANTIOQUEÑO REDUCIDO EN SODIO Y ADICIONADO CON Bifidobacterium lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDINSON ELIÉCER BEJARANO TORO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quesito antioqueño (QA, fresh, soft, milled and salty cheese, without added bacteria. This cheese contains 2,1% of sodium chloride. Were supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis (bb12 and It was salty with NaCl (Q1 and some mixtures of NaCl/KCl (3:1 (Q2 and 1:1 (Q3, w/w, to reduce the sodium content and give probiotic characteristics. There were no significant differences between treatments (Q1, Q2 and Q3 (P>0,05 in some compositional (moisture, MG/MS, total protein, ash, acidity, chemical (pH and physical (hardness, adhesiveness, springiness, cohesiveness, gumminess, chewiness, resilience characteristics. A significant difference was observed by storage time in moisture, pH, protein content and acidity (P<0,05. With respect to Na and K content, there was a significant differences between treatments (P<0,05 but was not in the Ca content. In Q2 the Na level was decreased 24,2% and K increased 143% in average; in Q3 the Na level was decreased 48,3% and K increased 311%. The processed QA with 50% of Na substitution maintains the traditional compositional a physicochemical characteristics, therefore, according to this investigation results, can be performed this substitution and it is an excellent matrix to include probiotics in the people diet.

  7. Influence of probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis lafti® b94, inulin and transglutaminase on the properties of set- style yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Benković

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to examine the influence of probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LAFTI® B94, inulin and transglutaminase on quality and sensory properties of set-style yoghurt. Fresh, homogenized milk with 3,3% of milk fat was used for yoghurt production, with addition of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LAFTI® B94, inulin and transglutaminase activated during 1h 30 min at 55 °C. Enzyme inactivation was carried out by pasteurization of milk during 15 minutes at 85 °C. Control samples were prepared without addition of probiotic culture, inulin and transglutaminase. Physico-chemical parameters and sensory properties of produced set-style yoghurt have been determined. For reliable identification of probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LAFTI® B94, isolated from the produced yoghurt, SDS-PAGE of whole cell proteins and PCR with species specific primers for Bifidobacterium were carried out. It has been shown that produced set-style yoghurt with probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LAFTI® B94, inulin and transglutaminase had higher firmness, less syneresis and better sensory properties than control yoghurt samples. After 28 days of storage the viable count of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis LAFTI® B94 was higher in samples containing inulin as prebiotic. Fermentation of yoghurt samples containing inulin and transglutaminase lasted shorter than fermentation of samples without inulin and transglutaminase. The presence of high number of probiotic culture (more than 106 cells/mL in produced set yoghurts was confirmed by SDS-PAGE of whole cell proteins and PCR with species specific primers for Bifidobacterium

  8. INHIBITION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BY LACTIC ACID BACTERIA AND / OR BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS DURING MILK FERMENTATION AND STORAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf S. Al-Delaimy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival and inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus by the lactic acid bacteria (LAB starter culture (Sterptococcus thermophillus and Lactobacillus delbrukii subsp. bulgaricus and/ or probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium lactis during milk fermentation to yoghurt and storage up to 12 days was studied. Adding S. aureus (initial count log 6.64/ ml with LAB (initial count log 6.8/ ml in milk during yoghurt processing and storage resulted in no significant change in the counts of both S. aureus and LAB during fermentation period of 4 hrs at 45° C. A steady decrease in S. aureus count during storage at 25° C and 4° C was observed reaching a complete (100 % inhibition after 9 and 12 days, respectively, with no significant increase in LAB count. Adding S. aureus (initial count log 6.62/ ml with B. lactis (initial count log 6.83/ ml in milk for 4 hr at45° C, no significant changes in the counts of both bacteria were found. After storage at 25° C and at 4° C a sharp decline in the S. aureus count with a 100 % inhibition after 6 and 9 days with approximately two log and one log increase in B. lactis counts consecutively. In general similar result was observed when adding S. aureus together with LAB and B. lactis in milk during fermentation and storage. pH values decreased during milk fermentation and storage from initially 6.55-6.64 to around 4 in most milk samples. The results of this study show that S. aureus was completely inhibited by LAB and/or B. lactis after milk fermentation to yoghurt and storage at room temperature and refrigeration for 6-9 days. It is therefore recommended to add the probiotic B. lactis with LAB to milk for yoghurt processing.

  9. Analysis of the human intestinal epithelial cell transcriptional response to Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus salivarius, Bifidobacterium lactis and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putaala, H; Barrangou, R; Leyer, G J

    2010-01-01

    a comparative analysis of the global in vitro transcriptional response of human intestinal epithelial cells to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM™, Lactobacillus salivarius Ls-33, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis 420, and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). Interestingly, L. salivarius Ls-33......, fundamental differences were observed between the pathogenic and probiotic treatments in the Toll-like receptor pathway, especially for adapter molecules with a lowered level of transcriptional activation of MyD88, TRIF, IRAK1 and TRAF6 by probiotics compared to EHEC. The results in this study provide...

  10. Stability of free and immobilized Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis in acidified milk and of immobilized B. lactis in yoghurt Estabilidade de Lactobacillus acidophilus e Bifidobacterium lactis nas formas livre e imobilizada em leite acidificado e de B. lactis imobilizado em iogurte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Raimundo Ferreira Grosso

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the stability of Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12 and of Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-05 both free and immobilized in calcium alginate, in milk and in acidified milk (pH 5.0, 4.4 and 3.8. The stability of immobilized B. lactis in yoghurt (fermented to pH 4.2, during 28 days of refrigerated storage was also evaluated. The efficiency of two culture media (modified MRS agar and Reinforced Clostridial Agar plus Prussian Blue for counting of B. lactis in yoghurt was determined. Lee's agar was used to count Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus when B. lactis were counted in the MRS medium. B. lactis and L. acidophilus in both free and immobilized forms presented satisfactory rates of survival in milk and acidified milk because the average reduction of the population was only one log cycle after 21 days of storage. The number of viable cells of immobilized B. lactis in yoghurt presented a gradual decline throughout the storage period, passing from 10(8 cfu/ml to no count after 28 days of storage. When the cultures were not in equilibrium just the selective medium was efficient in counting B. lactis in yoghurt. The results showed that both microorganisms can be added to milk and acidified milk, because their population was only slightly affected during storage. The presence of traditional culture of yoghurt seems to be harmful for survival of immobilized B. lactis and the immobilization in calcium alginate failed as an effective barrier to protect the cells in all analysed treatments.Este trabalho avaliou a estabilidade de Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb-12 e de Lactobacillus acidophilus (La-05 nas formas livre e imobilizada em alginato de cálcio, em leite e leite acidificado (pHs 5.0, 4.4 e 3.8, e a estabilidade de B. lactis imobilizado em iogurte (fermentado até pH 4.2, durante 28 dias de estocagem refrigerada. Também foi estudada a eficiência de dois meios de cultura (ágar MRS modificado e

  11. Potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 prevents weight gain and glucose intolerance in diet-induced obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, L K; Waget, A; Garret, C; Klopp, P; Burcelin, R; Lahtinen, S

    2014-12-01

    Alterations of the gut microbiota and mucosal barrier are linked with metabolic diseases. Our aim was to investigate the potential benefit of the potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 in reducing high-fat diet-induced body weight gain and diabetes in mice. In the obesity model, C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (60 energy %) for 12 weeks, and gavaged daily with B. lactis 420 (109 cfu) or vehicle. In the diabetes model, mice were fed a high-fat, ketogenic diet (72 energy % fat) for 4 weeks, with a 6-week subsequent treatment with B. lactis 420 (108-1010 cfu/day) or vehicle, after which they were analysed for body composition. We also analysed glucose tolerance, plasma lipopolysaccharide and target tissue inflammation using only one of the B. lactis 420 groups (109 cfu/day). Intestinal bacterial translocation and adhesion were analysed in a separate experiment using an Escherichia coli gavage. Body fat mass was increased in both obese (10.7 ± 0.8 g (mean ± standard error of mean) vs. 1.86 ± 0.21 g, Pdiabetic mice (3.01 ± 0.4 g vs. 1.14 ± 0.15 g, Pdiabetic mice (1.89 ± 0.16 g, P=0.02 for highest dose). This was reflected as reduced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, B. lactis 420 decreased plasma lipopolysaccharide levels (Pdiabetic mice. Reduced intestinal mucosal adherence and plasma lipopolysaccharide suggest a mechanism related to reduced translocation of gut microbes.

  12. Dose-response study of probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei CRL-341 in healthy young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.N.; Nielsen, S.; Kaestel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora was analy...

  13. Functional cream cheese supplemented with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 and Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 20016 and prebiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranza, Barbara; Campaniello, Daniela; Monacis, Noemi; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a functional fresh cream cheese with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 or Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 20016 and prebiotics (inulin, FOS and lactulose). The research was divided into two steps: in vitro evaluation of the effects of prebiotic compounds; validation at laboratory level with production of functional cream mini-cheeses. Prebiotics showed a protective effect: B. animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 cultivability on Petri dishes was positively influenced by lactulose, whereas fructooligosaccharides (FOS) were the prebiotic compounds able to prolong Lb. reuteri DSM 20016 cultivability. At 30 °C, a prolongation of the death time (more than 300 days) was observed, while the controls showed death time values about 100 days. At 45 °C, death time values increased from 32.2 (control) to 33, 35, and 38 days in the samples added with FOS, inulin and lactulose, respectively. Lactulose and FOS were chosen to be added to cream mini-cheeses inoculated with B. animalis subsp. lactis DSM 10140 and Lb. reuteri DSM 20016, respectively; the proposed functional cream cheese resulted in a product with favourable conditions for the viability of both probiotics which maintained cultivable cells above the recommended level during 28 days of storage at 4 °C with good sensory characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 restores gut barrier permeability in chronically low-grade inflamed mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca eMartín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the efficacy of many probiotic strains in the management of gastrointestinal disorders associated with deregulated intestinal barrier function and/or structure. In particular, bifidobacteria have been studied for their efficacy to both prevent and treat a broad spectrum of animal and/or human gut disorders. The aim of the current work was thus to evaluate effects on intestinal barrier function of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494, a strain used in fermented dairy products. A chronic DNBS-induced low-grade inflammation model causing gut dysfunction in mice was used in order to study markers of inflammation, intestinal permeability and immune function in the presence of the bacterial strain. In this chronic low-grade inflammation mice model several parameters pointed out the absence of an over active inflammation process. However, gut permeability, lymphocyte populations and colonic cytokines were found to be altered. B. animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 was able to protect barrier functions by restoring intestinal permeability, colonic goblet cell populations and cytokine levels. Furthermore, tight junction (TJ proteins levels were also measured by qRT-PCR showing the ability of this strain to specifically normalize the level of several TJ proteins, in particular for claudin-4. Finally, B. lactis strain counterbalanced CD4+ lymphocyte alterations in both spleen and mesenteric lymphoid nodes (MLN. It restores the Th1/Th2 ratio altered by the DNBS challenge (which locally augments CD4+ Th1 cells by increasing the Th2 response as measured by the increase in the production of major representative Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10. Altogether, these data suggest that B. animalis subsp lactis CNCM-I2494 may efficiently prevent disorders associated with increased barrier permeability.

  15. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenstein, Daniel J; Tan, Tina P; Molokin, Aleksey; Smith, Keisha Herbin; Roberts, Robert F; Shara, Nawar M; Mete, Mihriye; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of adults who were prescribed a 10-day course of antibiotics for a respiratory infection. Secondary aims were to assess the ability of BB-12 to affect the expression of whole blood immune markers associated with cell activation and inflammatory response. A phase I, double-blinded, randomized controlled study was conducted in compliance with FDA guidelines for an Investigational New Drug (IND). Forty participants were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12 -supplemented yogurt or non-supplemented control yogurt daily for 10 d. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, assessed by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 165 non-serious adverse events were reported, with no differences between the control and BB-12 groups. When compared to the control group, B lactis fecal levels were modestly higher in the BB-12-supplemented group. In a small subset of patients, changes in whole blood expression of genes associated with regulation and activation of immune cells were detected in the BB-12-supplemented group. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well tolerated when consumed by healthy adults concurrently taking antibiotics. This study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential immunomodulatory effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in a variety of disease states.

  16. Production of beta-glucosidase and hydrolysis of isoflavone phytoestrogens by Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, and Lactobacillus casei in soymilk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkor, O N; Shah, N P

    2008-01-01

    The study determined beta-glucosidase activity of commercial probiotic organisms for hydrolysis of isoflavone to aglycones in fermenting soymilk. Soymilk made with soy protein isolate (SPI) was fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus LAFTI L10, Bifidobacterium lactis LAFTI B94, and Lactobacillus casei LAFTI L26 at 37 degrees C for 48 h and the fermented soymilk was stored for 28 d at 4 degrees C. beta-Glucosidase activity of organisms was determined using rho-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside as a substrate and the hydrolysis of isoflavone glycosides to aglycones by these organisms was carried out. The highest level of growth occurred at 12 h for L. casei L26, 24 h for B. lactis B94, and 36 h for L. acidophilus L10 during fermentation in soymilk. Survival after storage at 4 degrees C for 28 d was 20%, 15%, and 11% greater (P < 0.05) than initial cell counts, respectively. All the bacteria produced beta-glucosidase, which hydrolyzed isoflavone beta-glycosides to isoflavone aglycones. The decrease in the concentration of beta-glycosides and the increase in the concentration of aglycones were significant (P < 0.05) in the fermented soymilk. Increased isoflavone aglycone content in fermented soymilk is likely to improve the biological functionality of soymilk.

  17. Probiotic treatment of collagenous colitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. Lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Munck, Lars K; Vinter-Jensen, Lars

    2006-01-01

    Probiotic treatment may be effective in diseases involving gut microflora and intestinal inflammation. In collagenous colitis (CC), a potential pathogenic role of the gut microflora has been proposed. The effect of probiotic treatment in CC is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the clinical effe...... of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (AB-Cap-10) in patients with CC....

  18. Assessment of stress tolerance acquisition in the heat-tolerant derivative strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakko, J; Sánchez, B; Gueimonde, M; Salminen, S

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the heat-shock response at molecular level in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and their heat-tolerant derivatives and to characterize the changes that make the derivatives more robust in terms of heat stress. The study strains were exposed for 2 h to a heat-shock treatment, Bif. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and its derivative at 50°C and the Lact. rhamnosus GG and its derivative at 60°C. Protein synthesis before and after heat shock was examined using proteomics and RT-qPCR. The analysis revealed that the regulation of seven proteins in both strain pairs was modified as a response to heat or between the original and the derivative strain. The comparison of wild-type strains and the heat-tolerant derivatives suggests that the acquisition of heat tolerance in the Bif. animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 derivative is due to a slightly increased constitutive level of chaperones, while in Lact. rhamnosus GG derivative, the main reason seems to be a higher ability to induce the production of chaperones. This study revealed possible markers of heat tolerance in B. lactis and Lact. rhamnosus strains. This study increases our knowledge on how Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains may acquire heat tolerance. These findings may be useful for improving the heat tolerance of existing probiotic strains as well as screening new heat-tolerant strains. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Development of a growth medium suitable for exopolysaccharide production and structural characterisation by Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis AD011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhudhud, M; Humphreys, P; Laws, A

    2014-05-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by Bifidobacteria have received considerable attention due to their ability to modify the rheological and physicochemical properties of dairy products. However, the quantification and characterisation of Bifidobacterial EPS are hampered by the presence of EPS-equivalent (EPS-E) substances in complex media such as Reinforced Clostridial Medium (RCM). This study has developed a medium based on RCM which both supports the growth of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis AD011 and does not interfere with the quantification and characterisation of the EPS generated. Medium development involved the identification of EPE-E containing components via NMR analysis followed by their removal, substitution or pre-treatment. Both beef extract and casein acid hydrolysate required chemical pre-treatment to remove polysaccharide components before the medium was free of EPS-E materials. Once EPS-E free components had been identified, lactose, glucose and galactose were evaluated as potential carbon sources. Glucose was found to be the optimum carbon source. The final medium composition supported growth to the same extent as RCM providing significant EPS yields and no interferences during analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis on lipid profile in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtahed, H S; Mohtadi-Nia, J; Homayouni-Rad, A; Niafar, M; Asghari-Jafarabadi, M; Mofid, V; Akbarian-Moghari, A

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotic and conventional yogurt on the lipid profile in type 2 diabetic people. In a randomized double-blind controlled trial, 60 people (23 males and 37 females) with type 2 diabetes and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) greater than 2.6 mmol/L were assigned to 2 groups. Participants consumed daily 300 g of probiotic yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or 300 g of conventional yogurt for 6 wk. Fasting blood samples, anthropometric measurements and 3-d, 24-h dietary recalls were collected at the baseline and at the end of the trial. Probiotic yogurt consumption caused a 4.54% decrease in total cholesterol and a 7.45% decrease in LDL-C compared with the control group. No significant changes from baseline were shown in triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the probiotic group. The total cholesterol:HDL-C ratio and LDL-C:HDL-C ratio as atherogenic indices significantly decreased in the probiotic group compared with the control group. Probiotic yogurt improved total cholesterol and LDL-C concentrations in type 2 diabetic people and may contribute to the improvement of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis) on the accumulation of lead in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Saman Yahyavi; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohseni, Mehran

    2017-01-01

    Lead is a toxic metal present in different concentrations in a wide variety of food products. Exposure to lead, even to low levels, causes acute and chronic toxicities. Lead can cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the nervous system. Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when used in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Although a recent study demonstrated that the studied bacteria have a protective effect against acute lead toxicity, no research has been found that shows the long-term impact of these bacteria in vivo. The current study surveyed the protective effects of two species of probiotics, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, that are most widely used in many functional foods against oral lead exposure (4 weeks) in rat brains. The results revealed that, at the end of the second week of chronic exposure to lead and probiotic bacteria, the lowest level of lead belonged to the Lactobacillus group. At the end of the fourth week, the lowest amount of lead was related to the group receiving both types of probiotics. With the physiological benefits of probiotic consumption, the bacterial solution in this study did not show high efficacy in reducing brain lead concentrations.

  2. Microbiological effects of consuming a synbiotic containing Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium lactis, and oligofructose in elderly persons, determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and counting of viable bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosch, Sabine; Woodmansey, Emma J; Paterson, Jacqueline C M; McMurdo, Marion E T; Macfarlane, George T

    2005-01-01

    Because of changes in gut physiology, immune system reactivity, and diet, elderly people are more susceptible to gastrointestinal infections than are younger adults. The gut microflora, which provides a natural defense against invading microorganisms, changes in elderly people with the development of potentially damaging bacterial populations, which may lead to alterations in bacterial metabolism and higher levels of infection. A randomized, double-blind, controlled feeding trial was done with 18 healthy elderly volunteers (age, >62 years) using a synbiotic comprising Bifidobacterium bifidum BB-02 and Bifidobacterium lactis BL-01 (probiotics) together with an inulin-based prebiotic (Synergy 1; Orafti). Real-time PCR was employed to quantitate total bifidobacteria, B. bifidum, and B. lactis in fecal DNA before, during, and after synbiotic consumption. Counting all viable anaerobes, bifidobacteria, and lactobacilli and identification of bacterial isolates to species level was also done. Throughout feeding, both bifidobacteria species were detected in fecal samples obtained from all subjects receiving the synbiotic, with significant increases in the number of copies of the 16S rRNA genes of B. bifidum, B. lactis, and total bifidobacteria, compared with the control week and the placebo group. At least 1 of these species remained detectable in fecal samples 3 weeks after feeding in individuals that had no fecal B. bifidum and/or B. lactis in the control week, indicating that the probiotics persisted in the volunteers. Counting of viable organisms showed significantly higher total numbers of fecal bifidobacteria, total numbers of lactobacilli, and numbers of B. bifidum during synbiotic feeding. Synbiotic consumption increased the size and diversity of protective fecal bifidobacterial populations, which are often very much reduced in older people.

  3. Dose-response study of probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei CRL-341 in healthy young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.N.; Nielsen, S.; Kaestel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora was analy......Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora...... was analyzed in the 10(10) CFU/day probiotic and placebo group. Design: The study was designed as a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, parallel dose-response study. Subjects: Healthy young adults (18 - 40 years) were recruited by advertising in local newspapers. Of the 75 persons enrolled, 71 ( 46...... women, 25 men, mean age 25.6 years ( range 18 - 40 years)) completed the study. Intervention: The volunteers were randomly assigned into five groups receiving either placebo or a mixture of the two probiotics in the concentration of 10(8), 10(9), 10(10) or 10(11) CFU/day in 2 weeks run-in period, 3...

  4. Beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium lactis on lipid profile and cytokines in patients with metabolic syndrome: A randomized trial. Effects of probiotics on metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Luciana Jesus; Simão, Andrea Name Colado; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Mari, Naiara Lourenço; de Souza, Cínthia Hoch Batista; Dichi, Isaías; Costa, Giselle Nobre

    2016-06-01

    Human studies have shown the beneficial effects of probiotic microorganisms on the parameters of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and other cardiovascular risks, but to our knowledge the effect of Bifidobacterium lactis has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of milk containing the probiotic B. lactis HN019 on the classical parameters of MetS and other related cardiovascular risk factors. Fifty-one patients with MetS were selected and divided into a control group (n = 25) and a probiotic group (n = 26). The probiotic group consumed fermented milk with probiotics over the course of 45 d. The effects of B. lactis on lipid profile, glucose metabolism, and proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were assessed in blood samples of the individuals at the baseline and after 45 d. Daily ingestion of 80 mL fermented milk with 2.72 × 10(10) colony-forming units of B. lactis HN019 showed significant reduction in body mass index (P = 0.017), total cholesterol (P = 0.009), and low-density lipoprotein (P = 0.008) compared with baseline and control group values. Furthermore, a significant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α (P = 0.033) and interleukin-6 (P = 0.044) proinflammatory cytokines was observed. These data showed potential effects of B. lactis HN019 in reducing obesity, blood lipids, and some inflammatory markers, which may reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with MetS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth of infants fed formula supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or Lactobacillus GG: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Growth is an essential outcome measure for evaluating the safety of any new ingredients, including probiotics, added to infant formulae. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of supplementation of infant formulae with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (B lactis) and/or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) compared with unsupplemented formula on the growth of healthy infants. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched in June 2013 for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in healthy term infants. Unpublished data were obtained from the manufacturer of B lactis-supplemented formula. The primary outcome measures were weight, length, and head circumference. Results Nine eligible trials were identified. Compared with unsupplemented controls, supplementation of infant formula with B lactis had no effect on weight gain [4 RCTs, n = 266, mean difference (MD) 0.96 g/day, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 2.63)], length gain (4 RCTs, n = 261, MD −0.39 mm/month, 95% CI −1.32 to 0.53), or head circumference gain (3 RCTs, n = 207, MD 0.56 mm/month, 95% CI −0.17 to 1.30). Data limited to one small (n = 105) trial suggest that infants who received standard infant formula supplemented with LGG grew significantly better. No such effect was observed in infants fed hydrolyzed formula supplemented with LGG. Conclusions Supplementation of infant formula with B lactis results in growth similar to what is found in infants fed unsupplemented formula. Limited data do not allow one to reach a conclusion regarding the effect of LGG supplementation on infant growth. PMID:24215626

  6. Growth of infants fed formula supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 or Lactobacillus GG: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewska, Hania; Chmielewska, Anna

    2013-11-12

    Growth is an essential outcome measure for evaluating the safety of any new ingredients, including probiotics, added to infant formulae. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effects of supplementation of infant formulae with Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (B lactis) and/or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) compared with unsupplemented formula on the growth of healthy infants. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched in June 2013 for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in healthy term infants. Unpublished data were obtained from the manufacturer of B lactis-supplemented formula. The primary outcome measures were weight, length, and head circumference. Nine eligible trials were identified. Compared with unsupplemented controls, supplementation of infant formula with B lactis had no effect on weight gain [4 RCTs, n = 266, mean difference (MD) 0.96 g/day, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 2.63)], length gain (4 RCTs, n = 261, MD -0.39 mm/month, 95% CI -1.32 to 0.53), or head circumference gain (3 RCTs, n = 207, MD 0.56 mm/month, 95% CI -0.17 to 1.30). Data limited to one small (n = 105) trial suggest that infants who received standard infant formula supplemented with LGG grew significantly better. No such effect was observed in infants fed hydrolyzed formula supplemented with LGG. Supplementation of infant formula with B lactis results in growth similar to what is found in infants fed unsupplemented formula. Limited data do not allow one to reach a conclusion regarding the effect of LGG supplementation on infant growth.

  7. Biochemical and kinetic characterisation of a novel xylooligosaccharide-upregulated GH43 β-d-xylosidase/α-l-arabinofuranosidase (BXA43) from the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Sørensen, Kim Ib; Gilad, Ofir

    2013-01-01

    The Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 gene BIF_00092, assigned to encode a β-d-xylosidase (BXA43) of glycoside hydrolase family 43 (GH43), was cloned with a C-terminal His-tag and expressed in Escherichia coli. BXA43 was purified to homogeneity from the cell lysate and found to be a dual...

  8. Consumption of Dairy Yogurt Containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis and Heat-Treated Lactobacillus plantarum Improves Immune Function Including Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoung Lee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of consuming dairy yogurt containing Lactobacillus paracasei ssp. paracasei (L. paracasei, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (B. lactis and heat-treated Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum on immune function. A randomized, open-label, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 200 nondiabetic subjects. Over a twelve-week period, the test group consumed dairy yogurt containing probiotics each day, whereas the placebo group consumed milk. Natural killer (NK cell activity, interleukin (IL-12 and immunoglobulin (Ig G1 levels were significantly increased in the test group at twelve weeks compared to baseline. Additionally, the test group had significantly greater increases in serum NK cell activity and interferon (IFN-γ and IgG1 than placebo group. Daily consumption of dairy yogurt containing L. paracasei, B. lactis and heat-treated L. plantarum could be an effective option to improve immune function by enhancing NK cell function and IFN-γ concentration (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03051425.

  9. The Impact of Storage Conditions on the Stability of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziari, Anastasia; Aakko, Juhani; Kumar, Himanshu; Tölkkö, Satu; du Toit, Elloise; Salminen, Seppo; Isolauri, Erika; Rautava, Samuli

    2017-11-01

    Human milk is the optimal source of complete nutrition for neonates and it also guides the development of infant gut microbiota. Importantly, human milk can be supplemented with probiotics to complement the health benefits of breastfeeding. Storage of human milk for limited periods of time is often unavoidable, but little is known about the effect of different storage conditions (temperature) on the viability of the added probiotics. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated how different storage conditions affect the viability of two specific widely used probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (Bb12), in human milk by culturing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicate that LGG and Bb12 remained stable throughout the storage period. Thus, we conclude that human milk offers an appropriate matrix for probiotic supplementation.

  10. D-Tagatose production in the presence of borate by resting Lactococcus lactis cells harboring Bifidobacterium longum L-arabinose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Noora; Salonen, Kalle; Leisola, Matti; Nyyssölä, Antti

    2013-04-01

    Bifidobacterium longum NRRL B-41409 L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) was overexpressed in Lactococcus lactis using a phosphate depletion inducible expression system. The resting L. lactis cells harboring the B. longum L-AI were used for production of D-tagatose from D-galactose in the presence of borate buffer. Multivariable analysis suggested that high pH, temperature and borate concentration favoured the conversion of D-galactose to D-tagatose. Almost quantitative conversion (92 %) was achieved at 20 g L⁻¹ substrate and at 37.5 °C after 5 days. The D-tagatose production rate of 185 g L⁻¹ day ⁻¹ was obtained at 300 g L⁻¹ galactose, at 1.15 M borate, and at 41 °C during 10 days when the production medium was changed every 24 h. There was no significant loss in productivity during ten sequential 24 h batches. The initial D-tagatose production rate was 290 g L⁻¹ day⁻¹ under these conditions.

  11. Study on effect of Artemisia sieberi hydro-alcoholic extract on the survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis in probiotic yoghurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Akbari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In the present study, the possibility of probiotic yoghurt production using Artemisia sieberi hydro- alcoholic extract and also the effects of different concentrations of this medicinal herb on the survival of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis, in probiotic yoghurt were investigated. Materials and Methods: In different treatments, the amounts of 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 gr/lit of Artemisia sieberi extract together with conventional yoghurt starter, Bif. lactis and lact. acidophilus were added to 1 liter of boiled milk. The samples were incubated at 37˚centigrade, and then, the acidity and pH changes every two hours during the incubation period were examined up to approximately 80˚ of the survival of probiotic bacteria was tested during the storage of the samples in the refrigerator. On the tenth day, after yoghurt production, all the samples were examined for sensory evaluation using a panel test and the obtained data was analyzed by means of SPSS software (V:19. Results: There was no significant difference in the acidity and pH changes during the production process of probiotic yoghurt in different treatments. The probiotic yoghurt containing 0.4 gr/lit  of Artemisia hydro-alcoholic extract had the best quality in terms of organoleptic properties and shelf life of the product. During 21 days storage in the refrigerator none of the treatments showed the number of probiotic bacteria less than 106 bacteria in gram. Conclusion: It was found that appropriate concentrations of Artemisia sieberi extract can be used for the production of probiotic yoghurt, as a new functional food containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifodobacterium lactis.

  12. Development of a rapid SNP-typing assay to differentiate Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis strains used in probiotic-supplemented dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonaco, Sara; Furumoto, Emily J; Loquasto, Joseph R; Morra, Patrizia; Grassi, Ausilia; Roberts, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Identification at the genus, species, and strain levels is desirable when a probiotic microorganism is added to foods. Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis (BAL) are commonly used worldwide in dairy products supplemented with probiotic strains. However, strain discrimination is difficult because of the high degree of genome identity (99.975%) between different genomes of this subspecies. Typing of monomorphic species can be carried out efficiently by targeting informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Findings from a previous study analyzing both reference and commercial strains of BAL identified SNP that could be used to discriminate common strains into 8 groups. This paper describes development of a minisequencing assay based on the primer extension reaction (PER) targeting multiple SNP that can allow strain differentiation of BAL. Based on previous data, 6 informative SNP were selected for further testing, and a multiplex preliminary PCR was optimized to amplify the DNA regions containing the selected SNP. Extension primers (EP) annealing immediately adjacent to the selected SNP were developed and tested in simplex and multiplex PER to evaluate their performance. Twenty-five strains belonging to 9 distinct genomic clusters of B. animalis ssp. lactis were selected and analyzed using the developed minisequencing assay, simultaneously targeting the 6 selected SNP. Fragment analysis was subsequently carried out in duplicate and demonstrated that the assay yielded 8 specific profiles separating the most commonly used commercial strains. This novel multiplex PER approach provides a simple, rapid, flexible SNP-based subtyping method for proper characterization and identification of commercial probiotic strains of BAL from fermented dairy products. To assess the usefulness of this method, DNA was extracted from yogurt manufactured with and without the addition of B. animalis ssp. lactis BB-12. Extracted DNA was then subjected to the minisequencing

  13. The GH5 1,4-β-mannanase from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 possesses a low-affinity mannan-binding module and highlights the diversity of mannanolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrill, Johan; Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Sulewska, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    , we report the biochemical properties of the first family 5 subfamily 8 glycoside hydrolase (GH5_8) mannanase from the probiotic bacterium Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 (BlMan5_8). BlMan5_8 possesses a novel low affinity carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specific for soluble mannan...... properties to support specialization towards a preferred substrate, which is likely to confer an advantage in the adaptation to competitive ecological niches....

  14. Calcium alginate-resistant starch mixed gel improved the survival of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis Bb12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus LBRE-LSAS in yogurt and simulated gastrointestinal conditions

    OpenAIRE

    ZIAR, Hasnia; Gerard, Philippe; Riazi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of microencapsulation in calcium alginate-resistant starch mixed gel of a new human isolated strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LBRE-LSAS compared with the probiotic strain of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12. Influence of microencapsulation was tested under deleterious digestive environment, when challenged to salivary a-amylase, to simulated gastric fluid and to simulated intestinal fluid. Bacterial survival, post-acid...

  15. THE EFFECT OF PROBIOTIC FERMENTED MILK THAT INCLUDES BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS CNCM I-2494 ON THE REDUCTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT AND SYMPTOMS IN ADULTS: A NARRATIVE REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitzberg, Dan L; Quilici, Flávio A; Michzputen, Sender; Friche Passos, Maria do Carmo

    2015-08-01

    determine the effectiveness of fermented milk that included Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-2429 for reducing gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort in healthy adults. we conducted a systematic literature search to identify studies reporting the use of B. animalis spp. lactis for GI discomfort/comfort in healthy adults. A total of 5329 records were identified, of these 99 full-text articles were assessed. Searches for additional trials were conducted using the names of authors of each identified study and several relevant databases. The study selection was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials; the included subjects were healthy adults; and the intervention group received B. lactis CNCM I-2494. Studies were excluded if they were non-randomized trials, if they included adults who were not healthy, if they included the use of any other intervention, or if they compared different products without a placebo group. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated using the Oxford Quality Scale and the Cochrane Concealment Assessment. A meta-analysis was not possible. the search strategy identified two studies that included a total of 538 healthy women, aged 18-60 years, normal weight or overweight (BMI 18-30 kg/m2). GI well-being was significantly improved in the Probiotic group vs. the Control group in one study, with no differences in the other. The percentage of responders for GI well-being was higher in the Probiotic group vs. the Control group in the first study but not in the second. GI symptoms were significantly decreased in the Probiotic group vs. the Control group in both studies. Bowel function was assessed by one study; the stool frequency did not differ between the groups, but a decrease in stool consistency was observed in the Probiotic group but not in the Control group. Possible mechanisms of action (gut motility

  16. Treatment and secondary prevention effects of the probiotics Lactobacillus paracasei or Bifidobacterium lactis on early infant eczema: randomized controlled trial with follow-up until age 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, C; Custovic, A; Tannock, G W; Munro, K; Kerry, G; Johnson, K; Peterson, C; Morris, J; Chaloner, C; Murray, C S; Woodcock, A

    2012-01-01

    Allergic disease has been associated with altered intestinal microbiota. Therefore, probiotics have been suggested as a potential treatment for eczema. We investigated whether dietary supplementation of infants with eczema at age 3-6 months with Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-2116 or Bifidobacterium lactis CNCM I-3446 had a treatment effect or altered allergic disease progression. Primary outcome included eczema severity (SCORing Atopic Dermatitis, SCORAD) 3 months post-randomization. Secondary: SCORAD (other visits); infant dermatitis quality of life (IDQoL); gastrointestinal permeability; urinary eosinophilic protein X; allergen-sensitization; allergic symptoms (age 12, 18, 36 months). A total of 208 infants aged 3-6 months with physician-diagnosed eczema were recruited; 137/208 (SCORAD ≥ 10, consuming ≥ 200 mL standard formula/day) were randomized to daily supplements containing L. paracasei or B. lactis or placebo for a 3-month period, while receiving extensively hydrolysed whey-formula (dairy-free diet). There were two open observational groups, one group exclusively breastfed (n = 22) and the other, standard formula-fed (n = 49). ISRCTN41490500. Eczema severity decreased significantly over time in all groups. No significant difference was observed between randomized groups after 12-week treatment-period (SCORAD-score pre-/post-intervention: B. lactis 25.9 [95% CI: 22.8-29.2] to 12.8 [9.4-16.6]; L. paracasei 25.4 [22.1-29] to 12.5 [9.2-16.4]; placebo 26.9 [23.4-30.6] to 11.8 [9.6-14.3]; P = 0.7). Results were similar when analysis was controlled for allergen-sensitization, or when only sensitized infants were analysed. No differences were found for secondary outcomes. No difference was observed in SCORAD-score between randomized and observational groups. We found no benefit from supplementation with B. lactis or L. paracasei in the treatment of eczema, when given as an adjunct to basic topical treatment, and no effect on the progression of allergic disease

  17. Predominant genera of fecal microbiota in children with atopic dermatitis are not altered by intake of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp.lactis Bi-07

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nadejda Nikolajevna; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Gøbel, Rikke Juul

    2011-01-01

    randomized to intake of one of the probiotic strain or placebo. Microbial composition was characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative PCR and, in a subset of subjects, by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The core population of the Lactobacillus group was identified...... significantly after intervention, indicating survival of the ingested bacteria. The levels of Bifidobacterium correlated positively (P = 0.03), while the levels of the Lactobacillus group negatively (P = 0.01) with improvement of atopic eczema evaluated by the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis index......The effect of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 on the composition of the Lactobacillus group, Bifidobacterium and the total bacterial population in feces from young children with atopic dermatitis was investigated. The study included 50 children...

  18. EVIDENCE-BASED DATA ON EFFECTIVENESS OF LACTOBACILLUS RHAMNOSUS GG AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM LACTIS ВB-12 IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Andreyeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of prebiotics in treatment of different disorders is used very often nowadays. However, this kind of a treatment confirmed its efficacy in only several diseases. The review presents the data on efficacy of two probiotic microorganisms (L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 in pediatric practice. Author summarizes and analyzes existing evidence-based data on efficacy of probiotics in treatment of acute diarrhea, prophylaxis of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and nosocomial infections. L. rhamnosus GG and B. lactis Вb-12 have their own place in prophylaxis of infections of airways and gastrointestinal tract. Administration of probiotics for treatment and prophylaxis of allergic and other diseases is reviewed. Safety of probiotics is described as well.

  19. Exopolysaccharide-producing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains and their polymers elicit different responses on immune cells from blood and gut associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Nikolic, Milica; López, Patricia; Suárez, Ana; Miljkovic, Marija; Kojic, Milan; Margolles, Abelardo; Golic, Natasa; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    The effect of exopolysaccharide (EPS) producing bifidobacteria, and the EPS derived thereof, on the modulation of immune response was evaluated. Cells isolated from gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of naïve rats were used. The proliferation and cytokine production of these immune cells in the presence of the three isogenic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains (A1, A1dOx and A1dOxR), as well as their purified polymers, were in vitro analysed. The cytokine pattern produced by immune cells isolated from GALT showed that most levels remained stable in the presence of the three strains or their corresponding polymers. However, in PBMC the UV-inactivated bacteria induced higher levels of the ratios IFNγ/IL-17, TNFα/IL-10 and TNFα/TGFβ, and no variation in the ratio IFNγ/IL-4. Thus, B. animalis subsp. lactis strains were able to activate blood monocytes as well as T lymphocytes towards a mild inflammatory Th1 response. Furthermore, only the EPS-A1dOxR was able to stimulate a response in a similar way than its EPS-producing bacterium. Our work supports the notion that some bifidobacterial EPS could play a role in mediating the dialog of these microorganisms with the immune system. In addition, this study emphasizes the effect that the origin of the immune cells has in results obtained; this could explain the great amount of contradiction found in literature about the immunomodulation capability of EPS from probiotic bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and, Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5-containing yoghurt, on fecal bacterial counts of healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Patricia; Lamarche, Benoît; Paradis, Marie-Eve; Thiboutot, Hélène; Laurin, Émilie; Roy, Denis

    2011-09-01

    This randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, parallel dose-response study investigated the impact of 4-week commercial yoghurt consumption supplemented with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5) on fecal bacterial counts of healthy adults. Fifty-eight volunteers were randomly assigned to three different groups: 1. placebo (no probiotic, no starter and no green tea extract); 2. Yoptimal (10(9)cfu/100g of BB-12 and LA-5 and 40mg of green tea extract) and 3. Yoptimal-10 (10(10)cfu/100g of BB-12, 10(9)cfu/100g of LA-5 and 40mg of green tea extract). These yoghurt products also contained Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (10(7)cfu/100g) and Streptococcus thermophilus (10(10)cfu/100g). The quantitative PCR (qPCR) results showed that there were significant increases (P=0.02) in bifidobacteria counts with the Yoptimal treatment as compared to baseline. The fecal numbers of B. animalis subsp. lactis and LA-5 significantly increased in the two probiotic treatments compared to the placebo treatment. Viable counts of fecal lactobacilli were significantly higher (P=0.05) and those of enterococci were significantly lower (P=0.04) after the intervention when compared to placebo. No significant difference was observed between treatments in volunteers' weight, waist girth, blood pressure, fasting plasma triglyceride and HDL-C concentrations, as well as cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio. However, a significant increase in plasma cholesterol levels was observed in the placebo group (P=0.0018) but the levels remained stable in the two probiotic yoghurt groups. These results show that probiotic strains supplemented in the form of yoghurt remain active during gut transit and are associated with an increase in beneficial bacteria and a reduction in potentially pathogenic bacteria. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00730626. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum containing yoghurt on dental plaque bacteria in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Esber

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the possible effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum DN-173 010 on dental plaque of children. 52 children (25 F and 27 M), between the ages of 8-10, participated in the present study. The study had a double blind, randomized crossover design and the experimental period consisted of four consecutive time periods. During periods 2 and 4 (2 weeks each), children consumed 110 g probiotic fruit yogurt (Bifidobacterium DN-173 010 (1 x 10(10) cfu/g)), or a placebo fruit yogurt per day. Available supragingival plaque (24 h later) was collected from teeth 16, 11, 36 and 31 at baseline and at the end of periods 2 and 4. The counts of dental plaque mutans streptococci (MS) were evaluated using Dentocult SM (Strep Mutans). Changes of pre- and post-treatment levels of dental plaque MS were recorded for four consecutive sampling sites. There were no statistically differences between transition scores of test and placebo groups regarding different dental plaque sampling sites (p > 0.05) (unpaired t-test). Within the limitations of the present study, Bifidobacterium bifidum DN-173 010 has no effect on dental plaque MS levels in children.

  2. Absolute Enumeration of Probiotic Strains Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM® and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04® via Chip-Based Digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Z. Hansen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current standard for enumeration of probiotics to obtain colony forming units by plate counts has several drawbacks: long time to results, high variability and the inability to discern between bacterial strains. Accurate probiotic cell counts are important to confirm the delivery of a clinically documented dose for its associated health benefits. A method is described using chip-based digital PCR (cdPCR to enumerate Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 and Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM both as single strains and in combination. Primers and probes were designed to differentiate the target strains against other strains of the same species using known single copy, genetic differences. The assay was optimized to include propidium monoazide pre-treatment to prevent amplification of DNA associated with dead probiotic cells as well as liberation of DNA from cells with intact membranes using bead beating. The resulting assay was able to successfully enumerate each strain whether alone or in multiplex. The cdPCR method had a 4 and 5% relative standard deviation (RSD for Bl-04 and NCFM, respectively, making it more precise than plate counts with an industry accepted RSD of 15%. cdPCR has the potential to replace traditional plate counts because of its precision, strain specificity and the ability to obtain results in a matter of hours.

  3. Probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 versus placebo for the symptoms of bloating in patients with functional bowel disorders: a double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Palsson, Olafur S; Maier, Danielle; Carroll, Ian; Galanko, Joseph A; Leyer, Gregory; Ringel, Yehuda

    2011-07-01

    Recent data suggest a role for the intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of functional bowel disorders (FBDs). Probiotic studies in FBDs generated inconsistent results suggesting a strain-specific and product-specific effect. To investigate the clinical efficacy of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (L-NCFM) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 (B-LBi07) in nonconstipation FBDs. A double-blind, placebo-control clinical trial of the probiotic bacterias L-NCFM and B-LBi07 twice a day (2×10(11) CFU/d) versus placebo over 8 weeks. Primary endpoints were global relief of gastrointestinal symptoms and satisfaction with treatment. Secondary endpoints were change in symptoms severity, well-being, and quality of life. Microbiological effect was assessed by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction on fecal samples. Sixty patients (probiotic, n=31; placebo, n=29), 72% females, 84% whites, mean age 37 years. Abdominal bloating improved in the probiotics compared with the placebo group at 4 weeks (4.10 vs 6.17, P=0.009; change in bloating severity P=0.02) and 8 weeks (4.26 vs 5.84, P=0.06; change in bloating severity Pbacteria in the pathophysiology of FBD and the role for probiotic bacteria in the management of these disorders.

  4. Influence of the addition of Lactobacillus acidophilus La-05, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 and inulin on the technological, physicochemical, microbiological and sensory features of creamy goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ilsa C; Oliveira, Maria E G; Madruga, Marta S; Gullón, Beatriz; Pacheco, Maria T B; Gomes, Ana M P; Batista, Ana S M; Pintado, Maria M E; Souza, Evandro L; Queiroga, Rita C R E

    2016-10-12

    The effects of the addition of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-05, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and inulin on the quality characteristics of creamy goat cheese during refrigerated storage were evaluated. The manufactured cheeses included the addition of starter culture (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris - R-704) (CC); starter culture, L. acidophilus LA-05 and inulin (CLA); starter culture, B. lactis BB-12 and inulin (CBB); or starter culture, L. acidophilus LA-05, B. lactis BB-12 and inulin (CLB). In the synbiotic cheeses (CLA, CBB and CLB), the counts of L. acidophilus LA-05 and B. lactis BB-12 were greater than 6log CFU g -1 , the amount of inulin was greater than 6 g per 100 g, and the firmness was reduced. The cheeses evaluated had high brightness values (L*), with a predominance of yellow (b*). CC had higher contents of proteins, lipids and minerals compared to the other cheeses. There was a decrease in the amount of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and an increase of medium-chain (MCFAs) and long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) in the synbiotic cheeses compared to CC. The amount of conjugated linoleic acid increased in CLA, CBB and CLB. The highest depth of proteolysis and the greatest changes in the release of free amino acids were found in CLB. The addition of inulin and probiotics, alone or in co-culture, did not affect the cheese acceptance. Inulin and probiotics can be used together for the production of creamy goat cheese without negatively affecting the general quality characteristics of the product, and to add value because of its synbiotic potential.

  5. The extracellular proteome of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB‐12 reveals proteins with putative roles in probiotic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Svensson, Birte; Viborg, Alexander Holm

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that exert health‐promoting effects on the human host, as demonstrated for numerous strains of the genus Bifidobacterium. To unravel the proteins involved in the interactions between the host and the extensively used and well‐studied probiotic strain...... functions include binding of plasminogen, formation of fimbriae, adhesion to collagen, attachment to mucin and intestinal cells as well as induction of immunomodulative response. These findings suggest a role of the proteins in colonization of the gastrointestinal tract, adhesion to host tissues......, or immunomodulation of the host immune system. The identification of proteins predicted to be involved in such interactions can pave the way towards well targeted studies of the protein‐mediated contacts between bacteria and the host, with the goal to enhance the understanding of the mode of action of probiotic...

  6. Breastfeeding-associated microbiota in human milk following supplementation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Melanie Rae; Avershina, Ekaterina; Storrø, Ola; Johnsen, Roar; Rudi, Knut; Øien, Torbjørn

    2018-02-01

    Breastfeeding is one of the major factors affecting the early development of the infant gut microbiota, and weaning is associated with a shift in the gut microbiota toward a more adult composition. Through breastfeeding, infants receive bioactive components that shape their microbiota while also being exposed to the breast milk and breast surface microbial communities. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of an entero-mammary route of microbial transfer, opening the possibility of infant gut microbiota modulation through maternal probiotic supplementation. In this study, we have analyzed breast milk samples collected at 10 d and 3 mo postpartum from women participating in the Probiotics in the Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim placebo controlled trial. Women who were randomized to the probiotic arm of the Probiotics in the Prevention of Allergy among Children in Trondheim trial received a fermented milk supplemented with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5, and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12, consuming this daily from 4 wk before their expected due date until 3 mo after birth. In total, 472 breast milk samples were assessed for the administered bacteria using quantitative real-time PCR and the microbiota transferred during breastfeeding was analyzed using 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of 142 samples. We found that breastfeeding is unlikely to be a significant source of L. rhamnosus GG, L. acidophilus La-5, and B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb-12 for infants in the probiotic arm of the trial. Furthermore, maternal supplementation did not significantly affect the overall composition of the breast milk microbiota transferred during breastfeeding. We also present a descriptive analysis of this microbiota, which was largely dominated by Streptococcus and Staphylococcus genera at both 10 d and 3 mo postpartum. Samples collected at 3 mo postpartum had a statistically significant lower presence and relative

  7. Effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® on health-related quality of life in college students affected by upper respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tracey J; Rigassio-Radler, Diane; Denmark, Robert; Haley, Timothy; Touger-Decker, Riva

    2013-06-01

    College students are susceptible to upper respiratory infections (URI) due to inadequate sleep, stress and close living quarters. Certain probiotic strains modulate immune function and may improve health-related quality of life (HRQL) during URI. The present study recruited apparently healthy college students and assessed the effect of probiotics on HRQL outcomes (i.e. self-reported duration, symptom severity and functional impairment of URI) in those who developed URI. Missed school and work days due to URI were also considered. Subjects (n 231) were apparently healthy college students living on campus in residence halls at the Framingham State University (Framingham, MA, USA), and were randomised to receive placebo (n 117) or probiotic-containing powder (daily dose of minimum 1 billion colony-forming units of each Lactobacillus rhamnosus LGG® (LGG®) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®); n 114) for 12 weeks. Subjects completed The Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 to assess HRQL during URI. The final analyses included 198 subjects (placebo, n 97 and probiotics, n 101). The median duration of URI was significantly shorter by 2 d and median severity score was significantly lower by 34% with probiotics v. placebo (P,0·001), indicating a higher HRQL during URI. Number of missed work days was not different between groups (P=0·429); however, the probiotics group missed significantly fewer school days (mean difference = 0·2 d) compared to the placebo group (P=0·002). LGG® and BB-12® may be beneficial among college students with URI for mitigating decrements in HRQL. More research is warranted regarding mechanisms of action associated with these findings and the cost-benefit of prophylactic supplementation.

  8. Short-term, daily intake of yogurt containing Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24384) does not affect colonic transit time in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenstein, Daniel J; D'Amico, Frank; Palese, Caren; Hahn, Alexander; Sparenborg, Jessy; Tan, Tina; Scott, Hillary; Polzin, Kayla; Kolberg, Lore; Roberts, Robert

    2014-01-28

    The present study investigated the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bf-6 (LMG 24 384) (Bf-6)-supplemented yogurt on colonic transit time (CTT). A triple-blinded, randomised, placebo-controlled, two-period cross-over trial was conducted with sixty-eight women with a self-reported history of straining during bowel movements or hard or lumpy stools in the past 2 years. As per regulatory requirements for probiotic studies, eligible women were generally healthy and not actively constipated at the time of enrolment. Participants consumed both Bf-6 and placebo yogurts for 14 d each in a randomised order, with a 6-week washout period between the treatments. The primary outcome, CTT, was assessed via Sitz marker X-rays. The average CTT was 42·1 h for the active period and 43·3 h for the control period (mean difference 1·2 h, 95 % CI - 4·9, 7·4). Since the statistical tests for the cross-over study implied that the mean CTT for the active and control periods in period 2 were biased, the standard protocol suggests examining the results of only period 1 as a traditional randomised controlled trial. This showed that the mean CTT was 35·2 h for the active period v. 52·9 h for the control period (P= 0·015). Bootstrapping demonstrated that both the mean and median differences remained significant (P= 0·016 and P= 0·045, respectively). Few adverse events were noted, with no differences among the active and control periods. The paired analysis showed no differences between the active and control periods during the cross-over trial. Further trials should be conducted in populations with underlying problems associated with disordered transit to determine the potential value of probiotic supplementation more accurately.

