WorldWideScience

Sample records for bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal

  1. Simultaneous bicompartmental bucket handle meniscal tears with a clinically competent Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright Jonathan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bucket handle meniscal tears (BHMT of the knee occur infrequently (approximately 10% of meniscal injuries. Simultaneous, bicompartmental BHMT are extremely rare. Previously, these have only been reported in association with a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL. The pathomechanism of this injury was thought to be due to the lack of knee stability following the ACL injury. We present a case of a 38 year old male patient with bicompartmental BHMT with a clinically competent ACL. This highlights the need for clinical and radiological suspicion of simultaneous BHMTs even in the presence of an intact ACL.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To define MR signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this technique. Retrospective study of 30 patients with a meniscal bucket-handle tear and 30 with a different type of tear, all proven by arthroscopy. The following MR signs of a bucket-handle tear were evaluated: 'separate meniscal fragment, 'double posterior cruciate ligament', 'snake sign' and 'double anterior horn'. A correct diagnosis of a bucket-handle tear was only made in 18/30 of patients. Several of the MR signs were seen in the same patient in 17 cases. A double posterior cruciate ligament was present only in cases of medial meniscus tears. The 12 menisci without these signs, and therefore not diagnosed as bucket-handle tears, were all classified as meniscal tears on the basis of signal extending to the meniscal surface. Nine of these were not displaced into the inter-condylar notch at arthroscopy. The interobserver agreement was excellent: kappa 0.88. The diagnosis of a bucket-handle meniscal tear, if it is displaced, can be made when one or more of the four MR evaluated signs are present. Other forms of meniscal tears are only exceptionally diagnosed as bucket-handle tears. (authors)

  3. Free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Faik; Korucu, Ismail Hakkı; Sever, Cem; Demirayak, Mehmet; Goncü, Gani; Toker, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of "fragment within the intercondylar notch sign" and "the absence of the bow tie sign" may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis. PMID:25002980

  4. Free Medial Meniscal Fragment Which Mimics the Dislocated Bucket-Handle Tear on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Türkmen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of “fragment within the intercondylar notch sign” and “the absence of the bow tie sign” may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis.

  5. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL. PMID:26270763

  6. 半月板桶柄状撕裂的MRI诊断与关节镜下分类的相关研究%MR imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears:a retrospective study of signs and the relation to arthroscopic classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亚非; 张兵; 赵玉霞

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the arthroscopic findings of meniscal bucket handle tears and to correlate them with the proposed MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket handle tears suggested in the literature. Methods Sixty-three patients who had a diagnosis of bucket handle tear in arthroscopy were included in our study.Meniscal tears were evaluated in arthroscopy according to Dandy's classification.The MRIs were retrospectively analyzed regarding the following findings:absence of bow tie sign,presence of double posterior cruciate ligament(PCL), fragment within the intercondylar region,flipped meniscus sign, abnormal circumferential meniscus sign. Sensitivity were evaluated for the presence of each individual sign. Results Locked types Ⅰand Ⅱfragment of medial meniscus and half-length,whole-width and whole length-half-width fragement of lateral meniscus in arthroscopy were correlated with fragement within the intercondylar notch and absent bow tie signs in MRI.We didn't find the double PCL sign in any of the patients with a lateral meniscal bucket handle tear.The most common signs in MR imagings of meniscal bucket handle tears were the fragement in the notch sign and the absent bow tie sign.They were observed with frequency of 84.6% and 81.5% respectively.The presence of double posterior cruciate ligament, flipped meniscus sign, abnormal circumferential meniscus sign were less common(43%,21.5% and 29.2%,respectively). Conclusions The presence of at least two of the five MRI signs should be regarded as highly suggestive for bucket handle tears of menisci.%目的 探讨MRI对半月板桶柄状撕裂的诊断与关节镜下分类的比较研究.方法 分析63例患者65个经关节镜检查证实为半月板桶柄状撕裂的术前MRI的特征性表现,并将5种MRI征象(双后交叉韧带征、半月板翻转征、空领结征、碎块内移征和外周残半月板征)与关节镜下Dandy分型进行比较.结果 MRI桶柄状撕裂诊断符合率89.2%.碎块内移征和