  9. Selenium and zinc internalized by Lactobacillus buchneri Lb26 (DSM 16341) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb1 (DSM 17850): improved bioavailability using a new biological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogna, Luca; Nicola, Stefania; Pane, Marco; Lorenzini, Paola; Strozzi, Gianpaolo; Mogna, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Minerals, often referred to as micronutrients, are one of the 5 fundamental groups of nutrients needed to sustain life. Micronutrient malnutrition affects >50% of the worldwide population. In particular, zinc (Zn) deficiency is considered an emerging public health problem in India and in other developing countries. Selenium (Se) is another trace mineral essential for humans and animals. Dietary Se exists primarily as selenomethionine and selenocysteine. In addition, Se may be present in its inorganic form (selenite) in some vegetables. To increase the daily intake of these minerals, numerous food supplements containing different inorganic and organic forms of Zn or Se are commercially available. At any rate, it is quite well known that inorganic salts have a very low bioavailability. Organic salts, commonly based on gluconate, orotate, citrate, or other molecules, are characterized by a higher systemic effect. The innovative opportunity of using certain species of probiotics enriched with the 2 minerals could represent an interesting alternative to these preparations. Diet integration with bacteria able to internalize Zn and Se may embody a new application of probiotics. To overcome the difficulties of in vivo animal or human trials, in this work a cell culture model using Caco-2 cells in bicameral chambers (Transwell system) was developed and validated to quantify the bioavailability of some commercial forms of Se and Zn compared with the organic forms accumulated intracellularly by Lactobacillus buchneri Lb26 (DSM 16341) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb1 (DSM 17850), respectively. The experimental data collected demonstrated a significantly higher bioavailability of Se and Zn internalized by L. buchneri Lb26 (DSM 16341) and B. lactis Bb1 (DSM 17850), respectively, compared with the inorganic and even organic forms tested. In particular, the Se accumulated at the intracellular level by L. buchneri Lb26 proved to be 5.9, 9.4, and 65 times more absorbable than sodium

  10. Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis Bl-04 interactions with prebiotic carbohydrates using differential proteomics and protein characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby

    are defined as probiotics. The positive clinical effects of probiotics, mainly belonging to the Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus genera in treatments of irritable bowel syndrome, gut infections and lifestyle diseases are well documented. Compounds that selectively stimulate the beneficial effect......Bacterial communities (microbiota) of great diversity populate the large intestine of animals including humans and influence the physiology, biochemistry and immunology of the host. Microorganisms mainly bacteria that when administered in sufficient amounts promote a beneficial effect to the host...

  11. Improved viability of bifidobacteria in fermented milk by cocultivation with Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odamaki, T; Xiao, J Z; Yonezawa, S; Yaeshima, T; Iwatsuki, K

    2011-03-01

    The poor survival of probiotic bacteria in commercial yogurts may limit their potential to exert health benefits in humans. The objective was to improve the survival of bifidobacteria in fermented milk. Cocultivation with some strains of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis improved the survival of bifidobacteria in fermented milk during refrigerated storage. Studies on one strain, Lc. lactis ssp. lactis MCC866, showed that the concentrations of dissolved oxygen were kept lower in the cocultivated fermented milk during storage compared with monocultured Bifidobacterium longum BB536 or samples cocultured with another noneffective Lc. lactis ssp. lactis strain. Degradation of genomic DNA was suppressed in the cocultivating system with Lc. lactis ssp. lactis MCC866. Several genes that participated in protection from active oxygen species (e.g., genes coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and Fe(2+) transport system) were expressed at higher levels during refrigerated storage in Lc. lactis ssp. lactis MCC 866 compared with another noneffective Lc. lactis ssp. lactis strain. Concentration of free iron ion was also lower in supernatants of fermented milk cocultivated with B. longum BB536 and Lc. lactis ssp. lactis MCC866. These results suggest that Lc. lactis ssp. lactis MCC 866 is potentially superior in reducing oxygen damage and consequently improves the survival of bifidobacteria in the cocultivating system. This cocultivation system is of industrial interest for producing fermented milk containing viable bifidobacteria with long shelf life. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Selective method for identification and quantification of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis BB-12 (BB-12) from the gastrointestinal tract of healthy volunteers ingesting a combination probiotic of BB-12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutsiaka, D D; Mahoney, I J; McDermott, L A; Stern, L L; Thorpe, C M; Kane, A V; Baez-Giangreco, C; McKinney, J; Davidson, L E; Leyva, R; Goldin, B; Snydman, D R

    2017-05-01

    To develop a novel validated method for the isolation of Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) from faecal specimens and apply it to studies of BB-12 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) recovered from the healthy human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. A novel method for isolating and enumerating BB-12 was developed based on its morphologic features of growth on tetracycline-containing agar. The method identified BB-12 correctly from spiked stool close to 100% of the time as validated by PCR confirmation of identity, and resulted in 97-104% recovery of BB-12. The method was then applied in a study of the recovery of BB-12 and LGG from the GI tract of healthy humans consuming ProNutrients ® Probiotic powder sachet containing BB-12 and LGG. Viable BB-12 and LGG were recovered from stool after 21 days of probiotic ingestion compared to baseline. In contrast, no organisms were recovered 21 days after baseline in the nonsupplemented control group. We demonstrated recovery of viable BB-12, using a validated novel method specific for the isolation of BB-12, and LGG from the GI tract of healthy humans who consumed the probiotic supplement. This method will enable more detailed and specific studies of BB-12 in probiotic supplements, including when in combination with LGG. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Impact of orally administered lozenges with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 on the number of salivary mutans streptococci, amount of plaque, gingival inflammation and the oral microbiome in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiviainen, Aino; Jalasvuori, Heli; Lahti, Emilia; Gursoy, Ulvi; Salminen, Seppo; Fontana, Margherita; Flannagan, Susan; Eckert, George; Kokaras, Alexis; Paster, Bruce; Söderling, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (BB-12) on the number of salivary mutans streptococci (MS), amount of plaque, gingival inflammation and the oral microbiota in healthy young adults. The study was a randomised, controlled, double-blind trial. Healthy volunteers used lozenges containing a combination of LGG and BB-12 (test group, n = 29) or lozenges without added probiotics (control group, n = 31) for 4 weeks. At baseline and at the end of the test period, the plaque index (PI) and gingival index (GI) were determined, and stimulated saliva was collected. The microbial composition of saliva was assessed using human oral microbe identification microarray (n = 30). MS and lactobacilli (LB) were plate cultured. The probiotic lozenge decreased both PI and GI (p < 0.05) while no changes were observed in the control group. However, no probiotic-induced changes were found in the microbial compositions of saliva in either group. The probiotic lozenge improved the periodontal status without affecting the oral microbiota. Short-term consumption of LGG and BB-12 decreased the amount of plaque which was associated with a clinical impact: a decrease in gingival inflammation.

  14. Discovery of proteins involved in the interaction between prebiotics carbohydrates and probiotics & whole proteome analysis of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis susp. lactis BB-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir

    in the human gastrointestinal tract. Despite an increased scientific focus within this field, the mechanisms behind the beneficial effects exerted by pre- and probiotics are still far from fully understood. The purpose of the present industrial-PhD project was to identify proteins involved in interactions......Probiotic bacteria, which primarily belong to the genera Lactobascillus and Bifidobacterium, are live microorganisms that have been related to a variety of health-promoting effects. Prebiotics are indigestible food components that specifically stimulate the growth of probiotic organisms...... on these results and on chromatographic analysis of XOS consumption in BB-12 cultures, a model for XOS utilisation in BB-12 was established. The subsequent phase of the PhD project included extracellular proteome analysis, giving rise to the identification of 86 unique proteins. Of these proteins, 33...

  15. Xylo-oligosaccharides alone or in synbiotic combination with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis induce bifidogenesis and modulate markers of immune function in healthy adults: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, factorial cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Caroline E; Röytiö, Henna; Alhoniemi, Esa; Fekete, Agnes A; Forssten, Sofia D; Hudjec, Natasa; Lim, Ying Ni; Steger, Cara J; Yaqoob, Parveen; Tuohy, Kieran M; Rastall, Robert A; Ouwehand, Arthur C; Gibson, Glenn R

    2014-06-14

    Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics are dietary ingredients with the potential to influence health and mucosal and systemic immune function by altering the composition of the gut microbiota. In the present study, a candidate prebiotic (xylo-oligosaccharide, XOS, 8 g/d), probiotic (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bi-07, 109 colony-forming units (CFU)/d) or synbiotic (8 g XOS+109 CFU Bi-07/d) was given to healthy adults (25-65 years) for 21 d. The aim was to identify the effect of the supplements on bowel habits, self-reported mood, composition of the gut microbiota, blood lipid concentrations and immune function. XOS supplementation increased mean bowel movements per d (P= 0·009), but did not alter the symptoms of bloating, abdominal pain or flatulence or the incidence of any reported adverse events compared with maltodextrin supplementation. XOS supplementation significantly increased participant-reported vitality (P= 0·003) and happiness (P= 0·034). Lowest reported use of analgesics was observed during the XOS+Bi-07 supplementation period (P= 0·004). XOS supplementation significantly increased faecal bifidobacterial counts (P= 0·008) and fasting plasma HDL concentrations (P= 0·005). Bi-07 supplementation significantly increased faecal B. lactis content (P= 0·007), lowered lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-4 secretion in whole-blood cultures (P= 0·035) and salivary IgA content (P= 0·040) and increased IL-6 secretion (P= 0·009). XOS supplementation resulted in lower expression of CD16/56 on natural killer T cells (P= 0·027) and lower IL-10 secretion (P= 0·049), while XOS and Bi-07 supplementation reduced the expression of CD19 on B cells (XOS × Bi-07, P= 0·009). The present study demonstrates that XOS induce bifidogenesis, improve aspects of the plasma lipid profile and modulate the markers of immune function in healthy adults. The provision of XOS+Bi-07 as a synbiotic may confer further benefits due to the discrete effects of Bi-07 on the gut

  16. Consumption of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 in yogurt reduced expression of TLR-2 on peripheral blood-derived monocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Huicui; Ba, Zhaoyong; Lee, Yujin; Peng, Jiayu; Lin, Junli; Fleming, Jennifer A; Furumoto, Emily J; Roberts, Robert F; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Rogers, Connie J

    2017-03-01

    Probiotic bacteria modulate immune parameters and inflammatory outcomes. Emerging evidence demonstrates that the matrix used to deliver probiotics may influence the efficacy of probiotic interventions in vivo. The aims of the current study were to evaluate (1) the effect of one species, Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 at a dose of log10 ± 0.5 CFUs/day on immune responses in a randomized, partially blinded, 4-period crossover, free-living study, and (2) whether the immune response to BB-12 differed depending on the delivery matrix. Healthy adults (n = 30) aged 18-40 years were recruited and received four treatments in a random order: (A) yogurt smoothie alone; smoothie with BB-12 added (B) before or (C) after yogurt fermentation, or (D) BB-12 given in capsule form. At baseline and after each 4-week treatment, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated, and functional and phenotypic marker expression was assessed. BB-12 interacted with peripheral myeloid cells via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2). The percentage of CD14 + HLA-DR + cells in peripheral blood was increased in male participants by all yogurt-containing treatments compared to baseline (p = 0.0356). Participants who consumed yogurt smoothie with BB-12 added post-fermentation had significantly lower expression of TLR-2 on CD14 + HLA-DR + cells (p = 0.0186) and reduction in TNF-α secretion from BB-12- (p = 0.0490) or LPS-stimulated (p = 0.0387) PBMCs compared to baseline. These findings not only demonstrate a potential anti-inflammatory effect of BB-12 in healthy adults, but also indicate that the delivery matrix influences the immunomodulatory properties of BB-12.

  17. Effect of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on defecation frequency in healthy subjects with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskesen, Dorte; Jespersen, Lillian; Michelsen, Birgit; Whorwell, Peter J; Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Morberg, Cathrine M

    2015-11-28

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, BB-12®, on two primary end points - defecation frequency and gastrointestinal (GI) well-being - in healthy adults with low defecation frequency and abdominal discomfort. A total of 1248 subjects were included in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomised to 1 or 10 billion colony-forming units/d of the probiotic strain BB-12® or a matching placebo capsule once daily for 4 weeks. Subjects completed a diary on bowel habits, relief of abdominal discomfort and symptoms. GI well-being, defined as global relief of abdominal discomfort, did not show significant differences. The OR for having a defecation frequency above baseline for ≥50% of the time was 1·31 (95% CI 0·98, 1·75), P=0·071, for probiotic treatment overall. Tightening the criteria for being a responder to an increase of ≥1 d/week for ≥50 % of the time resulted in an OR of 1·55 (95% CI 1·22, 1·96), P=0·0003, for treatment overall. A treatment effect on average defecation frequency was found (P=0·0065), with the frequency being significantly higher compared with placebo at all weeks for probiotic treatment overall (all Pprobiotic strain BB-12® resulted in a clinically relevant benefit on defecation frequency. The results suggest that consumption of BB-12® improves the GI health of individuals whose symptoms are not sufficiently severe to consult a doctor (ISRCTN18128385).

  18. Effects of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®on the lipid/lipoprotein profile and short chain fatty acids in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujin; Ba, Zhaoyong; Roberts, Robert F; Rogers, Connie J; Fleming, Jennifer A; Meng, Huicui; Furumoto, Emily J; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-06-29

    Some probiotics have hypocholesterolemic effects in animal studies, which are mediated, in part, by increases in fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Clinical trials of probiotics on lipids/lipoproteins are inconsistent. We examined the effects of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 ® (BB-12 ® ) (3.16 × 10 9  CFUs/day) on lipids and lipoproteins and fecal excretion of SCFAs in healthy adults. In a randomized, partially blinded, 4-period, crossover study, 30 adults (11 men, 19 women) aged 18-40 years were randomly assigned to: 1) yogurt smoothie with no BB-12 ® (YS), 2) yogurt smoothie with BB-12 ® added pre-fermentation (PRE), 3) yogurt smoothie with BB-12 ® added post-fermentation (POST), 4) BB-12 ® containing capsule (CAP). We measured serum lipids/lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fecal SCFAs at baseline and after each treatment period. Total cholesterol (TC), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TGs) did not differ after the PRE, POST, and CAP periods versus the YS or between treatments. Compared to baseline, fecal acetate was significantly increased after the YS (Δ = 211.89 ± 75.87 μg/g, P = 0.007) and PRE (Δ = 204.98 ± 75.70 μg/g, P = 0.009) periods. The percent increase in fecal acetate was significantly greater after the YS versus the POST period (52.2 ± 13.2% vs. 24.5 ± 13.2%, P = 0.023). Fecal total SCFAs, propionate and butyrate did not differ between treatment periods. Fecal total SCFAs were negatively associated with TC (r = -0.22, P = 0.01), LDL-C (r = -0.24, P = 0.004), age (r = -0.33, P BB-12 ® supplementation did not improve lipids, lipoproteins and total and individual fecal SCFAs. Fecal SCFAs were negatively associated with TC, LDL-C, age, and waist circumference. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01399996 .

  19. Survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM® and Bifidobacterium lactis HN019 encapsulated in chocolate during in vitro simulated passage of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klindt-Toldam, Stine; Larsen, Susanne K.; Saaby, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    dairy and juice based probiotic products, chocolate was an excellent carrier for probiotic delivery, because of very good survival of probiotics during simulated passage of the upper GI tract. The viability of B. lactis was slightly higher than Lb. acidophilus and survival rates were >6.5 log CFU...

  20. Diversity of the subspecies Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bunešová, V.; Killer, Jiří; Javůrková, B.; Vlková, E.; Tejnecký, V.; Musilová, S.; Rada, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2017), s. 40-47 ISSN 1075-9964 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bifidobacteria * environment * origin Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2016

  1. Lactococcus lactis is diploid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    As part of a collaboration with Danish Dairy Research Foundation we are interested in the DNA replication of Lactococcus lactis. For that we implemented flowcytometric analysis for these studies. The L. lactis does not respond to inhibition by rifampicin by finishing ongoing replication forks. We....... This unexpected result has been confirmed by radioactive labelling of slow growing cultures of Lactococcus lactis, which also showed the presence of two chromosomes. We therefore conclude that Lactococcus lactis is the first diploid bacterium found....... therefore turned to slow growing cultures in order to obtain information about the DNA replication in the cell cycle. From these studies we have obtained evidence that suggest that slow growing L. lactis are born with two chromosomes in contrast to other studied bacteria, which are born with one chromosome...

  2. Genetic analysis and morphological identification of pilus-like structures in members of the genus Bifidobacterium

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background Cell surface pili in Gram positive bacteria have been reported to orchestrate the colonization of host tissues, evasion of immunity and the development of biofilms. So far, little if any information is available on the presence of pilus-like structures in human gut commensals like bifidobacteria. Results and discussion In this report, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) of various bifidobacterial strains belonging to Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, Bifidobacterium dentium, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis revealed the existence of appendages resembling pilus-like structures. Interestingly, these microorganisms harbour two to six predicted pilus gene clusters in their genome, with each organized in an operon encompassing the major pilin subunit-encoding gene (designated fimA or fimP) together with one or two minor pilin subunit-encoding genes (designated as fimB and\\/or fimQ), and a gene encoding a sortase enzyme (strA). Quantitative Real Time (qRT)-PCR analysis and RT-PCR experiments revealed a polycistronic mRNA, encompassing the fimA\\/P and fimB\\/Q genes, which are differentially expressed upon cultivation of bifidobacteria on various glycans.

  3. Polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis monitoring of fecal bifidobacterium populations in a prebiotic and probiotic feeding trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satokari, R M; Vaughan, E E; Akkermans, A D; Saarela, M; De Vos, W M

    2001-07-01

    A culture-independent approach based on genus-specific PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to monitor qualitative changes in fecal bifidobacterial communities in a human feeding trial. DNA was extracted directly from feces and bifidobacterial 16S rDNA sequences were amplified using genus-specific PCR. The PCR fragments were subsequently separated in a sequence-specific manner by DGGE in order to obtain a profile of bifidobacterial fragments. The DGGE profiles revealed that in general, administration for two weeks of galactooligosaccharide and/or Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 (8 g and 3 x 10(10) cfu per day, respectively) did not affect the qualitative composition of the indigenous Bifidobacterium population, while B. lactis Bb-12 transiently colonised the gut.

  4. Immune Modulating Capability of Two Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium Strains in a Wistar Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Salazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermented dairy products are the usual carriers for the delivery of probiotics to humans, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus being the most frequently used bacteria. In this work, the strains Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 and Bifidobacterium longum IPLA E44 were tested for their capability to modulate immune response and the insulin-dependent glucose homeostasis using male Wistar rats fed with a standard diet. Three intervention groups were fed daily for 24 days with 10% skimmed milk, or with 109 cfu of the corresponding strain suspended in the same vehicle. A significant increase of the suppressor-regulatory TGF-β cytokine occurred with both strains in comparison with a control (no intervention group of rats; the highest levels were reached in rats fed IPLA R1. This strain presented an immune protective profile, as it was able to reduce the production of the proinflammatory IL-6. Moreover, phosphorylated Akt kinase decreased in gastroctemius muscle of rats fed the strain IPLA R1, without affecting the glucose, insulin, and HOMA index in blood, or levels of Glut-4 located in the membrane of muscle and adipose tissue cells. Therefore, the strain B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA R1 is a probiotic candidate to be tested in mild grade inflammation animal models.

  5. Bifidobacterium bifidum in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mirzaii

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The first step in utilizing appropriate microorganisms to produce probiotic milk products is to recognize their growth conditions in milk and the factors influencing them. In this research, the effect of dextrose, valine, glycine, thiamine and different temperatures on growth rate of Bifidobacterium bifidum in milk has been studied and for this purpose, fermented milk by B. bifidum has been used as stock culture in order to inoculate the milk samples. First 28, 35, 42, 49 and then 35, 38, 41 and 44°C incubators were used to choose the suitable incubation temperature for growth of the microorganisms and the acidity of milk samples were measured as a growth index of the microorganisms prior to and during incubation. Concentrations of 0 (control, 5, 10 and 15 ppm of thiamine; 0(control, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1% of dextrose; 0(control, 30, 60, 90 and 120 ppm of glycine and valine were used to evaluate their effects on the growth rate of B. bifidum and acidity of milk samples were measured before incubation and after 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours of incubation at 42°C. The rate of increase of acidity at 44°C and 41°C was significantly higher than the other temperatures (p

  6. Production of a Functional Frozen Yogurt Fortified with Bifidobacterium spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelazez, Amro; Muhammad, Zafarullah; Zhang, Qiu-Xue; Zhu, Zong-Tao; Abdelmotaal, Heba; Sami, Rokayya; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Frozen dairy products have characteristics of both yogurt and ice cream and could be the persuasive carriers of probiotics. Functions of the frozen yogurt containing viable bifidobacterial cells are recognized and favored by the people of all ages. We developed a kind of yogurt supplemented by Bifidobacterium species. Firstly, five strains of Bifidobacterium spp. (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11547, Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 11549, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551, Bifidobacterium adoles...

  7. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis as Potential Functional Starter Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Cvrtila

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify and characterise potential autochthonous functional starter cultures in homemade horsemeat sausage. The dominant microflora in the samples of horsemeat sausage were lactic acid bacteria (LAB, followed by micrococci. Among the LAB, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species, and since the first is not common in fermented sausages, we characterised it as a potential functional starter culture. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis produced a significant amount of lactic acid, displayed good growth capability at 12, 18 and 22 °C, growth in the presence of 5 % NaCl, good viability after lyophilisation and in simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, antimicrobial activity against test pathogens, and good adhesive properties in vitro.

  8. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis as Potential Functional
Starter Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvrtila, Jelena; Topić, Ivana; Delaš, Frane; Markov, Ksenija

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study is to identify and characterise potential autochthonous functional starter cultures in homemade horsemeat sausage. The dominant microflora in the samples of horsemeat sausage were lactic acid bacteria (LAB), followed by micrococci. Among the LAB, Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum were the dominant species, and since the first is not common in fermented sausages, we characterised it as a potential functional starter culture. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis produced a significant amount of lactic acid, displayed good growth capability at 12, 18 and 22 °C, growth in the presence of 5% NaCl, good viability after lyophilisation and in simulated gastric and small intestinal juice, antimicrobial activity against test pathogens, and good adhesive properties in vitro. PMID:27904322

  9. Viability of probiotic (Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei) and nonprobiotic microflora in Argentinian Fresco cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinderola, C G; Prosello, W; Ghiberto, T D; Reinheimer, J A

    2000-09-01

    We evaluated the suitability of Argentinian Fresco cheese as a food carrier of probiotic cultures. We used cultures of Bifidobacterium bifidum (two strains), Bifidobacterium longum (two strains), Bifidobacterium sp. (one strain), Lactobacillus acidophilus (two strains), and Lactobacillus casei (two strains) in different combinations, as probiotic adjuncts. Probiotic, lactic starter (Lactococcus lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus), and contaminant (coliforms, yeasts, and molds) organisms were counted at 0, 30, and 60 d of refrigerated storage. Furthermore, the acid resistance of probiotic and starter bacteria was determined from hydrochloric solutions (pH 2 and 3) of Fresco cheese. The results showed that nine different combinations of bifidobacteria and L. acidophilus had a satisfactory viability (count decreases in 60 d casei cultures assayed also showed a satisfactory survival (counts decreased casei). On the other hand, the three combinations of bifidobacteria, L. acidophilus, and L. casei tested adapted well to the Fresco cheese environment. When a cheese homogenate at pH 3 was used to partially simulate the acidic conditions in the stomach, the probiotic cultures had an excellent ability to remain viable up to 3 h. At pH 2, the cell viability was more affected; B. bifidum was the most resistant organism. This study showed that the Argentinian Fresco cheese could be used as an adequate carrier of probiotic bacteria.

  10. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...... milk products, is born with two complete non-replicating chromosomes. L. lactis therefore remain diploid throughout its entire life cycle....

  11. FORMULASI PRODUK SUSU FERMENTASI KERING DENGAN PENAMBAHAN BAKTERI PROBIOTIK Lactobacillus casei DAN Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dida Hani Rahman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTFermented milk is a healthy product that has many benefits especially for human digestive tract. Manufacturing of probiotic fermented milk products as a functional food with a viable long shelf life needs to be developed. The purpose of this study was to formulate a dried fermented milk product using probiotic bacterias. The experimental design study was a complete random design with 4 treatments using different lactic acid bacteria (LAB: A1 (Streptococcus lactis: 0.5%; A2 (Streptococcus lactis: 0.25% and Lactobacillus casei: 0.25%; A3 (Streptococcus lactis: 0.25%, Lactobacillus bulgaricus: 0.125%, Streptococcus thermophiles: 0.125%; and A4 (Streptococcus lactis: 0.25% and Bifidobacterium longum: 0.25%. The highest level of hardness was A2 product and the highest level of tenderness is A1 product. Results of proximate analysis showed that dried fermented milk products had high levels of the protein, calcium, and phosphorus. Microbiological test results showed that the amount of lactic acid bacteria (BAL in dried fermented milk products were eligible based on CODEX: 243 (2003. Statictical analysis using ANOVA in the hedonic quality test showed that the treatments were significantly different (p 0.05 on the attributes of color, aroma, hardness, and flavor except texture.Key words: dried fermented milk, functional food, probiotic, lactic acid bacteria (LABABSTRAKSusu fermentasi merupakan produk kesehatan yang mempunyai banyak manfaat terutama untuk saluran pencernaan manusia. Pembuatan produk susu fermentasi probiotik sebagai makanan fungsional yang mempunyai kelangsungan hidup dan daya simpan yang lama perlu dikembangan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk memformulasikan susu fermentasi kering menggunakan bakteri probiotik. Desain penelitian yang digunakan adalah rancangan acak lengkap dengan 4 perlakuan menggunakan 4 bakteri asam laktat (BAL, (Streptococcus lactis, 0.5%, A2 (Streptococcus lactis; 0.25% dan Lactobacillus casei; 0.25%, A3

  12. Cloning, Sequencing, and Expression of the Pyruvate Carboxylase Gene in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2†

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.; O'Sullivan, D. J.; Baldwin, K. A.; McKay, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    A functional pyc gene was isolated from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C2 and was found to complement a Pyc defect in L. lactis KB4. The deduced lactococcal Pyc protein was highly homologous to Pyc sequences of other bacteria. The pyc gene was also detected in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains.

  13. Survival of Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Bifidobacterium animalis in yoghurts made from commercial starter cultures during refrigerated storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Dudriková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, fermented dairy products have been consumed for nutrition and maintenance of good health for a very long time. This study evaluated the survival of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12 in yoghurts after the manufacturing during the shelf-life up to 21 days at 4 °C, which is mostly accepted by the consumers. The titratable acidity and pH showed the same patterns of increase or decline after manufacturing and storage of yoghurts. There was a significant difference (p <0.05 in acidity between yoghurts in glass bottle and plastic cup. The increase in numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and their survival during storage time were dependent on the species and strain of associative yoghurt bacteria (control-only yoghurt lactic acid bacteria and experimental containing except yoghurt culture also Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12 and on the packaging material (glass bottle versus plastic cup. It was observed, that counts of bifidobacteria were lower than counts of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus (190 to 434 x 107 at 1d and slowly increased (p <0.001 at maximum level on day 7 (294.3 - 754 x 107 and then slowly declined to 6.33 x 107 in glass bottle and 2.33 x 107 in plastic cups, respectively. Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus multiplied better in glass bottles than in plastic cups, as observed during experimental period in-group with Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB-12. At the end of the storage period at 4 ºC, viable counts of lactobacilli were higher (p <0.001 in glass bottles. Al the yoghurts, contained the recommended levels of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (107 cfu.g-1 at the end of storage period (21 d. 

  14. Engineering of sugar metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Weia Arianne

    2008-01-01

    Short English Summary Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium used in the dairy industry. This thesis decribes the genetic engineering performed on the sugar metabolism of L. lactis. Besides our fundamental interest for sugar metabolism and its regulation in L. lactis, this project had the

  15. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Soares, Siomar C

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity....

  16. Effects of ingesting Lactobacillus- and Bifidobacterium-containing yogurt in subjects with colonized Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuan-Yuan; Li, Shui-Nin; Liu, Chiang-Shin; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Su, Yu-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Jan, Chang-Ming; Lai, Chun-Huang; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Wang, Wen-Ming

    2004-09-01

    Evidence suggests that ingesting lactic acid bacteria exerts a suppressive effect on Helicobacter pylori infection in both animals and humans. Supplementing with Lactobacillus- and Bifidobacterium-containing yogurt (AB-yogurt) was shown to improve the rates of eradication of H. pylori in humans. We administered AB-yogurt to subjects with asymptomatic H. pylori to test whether the yogurt could inhibit H. pylori growth. The in vitro inhibition of H. pylori growth was determined by inoculating Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 or Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 on plates that were inoculated with H. pylori. Assessment of the viability of H. pylori was performed by the mixed culture method with La5 or Bb12. In an intervention study, 59 adult volunteers infected with H. pylori were given AB-yogurt (10(7) colony-forming units of both La5 and Bb12/mL) twice daily after a meal for 6 wk. Eleven subjects positive for H. pylori infection were treated with milk placebo as control subjects. H. pylori bacterial loads were determined with use of the (13)C-urea breath test, which was performed before and 4 and 8 wk after the start of AB-yogurt supplementation. Bb12 exerted an in vitro inhibitory effect against H. pylori, whereas La5 did not show an effect. Administration of AB-yogurt decreased the urease activity of H. pylori after 6 wk of therapy (P yogurt containing Bb12 and La5 effectively suppressed H. pylori infection in humans.

  17. Enhancing bile tolerance improves survival and persistence of Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus in the murine gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of commensal gastrointestinal bacteria used as probiotics are highly adapted to the specialised environment of the large bowel. However, unlike pathogenic bacteria; they are often inadequately equipped to endure the physicochemical stresses of gastrointestinal (GI delivery in the host. Herein we outline a patho-biotechnology strategy to improve gastric delivery and host adaptation of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 and the generally regarded as safe (GRAS organism Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. Results In vitro bile tolerance of both strains was significantly enhanced (P Listeria monocytogenes bile resistance mechanism BilE. Strains harbouring bilE were also recovered at significantly higher levels (P n = 5, following oral inoculation. Furthermore, a B. breve strain expressing bilE demonstrated increased efficacy relative to the wild-type strain in reducing oral L. monocytogenes infection in mice. Conclusion Collectively the data indicates that bile tolerance can be enhanced in Bifidobacterium and Lactococcus species through rational genetic manipulation and that this can significantly improve delivery to and colonisation of the GI tract.

  18. Probiotic Lactococcus lactis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Khemariya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis plays a critical role in food, dairy and health sectors. In food and dairy industries, it is found in production processes of various fermented products such as sausages, pickled vegetables, beverages such as beer and wine, breads, soymilk kefir, sour milk, butter, cream, fresh cheese and different types of cheeses, like Cheddar, Colby, Cottage cheese, Camembert, cream cheese, Roquefort and Brie. Additionally, there is an increasing interest towards the possible health benefits of the probiotic activity of this organism which generally is species and strain specific and depends upon the survival in gastrointestinal tract with sufficient number. Certain strains have the ability to produce antimicrobial peptide called nisin which exhibits preservative potential. Therefore, application of bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis in food and dairy sectors to preserve foods as a natural way and contributing health promoting attributes due to probiotic activity would definitely fulfil today’s consumer demands. This paper aimed to review the adaptation, antibiotic resistance, therapeutic and preservation potential of bacteriocinogenic and probiotic Lactococcus lactis.

  19. The Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efler, Petr

    -dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) in order to complete its catalytic cycle. Glutathione-dependent glutaredoxin complements Trx in many organisms. This thesis focuses on disulfide reduction pathways in Lactococcus lactis, an important industrial microorganism used traditionally for cheese and buttermilk production....... L. lactis lacks glutathione and glutaredoxin, but it a contains Trx system consisting of an NTR (LlTrxB), a classical Trx (LlTrxA) containing the conserved WCGPC active site motif, a Trx-like protein (LlTrxD) containing a WCGDC active site motif and a redoxin (LlNrdH) providing electrons to class Ib...... ribonucleotide reductase (NrdEF). Physiological functions of LlTrxA and LlTrxD were studied using ΔtrxA, ΔtrxD and ΔtrxAΔtrxD mutant strains of L. lactis ssp. cremoris MG1363 exposed to various stress conditions and comparing them to the wild type (wt) strain. These experiments revealed that the ΔtrxA genotype...

  20. Structural basis for arabinoxylo‐oligosaccharide capture by the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl‐04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby; Fredslund, Folmer; Vujicic‐Zagar, Andreja

    2013-01-01

    Glycan utilization plays a key role in modulating the composition of the gut microbiota, but molecular insight into oligosaccharide uptake by this microbial community is lacking. Arabinoxylo‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) are abundant in the diet, and are selectively fermented by probiotic bifidobacteria...... orientations, which facilitates the optimization of interactions with the various ligands. Broad substrate specificity was further enhanced by a spacious binding pocket accommodating decorations at different mainchain positions and conformational flexibility of a lid‐like loop. Phylogenetic and genetic...

  1. Transcriptional analysis of oligosaccharide utilization by Bifidobacterium lactis Bl-04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Joakim Mark; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Probiotic bifidobacteria in combination with prebiotic carbohydrates have documented positive effects on human health regarding gastrointestinal disorders and improved immunity, however the selective routes of uptake remain unknown for most candidate prebiotics. The differential...... of glycoside (galactosides, glucosides or xylosides) utilized. Carbohydrate transporters of the major facilitator superfamily (induced by gentiobiose and β-galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS)) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (upregulated by cellobiose, GOS, isomaltose, maltotriose, melibiose, panose......, raffinose, stachyose, xylobiose and β-xylo-oligosaccharides) were differentially upregulated, together with glycoside hydrolases from families 1, 2, 13, 36, 42, 43 and 77. Sequence analysis of the identified solute-binding proteins that determine the specificity of ABC transporters revealed similarities...

  2. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis decreases urinary oxalate excretion in a mouse model of primary hyperoxaluria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klimešová, Klára; Whittamore, J.M.; Hatch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2015), s. 107-117 ISSN 2194-7228 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Probiotics * Oxalobacter formigenes * Hyperoxaluria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.454, year: 2015

  3. Comparative genomics of the Bifidobacterium breve taxon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottacini, F.; O'Connell-Motherway, M.; Kuczynski, J.; O'Connell, K.J.; Serafini, F.; Duranti, S.; Milani, C.; Turroni, F.; Lugli, G.A.; Zomer, A.L.; Zhurina, D.; Riedel, C.; Ventura, M; Sinderen, D. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bifidobacteria are commonly found as part of the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of a broad range of hosts, where their presence is positively correlated with the host's health status. In this study, we assessed the genomes of thirteen representatives of Bifidobacterium

  4. Rewiring Lactococcus lactis for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Dehli, Tore Ibsen; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    to redirect the metabolism of LAB model organism Lactococcus lactis toward ethanol production. Codon-optimized Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was introduced and expressed from synthetic promoters in different strain backgrounds. In the wild-type L. lactis strain MG1363 growing on glucose, only...

  5. Obesity-associated gut microbiota is enriched in Lactobacillus reuteri and depleted in Bifidobacterium animalis and Methanobrevibacter smithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, M; Maraninchi, M; Henry, M; Armougom, F; Richet, H; Carrieri, P; Valero, R; Raccah, D; Vialettes, B; Raoult, D

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is associated with increased health risk and has been associated with alterations in bacterial gut microbiota, with mainly a reduction in Bacteroidetes, but few data exist at the genus and species level. It has been reported that the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genus representatives may have a critical role in weight regulation as an anti-obesity effect in experimental models and humans, or as a growth-promoter effect in agriculture depending on the strains. To confirm reported gut alterations and test whether Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium species found in the human gut are associated with obesity or lean status, we analyzed the stools of 68 obese and 47 controls targeting Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Methanobrevibacter smithii, Lactococcus lactis, Bifidobacterium animalis and seven species of Lactobacillus by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and culture on a Lactobacillus-selective medium. In qPCR, B. animalis (odds ratio (OR)=0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-1.01; P=0.056) and M. smithii (OR=0.76; 95% CI 0.59-0.97; P=0.03) were associated with normal weight whereas Lactobacillus reuteri (OR=1.79; 95% CI 1.03-3.10; P=0.04) was associated with obesity. The gut microbiota associated with human obesity is depleted in M. smithii. Some Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus species were associated with normal weight (B. animalis) while others (L. reuteri) were associated with obesity. Therefore, gut microbiota composition at the species level is related to body weight and obesity, which might be of relevance for further studies and the management of obesity. These results must be considered cautiously because it is the first study to date that links specific species of Lactobacillus with obesity in humans.

  6. Tulum Peynirlerinden izole Edilen Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YBML9 ve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin TUNCER

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalısmanın amacı tulum peynirlerinden izole edilen Lactococcus lactis suslarının fenotipik tanısı ve bu suslar tarafından üretilen bakteriyosinlerin kısmi karakterizasyonlarıdır. Bu amaçla Türkiye'nin sekiz farklı ilinden (Ankara, Antalya, Burdur, Denizli, Erzincan, Isparta, İstanbul ve İzmir yöresel pazarlardan toplanan 60 adet tulum peyniri örneginden 40 adet Lactococcus lactis susu (31 adet L. lactis subsp. lactis ve 9 adet L. lactis subsp. cremoris izole edildi. 40 adet L. lactis susu içerisinden, 2 adet L. lactis subsp. lactis (YBML9 ve YBML21 susu bakteriyosin üretme yeteneginde bulundu. L. lactis subsp. lactis YBML9 ve YBML21 susları tarafından üretilen bakteriyosinler, farklı enzim, pH ve sıcaklık uygulamaları sonucu; sırasıyla nisin ve laktisin 481 olarak tanımlandı.

  7. Production of a Functional Frozen Yogurt Fortified with Bifidobacterium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amro Abdelazez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Frozen dairy products have characteristics of both yogurt and ice cream and could be the persuasive carriers of probiotics. Functions of the frozen yogurt containing viable bifidobacterial cells are recognized and favored by the people of all ages. We developed a kind of yogurt supplemented by Bifidobacterium species. Firstly, five strains of Bifidobacterium spp. (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11547, Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 11549, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551, Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550, and Bifidobacterium breve ATCC 11548 were evaluated based on the feasibility criteria of probiotics, comprising acid production, bile tolerance, and adhesion to epithelial cells. Formerly, we combined the optimum strains with yogurt culture (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus EMCC 11102 and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus EMCC 11044 for producing frozen yogurt. Finally, physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation of the frozen yogurt were investigated during storage of 60 days at −18°C. Results directed that Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550 and Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551 could be utilized with yogurt culture for producing frozen yogurt. Moreover, the frozen yogurt fermented by two bifidobacterial strains and yogurt culture gained the high evaluation in the physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation. In summary, our results revealed that there was no significant difference between frozen yogurt fermented by Bifidobacterium spp. and yogurt culture and that fermented by yogurt culture only.

  8. Production of a Functional Frozen Yogurt Fortified with Bifidobacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelazez, Amro; Muhammad, Zafarullah; Zhang, Qiu-Xue; Zhu, Zong-Tao; Abdelmotaal, Heba; Sami, Rokayya; Meng, Xiang-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Frozen dairy products have characteristics of both yogurt and ice cream and could be the persuasive carriers of probiotics. Functions of the frozen yogurt containing viable bifidobacterial cells are recognized and favored by the people of all ages. We developed a kind of yogurt supplemented by Bifidobacterium species. Firstly, five strains of Bifidobacterium spp. ( Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11547, Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 11549, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551, Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550, and Bifidobacterium breve ATCC 11548) were evaluated based on the feasibility criteria of probiotics, comprising acid production, bile tolerance, and adhesion to epithelial cells. Formerly, we combined the optimum strains with yogurt culture ( Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus EMCC 11102 and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus EMCC 11044) for producing frozen yogurt. Finally, physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation of the frozen yogurt were investigated during storage of 60 days at -18°C. Results directed that Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550 and Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551 could be utilized with yogurt culture for producing frozen yogurt. Moreover, the frozen yogurt fermented by two bifidobacterial strains and yogurt culture gained the high evaluation in the physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation. In summary, our results revealed that there was no significant difference between frozen yogurt fermented by Bifidobacterium spp. and yogurt culture and that fermented by yogurt culture only.

  9. Production of a Functional Frozen Yogurt Fortified with Bifidobacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Zafarullah; Zhang, Qiu-Xue; Zhu, Zong-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Frozen dairy products have characteristics of both yogurt and ice cream and could be the persuasive carriers of probiotics. Functions of the frozen yogurt containing viable bifidobacterial cells are recognized and favored by the people of all ages. We developed a kind of yogurt supplemented by Bifidobacterium species. Firstly, five strains of Bifidobacterium spp. (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 11547, Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 11549, Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551, Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550, and Bifidobacterium breve ATCC 11548) were evaluated based on the feasibility criteria of probiotics, comprising acid production, bile tolerance, and adhesion to epithelial cells. Formerly, we combined the optimum strains with yogurt culture (Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus EMCC 11102 and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus EMCC 11044) for producing frozen yogurt. Finally, physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation of the frozen yogurt were investigated during storage of 60 days at −18°C. Results directed that Bifidobacterium adolescentis ATCC 11550 and Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 11551 could be utilized with yogurt culture for producing frozen yogurt. Moreover, the frozen yogurt fermented by two bifidobacterial strains and yogurt culture gained the high evaluation in the physiochemical properties and sensory evaluation. In summary, our results revealed that there was no significant difference between frozen yogurt fermented by Bifidobacterium spp. and yogurt culture and that fermented by yogurt culture only. PMID:28691028

  10. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes de; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-02

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (pcheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics of pyruvate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiorsen, Claus Rix; Jensen, Niels B.S.; Christensen, Bjarke

    2001-01-01

    The pyruvate metabolism in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis was studied in anaerobic cultures under transient conditions. During growth of L. lactis in continuous culture at high dilution rate, homolactic product formation was observed, i.e., lactate was produced as the major end...... product. At a lower dilution rate, the pyruvate metabolism shifted towards mixed acid-product formation where formate, acetate, and ethanol were produced in addition to lactate. The regulation of the shift in pyruvate metabolism was investigated by monitoring the dynamic behavior of L. lactis...

  12. Evaluation of the probiotic properties of new Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains and their in vitro effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, I; D'Orazio, G; Labra, M; La Ferla, B; Mezzasalma, V; Bizzaro, G; Giardina, S; Michelotti, A; Tursi, F; Vassallo, M; Di Gennaro, P

    2015-07-01

    Probiotic ingestion is recommended as a preventive approach to maintain the balance of the intestinal microbiota and to enhance the human well-being. During the whole life of each individual, the gut microbiota composition could be altered by lifestyle, diet, antibiotic therapies and other stress conditions, which may lead to acute and chronic disorders. Hence, probiotics can be administered for the prevention or treatment of some disorders, including lactose malabsorption, acute diarrhoea, irritable bowel syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and mild forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The probiotic-mediated effect is an important issue that needs to be addressed in relation to strain-specific probiotic properties. In this work, the probiotic properties of new Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains were screened, and their effects in vitro were evaluated. They were screened for probiotic properties by determining their tolerance to low pH and to bile salts, antibiotic sensitivity, antimicrobial activity and vitamin B8, B9 and B12 production, and by considering their ability to increase the antioxidant potential and to modulate the inflammatory status of systemic-miming cell lines in vitro. Three out of the examined strains presenting the most performant probiotic properties, as Lactobacillus plantarum PBS067, Lactobacillus rhamnosus PBS070 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis PBSO75, were evaluated for their effects also on human intestinal HT-29 cell line. The obtained results support the possibility to move to another level of study, that is, the oral administration of these probiotical strains to patients with acute and chronic gut disorders, by in vivo experiments.

  13. Introduction of peptidase genes from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis into Lactococcus lactis and controlled expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegmann, U.; Klein, J.R.; Drumm, I.; Kuipers, O.P.; Henrich, B.

    1999-01-01

    Peptidases PepI, PepL, PepW, and PepG from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp, lactis, which have no counterparts in Lactococcus lactis, and peptidase PepQ were examined to determine their potential to confer new peptidolytic properties to lactococci, Controllable expression of the corresponding genes

  14. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  15. Bifidobacterium bombi sp. nov., a new bifidobacterium from the bumblebee digestive tract

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Rada, V.; Benada, Oldřich; Koppová, Ingrid; Havlík, J.; Straka, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 8 (2009), s. 2020-2024 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500200572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : bifidobacterium bombi * anaerobic bacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.113, year: 2009

  16. Reclassification of Bifidobacterium stercoris Kim et al. 2010 as a later heterotypic synonym of Bifidobacterium adolescentis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Sedláček, I.; Rada, V.; Havlík, J.; Kopečný, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 63, Pt 11 (2013), s. 4350-4353 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/1252 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bacterial strain * Bifidobacterium Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 2.798, year: 2013

  17. Cholic acid resistance and the adherence ability of Bifidobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 55% respectively, depending on pH, time and strain. The adaptation of Bifidobacterium strains to cholic acid was shown to be increased with time. It was concluded that the acquisition of cholic acid resistance by those Bifidobacterium strains promoted changes in the adhesion ability on HT-29 human epithelium cell line.

  18. High Expression of β-Glucosidase in Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 and Application in Conversion of Isoflavone Glucosides During Fermentation of Soy Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Yong; Wu, Qian Qian; Ji, Geun Eog

    2015-04-01

    In spite of the reported probiotic effects, Bifidobacterium bifidum BGN4 (BGN4) showed no β- glucosidase activity and failed to biotransform isoflavone glucosides into the more bioactive aglycones during soy milk fermentation. To develop an isoflavone-biotransforming BGN4, we constructed the recombinant B. bifidum BGN4 strain (B919G) by cloning the structural β- glucosidase gene from B. lactis AD011 (AD011) using the expression vector with the constitutively active promoter 919 from BGN4. As a result, B919G highly expressed β- glucosidase and showed higher β-glucosidase activity and heat stability than the source strain of the β-glucosidase gene, AD011. The biotransformation of daidzin and genistin compounds using the crude enzyme extract from B919G was completed within 4 h, and the bioconversion of daidzin and genistin in soy milk during fermentation with B919G also occurred within 6 h, which was much faster and higher than with AD011. The incorporation of this β-glucosidaseproducing Bifidobacterium strain in soy milk could lead to the production of fermented soy milk with an elevated amount of bioavailable forms of isoflavones as well as to the indigenous probiotic effects of the Bifidobacterium strain.

  19. Isolation and molecular identification of lactic acid bacteria and Bifidobacterium spp. from faeces of the blue-fronted Amazon parrot in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, L; Revolledo, L; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Chacón, J L; Martins, L M; Seixas, G H F; Ferreira, A J P

    2014-12-01

    In Brazil, the blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) is a common pet. The faecal microbiota of these birds include a wide variety of bacterial species, the majority of which belong to the Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) clade. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in the diversity and abundance of LAB and Bifidobacterium spp. in the cloacae between wild and captive birds and to select, identify and characterise LAB for consideration as a parrot probiotic. Cloacal swabs were collected from 26 wild and 26 captive birds. Bacterial DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA genes were amplified. The numbers of PCR-positive Enterococcus, Pediococcus, and Lactobacillus species isolated from wild and captive birds were significantly different (P<0.05). Enterococcus was the most frequently isolated genus, followed by Pediococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium. Enterococcus faecium, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus coryniformis, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and Bifidobacterium bifidum were the most frequently isolated species from all birds. This study increases our understanding of the faecal microbiota, and may help to improve the nutrition and habitat management of captive and wild parrots. The bacterial population identified in the faecal microbiota of clinically healthy wild and captive parrots can serve as a database to analyse variations in the gut microbiota of pathogen-infected parrots and to develop probiotics specific to these genera.

  20. Efeito prebiótico do mel sobre o crescimento e viabilidade de Bifidobacterium spp. e Lactobacillus spp. em leite Prebiotic effect of honey on growth and viability of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Nolasco Macedo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Para ser considerado prebiótico, um microrganismo deve atender a uma série de requisitos, sendo a manutenção da viabilidade, um dos principais. Culturas probióticas de Lactobacillus spp. e Bifidobacterium spp. foram cultivadas em leite em pó desnatado reconstituído 12% adicionado de 3% (p/v de mel pasteurizado. Foram preparados controles sem mel. Todos os cultivos mantiveram-se viáveis por 46 dias a 7 °C atendendo o número mínimo exigido pela legislação. O maior número de células viáveis de L. casei-01 e L. casei Shirota (>9,0 log10 UFC.mL-1 foi observado nos cultivos contendo mel. A acidez titulável produzida por estas culturas foi de 1,44%. O número de células viáveis de L. acidophilus Sacco® aos 46 dias em cultivos com mel foi significativamente maior (p To be considered prebiotic, a microorganism must fulfill a series of requirements and the maintenance of viability is a major one. Probiotic cultures of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. were cultured in 12% (w/v reconstituted nonfat dry milk containing 3% (w/v of pasteurized honey. Controls without honey were prepared. All cultures remained viable for up 46 days at 7 °C conforming to the regulation requirement. The higher cell number of L. casei-01 and L. casei Shirota (>9.0 log10 CFU.mL-1 were maintained in the presence of honey. The titratable acidity produced by these cultures was of 1.44%. On the 46th day of storage, the number of L. acidophilus Sacco® viable cells in the presence of honey was significantly higher (p < 0.05 compared to the control. Considering the overall storage period, honey exerted significant positive effect (p < 0,05 only on Bifidobacterium cultures. The lowest growth and acidity on the 46th day was observed with Bf. Lactis Bb12, being 7,63 log10 CFU.g-1 and 0,61% of acidity in the presence of honey and 6.11 log CFU.mL-1 and 0,30% of acidity in the control. Differently, Bf. lactis Sacco® cultures reached counts of 9,11 log10 CFU

  1. Probiotic Dahi containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum modulates immunoglobulin levels and cytokines expression in whey proteins sensitised mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, Umesh Kumar; Sharma, Ankita; Kapila, Rajeev; Kansal, Vinod Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Cow milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children. So far, no effective treatment is available to prevent or cure food allergy. This study investigated whether orally administrated probiotics could suppress sensitisation in whey proteins (WP)-induced allergy mouse model. Two types of probiotic Dahi were prepared by co-culturing Dahi bacteria (Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris NCDC-86 and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis biovar diacetylactis NCDC-60) along with selected strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus LaVK2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BbVK3. Mice were fed with probiotic Dahi (La-Dahi and LaBb-Dahi) from 7 days before sensitisation with WP, respectively, in addition to milk protein-free basal diet, and control group received no supplements. Feeding of probiotic Dahi suppressed the elevation of whey proteins-specific IgE and IgG response of WP-sensitised mice. In addition, sIgA levels were significantly (P mice fed with La-Dahi. Production of T helper (Th)-1 cell-specific cytokines, i.e. interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-12, and IL-10 increased, while Th2-specific cytokines, i.e. IL-4 decreased in the supernatant of cultured splenocytes collected from mice fed with probiotic Dahi as compared to the other groups. Moreover, the splenic mRNA levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-10 were found to be significantly increased, while that of IL-4 decreased significantly in La-Dahi groups, as compared to control groups. Results of the present study indicate that probiotic Dahi skewed Th2-specific immune response towards Th1-specific response and suppressed IgE in serum. Collectively, this study shows the potential use of probiotics intervention in reducing the allergic response to whey proteins in mice. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Adaptation of Lactococcus lactis to its environment : a genomics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, Albertus Lambert

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of strategies of Lactococcus lactis to adapt to its ever-changing environment. Although the complete genome sequence of L. lactis subspecies lactis IL1403, became available when this research was started, the genome sequence of the lactic acid bacterial paradigm, L.

  3. Transcriptome analysis and related databases of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Jong, Anne de; Baerends, Richard J.S.; Hijum, Sacha A.F.T. van; Zomer, Aldert L.; Karsens, Harma A.; Hengst, Chris D. den; Kramer, Naomi E.; Buist, Girbe; Kok, Jan

    Several complete genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis and their annotations will become available in the near future, next to the already published genome sequence of L. lactis ssp. lactis IL1403. This will allow intraspecies comparative genomics studies as well as functional genomics studies

  4. Liposome-enhanced transformation of Streptococcus lactis and plasmid transfer by intergeneric protoplast fusion of Streptococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Kok, Jan; Lelie, Daniel van der; Venema, Gerhardus

    An efficient protoplast transformation system and a procedure of plasmid transfer by means of protoplast fusion is described for Streptococcus lactis. Protoplasts of S. lactis IL1403 and S. lactis MG1363 were transformed by pGK12 [2.9 MDa erythromycin resistance (Emr)] with an efficiency of 3 × 10^5

  5. Effect of production conditions on the stability of a human bifidobacterial species Bifidobacterium longum in yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, F; Tomita, S; Yaeshima, T; Iwatsuki, K

    2009-12-01

    Human bifidobacteria are more sensitive to external environmental factors than animal bifidobacteria, and it is difficult to ensure their stable survival in yogurt. The purpose of this investigation was to observe the survival of human bifidobacteria in yogurts produced under various production conditions. Frozen or lyophilized bifidobacteria starters containing Bifidobacterium longum BB536 originally isolated from an infant, and commercial lyophilized yogurt starters were used for yogurt preparation. After producing yogurts under various conditions, the survival of bifidobacteria in these yogurts over various storage periods was observed. Although there were some differences in bifidobacterial survival in yogurt between various production conditions, more than 1.0 x 10(7) CFU g(-1) of Bif. longum survived in yogurt after 35 days' storage at 5 degrees C. Lower fermentation temperature (37 degrees C) and inclusion of Lactococcus lactis in the starter significantly (P yogurt. In this investigation, the human bifidobacterial strain Bif. longum survived adequately in yogurt, although the fermentation temperature and starter composition affect bifidobacterial survival. This investigation indicates that stable probiotic yogurt using human bifidobacteria can be produced by choosing optimal production conditions.