  7. The displaced bucket-handle tear of the meniscus: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the features of displaced bucket-handle tears of the menisci on magnetic resonance(MR) images and to assess associated knee injuries. We retrospectively reviewed coronal and sagittal MR images in 21 bucket-handle tears. The subjects were patients who had underwent preoperative MR evaluations of the knee and were identified from the arthroscopic surgical records as bucket-handle tear. We also described patterns of associated injuries. On coronal MR images, (a) in all cases, peripheral portion of the meniscus(bucket) had the appearance of a truncated or altered wedge; (b) central fragments(handle) were observed to be sitting in the intercondylar notch (16 cases) or located between the femoral condyle and tibial plateau (5 cases). On sequential sagittal MR images, (c) the bow-tie appearance of the body of the meniscus was not seen (13 cases); (d) the bow-tie appearance of the displaced inner fragment was seen at the intercondylar notch level (9 cases); (e) 'double posterior cruciate ligament' sign was presented (7 cases). Associated joint abnormalities included anterior cruciate ligament tears(11), contralateral meniscal tears(11), posterior cruciate ligament tears(3), medial collateral ligament tears(3), osteoarthritis(1), and Baker's cyst(1). Awareness of these characteristic MR images(a-e) may increase the sensitivity of MR imaging in the diagnosis of displaced bucket-handle tears, and the MRI may be helpful to correctly characterize the displaced fragment and patterns of associated injury, providing arthroscopists a guide to appropriate surgical plans

  8. The double flipped meniscus sign: unusual MRI findings in bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin Hwan; Yim, Soo Jae; Seo, Yu Seok; Ko, Taeg Su; Lee, Joon Hee

    2014-01-01

    Bucket-handle meniscal tears are either longitudinal, vertical, or oblique in direction with an attached tear fragment displaced from the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs are widely used in the diagnosis of these tears, including the 'fragment within the intercondylar notch sign', 'flipped meniscus sign', 'double anterior horn sign', 'absence of the bow tie sign', 'double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign', 'posterior double PCL sign', and 'triple PCL sign'. We report an unusual case, not yet described in previous studies, of a bucket-handle tear presenting as a double longitudinal tear of the lateral meniscus (LM). Two longitudinal tears were observed in the white-white zone and the red-white zone of the LM, where both fragments were shown to be displaced and locked within the intercondylar notch. Partial menisectomy was performed for the central fragment and a repair with modified all-inside sutures was performed for the peripheral fragment. PMID:24156924

  9. The Diagnostic Value of Sonography in Bucket Handle Tear of Meniscus and Complete MCL Tear Compared with Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Najafi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The concept of evaluating the musculoskeletal system with ultrasound was initially introduced in the late 1970s. For evaluating meniscal tears, which are a common injury in traumatic events of knee, linear probes with high resolution have been used. In this study, we compared the results of sonography with arthroscopy in diagnosing bucket handle tear of meniscus and MCL tear. Patients and Methods: 218 clinically symptomatic knee joints with clinical indication of arthro-scopy were examined by sonography in a referral sport medicine center. The patients eventually had arthroscopic exam. The results were compared, and statistically analyzed using Fisher’s exact. Results: In this study, of 218 patient who had arthroscopy and sonography, the sensitivity and specificity of sonography in meniscal tear were 68.1% and 100%, respectively. 34 patients had bucket handle tear of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on sonography; six cases (17.6% of which had abnormally small posterior horns of medial meniscus (in favor of meniscal tear but in 60 patients with other types of meniscal tear, sonography revealed tear in 58 (96.6%(P<0.0001. Six patients had complete MCL tear in arthroscopy, while in sonography 4 complete MCL tears were shown. Sensitivity of ultrasound in diagnosing complete MCL tear was 66.6% and specificity of 98%. Conclusion: Ultrasound is easily applicable in evaluation of knee derangement: however, for bucket handle tears it has limited application. For MCL tears, sonography seems an accurate method. Ultrasonography is rapid, low-cost and non-invasive examination.

  10. Spontaneous healing of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus associated with ACL tear Resolução espontânea da lesão alça de balde do menisco medial associado com rotura de LCA

    OpenAIRE

    Neiffer Nunes Rabelo; Nícollas Nunes Rabelo; Aluísio Augusto Gonçalves Cunha; Francisco Correia

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of injury of the medial bucket handle meniscal tears (BH), which resolved spontaneously, in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. The patient twisted his left knee during a fight in martial arts, progressing to pain and joint locking and a sense of distortion. In NMR it could be seen bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus with displacement of the fragment to the intercondylar region, rupture of the lateral meniscus and ACL tear. After conservative treat...

  11. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect o...

  12. Bucket-handle tear of a discoid lateral meniscus in a 6-year-old girl

    OpenAIRE

    Yalcin, Nadir; Bektaser, Bulent; Cicekli, Ozgur; Dogan, Metin

    2004-01-01

    A six-year-old girl was examined upon development of pain, swelling, and locking in her right knee after a considerable period of discomfort and popping sensation. She had no history of trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a discoid lateral meniscus, filling the entire lateral plateau and exhibiting signs of degeneration. On arthroscopic examination, a bucket-handle tear of the discoid lateral meniscus was noted and the patient was treated with arthroscopic subtotal meniscectomy. During ...

  13. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  14. Bicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Luigi; Giachino, Matteo; Risitano, Salvatore; Atzori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most worldwide practiced surgery for knee osteoarthritis and its efficacy is mightily described by literature. Concerns about the invasiveness of TKA let the introduction of segmental resurfacing of the joint for younger patients with localized osteoarthritis. Bone stock sparing and ligaments preservation are the essence of both unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) and bicompartmental knee arthroplasty (BKA). Advantages related to BKA are the respect of knee biomechanics, lower complications rates, shorter hospital stay, faster rehabilitation. Moreover, in case of failure of the first implant the conversion to TKA is undemanding and can be compared to a standard prosthesis. Our experience suggest that BKA is a reliable technique in selected cases and especially younger people with higher functional requests can favourably profit from it. Although those results are encouraging, we still need further prospective, randomized, long-term studies to finally assess BKA indications and outcomes. PMID:26855941

  15. The Special Sign Analysis of Bucket Handle Tears of Lateral Meniscus on the Low Field MRI%外侧半月板桶柄状撕裂低场MRI特殊征象分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚海泉; 胡智斌; 林洪平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report special sign of bucket handle tears( BHT) of lateral meniscus on the low field MRI. Materials and Methods The low field MRI findings of 12 patients with BHT of lateral meniscus were retrospectively analyzed. The typical signs were summarized, the analysis for double anterior cruciate ligament sign and thick cake sign and "triple ligament sign"were focused. Results Of 12 cases,double anterior cruciate ligament signs were seen in 3 cases, flipped meniscus signs were seen in 6 cases, absent bow tie signs were seen in 12 cases, internal displaced fragment signs were seen in 10 cases, abnormal circumferential meniscus signs were seen in 9 cases, thick cake signs were seen in 4 cases, "triple ligament signs" were seen in 3 cases. Conclusion Internal displaced fragment sign, abnormal circumferential meniscus sign, flipped meniscus sign and absent bow tie sign are seen on the the medial meniscal as the same as on the lateral meniscal,double anterior cruciate ligament sign and thick cake sign and "triple ligament sign" are more common seen in bucket handle tears( BHT) of lateral meniscus.%目的 分析膝关节外侧半月板桶柄状撕裂(bucket-handle tears,BHT)的低场MRI特殊征象.资料与方法回顾性分析12例经关节镜证实为膝关节外侧半月板BHT患者的低场强MRI图像,总结MRI征象,除碎块内移征、外周残半月板征、半月板翻转征、空领结征外,着重分析双前交叉韧带征、厚饼征、三韧带征.结果 12例外侧半月板BHT中,碎块内移征10例、外周残半月板征9例、半月板翻转征6例、空领结征12例、双前交叉韧带征3例、厚饼征4例、三韧带征3例.结论 碎块内移征、外周残半月板征、半月板翻转征、空领结征见于内侧半月板BHT,同样见于外侧半月板BHT,前交叉韧带征、厚饼征和三韧带征为外侧半月板BHT特殊征象.