  6. Comparative study of Bifidobacterium animalis, Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Flaviano S; Silva, Aparecida A; Vieira, Angélica T; Barbosa, Flávio H F; Arantes, Rosa M E; Teixeira, Mauro M; Nicoli, Jacques Robert

    2009-08-01

    The present work investigates some probiotic properties of four different microorganisms (Bifidobacterium animalis var. lactis BB-12, Escherichia coli EMO, Lactobacillus casei and Saccharomyces boulardii). In vitro and in vivo tests were carried out to compare cell wall hydrophobicity, production of antagonistic substances, survival capacity in the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice without pathological consequence, and immune modulation by stimulation of Küpffer cells, intestinal sIgA and IL-10 levels. In vitro antagonism against pathogenic bacteria and yeast was only observed for the probiotic bacteria B. animalis and L. casei. The hydrophobic property of the cell wall was higher for B. animalis and E. coli EMO, and this property could be responsible for a better ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free mice. Higher levels of sIgA were observed mainly for S. boulardii, followed by E. coli EMO and B. animalis, and only S. boulardii induced a significant higher level of IL-10. In conclusion, for a probiotic use, S. boulardii presented better characteristics in terms of immunomodulation, and B. animalis and L. casei for antagonistic substance production. The knowledge of the different probiotic properties could be used to choice the better microorganism depending on the therapeutic or prophylactic application.

  7. Lactococcus lactis expressing food-grade β-galactosidase alleviates lactose intolerance symptoms in post-weaning Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjie; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Chuan; Yu, Qian; Dai, Ruirui; Pei, Xiaofang

    2012-12-01

    The endogenous β-galactosidase expressed in intestinal microbes is demonstrated to help humans in lactose usage, and treatment associated with the promotion of beneficial microorganism in the gut is correlated with lactose tolerance. From this point, a kind of recombinant live β-galactosidase delivery system using food-grade protein expression techniques and selected probiotics as vehicle was promoted by us for the purpose of application in lactose intolerance subjects. Previously, a recombinant Lactococcus lactis MG1363 strain expressing food-grade β-galactosidase, the L. lactis MG1363/FGZW, was successfully constructed and evaluated in vitro. This study was conducted to in vivo evaluate its efficacy on alleviating lactose intolerance symptoms in post-weaning Balb/c mice, which were orally administered with 1 × 10⁶ CFU or 1 × 10⁸ CFU of L. lactis MG1363/FGZW daily for 4 weeks before lactose challenge. In comparison with naïve mice, the mice administered with L. lactis MG1363/FGZW showed significant alleviation of diarrhea symptoms in less total feces weight within 6 h post-challenge and suppressed intestinal motility after lactose challenge, although there was no significant increase of β-galactosidase activity in small intestine. The alleviation also correlated with higher species abundance, more Bifidobacterium colonization, and stronger colonization resistance in mice intestinal microflora. Therefore, this recombinant L. lactis strain effectively alleviated diarrhea symptom induced by lactose uptake in lactose intolerance model mice with the probable mechanism of promotion of lactic acid bacteria to differentiate and predominantly colonize in gut microbial community, thus making it a promising probiotic for lactose intolerance subjects.

  8. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Lactococcus lactis HY 449 on Cariogenic Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2016-11-28

    Dental caries is caused by cariogenic biofilm, an oral biofilm including Streptococcus mutans . Recently, the prevention of dental caries using various probiotics has been attempted. Lactococcus lactis HY 449 is a probiotic bacterium. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of L. lactis HY 449 on cariogenic biofilm and to analyze its inhibitory mechanisms. Cariogenic biofilm was formed in the presence or absence of L. lactis HY 449 and L. lactis ATCC 19435, and analyzed with a confocal laser microscope. The formation of cariogenic biofilm was reduced in cultures spiked with both L. lactis strains, and L. lactis HY 449 exhibited more inhibitory effects than L. lactis ATCC 19435. In order to analyze and to compare the inhibitory mechanisms, the antibacterial activity of the spent culture medium from both L. lactis strains against S. mutans was investigated, and the expression of glucosyltransferases ( gtfs ) of S. mutans was then analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, the sucrose fermentation ability of both L. lactis strains was examined. Both L. lactis strains showed antibacterial activity and inhibited the expression of gtfs , and the difference between both strains did not show. In the case of sucrose-fermenting ability, L. lactis HY 449 fermented sucrose but L. lactis ATCC 19435 did not. L. lactis HY 449 inhibited the uptake of sucrose and the gtfs expression of S. mutans , whereby the development of cariogenic biofilm may be inhibited. In conclusion, L. lactis HY 449 may be a useful probiotic for the prevention of dental caries.

  10. Protein Profile and Plasmid Content of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LL52 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris LC79 Strains under Several Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    LALE, Rahmi; TÜKEL, Çağla; AKÇELİK, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the protein and plasmid content of 2 Lactococcus lactis strains, L. lactis subsp. lactis LL52 and L. lactis subsp. cremoris LC79, under the stresses of high and low temperature, osmotic shock, and low pH were determined. We identified 3 new proteins with molecular masses of 16.0, 29.4, and 45.0 kDa as high temperature stress response specific in strain LL52. High temperature stress did not cause any changes in the protein content of strain LC79. Proteins that were specific for ...

  11. Towards Enhanced Galactose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, A.R.; Pool, W.; Solopova, A.; Kok, J.; Santos, H; Kuipers, O.P.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of galactose in dairy products due to partial lactose fermentation by lactic acid bacteria yields poor-quality products and precludes their consumption by individuals suffering from galactosemia. This study aimed at extending our knowledge of galactose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis,

  12. Environmental stress responses in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, JW; Venema, G; Kok, J

    Bacteria can encounter a variety of physical conditions during their life, Bacterial cells are able to survive these (often adverse) conditions by the induction of specific or general protection mechanisms. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is widely used for the production of cheese.

  13. Protein export elements from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Martinez, Gaspar; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Dijl, Jan Maarten van; Smith, Hilda; Bron, Sierd

    Broad-host-range plasmids carrying α-amylase or β-lactamase reporter genes lacking a signal sequence were used to select export elements from Lactococcus lactis chromosomal DNA that could function as signal sequences. Fragments containing such elements were identified by their ability to direct the

  14. Heterologous Protein Expression by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villatoro-Hernández, J.; Kuipers, O.P.; Saucedo-Cárdenas, O.; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, R.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Lactococcus lactis as a safe and efficient cell factory to produce heterologous proteins of medical interest. The relevance of the use of this lactic acid bacterium (LAB) is that it is a noncolonizing, nonpathogenic microorganism that can be delivered in vivo at a

  15. The extracellular proteinase of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Harm Willem Frederik

    1991-01-01

    Lactococci are used in the production of fermentated dairy products of which cheese is one of the most important. In starter cultures used in dutch cheese manufacturing Lactococcus lactis the dominants pecies. The main functions of the Lactococci are a fast conversion of lactose into lactate and the

  16. The proteolytic system of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, Edmundus Richardus Stephanus

    1997-01-01

    The bacterium Lactococcus lactis usues an extencive proteolytic system to utilize milk proteins (caseins) in orde to meet its need for amino acids. The genetic and biochemical properties of the putative components of the proteolytic pathway are well-described. However, little is known about the role

  17. Phenotypic variation in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolates derived from intestinal tracts of marine and freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoi, S; Yuasa, K; Washio, S; Abe, T; Ikuno, E; Sugita, H

    2009-09-01

    We compared phenotypic characteristics of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis derived from different sources including the intestinal tract of marine fish and freshwater fish, and cheese starter culture. In the phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequences (1371 bp), freshwater fish-, marine fish- and cheese starter culture-derived strains were identical to that of L. lactis subsp. lactis previously reported. Fermentation profiles determined using the API 50 CH system were similar except for fermentation of several sugars including l-arabinose, mannitol, amygdalin, saccharose, trehalose, inulin and gluconate. The strains did have distinct levels of halotolerance: marine fish-derived strains > cheese starter-derived strain > freshwater fish-derived isolate. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis showed extensive diversity in phenotypic adaptation to various environments. The phenotypic properties of these strains suggested that L. lactis subsp. lactis strains from fish intestine have additional functions compared with the cheese starter-derived strain that has previously described. The unique phenotypic traits of the fish intestinal tract-derived L. lactis subsp. lactis might make them useful as a probiotics in aquaculture, and contribute to the development of functional foods and novel food additives, since the strains derived from fish intestines might have additional functions such as antibacterial activity.

  18. Occurrence of Bifidobacterium in the intestine of newborns by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezirtzoglou, E; Maipa, V; Chotoura, N; Apazidou, E; Tsiotsias, A; Voidarou, C; Kostakis, D; Alexopoulos, A

    2006-11-01

    Colonization by Bifidobacterium occurs generally within 4 days of life. The new method FISH has been applied for molecular detection of Bifidobacteria. The study was carried out on 26 healthy newborns delivered by vaginal delivery. Breast-fed infants harbor a gastrointestinal flora characterized by an increased concentration of Bifidobacterium cells (by a factor of 1.75). In artificial alimentation, some infants either did not harbor any Bifidobacterium or showed lower numbers of Bifidobacterium. Moreover, male newborns show higher numbers of Bifidobacterium, but in both sexes the predominance of Bifidobacterium is evident after maternal alimentation.

  19. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) strain BB-12-supplemented yogurt in healthy adults on antibiotics: a phase I safety study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that, when administered in sufficient doses, provide health benefits on the host. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires phase I safety studies for probiotics when the intended use of the product is as a drug. The purpose of the study was to ...

  20. Chorioamnionitis due to Lactococcus lactis cremoris: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Azouzi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis cremoris is rarely involved in human pathology. A thirty two-year old pregnant woman with premature rupture of membrane history presented with chorioamnionitis due to L. lactis cremoris. She underwent an emergency caesarian section and was treated with antibiotics including the association of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. She was completely recovered. This is the first case to our knowledge of chorioamnionitis due to this organism. Keywords: Chorioamnionitis, Premature rupture of membranes, Lactococcus lactis cremoris

  1. Cadmium tolerant characteristic of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yao; Wang, Ying; Yang, Xuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-12-01

    Environmental contamination caused by heavy metals poses a major threat to the wildlife and human health for their toxicity and intrinsically persistent nature. Some specific food grade bacteria have properties that enable them to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, newly isolated from pickles, is a cadmium (Cd) tolerant bacteria. Cd resistant properties of the lactis was evaluated under different Cd stresses. Cd accumulation in different cellular parts was determined by ICP-MS and cell morphology changes were measured by SEM-EDS and TEM-EDS. In addition, functional groups associated with Cd resistance were detected by infrared spectroscopic analysis. The results indicated that Cd mainly accumulated in the cell surface structures including cytoderm and cytomembrane. Functional groups such as OH and NH 2 in the cell surface played essential roles in Cd biosorption. The elements of O, P, S, and N of polysaccharide, membrane protein and phosphatidate in the cell surface structures might be responsible for Cd biosorption for their strong electronegativity. This study indicated that ultrastructural analysis can be a supplemental method to study heavy metal resistance mechanism of microorganism and the newly isolated lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis has great potential to be applied to decontamination of heavy metals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Probiotics modulate the Bifidobacterium microbiota of elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J; Tammela, Liisa; Korpela, Jaakko; Parhiala, Riikka; Ahokoski, Henri; Mykkänen, Hannu; Salminen, Seppo J

    2009-03-01

    Gut Bifidobacterium microbiota of the elderly has been suggested to differ from that of adults, possibly promoting the risk of infections and gut barrier dysfunction. Specific probiotics may improve the gut barrier. In this randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study, 66 elders consumed a fermented oat drink containing probiotic Bifidobacterium longum 46 and B. longum 2C or a non-fermented placebo oat drink for 6 months. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after the intervention. Levels of faecal bifidobacteria were determined using species-specific quantitative PCR and plate counting. The Bifidobacterium levels in the elderly were high and the species composition diverse. Probiotic intervention increased the levels bifidobacteria significantly. Specifically, the levels of B. catenulatum, B. bifidum and B. breve were enhanced. Consumption of the fermented oat drink itself was also associated with certain changes in microbiota. In conclusion, Bifidobacterium microbiota of elderly subjects may be modulated by probiotic administration. In some healthy elderly populations, Bifidobacterium microbiota may be more abundant and diverse than previously suggested.

  3. Light Sensitivity of Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas

    such as Staphylococcus aureus (SaTrxR), Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis. A comparative photo-inactivation of TrxR from L. lactis, S. aureus and B. subtilis reveals that SaTrxR and BsTrxR are much less sensitive to light-inactivation than LlTrxR, though SaTrxR exhibited a similar rate of O2 reduction...

  4. Microbes of fermented kefir-like using combination of kefir grains and Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Usmiati

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of research were to find out physico-chemical characters and to detect flavor volatile compound of kefir-like. Material used was skim milk TS 9.5% which was heated at 85oC for 30 minutes and cooled at 22oC before innoculation of the starter. Microorganisms used were (a Lactobacillus acidophilus P155110, (b Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus NCIMB 11778, (c Lactococcus lactis P155610, (d Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum NCIMB 3350, (e Acetobacter aceti P154810, (f Bifidobacterium longum BF1, and (g Saccharomyces cerevisiae P156252. The treatments consist of P1 = without (b; P2 = without (a; and P3= used (a until (g. The physico-chemical characters identified were lactic acid and lactose percentages, pH, viscosity, organoleptic test for intensity of kefir-like sensory attributes. Results indicated that B. longum was potential bacterium use for starter combination on kefir-like making. The use starter P1 combination has high acidity and viscosity, low pH and lactose percentage, and high intensity on attribute creamy-white color, soft and curdle consistency, and kefir specific aroma on kefir-like. Volatile compound acid group were dominate by high acidity character on kefir-like resulted from starter P1 combination. Compound of 3-hydroxi-2-butanone (acetoin was affecting butter-like of P3 character. This compound resulted from which is a character of fermented milk flavor was not detected on P1 kefir-like.

  5. Minimal requirements for exponential growth of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Hammer, Karin

    1993-01-01

    A minimal growth medium containing glucose, acetate, vitamins, and eight amino acids allowed for growth of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, with a specific growth rate in batch culture of mu = 0.3 h-1. With 19 amino acids added, the growth rate increased to mu = 0.7 h-1 and the exponential growth...

  6. Increase of nisin production by Lactococcus lactis in different media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nisin production related to the growth conditions of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454, the effects of various media components and concomitant release of nisin into the media, were studied through transfers (five times). Nisin production was assayed by agar diffusion using Lactobacillus sake ATCC 15521 as the ...

  7. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis is influenced by proteolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, G; Venema, G; Kok, J.

    1998-01-01

    The autolysin AcmA of Lactococcus lactis was shown to be degraded by the extracellular Lactococcal proteinase PrtP. Autolysis, as evidenced by reduction in optical density of a stationary-phase culture and concomitant release of intracellular proteins, was greatly reduced when L. lactis MG1363 cells

  8. Alternative lactose catabolic pathway in Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, T; Kok, J; Renault, P; Bardowski, J

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we present a glimpse of the diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 beta-galactosidase phenotype-negative mutants isolated by negative selection on solid media containing cellobiose or lactose and X-Gal (5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside), and we

  9. Nucleotide metabolism in Lactococcus lactis: Salvage pathways of exogenous pyrimidines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    By measuring enzyme activities in crude extracts and studying the effect of toxic analogs (5-fluoropyrimidines) on cell growth, the metabolism of pyrimidines in Lactococcus lactis was analyzed. Pathways by which uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine, cytidine, and deoxycytidine are metabolized in L. lactis...

  10. Expression of prophage-encoded endolysins contributes to autolysis of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Kurek, Dorota; Szeliga, Monika; Pastrana, Francisco Romero; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe

    Analysis of autolysis of derivatives of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 and subsp. lactis IL1403, both lacking the major autolysin AcmA, showed that L. lactis IL1403 still lysed during growth while L. lactis MG1363 did not. Zymographic analysis revealed that a peptidoglycan hydrolase

  11. Cloning, Expression, and Functional Characterization of Secondary Amino Acid Transporters of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    Fourteen genes encoding putative secondary amino acid transporters were identified in the genomes of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains MG1363 and SK11 and L. lactis subsp. lactis strains IL1403 and KF147, 12 of which were common to all four strains. Amino acid uptake in L. lactis cells

  12. Molecular Analyses of the Lactococcin A Gene Cluster from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Biovar Diacetylactis WM4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoddard, Gary W.; Petzel, James P.; Belkum, Marco J. van; Kok, Jan; McKay, Larry L.

    1992-01-01

    The genes responsible for bacteriocin production and immunity in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis WM4 were localized and characterized by DNA restriction fragment deletion, subcloning, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The nucleotide sequence of a 5.6-kb AvaII restriction

  13. MOLECULAR ANALYSES OF THE LACTOCOCCIN-A GENE-CLUSTER FROM LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS SUBSP LACTIS BIOVAR DIACETYLACTIS WM4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STODDARD, GW; PETZEL, JP; VANBELKUM, MJ; KOK, J; MCKAY, LL

    The genes responsible for bacteriocin production and immunity in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis WM4 were localized and characterized by DNA restriction fragment deletion, subcloning, and nucleotide sequence analysis. The nucleotide sequence of a 5.6-kb AvaII restriction

  14. Heterologous Expression and Characterization of an N-Acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase from Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis IL1403

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nguyen, A. H.; Nguyen, T.-H.; Křen, Vladimír; Eijsink, V. G. H.; Haltrich, D.; Peterbauer, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 12 (2012), s. 3275-3281 ISSN 0021-8561 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0629 Keywords : N-acetyl-beta-D-hexosaminidase * Lactococcus lactis ssp lactis IL1403 * pNP-GlcNAc Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.906, year: 2012

  15. Heterologous Gene Expression in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis : Synthesis, Secretion, and Processing of the Bacillus subtilis Neutral Protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Kodde, Jan; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis nprE gene lacking its own promoter sequence was inserted in the lactococcal expression vector pMG36e. Upon introduction of the recombinant plasmid into Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain MG1363, neutral protease activity could be visualized by the appearance of large

  16. Detection and viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout cheese ripening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ruggirello

    Full Text Available Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese.

  17. Detection and Viability of Lactococcus lactis throughout Cheese Ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocolin, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the presence of Lactococcus lactis during late cheese ripening. For this reason, the role of this microorganism, well known as dairy starter, should be reconsidered throughout cheese manufacturing and ripening. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a RT-qPCR protocol for the detection, quantification and determination of the viability of L. lactis in ripened cheese samples by direct analysis of microbial nucleic acids. Standard curves were constructed for the specific quantification of L. lactis in cheese matrices and good results in terms of selectivity, correlation coefficient and efficiency were obtained. Thirty-three ripened cheeses were analyzed and, on the basis of RNA analysis, twelve samples showed 106 to 108 CFU of L. lactis per gram of product, thirteen from 103 to 105 CFU/g, and in eight cheeses, L. lactis was not detected. Traditional plating on M17 medium led to loads ranging from 105 to 109 CFU/g, including the cheese samples where no L. lactis was found by RT-qPCR. From these cheeses, none of the colonies isolated on M17 medium was identified as L. lactis species. These data could be interpreted as a lack of selectivity of M17 medium where colony growth is not always related to lactococcal species. At the same time, the absence or low abundance of L. lactis isolates on M17 medium from cheese where L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR support the hypothesis that L. lactis starter populations are mainly present in viable but not culturable state during ripening and, for this reason, culture-dependent methods have to be supplemented with direct analysis of cheese. PMID:25503474

  18. Enhancement of growth performance and hematological changes in rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss alevins fed with Bifidobacterium bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sahandi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of probiotic application as an important rearing strategy was started more than 30 years ago and most of these studies were carried out to increase growth and survival of larvae. Effect of Bifidobacterium animalis PTTC-1631 and B. lactis PTTC-1736 as probiotic supplement has been studied on growth performance and hematological changes on rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss alevins with initial body weight of 0.583 ± 0.197 g. The commercial diet was supplemented with graded levels of probiotics (1×107, 2×107 and 3×107 CFU g-1 dry feed to obtain 3 sets of experimental diets (T1, T2, andT3 respectively and fed four times a day for 60 days. T1 alevin showed the best growth performance in terms of specific growth rate, weight gain, metabolic growth rate, feed conversion ratio and survival rate. The highest red and white blood cell concentrations were noticed in fish fed T2 and T3 diets, respectively, no significant difference was observed in hemoglobin content. T1 showed the significant elevation of serum biochemical parameters and reduction of cortisol level. The results of present study might suggest likely positive effects of probiotic supplements with concentration of 1×107 CFU g-1 dry feed on growth and hematology on rainbow trout alevins.

  19. Heat adaptation towards improve survival of Bifidobacterium longum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the survival of Bifidobacterium longum BB 536 following the spray drying and during the storage of Medida, a fermented Sudanese cereal porridge. Medida was produced using 225 g flour of two days malted brown rice; blended in 0.405 L distilled water and cooked in 1 L boiling water. 150 g skim milk ...

  20. The effect of fermented milk with Bifidobacterium infantis on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study deals with the ingestion of fermented milk with Bifidobacterium infantis, and its effect on intestinal disorders and on the intestinal lining during antibiotherapy with amoxicillin and contamination with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli EPEC O111.B4, the latter being responsible for 45% of infant diarrhoea in Algeria.

  1. Heat adaptation towards improve survival of Bifidobacterium longum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... sterilization at 121ºC for 15 min. Bacterial culture. Bifidobacterium longum BB536 (Morinaga Milk Industries, Tokyo,. Japan) from the stock culture of Food Biotechnology and Functional. Food Laboratory, Faculty of Food Science and Technology,. Universiti Putra Malaysia was used. Freeze dried culture was.

  2. Growth and lactic acid production by Bifidobacterium longum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fitness of a particular strains of Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli and Streptococci for commercial utilization depends on its rapid growth and acidification of milk as well as its acid and oxygen tolerence. From 20 samples of French commercial yoghurt, one species of bifidobacteria was identified as Bifidobacterium longum.

  3. Mupirocin-mucin agar for selective enumeration of Bifidobacterium bifidum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, R.; Rada, V.; Parafati, L.; Musilová, S.; Bunešová, V.; Vlková, E.; Killer, Jiří; Mrázek, Jakub; Kmeť, V.; Svejštil, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 191, č. 1 (2014), s. 32-35 ISSN 0168-1605 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08803S Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : probiotics * Bifidobacterium bifidum * selective enumeration Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2014

  4. Identification of Bifidobacterium strains from faeces of lambs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bunešová, V.; Vlková, E.; Killer, Jiří; Rada, V.; Ročková, Š.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 105, 1-3 (2012), 355-360 ISSN 0921-4488 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/08/1091; GA ČR GD525/08/H060 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : bifidobacterium * identification * lambs Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2012

  5. Bifidobacterium faecale sp. nov., isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Lee, Kyung Min; Lee, Myung-Ki; Cha, Chang-Jun; Kim, Geun-Bae

    2014-09-01

    A novel strain, designated strain CU3-7(T), was isolated from faeces of a two-week-old baby. The isolate was Gram-staining-positive, anaerobic and rod-shaped. Results from 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain CU3-7(T) was phylogenetically affiliated with members of the genus Bifidobacterium. Strain CU3-7(T) showed the highest level of sequence similarity with Bifidobacterium adolescentis KCTC 3216(T) (98.4 %), followed by Bifidobacterium ruminantium KCTC 3425(T) (97.9 %). Analysis of hsp60 sequences showed that strain CU3-7(T) was closely related to B. adolescentis KCTC 3216(T) (94.0 %) and B. ruminantium KCTC 3425(T) (92.5 %). The DNA-DNA hybridization values with the closely related strains were all below the cut-off value for species delineation, 17.0 % with B. ruminantium KCTC 3425(T) and 14.9 % with B. adolescentis KCTC 3216(T). Fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase activity was detected. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16 : 0 (27.7 %), C18 : 1ω9c (27.4 %) and C18 : 1ω9c dimethylacetate (15.5 %). The DNA G+C content was 58.6 mol%. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomy, strain CU3-7(T) should be classified as the type strain of a novel species within the genus Bifidobacterium, for which the name Bifidobacterium faecale sp. nov. is proposed ( = KACC 17904(T) = JCM 19861(T)). © 2014 IUMS.

  6. Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dylus

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  7. Enhanced production of nisin by co-culture of Lactococcus lactis sub sp. lactis and Yarrowia lipolytica in molasses based medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariana, Mehdi; Hamedi, Javad

    2017-08-20

    Nisin is a safe, approved and commercial bacteriocin that is produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Since lactate accumulation in fermentation medium reduces L. lactis growth and nisin production, Yarrowia lipolytica, a lactate consuming yeast and L. lactis subsp. lactis, were simultaneously cultured in a molasses based medium. Y. lipolytica is not able to consume sucrose as carbon source, but rather consumes lactate and hence decrease lactic acid titer by 10% in the medium. Lactic acid consumption, 15% increased pH value and stimulated L. lactis growth. In the mixed culture, nisin production and L. lactis growth were 50% and 49% higher than that of pure culture, respectively. Also the results showed that specific growth rate of L. lactis increased 4 times more than that of the pure culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ornithine transport and exchange in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1987-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis 133 appeared to accumulate [ 14 C]ornithine to a high concentration in the absence of an exogenous energy source. However, analysis of intracellular amino acid pool constituents and results of transport experiments revealed that the accumulation of ornithine represented a homoexchange between extracellular [ 14 C]ornithine and unlabeled ornithine in the cell. The energy-independent exchange of ornithine was not inhibited by proton-conducting uncouplers or by metabolic inhibitors. Intracellular [ 14 C]ornithine was retained by resting cells after suspension in a buffered medium. However, addition of unlabeled ornithine to the suspension elicited rapid exit of labeled amino acid. The initial rate of exist of [ 14 C]ornithine was dependent on the concentration of unlabeled ornithine in the medium, but this accelerative exchange diffusion process caused no net loss of amino acid. By contrast, the presence of a fermentable energy source caused a rapid expulsion of and new decrease in the concentration of intracellular ornithine. Kinetic analyses of amino acid transport demonstrated competitive inhibition between lysine and ornithine, and data obtained by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography established the heteroexchange of these basic amino acids. The effects of amino acids and of ornithine analogs on both entry and exit of [ 14 C]ornithine have been examined. The data suggest that common carrier mediates the entry and exchange of lysine, arginine, and ornithine in cells of S. lactis

  9. Genetic transformation of intact Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis by high-voltage electroporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntyre, D.A.; Harlander, S.K. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (USA))

    1989-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a system for electroporating intact cells of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LM0230 (previously designated Streptococcus lactis LM0230) with a commercially available electroporation unit. Parameters which influenced the efficiency of transformation included growth phase and final concentration of cells, ionic strength of the suspending medium, concentration of plasmid DNA, and the amplitude and duration of the pulse. Washed suspensions of intact cells suspended in deionized distilled water were subjected to one high-voltage electric pulse varying in voltage (300 to 900 V corresponding to field strengths of 5 to 17 kV/cm) and duration (100 {mu}s to 1 s). Transformation efficiencies of 10{sup 3} transformants per {mu}g of DNA were obtained when dense suspensions (final concentration, 5 {times} 10{sup 10} CFU/ml) of stationary-phase cells were subjected to one pulse with a peak voltage of 900 V (field strength, 17 kV/cm) and a pulse duration of 5 ms in the presence of plasmid DNA. Dilution of porated cells in broth medium followed by an expression period of 2 h at 30{degree}C was beneficial in enhancing transformation efficiencies. Plasmids ranging in size from 9.8 to 30.0 kilobase pairs could be transformed by this procedure.

  10. Genomic encyclopedia of type strains of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Christian; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Duranti, Sabrina; Turroni, Francesca; Bottacini, Francesca; Mangifesta, Marta; Sanchez, Borja; Viappiani, Alice; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Taminiau, Bernard; Delcenserie, Véronique; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Bifidobacteria represent one of the dominant microbial groups that are present in the gut of various animals, being particularly prevalent during the suckling stage of life of humans and other mammals. However, the overall genome structure of this group of microorganisms remains largely unexplored. Here, we sequenced the genomes of 42 representative (sub)species across the Bifidobacterium genus and used this information to explore the overall genetic picture of this bacterial group. Furthermore, the genomic data described here were used to reconstruct the evolutionary development of the Bifidobacterium genus. This reconstruction suggests that its evolution was substantially influenced by genetic adaptations to obtain access to glycans, thereby representing a common and potent evolutionary force in shaping bifidobacterial genomes. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Membrane Protein Production in Lactococcus lactis for Functional Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphne; King, Martin S; Sautron, Emiline; Moyet, Lucas; Catty, Patrice; André, François; Rolland, Norbert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, expression and study of membrane proteins in heterologous systems remains difficult. Among the bacterial systems available, the Gram-positive lactic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, traditionally used in food fermentations, is nowadays widely used for large-scale production and functional characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to describe the different possibilities for the functional characterization of peripheral or intrinsic membrane proteins expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

  12. Detection and characterization of bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis strains Detecção e caracterização de Lactococcus lactis produtores de bacteriocinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izildinha Moreno

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sixty seven strains of Lactococcus lactis were screened for bacteriocin production by well diffusion assay of GM17 agar. Fourteen (8.4% produced antimicrobial activity other than organic acids, bacteriophages or hydrogen peroxide. The frequency of bacteriocin production ranged from 2% in L. lactis subsp. cremoris up to 12% in L. lactis subsp. lactis. Antimicrobial activities were not observed in any strain of L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis. Among thirteen bacteriocin-producing strains and two nisin-producing strains (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 and L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, eight (53% were characterized as lactose-positive (Lac+ and proteinase-negative (Prt-. The bacteriocin-producing cultures were also characterized on the basis of plasmid content. All strains had 2 to 7 plasmids with molecular weights varying from 0.5 to 28.1 Mdal. Four strains (ITAL 435, ITAL 436, ITAL 437 and ITAL 438 showed identical profiles and the other were quite distinct.Um total de 167 linhagens de L. lactis foi selecionado para os testes de produção de bacteriocinas pelo método de difusão em poços em agar GM17. Desse total, 14 (8.4% produziram substâncias inibidoras que não foram associadas com ácidos orgânicos, peróxido de hidrogênio e bacteriófagos. A frequência de produção de bacteriocinas variou de 2% em L. lactis subsp. cremoris a 12% em L. lactis subsp. lactis. Nenhuma das linhagens de L. lactis subsp. lactis var. diacetylactis produziu substâncias inibidoras. De 13 linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas e duas de nisina (L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454 e L. lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 150, 8 (53% foram caracterizadas como lactose-positivas (Lac+ e proteinase-negativas (Prt-. As linhagens produtoras de bacteriocinas também foram caracterizadas no seu conteúdo de plasmídios. Elas apresentaram de 2 a 7 plasmídios, com pesos moleculares aproximados de 0.5 a 28.1 Mdal. Quatro linhagens (ITAL 435, ITAL 436

  13. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL -1 and 0.6-0.7 ng mL -1 , respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The Evolution of gene regulation research in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jan; van Gijtenbeek, Lieke A; de Jong, Anne; van der Meulen, Sjoerd B; Solopova, Ana; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-08-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a major microbe. This lactic acid bacterium (LAB) is used worldwide in the production of safe, healthy, tasteful and nutritious milk fermentation products. Its huge industrial importance has led to an explosion of research on the organism, particularly since the early 1970s. The upsurge in the research on L. lactis coincided not accidentally with the advent of recombinant DNA technology in these years. The development of methods to take out and re-introduce DNA in L. lactis, to clone genes and to mutate the chromosome in a targeted way, to control (over)expression of proteins and, ultimately, the availability of the nucleotide sequence of its genome and the use of that information in transcriptomics and proteomics research have enabled to peek deep into the functioning of the organism. Among many other things, this has provided an unprecedented view of the major gene regulatory pathways involved in nitrogen and carbon metabolism and their overlap, and has led to the blossoming of the field of L. lactis systems biology. All of these advances have made L. lactis the paradigm of the LAB. This review will deal with the exciting path along which the research on the genetics of and gene regulation in L. lactis has trodden. © FEMS 2017.

  15. Glutathione attenuates uranyl toxicity in Lactococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana; Solioz, M.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which in a large number of taxa plays a role in the protection against the toxicity of heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism allowing the study of GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. Microcalorimetric measurements of the metabolic heat showed that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10-150 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH.

  16. Glutathione attenuates uranyl toxicity in Lactococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Obeid, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which in a large number of taxa plays a role in the protection against the toxicity of heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism allowing the study of GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. Microcalorimetric measurements of the metabolic heat showed that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10-150 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH.

  17. Comparison of the acidifying activity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from goat's milk and Valdeteja cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Calleja, C; Carballo, J; Capita, R; Bernardo, A; García-López, M L

    2002-01-01

    This work was carried out to study the acid production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from goat's milk and goat cheese (Valdeteja variety) in order to select a suitable starter culture for industrial goat cheese manufacturing. The titrable acidity of 45 Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strains isolated from a home-made batch of Valdeteja cheese with excellent sensory characteristics was measured over a period of 18 h. The strains were divided into two groups depending on the acid production rate: 20 fast acid producer (F) strains and 25 slow acid producer (S) strains. The kinetic parameters (lag phase, maximum acid production rate and value of upper asymptote curve) of the acid production curves for F and S strains were significantly (P cheese manufacturing.

  18. Lactococcus lactis spp lactis infection in infants with chronic diarrhea: two cases report and literature review in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaaslan, Ayse; Soysal, Ahmet; Kepenekli Kadayifci, Eda; Yakut, Nurhayat; Ocal Demir, Sevliya; Akkoc, Gulsen; Atici, Serkan; Sarmis, Abdurrahman; Ulger Toprak, Nurver; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-03-31

    Lactococcus lactis is a gram-positive, facultative anaerobic coccus that is occasionally isolated from human mucocutaneous surfaces such as the intestines. It is used in the dairy industry for milk acidification and is mostly nonpathogenic in immunocompetent humans, however a number of cases of infection with L. lactis have been reported in recent years. In this article, we describe two cases of infection due to L. lactis in patients with chronic diarrhea. The first case is a five-month-old boy who was operated on for volvulus on his first day of life and had ileostomy with subsequent diagnosis of chronic diarrhea and bacteremia due to L. Lactis. The second case is a six-month-old girl with the diagnosis of chronic diarrhea that developed after a catheter-related bloodstream infection. Both of the infections due to L. Lactis spp lactis were successfully treated with intravenous vancomycin therapy. Although Lactococcus species is mostly known as nonpathogenic, it should be kept in mind as a potential pathogen, especially in patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  19. Comparative and functional genomics of the Lactococcus lactis taxon; insights into evolution and niche adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Philip; Bottacini, Francesca; Mahony, Jennifer; Kilcawley, Kieran N; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2017-03-29

    Lactococcus lactis is among the most widely studied lactic acid bacterial species due to its long history of safe use and economic importance to the dairy industry, where it is exploited as a starter culture in cheese production. In the current study, we report on the complete sequencing of 16 L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genomes. The chromosomal features of these 16 L. lactis strains in conjunction with 14 completely sequenced, publicly available lactococcal chromosomes were assessed with particular emphasis on discerning the L. lactis subspecies division, evolution and niche adaptation. The deduced pan-genome of L. lactis was found to be closed, indicating that the representative data sets employed for this analysis are sufficient to fully describe the genetic diversity of the taxon. Niche adaptation appears to play a significant role in governing the genetic content of each L. lactis subspecies, while (differential) genome decay and redundancy in the dairy niche is also highlighted.

  20. Engineering of the Lactococcus lactis serine proteinase by construction of hybrid enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerrigter, Ingrid J.; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Nijhuis, Monique; Reuver, Marjon B. de; Siezen, Roland J.; Venema, Gerhardus; Vos, Willem M. de; Kok, Jan

    Plasmids containing wild-type and hybrid proteinase genes were constructed from DNA fragments of the prtP genes of Lactococcus lactis strains Wg2 and SK11. These plasmids were introduced into the plasmid-free strain L. lactis MG1363. The serine proteinases produced by these L. lactis strains were

  1. 21 CFR 184.1985 - Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lactococcus lactis. 184.1985 Section 184.1985 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation derived from lactococcus lactis. (a) Aminopeptidase enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic bacterium Lactococcus lactis (previously named...

  2. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Jacek T; Schavemaker, Paul E; Krasnikov, Victor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-11-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane helix membrane proteins are similar to those in Escherichia coli. The translational diffusion of GFP in L. lactis drops by two orders of magnitude when the medium osmolality is increased by ∼ 1.9 Osm, and the decrease in mobility is partly reversed in the presence of osmoprotectants. We find a large spread in diffusion coefficients over the full population of cells but a smaller spread if only sister cells are compared. While in general the diffusion coefficients we measure under normal osmotic conditions in L. lactis are similar to those reported in E. coli, the decrease in translational diffusion upon osmotic challenge in L. lactis is smaller than in E. coli. An even more striking difference is that in L. lactis the GFP diffusion coefficient drops much more rapidly with volume than in E. coli. We discuss these findings in the light of differences in turgor, cell volume, crowding and cytoplasmic structure of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The effect of co-administration of lactobacillus probiotics and bifidobacterium on spatial memory and learning in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects numerous intracellular metabolic processes, which are reflected by changes in the concentration of some plasma constituents. Particularly, the disease may indirectly undermine some functions of the nervous system including learning and memory through altering oxidative stress status. On the other hand, probiotics can enhance the antioxidant capacity. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of probiotics on spatial memory, maze learning and indices of oxidative stress in diabetic rats.Methods: In this experimental study, 40 male Wistar rats were randomly allocated to 4 groups (n=10 for each: Control (CO, Control probiotic (CP, Control diabetic (DC, and Diabetic probiotic (DP. The probiotic supplement, including Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Bifidobacterium lactis (334 mg of each with a CFU of ~1010, was administered through drinking water every 12 hours for 8 weeks. Using morris water maze (MWM, spatial learning and memory were evaluated. Serum insulin and oxidative stress indices, including superoxide dismutase (SOD and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, were measured by standard laboratory kits.Results: Oral administration of probiotics improved impairment of spatial learning (P=0.008 and consolidated memory (P=0.01 in the rats. Moreover, probiotic treatment increased serum insulin (P<0.0001 and serum superoxide dismutase activity (P=0.007 while it decreased their blood glucose (P=0.006 and 8-OHdG (P<0.0001.Conclusion: Probiotic supplementation reversed the serum concentrations of insulin and glucose along with an increase in antioxidant capacity in diabetic rats. It also improved spatial learning and memory in the animals. Relevancy of the metabolic changes and behavioral functions need to be further studied.

  4. The effect of nisin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on refrigerated patin fillet quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adilla, S. N.; Utami, R.; Nursiwi, A.; Nurhartadi, E.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of nisin from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis with spraying method application on quality of patin fillet during refrigerated storage (4±1°C) was investigated. The quality of patin fillet based on total plate count (TPC), pH, TVB-N, and TBA values during 16 days at 4±1°C. Completely Randomized Design (CDR) was used in one factor (nisin activity) at 0 IU/ml, 500 IU/ml, 1000 IU/ml, and 2000 IU/ml. The observation was done at 0, 4th, 8th, 12th, and 16th days of storage. The result showed that variation of nisin activity significantly affected the quality of fillet according to TPC, pH, and TVB-N values, however no significant difference on the obtained of TBA value. Nisin in 500 IU/ml, 1000 IU/ml, and 2000 IU/ml could extend the shelf-life of fillet until 4th, 8th, and 12th days respectively based on standard in all parameters.

  5. Characterization of a cadmium resistance Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain by antioxidant assays and proteome profiles methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yao; Yang, Xuan; Lian, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal contamination poses a major threat to the environment and human health for their potential toxicity and non-biodegradable properties. At present, some probiotics bacteria are reported to have great potential to eliminate heavy metals from food and water. In this study, resistance properties of a newly isolated Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis for cadmium were studied by antioxidant assays and proteomics analysis. Antioxidant capacity of this strain was significantly activated under cadmium stress indicated by Fenton reaction, DPPH assay, SOD assay and GSH assay. Intracellular antioxidant enzyme systems, such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase were suggested to play vital roles in the activated antioxidant capacity. The up-regulated cadA was associated with the activated P-type ATPases that plays an important role in cadmium resistance. Proteomics analysis identified 12 over-expressed proteins under 50mg/L cadmium stress and these proteins are abundant in oxidative stress response and energy metabolism regulation, which were considered as consequences as cadmium resistance of the strain. Thus, the probiotics Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis may resist cadmium stress through antioxidant approach and enhanced energy metabolism. The food grade lactis strain may be applied in metal decontamination in environment and food/feed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Production and crystallization of α-phosphoglucomutase from Lactococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogly, Przemyslaw; Castro, Rute; Rosa, Matteo de; Neves, Ana Rute; Santos, Helena; Archer, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    α-Phosphoglucomutase from L. lactis, a homologue of human phosphomannomutase 1, was produced and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.5 Å resolution. α-Phosphoglucomutase (α-PGM) is an enzyme that is essential for the growth of Lactococcus lactis. The enzyme links bacterial anabolism with sugar utilization through glycolysis by catalyzing the reversible interconversion of glucose 6-phosphate and α-glucose 1-phosphate. The gene encoding α-PGM was cloned and overexpressed in L. lactis. The purified protein was functionally active and was crystallized with ammonium sulfate as a precipitant using vapour-diffusion and seeding techniques. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  7. Lactococcus lactis As a Versatile Vehicle for Tolerogenic Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Dana P.; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2018-01-01

    Genetically modified Lactococcus lactis bacteria have been engineered as a tool to deliver bioactive proteins to mucosal tissues as a means to exert both local and systemic effects. They have an excellent safety profile, the result of years of human consumption in the food industry, as well as a lack of toxicity and immunogenicity. Also, containment strategies have been developed to promote further application as clinical protein-based therapeutics. Here, we review technological advancements made to enhanced the potential of L. lactis as live biofactories and discuss some examples of tolerogenic immunotherapies mediated by mucosal drug delivery via L. lactis. Additionally, we highlight their use to induce mucosal tolerance by targeted autoantigen delivery to the intestine as an approach to reverse autoimmune type 1 diabetes. PMID:29387056

  8. Experimental determination of control of glycolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Andersen, Heidi Winterberg; Solem, Christian

    2002-01-01

    and below the wild-type level. We review a genetic approach that is well suited for both Metabolic Optimization and Metabolic Control Analysis and studies on the importance of a number of glycolytic enzymes for metabolic fluxes in Lactococcus lactis. The glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK......), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are shown to have no significant control on the glycolytic flux in exponentially growing cells of L. lactis MG1363. Introduction of an uncoupled ATPase activity results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass...... production. With MG1363 growing in defined medium supplemented with glucose, the ATP demanding processes do not have a significant control on the glycolytic flux; it appears that glycolysis is running at maximal rate. It is likely that the flux control is distributed over many enzymes in L. lactis...

  9. Elucidating Flux Regulation of the Fermentation Modes of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Siu Hung Joshua

    an important subject for basic research in cellular metabolism because L. lactis exhibits an interesting metabolic shift. Under anaerobic conditions, on fast fermentable sugars, L. lactis produces lactate as the primary product, known as homolactic fermentation but on slowly fermentable sugars, significant...... amounts of formate, acetate and ethanol are formed, known as mixed-acid fermentation. This shift is termed the mixedacid shift. This type of shift between a low-yield and a high-yield metabolism has drawn a lot of research focus and has similarly been observed in other bacteria, yeast and even tumor cells...... the expression level of certain genes in glycolysis and fermentation pathways, the levels of the cofactors NADH, NAD+, ATP and ADP, the balance between catabolism and anabolism, etc. In this project, we studied the mixed-acid fermentation of L. lactis by (i) examining the roles of the enzymes in the mixed...

  10. From Genome to Phenotype: An Integrative Approach to Evaluate the Biodiversity of Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroute, Valérie; Tormo, Hélène; Couderc, Christel; Mercier-Bonin, Muriel; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of the most extensively used lactic acid bacteria for the manufacture of dairy products. Exploring the biodiversity of L. lactis is extremely promising both to acquire new knowledge and for food and health-driven applications. L. lactis is divided into four subspecies: lactis, cremoris, hordniae and tructae, but only subsp. lactis and subsp. cremoris are of industrial interest. Due to its various biotopes, Lactococcus subsp. lactis is considered the most diverse. The diversity of L. lactis subsp. lactis has been assessed at genetic, genomic and phenotypic levels. Multi-Locus Sequence Type (MLST) analysis of strains from different origins revealed that the subsp. lactis can be classified in two groups: “domesticated” strains with low genetic diversity, and “environmental” strains that are the main contributors of the genetic diversity of the subsp. lactis. As expected, the phenotype investigation of L. lactis strains reported here revealed highly diverse carbohydrate metabolism, especially in plant- and gut-derived carbohydrates, diacetyl production and stress survival. The integration of genotypic and phenotypic studies could improve the relevance of screening culture collections for the selection of strains dedicated to specific functions and applications. PMID:28534821

  11. Estudo dos parâmetros da ultrafiltração de permeado de soro de queijo fermentado por Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Ultrafiltration conditions of whey permeate fermented by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane BRONSTEIN

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Permeado de soro doce, suplementado com extrato de levedura e peptona, foi utilizado como meio de crescimento para Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. No final da fase exponencial de crescimento, o meio de cultura fermentado foi submetido a uma ultrafiltração com o objetivo de concentrar o microrganismo. Foram realizados 6 processamentos diferentes, nos quais variou-se as condições iniciais da ultrafiltração, tendo sido avaliados os seguintes parâmetros: porosidade da membrana, pH e número de células viáveis no permeado e no retentado, a fim de ser estudado a influência de cada parâmetro na taxa de permeação da ultrafiltração. As membranas utilizadas foram eficazes como meio de barragem para o microrganismo Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, ficando o retentado com uma média celular de 10(8 ufc/ml e o permeado com uma média celular de 10² ufc/ml. Membranas de diferentes porosidades tiveram taxas de fluxo semelhantes. O aumento da concentração celular provocou a diminuição do fluxo. O pH também influenciou a taxa de permeação, havendo um aumento do fluxo quando foi utilizado um pH inicial mais alto.Cheese whey permeate supplemented with yeast extract and peptone was used as a growth medium for the bacteria Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. At the end of the exponential growth phase, the fermented growth medium was ultrafiltered to concentrate the microorganism and to evaluate the effect of the membrane porosity, inicial UF pH and cellular concentration in permeation rate during the ultrafiltration process. The membranes used were efficient as a mean of a barrage for the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. On average, the cellular concentrations were 10(8 CFU/mL and 10² CFU/mL for retentate and permeate, respectively. Membranes of different porosities had very similar flux rates. Better flow rates were obtained with inicial UF pH 6,5 and with the minors micrrorganism concentration.

  12. Experimental determination of control of glycolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Andersen, Heidi Winterberg; Solem, Christian

    2002-01-01

    ), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are shown to have no significant control on the glycolytic flux in exponentially growing cells of L. lactis MG1363. Introduction of an uncoupled ATPase activity results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass...... production. With MG1363 growing in defined medium supplemented with glucose, the ATP demanding processes do not have a significant control on the glycolytic flux; it appears that glycolysis is running at maximal rate. It is likely that the flux control is distributed over many enzymes in L. lactis...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of the Bifidobacterium genus using glycolysis enzyme sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn eBrandt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacteria are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract that promote the establishment of a healthy microbial consortium in the gut of infants. Recent studies have established that the Bifidobacterium genus is a polymorphic phylogenetic clade, which encompasses a diversity of species and subspecies that encode a broad range of proteins implicated in complex and non-digestible carbohydrate uptake and catabolism, ranging from human breast milk oligosaccharides, to plant fibers. Recent genomic studies have created a need to properly place Bifidobacterium species in a phylogenetic tree. Current approaches, based on core-genome analyses come at the cost of intensive sequencing and demanding analytical processes. Here, we propose a typing method based on sequences of glycolysis genes and the proteins they encode, to provide insights into diversity, typing, and phylogeny in this complex and broad genus. We show that glycolysis genes occur broadly in these genomes, to encode the machinery necessary for the biochemical spine of the cell, and provide a robust phylogenetic marker. Furthermore, glycolytic sequences-based trees are congruent with both the classical 16S rRNA phylogeny, and core genome-based strain clustering. Furthermore, these glycolysis markers can also be used to provide insights into the adaptive evolution of this genus, especially with regards to trends towards a high GC content. This streamlined method may open new avenues for phylogenetic studies on a broad scale, given the widespread occurrence of the glycolysis pathway in bacteria, and the diversity of the sequences they encode.

  14. Suitability of Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 as a protective culture for lightly preserved fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Stephen Wallace; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This study is part of strategy to control the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved fish products by using food-grade lactic acid bacteria. When the nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 was cultured in the same vessel as L-monocytogenes Scott A in brain....... At 5-degrees C in M17 broth, the organism grew well ans produced nisin. In an infusion of cold-smoked salmon the organism did not grow at 5-degrees C, althoigh it did at 10-degrees C. NACl up to 4% allowed for efficient growth and nisin production, while 5% NaCl resultes in very slow growth...

  15. Production and secretion of heterologous proteins by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asseldonk, van M.

    1994-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains have been used for centuries in food fermentation, now appreciated as traditional biotechnology. They have been applied in the cheesemaking process and for the manufacturing of other dairy products. Years of experience with these lactic acid

  16. Cloning of nis gene and Nisin purification from Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purified nisin by chloroform extraction was analyzed on 20% SDS-PAGE and gave sharp band at ~ 3.4 kDa. The 3 dimension structure of the purified Nisin was studied by CPHModels as pdb with chimera program. Keywords: Lactococcus lactis, nis cloning, 16S rRNA, chloroform extraction and SDS-PAGE

  17. The properties of Kluyveromyces lactis for the production of D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Production of D-arabitol from lactose by Kluyveromyces lactis NBRC 1903 was investigated to make a solution for utilization of whey. It turned out that initial concentration of yeast extract, working volume and initial cell mass concentration are important factors in D-arabitol production from lactose by this.

  18. The properties of Kluyveromyces lactis for the production of D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of D-arabitol from lactose by Kluyveromyces lactis NBRC 1903 was investigated to make a solution for utilization of whey. It turned out that initial concentration of yeast extract, working volume and initial cell mass concentration are important factors in D-arabitol production from lactose by this strain.

  19. Lactococcus lactis as host for overproduction of functional membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, ERS; Slotboom, DJ; Poolman, B

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis has many properties that are ideal for enhanced expression of membrane proteins. The organism is easy and inexpensive to culture, has a single membrane and relatively mild proteolytic activity. Methods for genetic manipulation are fully established and a tightly controlled

  20. Nucleotide metabolism in Lactococcus lactis: Salvage pathways of exogenous pyrimidines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    By measuring enzyme activities in crude extracts and studying the effect of toxic analogs (5-fluoropyrimidines) on cell growth, the metabolism of pyrimidines in Lactococcus lactis was analyzed. Pathways by which uracil, uridine, deoxyuridine, cytidine, and deoxycytidine are metabolized in L. lact...