  16. MRI demonstration of occult purely chondral fractures of the tibia: a potential mimic of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with bilateral, purely chondral fractures of the tibia. The patient had Crohn's disease treated with systemic corticosteroids. MR images of the knee were initially interpreted to show a bucket-handle tear of the lateral meniscus. However, arthroscopic evaluation revealed purely chondral fractures of the tibial plateau without meniscal damage. Re-evaluation of the MR study identified the chondral fracture of the lateral tibial articular cartilage detected arthroscopically. This purely chondral fracture of the tibial plateau represented a rare finding in the symptomatic knee that mimicked a meniscal tear by history, physical exam, and MR imaging. (orig.). With 4 figs

  17. Spontaneous healing of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus associated with ACL tear Resolução espontânea da lesão alça de balde do menisco medial associado com rotura de LCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiffer Nunes Rabelo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of injury of the medial bucket handle meniscal tears (BH, which resolved spontaneously, in association with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injury. The patient twisted his left knee during a fight in martial arts, progressing to pain and joint locking and a sense of distortion. In NMR it could be seen bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus with displacement of the fragment to the intercondylar region, rupture of the lateral meniscus and ACL tear. After conservative treatment and physiotherapy, in an interval of one year, later examinations showed that there was spontaneous healing of ABNeste trabalho é relatado um caso de lesão do menisco medial do tipo em alça de balde (AB, que se resolveu espontaneamente, em associação com lesão de ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA. O paciente torceu o joelho esquerdo durante uma luta em artes maciais, evoluindo com dor e bloqueio articular e sensação de falseamento. Na RMN havia rotura em alça de balde do menisco medial com deslocamento do fragmento para a região intercondilar, rotura do menisco lateral e rotura do LCA. Após tratamento clínico e fisioterápico, em um intervalo de um ano, o exame de controle demonstrou que havia ocorrido resolução espontânea da AB.

  18. Meniscal ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Takatomo; Taguchi, Tosihiko; Ihara, Koichiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Moriwaki, Tohru; Kawai, Shinya

    2003-02-01

    Meniscal ossicles are rare in the human knee. We present one case. A 57-year-old taxi driver complained of right knee pain and swelling with radiographic findings of a meniscal ossicle. Arthroscopic inspection showed a degenerative and horizontal tear and calcium deposit at the middle and posterior thirds of lateral discoid meniscus. His lateral discoid meniscus, containing the ossicle, was removed. He was asymptomatic at a 3-year follow-up. PMID:12579140

  19. Reversed double PCL sign: unusual location of a meniscal fragment of the knee observed by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    A 36-year-old woman with tears of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus received a meniscectomy. The MR images obtained prior to the partial meniscectomy showed a bucket-handle meniscal tear with centrally displaced fragment lying anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), representing a ''double PCL sign''; however, after the meniscectomy, MR images demonstrated a fragment in the space posterior to the PCL where no structure is generally recognized except for the ligament of wrisberg. This article reports a ''reversed'' double PCL sign, caused by inadequate surgical clearance of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. (orig.)

  20. MR diagnosis of meniscal tears of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many reports have been published about the utilization of MR imaging for the diagnosis of the meniscal injury of the knee. The grading system frequently used in these reports was proposed by Mink, although, this grading does not measure menisci with structural abnormality such as discoid deformity and bucket handle tear. Accordingly, there is ample room for further improvement in this evaluating system. To pursuit the accuracy of our newly designed grading system, we performed retrospective study on 128 patients who underwent MRI examination prior to arthroscopic examination. Furthermore, follow up study of the menisci, which showed high-intensity signal, was done to ascertain whether such abnormalities progress to meniscal tears. Based upon the newly developed grading system, the accuracy in identifying meniscal tears of lateral meniscus was 91.4% and median meniscus was 88.3% respectively. These accuracy compare favorably with the results of previously reported grading systems. Follow up MRIs and confirmation with arthroscopic examination were carried out in 13 cases which showed high-intensity signal in the meniscus. The mean interval between the initial and follow up imaging was 29 months (range, 15-50 months). In 7 cases of stable knee, increment of intra-meniscal intensity and zone were observed, although, there was no progression of grade and no tear was revealed by arthroscopic examination. On the other hand, in 6 cases with cruciate ligament injury, progression of the grade was observed. The results suggest that intra-meniscal derangement does not progress if the knee is stable and patient's activity is within recreation sports activity. (author)

  1. Rotura em "alça de balde" simultânea dos meniscos no mesmo joelho Simultaneous "bucket-handle" tear of both menisci on the same knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Francisco Gomes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotura em "alça de balde" de ambos os meniscos do mesmo joelho é um fenômeno raro. Apresentamos o caso de um paciente em que a ressonância magnética demonstrou rotura em "alça de balde" dos meniscos medial e lateral do mesmo joelho, associada a rotura do ligamento cruzado anterior, confirmado por videoartroscopia. A ressonância magnética demonstra sinais que permitem o diagnóstico preciso.Simultaneous "bucket-handle" tear of menisci on the same knee is a rare phenomenon. We describe a case of a bucket-handle tear of menisci and tear of anterior cruciate ligament of the same knee showed on magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by arthroscopy. The magnetic resonance imaging can provide accurate diagnosis of this type of injury.

  2. Meniscal injury: II. Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Patrick E; Holmstrom, Michael C; Bardana, Davide D; Burks, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    Meniscal repair is a viable alternative to resection in many clinical situations. Repair techniques traditionally have utilized a variety of suture methods, including inside-out and outside-in techniques. Bioabsorbable implants permit all-inside arthroscopic repairs. The success of meniscal repair depends on appropriate meniscal bed preparation and surgical technique and is also influenced by biologic factors such as tear rim width and associated ligamentous injury. Successful repair in >80% of cases has been reported in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Success rates are lower for isolated repairs. Complications related to repair include neurologic injury, postoperative loss of motion, recurrence of the tear, and infection. Meniscal allograft transplantation may provide a treatment option when meniscus salvage is not possible or when a previous total meniscectomy has been done. PMID:12041939

  3. Influence of Bicompartmental Knee Replacement on Stand-to-Sit Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Rolston, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis often occurs in medial and patellofemoral compartments. A bicompartmental knee replacement system replaces these two affected knee compartments and keeps the lateral compartment and cruciate ligaments intact. It is yet to be determined whether limbs with bicompartmental knee systems can demonstrate frontal-plane knee mechanics…

  4. MRI诊断膝关节半月板桶柄状撕裂%The bucket-handle tears of knee menisci on MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡泽银; 麦春华

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the MR imaging findings in diagnosing the bucket handle tears (BHT) of menisci of the knee. Methods: MR imaging of 146 knees with arthroscopy exams were retrospectively evaluated. Based on the results of arthroscopy,28 knees had BHT. Five MRI signs were observed, including internal displaced fragment sign, abnormal circumferential meniscus sign,double posterior cruciate ligament sign,absent bow tie sign and flipped meniscus sign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values,and accuracy for diagnosing menisci BHT of the five signs were calculated. Results: Of the five MRI signs, the internal displaced fragment sign had highest diagnostic sensitivity, accuracy and negative predictive values. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign has the highest specificity and positive predictive value. Conclusion : BHT of menisci had characteristic MRI findings and the internal displaced fragment sign is the most essential and reliable sign.%目的:总结分析半月板桶柄状撕裂的MRI征象和诊断价值.方法:回顾性分析146个经关节镜证实的膝关节MR图像,其中28个膝关节存在半月板桶柄状撕裂,记录如下5种MRI征象:碎块内移征、外周残半月板征、双PCL征、空领结征及双前角征,并分别计算每种征象诊断半月板桶柄状撕裂的敏感度、特异度、准确度、阳性预测值和阴性预测值.结果:5种征象中碎块内移征具有最高的敏感度、准确度和阴性预测值,而双PCL征具有最高的特异性和阳性预测值.结论:半月板桶柄状撕裂具有典型的MRI征象,其中碎块内移征是诊断半月板桶柄状撕裂的最基础、可靠的征象.

  5. Double anterior cruciate ligament sign: a MR finding of lateral meniscal bucket-handle tear%双前交叉韧带征:外侧半月板桶柄状撕裂MR征象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚静山; 陈蓟; 徐坚民; 潘晓华; 朱进; 饶梓彬; 杨忠; 黄国鑫

    2008-01-01

    目的:报道外侧半月板桶柄状撕裂的一个MR征象-双"ACL"征.方法:回顾性分析7例经关节镜证实外侧半月板桶柄状撕裂的MR表现.结果:7例患者中,4例MR机检查矢状位T2W图像上观察到ACL后方与ACL平行的条状低信号影,呈现双"ACL"征.结论:双"ACL"征可以提示ACL桶柄状撕裂可能,其临床价值有待于进一步研究.