  1. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis fails to secrete bovine chymosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luerce, Tessália Diniz; Azevedo, Marcela Santiago Pacheco; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Pontes, Daniela Santos

    2014-01-01

    Bovine chymosin is an important milk-clotting agent used in the manufacturing of cheeses. Currently, the production of recombinant proteins by genetically modified organisms is widespread, leading to greatly reduced costs. Lactococcus (L.) lactis, the model lactic acid bacterium, was considered a good candidate for heterologous chymosin production for the following reasons: (1) it is considered to be a GRAS (generally regarded as safe) microorganism, (2) only one protease is present on its surface, (3) it can secrete proteins of different sizes, and (4) it allows for the direct production of protein in fermented food products. Thus, three genetically modified L. lactis strains were constructed to produce and target the three different forms of bovine chymosin, prochymosin B, chymosin A and chymosin B to the extracellular medium. Although all three proteins were stably produced in L. lactis, none of the forms were detected in the extracellular medium or showed clotting activity in milk. Our hypothesis is that this secretion deficiency and lack of clotting activity can be explained by the recombinant protein being attached to the cell envelope. Thus, the development of other strategies is necessary to achieve both production and targeting of chymosin in L. lactis, which could facilitate the downstream processing and recovery of this industrially important protein. PMID:25482140

  2. Construction of an expression vector for Lactococcus lactis based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To construct an expression vector for Lactococcus lactis, the EmPMT fragment which contained the erythromycin resistance gene, P32 promoter, multiple cloning site (MCS) and terminator (T) was subcloned into the small cryptic plasmid pAR141. The resulting vector, designated as pAR1411, was found to be stably ...

  3. Expression of plant flavour genes in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández, I.; Molenaar, D.; Beekwilder, M.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2007-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, such as Lactococcus lactis, are attractive hosts for the production of plant-bioactive compounds because of their food grade status, efficient expression, and metabolic engineering tools. Two genes from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa), encoding an alcohol acyltransferase

  4. Two nucleoside transporters in Lactococcus lactis with different substrate specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Sørensen, Claus; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2010-01-01

    , and the utilization of nucleotides is dependent on exogenous phosphatases. The composition of transporters with specificity for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleobases is subject to variation. The ability of Lactococcus lactis to transport different nucleosides across the cell membrane was characterized...

  5. A review on Lactococcus lactis: from food to factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Adelene Ai-Lian; In, Lionel L A; Lim, Swee Hua Erin; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2017-04-04

    Lactococcus lactis has progressed a long way since its discovery and initial use in dairy product fermentation, to its present biotechnological applications in genetic engineering for the production of various recombinant proteins and metabolites that transcends the heterologous species barrier. Key desirable features of this gram-positive lactic acid non-colonizing gut bacteria include its generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status, probiotic properties, the absence of inclusion bodies and endotoxins, surface display and extracellular secretion technology, and a diverse selection of cloning and inducible expression vectors. This have made L. lactis a desirable and promising host on par with other well established model bacterial or yeast systems such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella cerevisiae and Bacillus subtilis. In this article, we review recent technological advancements, challenges, future prospects and current diversified examples on the use of L. lactis as a microbial cell factory. Additionally, we will also highlight latest medical-based applications involving whole-cell L. lactis as a live delivery vector for the administration of therapeutics against both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

  6. Statistical optimization of lactic acid production by Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The individual and interactive effects of a total inoculums size (% v/v), fermentation temperature and skim milk dry matter added (% w/v) on the lactic acid production by Lactococcus lactis LCL strain were studied by quadratic response surface methodology. The central composite design (CCD) was employed to determine ...

  7. Factors affecting proteolytic action of Lactococcus lactis in cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, Y.B.

    1992-01-01

    Model cheeses were developed to study the behaviour of proteolytic agents involved in cheese maturation under conditions that closely resemble those in normal cheese. The models were applied to study protein breakdown by Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris HP , as a

  8. Inhibition ability of probiotic, Lactococcus lactis , against A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate the inhibition ability of probiotic, Lactococcus lactis RQ516, against A. hydrophila in vitro and its immunostimulatory effect in tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus as growth promoter. Six tanks were used (T-1 and control treated with and without RQ516, respectively) and three ...

  9. Impact of osmotic stress on protein diffusion in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mika, Jacek; Schavemaker, Paul; Krasnikov, Viktor; Poolman, Bert

    2014-01-01

    We measured translational diffusion of proteins in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis and probed the effect of osmotic upshift. For cells in standard growth medium the diffusion coefficients for cytosolic proteins (27 and 582 kDa) and 12-transmembrane

  10. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative genomics of bifidobacterium, lactobacillus and related probiotic genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David; Wassenaar, Trudy M.

    2012-01-01

    Six bacterial genera containing species commonly used as probiotics for human consumption or starter cultures for food fermentation were compared and contrasted, based on publicly available complete genome sequences. The analysis included 19 Bifidobacterium genomes, 21 Lactobacillus genomes, 4...... Lactococcus and 3 Leuconostoc genomes, as well as a selection of Enterococcus (11) and Streptococcus (23) genomes. The latter two genera included genomes from probiotic or commensal as well as pathogenic organisms to investigate if their non-pathogenic members shared more genes with the other probiotic......- and core genome of each genus were compared. In addition, it was investigated whether pathogenic genomes contain different COG classes compared to the probiotic or fermentative organisms, again comparing their pan- and core genomes. The obtained results were compared with published data from the literature...

  12. Suitability of Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 as a protective culture for lightly preserved fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessels, Stephen Wallace; Huss, Hans Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This study is part of strategy to control the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes in lightly preserved fish products by using food-grade lactic acid bacteria. When the nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 11454 was cultured in the same vessel as L-monocytogenes Scott A in brain......-heart infusion broth (BHI) at 30-degrees C, the pathogen declined from 5x10(5) to fewer than 5 cfu ml(-1) within 31 h. The effect was not due to lactic acid inhibition. Growth and nisin production by L- lactis ATCC 11454 were investigated under the conditions of temperature and salt used for light preservation...... and no detectable nisin. On slices of commercial cold-smoked salmon at 10-degrees C, no net propagation pf L-lactis ATCC 11454 could be detected within 21 days. However, when salmon slices were inoculated with L- mycocytogenes at 10(4) cfu g(-1) and a 300-fold excess of washed lactococcus cells, the pathogen...

  13. Formation and conversion of oxygen metabolites by Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis ATCC 19435 under different growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niel, van E.W.J.; Hofvendahl, K.; Hahn Hagerdal, B.

    2002-01-01

    A semidefined medium based on Casamino Acids allowed Lactococcus lactis ATCC 19435 to grow in the presence of oxygen at a slow rate (0.015 h-1). Accumulation of H2O2 in the culture prevented a higher growth rate. Addition of asparagine to the medium increased the growth rate, whereby H2O2

  14. Effect of Bifidobacterium animalis B/12 administration in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strompfová, Viola; Pogány Simonová, Monika; Gancarčíková, Soňa; Mudroňová, Dagmar; Farbáková, Jana; Mad'ari, Aladár; Lauková, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Bifidobacterium species constitute the most frequently used health-enhancing bacteria in functional foods or probiotic products, and most of their health benefits have been demonstrated in human or mice studies. However, knowledge of the effects of these bacteria in the canine organism is very limited. In this study, the canine-derived strain Bifidobacterium animalis B/12 (10(9) CFU) was tested for its effects on faecal microbiota, faecal characteristics, faecal organic acid concentrations, blood biochemistry, haematological and immunological parameters in healthy dogs (C-control, BA-B. animalis B/12 group, 10 dogs in each). The experiment lasted for 49 days with a 14-day treatment period (sample collection at days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 49). A significantly higher population of lactic acid bacteria was detected (day 7) while the counts of coliform bacteria were lower in faeces of the BA group (days 14, 21, 28, 49) compared to control group C. Faecal concentrations of acetic (day 7, 21, 28, 49), acetoacetic (7-49) and valeric acid (14) were higher in contrast to formic acid (day 7-21), which was decreased after the treatment. In blood serum, significantly lower concentrations of triglyceride (day 14) and albumin (day 14, 28, 49) and significantly higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (day 14) and alkaline phosphatase (day 14, 28) were observed in the BA dogs. The phagocytic activity of leukocytes (especially of neutrophils) was higher in dogs after 14-day consumption of B/12 strain (day 14). The results show that many of these effects could also still be recorded several weeks after the treatment period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors affecting viability of Bifidobacterium bifidum during spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Zahra; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Ardjmand, Mehdi; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad; Gilani, Kambiz

    2015-01-25

    There is substantial clinical data supporting the role of Bifidobacterium bifidum in human health particularly in benefiting the immune system and suppressing intestinal infections. Compared to the traditional lyophilization, spray-drying is an economical process for preparing large quantities of viable microorganisms. The technique offers high production rates and low operating costs but is not usually used for drying of substances prone to high temperature. The aim of this study was to establish the optimized environmental factors in spray drying of cultured bifidobacteria to obtain a viable and stable powder. The experiments were designed to test variables such as inlet air temperature, air pressure and also maltodextrin content. The combined effect of these variables on survival rateand moisture content of bacterial powder was studied using a central composite design (CCD). Sub-lethal heat-adaptation of a B. bifidum strain which was previously adapted to acid-bile-NaCl led to much more resistance to high outlet temperature during spray drying. The resistant B. bifidum was supplemented with cost friendly permeate, sucrose, yeast extract and different amount of maltodextrin before it was fed into a Buchi B-191 mini spray-dryer. Second-order polynomials were established to identify the relationship between the responses andthe three variables. Results of verification experiments and predicted values from fitted correlations were in close agreement at 95% confidence interval. The optimal values of the variables for maximum survival and minimum moisture content of B. bifidum powder were as follows: inlet air temperature of 111.15°C, air pressure of 4.5 bar and maltodextrin concentration of 6%. Under optimum conditions, the maximum survival of 28.38% was achieved while moisture was maintained at 4.05%. Viable and cost effective spray drying of Bifidobacterium bifidum could be achieved by cultivating heat and acid adapted strain into the culture media containing

  16. Use of a genetically enhanced, pediocin-producing starter culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, to control Listeria monocytogenes in cheddar cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buyong, N; Kok, J; Luchansky, JB

    1998-01-01

    Cheddar cheese was prepared with Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MM217, a starter culture which contains pMC117 coding for pediocin PA-1, About 75 liters of pasteurized milk (containing ca, 3.6% fat) was inoculated with strain MM217 (ca, 10(6) CFU per ml) and a mixture of three Listeria

  17. Differential expression of proteins and genes in the lag phase of Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis grown in synthetic medium and reconstituted skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, N.; Boye, Mette; Jakobsen, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    We investigated protein and gene expression in the lag phase of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CNRZ 157 and compared it to the exponential and stationary phases. By means of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 28 highly expressed lag-phase proteins, implicated in nucleotide meta...

  18. A genome-based identification approach for members of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sinderen, Douwe van; Ventura, Marco

    2015-03-01

    During recent years, the significant and increasing interest in novel bifidobacterial strains with health-promoting characteristics has catalyzed the development of methods for efficient and reliable identification of Bifidobacterium strains at (sub) species level. We developed an assay based on recently acquired bifidobacterial genomic data and involving 98 primer pairs, called the Bifidobacterium-ampliseq panel. This panel includes multiplex PCR primers that target both core and variable genes of the pangenome of this genus. Our results demonstrate that the employment of the Bifidobacterium-ampliseq panel allows rapid and specific identification of the so far recognized 48 (sub)species harboring the Bifidobacterium genus, and thus represents a cost- and time-effective bifidobacterial screening methodology. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Effect of Potential Probiotic Lactococcus lactis Subsp. lactis on Growth Performance, Intestinal Microbiota, Digestive Enzyme Activities, and Disease Resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Milad; El-Sayed, Abdel-Fattah M; Yeganeh, Sakineh; Dadar, Maryam; Giri, Sib Sankar

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis on the growth, intestinal microbiota, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of Litopenaeus vannamei. Diets containing four different concentrations of L. lactis (0 [basal diet], 10 6 , 10 7 , and 10 8  CFU g -1 ) were fed to white shrimps L. vannamei (average weight 5.89 ± 0.36 g) for 8 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, shrimps were immersed in Caspian Seawater (10.8 ppt) contaminated with 10 6  CFU ml -1 pathogenic V. anguillarum for 2 h. Results revealed that growth rate, survival, and body protein level were increased with dietary supplementation of L. lactis. The activities of digestive enzymes (cellulose, lipase, amylase, and protease) were significantly higher in the groups fed with diets containing 10 7 or 10 8  CFU g -1 L. lactis than those in the control. The Lactobacillus and Bacillus counts were higher (P lactis-supplemented diets. In addition, higher level of L. lactis supplementation decreased the Vibrio counts. Moreover, L. vannamei fed diet supplemented with 10 8  CFU g -1 of L. lactis exhibited significantly the highest hematocyte count and post-challenge survival rate (79.2 %). Collectively, these results suggest that dietary supplementation of L. lactis subsp. lactis at 10 8  CFU g -1 can promote growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, and disease resistance of L. vannamei.

  20. Generation of Dipeptidyl Peptidase-IV-Inhibiting Peptides from β-Lactoglobulin Secreted by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Shigemori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that hydrolysates of β-lactoglobulin (BLG prepared using gastrointestinal proteases strongly inhibit dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV activity in vitro. In this study, we developed a BLG-secreting Lactococcus lactis strain as a delivery vehicle and in situ expression system. Interestingly, trypsin-digested recombinant BLG from L. lactis inhibited DPP-IV activity, suggesting that BLG-secreting L. lactis may be useful in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  1. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-01-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains

  2. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  3. Characterization of a Wild, Novel Nisin A-Producing Lactococcus Strain with an L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotype and an L. lactis subsp. lactis Phenotype, Isolated from Greek Raw Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parapouli, Maria; Delbès-Paus, Céline; Kakouri, Athanasia; Koukkou, Anna-Irini; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2013-01-01

    Several molecular taxonomic studies have revealed that many natural (wild) Lactococcus lactis strains of dairy origin which are phenotypically representative of the L. lactis subspecies lactis cluster genotypically within subspecies cremoris and vice versa. Recently, we isolated two wild nisin-producing (Nis+) L. lactis strains, M78 and M104, of the lactis phenotype from Greek raw milk (J. Samelis, A. Lianou, A. Kakouri, C. Delbès, I. Rogelj, B. B. Matijašic, and M. C. Montel, J. Food Prot. 72:783–790, 2009); strain M78 possess a novel nisin A sequence (GenBank accession number HM219853). In this study, the actual subspecies identity of M78 and M104 isolates was elucidated, using 16S rRNA and acmA (encoding lactococcal N-acetylmuramidase) gene and histidine biosynthesis operon polymorphisms and 16S rRNA and ldh (encoding lactate dehydrogenase) gene phylogenies. Except the acmA gene analysis, molecular tools revealed that isolates M78 and M104 clustered with strains of the cremoris genotype, including the LMG 6897T strain, while they were distant from strains of the lactis genotype, including the LMG 6890T strain. The two wild isolates had identical repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), plasmid, and whole-cell protein profiles and shared high 16S rRNA (99.9%) and ldh (100%) gene sequence homologies. In contrast, they exhibited identical sugar fermentation and enzymatic patterns which were similar to those of the subspecies lactis LMG 6890T strain. To our knowledge, this is the first complete identification report on a wild L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype of the lactis phenotype which is capable of nisin A production and, thus, has strong potential for use as a novel dairy starter and/or protective culture. PMID:23542625

  4. Physiological Studies of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gunda

    medium and (specific) acidification activity in milk in response to the extracellular pH (pHex) during batch fermentations and in response to stress during downstream processing and storage as frozen, freeze- and spray-dried cells. In this PhD thesis, in situ flow cytometric viability assessment...... fermentation, downstream processing and storage in the absence of a protectant. However, storing freeze-dried L. lactis cells at 30 °C negatively affected the culturability and acidification activity. The reactivation of freeze-dried cells in fermentation medium prior to flow cytometric viability assessment...... industrial production by employing flow cytometry for viability assessment, cell size comparison, intracellular pH (pHi) determination and cell sorting. The physiological studies of L. lactis were complemented by examining the growth behavior, glucose consumption, lactate production, culturability on solid...

  5. Transforming Lactococcus lactis into a microbial cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest

    Biological conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and -chemicals is a promising technology to reduce dependency on fossil fuels. This is important considering the environmental problems associated with consumption of the fossil fuels together with the fact that the reserves are limited...... and will be depleted if the increasing demand continues. However, one of the main challenges in the biological conversion is the identification of suitable platform organisms that can convert all the sugars present in the lignocellulosic biomass, including xylose. The aim of this PhD project was to investigate...... the potential of Lactococcus lactis as a platform organism for production of biofuels and-chemicals with a focus on characterization and optimization of the xylose metabolism. The plant isolate L. lactis KF147 was selected as the potential platform organism due to its natural ability to utilize both the pentose...

  6. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopin, M.C.; Rouault, A. (Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Rennes (France). Lab. de Recherches de Technologie Laitiere); Moillo-Batt, A. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Hopital de Pontchaillon, 35 - Rennes (France))

    1985-02-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by co-transfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci.

  7. Taxonomy, physiology and growth of Lactococcus lactis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Samaržija

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis species is one of the most important groups of lactic acid bacteria that are used in the dairy industry. The major functions of this species in dairy fermentation are the production of lactic acid from lactose, hydrolysis of casein and citric acid fermentation. Thus their metabolic end products and enzymes directly or indirectly have significant influence in determining the texture and flavour of the final products. In recent years, genetics and physiological properties of lactococci have considerable changed. Therefore, both for basic research and for application purposes in this paper the general view of the new taxonomic classification of Lactococcus lactis, the role of their plasmids and the physiology and nutritional requirements during growth are discussed.

  8. Plasmid-mediated UV-protection in Streptococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopin, M.-C.; Rouault, A.

    1985-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis strain IL594 contains 9 plasmids, designated pIL1 to pIL9. On the basis of protoplast-induced curing experiments the authors showed that derivatives containing pIL7 were resistant to UV-irradiation while derivatives lacking pIL7 were sensitive. The pIL7-determined UV-protection was confirmed by cotransfer of the plasmid and of the character into a plasmid-free derivative of S. lactis IL594. Moreover, prophage induction required higher UV-fluence in this derivative carrying pIL7 than in the plasmid-free strain. This is the first report of a plasmid-mediated UV-protection in group N streptococci. (orig.)

  9. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-mediated bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Millen

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins, which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB, none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes.

  10. Genes but not genomes reveal bacterial domestication of Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Passerini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between "environmental" strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and "domesticated" strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the "domesticated" strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable

  11. Transcriptional regulation of the Kluyveromyces lactis beta-galactosidase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy, L R; Dickson, R C

    1981-01-01

    We examined the molecular basis for beta-D-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) induction in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin effectively blocked both protein synthesis and enzyme induction by lactose. Further, hybridization analysis with the cloned beta-galactosidase gene indicated coordinate increases in the concentration of beta-galactosidase messenger ribonucleic acid and enzyme activity. The half-life of beta-galactosidase messenger ribonucleic acid was t...

  12. CTP limitation increases expression of CTP synthase in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.M.; Hammer, Karin; Martinussen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    CTP synthase is encoded by the pyrG gene and catalyzes the conversion of UTP to CTP. A Lactococcus lactis pyrG mutant with a cytidine requirement was constructed, in which beta-galactosidase activity in a pyrG-lacLM transcriptional fusion was used to monitor gene expression of pyrG. A 10-fold...... decrease in the CTP pool induced by cytidine limitation was found to immediately increase expression of the L. lactis pyrG gene. The final level of expression of pyrG is 37-fold higher than the uninduced level. CTP limitation has pronounced effects on central cellular metabolism, and both RNA and protein...... for regulation of the pyrG gene. It is possible to fold the pyrG leader in an alternative structure that would prevent the formation of the terminator. We suggest a model for pyrG regulation in L. lactis, and probably in other gram-positive bacteria as well, in which pyrG expression is directly dependent...

  13. Characterization of a Lactococcus lactis promoter for heterologous protein production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian E. Ogaugwu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Constitutively active promoter elements for heterologous protein production in Lactococcus lactis are scarce. Here, the promoter of the PTS-IIC gene cluster from L. lactis NZ3900 is described. This promoter was cloned upstream of an enhanced green fluorescent protein, GFPmut3a, and transformed into L. lactis. Transformants produced up to 13.5 μg of GFPmut3a per milliliter of log phase cells. Addition of cellobiose further increased the production of GFPmut3a by up to two-fold when compared to glucose. Analysis of mutations at two specific positions in the PTS-IIC promoter showed that a ‘T’ to ‘G’ mutation within the −35 element resulted in constitutive expression in glucose, while a ‘C’ at nucleotide 7 in the putative cre site enhanced promoter activity in cellobiose. Finally, this PTS-IIC promoter is capable of mediating protein expression in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, suggesting the potential for future biotechnological applications of this element and its derivatives.

  14. Efficiency of PCR-based methods in discriminating Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis strains of human origin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrůtková, Dagmar; Španová, A.; Špano, M.; Dráb, V.; Schwarzer, Martin; Kozáková, Hana; Rittich, B.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 1 (2011), s. 10-16 ISSN 0167-7012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Bifidobacterium longum * ARDRA * pcr Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.086, year: 2011

  15. Isolation and Characterisation of Bacteriocin and Aggregation-Promoting Factor Production in Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis BGBM50 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemanja Mirkovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis BGBM50, a producer of lactococcin G and aggregation-promoting factor, was isolated from selected lactic acid bacteria taken from semi-hard cheese traditionally produced in the village Žanjic, Montenegro. Strain BGBM50 harbours a number of plasmids of diff erent sizes. Plasmid curing experiments showed that genes for bacteriocin production are located on pBM140, a plasmid 140 kb in length. PCR analysis with primers specifi c for lactococcin Q and G genes gave fragment of the expected size. In addition, after plasmid curing of strain BGBM50, different derivatives with altered phenotypes were obtained, among them BGBM50-34 strain, which retained bacteriocin synthesis but had enhanced aggregation ability.

  16. Ribose utilization by the human commensal Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokusaeva, Karina; Neves, Ana Rute; Zomer, Aldert; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; MacSharry, John; Curley, Peter; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2010-05-01

    Growth of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 on ribose leads to the transcriptional induction of the rbsACBDK gene cluster. Generation and phenotypic analysis of an rbsA insertion mutant established that the rbs gene cluster is essential for ribose utilization, and that its transcription is likely regulated by a LacI-type regulator encoded by rbsR, located immediately upstream of rbsA. Gel mobility shift assays using purified RbsR(His) indicate that the promoter upstream of rbsABCDK is negatively controlled by RbsR(His) binding to an 18 bp inverted repeat and that RbsR(His) binding activity is modulated by D-ribose. The rbsK gene of the rbs operon of B. breve UCC2003 was shown to specify a ribokinase (EC 2.7.1.15), which specifically directs its phosphorylating activity towards D-ribose, converting this pentose sugar to ribose-5-phosphate. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis infection in Bester sturgeon, a cultured hybrid of Huso huso × Acipenser ruthenus, in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Hui; Hung, Shao-Wen; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Lin, Cheng-Chung; Liu, Pan-Chen; Chang, Chen-Hsuan; Shia, Wei-Yau; Cheng, Ching-Fu; Lin, Shiun-Long; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Wang, Way-Shyan

    2012-10-01

    Approximately 5300 hybrid sturgeons with an average body weight of 600-800 g were farmed in 3 round tankers measuring 3m in diameter each containing 28,000 L of aerated groundwater. According to the owner's description, the diseased fish had anorexia, pale body color, and reddish spots on the abdomen. The morbidity and lethality rates in this outbreak were about 70% (3706/5300) and 100% (3706/3706), respectively. The clinical examination revealed enteritis, enlarged abdomen, and rapid respiration rate. The gross findings revealed a volume of about 4 mL of ascites. The histopathological examination showed multiple massive, hemorrhagic or coagulative necrotic foci in the liver and spleen. Furthermore, there was diffuse infiltration of glycogen in hepatic cells, and a few polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leucocytes were observed surrounding the spleen. Some bacterial clumps were noted around the necrotic foci. We also observed that there was moderate to severe, acute, multifocal, coagulative necrosis in the renal parenchyma, with some necrotic foci present beneath the margin of the kidney. Additionally, multifocal, coagulative necrosis was found in the pancreas. Results of microbiologic examinations, including biochemical characteristics, PCR amplification of 16S rRNA gene, sequencing and comparison, and phylogenetic analysis, revealed the pathogen of this infection was Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, and based on the results of an antimicrobial agent sensitivity test the bacterium was only sensitive to ampicillin and florfenicol. Additionally, results of in vivo experimental infections in hybrid tilapia showed that 1×10(8) and 1×10(9) CFU/mL of our isolate caused death in all fish and LD(50) values ranged from 10(2) to 10(5) CFU/mL. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis infection in hybrid sturgeon. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Statistical optimization of cell disruption techniques for releasing intracellular X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase from Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üstün-Aytekin, Özlem; Arısoy, Sevda; Aytekin, Ali Özhan; Yıldız, Ece

    2016-03-01

    X-prolyl dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (PepX) is an intracellular enzyme from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis NRRL B-1821, and it has commercial importance. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of several cell disruption methods on the activity of PepX. Statistical optimization methods were performed for two cavitation methods, hydrodynamic (high-pressure homogenization) and acoustic (sonication), to determine the more appropriate disruption method. Two level factorial design (2FI), with the parameters of number of cycles and pressure, and Box-Behnken design (BBD), with the parameters of cycle, sonication time, and power, were used for the optimization of the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods, respectively. In addition, disruption methods, consisting of lysozyme, bead milling, heat treatment, freeze-thawing, liquid nitrogen, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), Triton-X, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), chloroform, and antibiotics, were performed and compared with the high-pressure homogenization and sonication methods. The optimized values of high-pressure homogenization were one cycle at 130 MPa providing activity of 114.47 mU ml(-1), while sonication afforded an activity of 145.09 mU ml(-1) at 28 min with 91% power and three cycles. In conclusion, sonication was the more effective disruption method, and its optimal operation parameters were manifested for the release of intracellular enzyme from a L. lactis spp. lactis strain, which is a Gram-positive bacterium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis during milk acidification as affected by dissolved oxygen and the redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nadja; Moslehi-Jenabian, Saloomeh; Werner, Birgit Brøsted; Jensen, Maiken Lund; Garrigues, Christel; Vogensen, Finn Kvist; Jespersen, Lene

    2016-06-02

    Performance of Lactococcus lactis as a starter culture in dairy fermentations depends on the levels of dissolved oxygen and the redox state of milk. In this study the microarray analysis was used to investigate the global gene expression of L. lactis subsp. lactis DSM20481(T) during milk acidification as affected by oxygen depletion and the decrease of redox potential. Fermentations were carried out at different initial levels of dissolved oxygen (dO2) obtained by milk sparging with oxygen (high dO2, 63%) or nitrogen (low dO2, 6%). Bacterial exposure to high initial oxygen resulted in overexpression of genes involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidation-reduction processes, biosynthesis of trehalose and down-regulation of genes involved in purine nucleotide biosynthesis, indicating that several factors, among them trehalose and GTP, were implicated in bacterial adaptation to oxidative stress. Generally, transcriptional changes were more pronounced during fermentation of oxygen sparged milk. Genes up-regulated in response to oxygen depletion were implicated in biosynthesis and transport of pyrimidine nucleotides, branched chain amino acids and in arginine catabolic pathways; whereas genes involved in salvage of nucleotides and cysteine pathways were repressed. Expression pattern of genes involved in pyruvate metabolism indicated shifts towards mixed acid fermentation after oxygen depletion with production of specific end-products, depending on milk treatment. Differential expression of genes, involved in amino acid and pyruvate pathways, suggested that initial oxygen might influence the release of flavor compounds and, thereby, flavor development in dairy fermentations. The knowledge of molecular responses involved in adaptation of L. lactis to the shifts of redox state and pH during milk fermentations is important for the dairy industry to ensure better control of cheese production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. EXPRESSION OF A CHITINASE GENE FROM SERRATIA-MARCESCENS IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS AND LACTOBACILLUS-PLANTARUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRURBERG, MB; HAANDRIKMAN, AJ; LEENHOUTS, KJ; VENEMA, G; NES, IF

    1994-01-01

    A chitinase gene from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens BJL200 was cloned in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 and in the silage inoculum strain Lactobacillus plantarum E19b. The chitinase gene was expressed as an active enzyme at a low level in Lactococcus lactis, when cloned in

  1. Genotype-phenotype matching analysis of 38 Lactococcus lactis strains using random forest methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayjanov, J.; Starrenburg, M.J.; Sijde, M.R. van der; Siezen, R.J.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lactococcus lactis is used in dairy food fermentation and for the efficient production of industrially relevant enzymes. The genome content and different phenotypes have been determined for multiple L. lactis strains in order to understand intra-species genotype and phenotype diversity

  2. Complete genome sequence of the prototype lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp cremoris MG1363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegmann, Udo; O'Connell-Motherwy, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; Buist, Girbe; Shearman, Claire; Canchaya, Carlos; Ventura, Marco; Goesmann, Alexander; Gasson, Michael J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Kok, Jan

    Lactococcus lactis is of great importance for the nutrition of hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This paper describes the genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, the lactococcal strain most intensively studied throughout the world. The 2,529,478-bp genome contains 81

  3. Heterologous expression and characterization of recombinant Lactococcus lactis neutral endopeptidase (Neprilysin)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lian, W; Wu, D; Konings, W.N; Mierau, I; Hersh, L.B

    1996-01-01

    A neutral endopeptidase (NEP) from Lactococcus lactis has recently been cloned and shown to contain high sequence homology with the human neutral endopeptidase, endopeptidase 24.11 (I. Mierau et al., J. Bacteriol. 175, 2087-2096, 1993). The gene for the neutral endopeptidase from L. lactis was

  4. Transcriptome profiling of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 in response to agmatine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, M Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    The dairy strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) synthesizes the biogenic amine putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are

  5. Regulation of the Glutamate-Glutamine Transport System by Intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; HELLINGWERF, KJ; KONINGS, WN

    Various methods of manipulation of the intracellular pH in Streptococcus lactis result in a unique relationship between the rate of glutamate and glutamine transport and the cytoplasmic pH. The initial rate of glutamate uptake by S. lactis cells increases more than 30-fold when the intracellular pH

  6. Characterization of the role of para-aminobenzoic acid biosynthesis in folate production by Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegkamp, H.B.A.; Oorschot, van A.; Vos, de W.M.; Smid, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    The pab genes for para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA) biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis were identified and characterized. In L. lactis NZ9000, only two of the three genes needed for pABA production were initially found. No gene coding for 4-amino-4-deoxychorismate lyase (pabC) was initially annotated,

  7. Regulation of Arginine-Ornithine Exchange and the Arginine Deiminase Pathway in Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    Streptococcus lactis metabolizes arginine by the argiqine deiminase (ADI) pathway. Resting cells of S. lactis grown in the presence of galactose and arginine maintain a high intracellular ornithine pool in the absence of arginine and other exogenous energy sources. Addition of arginine results in a

  8. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis is increased upon D-alanine depletion of peptidoglycan and lipoteichoic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Deghorain, Marie; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Delcour, Jean; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe; Hols, Pascal

    Mutations in the genes encoding enzymes responsible for the incorporation of D-Ala into the cell wall of Lactococcus lactis affect autolysis. An L. lactis alanine racemase (alr) mutant is strictly dependent on an external Supply Of D-Ala to be able to synthesize peptidoglycan and to incorporate

  9. The pyrimidine operon pyrRPB-carA from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Schallert, J.; Andersen, Birgit

    2001-01-01

    The four genes pyrR, pyrP, pyrB, and carA were found to constitute an operon in Lactococcus lactis subsp, lactis MG1363. The functions of the different genes were established by mutational analysis. The first gene in the operon is the pyrimidine regulatory gene, pyrR, which is responsible...

  10. Hemin reconstitutes proton extrusion in an H+-ATPase-negative mutant of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, L.M.; Købmann, Brian Jensen; Michelsen, Ole

    2001-01-01

    H+-ATPase is considered essential for growth of Lactococcus lactis. However, media containing hemin restored the aerobic growth of an H+-ATPase-negative mutant, suggesting that hemin complements proton extrusion. We show that inverted membrane vesicles prepared from hemin-grown L. lactis cells...

  11. Time-resolved genetic responses of Lactococcus lactis to a dairy environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bachmann, H.; Wilt, de L.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of main bacterial species found in mixed dairy starter cultures for the production of semi-hard cheese. Despite the appreciation that mixed cultures are essential for the eventual properties of the manufactured cheese the vast majority of studies on L. lactis were carried

  12. Cloning and analysis of the pepV dipeptidase gene of Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellendoorn, Michiel A.; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M.D.; Mierau, Igor; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    The gene pepV, encoding a dipeptidase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363, was identified in a genomic library in pUC19 in a peptidase-deficient Escherichia coli strain and subsequently sequenced. PepV of L. lactis is enzymatically active in E. coli and hydrolyzes a broad range of

  13. Complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1, a lactic acid bacterium that utilizes xylose and produces high levels of L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Shiwa, Yuh; Oshima, Kenshiro; Machii, Miki; Araya-Kojima, Tomoko; Zendo, Takeshi; Shimizu-Kadota, Mariko; Hattori, Masahira; Sonomoto, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis IO-1 (= JCM7638). It is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, produces nisin Z, ferments xylose, and produces predominantly L-lactic acid at high xylose concentrations. From ortholog analysis with other five L. lactis strains, IO-1 was identified as L. lactis subsp. lactis.

  14. Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MA83 Suşunda Aktif Bir Faj Dirençlilik Sisteminin Genetik ve Biyokimyasal Doğası

    OpenAIRE

    Tükel, Çağla; Akçelik, Mustafa

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MA83 susunda fajlann adsorbsiyonu, bu bakteride 32.7 kb büyüklükteki plazmidin varlığında üretilen ekzopolisakkarit materyal tarafından engellendi. Kimyasal analizler sonucunda bu ekzopolisakkarit materyalin ana bileşenlerinin galaktoz, galaktozamin, ramnoz ve fosfat olduğu belirlendi. Ayrıca, L. lactis subsp. lactis MA83 susunda Øla2, Øp78, Ør4 ve Øp81 fajlannın almaç bölgelerinin protein yapıda olduğu saptandı.  

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR fingerprint characterization of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and Lactococcus garvieae isolated from bovine intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumed-Ferrer, C; Barberio, A; Franklin-Guild, R; Werner, B; McDonough, P; Bennett, J; Gioia, G; Rota, N; Welcome, F; Nydam, D V; Moroni, P

    2015-09-01

    In total, 181 streptococci-like bacteria isolated from intramammary infections (IMI) were submitted by a veterinary clinic to Quality Milk Production Services (QMPS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY). The isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, and 46 Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis and 47 Lactococcus garvieae were tested for susceptibility to 17 antibiotics. No resistant strains were found for β-lactam antibiotics widely used in clinical practice (penicillin, ampicillin, and amoxicillin), and all minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were far from the resistance breakpoints. Eight strains had MIC intermediate to cefazolin. The random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR fingerprint patterns showed a slightly higher heterogeneity for Lc. lactis ssp. lactis isolates than for Lc. garvieae isolates. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 Grown on Xylo-Oligosaccharides and a Model of Their Utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Jacobsen, Susanne; Stuer-Lauridsen, B.

    2010-01-01

    of these (beta-D-xylosidase, sugar-binding protein, and xylose isomerase) showed higher abundance on XOS. Based on the obtained results, a model for the catabolism of XOS in BB-12 is suggested, according to which the strain utilizes an ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transport system (probably for oligosaccharides...... XOS or glucose. The analyses show that 9 of the 10 genes that encode proteins predicted to play a role in XOS catabolism (i.e., XOS-degrading and -metabolizing enzymes, transport proteins, and a regulatory protein) were induced by XOS at the transcriptional level, and the proteins encoded by three...

  17. Short communication: Genotypic and phenotypic identification of environmental streptococci and association of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis with intramammary infections among different dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B; Moroni, P; Gioia, G; Lavín-Alconero, L; Yousaf, A; Charter, M E; Carter, B Moslock; Bennett, J; Nydam, D V; Welcome, F; Schukken, Y H

    2014-11-01

    Lactococcus species are counted among a large and closely related group of environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria that include bovine mastitis pathogenic Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Aerococcus species. Phenotypic and biochemical identification methods can be inaccurate and unreliable for species within this group, particularly for Lactococcus spp. As a result, the incidence of Lactococcus spp. on the farm may have been historically underreported and consequently little is known about the clinical importance of this genus as a mastitis pathogen. We used molecular genetic identification methods to accurately differentiate 60 environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria isolated from cows with high somatic cell count and chronic intramammary infection (IMI; >2 somatic cell scores above 4) among 5 geographically distinct farms in New York and Minnesota that exhibited an observed increase in IMI. These isolates were phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus spp. Genetic methods identified 42 isolates (70%) as Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis, including all 10 isolates originally phenotypically identified as Streptococcus uberis. Antibiotic inhibition testing of all Lc. lactis ssp. lactis showed that 7 isolates were resistant to tetracycline. In the present study, a predominance of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis was identified in association with chronic, clinical bovine IMI among all 5 farms and characterized antimicrobial resistance for treatment therapies. Routine use by mastitis testing labs of molecular identification methods for environmental streptococci and streptococci-like bacteria can further define the role and prevalence of Lc. lactis ssp. lactis in association with bovine IMI and may lead to more targeted therapies. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and Exploitation of CRISPR Loci in Bifidobacterium longum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Hidalgo-Cantabrana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Diverse CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity in many bacteria and most archaea, via a DNA-encoded, RNA-mediated, nucleic-acid targeting mechanism. Over time, CRISPR loci expand via iterative uptake of invasive DNA sequences into the CRISPR array during the adaptation process. These genetic vaccination cards thus provide insights into the exposure of strains to phages and plasmids in space and time, revealing the historical predatory exposure of a strain. These genetic loci thus constitute a unique basis for genotyping of strains, with potential of resolution at the strain-level. Here, we investigate the occurrence and diversity of CRISPR-Cas systems in the genomes of various Bifidobacterium longum strains across three sub-species. Specifically, we analyzed the genomic content of 66 genomes belonging to B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis, and identified 25 strains that carry 29 total CRISPR-Cas systems. We identify various Type I and Type II CRISPR-Cas systems that are widespread in this species, notably I-C, I-E, and II-C. Noteworthy, Type I-C systems showed extended CRISPR arrays, with extensive spacer diversity. We show how these hypervariable loci can be used to gain insights into strain origin, evolution and phylogeny, and can provide discriminatory sequences to distinguish even clonal isolates. By investigating CRISPR spacer sequences, we reveal their origin and implicate phages and prophages as drivers of CRISPR immunity expansion in this species, with redundant targeting of select prophages. Analysis of CRISPR spacer origin also revealed novel PAM sequences. Our results suggest that CRISPR-Cas immune systems are instrumental in mounting diversified viral resistance in B. longum, and show that these sequences are useful for typing across three subspecies.

  19. Microencapsulation in alginate and chitosan microgels to enhance viability of Bifidobacterium longum for oral delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy W. Yeung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic microorganisms are incorporated into a wide variety of foods, supplements, and pharmaceuticals to promote human health and wellness. However, maintaining bacterial cell viability during storage and gastrointestinal transit remains a challenge. Encapsulation of bifidobacteria within food-grade hydrogel particles potentially mitigates their sensitivity to environmental stresses. In this study, Bifidobacterium longum subspecies and strains were encapsulated in core-shell microgels consisting of an alginate core and a microgel shell. Encapsulated obligate anaerobes Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum exhibited differences in viability in a strain-dependent manner, without a discernable relationship to subspecies lineage. This includes viability under aerobic storage conditions and modeled gastrointestinal tract conditions. Coating alginate microgels with chitosan did not improve viability compared to cells encapsulated in alginate microgels alone, suggesting that modifying the surface charge alone does not enhance delivery. Thus hydrogel beads have great potential for improving the stability and efficacy of bifidobacterial probiotics in various nutritional interventions.

  20. Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011 genome analysis reveals clues for colonization of the insect gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottacini, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Turroni, Francesca; Sánchez, Borja; Foroni, Elena; Duranti, Sabrina; Serafini, Fausta; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Ferrarini, Alberto; Delledonne, Massimo; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are known as anaerobic/microaerophilic and fermentative microorganisms, which commonly inhabit the gastrointestinal tract of various animals and insects. Analysis of the 2,167,301 bp genome of Bifidobacterium asteroides PRL2011, a strain isolated from the hindgut of Apis mellifera var. ligustica, commonly known as the honey bee, revealed its predicted capability for respiratory metabolism. Conservation of the latter gene clusters in various B. asteroides strains enforces the notion that respiration is a common metabolic feature of this ancient bifidobacterial species, which has been lost in currently known mammal-derived Bifidobacterium species. In fact, phylogenomic based analyses suggested an ancient origin of B. asteroides and indicates it as an ancestor of the genus Bifidobacterium. Furthermore, the B. asteroides PRL2011 genome encodes various enzymes for coping with toxic products that arise as a result of oxygen-mediated respiration.

  1. Cell growth and resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161 following freezing, drying and freeze-dried storage are differentially affected by fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Fonseca, F; Passot, S; Delacroix-Buchet, A; Bouix, M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the effects of fermentation parameters on the cell growth and on the resistance to each step of the freeze-drying process of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161, a natural cheese isolate, using a response surface methodology. Cells were cultivated at different temperatures (22, 30 and 38°C) and pH (5·6, 6·2 and 6·8) and were harvested at different growth phases (0, 3 and 6 h of stationary phase). Cultivability and acidification activity losses of Lc. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, 1 and 3 months of storage at 4 and 25°C. Lactococcus lactis was not damaged by freezing but was sensitive to drying and to ambient temperature storage. Moreover, the fermentation temperature and the harvesting time influenced the drying resistance of Lc. lactis. Lactococcus lactis cells grown in a whey-based medium at 32°C, pH 6·2 and harvested at late stationary phase exhibited both an optimal growth and the highest resistance to freeze-drying and storage. A better insight on the individual and interaction effects of fermentation parameters made it possible the freeze-drying and storage preservation of a sensitive strain of technological interest. Evidence on the particularly damaging effect of the drying step and the high-temperature storage is presented. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 protects against pathogen-induced NF-kappaB activation in vivo

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, David

    2010-12-22

    Abstract Background Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are among the early and important colonizers of the gastrointestinal tract and are generally considered to be part of a normal, healthy microbiota. It is believed that specific strains within the microbiota can influence host immune-reactivity and may play a role in protection from infection and aberrant inflammatory activity. One such strain, Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7, has been previously shown to protect against Salmonella typhimurium infection in mice and helps resolve acute idiopathic diarrhea in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning the Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 protective effect. Results Following 4 hours of infection with Salmonella typhimurium, NF-κB activation was significantly elevated in vivo in placebo and Enterococcus faecium-fed animals while Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 consumption significantly attenuated the NF-κB response. In vitro anti-CD3\\/CD28 stimulated Peyer\\'s patch cells secreted significantly less TNF-α and IFN-γ following Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 consumption. Stimulated cells released more IL-12p70 but this difference did not reach statistical significance. No alteration in mucosal IL-6, IL-10 or MCP-1 levels were observed. No statistically significant change in the cytokine profile of mesenteric lymph node cells was noted. In vitro, Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 was bound by dendritic cells and induced secretion of both IL-10 and IL-12p70. In addition, co-culture of CD4+ T cells with Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7-stimulated dendritic cells resulted in a significant increase in CD25+Foxp3+ T cell numbers. Conclusion Bifidobacterium animalis AHC7 exerts an anti-inflammatory effect via the attenuation of pro-inflammatory transcription factor activation in response to an infectious insult associated with modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine production within the mucosa. The cellular mechanism

  3. Genetically Modified Lactococcus lactis for Delivery of Human Interleukin-10 to Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge L. Huibregtse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-10 (IL-10 plays an indispensable role in mucosal tolerance by programming dendritic cells (DCs to induce suppressor Th-cells. We have tested the modulating effect of L. lactis secreting human IL-10 (L.  lactisIL-10 on DC function in vitro. Monocyte-derived DC incubated with L.  lactisIL-10 induced effector Th-cells that markedly suppressed the proliferation of allogenic Th-cells as compared to L. lactis. This suppressive effect was only seen when DC showed increased CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, enhanced production of IL-10 was measured in both L.  lactisIL-10-derived DC and Th-cells compared to L. lactis-derived DC and Th-cells. Neutralizing IL-10 during DC-Th-cell interaction and coculturing L.  lactisIL-10-derived suppressor Th-cells with allogenic Th-cells in a transwell system prevented the induction of suppressor Th-cells. Only 130 pg/mL of bacterial-derived IL-10 and 40 times more exogenously added recombinant human IL-10 were needed during DC priming for the generation of suppressor Th-cells. The spatially restricted delivery of IL-10 by food-grade bacteria is a promising strategy to induce suppressor Th-cells in vivo and to treat inflammatory diseases.

  4. Dual recombinant Lactococcus lactis for enhanced delivery of DNA vaccine reporter plasmid pPERDBY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Sharma, Drashya; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2017-04-01

    Food grade Lactococcus lactis has been widely used as an antigen and DNA delivery vehicle. We have previously reported the use of non-invasive L. lactis to deliver the newly constructed immunostimulatory DNA vaccine reporter plasmid, pPERDBY. In the present report, construction of dual recombinant L. lactis expressing internalin A of Listeria monocytogenes and harboring pPERDBY (LL InlA + pPERDBY) to enhance the efficiency of delivery of DNA by L. lactis is outlined. After confirmation and validation of LL InlA + pPERDBY, its DNA delivery potential was compared with previously developed non-invasive r- L. lactis::pPERDBY. The use of invasive L. lactis resulted in around threefold increases in the number of enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing Caco-2 cells. These findings reinforce the prospective application of invasive strain of L. lactis for delivery of DNA/RNA and antigens. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Oral Administration of Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Cellulase Gene Increases Digestibility of Fiber in Geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haizhu; Gao, Yunhang; Gao, Guang; Lou, Yujie

    2015-12-01

    Enhancing cellulose digestibility in animals is important for improving the utilization of forage, which can decrease the amount of food used in animal production. The aim of the present study was to achieve recombinant expression of the cellulase gene in Lactococcus lactis and evaluate the effects of oral administration of the recombinant L. lactis on fiber digestibility in geese. Cellulase (Cell) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were cloned into a L. lactis expression vector (pNZ8149) to construct the recombinant expression plasmid (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell). Then, the recombinant expression plasmid was transformed into L. lactis (NZ3900) competent cells by electroporation to obtain recombinant L. lactis (pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900) in which protein expression was induced by Nisin. Expression of GFP and Cell by the recombinant L. lactis was confirmed using SDS-PAGE, fluorescence detection, and Congo red assays. A feeding experiment showed that oral administration of pNZ8149-GFP-Cell/NZ3900 significantly increased the digestibility of dietary fiber in geese fed either a maize stalk diet or a rice chaff diet. Therefore, oral administration of recombinant L. lactis cells expressing the cellulase gene increases fiber digestibility in geese, offering a way to increase the utilization of dietary fiber in geese.

  6. Expression of prophage-encoded endolysins contributes to autolysis of Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R; Kurek, Dorota; Szeliga, Monika; Pastrana, Francisco Romero; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of autolysis of derivatives of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 and subsp. lactis IL1403, both lacking the major autolysin AcmA, showed that L. lactis IL1403 still lysed during growth while L. lactis MG1363 did not. Zymographic analysis revealed that a peptidoglycan hydrolase activity of around 30 kDa is present in cell extracts of L. lactis IL1403 that could not be detected in strain MG1363. A comparison of all genes encoding putative peptidoglycan hydrolases of IL1403 and MG1363 led to the assumption that one or more of the 99 % homologous 27.9-kDa endolysins encoded by the prophages bIL285, bIL286 and bIL309 could account for the autolysis phenotype of IL1403. Induced expression of the endolysins from bIL285, bIL286 or bIL309 in L. lactis MG1363 resulted in detectable lysis or lytic activity. Prophage deletion and insertion derivatives of L. lactis IL1403 had a reduced cell lysis phenotype. RT-qPCR and zymogram analysis showed that each of these strains still expressed one or more of the three phage lysins. A homologous gene and an endolysin activity were also identified in the natural starter culture L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains E8, Wg2 and HP, and the lytic activity could be detected under growth conditions that were identical as those used for IL1403. The results presented here show that these endolysins of L. lactis are expressed during normal growth and contribute to autolysis without production of (lytic) phages. Screening for natural strains expressing homologous endolysins could help in the selection of strains with enhanced autolysis and, thus, cheese ripening properties.

  7. Functional Expression of an Orchid Fragrance Gene in Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Adelene Ai Lian; Abdullah, Janna O.; Abdullah, Mohd Puad; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha A.

    2012-01-01

    Vanda Mimi Palmer (VMP), an orchid hybrid of Vanda tesselata and Vanda Tan Chay Yan is a highly scented tropical orchid which blooms all year round. Previous studies revealed that VMP produces a variety of isoprenoid volatiles during daylight. Isoprenoids are well known to contribute significantly to the scent of most fragrant plants. They are a large group of secondary metabolites which may possess valuable characteristics such as flavor, fragrance and toxicity and are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or/and the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, a sesquiterpene synthase gene denoted VMPSTS, previously isolated from a floral cDNA library of VMP was cloned and expressed in Lactococcus lactis to characterize the functionality of the protein. L. lactis, a food grade bacterium which utilizes the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid production was found to be a suitable host for the characterization of plant terpene synthases. Through recombinant expression of VMPSTS, it was revealed that VMPSTS produced multiple sesquiterpenes and germacrene D dominates its profile. PMID:22408409

  8. Production of recombinant peanut allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenting, J.; Poulsen, Lars K.; Kato, K.

    2007-01-01

    lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some...... of the major allergens in peanut have been described. However, for therapeutic usage more information about the individual allergenic components is needed. In this paper we report recombinant production of the Ara h 2 peanut allergen using L. lactis. Results: A synthetic ara h 2 gene was cloned into an L...

  9. Strains of Lactococcus lactis with a partial pyrimidine requirement show sensitivity toward aspartic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Martinussen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The growth rate of the widely used laboratory strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris LM0230 was reduced if aspartic acid were present in the growth medium. The strain LM0230 is a plasmid- and phage-cured derivative of L. lactis subsp. cremoris C2, the ancestor of the original dairy isolate L...... that the partial pyrimidine requirement can be explained by a low specific activity of the pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. In conclusion, L. lactis LM0230 during the process of plasmid- and prophage-curing has acquired a partial pyrimidine requirement resulting in sensitivity toward aspartic acid....

  10. Susceptibility of human and probiotic Bifidobacterium spp. to selected antibiotics as determined by the Etest method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matto, J.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Domig, K.J.; Saarela, M.; Flórez, A.B.; Brockmann, E.; Amtmann, E.; Mayo, B.; Aarts, H.J.M.; Danielsen, M.

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the antibiotic susceptibility of 203 strains representing human or probiotic associated Bifidobacterium species as determined by the Etest method. Strains showing minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for tetracycline >= 16 mu g mL(-1) were detected in all studied

  11. Imbalances in faecal and duodenal Bifidobacterium species composition in active and non-active coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Yolanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gut bifidobacteria are believed to influence immune-related diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the possible relationships between the gut bifidobacteria composition and coeliac disease (CD in children. A total of 48 faecal samples (30 and 18 samples from active and no active CD patients, respectively and 33 duodenal biopsy specimens of CD patients (25 and 8 samples from active and non-active CD patients, respectively were analysed. Samples (30 faecal samples and 8 biopsies from a control age-matched group of children were also included for comparative purposes. Gut Bifidobacterium genus and species were analyzed by real-time PCR. Results Active and non-active CD patients showed lower numbers of total Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faeces and duodenal biopsies than controls, and these differences were particularly remarkable between active CD patients and controls. B. catenulatum prevalence was higher in biopsies of controls than in those of active and non-active CD patients, whereas B. dentium prevalence was higher in faeces of non-active CD patients than in controls. Correlations between levels of Bifidobacterium and B. longum species in faecal and biopsy samples were detected in both CD patients and controls. Conclusion Reductions in total Bifidobacterium and B. longum populations were associated with both active and non-active CD when compared to controls. These bacterial groups could constitute novel targets for adjuvant dietary therapies although the confirmation of this hypothesis would require further investigations.

  12. Cloning and characterization of two a-glucosidases from Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM20083.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den L.A.M.; Struijs, K.; Verdoes, J.C.; Beldman, G.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Two alpha-glucosidase encoding genes (aglA and aglB) from Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 were isolated and characterized. Both alpha-glucosidases belong to family 13 of the glycosyl hydrolases. Recombinant AglA (EC 3.2.1.10) and AglB (EC 3.2.1.20), expressed in Escherichia coli, showed high

  13. Differential transcriptional response of Bifidobacterium longum to human milk, formula milk and galactooligosaccharide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez, R.; Klaassens, E.S.; Malinen, E.; Vos, de W.M.; Vaughan, E.E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the effects of human breast milk on the development of the intestinal bifidobacteria and associated health effects, the transcriptome of Bifidobacterium longum LMG 13197 grown in breast milk and formula milk containing galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and long-chain

  14. Bifidobacterium bifidum Actively Changes the Gene Expression Profile Induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in Murine Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Gudrun Margarethe; Rasmussen, Simon; Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2010-01-01

    cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium...

  15. Expression of Helicobacter pylori hspA Gene in Lactococcus lactis NICE System and Experimental Study on Its Immunoreactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Juan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to develop an oral Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Methods. After L. lactis NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA was constructed, growth curves were plotted to study whether the growth of recombinant L. lactis was affected after hspA was cloned into L. lactis and whether the growth of empty bacteria, empty plasmid bacteria, and recombinant L. lactis was affected by different concentrations of Nisin; SDS-PAGE and Western blot were adopted, respectively, to detect the HspA expressed by recombinant L. lactis and its immunoreactivity. Results. There was no effect observed from the growth curve after exogenous gene hspA was cloned into L. lactis NZ3900; different concentrations of Nisin did not affect the growth of NZ3900 and NZ3900/pNZ8110, while different concentrations of Nisin inhibited the growth of NZ3900/pNZ8110-hspA except 10 ng/mL Nisin. No HspA strip was observed from SDS-PAGE. Western blot analysis showed that HspA expressed by recombinant bacteria had favorable immunoreactivity. Conclusion. The growth of recombinant L. lactis was suppressed even though a small amount of HspA had been induced to express. Therefore recombinant L. lactis only express HspA which was not suitable to be oral vaccine against Helicobacter pylori.

  16. Is Bifidobacterium breve effective in the treatment of childhood constipation? Results from a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseboom MG

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotics are increasingly used in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Studies in constipated adults with a Bifidus yoghurt (containing Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Lactobacillus acidophilus showed a significant increase in defecation frequency. The aim of this pilot study was to determine if Bifidobacterium breve is effective in the treatment of childhood constipation. Methods Children, 3 to 16 years of age, with functional constipation according to the Rome III criteria were eligible for this study. During 4 weeks, children received one sachet of powder daily, containing 108- 1010 CFU Bifidobacterium breve. Furthermore, children were instructed to try to defecate on the toilet for 5-10 minutes after each meal and to complete a standardized bowel diary daily. The primary outcome measure was change in defecation frequency. Secondary outcome measures were stool consistency using the Bristol stool scale frequency of episodes of faecal incontinence, pain during defecation, frequency of abdominal pain, frequency of adverse effects (nausea, diarrhoea and bad taste, and frequency of intake of bisacodyl. Results Twenty children (75% male, mean age 7.4 were included in this pilot study. The defecation frequency per week significantly increased from 0.9 (0-2 at baseline to 4.9 (0-21 in week 4 (p Conclusion Bifidobacterium breve is effective in increasing stool frequency in children with functional constipation. Furthermore it has a positive effect with respect to stool consistency, decreasing the number of faecal incontinence episodes and in diminishing abdominal pain. A randomized placebo controlled trial is required to confirm these data.

  17. Iogurte probiótico produzido com leite de cabra suplementado com Bifidobacterium spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Mazochi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se iogurtes de leite de cabra contendo ou não Bifidobacterium longum, B. breve, B. pseudolongum ou B. bifidum, adicionados ou não de aroma de morango. Os dados obtidos nas análises higiênico-sanitárias e físico-químicas foram dentro dos valores exigidos pela legislação brasileira; apenas o valor encontrado para lactose esteve abaixo do recomendado. Quanto às bactérias do iogurte, não houve diferença na contagem de Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus durante a estocagem, e não foi detectado Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus nas diluições utilizadas. A enumeração de Bifidobacterium spp. manteve-se entre 10(6 e 10(8UFC/mL e não diferiu entre as espécies ao longo do tempo. Considerando-se a adição ou não de aroma, a análise das variáveis tempo e aroma não mostrou diferença estatística. A contagem entre os Bifidobacterium spp. demonstrou que nenhum microrganismo apresentou um comportamento superior a outro. Na análise sensorial, as amostras de iogurtes adicionados ou não de Bifidobacterium spp. e adicionados de aroma de morango não apresentaram diferenças entre si. O estudo mostrou ser possível a elaboração de iogurte de leite de cabra adicionado de Bifidobacterium spp. e de aroma de morango com qualidade assegurada, potencial para uso probiótico e boa aceitação pelo consumidor.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains against pathogenic microorganisms “in vitro”Atividade antimicrobiana de Lactobacillus e Bifodobacterium frente a microrganismos patogênicos “in vitro”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Nobre Costa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria have a long history of safe use in foods. These bacteria have biotechnological characteristics of interest such as the inhibition of pathogens. In this work, two lactobacilli strain and a bifidobacterium strain isolated from human gut were evaluated concerning to their ability to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms in foods by diffusion agar tests. Moreover, we assessed the metabolites produced in culture broth under static and shaking growth to simulate anaerobiosis and aerobiosis conditions, respectively. L. acidophilus LA5, L. plantarum DCTA 8420 and B. lactis DCTA 8724 showed ability to inhibit S. aureus FRI 196, strains producer toxins A and D, as well as B. cereus ATCC 25923, E. coli ATCC 25922 and S. Enteritidis, whose inhibition halos reached, on average, 24 mm in diameter. In the agar diffusion method with concentrated culture medium, it was possible to observe the effect of oxygen on the production of toxic substances. This result showed that cultivation of Lactobacillus under aerobic conditions seems to exert greater inhibitory effect, whereas for Bifidobacterium strain the effect was the opposite.Lactobacilos e bifidobactérias apresentam um longo histórico de uso seguro em alimentos, além de apresentarem características de interesse biotecnológico como a inibição de patógenos. Neste trabalho duas linhagens de lactobacilos e uma de bifidobactéria, isoladas do intestino humano, foram avaliadas em testes de difusão em ágar, quanto à capacidade de inibição de microrganismos patogênicos de ocorrência comuns em toxinfecções alimentares. Adicionalmente, foram avaliados os metabólitos produzidos em caldo de cultivo estático e em agitação para simular condições de anaerobiose a aerobiose, respectivamente. As três bactérias, L. acidophilus LA5, L. plantarum DCTA 8420 e B. lactis DCTA 8724 apresentaram capacidade de inibição para S. aureus FRI 196 linhagem produtora de toxinas A e D

  19. Quantitative PCR for the specific quantification of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus paracasei and its interest for Lactococcus lactis in cheese samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilleos, Christine; Berthier, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The first objective of this work was to develop real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to quantify two species of mesophilic lactic acid bacteria technologically active in food fermentation, including cheese making: Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus paracasei. The second objective was to compare qPCR and plate counts of these two species in cheese samples. Newly designed primers efficiently amplified a region of the tuf gene from the target species. Sixty-three DNA samples from twenty different bacterial species, phylogenetically related or commonly found in raw milk and dairy products, were selected as positive and negative controls. Target DNA was successfully amplified showing a single peak on the amplicon melting curve; non-target DNA was not amplified. Quantification was linear over 5 log units (R(2) > 0.990), down to 22 gene copies/μL per well for Lc. lactis and 73 gene copies/μL per well for Lb. paracasei. qPCR efficiency ranged from 82.9% to 93.7% for Lc. lactis and from 81.1% to 99.5% for Lb. paracasei. At two stages of growth, Lc. lactis was quantified in 12 soft cheeses and Lb. paracasei in 24 hard cooked cheeses. qPCR proved to be useful for quantifying Lc. lactis, but not Lb. paracasei. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Riboflavin Production in Lactococcus lactis: Potential for In Situ Production of Vitamin-Enriched Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Catherine; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Sybesma, Wilbert; Hugenholtz, Jeroen; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the genetic analysis of the riboflavin (vitamin B2) biosynthetic (rib) operon in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain NZ9000. Functional analysis of the genes of the L. lactis rib operon was performed by using complementation studies, as well as by deletion analysis. In addition, gene-specific genetic engineering was used to examine which genes of the rib operon need to be overexpressed in order to effect riboflavin overproduction. Transcriptional regulation of the L. lactis riboflavin biosynthetic process was investigated by using Northern hybridization and primer extension, as well as the analysis of roseoflavin-induced riboflavin-overproducing L. lactis isolates. The latter analysis revealed the presence of both nucleotide replacements and deletions in the regulatory region of the rib operon. The results presented here are an important step toward the development of fermented foods containing increased levels of riboflavin, produced in situ, thus negating the need for vitamin fortification. PMID:15466513

  1. Physicochemical and functional characterization of a biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, LR; Teixeira, JA; van der Mei, HC; Oliveira, R

    2006-01-01

    Isolation and identification of key components of the crude biosurfactant produced by Lactococcus lactis 53 was studied. Fractionation was achieved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography which allowed the isolation of a fraction rich in glycoproteins. Molecular (by Fourier transform infrared

  2. Inside the adaptation process of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis to bile

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Patricia; Sánchez García, Borja; Vinderola, Gabriel; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Ruíz García, Lorena; Margolles Barros, Abelardo; Reinheimer, Jorge A.; González de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Progressive adaptation to bile might render some lactobacilli able to withstand physiological bile salt concentrations. In this work, the adaptation to bile was evaluated on previously isolated dairy strains of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis 200 and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis 200+, a strain derived thereof with stable bile-resistant phenotype. The adaptation to bile was obtained by comparing cytosolic proteomes of both strains grown in the presence or absence of bile. Proteomics we...

  3. Expanding the molecular toolbox for Lactococcus lactis: construction of an inducible thioredoxin gene fusion expression system

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Douillard, Francois P

    2011-08-09

    Abstract Background The development of the Nisin Inducible Controlled Expression (NICE) system in the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris represents a cornerstone in the use of Gram-positive bacterial expression systems for biotechnological purposes. However, proteins that are subjected to such over-expression in L. lactis may suffer from improper folding, inclusion body formation and\\/or protein degradation, thereby significantly reducing the yield of soluble target protein. Although such drawbacks are not specific to L. lactis, no molecular tools have been developed to prevent or circumvent these recurrent problems of protein expression in L. lactis. Results Mimicking thioredoxin gene fusion systems available for E. coli, two nisin-inducible expression vectors were constructed to over-produce various proteins in L. lactis as thioredoxin fusion proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that our novel L. lactis fusion partner expression vectors allow high-level expression of soluble heterologous proteins Tuc2009 ORF40, Bbr_0140 and Tuc2009 BppU\\/BppL that were previously insoluble or not expressed using existing L. lactis expression vectors. Over-expressed proteins were subsequently purified by Ni-TED affinity chromatography. Intact heterologous proteins were detected by immunoblotting analyses. We also show that the thioredoxin moiety of the purified fusion protein was specifically and efficiently cleaved off by enterokinase treatment. Conclusions This study is the first description of a thioredoxin gene fusion expression system, purposely developed to circumvent problems associated with protein over-expression in L. lactis. It was shown to prevent protein insolubility and degradation, allowing sufficient production of soluble proteins for further structural and functional characterization.

  4. Efeito e modo de ação das bacteriocinas produzidas por Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383, ATCC 11454 e CNRZ 150 contra Listeria innocua LIN 11 Effect and mode of action of the bacterioncin produced by Lactococcus. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383, ATCC 11454 e CNRZ 150 against Listeria innocua LIN 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izildinha MORENO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O efeito e o modo de ação das bacteriocinas produzidas por L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 e CNRZ 150 são similares à nisina de L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. Estas bacteriocinas apresentaram um modo de ação bactericida, causando a lise de células de L. innocua LIN 11, associada ao decréscimo da absorbância e da viabilidade celular. O efeito letal foi maior para células em fase exponencial comparativamente à fase estacionária de crescimento. A adsorção dessas bacteriocinas às células de L. innocua LIN 11 foi muito rápida e influenciada pelo pH do meio de suspensão; adsorção máxima foi verificada a pH 6,0 e logo após o contato inicial. Perda completa de adsorção ocorreu em pH 2,0.The effect and mode of action of the bacteriocin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis ITAL 383 and CNRZ 150 are similar to the nisin produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis ATCC 11454. It was clearly bactericidal, and caused lysis of a strain of L. innocua LIN 11 detected by the decrease of absorbance values and the cell viability. Their lethal effect was considerably higher during the logarithmic growth when compared to the stationary phase. Adsorption developed rapidly and was influenced by the pH value of the suspension medium. Maximum adsorption was observed at pH 6,0 and immediately after initial contact and loss at pH 2,0.

  5. Fate of Lactococcus lactis starter cultures during late ripening in cheese models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggirello, Marianna; Cocolin, Luca; Dolci, Paola

    2016-10-01

    The presence of Lactococcus lactis, commonly employed as starter culture, was, recently, highlighted and investigated during late cheese ripening. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to assess the persistence and viability of this microorganism throughout manufacturing and ripening of model cheeses. Eight commercial starters, constituted of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, were inoculated in pasteurized milk in order to manufacture miniature cheeses, ripened for six months. Samples were analysed at different steps (milk after inoculum, curd after cutting, curd after pressing and draining, cheese immediately after salting and cheese at 7, 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 days of ripening) and submitted to both culture-dependent (traditional plating on M17) and -independent analysis (reverse transcription-quantitative PCR). On the basis of direct RNA analysis, L. lactis populations were detected in all miniature cheeses up to the sixth month of ripening, confirming the presence of viable cells during the whole ripening process, including late stages. Noteworthy, L. lactis was detected by RT-qPCR in cheese samples also when traditional plating failed to indicate its presence. This discrepancy could be explain with the fact that lactococci, during ripening process, enter in a stressed physiological state (viable not culturable, VNC), which might cause their inability to grow on synthetic medium despite their viability in cheese matrix. Preliminary results obtained by "resuscitation" assays corroborated this hypothesis and 2.5% glucose enrichment was effective to recover L. lactis cells in VNC state. The capability of L. lactis to persist in late ripening, and the presence of VNC cells which are known to shift their catabolism to peptides and amino acids consumption, suggests a possible technological role of this microorganism in cheese ripening with a possible impact on flavour formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Lactococcus lactis Metabolism and Gene Expression during Growth on Plant Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. PMID:25384484

  7. Transcriptome analysis of the Lactococcus lactis ArgR and AhrC regulons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Martinussen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that direct protein-protein. interaction between the two regulators ArgR and AhrC in Lactococcus lactis is required for arginine-dependent repression of the biosynthetic argC promoter and the activation of the catabolic arcA promoter. Here, we establish the global...... ArgR and AhrC regulons by transcriptome analyses and show that both regulators are dedicated to the control of arginine metabolism in L. lactis....

  8. Lactococcus lactis metabolism and gene expression during growth on plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L; Marco, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have been isolated from living, harvested, and fermented plant materials; however, the adaptations these bacteria possess for growth on plant tissues are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated plant habitat-specific traits of Lactococcus lactis during growth in an Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissue lysate (ATL). L. lactis KF147, a strain originally isolated from plants, exhibited a higher growth rate and reached 7.9-fold-greater cell densities during growth in ATL than the dairy-associated strain L. lactis IL1403. Transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) of KF147 identified 853 induced and 264 repressed genes during growth in ATL compared to that in GM17 laboratory culture medium. Genes induced in ATL included those involved in the arginine deiminase pathway and a total of 140 carbohydrate transport and metabolism genes, many of which are involved in xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, and hemicellulose metabolism. The induction of those genes corresponded with L. lactis KF147 nutrient consumption and production of metabolic end products in ATL as measured by gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF/MS) untargeted metabolomic profiling. To assess the importance of specific plant-inducible genes for L. lactis growth in ATL, xylose metabolism was targeted for gene knockout mutagenesis. Wild-type L. lactis strain KF147 but not an xylA deletion mutant was able to grow using xylose as the sole carbon source. However, both strains grew to similarly high levels in ATL, indicating redundancy in L. lactis carbohydrate metabolism on plant tissues. These findings show that certain strains of L. lactis are well adapted for growth on plants and possess specific traits relevant for plant-based food, fuel, and feed fermentations. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Improvement of the respiration efficiency of Lactococcus lactis by decreasing the culture pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weijia; Li, Yu; Gao, Xueling; Fu, Ruiyan

    2016-03-01

    The growth characteristics and intracellular hemin concentrations of Lactococcus lactis grown under different culture pH and aeration conditions were examined to investigate the effect of culture pH on the respiration efficiency of L. lactis NZ9000 (pZN8148). Cell biomass and biomass yield of L. lactis grown with 4 μg hemin/ml and O2 were higher than those without aeration when the culture pH was controlled at 5-6.5. The culture pH affected the respiratory efficiency in the following order of pH: 5 > 5.5 > 6 > 6.5; the lag phase increased as the culture pH decreased. Hemin accumulation was sensitive to culture pH. Among the four pH conditions, pH 5.5 was optimal for hemin accumulation in the cells. The highest intracellular hemin level in L. lactis resting cells incubated at different pH saline levels (5-6.5) was at pH 5.5. The respiration efficiency of L. lactis under respiration-permissive conditions increases markedly as the culture pH decreases. These results may help develop high cell-density L. lactis cultures. Thus, this microorganism may be used for industrial applications.

  10. [The humoral immune response in mice induced by recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing HIV-1 gag].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Cairong; Liu, Xiaojuan; Ma, Zhenghai

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the humoral immune response induced by recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing HIV-1 gag in mice immunized orally, intranasally, subcutaneously or in the combined way of above three. Fifty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, 10 mice per group. The mice were immunized consecutively three times at two week intervals with 10(9) CFU of recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing gag through oral, intranasal, subcutaneous administration or the mix of them. The mice that were immunized orally with Lactococcus lactis containing PMG36e served as a control group. The sera of mice were collected before primary immunization and 2 weeks after each immunization to detect the gag specific IgG by ELISA. Compared with the control group, the higher titer of serum gag specific IgG was detected in the four groups immunized with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing gag, and it was the highest in the mixed immunization group (PLactococcus lactis expressing gag can induce humoral immune response in mice by oral, intranasal, subcutaneous injection or the mix of them, and the mixed immunization can enhance the immune effects of Lactococcus lactis vector vaccine.

  11. A counterselection method for Lactococcus lactis genome editing based on class IIa bacteriocin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xing; Usvalampi, Anne M; Saris, Per E J; Takala, Timo M

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new counterselection method for deleting fragments from Lactococcus lactis chromosome. The method uses a non-replicating plasmid vector, which integrates into the chromosome and makes the cell sensitive to bacteriocins. The integration vector carries pUC ori functional in Escherichia coli but not in L. lactis, an erythromycin resistance gene for selecting single crossover integrants, and two fragments from L. lactis chromosome for homologous recombinations. In addition, the integration vector is equipped with the Listeria monocytogenes gene mptC encoding the mannose-phosphotransferase system component IIC, the receptor for class IIa bacteriocins. Expression of mptC from the integration vector renders the naturally resistant L. lactis sensitive to class IIa bacteriocins. This sensitivity is then used to select the double crossover colonies on bacteriocin agar. Only the cells which have regained the endogenous bacteriocin resistance through the loss of the mptC plasmid will survive. The colonies carrying the desired deletion can then be distinguished from the wild-type revertants by PCR. By using the class IIa bacteriocins leucocin A, leucocin C or pediocin AcH as the counterselective agents, we deleted 22- and 33-kb chromosomal fragments from the wild-type nisin producing L. lactis strain N8. In conclusion, this counterselection method presented here is a convenient, efficient and inexpensive technique to generate successive deletions in L. lactis chromosome.

  12. Cytoplasmic expression of a thermostable invertase from Thermotoga maritima in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, Han Bin; Lim, Pei Yu; Liu, Chengcheng; Lee, Dong-Yup; Bi, Xuezhi; Wong, Fong Tian; Ow, Dave Siak-Wei

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the secretory and cytoplasmic expression of a thermostable Thermogata maritima invertase in Lactococcus lactis. The thermostable invertase from T. maritima was cloned with and without the USP45 secretory peptide into the pNZ8148 vector for nisin-inducible expression in L. lactis. The introduction of an USP45 secretion peptide at the N-terminal of the enzyme led to a loss of protein solubility. Computational homology modeling and hydrophobicity studies indicated that the USP45 peptide exposes a stretch of hydrophobic amino acids on the protein surface resulting in lower solubility. Removal of the USP45 secretion peptide allowed a soluble and functional invertase to be expressed intracellularly in L. lactis. Immobilized metal affinity chromatography purification of the cell lysate with nickel-NTA gave a single protein band on SDS-PAGE, while E. coli-expressed invertase consistently co-purified with an additional band. The yields of the purified invertase from E. coli and L. lactis were 14.1 and 6.3 mg/l respectively. Invertase can be expressed in L. lactis and purified in a functional form. L. lactis is a suitable host for the production of food-grade invertase for use in the food and biotechnology industries.

  13. Secretion of Kluyveromyces lactis Cu/Zn SOD: strategies for enhanced production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Stefano; Uccelletti, Daniela; Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Palleschi, Claudio; Rossi, Maddalena

    2010-04-01

    The Kluyveromyces lactis Cu/Zn SOD gene (SOD1) was fused with the toxin K1 signal sequence to obtain extracellular production of superoxide dismutase. Kluyveromyces marxianus L3 and K. lactis MW98-8C strains were transformed and compared as hosts for the secretion. The effects of the media composition were evaluated: In K. lactis, the highest volumetric activity was obtained in YKK synthetic medium in the presence of Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) cofactors (9.6 kU l(-1)). In K. marxianus, active SOD was produced only in YPD medium supplemented with Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (8.8 kU l(-1)). In order to improve the production of secreted active SOD in K. lactis, the SOD1 copper carrier (CCS1) was overexpressed and targeted to the secretory apparatus. A positive effect was observed only when K. lactis was grown in a medium without Cu(2+)/Zn(2+) supplement. The best performing culture conditions for K. lactis and K. marxianus recombinant strains were successfully applied to two laboratory-scale fed-batch processes, and volumetric SOD activities increased up to 19.4 and 24.1 kU l(-1), respectively.

  14. Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase Is Sensitive to Light Inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Viennet, Thibault; Skjoldager, Nicklas

    2015-01-01

    enzymes belong to the same class of low-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases and display similar kcat values (∼25 s-1) with their cognate thioredoxin. Remarkably, however, the L. lactis enzyme is inactivated by visible light and furthermore reduces molecular oxygen 10 times faster than E. coli Trx......R. The rate of light inactivation under standardized conditions (λmax = 460 nm and 4 °C) was reduced at lowered oxygen concentrations and in the presence of iodide. Inactivation was accompanied by a distinct spectral shift of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) that remained firmly bound. High......-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of heat-extracted FAD from light-damaged TrxR revealed a mass increment of 13.979 Da, relative to that of unmodified FAD, corresponding to the addition of one oxygen atom and the loss of two hydrogen atoms. Tandem mass spectrometry confined the increase in mass...

  15. Investigation of glycerol assimilation and cofactor metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed

    : anaerobic, aerobic and respiration permissive growth in combination with either glycerol as a sole substrate or with co-metabolization of glycerol with common sugar substrates. Although no growth on glycerol was seen, both positive and detrimental effects were observed from cultures with glycerol...... itself under both anaerobic and respiration permissive conditions, but was not found to have the same profound effect on other sugar substrates such as galactose or ribose. Supplementation of nucleosides to the growth medium or increased substrate concentration were found to counteract the inhibitory...... of glycerol kinase from L. lactis, introduction of a heterologous glycerol assimilation pathway and construction of a library of NADH oxidase activity. Based on a preliminary analysis of transcription level data, an attempt was made to stimulate glycerol assimilation by overexpressing the glycerol kinase...

  16. Proteome analysis of the purine stimulon from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, N.H.; Roepstorff, P.; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    E, PurS, PurM, PurL), and enzymes involved in the generation of C1 units (GlyA, Fhs). Cl units are primarily required for purine biosynthesis. Upon analysis of the nucleotide sequence preceding the structural genes for these proteins in the L. lactis IL1403 genome sequence showed that all contained PurBox......-Pribnov box structures resembling the PurR activated promoters for the purDEK and purCSQLF operons. Most, and possibly all members of the Psu stimulon are thus members of the PurR regulon. Five Psu proteins could not be identified. The second stimulon, the Psd stimulon (purine starvation decreased), whose...... escaped identification. The last, Dcu (decoynine up-regulated), stimulon contained proteins whose synthesis escaped the severe general depression during inhibition of the GMP synthetase by decoynine. This regulon was comprised of mostly glycolytic enzymes (fructose bisphosphate aldolase, enolase, pyruvate...

  17. Glycosylation in secreted proteins from yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.V.; Passos, F.M.L. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia. Lab. de Fisiologia de Microrganismos; Azevedo, B.R.; Pimenta, A.M.C.; Santoro, M.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia. Lab. de Enzimologia e Fisico-Quimica de Proteina

    2008-07-01

    Full text: The nutritional status of a cell culture affects either the expression or the traffic of a number of proteins. The identification of the physiological conditions which favor protein secretion has important biotechnological consequences in designing systems for recombinant extracellular protein industrial production. Yeast Kluyvromyces lactis has been cultured in a continuous stirring tank bioreactor (CSTR) under nitrogen limitation at growth rates (0.03 h{sup -1} and 0.09 h{sup -1}) close to either exponential or stationary batch growth phases, respectively the objective was to investigate the extracellular glycoproteins at these two level of nitrogen limitation. Proteins from free cell extracts were separated by gradient SDS-PAGE (5-15%) and two-dimensional chromatography, and were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS). In SDS-PAGE analysis, differences in extracellular proteome were visualized: different proteins profiles at these two growth rates. The 0.09 h-1 growth rate showed larger number of bands using colloidal Coma ssie Blue staining. Different bands were detected at these two growth rates when the PAS assay for glycoprotein detection in polyacrylamide gel was used. The two-dimensional chromatogram profiles were comparatively distinguished between the 0.03 h{sup -1} and 0.09 h{sup -1} growth rate samples. Protein peaks from the second dimension, were subjected to mass spectrometry. The mass spectrums visualized showed glycosylated proteins with N-acetylglucosamine molecules and 8, 9 or 15 hexoses molecules. Comparisons between the proteins averaged mass values with the deduced proteins masses from K. lactis secreted proteins database indicated possible post-translational modifications, such as post-translational proteolysis, acetylation, deamidation and myristoylation.

  18. Evaluation of Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Nondairy Sources with Potential Dairy Applications Reveals Extensive Phenotype-Genotype Disparity and Implications for a Revised Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Casey, Aidan; Altermann, Eric; Cotter, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-06-15

    Lactococcus lactis is predominantly associated with dairy fermentations, but evidence suggests that the domesticated organism originated from a plant niche. L. lactis possesses an unusual taxonomic structure whereby strain phenotypes and genotypes often do not correlate, which in turn has led to confusion in L. lactis classification. A bank of L. lactis strains was isolated from various nondairy niches (grass, vegetables, and bovine rumen) and was further characterized on the basis of key technological traits, including growth in milk and key enzyme activities. Phenotypic analysis revealed all strains from nondairy sources to possess an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype (lactis phenotype); however, seven of these strains possessed an L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype (cremoris genotype), determined by two separate PCR assays. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that strains with lactis and cremoris genotypes clustered together regardless of habitat, but it highlighted the increased diversity that exists among "wild" strains. Calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), using the JSpecies software tool, revealed that L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis differ in ANI values by ∼14%, below the threshold set for species circumscription. Further analysis of strain TIFN3 and strains from nonindustrial backgrounds revealed TETRA values of lactis taxonomy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Enhanced heterologous protein productivity by genome reduction in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Duolong; Fu, Yuxin; Liu, Fulu; Xu, Haijin; Saris, Per Erik Joakim; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2017-01-03

    The implementation of novel chassis organisms to be used as microbial cell factories in industrial applications is an intensive research field. Lactococcus lactis, which is one of the most extensively studied model organisms, exhibits superior ability to be used as engineered host for fermentation of desirable products. However, few studies have reported about genome reduction of L. lactis as a clean background for functional genomic studies and a model chassis for desirable product fermentation. Four large nonessential DNA regions accounting for 2.83% in L. lactis NZ9000 (L. lactis 9 k) genome (2,530,294 bp) were deleted using the Cre-loxP deletion system as the first steps toward a minimized genome in this study. The mutants were compared with the parental strain in several physiological traits and evaluated as microbial cell factories for heterologous protein production (intracellular and secretory expression) with the red fluorescent protein (RFP) and the bacteriocin leucocin C (LecC) as reporters. The four mutants grew faster, yielded enhanced biomass, achieved increased adenosine triphosphate content, and diminished maintenance demands compared with the wild strain in the two media tested. In particular, L. lactis 9 k-4 with the largest deletion was identified as the optimum candidate host for recombinant protein production. With nisin induction, not only the transcriptional efficiency but also the production levels of the expressed reporters were approximately three- to fourfold improved compared with the wild strain. The expression of lecC gene controlled with strong constitutive promoters P5 and P8 in L. lactis 9 k-4 was also improved significantly. The genome-streamlined L. lactis 9 k-4 outcompeted the parental strain in several physiological traits assessed. Moreover, L. lactis 9 k-4 exhibited good properties as platform organism for protein production. In future works, the genome of L. lactis will be maximally reduced by using our specific design

  20. Unleashing Natural Competence in Lactococcus lactis by Induction of the Competence Regulator ComX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Joyce; Wels, Michiel; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Bron, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In biotechnological workhorses like Streptococcus thermophilus and Bacillus subtilis, natural competence can be induced, which facilitates genetic manipulation of these microbes. However, in strains of the important dairy starter Lactococcus lactis, natural competence has not been established to date. However, in silico analysis of the complete genome sequences of 43 L. lactis strains revealed complete late competence gene sets in 2 L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains (KW2 and KW10) and at least 10 L. lactis subsp. lactis strains, including the model strain IL1403 and the plant-derived strain KF147. The remainder of the strains, including all dairy isolates, displayed genomic decay in one or more of the late competence genes. Nisin-controlled expression of the competence regulator comX in L. lactis subsp. lactis KF147 resulted in the induction of expression of the canonical competence regulon and elicited a state of natural competence in this strain. In contrast, comX expression in L. lactis NZ9000, which was predicted to encode an incomplete competence gene set, failed to induce natural competence. Moreover, mutagenesis of the comEA-EC operon in strain KF147 abolished the comX-driven natural competence, underlining the involvement of the competence machinery. Finally, introduction of nisin-inducible comX expression into nisRK-harboring derivatives of strains IL1403 and KW2 allowed the induction of natural competence in these strains also, expanding this phenotype to other L. lactis strains of both subspecies. IMPORTANCE Specific bacterial species are able to enter a state of natural competence in which DNA is taken up from the environment, allowing the introduction of novel traits. Strains of the species Lactococcus lactis are very important starter cultures for the fermentation of milk in the cheese production process, where these bacteria contribute to the flavor and texture of the end product. The activation of natural competence in this industrially

  1. Microencapsulation and Fermentation of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium BB-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of poor survival of probiotic bacteria, microencapsulation evolved from the immobilized cell culture technology used in the biotechnological industry. Two probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium (BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA-5 were immobilized in calcium alginate by extrusion method. Encapsulation parameters and efficacy of this method were evaluated. Growth factors of these two bacteria were also measured by culturing in 10-L fermenter. Growth curves were obtained with respect to optical density and dry biomass weight. Encapsulation yield was over than 60% in each experiment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM of Entrapment of cells in alginate matrix and cross-sections of dried bead were obtained and illustrated. Bifidobacterium have been shown better biotechnological properties.

  2. Physical and physicochemical stability evaluation of cosmetic formulations containing soybean extract fermented by Bifidobacterium animalis

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Pinto Vieira; Alessandra Ribeiro Fernandes; Telma Mary Kaneko; Vladi Olga Consiglieri; Claudinéia Aparecida Sales de Oliveira Pinto; Claudia Silva Cortez Pereira; André Rolim Baby; Maria Valéria Robles Velasco

    2009-01-01

    Peel off facial masks, based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), are formulations that, after application and drying, form an occlusive film over the face. After removing, they provide cleanness, tensor and moisturizing effects, removing dead cells, residues and other materials deposited on the stratum corneous. The soybean extract fermented by Bifidobacterium animalis has sugars, amino acids, peptides, proteins and free isoflavonoids in high concentrations, when compared to the unfermented extract, ...

  3. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-01-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of [ 14 C]lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM

  4. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  5. Interaction between the genomes of Lactococcus lactis and phages of the P335 species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J.; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2013-01-01

    Phages of the P335 species infect Lactococcus lactis and have been particularly studied because of their association with strains of L. lactis subsp. cremoris used as dairy starter cultures. Unlike other lactococcal phages, those of the P335 species may have a temperate or lytic lifestyle, and are believed to originate from the starter cultures themselves. We have sequenced the genome of L. lactis subsp. cremoris KW2 isolated from fermented corn and found that it contains an integrated P335 species prophage. This 41 kb prophage (Φ KW2) has a mosaic structure with functional modules that are highly similar to several other phages of the P335 species associated with dairy starter cultures. Comparison of the genomes of 26 phages of the P335 species, with either a lytic or temperate lifestyle, shows that they can be divided into three groups and that the morphogenesis gene region is the most conserved. Analysis of these phage genomes in conjunction with the genomes of several L. lactis strains shows that prophage insertion is site specific and occurs at seven different chromosomal locations. Exactly how induced or lytic phages of the P335 species interact with carbohydrate cell surface receptors in the host cell envelope remains to be determined. Genes for the biosynthesis of a variable cell surface polysaccharide and for lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) are found in L. lactis and are the main candidates for phage receptors, as the genes for other cell surface carbohydrates have been lost from dairy starter strains. Overall, phages of the P335 species appear to have had only a minor role in the adaptation of L. lactis subsp. cremoris strains to the dairy environment, and instead they appear to be an integral part of the L. lactis chromosome. There remains a great deal to be discovered about their role, and their contribution to the evolution of the bacterial genome. PMID:24009606

  6. Heterologous Expression of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase in Lactococcus lactis for Acetaldehyde Detoxification at Low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yunbin; LaPointe, Gisèle; Zhong, Lei; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2018-02-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.1.x) can catalyze detoxification of acetaldehydes. A novel acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (istALDH) from the non-Saccharomyces yeast Issatchenkia terricola strain XJ-2 has been previously characterized. In this work, Lactococcus lactis with the NIsin Controlled Expression (NICE) System was applied to express the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (istALDH) in order to catalyze oxidation of acetaldehyde at low pH. A recombinant L. lactis NZ3900 was obtained and applied for the detoxification of acetaldehyde as whole-cell biocatalysts. The activity of IstALDH in L. lactis NZ3900 (pNZ8148-istALDH) reached 36.4 U mL -1 when the recombinant cells were induced with 50 ng mL -1 nisin at 20 °C for 2 h. The IstALDH activity of recombinant L. lactis cells showed higher stability at 37 °C and pH 4.0 compared with the crude enzyme. L. lactis NZ3900 (pNZ8148-istALDH) could convert acetaldehyde at pH 2.0 while the crude enzyme could not. Moreover, the resting cells of L. lactis NZ3900 (pNZ8148-istALDH) showed a 2.5-fold higher activity and better stability in catalyzing oxidation of acetaldehyde at pH 2.0 compared with that of Escherichia coli expressing the IstALDH. Taken together, the L. lactis cells expressing recombinant IstALDH are potential whole-cell biocatalysts that can be applied in the detoxification of aldehydes.

  7. Alterations in Fecal Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium Species in Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Southern China Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim-Anne eLê

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The connection between gut microbiota and metabolism and its role in the pathogenesis of diabetes are increasingly recognized. The objective of this study was to quantitatively measure Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species, members of commensal bacteria found in human gut, in type 2 diabetic patients (T2D patients from Southern China. Methods: Fifty patients with T2D and thirty control individuals of similar BMI were recruited from Southern China. T2D and control subjects were confirmed with both oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and HbA1c measurements. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species in feces were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Data were analyzed with STATA 11.0 statistical software.Results: In comparison to control subjects T2D patients had significantly more total Lactobacillus (+18%, L. bugaricus (+13%, L. rhamnosum (+37% and L. acidophilus (+48% (P <0.05. In contrast, T2D patients had less amounts of total Bifidobacteria (-7% and B. adolescentis (-12% (P <0.05. Cluster analysis showed that gut microbiota pattern of T2D patients is characterized by greater numbers of L. rhamnosus and L. acidophillus, together with lesser numbers of B. adolescentis (P <0.05. Conclusion: The gut microflora in T2D patients is characterized by greater numbers of Lactobacillus and lesser numbers of Bifidobacterium species.

  8. Cross-feeding by Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 during co-cultivation with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 in a mucin-based medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Muireann; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Kane, Marian; Joshi, Lokesh; Ventura, Marco; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-11-25

    Bifidobacteria constitute a specific group of commensal bacteria that commonly inhabit the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 was previously shown to utilize a variety of plant/diet/host-derived carbohydrates, including cellodextrin, starch and galactan, as well as the mucin and HMO-derived monosaccharide, sialic acid. In the current study, we investigated the ability of this strain to utilize parts of a host-derived source of carbohydrate, namely the mucin glycoprotein, when grown in co-culture with the mucin-degrading Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. B. breve UCC2003 was shown to exhibit growth properties in a mucin-based medium, but only when grown in the presence of B. bifidum PRL2010, which is known to metabolize mucin. A combination of HPAEC-PAD and transcriptome analyses identified some of the possible monosaccharides and oligosaccharides which support this enhanced co-cultivation growth/viability phenotype. This study describes the potential existence of a gut commensal relationship between two bifidobacterial species. We demonstrate the in vitro ability of B. breve UCC2003 to cross-feed on sugars released by the mucin-degrading activity of B. bifidum PRL2010, thus advancing our knowledge on the metabolic adaptability which allows the former strain to colonize the (infant) gut by its extensive metabolic abilities to (co-)utilize available carbohydrate sources.

  9. Isolation, cloning and characterisation of the abiI gene from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis M138 encoding abortive phage infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ping; Harvey, Melissa; Im, Hee J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmid pND852 (56 kb) encodes nisin resistance and was isolated from Lactococcus lactis ssp lactis (L. lactis) M138 by conjugation to L. lactis LM0230. It conferred strong resistance to the isometric-headed phage φ712 and partial resistance to the prolate-headed phage φc2. A 2.6 kb HpaII fragment encoding phage resistance was cloned into the streptococcal/Bacillus hybrid vector pGB301 to generate pND817. The mechanism of phage resistance encoded by pND817 involved abortive infection and this was illustrated by a reduction in burst size from 166 to 6 at 30°C and from 160 to 90 at 37°C. Partial resistance was therefore retained at 37°C. DNA sequencing revealed that the abortive infection was encoded by a single open reading frame (ORF), designated abiI, encoding a 332 amino acid protein. Neither abiI nor the predicted product showed significant homology to any existing sequence in the GenBank database. Frame shift mutation at the unique EcoRI site within the ORF resulted in loss of the Abi+ phenotype, confirming that the ORF is responsible for the encoded phage resistance. PMID:9195753

  10. Analyses of the probiotic property and stress resistance-related genes of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 through comparative genomics and in vitro assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Silva, Wanderson M; Pereira, Ulisses P; Campos, Bruno C; Benevides, Leandro J; Rocha, Flávia S; Figueiredo, Henrique C P; Azevedo, Vasco; Soares, Siomar C

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 was recently reported to alleviate colitis symptoms via its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities, which are exerted by exported proteins that are not produced by L. lactis subsp. lactis IL1403. Here, we used in vitro and in silico approaches to characterize the genomic structure, the safety aspects, and the immunomodulatory activity of this strain. Through comparative genomics, we identified genomic islands, phage regions, bile salt and acid stress resistance genes, bacteriocins, adhesion-related and antibiotic resistance genes, and genes encoding proteins that are putatively secreted, expressed in vitro and absent from IL1403. The high degree of similarity between all Lactococcus suggests that the Symbiotic Islands commonly shared by both NCDO 2118 and KF147 may be responsible for their close relationship and their adaptation to plants. The predicted bacteriocins may play an important role against the invasion of competing strains. The genes related to the acid and bile salt stresses may play important roles in gastrointestinal tract survival, whereas the adhesion proteins are important for persistence in the gut, culminating in the competitive exclusion of other bacteria. Finally, the five secreted and expressed proteins may be important targets for studies of new anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory proteins. Altogether, the analyses performed here highlight the potential use of this strain as a target for the future development of probiotic foods.

  11. Different effects of two newly-isolated probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum 15HN and Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis 44Lac strains from traditional dairy products on cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas, Babak; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Nami, Yousef; Radiah, Dayang; Rosli, Rozita; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2014-12-01

    Lactobacillus and Lactococcus strains isolated from food products can be introduced as probiotics because of their health-promoting characteristics and non-pathogenic nature. This study aims to perform the isolation, molecular identification, and probiotic characterization of Lactobacillus and Lactococcus strains from traditional Iranian dairy products. Primary probiotic assessments indicated high tolerance to low pH and high bile salt conditions, high anti-pathogenic activities, and susceptibility to high consumption antibiotics, thus proving that both strains possess probiotic potential. Cytotoxicity assessments were used to analyze the effects of the secreted metabolite on different cancer cell lines, including HT29, AGS, MCF-7, and HeLa, as well as a normal human cell line (HUVEC). Results showed acceptable cytotoxic properties for secreted metabolites (40 μg/ml dry weight) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis 44Lac. Such performance was similar to that of Taxol against all of the treated cancer cell lines; however, the strain exhibited no toxicity on the normal cell line. Cytotoxic assessments through flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy demonstrated that apoptosis is the main cytotoxic mechanism for secreted metabolites of L. lactis subsp. Lactis 44Lac. By contrast, the effects of protease-treated metabolites on the AGS cell line verified the protein nature of anti-cancer metabolites. However, precise characterizations and in vitro/in vivo investigations on purified proteins should be conducted before these metabolites are introduced as potential anti-cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced lysis upon growth of Lactococcus lactis on galactose is a consequence of decreased binding of the autolysin AcmA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, Anton; Buist, Girbe; Kramer, Naomi E.; Jalving, Ruud; Benus, Germaine F. J. D.; Venema, Gerard; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan

    When Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IL1403 or L. lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is grown in a medium with galactose as the carbon source, the culture lyses to a lesser extent in stationary phase than when the bacteria are grown in a medium containing glucose. Expression of AcmA, the major autolysin

  13. High-Resolution Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Typing of Lactococcus lactis Strains Enables Identification of Genetic Markers for Subspecies-Related Phenotypes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kütahya, Oylum Erkus; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Rademaker, Jan L. W.; Klaassen, Corné H. W.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology was developed to achieve the delineation of closely related Lactococcus lactis strains. The differentiation depth of 24 enzyme-primer-nucleotide combinations was experimentally evaluated to maximize the number of polymorphisms. The resolution depth was confirmed by performing diversity analysis on 82 L. lactis strains, including both closely and distantly related strains with dairy and nondairy origins. Strains clustered into two main genomic lineages of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genotypes and a third novel genomic lineage rooted from the L. lactis subsp. lactis genomic lineage. Cluster differentiation was highly correlated with small-subunit rRNA homology and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) studies. Additionally, the selected enzyme-primer combination generated L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype-specific fragments irrespective of the genotype. These phenotype-specific markers allowed the differentiation of L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype from L. lactis subsp. cremoris phenotype strains within the same L. lactis subsp. cremoris type-strain-like genomic lineage, illustrating the potential of AFLP for the generation of phenotype-linked genetic markers. PMID:21666014

  14. The prophylactic effect of probiotic Enterococcus lactis IW5 against different human cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUSEF eNAMI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus lactis IW5 was obtained from human gut and the potential probiotic characteristics of this organism were then evaluated. Results showed that this strain was highly resistant to low pH and high bile salt and adhered strongly to Caco-2 human epithelial colorectal cell lines. The supernatant of E. lactis IW5 strongly inhibited the growth of several pathogenic bacteria and decreased the viability of different cancer cells, such as HeLa, AGS, HT-29, and MCF-7. Conversely, E. lactis IW5 did not inhibit the viability of normal FHs-74 cells. This strain did not generate toxic enzymes, including β-glucosidase, β-glucuronidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase and was highly susceptible to ampicillin, gentamycin, penicillin, vancomycin, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazol, and chloramphenicol but resistant to erythromycin and tetracyclin. This study provided evidence for the effect of E. lactis IW5 on cancer cells. Therefore, E. lactis IW5, as a bioactive therapeutics, should be subjected to other relevant tests to verify the therapeutic suitability of this strain for clinical applications.

  15. Deciphering a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes in the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Qingjing; Fisher, Derek J; Cai, Mingzhu; Chakravartty, Vandana; Ye, Huiyan; Li, Ping; Solbiati, Jose O; Feng, Youjun

    2016-05-10

    Biotin protein ligase (BPL) is widespread in the three domains of the life. The paradigm BPL is the Escherichia coli BirA protein, which also functions as a repressor for the biotin biosynthesis pathway. Here we report that Lactococcus lactis possesses two different orthologues of birA (birA1_LL and birA2_LL). Unlike the scenario in E. coli, L. lactis appears to be auxotrophic for biotin in that it lacks a full biotin biosynthesis pathway. In contrast, it retains two biotin transporter-encoding genes (bioY1_LL and bioY2_LL), suggesting the use of a scavenging strategy to obtain biotin from the environment. The in vivo function of the two L. lactis birA genes was judged by their abilities to complement the conditional lethal E. coli birA mutant. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectroscopy assays demonstrated that these two recombinant BirA proteins catalyze the biotinylation reaction of the acceptor biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), through the expected biotinoyl-AMP intermediate. Gel shift assays were used to characterize bioY1_LL and BirA1_LL. We also determined the ability to uptake (3)H-biotin by L. lactis. Taken together, our results deciphered a unique biotin scavenging pathway with redundant genes present in the probiotic bacterium L. lactis.

  16. Simultaneous lactic acidification and coagulation by using recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftari, M; Ghafourian, S; Abu Bakar, F

    2017-04-01

    This study was an attempt to create a novel milk clotting procedure using a recombinant bacterium capable of milk coagulation. The Rhizomucor pusillus proteinase (RPP) gene was sub-cloned into a pALF expression vector. The recombinant pALF-RPP vector was then electro-transferred into Lactococcus lactis. Finally, the milk coagulation ability of recombinant L. lactis carrying a RPP gene was evaluated. Nucleotide sequencing of DNA insertion from the clone revealed that the RPP activity corresponded to an open reading frame consisting of 1218 bp coding for a 43·45 kDa RPP protein. The RPP protein assay results indicated that the highest RPP enzyme expression with 870 Soxhlet units (SU) per ml and 7914 SU/OD were obtained for cultures which were incubated at pH 5·5 and 30°C. Interestingly, milk coagulation was observed after 205 min of inoculating milk with recombinant L. lactis carrying the RPP gene. The recombinant L. lactis carrying RPP gene has the ability to function as a starter culture for acidifying and subsequently coagulating milk by producing RPP as a milk coagulant agent. Creating a recombinant starter culture bacterium that is able to coagulate milk. It is significant because the recombinant L. lactis has the ability to work as a starter culture and milk coagulation agent. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Surface Proteins of Lactococcus lactis: Bacterial Resources for Muco-adhesion in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Mercier-Bonin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food and probiotic bacteria, in particular lactic acid bacteria, are ingested in large amounts by humans and are part of the transient microbiota which is increasingly considered to be able to impact the resident microbiota and thus possibly the host health. The lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is extensively used in starter cultures to produce dairy fermented food. Also because of a generally recognized as safe status, L. lactis has been considered as a possible vehicle to deliver in vivo therapeutic molecules with anti-inflammatory properties in the gastrointestinal tract. One of the key factors that may favor health effects of beneficial bacteria to the host is their capacity to colonize transiently the gut, notably through close interactions with mucus, which covers and protects the intestinal epithelium. Several L. lactis strains have been shown to exhibit mucus-binding properties and bacterial surface proteins have been identified as key determinants of such capacity. In this review, we describe the different types of surface proteins found in L. lactis, with a special focus on mucus-binding proteins and pili. We also review the different approaches used to investigate the adhesion of L. lactis to mucus, and particularly to mucins, one of its major components, and we present how these approaches allowed revealing the role of surface proteins in muco-adhesion.

  18. Lactococcus lactis KR-050L inhibit IL-6/STAT3 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J T; Jang, H-J; Kim, J H; Park, C S; Kim, Y; Lim, C-H; Lee, S W; Rho, M-C

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate IL-6/STAT3 inhibitory activity using lactic acid bacteria (LABs) isolated from Gajuknamu kimchi. Six LABs were isolated from Gajuknamu kimchi and identified through 16S rRNA sequencing. Among them, the culture broth of Lactococcus lactis KR-050L inhibited IL-6-induced STAT3 luciferase activity. Fifteen compounds were isolated from the EtOAc extract of culture broth though column chromatography and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, and they were identified as 2,5-diketopipperazine structures by spectroscopic analyses (MS, 1 H- and 13 C-NMR). They also showed inhibitory activities on IL-6-induced STAT3 activation, and showed the different in activity according to the presence of a phenylalanine residue, hydroxyl groups and isometric structure. The six new LABs isolated from Gajuknamu kimchi, and Lc. lactis KR-050L was selected as candidate IL-6/STAT3 inhibitors. The activity levels of 15 2,5-DKPs isolated from Lc. lactis KR-050L were verified. This study constitutes the first attempt to isolate various LABs from Gajuknamu kimchi and to discover IL-6/STAT3 inhibitors in the EtOAc extract of Lc. lactis KR-050L culture broth. Moreover, our data provide useful biochemical information regarding the commercialization of Lc. lactis isolated from Gajuknamu kimchi as an approach to use functional foods for the treatment of various diseases via IL-6/STAT3 activation. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Effects of gene disruptions in the nisin gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis on nisin production and producer immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ra, Runar; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Saris, Per E.J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1999-01-01

    The lantibiotic nisin is produced by several strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The chromosomally located gene cluster nisABTCIPRKFEG is required for biosynthesis, development of immunity, and regulation of gene expression. In-frame deletions in the nisB and nisT genes, and disruption of

  20. Fermentation-induced variation in heat and oxidative stress phenotypes of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 reveals transcriptome signatures for robustness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.R.; Alkema, W.; Starrenburg, M.J.C.; Hugenholtz, J.; van Hijum, S.A.F.T.; Bron, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lactococcus lactis is industrially employed to manufacture various fermented dairy products. The most cost-effective method for the preservation of L. lactis starter cultures is spray drying, but during this process cultures encounter heat and oxidative stress, typically resulting in low

  1. Contribution of the CesR-regulated genes llmg0169 and llmg2164-2163 to Lactococcus lactis fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roces, Clara; Campelo, Ana B.; Veiga, Patrick; Pinto, Joao P. C.; Rodriguez, Ana; Martinez, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of the main components of the starter cultures used in cheese manufacture. As starter, L lactis must tolerate harsh conditions encountered either during their production in bulk quantities or during dairy products processing. To face these hostile conditions, bacteria

  2. Proton Motive Force-Driven and ATP-Dependent Drug Extrusion Systems in Multidrug-Resistant Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOLHUIS, H; MOLENAAR, D; POELARENDS, G; VANVEEN, HW; POOLMAN, B; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1994-01-01

    Three mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363, termed Eth(R), Dau(R), and Rho(R), were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide, daunomycin, and rhodamine 6G, respectively. These mutants were found to be cross resistant to a number of structurally and

  3. Glucose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis MG1363 under different aeration conditions: Requirement of acetate to sustain growth under microaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordkvist, Mikkel; Jensen, N.B.S.; Villadsen, John

    2003-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 was grown in batch cultures on a defined medium with glucose as the energy source under different aeration conditions, namely, anaerobic conditions, aerobic conditions, and microaerobic conditions with a dissolved oxygen tension of 5% (when saturation with ...