  6. Analysis of meniscal degeneration and meniscal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton James H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menisci play a vital role in load transmission, shock absorption and joint stability. There is increasing evidence suggesting that OA menisci may not merely be bystanders in the disease process of OA. This study sought: 1 to determine the prevalence of meniscal degeneration in OA patients, and 2 to examine gene expression in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Methods Studies were approved by our human subjects Institutional Review Board. Menisci and articular cartilage were collected during joint replacement surgery for OA patients and lower limb amputation surgery for osteosarcoma patients (normal control specimens, and graded. Meniscal cells were prepared from these meniscal tissues and expanded in monolayer culture. Differential gene expression in OA meniscal cells and normal meniscal cells was examined using Affymetrix microarray and real time RT-PCR. Results The grades of meniscal degeneration correlated with the grades of articular cartilage degeneration (r = 0.672; P HLA-DPA1, integrin, beta 2 (ITGB2, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1, ankylosis, progressive homolog (ANKH and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7, were expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Importantly, many of the genes that have been shown to be differentially expressed in other OA cell types/tissues, including ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 5 (ADAMTS5 and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES, were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells. This consistency suggests that many of the genes detected in our study are disease-specific. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OA is a whole joint disease. Meniscal cells may play an active role in the development of OA. Investigation of the gene expression profiles of OA meniscal cells may reveal new therapeutic targets for OA therapy and also may uncover novel

  7. Meniscal repair using the Polysorb Meniscal Stapler XLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, Michael A; Chisar, Michael A

    2005-09-01

    We present our technique of repair of meniscal tears in 11 patients using a newly designed stapler, the Polysorb Meniscal Stapler XLS (USS Sports Medicine, Norwalk, CT), to increase the effectiveness and ease of repair of tears in the vascular zone while limiting potential complications. The low-profile stapler comes with a reloadable pistol grip device and a disposable straight or 15 degrees upcurved shaft with a single preloaded 10-mm staple. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals were used, along with a superomedial portal for inflow. The portal was enlarged slightly to facilitate introduction of the cannula or the stapler directly into the knee. The nose of the stapler was applied to the superior surface of the inner edge of the meniscal tear. The sharp points on the tip of the nose were used to manipulate the inner edge and coapt the tear site. Firm pressure was applied to the meniscal tissue, and the nose of the stapler was embedded in the inner edge of the meniscus no more than 2 to 3 mm from the tear (as measured along the meniscal surface). The handle was pulled slowly as the staple engaged the meniscal tissue. This step was repeated every 3 to 4 mm to ensure ideal tear stabilization. PMID:16171646

  8. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  9. Meniscal injury: I. Basic science and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Patrick E; Bardana, Davide D; Holmstrom, Michael C; Burks, Robert T

    2002-01-01

    The patient with meniscal injury may present with pain, swelling, or mechanical symptoms and often requires surgical intervention for symptom resolution. Treatment of such injuries relies on understanding the gross and microanatomic features of the meniscus that are important in maintaining meniscal function. The ability of the meniscus to participate in load bearing, shock absorption, joint lubrication, and joint stability depends on the maintenance of its structural integrity. The diagnosis of meniscal injury often can be made by clinical evaluation utilizing the history, physical examination, and plain radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging can be useful in confirming the diagnosis when clinical findings are inconclusive. Treatment depends on tear pattern, vascularity, and an assessment of tissue quality. Surgical decision making for the treatment of meniscal injury is based on patient factors and understanding of the meniscal structure, function, and pathology. PMID:12041938

  10. Multiple MRI signs in diagnosis of bucket-handle tears of the knee menisci%MRI多征象分析诊断半月板桶柄状撕裂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁绮玲; 韩立新; 曹惠霞; 杜渭清; 崔静