  4. An engineered Lactococcus lactis strain exerts significant immune responses through efficient expression and delivery of Helicobacter pylori Lpp20 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongguang; Peng, Xiaoyan; Duan, Guangcai; Shi, Qingfeng; Chen, Shuaiyin; Wang, Chen; Fan, Qingtang; Xi, Yuanlin

    2016-12-01

    To produce and deliver Helicobacter pylori lipoprotein Lpp20 via using Lactococcus lactis with aim of developing an efficient way to use this protective antigen in vaccine formulation. An engineered L. lactis strain carrying the lpp20 gene from H. pylori was constructed. The inducible expression of Lpp20 in L. lactis was detected as a 20 kDa intracellular protein by SDS-PAGE. Lpp20 constituted 10 % of the L. lactis cellular proteins. The expression product was highly immunoreactive, as demonstrated by western blot assays using mouse anti-H. pylori sera. Animal experimentation showed that oral vaccination with the engineered strain excited significantly elevated levels of serum Lpp20-specific IgG antibodies in BALB/c mice (P lactis, demonstrating an efficient utilization mode of Lpp20 in anti-H. pylori vaccination.

  5. Some chemical properties of nisin produced by lactococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, H.; Abdel Karem, H.; El-Hadedy, D.; Badr, S.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was carried out to study the properties of nisin produced by lactococcus lactis FG 2 isolated from local un fated cheese. The maximum anti-microbial effect of pure nisin was occurred at ph 6 and 7. Nisin was heat stable from 40 to 90 degree C for 30 min. Molecular weight of nisin was determined by SDS-PAGE, it was 3.0 kDa and after irradiated the microbial cells to 1.5 kGy dose level the molecular weight increased to 3.5 t kDa then decreased at 2 kGy . Storage for two weeks it appeared in dimmer means and had a molecular weight 7 kDa . Using amino acid analyzer reveled that nisin contained a majority of nonpolar amino acids and exhibited cystine in composition . Nisin produced in whey have higher activity than nisin produced in MRS medium but both had the same structure. The results proved that nisin gene is in coded in chromosome and not with plasmid.

  6. Vaccination against Staphylococcus aureus experimental endocarditis using recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing ClfA or FnbpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Tiago Rafael; Mancini, Stefano; Giddey, Marlyse; Vouillamoz, Jacques; Que, Yok-Ai; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José Manuel

    2015-07-09

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of serious infections in humans and animals and a vaccine is becoming a necessity. Lactococcus lactis is a non-pathogenic bacterium that can be used as a vector for the delivery of antigens. We investigated the ability of non-living L. lactis heterologously expressing S. aureus clumping factor A (ClfA) and fibronectin-binding protein A (FnbpA), alone or together, to elicit an immune response in rats and protect them from S. aureus experimental infective endocarditis (IE). L. lactis ClfA was used for immunization against S. aureus Newman (expressing ClfA but not FnbpA), while L. lactis ClfA, L. lactis FnbpA, as well as L. lactis ClfA/FnbpA, were used against S. aureus P8 (expressing ClfA and FnbpA). Vaccination of rats with L. lactis ClfA elicited antibodies that inhibited binding of S. aureus Newman to fibrinogen, triggered the production of IL-17A and conferred protection to 13/19 (68%) of the animals from IE (Plactis ClfA, L. lactis FnbpA or L. lactis ClfA/FnbpA also produced antibodies against the target proteins, but these did not prevent binding of S. aureus P8 to fibrinogen or fibronectin and did not protect animals against S. aureus P8 IE. Moreover, immunization with constructs containing FnbpA did not increase IL-17A production. These results indicate that L. lactis is a valuable antigen delivery system able to elicit efficient humoral and cellular responses. However, the most appropriate antigens affording protection against S. aureus IE are yet to be elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidative Stress at High Temperatures in Lactococcus lactis Due to an Insufficient Supply of Riboflavin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Solem, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis MG1363 was found to be unable to grow at temperatures above 37°C in a defined medium without riboflavin, and the cause was identified to be dissolved oxygen introduced during preparation of the medium. At 30°C, growth was unaffected by dissolved oxygen and oxygen was consumed...... riboflavin to the medium, it was possible to improve growth and oxygen consumption at 37°C, and this also normalized the [ATP]-to-[ADP] ratio. A codon-optimized redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced into L. lactis and revealed a more oxidized cytoplasm at 37°C than at 30°C....... These results indicate that L. lactis suffers from heat-induced oxidative stress at increased temperatures. A decrease in intracellular flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which is derived from riboflavin, was observed with increasing growth temperature, but the presence of riboflavin made the decrease smaller...

  8. Butanol is cytotoxic to Lactococcus lactis while ethanol and hexanol are cytostatic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    attention. In the present study the physiological alcohol stress response of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 towards the primary, even-chain alcohols; ethanol, butanol, and hexanol was characterized. The alcohol tolerance of L. lactis was found comparable to those reported for highly alcohol......Lactic acid bacteria currently used extensively by the dairy industry have a superior tolerance towards small chain alcohols, which makes them interesting targets for use in future bio-refineries. The mechanism underlying the alcohol tolerance of lactic acid bacteria has so far received little...... resistant lactic acid bacteria. Combined results from alcohol survival rate, live/dead staining, and a novel usage of the beta-galactosidase assay, revealed that while high concentrations of ethanol and hexanol were cytostatic to L. lactis, high concentrations of butanol were cytotoxic, causing irreparable...

  9. Physiochemical parameters optimization for enhanced nisin production by Lactococcus lactis (MTCC 440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspadhwaja Mall

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The influence of various physiochemical parameters on the growth of Lactococcus lactis sub sp. lactis MTCC 440 was studied at shake flask level for 20 h. Media optimization (MRS broth was studied to achieve enhanced growth of the organism and also nisin production. Bioassay of nisin was done with agar diffusion method using Streptococcus agalactae NCIM 2401 as indicator strain. MRS broth (6%, w/v with 0.15μg/ml of nisin supplemented with 0.5% (v/v skimmed milk was found to be the best for nisin production as well as for growth of L lactis. The production of nisin was strongly influenced by the presence of skimmed milk and nisin in MRS broth. The production of nisin was affected by the physical parameters and maximum nisin production was at 30(0C while the optimal temperature for biomass production was 37(0C.

  10. Enhancement of nisin production in milk by conjugal transfer of the protease-lactose plasmid pLP712 to the wild strain Lactococcus lactis UQ2

    OpenAIRE

    García-Parra, María D.; Campelo, Ana B.; García-Almendárez, Blanca E.; Regalado, Carlos; Rodríguez González, Ana; Martínez Fernández, Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis UQ2 is a wild nisin A producer isolated from a Mexican cheese that grows poorly in milk. Conjugal matings with L. lactis NCDO712 to transfer the Lac+ Prt+ plasmid pLP712 and selection with nisin and lactose yielded L. lactis NCDO712 NisA+. Naturally rifampicin resistant L. lactis UQ2Rif was isolated to provide an additional selective marker. The identity of a transconjugant L. lactis UQ2Rif Lac+ was confirmed by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting, nisA PCR amplification, nisin product...

  11. Effects of metal ions on growth, β-oxidation system, and thioesterase activity of Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Ma, Ying

    2014-10-01

    The effects of divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Fe(2+), and Cu(2+)) on the growth, β-oxidation system, and thioesterase activity of Lactococcus lactis were investigated. Different metal ions significantly influenced the growth of L. lactis: Ca(2+) and Fe(2+) accelerated growth, whereas Cu(2+) inhibited growth. Furthermore, Mg(2+) inhibited growth of L. lactis at a low concentration but stimulated growth of L. lactis at a high concentration. The divalent metal ions had significant effects on activity of the 4 key enzymes of the β-oxidation system (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, enoyl-CoA hydratase, L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and thiolase) and thioesterase of L. lactis. The activity of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases increased markedly in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), whereas it decreased with 1 mmol/L Fe(2+) or 12 mmol/L Mg(2+). All the metal ions could induce activity of enoyl-CoA hydratase. In addition, 12 mmol/L Mg(2+) significantly stimulated activity of L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and all metal ions could induce activity of thiolase, although thiolase activity decreased significantly when 0.05 mmol/L Cu(2+) was added into M17 broth. Inhibition of thioesterase activity by all 4 metal ions could be reversed by 2 mmol/L Ca(2+). These results help us understand the effect of metal ions on the β-oxidation system and thioesterase activity of Lactococcus lactis. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Secretion of biologically active interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) by Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro-Hernandez, Julio; Loera-Arias, Maria J; Gamez-Escobedo, Anali; Franco-Molina, Moises; Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Gutierrez-Puente, Yolanda; Saucedo-Cardenas, Odila; Valdes-Flores, Jesus; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2008-07-28

    Chemokines are a large group of chemotactic cytokines that regulate and direct migration of leukocytes, activate inflammatory responses, and are involved in many other functions including regulation of tumor development. Interferon-gamma inducible-protein-10 (IP-10) is a member of the C-X-C subfamily of the chemokine family of cytokines. IP-10 specifically chemoattracts activated T lymphocytes, monocytes, and NK cells. IP-10 has been described also as a modulator of other antitumor cytokines. These properties make IP-10 a novel therapeutic molecule for the treatment of chronic and infectious diseases. Currently there are no suitable live biological systems to produce and secrete IP-10. Lactococcus lactis has been well-characterized over the years as a safe microorganism to produce heterologous proteins and to be used as a safe, live vaccine to deliver antigens and cytokines of interest. Here we report a recombinant strain of L. lactis genetically modified to produce and secrete biologically active IP-10. The IP-10 coding region was isolated from human cDNA and cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid under the regulation of the pNis promoter. By fusion to the usp45 secretion signal, IP-10 was addressed out of the cell. Western blot analysis demonstrated that recombinant strains of L. lactis secrete IP-10 into the culture medium. Neither degradation nor incomplete forms of IP-10 were detected in the cell or supernatant fractions of L. lactis. In addition, we demonstrated that the NICE (nisin-controlled gene expression) system was able to express IP-10 "de novo" even two hours after nisin removal. This human IP-10 protein secreted by L. lactis was biological active as demonstrated by Chemotaxis assay over human CD3+T lymphocytes. Expression and secretion of mature IP-10 was efficiently achieved by L. lactis forming an effective system to produce IP-10. This recombinant IP-10 is biologically active as demonstrated by its ability to chemoattract human CD3+ T

  13. Secretion of biologically active interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10 by Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Cardenas Odila

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines are a large group of chemotactic cytokines that regulate and direct migration of leukocytes, activate inflammatory responses, and are involved in many other functions including regulation of tumor development. Interferon-gamma inducible-protein-10 (IP-10 is a member of the C-X-C subfamily of the chemokine family of cytokines. IP-10 specifically chemoattracts activated T lymphocytes, monocytes, and NK cells. IP-10 has been described also as a modulator of other antitumor cytokines. These properties make IP-10 a novel therapeutic molecule for the treatment of chronic and infectious diseases. Currently there are no suitable live biological systems to produce and secrete IP-10. Lactococcus lactis has been well-characterized over the years as a safe microorganism to produce heterologous proteins and to be used as a safe, live vaccine to deliver antigens and cytokines of interest. Here we report a recombinant strain of L. lactis genetically modified to produce and secrete biologically active IP-10. Results The IP-10 coding region was isolated from human cDNA and cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid under the regulation of the pNis promoter. By fusion to the usp45 secretion signal, IP-10 was addressed out of the cell. Western blot analysis demonstrated that recombinant strains of L. lactis secrete IP-10 into the culture medium. Neither degradation nor incomplete forms of IP-10 were detected in the cell or supernatant fractions of L. lactis. In addition, we demonstrated that the NICE (nisin-controlled gene expression system was able to express IP-10 "de novo" even two hours after nisin removal. This human IP-10 protein secreted by L. lactis was biological active as demonstrated by Chemotaxis assay over human CD3+T lymphocytes. Conclusion Expression and secretion of mature IP-10 was efficiently achieved by L. lactis forming an effective system to produce IP-10. This recombinant IP-10 is biologically active as

  14. Activation and Transfer of the Chromosomal Phage Resistance Mechanism AbiV in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, J.; Moineau, S.; Hammer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    AbiV is a chromosomally encoded phage resistance mechanism that is silent in the wild-type phage-sensitive strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363. Spontaneous phage-resistant mutants of L. lactis MG1363 were analyzed by reverse transcriptase PCR and shown to express AbiV. This expression...... was related to a reorganization in the upstream region of abiV. Transfer of abiV between two lactococcal strains, most likely by conjugation, was also demonstrated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural transfer of a chromosomally encoded phage resistance mechanism....

  15. Analysis of heat shock gene expression in Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, José; Sørensen, Kim; Appel, Karen Fuglede

    1996-01-01

    The induction of the heat shock response in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was analysed at the RNA level using a novel RNA isolation procedure to prevent degradation. Cloning of the dnaJ and groEL homologous was carried out. Nothern blot analysis showed a similar induction pattern...... in the heat shock response in L. lactis MG1363 is presented. A gene located downstream of the dnaK operon in strain MG1363, named orf4, was shown not to be regulated by heat shock....

  16. Detection of bacteriophage-infected cells of Lactococcus lactis using flow cytometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Cuesta-Dominguez, Álvaro; Albrektsen, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage infection in dairy fermentation constitutes a serious problem worldwide. We have studied bacteriophage infection in Lactococcus lactis by using the flow cytometer. The first effect of the infection of the bacterium is a change from cells in chains toward single cells. We interpret...... describe a new method for detection of phage infection in Lactococcus lactis dairy cultures. The method is based on flow cytometric detection of cells with low-density cell walls. The method allows fast and early detection of phage-infected bacteria, independently of which phage has infected the culture...

  17. Structure and properties of the metastable bacteriocin Lcn972 from Lactococcus lactis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David L.; Lamosa, Pedro; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis IPLA 972 produces a polypeptide bacteriocin of 7.5 kDa which has a bactericidal effect on sensitive lactococci, inhibiting septum formation in dividing cells. The active form is a monomer that is metastable under normal conditions but is stabilised by glycerol. The NMR structure of Lcn972 shows a β-sandwich comprising two three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets. Detaching the final strand could allow the sandwich to open, and the irreversible unfolding leads to a loss of antibacterial activity. Covalent linkage of the final strand should increase the stability of Lcn972 and facilitate the study of its interaction with lipid II.

  18. Multi-stress resistance in Lactococcus lactis is actually escape from purine-induced stress sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryssel, Mia; Hviid, Anne-Mette Meisner; Dawish, Mohamed S.

    2014-01-01

    in the rich and complex M17 medium. When salvage of purines and subsequent conversion to GTP was permitted in various genetic backgrounds of L. lactis MG1363, the cells became sensitive to acid stress, indicating that an excess of guanine nucleotides induces stress sensitivity. The addition of phosphate...... nucleotides is formed as a result of an improved conversion of guanosine in the salvage pathway. Based upon our findings, we suggest that L. lactis MG1363 is naturally multi-stress resistant in habitats devoid of any purine source. However, any exogenous purine that results in increased guanine nucleotide...

  19. Mycotoxin production by isolates of Fusarium lactis from greenhouse sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Bouras, N; Yang, J; Howard, R J; Strelkov, S E

    2011-12-02

    Internal fruit rot, caused by Fusarium lactis, is an important disease of sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum) in Canadian greenhouses. Production of the mycotoxins fumonisin B₁ (FB₁), moniliformin (MON) and beauvericin (BEA) by F. lactis (17 isolates) and the related species F. proliferatum (three isolates) and F. verticillioides (one isolate), which are also associated with internal fruit rot, was evaluated on rice medium. All 21 isolates examined were found to produce BEA, at concentrations ranging from 13.28 to 1674.60 ppm, while 13 of 17 F. lactis isolates and two of three F. proliferatum isolates produced MON (0.23 to 181.85 ppm). Only one isolate of F. lactis produced detectable levels of FB₁ in culture, whereas all three F. proliferatum isolates and the F. verticilloides isolate produced this mycotoxin (0.28 to 314 ppm). Production of FB₁, MON and BEA was also evaluated in inoculated pepper fruits showing mild or severe symptoms of infection. FB₁ could be detected in both lightly and heavily diseased fruit tissue after inoculation with F. lactis, F. proliferatum or F. verticilloides, at concentrations ranging from 0.61 to 8.04 ppm. BEA was also detected in lightly and heavily diseased fruit tissue inoculated with F. lactis, as well as in heavily diseased tissue inoculated with F. proliferatum (3.00 to 19.43 ppm), but not in tissue inoculated with F. verticilloides. MON was detected in all tissues inoculated with F. proliferatum or F. verticilloides, and in heavily diseased tissue inoculated with F. lactis (0.03 to 0.27 ppm). The three mycotoxins were also found in naturally infected sweet pepper fruits exhibiting symptoms of internal fruit rot and collected from a commercial greenhouse. The production of MON, BEA and FB₁ alone or in combination by isolates of F. lactis suggests that development of internal fruit rot of sweet pepper is an important food safety concern, and that every effort should be made to cull infected fruit before it makes it to

  20. Classification of a moderately oxygen-tolerant isolate from baby faeces as Bifidobacterium thermophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliss Ismaïl

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria are found at varying prevalence in human microbiota and seem to play an important role in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Bifidobacteria are highly adapted to the human GIT which is reflected in the genome sequence of a Bifidobacterim longum isolate. The competitiveness against other bacteria is not fully understood yet but may be related to the production of antimicrobial compounds such as bacteriocins. In a previous study, 34 Bifidobacterium isolates have been isolated from baby faeces among which six showed proteinaceous antilisterial activity against Listeria monocytogenes. In this study, one of these isolates, RBL67, was further identified and characterized. Results Bifidobacterium isolate RBL67 was classified and characterized using a polyphasic approach. RBL67 was classified as Bifidobacterium thermophilum based on phenotypic and DNA-DNA hybridization characteristics, although 16S rDNA analyses and partial groEL sequences showed higher homology with B. thermacidophilum subsp. porcinum and B. thermacidophilum subsp. thermacidophilum, respectively. RBL67 was moderately oxygen-tolerant and was able to grow at pH 4 and at a temperature of 47°C. Conclusion In order to assign RBL67 to a species, a polyphasic approach was used. This resulted in the classification of RBL67 as a Bifidobacterium thermophilum strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report about B. thermophilum isolated from baby faeces since the B. thermophilum strains were related to ruminants and swine faeces before. B. thermophilum was previously only isolated from animal sources and was therefore suggested to be used as differential species between animal and human contamination. Our findings may disapprove this suggestion and further studies are now conducted to determine whether B. thermophilum is distributed broader in human faeces. Furthermore, the postulated differentiation between human and animal strains by growth above 45

  1. Sequencing and Transcriptional Analysis of the Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Putrescine-Producing Lactococcus lactis ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladero, Victor; Rattray, Fergal P.; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a prokaryotic microorganism with great importance as a culture starter and has become the model species among the lactic acid bacteria. The long and safe history of use of L. lactis in dairy fermentations has resulted in the classification of this species as GRAS (General Regarded As Safe) or QPS (Qualified Presumption of Safety). However, our group has identified several strains of L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris that are able to produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. Putrescine is a biogenic amine that confers undesirable flavor characteristics and may even have toxic effects. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed of a putative regulatory gene, aguR, followed by the genes (aguB, aguD, aguA, and aguC) encoding the catabolic enzymes. These genes are transcribed as an operon that is induced in the presence of agmatine. In some strains, an insertion (IS) element interrupts the transcription of the cluster, which results in a non-putrescine-producing phenotype. Based on this knowledge, a PCR-based test was developed in order to differentiate nonproducing L. lactis strains from those with a functional AGDI cluster. The analysis of the AGDI cluster and their flanking regions revealed that the capacity to produce putrescine via the AGDI pathway could be a specific characteristic that was lost during the adaptation to the milk environment by a process of reductive genome evolution. PMID:21803900

  2. Development of Chemically Defined Media to Express Trp-Analog-Labeled Proteins in a Lactococcus lactis Trp Auxotroph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jinfeng; Marcondes, Marcelo F M; Oliveira, Vitor; Broos, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Chemically defined media for growth of Lactococcus lactis strains contain about 50 components, making them laborious and expensive growth media. However, they are crucial for metabolism studies as well as for expression of heterologous proteins labeled with unnatural amino acids. In particular, the L. lactis Trp auxotroph PA1002, overexpressing the tryptophanyl tRNA synthetase enzyme of L. lactis, is very suitable for the biosynthetic incorporation of Trp analogs in proteins because of its most relaxed substrate specificity reported towards Trp analogs. Here we present two much simpler defined media for L. lactis, which consist of only 24 or 31 components, respectively, and with which the L. lactis Trp auxotroph shows similar growth characteristics as with a 50-component chemically defined medium. Importantly, the expression levels of two recombinant proteins used for evaluation were up to 2-3 times higher in these new media than in the 50-component medium, without affecting the Trp analog incorporation efficiency. Taken together, the simplest chemically defined media reported so far for L. lactis are presented. Since L. lactis also shows auxotrophy for Arg, His, Ile, Leu Val, and Met, our simplified media may also be useful for the biosynthetic incorporation of analogs of these five amino acids. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Construction of a new shuttle vector for DNA delivery into mammalian cells using non-invasive Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Bhrugu; Padh, Harish; Desai, Priti

    2016-04-01

    Use of food grade Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is fast emerging as a safe alternative for delivery of DNA vaccine. To attain efficient DNA delivery, L. lactis, a non-invasive bacterium is converted to invasive strain either by expressing proteins like Internalin A (InlA) or Fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) or through chemical treatments. However the safety status of invasive L. lactis is questionable. In the present report, we have shown that non-invasive L. lactis efficiently delivered the newly constructed reporter plasmid pPERDBY to mammalian cells without any chemical enhancers. The salient features of the vector are; I) Ability to replicate in two different hosts; Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), II) One of the smallest reporter plasmid for DNA vaccine, III) Enhanced Green Fluorescence Protein (EGFP) linked to Multiple Cloning Site (MCS), IV) Immunostimulatory CpG motifs functioning as an adjuvant. Expression of EGFP in pPERDBY transfected CHO-K1 and Caco-2 cells demonstrates its functionality. Non-invasive r-L. lactis was found efficient in delivering pPERDBY to Caco-2 cells. The in vitro data presented in this article supports the hypothesis that in the absence of invasive proteins or relevant chemical treatment, L. lactis was found efficient in delivering DNA to mammalian cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Rationale for Using of Bifidobacterium Probiotic Strains-Fermented Milk Against Colitis Based on Animal Experiments and Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Akemi; Umesaki, Yoshinori

    2009-06-01

    Probiotic foods such as probiotic strain-fermented milk or supplements proposing various health claims are now available. The beneficial effects of these probiotic foods on the digestive system are expected for not only healthy persons but also patients with diseases of the alimentary tract. This review focused on the rationale of using our Bifidobacterium strains-fermented milk as an adjunct for the prevention of recurrence or exacerbation of colitis. Animal experiments using gnotobiotic colitis or spontaneously colitis models and also human clinical trials of ulcerative colitis patients showed the potential of Bifidobacterium strains-fermented milk as a beneficial anti-colitis adjunct.

  5. Cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids and membrane rigidification improve the freeze-drying resistance of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis TOMSC161.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, H; Bouix, M; Passot, S; Penicaud, C; Beinsteiner, H; Ghorbal, S; Lieben, P; Fonseca, F

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the biochemical and biophysical properties of the membrane of Lactococcus lactis TOMSC161 cells during fermentation at different temperatures, in relation to their freeze-drying and storage resistance. Cells were cultivated at two different temperatures (22 and 30 °C) and were harvested at different growth phases (from the middle exponential phase to the late stationary phase). Bacterial membranes were characterized by determining the fatty acid composition, the lipid phase transition, and the membrane fluidity. Cultivability and acidification activity losses of L. lactis were quantified after freezing, drying, and 3 months of storage. The direct measurement of membrane fluidity by fluorescence anisotropy was linked to lipid composition, and it was established that the cyclopropanation of unsaturated fatty acids with concomitant membrane rigidification during growth led to an increase in the freeze-drying and storage resistance of L. lactis. As expected, cultivating cells at a lower fermentation temperature than the optimum growth temperature induced a homeoviscous adaptation that was demonstrated by a lowered lipid phase transition temperature but that was not related to any improvement in freeze-drying resistance. L. lactis TOMSC161 was therefore able to develop a combined biochemical and biophysical response at the membrane level during fermentation. The ratio of cyclic fatty acids to unsaturated fatty acids (CFA/UFA) appeared to be the most relevant parameter associated with membrane rigidification and cell resistance to freeze-drying and storage. This study increased our knowledge about the physiological mechanisms that explain the resistance of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to freeze-drying and storage stresses and demonstrated the relevance of complementary methods of membrane characterization.

  6. Immunization against Leishmania major infection using LACK- and IL-12-expressing Lactococcus lactis induces delay in footpad swelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hugentobler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania is a mammalian parasite affecting over 12 million individuals worldwide. Current treatments are expensive, cause severe side effects, and emerging drug resistance has been reported. Vaccination is the most cost-effective means to control infectious disease but currently there is no vaccine available against Leishmaniasis. Lactococcus lactis is a non-pathogenic, non-colonizing Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium commonly used in the dairy industry. Recently, L. lactis was used to express biologically active molecules including vaccine antigens and cytokines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the generation of L. lactis strains expressing the protective Leishmania antigen, LACK, in the cytoplasm, secreted or anchored to the bacterial cell wall. L. lactis was also engineered to secrete biologically active single chain mouse IL-12. Subcutaneous immunization with live L. lactis expressing LACK anchored to the cell wall and L. lactis secreting IL-12 significantly delayed footpad swelling in Leishmania major infected BALB/c mice. The delay in footpad swelling correlated with a significant reduction of parasite burden in immunized animals compared to control groups. Immunization with these two L. lactis strains induced antigen-specific multifunctional T(H1 CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and a systemic LACK-specific T(H1 immune response. Further, protection in immunized animals correlated with a Leishmania-specific T(H1 immune response post-challenge. L. lactis secreting mouse IL-12 was essential for directing immune responses to LACK towards a protective T(H1 response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report demonstrates the use of L. lactis as a live vaccine against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. The strains generated in this study provide the basis for the development of an inexpensive and safe vaccine against the human parasite Leishmania.

  7. Production of the small heat shock protein Lo18 from Oenococcus oeni in Lactococcus lactis improves its stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Stéphanie; Maitre, Magali; Laurent, Julie; Coucheney, Françoise; Rieu, Aurélie; Guzzo, Jean

    2017-04-17

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in cheese and fermented milk production. During fermentation, L. lactis is subjected to acid stress that impairs its growth. The small heat shock protein (sHsp) Lo18 from the acidophilic species Oenococcus oeni was expressed in L. lactis. This sHsp is known to play an important role in protein protection and membrane stabilization in O. oeni. The role of this sHsp could be studied in L. lactis, since no gene encoding for sHsp has been detected in this species. L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was transformed with the pDLhsp18 plasmid, which is derived from pDL278 and contains the hsp18 gene (encoding Lo18) and its own promoter sequence. The production of Lo18 during stress conditions was checked by immunoblotting and the cellular distribution of Lo18 in L. lactis cells after heat shock was determined. Our results clearly indicated a role for Lo18 in cytoplasmic protein protection and membrane stabilization during stress. The production of sHsp in L. lactis improved tolerance to heat and acid conditions in this species. Finally, the improvement of the L. lactis survival in milk medium thanks to Lo18 was highlighted, suggesting an interesting role of this sHsp. These findings suggest that the expression of a sHsp by a L. lactis strain results in greater resistance to stress, and, can consequently enhance the performances of industrial strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunization against Leishmania major Infection Using LACK- and IL-12-Expressing Lactococcus lactis Induces Delay in Footpad Swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugentobler, Felix; Yam, Karen K.; Gillard, Joshua; Mahbuba, Raya; Olivier, Martin; Cousineau, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Background Leishmania is a mammalian parasite affecting over 12 million individuals worldwide. Current treatments are expensive, cause severe side effects, and emerging drug resistance has been reported. Vaccination is the most cost-effective means to control infectious disease but currently there is no vaccine available against Leishmaniasis. Lactococcus lactis is a non-pathogenic, non-colonizing Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium commonly used in the dairy industry. Recently, L. lactis was used to express biologically active molecules including vaccine antigens and cytokines. Methodology/Principal findings We report the generation of L. lactis strains expressing the protective Leishmania antigen, LACK, in the cytoplasm, secreted or anchored to the bacterial cell wall. L. lactis was also engineered to secrete biologically active single chain mouse IL-12. Subcutaneous immunization with live L. lactis expressing LACK anchored to the cell wall and L. lactis secreting IL-12 significantly delayed footpad swelling in Leishmania major infected BALB/c mice. The delay in footpad swelling correlated with a significant reduction of parasite burden in immunized animals compared to control groups. Immunization with these two L. lactis strains induced antigen-specific multifunctional TH1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and a systemic LACK-specific TH1 immune response. Further, protection in immunized animals correlated with a Leishmania-specific TH1 immune response post-challenge. L. lactis secreting mouse IL-12 was essential for directing immune responses to LACK towards a protective TH1 response. Conclusions/Significance This report demonstrates the use of L. lactis as a live vaccine against L. major infection in BALB/c mice. The strains generated in this study provide the basis for the development of an inexpensive and safe vaccine against the human parasite Leishmania. PMID:22348031

  9. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N. Furtado

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain (Lc. lactis DF4Mi, isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  10. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Application in the control of Listeria monocytogenes in fresh Minas-type goat cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a pathogen frequently found in dairy products. Its control in fresh cheeses is difficult, due to the psychrotrophic properties and salt tolerance. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with proven in vitro antilisterial activity can be an innovative technological approach but their application needs to be evaluated by means of in situ tests. In this study, a novel bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis strain ( Lc . lactis DF4Mi), isolated from raw goat milk, was tested for control of growth of L. monocytogenes in artificially contaminated fresh Minas type goat cheese during storage under refrigeration. A bacteriostatic effect was achieved, and counts after 10 days were 3 log lower than in control cheeses with no added LAB. However, this effect did not differ significantly from that obtained with a non-bacteriocinogenic Lc. lactis strain. Addition of nisin (12.5 mg/kg) caused a rapid decrease in the number of viable L. monocytogenes in the cheeses, suggesting that further studies with the purified bacteriocin DF4Mi may open new possibilities for this strain as biopreservative in dairy products.

  11. A mouse mastitis model to study the effects of the intramammary infusion of a food-grade Lactococcus lactis strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Camperio

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is one of the most important microorganisms in the dairy industry and has "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS status. L. lactis belongs to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB and is encountered in a wide range of environments. Recently, the use of the intramammary infusion of a live culture of LAB has been investigated as a new antibiotic alternative for treating mastitis in dairy ruminants. Controversial results are described in literature regarding its efficacy and safety. In this study we conducted in-depth investigation of the mammary gland immune response induced by intramammary inoculum of a live culture of L. lactis LMG 7930 using the mouse mastitis model. Overnight cultures either of L. lactis (≈ 107 CFU or of the mastitis pathogens Staphylococcus chromogenes (≈ 105 CFU or S. aureus (≈ 102 CFU/ml were injected into the mouse inguinal glands. A double injection, consisting of S. chromogenes first and then L. lactis, was also investigated. Bacterial recovery from the gland and inflammatory cell infiltration were assessed. L. lactis-treated and control glands were analysed for proinflammatory cytokine production. Microbiological results showed that L. lactis was able to survive in the mammary gland 24 h post infection, as were the mastitis pathogens S. chromogenes and S. aureus. L. lactis reduced S. chromogenes survival in the glands and increased its own survival ability by coexisting with the pathogen. Histology showed that L. lactis-treated glands presented variable histological features, ranging from undamaged tissue with no inflammatory cell infiltrate to severe PMN infiltrate with focal areas of tissue damage. S. aureus-treated glands showed the most severe histological grade of inflammation despite the fact that the inoculum size was the smallest. In contrast, most S. chromogenes-treated glands showed normal structures with no infiltration or lesions. Significant increases in IL-1β and TNF-α levels were

  12. A mouse mastitis model to study the effects of the intramammary infusion of a food-grade Lactococcus lactis strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasibetti, Elena; Frassanito, Paolo; Giovannelli, Carlo; Spuria, Liliana; D’Agostino, Claudia; Tait, Sabrina; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of the most important microorganisms in the dairy industry and has “generally recognized as safe” (GRAS) status. L. lactis belongs to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and is encountered in a wide range of environments. Recently, the use of the intramammary infusion of a live culture of LAB has been investigated as a new antibiotic alternative for treating mastitis in dairy ruminants. Controversial results are described in literature regarding its efficacy and safety. In this study we conducted in-depth investigation of the mammary gland immune response induced by intramammary inoculum of a live culture of L. lactis LMG 7930 using the mouse mastitis model. Overnight cultures either of L. lactis (≈ 107 CFU) or of the mastitis pathogens Staphylococcus chromogenes (≈ 105 CFU) or S. aureus (≈ 102 CFU/ml) were injected into the mouse inguinal glands. A double injection, consisting of S. chromogenes first and then L. lactis, was also investigated. Bacterial recovery from the gland and inflammatory cell infiltration were assessed. L. lactis-treated and control glands were analysed for proinflammatory cytokine production. Microbiological results showed that L. lactis was able to survive in the mammary gland 24 h post infection, as were the mastitis pathogens S. chromogenes and S. aureus. L. lactis reduced S. chromogenes survival in the glands and increased its own survival ability by coexisting with the pathogen. Histology showed that L. lactis-treated glands presented variable histological features, ranging from undamaged tissue with no inflammatory cell infiltrate to severe PMN infiltrate with focal areas of tissue damage. S. aureus-treated glands showed the most severe histological grade of inflammation despite the fact that the inoculum size was the smallest. In contrast, most S. chromogenes-treated glands showed normal structures with no infiltration or lesions. Significant increases in IL-1β and TNF-α levels were also found

  13. A mouse mastitis model to study the effects of the intramammary infusion of a food-grade Lactococcus lactis strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camperio, Cristina; Armas, Federica; Biasibetti, Elena; Frassanito, Paolo; Giovannelli, Carlo; Spuria, Liliana; D'Agostino, Claudia; Tait, Sabrina; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is one of the most important microorganisms in the dairy industry and has "generally recognized as safe" (GRAS) status. L. lactis belongs to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and is encountered in a wide range of environments. Recently, the use of the intramammary infusion of a live culture of LAB has been investigated as a new antibiotic alternative for treating mastitis in dairy ruminants. Controversial results are described in literature regarding its efficacy and safety. In this study we conducted in-depth investigation of the mammary gland immune response induced by intramammary inoculum of a live culture of L. lactis LMG 7930 using the mouse mastitis model. Overnight cultures either of L. lactis (≈ 107 CFU) or of the mastitis pathogens Staphylococcus chromogenes (≈ 105 CFU) or S. aureus (≈ 102 CFU/ml) were injected into the mouse inguinal glands. A double injection, consisting of S. chromogenes first and then L. lactis, was also investigated. Bacterial recovery from the gland and inflammatory cell infiltration were assessed. L. lactis-treated and control glands were analysed for proinflammatory cytokine production. Microbiological results showed that L. lactis was able to survive in the mammary gland 24 h post infection, as were the mastitis pathogens S. chromogenes and S. aureus. L. lactis reduced S. chromogenes survival in the glands and increased its own survival ability by coexisting with the pathogen. Histology showed that L. lactis-treated glands presented variable histological features, ranging from undamaged tissue with no inflammatory cell infiltrate to severe PMN infiltrate with focal areas of tissue damage. S. aureus-treated glands showed the most severe histological grade of inflammation despite the fact that the inoculum size was the smallest. In contrast, most S. chromogenes-treated glands showed normal structures with no infiltration or lesions. Significant increases in IL-1β and TNF-α levels were also found in

  14. A comparative study between inhibitory effect of L. lactis and nisin on important pathogenic bacteria in Iranian UF Feta cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Mirdamadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : In the present study, the inhibitory effect of nisin-producing Lactococcus lactis during co-culture and pure standard nisin were assessed against selected foodborne pathogenes in growth medium and Iranian UF Feta cheese. In comparison L lactis, not only proves flavor but also plays a better role in microbial quality of Iranian UF Feta cheese as a model of fermented dairy products.   Materials and method s: L. lactis subsp. lactis as nisin producer strain, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as pathogenic strains were inoculated in Ultra-Filtered Feta cheese. Growth curve of bacterial strains were studied by colony count method in growth medium and UF Feta cheese separately and during co-culture with L. lactis. Nisin production was determined by agar diffusion assay method against susceptible test strain and confirmed by RP-HPLC analysis method.   Results : Counts of L. monocytogenes decreased in cheese sample containing L. lactis and standard nisin, to 103 CFU/g after 7 days and it reached to undetectable level within 2 weeks. S. aureus counts remained at its initial number, 105 CFU/g, after 7 days then decreased to 104 CFU/g on day 14 and it was not detectable on day 28. E. coli numbers increased in both treatments after 7 days and then decreased to 104 CFU/g after 28 days. Despite the increasing number of E. coli in growth medium containing nisin, due to the synergistic effect of nisin and other metabolites produced by Lactococcus lactis and starter cultures, the number of E. coli decreased with slow rate . Discussion and conclusion : The results showed, L. monocytogenes was inhibited by L. lactis before entering the logarithmic phase during co-culture. S. aureus was also inhibited during co-culture, but it showed less sensitivity in comparison with L. monocytogenes. However, the number of E. coli remained steady in co-culture with L. lactis. Also, we found that, in all cheese samples, E

  15. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the

  16. Quantitative physiology of Lactococcus lactis at extreme low-growth rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the metabolic adaptation of Lactococcus lactis during the transition from a growing to a non-growing state using retentostat cultivation. Under retentostat cultivation, the specific growth rate decreased from 0.025 h-1 to 0.0001 h-1 in 42 days, while doubling time increased to

  17. The Mode of Replication Is a Major Factor in Segregational Plasmid Instability in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, Rense; Kok, Jan; Seegers, Jos F.M.L.; Venema, Gerard; Bron, Sierd

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the rolling-circle and theta modes of replication on the maintenance of recombinant plasmids in Lactococcus lactis were studied. Heterologous Escherichia coli or bacteriophage λ DNA fragments of various sizes were inserted into vectors based on either the rolling-circle-type plasmid

  18. Carbon catabolite repression and global control of the carbohydrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesink, E.J.

    1998-01-01

    In view of the economic importance of fermented dairy products considerable scientific attention has been given to various steps of fermentation processes, including the L-lactate formation of lactic acid bacteria (de Vos, 1996). In particular, the carbohydrate metabolism of L. lactis has

  19. Bacteriophage resistance of a Delta thyA mutant of Lactococcus lactis blocked in DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, M.B.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Janzen, T.

    2002-01-01

    The thyA gene, which encodes thymidylate synthase (TS), of Lactococcus lactis CHCC373 was sequenced, including the upstream and downstream regions. We then deleted part of thyA by gene replacement. The resulting strain, MBP71 DeltathyA, was devoid of TS activity, and in media without thymidine...

  20. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria : Genetics of proteolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Buist, Girbe

    2003-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical research over the past 15 years on milk protein degradation by Lactococcus lactis has resulted in a detailed picture of how casein is broken down into its sub-fragments and used for cellular growth. Starting with the action of an extracellular but cell-wall-located

  1. Insertion-Sequence-Mediated Mutations Isolated During Adaptation to Growth and Starvation in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the activity of three multicopy insertion sequence (IS) elements in 12 populations of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 that evolved in the laboratory for 1000 generations under various environmental conditions (growth or starvation and shaken or stationary). Using RFLP analysis of single-clone

  2. Transport of Basic Amino Acids by Membrane Vesicles of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Leeuwen, Cornelis van; Konings, Wilhelmus

    The uptake of the basic amino acids arginine, ornithine, and lysine was studied in membrane vesicles derived from cells of Lactococcus lactis which were fused with liposomes in which beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase was incorporated as a proton motive force (PMF)-generating system. In

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (µ = 0.0001 h-1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  4. Development, molecular characterisation and exploitation of the nisin controlled expression system in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruyter, de P.G.G.A.

    1998-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are gram-positive bacteria that are widely used in a variety of dairy fermentation processes. Notably, strains of the lactic acid starter bacterium Lactococcus lactis are of great economic importance because of their world-wide use in cheese making.

  5. Immunogenicity of a malaria parasite antigen displayed by Lactococcus lactis in oral immunisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Yasawardena, S; Zomer, A; Venema, G; Kok, J; Leenhouts, K

    2006-01-01

    A putative protective protein from Plasmodium falciparum merozoites, MSA2, was expressed in two different ways on the cell surface of the Gram-positive food-grade bacterium, Lactococcus lactis. The first display format exploits an LPXTG-type anchoring motif of the lactococcal proteinase PrtP to

  6. Spray drying of starter cultures: Diverse solutions within Lactococcus lactis to improve robustness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes the assessment and the possible exploitation of the natural diversity within Lactococcus lactis strains with respect to robustness. Special focus was on survival during heat and oxidative stress, which are both important parameters for optimal performance and survival during

  7. A chloride-inducible gene expression cassette and its use in induced lysis of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A chloride-inducible promoter previously isolated from the chromosome of Lactococcus lactis (J. W. Sanders, G. Venema, J. Kok, and K. Leenhouts, Mol. Gen. Genet., in press) was exploited for the inducible expression of homologous and heterologous gens. An expression cassette consisting of the

  8. The Transcriptional and Gene Regulatory Network of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 during Growth in Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jong, Anne; Hansen, Morten Ejby; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examine the changes in the expression of genes of Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363 during growth in milk. To reveal which specific classes of genes (pathways, operons, regulons, COGs) are important, we performed a transcriptome time series experiment. Global a...

  9. Characterization of the Lactococcus lactis lactose genes and regulation of their expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van R.J.

    1993-01-01

    An important trait of the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis , that is used in industrial dairy fermentations, is the conversion of lactose into lactic acid. The enzymatic steps involved in the breakdown of lactose, that is transported into the cell via a

  10. 21 CFR 184.1388 - Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces... GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1388 Lactase enzyme preparation from Kluyveromyces lactis. (a) This enzyme preparation is derived from the nonpathogenic...

  11. Effects of Lactococcus lactis on composition of intestinal microbiota: Role of nisin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernbom, Nete; Licht, Tine Rask; Brogren, Carl-Henrik

    2006-01-01

    in the rat fecal microbiota were observed after dosage with nisin. Pearson cluster analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles of the 16S rRNA genes present in the fecal microbial population revealed that the microbiota of animals dosed with either of the two L. lactis strains were different...

  12. Dependence of Streptococcus lactis Phosphate Transport on Internal Phosphate Concentration and Internal pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; NIJSSEN, RMJ; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    Uptake of phosphate by Streptococcus lactis ML3 proceeds in the absence of a proton motive force, but requires the synthesis of ATP by either arginine or lactose metabolism. The appearance of free Pi internally in arginine-metabolizing cells corresponded quantitatively with the disappearance of

  13. Cloning, Characterization, Controlled Overexpression, and Inactivation of the Major Tributyrin Esterase Gene of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernández, Leonides; Beerthuyzen, Marke M.; Brown, Julie; Siezen, Roland J.; Coolbear, Tim; Holland, Ross; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2000-01-01

    The gene encoding the major intracellular tributyrin esterase of Lactococcus lactis was cloned using degenerate DNA probes based on 19 known N-terminal amino acid residues of the purified enzyme. The gene, named estA, was sequenced and found to encode a protein of 258 amino acid residues. The

  14. Autolysis of Lactococcus lactis caused by induced overproduction of its major autolysin, AcmA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Girbe; Karsens, H; Nauta, A; van Sinderen, D; Venema, G; Kok, J

    The optical density of a culture of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 was reduced more than 60% during prolonged stationary phase, Reduction in optical density (autolysis) was almost absent in a culture of an isogenic mutant containing a deletion in the major autolysin gene, acmA. An acmA mutant carrying

  15. Production of Pediocin PA-1 by Lactococcus lactis Using the Lactococcin A Secretory Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Nikki; Martínez, María I.; Martínez, José M.; Hernández, Pablo E.; Gasson, Michael J.; Rodríguez, Juan M.; Dodd, Helen M.

    1998-01-01

    The class II bacteriocins pediocin PA-1, from Pediococcus acidilactici, and lactococcin A, from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis WM4 have a number of features in common. They are produced as precursor peptides containing similar amino-terminal leader sequences with a conserved processing site (Gly-Gly at positions −1 and −2). Translocation of both bacteriocins occurs via a dedicated secretory system. Because of the strong antilisterial activity of pediocin PA-1, its production by lactic acid bacteria strains adapted to dairy environments would considerably extend its application in the dairy industry. In this study, the lactococcin A secretory system was adapted for the expression and secretion of pediocin PA-1. A vector containing an in-frame fusion of sequences encoding the lcnA promoter, the lactococcin A leader, and the mature pediocin PA-1, was introduced into L. lactis IL1403. This strain is resistant to pediocin PA-1 and encodes a lactococcin translocation apparatus. The resulting L. lactis strains secreted a bacteriocin with an antimicrobial activity of approximately 25% of that displayed by the parental pediocin-producing P. acidilactici 347. A noncompetitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with pediocin PA-1-specific antibodies and amino-terminal amino acid sequencing confirmed that pediocin PA-1 was being produced by the heterologous host. PMID:9501421

  16. ClpE from Lactococcus lactis promotes repression of CtsR-dependent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varmanen, P.; Vogensen, F.K.; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    ATPase (ClpE) in Lactococcus lactis is required for such a decrease in expression of a gene negatively regulated by the heat shock regulator (CtsR). Northern blot analysis showed that while a shift to a high temperature in wild-type cells resulted in a temporal increase followed by a decrease...

  17. Relationships between MDR proteins, bacteriocin production and proteolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gajic, Olivera

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis can harbour a wide variety of circular extrachromosomal DNA molecules, so-called plasmids. Many of the traits that make them useful for manufacturing of fermented food products (e.g. bacteriophage resistance, bacteriocin and proteinase

  18. Molecular characterization and exploitation of the temperate Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage r1t

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Arjen

    1997-01-01

    When comprehending the scale at wich the Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is used in the dairy-industry, one can imagine the consequences of fermentation failures. To date, the most serious threat to these large scale fermentation processes. ... Zie Summary

  19. Lipid-protein interactions. The leucine transport system of Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, Geertruida Elisabeth in 't

    1992-01-01

    In summary, it is concluded, that a functionally reconstituted leucine transport system of L. lactis is affected by bilayer features in the following order of importance: lipid headgroup (H+-bonding) › acyl chain carbon number (thickness) › cholesterol (fluidity) › acyl chain unsaturation (indirect

  20. Secreted expression of Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucansucrase in Lactococcus lactis for the production of insoluble glucans

    Science.gov (United States)

    We expressed a glucansucrase, DsrI, from Leuconostoc mesenteroides that catalyzes formation of water-insoluble glucans from sucrose in Lactococcus lactis using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Production of DsrI was optimized using several different background vectors, signal peptides, str...

  1. Topology of a type I secretion system for bacteriocins of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, Christian Marc

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of a number of aspects of the secretion and muturation machinery of the bacteriocin lactococcin A (LcnA) from Lactococcus lactis, whick is initially synthesized as a precursor protein (preLcnA), containing an N-terminal extension of 20 amino acids (the leader)....

  2. The Plasmid Complement of Lactococcus lactis UC509.9 Encodes Multiple Bacteriophage Resistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Mahony, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains are used globally for the production of fermented dairy products, particularly hard cheeses. Believed to be of plant origin, L. lactis strains that are used as starter cultures have undergone extensive adaptation to the dairy environment, partially through the acquisition of extrachromosomal DNA in the form of plasmids that specify technologically important phenotypic traits. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the eight plasmids of L. lactis UC509.9, an Irish dairy starter strain. Key industrial phenotypes were mapped, and genes that are typically associated with lactococcal plasmids were identified. Four distinct, plasmid-borne bacteriophage resistance systems were identified, including two abortive infection systems, AbiB and AbiD1, thereby supporting the observed phage resistance of L. lactis UC509.9. AbiB escape mutants were generated for phage sk1, which were found to carry mutations in orf6, which encodes the major capsid protein of this phage. PMID:24814781

  3. Unity in organisation and regulation of catabolic operons in Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis and Listeria monocytogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersson, U.; Molenaar, D.; Radstrom, P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2005-01-01

    Global regulatory circuits together with more specific local regulators play a notable role when cells are adapting to environmental changes. Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium abundant in nature fermenting most mono- and disaccharides. Comparative genomics analysis of the operons

  4. Effects of structural modifications on some physical characteristics of exopolysaccharides from Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinier, R.; Casteren, van W.H.M.; Looijesteijn, P.J.; Schols, H.A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Zoon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between the primary structure and the chain stiffness of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and modified EPSs produced by two strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris was investigated. The molar mass and radius of gyration of these exopolysaccharides were analyzed by multiangle static

  5. Natural sweetening of food products by engineering Lactococcus lactis for glucose production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Wietske A.; Neves, Ana Rute; Kok, Jan; Santos, Helena; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    We show that sweetening of food products by natural fermentation can be achieved by a combined metabolic engineering and transcriptome analysis approach. A Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris strain was constructed in which glucose metabolism was completely disrupted by deletion of the genes coding for

  6. Overview on sugar metabolism and its control in Lactococcus lactis - The input from in vivo NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neves, AR; Pool, WA; Kok, J; Kuipers, OP; Santos, H; Neves, Ana Rute; Pool, Wietske A.

    The wide application of lactic acid bacteria in the production of fermented foods depends to a great extent on the unique features of sugar metabolism in these organisms. The relative metabolic simplicity and the availability of genetic tools made Lactococcus lactis the organism of choice to gain

  7. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ENDOPEPTIDASE FROM LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS SUBSP CREMORIS WG2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAN, PST; POS, KM; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    An endopeptidase has been purified to homogeneity from a crude cell extract of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 by a procedure that includes diethyl-aminoethane-Sephacel chromatography, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, and fast protein liquid chromatography over

  8. Physiological responses of Lactococcus lactis ML3 to alternating conditions of growth and starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, E.R.S.; Ubbink, T.; Matin, A.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N.

    Lactococcus lactis species can survive periods of carbohydrate starvation for relatively long periods of time. In the first hours of starvation, however, the maximal glycolytic and arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway activities decline rapidly. The rate of decrease of the pathway activities diminishes

  9. OLIGOPEPTIDES ARE THE MAIN SOURCE OF NITROGEN FOR LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS DURING GROWTH IN MILK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JUILLARD, [No Value; LEBARS, D; KUNJI, ERS; KONINGS, WN; GRIPON, JC; RICHARD, J

    The consumption of amino acids and peptides was monitored during growth in milk of proteinase-positive (Prt(+)) and -negative (Prt(-)) strains of Lactococcus lactis, The Prt(-) strains showed monophasic exponential growth, while the Prt(+) strains grew in two phases. The first growth phases of the

  10. Arginine metabolism in sugar deprived Lactococcus lactis enhances survival and cellular activity, while supporting flavour production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, J.B.; Kraats, van de I.; Abee, T.; Zwietering, M.H.; Meijer, W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Flavour development in cheese is affected by the integrity of Lactococcus lactis cells. Disintegrated cells enhance for instance the enzymatic degradation of casein to free amino acids, while integer cells are needed to produce specific flavour compounds from amino acids. The impact of the cellular

  11. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Siso, M Isabel; García-Leiro, Ana; Tarrío, Nuria; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-08-30

    A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed.

  12. Sugar metabolism, redox balance and oxidative stress response in the respiratory yeast Kluyveromyces lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerdán M Esperanza

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A lot of studies have been carried out on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an yeast with a predominant fermentative metabolism under aerobic conditions, which allows exploring the complex response induced by oxidative stress. S. cerevisiae is considered a eukaryote model for these studies. We propose Kluyveromyces lactis as a good alternative model to analyse variants in the oxidative stress response, since the respiratory metabolism in this yeast is predominant under aerobic conditions and it shows other important differences with S. cerevisiae in catabolic repression and carbohydrate utilization. The knowledge of oxidative stress response in K. lactis is still a developing field. In this article, we summarize the state of the art derived from experimental approaches and we provide a global vision on the characteristics of the putative K. lactis components of the oxidative stress response pathway, inferred from their sequence homology with the S. cerevisiae counterparts. Since K. lactis is also a well-established alternative host for industrial production of native enzymes and heterologous proteins, relevant differences in the oxidative stress response pathway and their potential in biotechnological uses of this yeast are also reviewed.