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨MRI多征象分析诊断半月板桶柄状撕裂(BHT)的价值.方法 回顾性分析84个经关节镜证实为半月板损伤的膝关节的MR图像,其中42个膝关节为半月板BHT,另42个膝关节为非BHT.观察以下8种征象:双后交叉韧带(PCL)征、半月板翻转征、空领结征、领结残破征、后角残破征、厚饼征、碎块内移征及外周残半月板征,分别计算每种征象诊断半月板BHT的敏感度、特异度、阳性预测值、阴性预测值和准确率.结果 双PCL征、半月板翻转征、厚饼征、碎块内移征及外周残半月板征具有相对高的特异度,但除碎块内移征及外周残半月板征的敏感度相对高外,其余6种MRI征象的敏感度均较小.结论 半月板BHT可有多种MRI表现,碎块内移征与外周残半月板征最具诊断价值,而双PCL征、半月板翻转征及厚饼征特异度较高,这些征象的出现强烈提示半月板BHT.%Objective To assess the diagnostic value of multiple MRI signs in diagnosis of bucket-handle tears (BHT) of the knee menisci. Methods MRI images of 84 knee joints with menisci injury were retrospectively analyzed. There were 42 knees with BHT of menisci and 42 knees without BHT of menisci according to arthroscopy. Double posterior cruciate ligament sign, flipped meniscus sign, absent bow tie sign, bow tie broken sign, posterior angle broken sign, thick pastry sign, internal displaced fragment sign and abnormal circumferential meniscus sign were observed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy for diagnosing BHT of menisci were calculated for the presence of each individual sign. Results Among these eight signs, double posterior cruciate ligament sign, flipped meniscus sign, thick pastry sign, internal displaced fragment sign and abnormal circumferential meniscus sign had relative high specificities. Most of the signs except internal displaced fragment sign and abnormal circumferential

  11. Treatment of meniscal injury: a current concept review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yang-lin; WANG Yu-bin

    2010-01-01

    Meniscal injury is one of the most common injuries to the knee. The menisci are important for normal knee function. And loss of a meniscus increases the risk of subsequent development of degenerative changes in the knee. Now there are different techniques available for meniscal injury. These techniques include expectant treatment, meniscectomy, meniscal repair, meniscal replacement, and meniscal tissue engineering. Expectant treatment is the appropriate treatment for minor tears of the menisci. Meniscectomy being favored at the beginning is now obsolete. Meniscus repair has become a standard procedure. Meniscal replacement and tissue engineering are used to deal with considerable meniscal injuries. The purpose of this paper is to provide current knowledge regarding the anatomy and function of the menisci, incidence,aetiology, symptoms, signs, investigations and treatments of meniscal injury.

  12. MR imaging of meniscal subluxation in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish diagnostic criteria for meniscal subluxation, and to determine whether there was any connection between meniscal subluxation and other common meniscal and knee-joint abnormalities. Material and Methods: The normal position of the meniscal body was assessed in 10 asymptomatic volunteers. MR signs of meniscal subluxation were evaluated retrospectively in 60 symptomatic patients with pain the knee, impaired mobility, and/or joint swelling who had no clear diagnosis after the evaluation of case history, clinical examination, and radiography. The criterion for subluxation of the meniscus was defined as a distance of ≥3 mm between the peripheral border of the meniscus and the edge of the tibial plateau. Results: In the volunteers, the mean distance form the medial meniscus to the edge of the tibial plateau was 0.07 mm, and that from the lateral meniscus was 0 mm. In 55 symptomatic patients without meniscal subluxation, the mean distance from the meniscus to the edge of the tribial plateau was 0.27 mm. Five patients (8%) had evidence of meniscal subluxation, 4 in the medial meniscus and one in the lateral meniscus. The most commonly associated knee abnormality was joint effusion in 5 knees and osteoarthritis in 2 knees. Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with painful knees. Meniscal subluxation was associated with other knee abnormalities such as joint effusion or osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  13. Lateral Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: The Bone Trough Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahla, Jorge; Olivetto, Javier; Dean, Chase S; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-04-01

    The lateral meniscus plays a critical role in the stability and health of the knee. Treating patients who have undergone a total lateral meniscectomy or functional equivalent is challenging, especially young and active patients. Current literature regarding meniscal tears supports that repair should be the first surgical option. Moreover, it is recommended to preserve as much meniscal tissue as possible. In cases in which a total or functional meniscectomy is a pre-existing condition, a lateral meniscal allograft transplantation is a possible option. The purpose of this surgical technique description was to detail the method of lateral meniscal allograft transplantation using a bone trough. PMID:27462536