  13. Stimulation of acetoin production in metabolically engineered Lactococcus lactis by increasing ATP demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianming; Kandasamy, Vijayalakshmi; Würtz, Anders

    2016-01-01

    into a Lactococcus lactis strain engineered into producing acetoin, we show that production titer and yield both can be increased. At high F1-ATPase expression level, the acetoin production yield could be increased by 10 %; however, because of the negative effect that the F1-ATPase had on biomass yield and growth...

  14. CLONING AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF THE DIHYDROFOLATE-REDUCTASE GENE FROM LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LESZCZYNSKA, K; BOLHUIS, A; LEENHOUTS, K; VENEMA, G; CEGLOWSKI, P

    The Lactococcus lactis gene encoding trimethoprim resistance has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Several lines of evidence indicate that the cloned gene encodes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). (i) It fully complements the fol ''null'' mutation in E. coli. (ii)

  15. Stress Response in Lactococcus lactis : Cloning, Expression Analysis, and Mutation of the Lactococcal Superoxide Dismutase Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Leenhouts, Kees J.; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Venema, Gerard; Kok, Jan

    In an analysis of the stress response of Lactococcus lactis, three proteins that were induced under low pH culture conditions were detected. One of these was identified as the lactococcal superoxide dismutase (SodA) by N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis. The gene encoding this protein,

  16. Phosphoglycerate Mutase Is a Highly Efficient Enzyme without Flux Control in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Petranovic, D.; Købmann, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM), which catalyzes the conversion of 3-phosphoglycerate to 2-phosphoglycerate, was examined in Lactococcus lactis with respect to its function, kinetics and glycolytic flux control. A library of strains with PGM activities ranging between 15-465% ...

  17. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (? = 0.0001 h?1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  18. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.W.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (mu = 0.0001 h(-1)) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed

  19. A System To Generate Chromosomal Mutations in Lactococcus lactis Which Allows Fast Analysis of Targeted Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Jean; Buist, Girbe; Haandrikman, Alfred; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerhardus; Leenhouts, Kees

    1995-01-01

    A system for generating chromosomal insertions in lactococci is described. It is based on the conditional replication of lactococcal pWV01-derived Ori+ RepA- vector pORI19, containing lacZα and the multiple cloning site of pUC19. Chromosomal AluI fragments of Lactococcus lactis were cloned in pORI19

  20. An exoproteome approach to monitor safety of a cheese-isolated Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genovese, Federica; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Majumder, Avishek

    2013-01-01

    The safety of the cheese-isolated and potential starter Lactococcus lactis 11D was explored by means of an extracellular proteomic study. A preliminary analysis showed good caseification/proteolytic behavior of the strain, absence of production of biogenic amines and good survival at acidic p...

  1. Relation of Growth of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris to Amino Acid Transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    The maximum specific growth rate of Streptococcus lactis and Streptococcus cremoris on synthetic medium containing glutamate but no glutamine decreases rapidly above pH 7. Growth of these organisms is extended to pH values in excess of 8 in the presence of glutamine. These results can be explained

  2. Enhanced butyrate formation by cross-feeding between Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Covian, David; Gueimonde, Miguel; Duncan, Sylvia H; Flint, Harry J; de los Reyes-Gavilan, Clara G

    2015-11-01

    Cross-feeding is an important metabolic interaction mechanism of bacterial groups inhabiting the human colon and includes features such as the utilization of acetate by butyrate-producing bacteria as may occur between Bifidobacterium and Faecalibacterium genera. In this study, we assessed the utilization of different carbon sources (glucose, starch, inulin and fructooligosaccharides) by strains of both genera and selected the best suited combinations for evidencing this cross-feeding phenomenon. Co-cultures of Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32 with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii S3/L3 with fructooligosaccharides as carbon source, as well as with F. prausnitzii A2-165 in starch, were carried out and the production of short-chain fatty acids was determined. In both co-cultures, acetate levels decreased between 8 and 24 h of incubation and were lower than in the corresponding B. adolescentis monocultures. In contrast, butyrate concentrations were higher in co-cultures as compared to the respective F. prausnitzii monocultures, indicating enhanced formation of butyrate by F. prausnitzii in the presence of the bifidobacteria. Variations in the levels of acetate and butyrate were more pronounced in the co-culture with fructooligosaccharides than with starch. Our results provide a clear demonstration of cross-feeding between B. adolescentis and F. prausnitzii. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Intrinsic tolerance of Bifidobacterium species to heat and oxygen and survival following spray drying and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, P J; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Ross, R P

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the tolerance of various species of the genus Bifidobacterium to heat and oxygen and evaluated the survival of selected strains following spray drying and during storage. Nine Bifidobacterium species were considered to be relatively tolerant to both heat and oxygen and mostly segregated into two clusters within the 16S rDNA phylogenetic tree. Four species were tolerant to oxygen and 12 species were considered sensitive to oxygen and heat. Using a skimmed milk-based carrier good survival following spray drying and storage at 4 degrees C correlated with tolerance to heat and oxygen. Viability was inversely related to storage temperature and at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C, a significant decline was observed for all species. The inclusion of gum acacia had no significant affect on survival or viability. However, using a fluidized-bed spray dryer viability was greatly improved. A group of closely related species tolerant to heat and oxygen had high survival following spray drying and maintained viability during prolonged storage at 4 degrees C. Spray drying is a suitable method for the production of skimmed milk powder enriched with high numbers of viable bifidobacteria.

  4. Creation of the Probiotic Consortium on the Base of Strains of Bifidobacterium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhakhmetov, S. S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a widespread circulation of disbiotic conditions among the population of all ages in Kazakhstan requires an active development in industry for both preparations and products with probiotic properties. The gained bacterial isolates, Bifidobacterium adolescentis 180, B. breve 204, B. breve 584 and B. breve 587 were used in our researches and screening showed they possess high probiotic properties. The consortium possesses strong antimicrobial activity to pathogenic and potentially-pathogenic microflora, insulated during disbacteriosis, as well as from vagina and urea. They are able to produce vitamin B12 and also have antimutagenic activity. As a result, the consortium on the base of strains of Bifidobacterium spp. was received, possessing the following advantages: contains live mass of microbial, antagonistically active strains B. breve and B. adolescentis; contains more than 10^9 alive Bifidobacteria; does not contain plasmids, which means that it could not be a carrier of antibiotic stability for Gram-positive receptive pathogenic and potentially-pathogenic microflora.

  5. Tracking the Taxonomy of the Genus Bifidobacterium Based on a Phylogenomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Mangifesta, Marta; Turroni, Francesca; Viappiani, Alice; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2018-02-15

    For decades, bacterial taxonomy has been based on in vitro molecular biology techniques and comparison of molecular marker sequences to measure the degree of genetic similarity and deduce phylogenetic relatedness of novel bacterial species to reference microbial taxa. Due to the advent of the genomic era, access to complete bacterial genome contents has become easier, thereby presenting the opportunity to precisely investigate the overall genetic diversity of microorganisms. Here, we describe a high-accuracy phylogenomic approach to assess the taxonomy of members of the genus Bifidobacterium and identify apparent misclassifications in current bifidobacterial taxonomy. The developed method was validated by the classification of seven novel taxa belonging to the genus Bifidobacterium by employing their overall genetic content. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of this whole-genome approach to become the gold standard for phylogenomics-based taxonomic classification of bacteria. IMPORTANCE Nowadays, next-generation sequencing has given access to genome sequences of the currently known bacterial taxa. The public databases constructed by means of these new technologies allowed comparison of genome sequences between microorganisms, providing information to perform genomic, phylogenomic, and evolutionary analyses. In order to avoid misclassifications in the taxonomy of novel bacterial isolates, new (bifido)bacterial taxons should be validated with a phylogenomic assessment like the approach presented here. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on the production and characterization of exopolysaccharides by Bifidobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiang Hu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke on the production and characterization of exopolysaccharides (EPSs produced by Bifidobacterium. Cigarettes of Shanhua brand (nicotine: 1.1 mg, tar: 11 mg were utilized to prepare a cigarette smoke condensate (CSC. The standard strain of Bifidobacterium animalis was cultured in MRS media under anaerobic addition of CSC. The results showed that CSC significantly decreased the growth of B. animalis as well as EPSs and acetic acid production. Furthermore, two EPSs fractions (Fr-I and Fr-II were isolated and purified for chemical and molecular determination. By comparison with control, CSC was found to be of great impact on EPSs carbohydrate composition. The molecular weight mass of Fr-I changed from 3.33×105 g/mol (without CSC to 2.99×105 (with CSC. In conclusion, in vitro studies revealed that CSC was directly able to affect the production of metabolites for B. animalis, which could be an essential factor in certain pathological disorders.

  7. Immunoreactive Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp longum CCDM 372 Identified by Gnotobiotic Mono-Colonized Mice Sera, Immune Rabbit Sera and Non-immune Human Sera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Górska, S.; Dylus, E.; Rudawska, A.; Brzozowska, E.; Šrůtková, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Razim, A.; Kozáková, Hana; Gamian, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, SEP 29 (2016), s. 1537 ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB16PL006 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bifidobacterium * probiotics * moonlighting proteins Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.076, year: 2016

  8. Chromosomal Diversity in Lactococcus lactis and the Origin of Dairy Starter Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William J.; Ward, Lawrence J. H.; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2010-01-01

    A large collection of Lactococcus lactis strains, including wild-type isolates and dairy starter cultures, were screened on the basis of their phenotype and the macrorestriction patterns produced from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of SmaI digests of genomic DNA. Three groups of dairy starter cultures, used for different purposes in the dairy industry, and a fourth group made up of strains isolated from the environment were selected for analysis of their chromosomal diversity using the endonuclease I-CeuI. Chromosome architecture was largely conserved with each strain having six copies of the rRNA genes, and the chromosome size of individual strains ranged between 2,240 and 2,688 kb. The origin of L. lactis strains showed the greatest correlation with chromosome size, and dairy strains, particularly those with the cremoris phenotype, had smaller chromosomes than wild-type strains. Overall, this study, coupled with analysis of the sequenced L. lactis genomes, provides evidence that defined strain dairy starter cultures have arisen from plant L. lactis strains. Adaptation of these strains to the dairy environment has involved loss of functions resulting in smaller chromosomes and acquisition of genes (usually plasmid associated) that facilitate growth in milk. We conclude that dairy starter cultures generally and the industrially used cremoris and diacetylactis phenotype strains in particular comprise a specialized group of L. lactis strains that have been selected to become an essential component of industrial processes and have evolved accordingly, so that they are no longer fit to survive outside the dairy environment. PMID:20847124

  9. Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis and ssp. bulgaricus: a chronicle of evolution in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kafsi, Hela; Binesse, Johan; Loux, Valentin; Buratti, Julien; Boudebbouze, Samira; Dervyn, Rozenn; Kennedy, Sean; Galleron, Nathalie; Quinquis, Benoît; Batto, Jean-Michel; Moumen, Bouziane; Maguin, Emmanuelle; van de Guchte, Maarten

    2014-05-28

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. lactis and ssp. bulgaricus are lactic acid producing bacteria that are largely used in dairy industries, notably in cheese-making and yogurt production. An earlier in-depth study of the first completely sequenced ssp. bulgaricus genome revealed the characteristics of a genome in an active phase of rapid evolution, in what appears to be an adaptation to the milk environment. Here we examine for the first time if the same conclusions apply to the ssp. lactis, and discuss intra- and inter-subspecies genomic diversity in the context of evolutionary adaptation. Both L. delbrueckii ssp. show the signs of reductive evolution through the elimination of superfluous genes, thereby limiting their carbohydrate metabolic capacities and amino acid biosynthesis potential. In the ssp. lactis this reductive evolution has gone less far than in the ssp. bulgaricus. Consequently, the ssp. lactis retained more extended carbohydrate metabolizing capabilities than the ssp. bulgaricus but, due to high intra-subspecies diversity, very few carbohydrate substrates, if any, allow a reliable distinction of the two ssp. We further show that one of the most important traits, lactose fermentation, of one of the economically most important dairy bacteria, L. delbruecki ssp. bulgaricus, relies on horizontally acquired rather than deep ancestral genes. In this sense this bacterium may thus be regarded as a natural GMO avant la lettre. The dairy lactic acid producing bacteria L. delbrueckii ssp. lactis and ssp. bulgaricus appear to represent different points on the same evolutionary track of adaptation to the milk environment through the loss of superfluous functions and the acquisition of functions that allow an optimized utilization of milk resources, where the ssp. bulgaricus has progressed further away from the common ancestor.

  10. Cell-free spent media obtained from Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis grown in media supplemented with 3’-sialyllactose exert virulence modulation on intestinal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondue Pauline

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO possess an antimicrobial activity and can promote the growth of bifidobacteria such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. In addition, fermentation of carbohydrates by bifidobacteria can result in the production of metabolites presenting an antivirulence effect on several pathogenic bacteria. Whey is rich in complex bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO structurally similar to HMO and B. crudilactis, a species of bovine origin, is able to metabolize some of those complex carbohydrates. This study focused on the ability of B. bifidum and B. crudilactis to grow in a culture medium supplemented in 3’-sialyllactose (3’SL as sole source of carbon, a main BMO encountered in cow milk. Next, the effects of cell-free spent media (CFSM were tested against virulence expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both strains were able to grow in presence of 3’SL, but B. crudilactis showed the best growth (7.92 ± 0.3 log cfu/ml compared to B. bifidum (6.84 ± 0.9 log cfu/ml. Then, CFSM were tested for their effects on virulence gene expression by ler and hilA promoter activity of luminescent mutants of E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively, and on wild type strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium using RT-qPCR. All CFSM resulted in significant under expression of the ler and hilA genes for the luminescent mutants and ler (ratios of -15.4 and -8.1 respectively and qseA (ratios of -2.1 and -3.1 for the wild type strain of E. coli O157:H7. The 3’SL, a major BMO, combined with some bifidobacteria strains of bovine or human origin could therefore be an interesting synbiotic to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro will be further investigated regarding the exact nature of the active molecules.

  11. Increasing the transglycosylation activity of alpha-galactosidase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 by site-directed mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinz, S.W.A.; Doeswijk-Voragen, C.H.L.; Schipperus, R.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Vincken, J.P.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    The ¿-galactosidase (AGA) from Bifidobacterium adolescentis DSM 20083 has a high transglycosylation activity. The optimal conditions for this activity are pH 8, and 37°C. At high melibiose concentration (600 mM), approximately 64% of the enzyme-substrate encounters resulted in transglycosylation.

  12. Molecularly assessed shifts of Bifidobacterium spp. and less diverse microbial communities are characteristic of 5-year-old allergic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stsepetova, J.; Sepp, E.; Julge, K.; Vaughan, E.E.; Mikelsaar, M.; Vos, de W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The composition of intestinal microbiota and the Bifidobacterium group community in 20 allergic and 20 nonallergic 5-year-old children was visualized by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The number of dominant bands in the DGGE profiles was smaller in allergic children than in

  13. Bifidobacterium apri sp nov., a thermophilic actinobacterium isolated from the digestive tract of wild pigs (Sus scrofa)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pechar, R.; Killer, Jiří; Salmonová, H.; Geigerová, M.; Švejstil, R.; Švec, P.; Sedláček, I.; Rada, V.; Benada, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 7 (2017), s. 2349-2356 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-08803S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : Bifidobacterium * wild pigs * thermophilic bifidobacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.134, year: 2016

  14. Post-sensitization administration of non-digestible oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve M-16V reduces allergic symptoms in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, Betty C A M; Abbring, Suzanne; Diks, Mara A P; Dingjan, Gemma M; Harthoorn, Lucien F; Vos, A Paul; Garssen, Johan

    To support dietary management of severe cow's milk allergic infants, a synbiotic mixture of non-digestible oligosaccharides and Bifidobacterium breve M-16V (B. breve) was designed from source materials that are completely cow's milk-free. It was investigated whether this specific synbiotic concept

  15. In vitro study of the prebiotic xylooligosaccharide (XOS) on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp and Lactobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Summanen, Paula H; Komoriya, Tomoe; Finegold, Sydney M

    2015-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that XOS increased the counts of Bifidobacterium in vivo without increasing Lactobacillus in healthy adults. In the current study, we evaluated the effect of XOS on the growth of 35 Bifidobacterium and 29 Lactobacillus strains in in vitro conditions. Bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The growth stimulation was determined by agar dilution technique on plates containing two-fold serial dilutions of XOS (100-0.1 mg/ml). The growth of 86% of Bifidobacterium strains was stimulated at 1.56 mg/ml XOS and 100% at 6.25 mg/ml XOS. The growth of 38% of Lactobacillus strains was stimulated at 1.56 mg/ml XOS and 62% at 6.25 mg/ml XOS; 31% of Lactobacillus were not stimulated by XOS. Our results further suggest that XOS may be beneficial in stimulating intestinal Bifidobacterium without having much effect on Lactobacillus. The potential role for XOS in managing obesity should be investigated further.

  16. Powerful methods to establish chromosomal markers in Lactococcus lactis: an analysis of pyrimidine salvage pathway mutants obtained by positive selections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1995-01-01

    Using different 5-fluoropyrimidine analogues, positive selection procedures for obtaining mutants blocked in pyrimidine and purine salvage genes of Lactococcus lactis were established. Strains lacking the following enzyme activities due to mutations in the corresponding genes were isolated: uracil...

  17. Reconstitution of the Leucine Transport System of Lactococcus lactis into Liposomes Composed of Membrane-Spanning Lipids from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in t Veld, Geertruida; Elferink, Maria; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    The effect of bipolar tetraether lipids, extracted from the thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, on the branched-chain amino acid transport system of the mesophilic bacterium Lactococcus lactis was investigated. Liposomes were prepared from mixtures of monolayer lipids and the

  18. Development and Diversity of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc Bacteriophages in Dairies Using Undefined Mesophilic DL-Starter Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammed, Musemma Kedir

    Bacteriophages (phages) attacking strains of Lactococcus (Lc.) lactis and Leuconostoc species, used as starter cultures in mesophilic dairy productions, produce huge problems through waste of ingredients, increased processing time, reduced product quality, consistency and safety, and occasionally...

  19. Behavior and viability of spontaneous oxidative stress-resistant Lactococcus lactis mutants in experimental fermented milk processing

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, M. N.; ALMEIDA, K. E.; DAMIN, M. R.; ROCHAT, T.; GRATADOUX, J. -J.; MIYOSHI, A.; LANGELLA, P.; AZEVEDO, V.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we isolated two strains of spontaneous oxidative (SpOx2 and SpOx3) stress mutants of Lactococcus lactis subsp cremoris. Herein, we compared these mutants to a parental wild- type strain (J60011) and a commercial starter in experimental fermented milk production. Total solid contents of milk and fermentation temperature both affected the acidification profile of the spontaneous oxidative stress- resistant L. lactis mutants during fermented milk production. Fermentation times to pH ...

  20. In Vitro characterization of Lactococcus lactis strains Isolated from Iranian Traditional Dairy Products as a Potential Probiotic

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Nejati; Tobias Oelschlaeger

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have been reported regarding probiotic properties of Lactococcus lactis strains although they are extensively used as starter cultures in the production of dairy products. In this study 8 wild isolates of Lactococcus lactis were evaluated in vitro with regard to resistance to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, adherence ability to Caco-2 cells and HT29-MTX-E12 cell lines, anti-microbial activity, hydrophobicity and antibiotic susceptibility. The results revealed that all iso...

  1. Reduced binding of the endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH contributes to phage resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLARA eROCES

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analysed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin-pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712. Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40 % less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that contributes to a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate and, likely to its catalytic activity.

  2. Reduced Binding of the Endolysin LysTP712 to Lactococcus lactis ΔftsH Contributes to Phage Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces, Clara; Campelo, Ana B; Escobedo, Susana; Wegmann, Udo; García, Pilar; Rodríguez, Ana; Martínez, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Absence of the membrane protease FtsH in Lactococcus lactis hinders release of the bacteriophage TP712. In this work we have analyzed the mechanism responsible for the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH after phage infection. The lytic cassette of TP712 contains a putative antiholin-pinholin system and a modular endolysin (LysTP712). Inducible expression of the holin gene demonstrated the presence of a dual start motif which is functional in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells. Moreover, simulating holin activity with ionophores accelerated lysis of wildtype cells but not L. lactis ΔftsH cells, suggesting inhibition of the endolysin rather than a role of FtsH in holin activation. However, zymograms revealed the synthesis of an active endolysin in both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH TP712 lysogens. A reporter protein was generated by fusing the cell wall binding domain of LysTP712 to the fluorescent mCherry protein. Binding of this reporter protein took place at the septa of both wildtype and L. lactis ΔftsH cells as shown by fluorescence microscopy. Nonetheless, fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that mutant cells bound 40% less protein. In conclusion, the non-lytic phenotype of L. lactis ΔftsH is not due to direct action of the FtsH protease on the phage lytic proteins but rather to a putative function of FtsH in modulating the architecture of the L. lactis cell envelope that results in a lower affinity of the phage endolysin to its substrate.

  3. Recombinant invasive Lactococcus lactis can transfer DNA vaccines either directly to dendritic cells or across an epithelial cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Marcela; Meijerink, Marjolein; Taverne, Nico; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Langella, Philippe; Wells, Jerry M; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-11

    Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis), a generally regarded as safe (GRAS) bacterium has recently been investigated as a mucosal delivery vehicle for DNA vaccines. Because of its GRAS status, L. lactis represents an attractive alternative to attenuated pathogens. Previous studies showed that eukaryotic expression plasmids could be delivered into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) by L. lactis, or recombinant invasive strains of L. lactis, leading to heterologous protein expression. Although expression of antigens in IECs might lead to vaccine responses, it would be of interest to know whether uptake of L. lactis DNA vaccines by dendritic cells (DCs) could lead to antigen expression as they are unique in their ability to induce antigen-specific T cell responses. To test this, we incubated mouse bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) with invasive L. lactis strains expressing either Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin Binding Protein A (LL-FnBPA+), or Listeria monocytogenes mutated Internalin A (LL-mInlA+), both strains carrying a plasmid DNA vaccine (pValac) encoding for the cow milk allergen β-lactoglobulin (BLG). We demonstrated that they can transfect BMDCs, inducing the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12. We also measured the capacity of strains to invade a polarized monolayer of IECs, mimicking the situation encountered in the gastrointestinal tract. Gentamycin survival assay in these cells showed that LL-mInlA+ is 100 times more invasive than L. lactis. The cross-talk between differentiated IECs, BMDCs and bacteria was also evaluated using an in vitro transwell co-culture model. Co-incubation of strains in this model showed that DCs incubated with LL-mInlA+ containing pValac:BLG could express significant levels of BLG. These results suggest that DCs could sample bacteria containing the DNA vaccine across the epithelial barrier and express the antigen. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Genome‐scale diversity and niche adaptation analysis of Lactococcus lactis by comparative genome hybridization using multi‐strain arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Bayjanov, Jumamurat R.; Felis, Giovanna E.; van der Sijde, Marijke R.; Starrenburg, Marjo; Molenaar, Douwe; Wels, Michiel; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lactococcus lactis produces lactic acid and is widely used in the manufacturing of various fermented dairy products. However, the species is also frequently isolated from non‐dairy niches, such as fermented plant material. Recently, these non‐dairy strains have gained increasing interest, as they have been described to possess flavour‐forming activities that are rarely found in dairy isolates and have diverse metabolic properties. We performed an extensive whole‐genome diversity analysis on 39 L. lactis strains, isolated from dairy and plant sources. Comparative genome hybridization analysis with multi‐strain microarrays was used to assess presence or absence of genes and gene clusters in these strains, relative to all L. lactis sequences in public databases, whereby chromosomal and plasmid‐encoded genes were computationally analysed separately. Nearly 3900 chromosomal orthologous groups (chrOGs) were defined on basis of four sequenced chromosomes of L. lactis strains (IL1403, KF147, SK11, MG1363). Of these, 1268 chrOGs are present in at least 35 strains and represent the presently known core genome of L. lactis, and 72 chrOGs appear to be unique for L. lactis. Nearly 600 and 400 chrOGs were found to be specific for either the subspecies lactis or subspecies cremoris respectively. Strain variability was found in presence or absence of gene clusters related to growth on plant substrates, such as genes involved in the consumption of arabinose, xylan, α‐galactosides and galacturonate. Further niche‐specific differences were found in gene clusters for exopolysaccharides biosynthesis, stress response (iron transport, osmotolerance) and bacterial defence mechanisms (nisin biosynthesis). Strain variability of functions encoded on known plasmids included proteolysis, lactose fermentation, citrate uptake, metal ion resistance and exopolysaccharides biosynthesis. The present study supports the view of L. lactis as a species with a very flexible

  5. Metabolism of [14C] bicarbonate by Streptococcus lactis: the synthesis, uptake and excretion of aspartate by resting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, A.J.; Rice, G.H.; Jago, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    Resting cells of Streptococcus lactis C10 were able to synthesize aspartic acid de novo but could not actively transport aspartic acid into the cell. Intracellular aspartate was excreted from the cell in the presence of glucose but did not exchange with any extracellular amino acids. The results indicate that Str. lactis C10 obtains the aspartic acid it requires for growth by bicarbonate fixation instead of by the utilization of extracellular aspartic acid. (author)

  6. Combination of Ononis hirta and Bifidobacterium longum decreases syngeneic mouse mammary tumor burden and enhances immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Wamidh H; Mahasneh, Adel M

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of solid tumors to conventional therapies has prompted the need for alternative therapies. To evaluate in vitro and in vivo effect of extracts from Ononis hirta against resistant mouse mammary gland cell line (66 cl-4-GFP) and to use a combination of Ononis hirta extract with Bifidobacterium longum to target resistant solid tumors in mice. Different solvent extracts of Ononis hirta were prepared and their in vitro antiproliferative activity was tested against 66 cl-4-GFP cell line using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to identify the active extracts. Balb/C mice were transplanted with 66 cl-4-GFP cell line and in vivo antitumor activity was assessed for the plant extract, Bifidobacterium longum, and a combination of plant extract and Bifidobacterium longum. Histological examination of tumors was performed using standard hematoxylin/eosin staining protocol while gram stain was used to detect the presence of anaerobic bacteria in these sections. A combination of Ononis hirta methanol extract and Bifidobacterium longum showed high ability in targeting solid mammary gland tumors in mice. It also induced extensive necrosis in these tumors. Thirty percent of mice treated with such combination were cured of their cancers. The mechanism underlying this anticancer activity involves immune system activation exemplified by the observed rejection of reinoculated tumors by cured mice. Chemical TLC analysis of the active methanol extract showed the presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, and alkaloids. HPLC analysis confirmed the presence of flavonoids and alkaloids in Ononis hirta methanol extract. The complete regression of the tumor is encouraging and shows that plant extracts in combination with Bifidobacterium longum is an inviting option to treat solid tumors.

  7. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant Lactococcus lactis expressing Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Brucella abortus triggers protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Darwin; Fernández, Pablo; Rivera, Alejandra; Andrews, Edilia; Oñate, Angel

    2012-02-08

    Brucella infections mainly occur through mucosal surfaces. Thus, the development of mucosal administered vaccines could be instrumental for the control of brucellosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of recombinant Lactococcus lactis secreting Brucella abortus Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) as oral antigen delivery system, when administered alone or in combination with L. lactis expressing IL-12. To this end, mice were vaccinated by oral route with L. lactis NZ9000 transformed with pSEC derivatives encoding for SOD (pSEC:SOD) and IL-12 (pSEC:scIL-12). In animals receiving L. lactis pSEC:SOD alone, anti-SOD-specific IgM antibodies were detected in sera at day 28 post-vaccination, together with an IgG2a dominated IgG response. SOD-specific sIgA was also detected in nasal and bronchoalveolar lavages. In addition, T-cell-proliferative responses upon re-stimulation with either recombinant SOD or crude Brucella protein extracts were observed up to 6 months after the last boost, suggesting the induction of long term memory. Vaccinated animals were also protected against challenge with the virulent B. abortus 2308 strain. Responses were mildly improved when L. lactis pSEC:SOD was co-administered with L. lactis pSEC:scIL-12. These results indicated that vaccines based on lactococci-derived live carriers are promising interventions against B. abortus infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production.

  9. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freires, Irlan A; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Kitten, Todd; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Swartz, Michael; Knight, Peter A; Rosalen, Pedro L; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2017-01-02

    In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus lactis NZ9800 using a nisin-inducible system. Despite the absence of the machinery necessary for Cnm glycosylation, Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that Cnm was effectively expressed and translocated to the cell wall of L. lactis. Similar to S. mutans, expression of Cnm in L. lactis enabled robust binding to collagen and laminin, invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells and increased virulence in G. mellonella. Using an ex vivo human heart tissue colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further characterization of bacterial virulence factors.

  10. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangrong Dong

    Full Text Available PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production.

  11. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis Expressing Haemagglutinin from a Polish Avian H5N1 Isolate and Its Immunological Effect in Preliminary Animal Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepankowska, Agnieszka K.; Szatraj, Katarzyna; Sałański, Przemysław; Rózga, Agnieszka; Górecki, Roman K.; Bardowski, Jacek K.

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are Gram-positive, nonpathogenic microorganisms that are gaining much interest as antigen producers for development of live vaccine vectors. Heterologous proteins of different origin have been successfully expressed in various LAB species, including Lactococcus lactis. Recombinant L. lactis strains have been shown to induce specific local and systemic immune responses against various antigens. Our study aimed at constructing a L. lactis strain expressing haemaggluti...

  12. Developing a xylanase XYNZG from Plectosphaerella cucumerina for baking by heterologously expressed in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Fei Xiang; Wang, Qin Hong; Jiang, Si Jing; Zhou, Yu Ling; Zhang, Gui Min; Ma, Yan He

    2014-12-16

    Xylanase can replace chemical additives to improve the volume and sensory properties of bread in the baking. Suitable baking xylanase with improved yield will promote the application of xylanase in baking industry. The xylanase XYNZG from the Plectosphaerella cucumerina has been previously characterized by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. However, P. pastoris is not a suitable host for xylanase to be used in the baking process since P. pastoris does not have GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) status and requires large methanol supplement during the fermentation in most conditions, which is not allowed to be used in the food industry. Kluyveromyces lactis, as another yeast expression host, has a GRAS status, which has been successfully used in food and feed applications. No previous work has been reported concerning the heterologous expression of xylanase gene xynZG in K. lactis with an aim for application in baking. The xylanase gene xynZG from the P. cucumerina was heterologously expressed in K. lactis. The recombinant protein XYNZG in K. lactis presented an approximately 19 kDa band on SDS-PAGE and zymograms analysis. Transformant with the highest halo on the plate containing the RBB-xylan (Remazol Brilliant Blue-xylan) was selected for the flask fermentation in different media. The results indicated that the highest activity of 115 U/ml at 72 h was obtained with the YLPU medium. The mass spectrometry analysis suggested that the hydrolytic products of xylan by XYNZG were mainly xylobiose and xylotriose. The results of baking trials indicated that the addition of XYNZG could reduce the kneading time of dough, increase the volume of bread, improve the texture, and have more positive effects on the sensory properties of bread. Xylanase XYNZG is successfully expressed in K. lactis, which exhibits the highest activity among the published reports of the xylanase expression in K. lactis. The recombinant XYNZG can be used to improve the volume and sensory

  13. Production of Recombinant Peanut Allergen Ara h 2 using Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frøkiær Hanne

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural allergen sources can supply large quantities of authentic allergen mixtures for use as immunotherapeutics. However, such extracts are complex, difficult to define, vary from batch to batch, which may lead to unpredictable efficacy and/or unacceptable levels of side effects. The use of recombinant expression systems for allergen production can alleviate some of these issues. Several allergens have been tested in high-level expression systems and in most cases show immunereactivity comparable to their natural counterparts. The gram positive lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis is an attractive microorganism for use in the production of protein therapeutics. L. lactis is considered food grade, free of endotoxins, and is able to secrete the heterologous product together with few other native proteins. Hypersensitivity to peanut represents a serious allergic problem. Some of the major allergens in peanut have been described. However, for therapeutic usage more information about the individual allergenic components is needed. In this paper we report recombinant production of the Ara h 2 peanut allergen using L. lactis. Results A synthetic ara h 2 gene was cloned into an L. lactis expression plasmid containing the P170 promoter and the SP310mut2 signal sequence. Flask cultures grown overnight showed secretion of the 17 kDa Ara h 2 protein. A batch fermentation resulted in 40 mg/L recombinant Ara h 2. Purification of Ara h 2 from the culture supernatant was done by hydrophobic exclusion and size separation. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal analysis showed a recombinant Ara h 2 of full length and correctly processed by the signal peptidase. The immunological activity of recombinant Ara h 2 was analysed by ELISA using antibodies specific for native Ara h 2. The recombinant Ara h 2 showed comparable immunereactivity to that of native Ara h 2. Conclusion Recombinant production of Ara h 2 using L. lactis can offer high yields

  14. Optimization of nitrogen source for Bifidobacterium bifidum using response surface methodology

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    Chen He

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the viable counts of Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 in the liquid medium, the Central Composite Design (CCD was used to optimize the nitrogen source in the medium of B. bifidum BB01. The results showed that the nitrogen source composition of B. bifidum BB01 was: peptone 0.9%, yeast extracts 0.3%, beef paste 0.7%. Under the optimal conditions, the viable counts of B. bifidum BB01 reached (2.49±0.06×109CFU/mL after cultured at 18h, which was 42.97% higher than MRS (lactose, and 12.85% higher than the optimized MRS medium (carbon source and prebiotics were optimized. Therefore, the CCD used in this study is workable for promoting the growth of B. bifidum BB01.

  15. Epithelial cell proliferation arrest induced by lactate and acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve.

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    Takahiro Matsuki

    Full Text Available In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut.

  16. Optimization the Process of Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 by Box-Behnken Design

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    Chen He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cell suspension-alginate ratios, sodium erythorbate, and inulin on encapsulation yield of microcapsules of Bifidobacterium bifidum BB01 were studied by Box-Behnken design. The experimental results indicated that cell suspension-alginate ratios, sodium erythorbate and inulin had a significant impact on encapsulation yield, and the embedding yield could be enhanced significantly in the condition of 1:3 cell suspension-alginate ratios, 0.12% sodium erythorbate, and 6% inulin. The optimal embedding yields of microencapsulation of B. bifidum BB01 were observed to be 81.52%, that values were very close to the expected values 81.81%, so the method was effective.

  17. Applications of Microencapsulated Bifidobacterium Longum with Eleutherine Americana in Fresh Milk Tofu and Pineapple Juice

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    Atchara N. Phoem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium longum was microencapsulated by extrusion technique and added in fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice. Microencapsulation of B. longum with Eleutherine americana extract, oligosaccharides extract, and commercial fructo-oligosaccharides was assessed for the bacterial survival after sequential exposure to simulated gastric and intestinal juices, and refrigeration storage. Microencapsulated B. longum with the extract and oligosaccharides extract in the food products showed better survival than free cells under adverse conditions. Sensory analysis demonstrated that the products containing co-encapsulated bacterial cells were more acceptable by consumers than free cells. Pineapple juice prepared with co-encapsulated cells had lower values for over acidification, compared with the juice with free cells added. This work suggested that microencapsulated B. longum with E. americana could enhance functional properties of fresh milk tofu and pineapple juice.

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Bifidobacterium adolescentis xylose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Caio Vinicius; Bernardes, Amanda; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-05-01

    Xylose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.5) is a key enzyme in xylose metabolism which is industrially important for the transformation of glucose and xylose into fructose and xylulose, respectively. The Bifidobacterium adolescentis xylA gene (NC_008618.1) encoding xylose isomerase (XI) was cloned and the enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant XI was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol 3350 as the precipitating agent. A complete native data set was collected to 1.7 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.78, b = 123.98, c = 78.63 Å.

  19. Effects of phytochemicals on in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Kyuichi; Kato, Yuri; Sakano, Taiken; Baba, Nobuyuki; Hagiwara, Kota; Tamura, Akira; Baba, Seigo; Natsume, Midori; Ohigashi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics have been shown to improve the condition of not only the human gastrointestinal tract but also the entire body. We found that quercetin enhances the anti-inflammatory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescentis, which is abundant in human intestines. Here, we assessed whether certain phytochemicals could enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of B. adolescentis. Bifidobacteria were anaerobically cultured with phytochemicals for 3 h, and the anti-inflammatory activity of the supernatants was estimated by testing their ability to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264 macrophages. Of the 55 phytochemicals tested, phloretin, (+)-taxifolin, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate as well as quercetin-3-O-glucoside and quercetin-4'-O-glucoside were similar to quercetin in promoting NO suppression by B. adolescentis. In addition, the phytochemicals excluding quercetin increased the concentrations of lactic and acetic acids in the co-culture supernatants. These results suggest that some phytochemicals may activate the anti-inflammatory function of B. adolescentis.

  20. Plasmids of Raw Milk Cheese Isolate Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Biovar diacetylactis DPC3901 Suggest a Plant-Based Origin for the Strain ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallico, Vincenzo; McAuliffe, Olivia; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul

    2011-01-01

    The four-plasmid complement of the raw milk cheese isolate Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis DPC3901 was sequenced, and some genetic features were functionally analyzed. The complete sequences of pVF18 (18,977 bp), pVF21 (21,739 bp), pVF22 (22,166 bp), and pVF50 (53,876 bp) were obtained. Each plasmid contained genes not previously described for Lactococcus, in addition to genes associated with plant-derived lactococcal strains. Most of the novel genes were found on pVF18 and encoded functions typical of bacteria associated with plants, such as activities of plant cell wall modification (orf11 and orf25). In addition, a predicted high-affinity regulated system for the uptake of cobalt was identified (orf19 to orf21 [orf19-21]), which has a single database homolog on a plant-derived Leuconostoc plasmid and whose functionality was demonstrated following curing of pVF18. pVF21 and pVF22 encode additional metal transporters, which, along with orf19-21 of pVF18, could enhance host ability to uptake growth-limiting amounts of biologically essential ions within the soil. In addition, vast regions from pVF50 and pVF21 share significant homology with the plant-derived lactococcal plasmid pGdh442, which is indicative of extensive horizontal gene transfer and recombination between these plasmids and suggests a common plant niche for their hosts. Phenotypes associated with these regions include glutamate dehydrogenase activity and Na+ and K+ transport. The presence of numerous plant-associated markers in L. lactis DPC3901 suggests a plant origin for the raw milk cheese isolate and provides for the first time the genetic basis to support the concept of the plant-milk transition for Lactococcus strains. PMID:21803914

  1. Improved adhesive properties of recombinant bifidobacteria expressing the Bifidobacterium bifidum-specific lipoprotein BopA

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    Gleinser Marita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bifidobacteria belong to one of the predominant bacterial groups in the intestinal microbiota of infants and adults. Several beneficial effects on the health status of their human hosts have been demonstrated making bifidobacteria interesting candidates for probiotic applications. Adhesion of probiotics to the intestinal epithelium is discussed as a prerequisite for colonisation of and persistence in the gastrointestinal tract. Results In the present study, 15 different strains of bifidobacteria were tested for adhesion. B. bifidum was identified as the species showing highest adhesion to all tested intestinal epithelial cell (IEC lines. Adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs was strongly reduced after treatment of bacteria with pronase. These results strongly indicate that a proteinaceous cell surface component mediates adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. In silico analysis of the currently accessible Bifidobacterium genomes identified bopA encoding a lipoprotein as a B. bifidum-specific gene previously shown to function as an adhesin of B. bifidum MIMBb75. The in silico results were confirmed by Southern Blot analysis. Furthermore, Northern Blot analysis demonstrated that bopA is expressed in all B. bifidum strains tested under conditions used to cultivate bacteria for adhesion assays. The BopA gene was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography as a C-terminal His6-fusion. Purified BopA had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of B. bifidum S17 to IECs. Moreover, bopA was successfully expressed in B. bifidum S17 and B. longum/infantis E18. Strains overexpressing bopA showed enhanced adhesion to IECs, clearly demonstrating a role of BopA in adhesion of B. bifidum strains. Conclusions BopA was identified as a B. bifidum-specific protein involved in adhesion to IECs. Bifidobacterium strains expressing bopA show enhanced adhesion. Our results represent the first report on recombinant

  2. Increased biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis during energetically limited growth and respiratory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Blank, Lars Mathias; Solem, Christian

    2008-01-01

    (glucose/mannose-specific phosphotransferase system). Amino acid catabolism could be excluded as the source of the additional ATP. Since mutants without a functional H+-ATPase produced less ATP under sugar starvation and respiratory conditions, the additional ATP yield appears to come partly from energy......Lactococcus lactis is known to be capable of respiration under aerobic conditions in the presence of haemin. In the present study the effect of respiration on ATP production during growth on different sugars was examined. With glucose as the sole carbon source, respiratory conditions in L. lactis...... MG1363 resulted in only a minor increase, 21%, in biomass yield. Since ATP production through substrate-level phosphorylation was essentially identical with and without respiration, the increased biomass yield was a result of energy-saving under respiratory conditions estimated to be 0.4 mol of ATP...

  3. Exploitation of a chromosomally integrated lactose operon for controlled gene expression in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, J; MacCormick, C A; Griffin, H G; Gasson, M J

    1996-02-01

    Lactococcus lactis MG5267 is a plasmid-free strain in which the lactose operon is integrated in the bacterial chromosome. The chromosomal lacG gene which encodes phospho-beta-galactosidase was inactivated by a double cross-over integration event. Unexpectedly, the resultant mutant was shown to retain a Lac-positive phenotype. The lysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes bacteriophage LM-4 was subsequently integrated into the chromosome of this strain such that expression of the heterologous gene was mediated by the lactose operon promoter. Expression of the lysin gene was shown to be regulated by growth on lactose. This represents an important strategy for the controlled and stabilised expression of biotechnologically useful genes in L. lactis.

  4. Analysis of heat shock gene expression in Lactococcus lactis MG1363

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, José; Sørensen, Kim; Appel, Karen Fuglede

    1996-01-01

    The induction of the heat shock response in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was analysed at the RNA level using a novel RNA isolation procedure to prevent degradation. Cloning of the dnaJ and groEL homologous was carried out. Nothern blot analysis showed a similar induction pattern......, although maximum induction was observed earlier for orf1 and grpE. Novel transcript sizes were detected in heat-shocked cells. The induction kinetics observed for ftsH suggested a different regulation for this gene. Experimental evidence for a prenounced transcriptional regulation being involved...... in the heat shock response in L. lactis MG1363 is presented. A gene located downstream of the dnaK operon in strain MG1363, named orf4, was shown not to be regulated by heat shock....

  5. Biosorption of silver cations onto Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei isolated from dairy products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Milanowski

    Full Text Available The current work deals with the phenomenon of silver cations uptake by two kinds of bacteria isolated from dairy products. The mechanism of sorption of silver cations by Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei bacteria was investigated. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was used for determination of silver concentration sorbed by bacteria. Analysis of charge distribution was conducted by diffraction light scattering method. Changes in the ultrastructure of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus casei cells after treatment with silver cations were investigated using transmission electron microscopy observation. Molecular spectroscopy methods, namely Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS were employed for description of the sorption mechanism. Moreover, an analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs extracted from bacterial cells was performed.

  6. Study of the transgalactosylation activity of ß-galactosidase from a new strain Kluyveromyces lactis 3

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    ILIA ILIEV

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Beta-galactosidase (EC.3.2.1.23 is an important enzyme industrially used for the hydrolysis of lactose from milk and milk whey for several applications. Lately, the importance of this enzyme was enhanced by its galactosyltransferase activity, which is responsible for synthesis of transgalactosylated oligosaccharides that act as prebiotics with several beneficial effects on the consumers. ß-Galactosidase production by Kluyveromyces lactis 3 was studied in shake flask culture. The highest enzymatic activity was obtained at 10-th hour of the fermentation. The optimum temperature for transferase activity was 50°C. When incubated with 30% lactose in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0 the enzyme can synthesize up to 41% galacto-oligosaccharides (GalOS. β-Galactosidase from strain Kluyveromyces lactis 3 produces mainly oligosaccharides with degree of polymerization (DP 6 at 40°C and with DP 3 at 50°C.

  7. Metabolic Profiling of Lactococcus lactis Under Different Culture Conditions

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    Normah Mohd Noor

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS and headspace gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS/GC-MS were used to study metabolites produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 grown at a temperature of 30 °C with and without agitation at 150 rpm, and at 37 °C without agitation. It was observed that L. lactis produced more organic acids under agitation. Primary alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and polyols were identified as the corresponding trimethylsilyl (TMS derivatives, whereas amino acids and organic acids, including fatty acids, were detected through methyl chloroformate derivatization. HS analysis indicated that branched-chain methyl aldehydes, including 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, and 2-methylpropanal are degdradation products of isoleucine, leucine or valine. Multivariate analysis (MVA using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA revealed the major differences between treatments were due to changes of amino acids and fermentation products.

  8. Protective Effects of Bifidobacterium on Intestinal Barrier Function in LPS-Induced Enterocyte Barrier Injury of Caco-2 Monolayers and in a Rat NEC Model.

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    Xiang Ling

    Full Text Available Zonulin protein is a newly discovered modulator which modulates the permeability of the intestinal epithelial barrier by disassembling intercellular tight junctions (TJ. Disruption of TJ is associated with neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC. It has been shown bifidobacterium could protect the intestinal barrier function and prophylactical administration of bifidobacterium has beneficial effects in NEC patients and animals. However, it is still unknown whether the zonulin is involved in the gut barrier dysfunction of NEC, and the protective mechanisms of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function are also not well understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of bifidobacterium on intestinal barrier function, zonulin regulation, and TJ integrity both in LPS-induced enterocyte barrier injury of Caco-2 monolayers and in a rat NEC model. Our results showed bifidobacterium markedly attenuated the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and the increase in paracellular permeability in the Caco-2 monolayers treated with LPS (P < 0.01. Compared with the LPS group, bifidobacterium significantly decreased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α (P < 0.01 and suppressed zonulin release (P < 0.05. In addition, bifidobacterium pretreatment up-regulated occludin, claudin-3 and ZO-1 expression (P < 0.01 and also preserved these proteins localization at TJ compared with the LPS group. In the in vivo study, bifidobacterium decreased the incidence of NEC from 88 to 47% (P < 0.05 and reduced the severity in the NEC model. Increased levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the ileum of NEC rats were normalized in bifidobacterium treated rats (P < 0.05. Moreover, administration of bifidobacterium attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability (P < 0.01, decreased the levels of serum zonulin (P < 0.05, normalized the expression and localization of TJ proteins in the ileum compared with animals with NEC. We concluded that bifidobacterium may

  9. Role of Bifidobacterium bifidum and plant food extracts in improving microflora and biochemical and cytogenetic parameters in adjuvant arthritis.

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    Donya, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to discover plant food extracts and probiotics that may have bioactivity towards chronic inflammation. Three plant food extract mixtures expected to be rich in phenolic compounds, carotenoids and tocopherols were prepared. The anti-inflammatory activity of the different mixtures as well as probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum were evaluated in adjuvant arthritis in rats. The anti-inflammatory effect, mechanism of action and safety of the three mixtures and Bifidobacterium bifidum were studied by measuring the size of inflammation and the determination of inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, colonic bacteria profile and specific cytogenetic parameters. The contents of tocopherols, β-carotene and phenolic compounds in the mixtures were determined. The results show that the tested mixtures and Bifidobacterium bifidum possess promising anti-inflammatory effects. The mechanism of action seems to involve a reduction in oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers and an effect on colonic microflora. Genotoxicity and DNA fragmentation induced by adjuvant arthritis were prevented after supplementation with the tested mixtures.El objetivo de la presente investigación fue encontrar extractos de alimentos vegetales y probióticos que puedan tener bioactividad hacía la inflamación crónica. Mezclas de tres extractos de alimentos vegetales conocidos por su riqueza en compuestos fenólicos, carotenoides y tocoferoles han sido preparadas. La actividad anti-inflamatoria de las diferentes mezclas y de bacterias probióticas (Bifidobacterium bifidum fue evaluada en artritis adyuvante en ratas. El efecto anti-inflamatorio, mecanismo de acción y salubridad de las tres mezclas y de Bifidobacterium bifidum ha sido estudiado mediante la medida del tamaño de la inflamación y la determinación de biomarcadores de inflamación y estrés oxidativo, del perfil de bacterias del colón y de parámetros citogen

  10. Lactococcus lactis is capable of improving the riboflavin status in deficient rats

    OpenAIRE

    LeBlanc, Jean Guy; Burgess, Catherine M.; Sesma, Fernando; de Giori, Graciela Savoy; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2005-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a commonly used starter strain that can be converted from a vitamin B2 consumer into a vitamin B2 'factory' by over-expressing its riboflavin biosynthesis genes. The present study was conducted to assess in a rat bioassay the response of riboflavin produced by GM or native lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The riboflavin-producing strains were able to eliminate most physiological manifestations of ariboflavinosis such as stunted growth, elevated erythrocyte glutathione reducta...

  11. Biosurfactant from Lactococcus lactis 53 inhibits microbial adhesion on silicone rubber

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, L. R.; Mei, Henny van der; Teixeira, J. A.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2004-01-01

    The ability of biosurfactant obtained from the probiotic bacterium Lactococcus lactis 53 to inhibit adhesion of four bacterial and two yeast strains isolated from explanted voice prostheses to silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed biosurfactant layer was investigated in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The microbial cell surfaces and the silicone rubber with and without an adsorbed biosurfactant layer were characterized using contact-angle measurements. Water contact angles indi...

  12. Intramammary infusion of a live culture of Lactococcus lactis in ewes to treat staphylococcal mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignacca, Sebastian Alessandro; Dore, Simone; Spuria, Liliana; Zanghì, Pietro; Amato, Benedetta; Duprè, Ilaria; Armas, Federica; Biasibetti, Elena; Camperio, Cristina; Lollai, Stefano A; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Cannas, Eugenia Agnese; Di Marco Lo Presti, Vincenzo; Marianelli, Cinzia

    2017-12-01

    Alternatives to antibiotic therapy for mastitis in ruminants are needed. We present an evaluation, in two trials, of the efficacy of an intramammary infusion of a live culture of Lactococcus lactis for the treatment of subclinical and clinical mastitis in ewes. In total, 67 animals were enrolled: 19 lactating ewes (study 1), including healthy (N=6) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)-infected ewes (N=13); and 48 lactating ewes (study 2) with either CNS mastitis (N=32), or Staphylococcus aureus mastitis (N=16), for a total of 123 mammary glands. Intramammary infusions were performed with either L. lactis or PBS for 3 (study 1) or 7 (study 2) consecutive days. Antibiotic-treated and untreated control glands were included. Milk samples for microbiology, somatic cell analysis and milk production were collected before and after treatment.Results/Key findings.L. lactis rapidly activated the mammary glands' innate immune response and initiated an inflammatory response as evidenced by the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and increased somatic cell counts. But while leading to a transient clearance of CNS in the gland, this response caused mild to moderate clinical cases of mastitis characterized by abnormal milk secretions and udder inflammation. Moreover, S. aureus infections did not improve, and CNS infections tended to relapse. Under our experimental conditions, the L. lactis treatment led to a transient clearance of the pathogen in the gland, but also caused mild to moderate clinical cases of mastitis. We believe it is still early to implement bacterial formulations as alternatives in treating mastitis in ruminants and further experimentation is needed.

  13. Coculture-inducible bacteriocin biosynthesis of different probiotic strains by dairy starter culture Lactococcus lactis

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    Blaženka Kos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins produced by probiotic strains effectively contribute to colonization ability of probiotic strains and facilitate their establishment in the competitive gut environment and also protect the gut from gastrointestinal pathogens. Moreover, bacteriocins have received considerable attention due to their potential application as biopreservatives, especially in dairy industry. Hence, the objective of this research was to investigate antimicrobial activity of probiotic strains Lactobacillus helveticus M92, Lactobacillus plantarum L4 and Enterococcus faecium L3, with special focus on their bacteriocinogenic activity directed towards representatives of the same or related bacterial species, and towards distant microorganisms including potential food contaminants or causative agents of gut infections. In order to induce bacteriocin production, probiotic cells were cocultivated with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis LMG 9450, one of the most important starter cultures in cheese production. The presence of bacteriocin coding genes was investigated by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers for helveticin and was confirmed for probiotic strain L. helveticus M92. All examined probiotic strains have shown bacteriocinogenic activity against Staphylococcus aureus 3048, Staphylococcus aureus K-144, Escherichia coli 3014, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium FP1, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Bacillus cereus TM2, which is an important functional treat of probiotic strains significant in competitive exclusion mechanism which provides selective advantage of probiotic strains against undesirable microorganisms in gastrointestinal tract of the host. According to obtained results, living cells of starter culture Lc. lactis subsp. lactis LMG 9450 induced bacteriocin production by examined probiotic strains but starter culture itself was not sensitive to bacteriocin activity.

  14. PpiA, a surface PPIase of the cyclophilin family in Lactococcus lactis.

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    Nicolas Trémillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein folding in the envelope is a crucial limiting step of protein export and secretion. In order to better understand this process in Lactococcus lactis, a lactic acid bacterium, genes encoding putative exported folding factors like Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerases (PPIases were searched for in lactococcal genomes. RESULTS: In L. lactis, a new putative membrane PPIase of the cyclophilin subfamily, PpiA, was identified and characterized. ppiA gene was found to be constitutively expressed under normal and stress (heat shock, H(2O(2 conditions. Under normal conditions, PpiA protein was synthesized and released from intact cells by an exogenously added protease, showing that it was exposed at the cell surface. No obvious phenotype could be associated to a ppiA mutant strain under several laboratory conditions including stress conditions, except a very low sensitivity to H(2O(2. Induction of a ppiA copy provided in trans had no effect i on the thermosensitivity of an mutant strain deficient for the lactococcal surface protease HtrA and ii on the secretion and stability on four exported proteins (a highly degraded hybrid protein and three heterologous secreted proteins in an otherwise wild-type strain background. However, a recombinant soluble form of PpiA that had been produced and secreted in L. lactis and purified from a culture supernatant displayed both PPIase and chaperone activities. CONCLUSIONS: Although L. lactis PpiA, a protein produced and exposed at the cell surface under normal conditions, displayed a very moderate role in vivo, it was found, as a recombinant soluble form, to be endowed with folding activities in vitro.

  15. Induced mutants of Streptococcus lactis by gamma irradiation and its effect on milk acidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daowd, A.H.; Sabbour, M.M.; Newigy, N.A.; Wahab, G.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Streptococus lactis was exposed to different doses of gamma-irradiation (10, 50, 100 and 150 Kr). The results of acidity production in sterilized milk inoculated by isolates from radiation treatments and control could be summarized in the following: 1. The mean acidity produced by S. lactis isolates after irradiation at 10 Kr increased to be 0.66% than that of control isolates (0.62%). The acidity produced by the isolates of the 50 Kr treatment showed more increment to reach the peak (0.7%). Thereafter, acidity production decreased by isolates of the 100 Kr (0.53%) and 150 Kr (0.51%) treatments. Heme, the 50 Kr treatment could be considered activation dose to S. lactis starter for acid production. 2. Two mutants were selected. Acidity production by mutant I (from 10 Kr treatment) was 0.95%, and that of mutant II (from 50 Kr treatment) was 1.0%, while acid production by the parent S. lactis culture was 0.62%. Concerning the stability of the isolates, it was found that acid production by mutant I and mutant II slightly decreased by time. The mutants were re-irradiated after 37 and 60 days at doses 10, 25 and 50 Kr. Acid production in milk by isolates of the radiation treatments was determined. The following results were obtained: -The re-irradiation of the mutants decreased the ability of the isolates for acid production than that of parent mutants. -The re-irradiation of the mutants after 60 days yielded isolates which showed more reduction in acid produced than of isolates obtained from re-irridation of the mutants after 37-days. -The higher the dose of the re-irradiation of the mutants, the lower the mean of acid production by isolates of the treatment

  16. Production of galactooligosaccharides using a hyperthermophilic β-galactosidase in permeabilized whole cells of Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L; O'Sullivan, D J

    2014-02-01

    Galactooligosaccharides (GOS) are novel prebiotic food ingredients that can be produced from lactose using β-galactosidase, but the process is more efficient at higher temperatures. To efficiently express the lacS gene from the hyperthermophile Sulfolobus solfataricus, in Lactococcus lactis a synthetic gene (lacSt) with optimized codon usage for Lc. lactis was designed and synthesized. This hyperthermostable β-galactosidase enzyme was successfully overexpressed in Lc. lactis LM0230 using a nisin-controlled gene expression system. Enzyme-containing cells were then killed and permeabilized using 50% ethanol and were used to determine both hydrolysis and transgalactosylation activity. The optimum conditions for GOS synthesis was found to be at pH 6.0 and 85 °C. A maximum production of 197 g/L of GOS tri- and tetrasaccharides was obtained from 40% initial lactose, after 55 h of incubation. The total GOS yield increased with the initial lactose concentration, whereas the highest lactose conversion rate (72%) was achieved from a low lactose solution (5%). Given that a significant proportion of the remaining lactose would be expected to be converted into disaccharide GOS, this should enable the future development of a cost-effective approach for the conversion of whey-based substrates into GOS-enriched food ingredients using this cell-based technology. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. From field to fermentation: the origins of Lactococcus lactis and its domestication to the dairy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-05-01

    Lactococcus lactis is an organism of substantial economic importance, used extensively in the production of fermented foods and widely held to have evolved from plant strains. The domestication of this organism to the milk environment is associated with genome reduction and gene decay, and the acquisition of specific genes involved in protein and lactose utilisation by horizontal gene transfer. In recent years, numerous studies have focused on uncovering the physiology and molecular biology of lactococcal strains from the wider environment for exploitation in the dairy industry. This in turn has facilitated comparative genome analysis of lactococci from different environments and provided insight into the natural phenotypic and genetic diversity of L. lactis. This diversity may be exploited in dairy fermentations to develop products with improved quality and sensory attributes. In this review, we discuss the classification of L. lactis and the problems that arise with phenotype/genotype designation. We also discuss the adaptation of non-dairy lactococci to milk, the traits associated with this adaptation and the potential application of non-dairy lactococci to dairy fermentations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Probiotic assessment of Enterococcus durans 6HL and Lactococcus lactis 2HL isolated from vaginal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Yousef; Abdullah, Norhafizah; Haghshenas, Babak; Radiah, Dayang; Rosli, Rozita; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2014-08-01

    Forty-five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from the vaginal specimens of healthy fertile women, and the identities of the bacteria were confirmed by sequencing of their 16S rDNA genes. Among these bacteria, only four isolates were able to resist and survive in low pH, bile salts and simulated in vitro digestion conditions. Lactococcus lactis 2HL, Enterococcus durans 6HL, Lactobacillus acidophilus 36YL and Lactobacillus plantarum 5BL showed the best resistance to these conditions. These strains were evaluated further to assess their ability to adhere to human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Lactococcus lactis 2HL and E. durans 6HL were the most adherent strains. In vitro tests under neutralized pH proved the antimicrobial activity of both strains. Results revealed that the growth of Escherichia coli O26, Staphylococcus aureus and Shigella flexneri was suppressed by both LAB strains. The antibiotic susceptibility tests showed that these strains were sensitive to all nine antibiotics: vancomycin, tetracycline, ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole and chloramphenicol. These data suggest that E. durans 6HL and Lactococcus lactis 2HL could be examined further for their useful properties and could be developed as new probiotics. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

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    Beatriz del Rio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14 is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC [1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC [2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1,3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession no. GSE59514.

  20. Heterologous Expression of the Lactococcus lactis Bacteriocin, Nisin, in a Dairy Enterococcus Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiping; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    The bacteriocin nisin is produced only by some strains of Lactococcus lactis, and to date production in other lactic acid bacteria has not been achieved. Enterococcus sp. strain N12β is a nisin-immune transconjugant obtained from a nisin-producing donor (L. lactis ATCC 11454) and a dairy recipient (Enterococcus sp. strain S12β), but it does not produce nisin. In this study, using PCR amplification, we confirmed that the whole nisin operon is likely present in Enterococcus sp. strain N12β. Northern hybridization of total RNA from strain N12β with a nisA probe and the results of reverse transcriptase PCR showed the lack of nisA transcription in this strain. However, nisA transcription was partially restored in strain N12β upon growth in the presence of exogenous nisin, and the nisA transcription signal was intensified after an increase in the external nisin level. Furthermore, bioassays showed that active nisin was produced in a dose-dependent fashion by strain N12β following induction by exogenous nisin. These results indicated that expression of the nisin genes in Enterococcus sp. strain N12β depended on autoinduction via signal transduction. However, the amount of external inducing signal required was significantly greater than the amount needed for autoinduction in L. lactis. PMID:12089020

  1. Heterologous protein secretion in Lactococcus lactis: a novel antigen delivery system

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    Langella P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive bacteria and are generally regarded as safe (GRAS organisms. Therefore, LAB could be used for heterologous protein secretion and they are good potential candidates as antigen delivery vehicles. To develop such live vaccines, a better control of protein secretion is required. We developed an efficient secretion system in the model LAB, Lactococcus lactis. Staphylococcal nuclease (Nuc was used as the reporter protein. We first observed that the quantity of secreted Nuc correlated with the copy number of the cloning vector. The nuc gene was cloned on a high-copy number cloning vector and no perturbation of the metabolism of the secreting strain was observed. Replacement of nuc native promoter by a strong lactococcal one led to a significant increase of nuc expression. Secretion efficiency (SE of Nuc in L. lactis was low, i.e., only 60% of the synthesized Nuc was secreted. Insertion of a synthetic propeptide between the signal peptide and the mature moiety of Nuc increased the SE of Nuc. On the basis of these results, we developed a secretion system and we applied it to the construction of an L. lactis strain which secretes a bovine coronavirus (BCV epitope-protein fusion (BCV-Nuc. BCV-Nuc was recognized by both anti-BCV and anti-Nuc antibodies. Secretion of this antigenic fusion is the first step towards the development of a novel antigen delivery system based on LAB-secreting strains.

  2. Effect of wild strains of Lactococcus lactis on the volatile profile and the sensory characteristics of ewes' raw milk cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, J A; Tomillo, F J; Fernández-García, E; Gaya, P; Nuñez, M

    2002-12-01

    The production of volatile compounds by wild strains of Lactococcus lactis used as starter cultures and their effect on the sensory characteristics of ewes' raw milk cheese were investigated. Sixteen vats of cheese were manufactured and ripened for 120 d in two experiments, each of them duplicated. In the first experiment, milk was inoculated with different ratios of four wild Lactococcus lactis strains, two producing and two not producing branched-chain volatile compounds, and in the second experiment with different ratios of a commercial starter culture and the two strains producing branched-chain volatile compounds. Cheese pH, proteolysis, and aminopeptidase activity increased when the strains producing branched-chain volatile compounds were inoculated at a higher rate. Fifty volatile compounds were identified in cheeses using a purge and trap system coupled to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry apparatus. The relative abundances of 30 volatile compounds (8 alcohols, 5 aldehydes, 3 ketones, 12 esters, 1 sulfur compound, and 1 benzenic compound) were influenced by starter culture composition. 2-Methylpropanol, 3-methylbutanol, isobutyl acetate, isoamyl acetate, ethyl butyrate, isobutyl butyrate, and isoamyl butyrate were always more abundant in the cheeses made with a higher level of L. lactis strains producing branched-chain volatile compounds. Flavor intensity was enhanced by a high level of L. lactis strains producing branched-chain volatile compounds in the first experiment, in which four wild L. lactis strains were used as starter culture, but not in the second experiment, in which a combination of two wild L. lactis strains and the commercial starter culture were used. Flavor quality, as judged by trained panelists, was impaired in both experiments by a high level of L. lactis strains producing branched-chain volatile compounds.

  3. Evaluation of acceptor selectivity of Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis trehalose 6-phosphate phosphorylase in the reverse phosphorolysis and synthesis of a new sugar phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Yodai; Saburi, Wataru; Imai, Ryozo; Mori, Haruhide

    2017-08-01

    Trehalose 6-phosphate phosphorylase (TrePP), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 65, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of trehalose 6-phosphate (Tre6P) with inversion of the anomeric configuration to produce β-d-glucose 1-phosphate (β-Glc1P) and d-glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P). TrePP in Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis (LlTrePP) is, alongside the phosphotransferase system, involved in the metabolism of trehalose. In this study, recombinant LlTrePP was produced and characterized. It showed its highest reverse phosphorolytic activity at pH 4.8 and 40°C, and was stable in the pH range 5.0-8.0 and at up to 30°C. Kinetic analyses indicated that reverse phosphorolysis of Tre6P proceeded through a sequential bi bi mechanism involving the formation of a ternary complex of the enzyme, β-Glc1P, and Glc6P. Suitable acceptor substrates were Glc6P, and, at a low level, d-mannose 6-phosphate (Man6P). From β-Glc1P and Man6P, a novel sugar phosphate, α-d-Glcp-(1↔1)-α-d-Manp6P, was synthesized with 51% yield.

  4. Lactococcus lactis Subsp. Lactis Suşlarında Yüksek Sıklıkta Konjugal Transfer Sistemlerinin Analizi

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    Çağla Tükel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada L. lactis subsp. lactis suşlarında laktoz fermentasyonu özelliğini kodlayan altı farklı plazmidin yüksek sıklıkta konjugal aktarım yeteneği araştırıldı. Bu plazmidlerin konjugal transfer sıklıkları; iki seks faktörünün interaksiyonuna bağlı olarak (Clu ve Agg, Clu-/Agg-, Agg+ x Clu-/Agg+, Agg- ya da Clu+/Agg- x Clu-/Agg- konjugasyon eşleri için 1.5x10-5–1.0x10-7 ve Clu+/Agg- x Clu-/Agg+ konjugasyon eşleri için 7.1x10-2-2.7x10-3 oranlarında değişim gösterdi. Laktoz plazmidlerinin stabiliteleri ise; doğal suşlarda %82-96, MG1390 alıcı suşu için tanımlanan konjugantlarda %77-98 ve MCL8060 alıcı suşu için tanımlanan konjugantlarda ise %44-67 arasında saptandı.

  5. The distinct effects of orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 on gene expression in the murine small intestine.

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    Chise Suzuki

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of strain-specific probiotic effects and the impact of the oral administration of probiotic strains on the host's gene expression are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain-specific effects of probiotic strain intake on gene expression in the murine small intestine. Two distinct strains of lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 (C59, were orally administered to BALB/c mice, daily for 2 weeks. The total RNA was isolated from the upper (including the duodenum and lower (the terminal ileum small intestine, and gene expression was assessed by microarray analysis. The data revealed (1 oral administration of C59 and GG markedly down-regulated the expression of genes encoding fibrinogen subunits and plasminogen in the upper small intestine; (2 administration of more than 1 × 107 CFU/day of GG changed the gene expression of the host ileum. (3 strain- and dose-related effects on various GO biological processes; and (4 enrichment for B cell-related Gene Ontology terms among up-regulated genes in the terminal ileum of mice administered the 1 × 109 CFU/day of GG. The distinct effects of GG and C59 on gene expression in the intact small intestine provide clues to understand how the health beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotic bacteria are mediated by interactions with intestinal cells.

  6. The distinct effects of orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 on gene expression in the murine small intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Aoki, Reiji; Sasaki, Keisuke; Takayama, Yoshiharu; Mizumachi, Koko

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of strain-specific probiotic effects and the impact of the oral administration of probiotic strains on the host’s gene expression are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain-specific effects of probiotic strain intake on gene expression in the murine small intestine. Two distinct strains of lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 (C59), were orally administered to BALB/c mice, daily for 2 weeks. The total RNA was isolated from the upper (including the duodenum) and lower (the terminal ileum) small intestine, and gene expression was assessed by microarray analysis. The data revealed (1) oral administration of C59 and GG markedly down-regulated the expression of genes encoding fibrinogen subunits and plasminogen in the upper small intestine; (2) administration of more than 1 × 107 CFU/day of GG changed the gene expression of the host ileum. (3) strain- and dose-related effects on various GO biological processes; and (4) enrichment for B cell-related Gene Ontology terms among up-regulated genes in the terminal ileum of mice administered the 1 × 109 CFU/day of GG. The distinct effects of GG and C59 on gene expression in the intact small intestine provide clues to understand how the health beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotic bacteria are mediated by interactions with intestinal cells. PMID:29220366

  7. The distinct effects of orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 on gene expression in the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chise; Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Aoki, Reiji; Sasaki, Keisuke; Takayama, Yoshiharu; Mizumachi, Koko

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of strain-specific probiotic effects and the impact of the oral administration of probiotic strains on the host's gene expression are not yet well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain-specific effects of probiotic strain intake on gene expression in the murine small intestine. Two distinct strains of lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (GG) and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis C59 (C59), were orally administered to BALB/c mice, daily for 2 weeks. The total RNA was isolated from the upper (including the duodenum) and lower (the terminal ileum) small intestine, and gene expression was assessed by microarray analysis. The data revealed (1) oral administration of C59 and GG markedly down-regulated the expression of genes encoding fibrinogen subunits and plasminogen in the upper small intestine; (2) administration of more than 1 × 107 CFU/day of GG changed the gene expression of the host ileum. (3) strain- and dose-related effects on various GO biological processes; and (4) enrichment for B cell-related Gene Ontology terms among up-regulated genes in the terminal ileum of mice administered the 1 × 109 CFU/day of GG. The distinct effects of GG and C59 on gene expression in the intact small intestine provide clues to understand how the health beneficial effects of specific strains of probiotic bacteria are mediated by interactions with intestinal cells.

  8. Proteolysis in Hispánico cheese manufactured using a mesophilic starter, a thermophilic starter, and bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415 adjunct culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Sonia; Tomillo, Javier; Gaya, Pilar; Medina, Margarita; Nuñez, Manuel

    2002-06-05

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis INIA 415, a strain harboring the structural genes of bacteriocins nisin Z and lacticin 481, was used as adjunct culture in the manufacture of Hispánico cheese with a mesophilic starter and a thermophilic starter of high aminopeptidase activity. Addition of the bacteriocin producer promoted early lysis of mesophilic and thermophilic starter bacteria. Extracellular aminopeptidase activity in 7-day-old cheese made using mesophilic and thermophilic starters plus bacteriocin producer was 3.0-fold the level reached in cheese made without the bacteriocin producer. Proteolysis in cheese made with mesophilic and thermophilic starters plus bacteriocin-producing adjunct culture after 25 days of ripening was 1.5-fold the level reached in cheese made without the bacteriocin producer, and the level of total free amino acids was 2.9-fold the level found in cheese made without the bacteriocin producer. Cheese made with mesophilic and thermophilic starters plus bacteriocin producer received the highest scores for flavor quality and flavor intensity and reached in 25 days the flavor intensity score of a 75-day-old cheese made without the bacteriocin producer.

  9. Development of a versatile Cas9-driven subpopulation-selection toolbox inLactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Els, Simon; James, Jennelle K; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A

    2018-02-16

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been exploited for the removal or replacement of genetic elements in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here we describe the extension of the Cas9 application toolbox to the industrially important dairy species Lactococcus lactis The Cas9 expression vector pLABTarget was constructed, encoding the Streptocccus pyogenes Cas9 under control of a constitutive promoter, and allowing plug and play introduction of sgRNA sequences to target specific genetic loci. Introduction of a pepN -targeting derivative of pLABTarget into L. lactis MG1363 led to a strong reduction in the number of transformants obtained, which did not occur in a pepN deletion derivative of the same strain, demonstrating the specificity and lethality of the Cas9 mediated double strand breaks in the lactococcal chromosome. Moreover, the same pLABTarget derivative allowed the selection of a pepN deletion subpopulation from its corresponding single crossover plasmid integrant precursor, accelerating the construction and selection of gene-specific deletion derivatives in L. lactis Finally, pLABTarget containing sgRNAs designed to target mobile genetic elements, allowed the effective curing of plasmids, prophages and integrative conjugative elements (ICE). These results establish that pLABTarget enables the effective exploitation of Cas9 targeting in L. lactis , while the broad host range vector used suggests that this toolbox could be readily expanded to other Gram-positive bacteria. Significance statement Mobile genetic elements in Lactococcus lactis and other lactic acid bacteria play an important role in dairy fermentation, having both positive and detrimental effects during the production of fermented dairy products. The pLABTarget vector offers an efficient cloning platform for Cas9 application in lactic acid bacteria. Targeting Cas9 towards mobile genetic elements enabled their effective curing, which is of particular interest in the context of potentially

  10. Non-fusion and fusion expression of beta-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan; Zhang, Chao-Wu; Liu, Heng-Chuan; Yu, Qian; Pei, Xiao-Fang

    2008-10-01

    To construct four recombinant Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting high beta-galactosidase activity in fusion or non-fusion ways, and to study the influence factors for their protein expression and secretion. The gene fragments encoding beta-galactosidase from two strains of Lactobacillus bulgaricus, wch9901 isolated from yogurt and 1.1480 purchased from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, were amplified and inserted into lactococcal expression vector pMG36e. For fusion expression, the open reading frame of the beta-galactosidase gene was amplified, while for non-fusion expression, the open reading frame of the beta-galactosidase gene was amplified with its native Shine-Dalgarno sequence upstream. The start codon of the beta-galactosidase gene partially overlapped with the stop codon of vector origin open reading frame. Then, the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli DH5 alpha and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1363 and confirmed by determining beta-galactosidase activities. The non-fusion expression plasmids showed a significantly higher beta-galactosidase activity in transformed strains than the fusion expression plasmids. The highest enzyme activity was observed in Lactococcus lactis transformed with the non-fusion expression plasmids which were inserted into the beta-galactosidase gene from Lactobacillus bulgaricus wch9901. The beta-galactosidase activity was 2.75 times as high as that of the native counterpart. In addition, beta-galactosidase expressed by recombinant plasmids in Lactococcus lactis could be secreted into the culture medium. The highest secretion rate (27.1%) was observed when the culture medium contained 20 g/L of lactose. Different properties of the native bacteria may have some effects on the protein expression of recombinant plasmids. Non-fusion expression shows a higher enzyme activity in host bacteria. There may be a host-related weak secretion signal peptide gene within the structure gene of Lb. bulgaricus beta

  11. Production of exopolysaccharides by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains of human origin, and metabolic activity of the producing bacteria in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, N; Prieto, A; Leal, J A; Mayo, B; Bada-Gancedo, J C; de los Reyes-Gavilán, C G; Ruas-Madiedo, P

    2009-09-01

    This work reports on the physicochemical characterization of 21 exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains isolated from human intestinal microbiota, as well as the growth and metabolic activity of the EPS-producing strains in milk. The strains belong to the species Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum. The molar mass distribution of EPS fractions showed 2 peaks of different sizes, which is a feature shared with some EPS from bacteria of food origin. In general, we detected an association between the EPS size distribution and the EPS-producing species, although because of the low numbers of human bacterial EPS tested, we could not conclusively establish a correlation. The main monosaccharide components of the EPS under study were glucose, galactose, and rhamnose, which are the same as those found in food polymers; however, the rhamnose and glucose ratios was generally higher than the galactose ratio in our human bacterial EPS. All EPS-producing strains were able to grow and acidify milk; most lactobacilli produced lactic acid as the main metabolite. The lactic acid-to-acetic acid ratio in bifidobacteria was 0.7, close to the theoretical ratio, indicating that the EPS-producing strains did not produce an excessive amount of acetic acid, which could adversely affect the sensory properties of fermented milks. With respect to their viscosity-intensifying ability, L. plantarum H2 and L. rhamnosus E41 and E43R were able to increase the viscosity of stirred, fermented milks to a similar extent as the EPS-producing Streptococcus thermophilus strain used as a positive control. Therefore, these human EPS-producing bacteria could be used as adjuncts in mixed cultures for the formulation of functional foods if probiotic characteristics could be demonstrated. This is the first article reporting the

  12. The Survival of Bifidobacterium infantis 20088 and Physicochemical Changes During Refrigeration Storage of Selected Fermented Traditional Sudanese Fruit Beverages

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    Wala Salah Elden Babekir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate survival of Bifidobacterium infantis 20088 in fermented beverage formulated from selected traditional Sudanese fruits Gudaim and dom. The viable counts of the strain and physiochemical changes during refrigeration were determined. 10% beverages (w/v were prepared from dom and gudaim powder. 2.5% (w/w skim milk was supplemented to each formulation to provide the required nutrient for bacteria growth during the fermentation. After sterilization and cooling, the mixture was inoculated with a 10% culture of B. infants 20088 followed by incubation for 36 h at 37°C. Reconstituted skim milk was used as control. Fermented beverages were held at refrigeration (4°C for a period of 2 weeks. During the refrigeration storage of the fermented beverages there was significant reduction in Bifidobacterium infantis of all fermented beverages. Nevertheless, the strain was maintained high; fulfill the number required to presence in probiotic foods, which was at least 6 log CFU/ml fermented product. There was no significantly difference in TSS and pH as compared to their initial at the beginning of fermentation except in pH of fermented gudaim. Therefore gudaim and dom are suitable carrier to deliver Bifidobacterium infantis 20088 to consumer.

  13. Effect of triple viable bifidobacterium combined with mosapride on hemorheology and serum gastrointestinal hormone levels in patients with functional dyspepsia

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    Shun-Bin Ding

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the effect of triple viable bifidobacterium combined with mosapride on hemorheology and serum gastrointestinal hormone levels in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD. Methods: A total of 127 patients with FD were randomly divided into the observation group (67cases and the control group (62 cases. The control group was given mosapride, the observation group was given triple viable bifidobacterium on the base of the control group. For 2 months, to observe the efficacy and changes of hemorheology [the whole blood viscosity (high and low shear, plasma viscosity] and serum gastrointestinal hormone levels (MTL, NPY, VIP. Results: After treatment, the observation group of the whole blood viscosity (high and low shear, plasma viscosity were decreased significantly (P0.05. There was significantly difference between the two groups (P<0.05; After treatment, serum MTL, NPY were increased and VIP was increased in both groups (P<0.05, and all indexes of the observation group were improved more significant than those of the control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Efficacy of triple viable bifidobacterium combined with mosapride is more better than single mosapride in the treatment of FD. It may be related to its effects on hemorheology and gastrointestinal hormone.

  14. Identification of Bifidobacterium Strains Isolated from Kashk-e Zard: A Traditional Iranian Fermented Cereal-Dairy Based Food

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    Mashak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The genus Bifidobactrium enjoys considerable significance among the probiotic bacteria for having appropriately adapted to the human gastrointestinal tract. As the properties of Bifidobacteria are strain-oriented and niche-dependent, there is growing interest in studying the different sources of these probiotics. Kashk-e Zard, a traditional fermented food produced from wheat and yogurt through a two-week, two-step fermentation process, is rich in probiotics and is worthy of study in this regard. The present study aimed to identify Bifidobacterium spp. in Kashk-e Zard. Methods Twenty-three samples of Kashk-e Zard were collected and subjected to Bifidobacterium identification experiments. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing methods were applied for bacterial identification. Results Twelve of the isolates obtained were G +, rod-shaped, and catalase-, whereas only three of them identified positive for fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (F6PPK a Bifidobacterium specific test and mupirocin resistance. These three isolates were then considered for further identification using the 16SrDNA sequencing technique. Conclusions Although carbohydrate fermentation patterns specified these three isolates as B. infantis, B. bifidum, and B. longum, the molecular results did not confirm B. longum, which is still also controversial in the literature. Overall, our results demonstrated that Kashk-e Zard is a rich potential source of probiotic bacteria and further investigations should be undertaken.

  15. Role of Bifidobacterium bifidum and plant food extracts in improving microflora and biochemical and cytogenetic parameters in adjuvant arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Okbi, S. Y.; Mohamed, D. A.; Donya, S. M.; Abd El Khalek, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present research was to discover plant food extracts and probiotics that may have bioactivity towards chronic inflammation. Three plant food extract mixtures expected to be rich in phenolic compounds, carotenoids and tocopherols were prepared. The anti-inflammatory activity of the different mixtures as well as probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum) were evaluated in adjuvant arthritis in rats. The anti-inflammatory effect, mechanism of action and safety of the three mixtures and Bifidobacterium bifidum were studied by measuring the size of inflammation and the determination of inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, colonic bacteria profile and specific cytogenetic parameters. The contents of tocopherols, {beta}-carotene and phenolic compounds in the mixtures were determined. The results show that the tested mixtures and Bifidobacterium bifidum possess promising anti-inflammatory effects. The mechanism of action seems to involve a reduction in oxidative stress and inflammatory bio markers and an effect on colonic microflora. Genotoxicity and DNA fragmentation induced by adjuvant arthritis were prevented after supplementation with the tested mixtures. (Author) 61 refs.

  16. Display of the Viral Epitopes on Lactococcus lactis: A Model for Food Grade Vaccine against EV71

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    Nadimpalli Ravi S. Varma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed a system for display of antigens of Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 on the cell surface of L. lactis. The viral capsid protein (VP1 gene from a local viral isolate was utilized as the candidate vaccine for the development of oral live vaccines against EV71 using L. lactis as a carrier. We expressed fusion proteins in E. coli and purified fusion proteins were incubated with L. lactis. We confirmed that mice orally fed with L. lactis displaying these fusion proteins on its surface were able to mount an immune response against the epitopes of EV71. This is the first example of an EV71 antigen displayed on the surface of a food grade organism and opens a new perspective for alternative vaccine strategies against the EV71. We believe that the method of protein docking utilized in this study will allow for more flexible presentations of short peptides and proteins on the surface of L. lactis to be useful as a delivery vehicle.

  17. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 Alleviates Food Allergic Manifestations in Sensitized Mice by Reducing IL-13 Expression Specifically in the Ileum

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    Adrian W. Zuercher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Utilizing a food allergy murine model, we have investigated the intrinsic antiallergic potential of the Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 strain. Methods. BALB/c mice were sensitized at weekly intervals with ovalbumin (OVA plus cholera toxin (CT by the oral route for 7 weeks. In this model, an oral challenge with a high dose of OVA at the end of the sensitization period leads to clinical symptoms. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 was given to mice via the drinking water during sensitization (prevention phase or after sensitization (management phase. Results. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 administration to sensitized mice strikingly reduced allergic manifestations in the management phase upon challenge, when compared to control mice. No preventive effect was observed with the strain. Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 significantly decreased relative expression levels of the Th-2 cytokine, IL-13, and associated chemokines CCL11 (eotaxin-1 and CCL17 (TARC in the ileum. No effect was observed in the jejunum. Conclusion/Significance. These results taken together designate Lactococcus lactis NCC 2287 as a candidate probiotic strain appropriate in the management of allergic symptoms.

  18. The novel sRNA s015 improves nisin yield by increasing acid tolerance of Lactococcus lactis F44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jiakun; Caiyin, Qinggele; Wu, Hao; Tian, Kairen; Wang, Binbin; Li, Yanni; Qiao, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Nisin, a polycyclic antibacterial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis, is stable at low pH. Improving the acid tolerance of L. lactis could thus enhance nisin yield. Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in acid tolerance by regulating their target mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In this study, a novel sRNA, s015, was identified in L. lactis F44 via the use of RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR analysis, and Northern blotting. s015 improved the acid tolerance of L. lactis and boosted nisin yield at low pH. In silico predictions enabled us to construct a library of possible s015 target mRNAs. Statistical analysis and validation suggested that s015 contains a highly conserved region (5'-GAAAAAAAC-3') that likely encompasses the regulatory core of the sRNA. atpG, busAB, cysD, ilvB, tcsR, ung, yudD, and ywdA were verified as direct targets of s015, and the interactions between s015 and its target genes were elucidated. This work provided new insight into the adaptation mechanism of L. lactis under acid stress.

  19. The effects of RecO deficiency in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000 on resistance to multiple environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengru; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Juan; Du, Guocheng

    2014-12-01

    Multiple stresses could cause damage to DNA and other macromolecules. RecO, belonging to the family of DNA repair proteins, plays an important part in homologous recombination and replication repair. In order to explore the role of RecO in overcoming multiple stresses, a mutant of recO deletion is constructed in Lactococcus lactis ssp. cremoris NZ9000. Compared with the mutant strain, the original strain L. lactis NZ9000 shows better performance in growth under multiple stresses. The survival rates of the original strain under acid, osmotic and chill stresses are 13.49-, 2.78- and 60.89-fold higher. In our deeper research on fermentation capability under osmotic stress, lactate dehydrogenase activity after 8 h fermentation, maximum lactate acid production, lactate yield and maximum lactate productivity of L. lactis NZ9000 are 1.63-, 1.28-, 1.28- and 1.5-fold higher, respectively. Results indicate that RecO has positively improved the survival of L. lactis NZ9000, protected its key enzymes and enhanced its fermentation efficiencies. Our research confirms the role of RecO in enhancing tolerances to multiple stresses of L. lactis NZ9000, and puts forward the suggestion that RecO could be used in other industrial microorganisms as a new anti-stress component to improve their resistance to various stresses. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Complete genome sequences of four novel Lactococcus lactis phages distantly related to the Rare 1706 Phage Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr; Neve, Horst; Vogensen, Finn Kvist

    2014-01-01

    Lactoccocus lactis is a Gram-positive bacterium widely used in the dairy industry in the production of an array of cheeses and other fermented milk products. Here, we describe the sequencing and genome annotations of a set of four phages virulent to L. lactis and exhibiting similarities to phage...

  1. Cold Shock Proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 Are Involved in Cryoprotection and in the Production of Cold-Induced Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Frenkiel, Hélène; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Abee, Tjakko

    2001-01-01

    Members of the group of 7-kDa cold-shock proteins (CSPs) are the proteins with the highest level of induction upon cold shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. By using double-crossover recombination, two L. lactis strains were generated in which genes encoding CSPs are

  2. Identification and functional characterization of the Lactococcus lactis CodY-regulated branched-chain amino acid permease BcaP (CtrA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hengst, CD; Groeneveld, M; Kuipers, OP; Kok, J; Hengst, Chris D. den

    Transcriptome analyses have previously revealed that a gene encoding the putative amino acid transporter CtrA (YhdG) is one of the major targets of the pleiotropic regulator CodY in Lactococcus lactis and Bacillus subtilis. The role of ctrA in L. lactis was further investigated with respect to both

  3. Transcriptional activation of the glycolytic las operon and catabolite repression of the gal operon in Lactococcus lactis are mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luesink, Evert J.; Herpen, René E.M.A. van; Grossiord, Benoît P.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1998-01-01

    The Lactococcus lactis ccpA gene, encoding the global regulatory protein CcpA, was identified and characterized. Northern blot and primer extension analyses showed that the L. lactis ccpA gene is constitutively transcribed from a promoter that does not contain a cre sequence. Inactivation of the

  4. The level of pyruvate-formate lyase controls the shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchiorsen, C.R.; Jokumsen, K.V.; Villadsen, John

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of pyruvate-formate lyase (PFL) activity in vivo plays a central role in the shift from homolactic to mixed-acid product formation observed during the growth of Lactococcus lactis on glucose and galactose, respectively. Characterisation of L lactis MG1363 in anaerobic batch cultures sh...

  5. AguR is a transmembrane transcription activator of the putrescine biosynthesis operon in Lactococcus lactis, and acts in response to agmatine concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linares, Daniel M; Del Rio, Beatriz; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Martin, Ma Cruz; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Fernandez, Maria; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Dairy industry fermentative processes mostly use Lactococcus lactis as a starter. However, some dairy L. lactis strains produce putrescine - a biogenic amine that raises food safety and spoilage concerns - via the agmatine deiminase pathway (AGDI). The enzymatic activities responsible for putrescine

  6. Differentiation of Bifidobacterium longum subspecies longum and infantis by quantitative PCR using functional gene targets

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    Blair Lawley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Members of the genus Bifidobacterium are abundant in the feces of babies during the exclusively-milk-diet period of life. Bifidobacterium longum is reported to be a common member of the infant fecal microbiota. However, B. longum is composed of three subspecies, two of which are represented in the bowel microbiota (B. longum subsp. longum; B. longum subsp. infantis. B. longum subspecies are not differentiated in many studies, so that their prevalence and relative abundances are not accurately known. This may largely be due to difficulty in assigning subspecies identity using DNA sequences of 16S rRNA or tuf genes that are commonly used in bacterial taxonomy. Methods We developed a qPCR method targeting the sialidase gene (subsp. infantis and sugar kinase gene (subsp. longum to differentiate the subspecies using specific primers and probes. Specificity of the primers/probes was tested by in silico, pangenomic search, and using DNA from standard cultures of bifidobacterial species. The utility of the method was further examined using DNA from feces that had been collected from infants inhabiting various geographical regions. Results A pangenomic search of the NCBI genomic database showed that the PCR primers/probes targeted only the respective genes of the two subspecies. The primers/probes showed total specificity when tested against DNA extracted from the gold standard strains (type cultures of bifidobacterial species detected in infant feces. Use of the qPCR method with DNA extracted from the feces of infants of different ages, delivery method and nutrition, showed that subsp. infantis was detectable (0–32.4% prevalence in the feces of Australian (n = 90, South-East Asian (n = 24, and Chinese babies (n = 91, but in all cases at low abundance (<0.01–4.6% compared to subsp. longum (0.1–33.7% abundance; 21.4–100% prevalence. Discussion Our qPCR method differentiates B. longum subspecies longum and infantis using

  7. Persistence of SupplementedBifidobacterium longumsubsp.infantisEVC001 in Breastfed Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Steven A; Hutton, Andra A; Contreras, Lindsey N; Shaw, Claire A; Palumbo, Michelle C; Casaburi, Giorgio; Xu, Gege; Davis, Jasmine C C; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Henrick, Bethany M; Freeman, Samara L; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Mills, David A; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Underwood, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    Attempts to alter intestinal dysbiosis via administration of probiotics have consistently shown that colonization with the administered microbes is transient. This study sought to determine whether provision of an initial course of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ( B. infantis ) would lead to persistent colonization of the probiotic organism in breastfed infants. Mothers intending to breastfeed were recruited and provided with lactation support. One group of mothers fed B. infantis EVC001 to their infants from day 7 to day 28 of life ( n = 34), and the second group did not administer any probiotic ( n = 32). Fecal samples were collected during the first 60 postnatal days in both groups. Fecal samples were assessed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, quantitative PCR, mass spectrometry, and endotoxin measurement. B. infantis -fed infants had significantly higher populations of fecal Bifidobacteriaceae , in particular B. infantis , while EVC001 was fed, and this difference persisted more than 30 days after EVC001 supplementation ceased. Fecal milk oligosaccharides were significantly lower in B. infantis EVC001-fed infants, demonstrating higher consumption of human milk oligosaccharides by B. infantis EVC001. Concentrations of acetate and lactate were significantly higher and fecal pH was significantly lower in infants fed EVC001, demonstrating alterations in intestinal fermentation. Infants colonized by Bifidobacteriaceae at high levels had 4-fold-lower fecal endotoxin levels, consistent with observed lower levels of Gram-negative Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes . IMPORTANCE The gut microbiome in early life plays an important role for long-term health and is shaped in large part by diet. Probiotics may contribute to improvements in health, but they have not been shown to alter the community composition of the gut microbiome. Here, we found that breastfed infants could be stably colonized at high levels by provision of B. infantis EVC001, with significant

  8. Alternatives for biosurfactants and bacteriocins extraction from Lactococcus lactis cultures produced under different pH conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, N; Salgado, J M; Cortés, S; Domínguez, J M

    2010-08-01

    Study of the potential of Lactococcus lactis CECT-4434 as a biosurfactants and nisin (the only bacteriocin allowed to be used in the food industry) producer for industrial applications, exploiting the possibility of recovering separately both metabolites, taking into account that L. lactis is an interesting micro-organism with several applications in the food industry because it is recognized as GRAS. The results showed the ability of this strain to produce cell-bound biosurfactants, under controlled pH, and cell-bound biosurfactants and bacteriocins, when pH was not controlled. Three extraction procedures were designed to separately recover these substances. The strain L. lactis CECT-4434 showed to be a cell-bound biosurfactants and bacterocins producer when fermentations were carried out under uncontrolled pH. Both products can be recovered separately. Development of a convenient tool for the extraction of cell-bound biosurfactants and bacteriocins from the fermentation broth.

  9. Bioaccessible Antioxidants in Milk Fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175–358%) was observed during digestion. PMID:25802836

  10. Bioaccessible antioxidants in milk fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175-358%) was observed during digestion.

  11. Characterization of ATPase activity of the AAA ARC from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Mabel; de la Rosa, Ana Paulina Barba; Santos, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are considered to be probiotics that exist in the large intestine and are helpful to maintain human health. Oral administration of bifidobacteria may be effective in improving the intestinal flora and environment, stimulating the immune response and possibly preventing cancer. However, for consistent and positive results, further well-controlled studies are urgently needed to describe the basic mechanisms of this microorganism. Analysis of the proteasome-lacking Bifidobacterium longum genome reveals that it possesses a gene, IPR003593 AAA ATPase core, which codes a 56 kDa protein containing one AAA ATPase domain. Phylogenetic classification made by CLANS, positioned this sequence into the ARC divergent branch of the AAA ATPase family of proteins. N-terminal analysis of the sequence indicates this protein is closely related to other ATPases such as the Rhodococcus erythropolis ARC, Archaeoglobus fulgidus PAN, Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mpa and the human proteasomal Rpt1 subunit. This gene was cloned, the full-length recombinant protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified as a high-molecular size complex and named Bl-ARC. Enzymatic characterization showed that Bl-ARC ATPase is active, Mg(+2)-dependent and sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Gene organization positions bl-arc in a region flanked by a cluster of genes that includes pup, dop and pafA genes. These findings point to a possible function as a chaperone in the degradation pathway via pupylation.

  12. Genomic Microdiversity of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum Underlying Differential Strain-Level Responses to Dietary Carbohydrate Intervention

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    Guojun Wu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The genomic basis of the response to dietary intervention of human gut beneficial bacteria remains elusive, which hinders precise manipulation of the microbiota for human health. After receiving a dietary intervention enriched with nondigestible carbohydrates for 105 days, a genetically obese child with Prader-Willi syndrome lost 18.4% of his body weight and showed significant improvement in his bioclinical parameters. We obtained five isolates (C1, C15, C55, C62, and C95 of one of the most abundantly promoted beneficial species, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, from a postintervention fecal sample. Intriguingly, these five B. pseudocatenulatum strains showed differential responses during the dietary intervention. Two strains were largely unaffected, while the other three were promoted to different extents by the changes in dietary carbohydrate resources. The differential responses of these strains were consistent with their functional clustering based on the COGs (Clusters of Orthologous Groups, including those involved with the ABC-type sugar transport systems, suggesting that the strain-specific genomic variations may have contributed to the niche adaption. Particularly, B. pseudocatenulatum C15, which had the most diverse types and highest gene copy numbers of carbohydrate-active enzymes targeting plant polysaccharides, had the highest abundance after the dietary intervention. These studies show the importance of understanding genomic diversity of specific members of the gut microbiota if precise nutrition approaches are to be realized.

  13. Development of healthy whey drink with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii

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    T.K. Maity

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey beverage was prepared by utilizing Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDO 243, Bifidobacterium bifidum NCDO 2715 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii MTCC 1371 in order to make a fermented probiotic healthy drink. The product made with 4 % mixed culture (1:1:1 inoculated (initial count - lactobacilli 6.2 x 107 CFU/mL, bifidobacteria 5.4 x 107 CFU/mL, propionibacteria 3.9 x 107 CFU/mL in deprotienized whey (4.6 % lactose, 0.62 % ash, 0.48 % fat and 0.5 % protein adjusted to pH 6.4 and incubated at 37 °C for 8 h has a good technological and dietetic criteria required for a probiotic product. Total bacterial count, lactobacilli count, bifidobacteria count, propionibacteria count, titratable acidity, β-D galactosidase activity, concentration of lactic acid and sensory properties were monitored during storage period. The whey beverage fermented for 8 h and prepared with 4 % inoculum of mixed culture (1:1:1 met the probiotic criterion by maintaining each type of bacterial population at counts greater than 108 CFU/mL up to 10 days of storage period. The titratable acidity as well as sensory properties did not change appreciably during first 7 days of storage. At the end of 15 days of storage, slight acidification was detected, although the beverage still retained an acceptable flavour.

  14. Sensory characteristics and volatile composition of a cereal beverage fermented with Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702257.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmerón, Ivan; Rozada, Raquel; Thomas, Keith; Ortega-Rivas, Enrique; Pandiella, Severino S

    2014-04-01

    Most of the commercialized lactic acid fermented products are dairy-based. Hence, the development of non-dairy fermented products with probiotic properties draws significant attention within the functional foods industry. The microorganisms used in such products have complex enzyme systems through which they generate diverse metabolites (volatile and non-volatile) that provide significant flavour attributes of importance for fermented foods. The correlation of the volatile flavour compounds of a malt beverage fermented with a Bifidobacterium breve strain with its unique sensory characteristics was performed. The volatile composition analysis exposed the presence of 12 components. Eight of these flavour volatiles were produced through the metabolic activity of the bifidobacteria strain. Notably acetic acid, of reported sour flavour characteristics, exhibited the greatest intensity. Four components of considerable organoleptic characteristics were identified as Maillard-derived products, namely maltol, pyranone, 2 (5H)-furanmethanol and 3-furanmethanol. The sensory evaluation exhibited that the fermented cereal beverage had a sour flavour with mild sweet and malty notes. These results indicate that the volatile compounds identified can be appointed as significant flavour markers of the novel fermented cereal beverage.

  15. Mechanisms involved in alleviation of intestinal inflammation by bifidobacterium breve soluble factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Heuvelin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Soluble factors released by Bifidobacterium breve C50 (Bb alleviate the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immune cells, but their effect on intestinal epithelium remains elusive. To decipher the mechanisms accounting for the cross-talk between bacteria/soluble factors and intestinal epithelium, we measured the capacity of the bacteria, its conditioned medium (Bb-CM and other Gram(+ commensal bacteria to dampen inflammatory chemokine secretion. METHODS: TNFalpha-induced chemokine (CXCL8 secretion and alteration of NF-kappaB and AP-1 signalling pathways by Bb were studied by EMSA, confocal microscopy and western blotting. Anti-inflammatory capacity was also tested in vivo in a model of TNBS-induced colitis in mice. RESULTS: Bb and Bb-CM, but not other commensal bacteria, induced a time and dose-dependent inhibition of CXCL8 secretion by epithelial cells driven by both AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription pathways and implying decreased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and IkappaB-alpha molecules. In TNBS-induced colitis in mice, Bb-CM decreased the colitis score and inflammatory cytokine expression, an effect reproduced by dendritic cell conditioning with Bb-CM. CONCLUSIONS: Bb and secreted soluble factors contribute positively to intestinal homeostasis by attenuating chemokine production. The results indicate that Bb down regulate inflammation at the epithelial level by inhibiting phosphorylations involved in inflammatory processes and by protective conditioning of dendritic cells.

  16. Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Hevia

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence suggests a relationship between specific allergic processes, such as atopic eczema in children, and an aberrant fecal microbiota. However, little is known about the complete microbiota profile of adult individuals suffering from asthma. We determined the fecal microbiota in 21 adult patients suffering allergic asthma (age 39.43 ± 10.98 years old and compare it with the fecal microbiota of 22 healthy controls (age 39.29 ± 9.21 years old using culture independent techniques. An Ion-Torrent 16S rRNA gene-based amplification and sequencing protocol was used to determine the fecal microbiota profile of the individuals. Sequence microbiota analysis showed that the microbial alpha-diversity was not significantly different between healthy and allergic individuals and no clear clustering of the samples was obtained using an unsupervised principal component analysis. However, the analysis of specific bacterial groups allowed us to detect significantly lower levels of bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma. Also, in allergic individuals the Bifidobacterium adolescentis species prevailed within the bifidobacterial population. The reduction in the levels on bifidobacteria in patients with long-term asthma suggests a new target in allergy research and opens possibilities for the therapeutic modulation of the gut microbiota in this group of patients.

  17. Immunomodulatory and antitumor effects in vivo by the cytoplasmic fraction of Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Woo; Shin, Jung-Gul; Kim, Eun Hee; Kang, Hae Eun; Yim, In Been; Kim, Ji Yeon; Joo, Hong-Gu; Woo, Hee Jong

    2004-03-01

    The immunomodulatory and antitumor effects of lactic acid bacteria (LABs) were investigated. Cytoplasmic fraction of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum were tested for the antiproliferative activity in vitro to SNUC2A, SNU1, NIH/3T3 and Jurkat cell lines by crystal violet assay. All cytoplasmic fraction suppressed proliferation of tumor cells, though L. casei and B. longum were more effective. From these results, cytoplasmic fraction of L. casei and B. longum with Y400 as a control were administered as dietary supplements to Balb/c mice for 2, and 4 consecutive wks. Administration for 4 wks enhanced the number of total T cells, NK cells and MHC class II+ cells, and CD4-CD8+ T cells in flow cytometry analysis. To determine of antitumor activity of LABs preparation in vivo, F9 teratocarcinoma cells were inoculated on mice at 14th day. Body weight was decreased with increased survival rate in all groups with the cytoplasm of LABs. Our results showed that cytoplasmic fraction of LABs had direct antiproliferative effects on tumor cell lines in vitro, effects on immune cells in vivo, and antitumor effects on tumor-bearing mice with prolonged survival periods.

  18. Evidence of immunomodulatory effects of a novel probiotic, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jialu; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2012-12-01

    Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486 was originally isolated from healthy elderly subjects and demonstrated to have particular ecological fitness and anti-pathogenic effects. Bifidobacteria are commonly associated with immuno-modulatory properties, especially in older people, but this strain has not been investigated for effects on immune function. This study aimed to explore the immunomodulatory effects of this novel probiotic, compared with three commercial strains, B. longum SP 07/3, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) and Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from fasting blood of young or older volunteers and exposed to probiotic strains or Con A. NK activity and activation, and cytokine release was enhanced by all probiotics with strain specificities. The effect of B. infantis on NK activity was influenced by ageing. Except for L.GG, probiotics increased IFN-γ production to a much greater degree in young subjects and increased IL-6 production to a much greater degree in older subjects. Based on IL-10/IL-12 ratios, B. infantis resulted in the most anti-inflammatory profile of all of the probiotics. These results suggest that B. infantis CCUG 52486 has strong immunomodulatory potential compared with well-known commercial strains and that the immune response to probiotics may be influenced by ageing. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Case series of Bifidobacterium longum bacteremia in three preterm infants on probiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbinden, Andrea; Zbinden, Reinhard; Berger, Christoph; Arlettaz, Romaine

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics as prophylaxis for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants is being increasingly practised. We report, for the first time, a case series of 3 preterm, very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants who developed bacteremia with Bifidobacterium longum on probiotic therapy with Infloran® containing viable B. longum. We retrospectively reviewed data of 3 infants (of gestational age probiotic therapy with Infloran or shortly after, respectively, and was interpreted as transient bacteremia. The clinical presentation of these infants did not require antibiotic treatment after the isolation of B. longum. Infant 3 developed an NEC despite probiotic therapy with Infloran and the blood cultures showed B. longum growth. This infant required explorative laparotomy and antibiotic treatment. The clinical isolates of B. longum and the strain of the Infloran capsule showed an identical profile on biochemical, mass-spectrometric and molecular analyses, suggesting a direct correlation between the administration of probiotics and bacteremia with B. longum in all 3 infants. The occurrence of bacteremia with bifidobacteria after its prophylactic administration in VLBW infants and its possible clinical consequences are a matter of concern. In the interests of safety, the use of probiotics in such a population should be indicated with caution and requires further investigation. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BB-12 in Rice Pudding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Ozcan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the survival of two probiotic micro-organisms (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Bifidobacterium bifidum BB-12 in a rice pudding, the impact of these bacteria on hygienic quality, and to verify the perspectives of the product with regard to consumer sensorial acceptance. The products were monitored for the microbial population, pH, titratable acidity and consistency, during storage at 4±1 °C for up to 21 days. Sensory preference was also tested. Even though the viability of the probiotic bacteria was reduced over 21 days of storage, the viable cell concentrations were still sufficient to obtain the desired therapeutic impact. The counts of yeasts-moulds and Staphylococcus spp. decreased in samples with added probiotic bacteria. The sensorial properties of probiotic rice pudding demonstrated similar acceptability to the control up to 14 days and declined thereafter. Rice pudding was considered suitable food for the delivery of probiotic micro-organisms, with sufficient viability and acceptable sensory characteristics.