  14. Lesão meniscal por fadiga Meniscal injury due to fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Luis Camanho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O intuito do presente estudo é de analisar um grupo de pacientes portadores de lesão meniscal decorrente da falência estrutural sem relação com trauma ou problemas degenerativos, optando por chamá-la de lesão meniscal por fadiga. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 140 pacientes com lesão meniscal sem causa aparente e, portanto, considerados portadores da lesão meniscal por fadiga. Dentre eles, 85 pacientes eram do sexo masculino e 55 do sexo feminino. O menisco medial foi o mais acometido (92% dos casos. RESULTADOS: Todas as lesões foram diagnosticadas através de exame clínico e ressonância magnética. Os pacientes foram submetidos a meniscectomia por via artroscópica e os resultados foram divididos em dois tipos: bons e maus. Foram encontrados 27% de maus resultados dos quais nove pacientes evoluíram para osteonecrose idiopática. CONCLUSÃO: Concluímos que as lesões por fadiga devem ser analisadas como lesões provocadas por falência, portanto uma patologia sindrômica que pode evoluir para uma osteonecrose idiopática..OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to review a group of patients with meniscal injuries resulting from structural failure unrelated to trauma or degenerative problems to which was given the name "meniscal injury due to fatigue". MATERIAL AND METHOD: Evaluations were made on 140 patients with meniscal injuries without any apparent cause, who were therefore considered to have meniscal injuries due to fatigue. Among these, 85 patients were male and 55 were female. The medial meniscus was the most affected site (92% of the cases. RESULTS: All these injuries were diagnosed by means of clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. The patients underwent meniscectomy by means of arthroscopy and the results were divided into two types: good and poor. Poor results were found in 27% of the cases, among which nine patients progressed to idiopathic osteonecrosis. CONCLUSION: We conclude that

  15. The role of the bi-compartmental stem cell niche in delaying cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriyari, Leili; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, by using modern imaging techniques, scientists have found evidence of collaboration between different types of stem cells (SCs), and proposed a bi-compartmental organization of the SC niche. Here we create a class of stochastic models to simulate the dynamics of such a heterogeneous SC niche. We consider two SC groups: the border compartment, S1, is in direct contact with transit-amplifying (TA) cells, and the central compartment, S2, is hierarchically upstream from S1. The S1 SCs differentiate or divide asymmetrically when the tissue needs TA cells. Both groups proliferate when the tissue requires SCs (thus maintaining homeostasis). There is an influx of S2 cells into the border compartment, either by migration, or by proliferation. We examine this model in the context of double-hit mutant generation, which is a rate-limiting step in the development of many cancers. We discover that this type of a cooperative pattern in the stem niche with two compartments leads to a significantly smaller rate of double-hit mutant production compared with a homogeneous, one-compartmental SC niche. Furthermore, the minimum probability of double-hit mutant generation corresponds to purely symmetric division of SCs, consistent with the literature. Finally, the optimal architecture (which minimizes the rate of double-hit mutant production) requires a large proliferation rate of S1 cells along with a small, but non-zero, proliferation rate of S2 cells. This result is remarkably similar to the niche structure described recently by several authors, where one of the two SC compartments was found more actively engaged in tissue homeostasis and turnover, while the other was characterized by higher levels of quiescence (but contributed strongly to injury recovery). Both numerical and analytical results are presented.

  16. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  17. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation

  18. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelec, K. M., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E. [Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, Materials Science and Metallurgy Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Wardale, R. J., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk [Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  19. Clinical Results of All-inside Meniscal Repair Using the FasT-Fix Meniscal Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chiang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The meniscus plays a key role in the functioning of the knee. At the presenttime, meniscal repair has becomes the main treatment for meniscal tear.Compared to open surgery, arthroscopic meniscal repair has become popularbecause of shorter time need for the operation, the smaller wound, and betteraccessibility to the tear portion, which is particularly difficult during opensurgery. Three arthroscopic techniques are widely used, namely inside-out,outside-in, and all-inside. Arthroscopy all inside meniscal repair has the lowest neurovascular injury rate.Methods: This study prospectively evaluated 31 consecutively treated patients to determine the effectiveness/safety of arthroscopic meniscal repair using the FasTFix repair system. The inclusion criteria for this study were: vertical fullthickness tear > 10 mm in length; location of the meniscal tear < 6 mm fromthe meniscocapsular junction; repair of the meniscus solely with the FasTFix system; no former meniscus surgery; and no evidence of arthritis duringarthroscopy. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL deficient knees were reconstructed using a hamstring autograft at the time of the meniscal repair.Follow-up examinations consisted of Lysholm knee score, Tegner activityscore and radiographic evaluation.Results: After an average of 3 years follow-up, no symptoms of meniscal tears werefound in 30/31 of the cases. For patients with isolated meniscal repair or concurrent ACL reconstruction, the Lysholm and Tegner activity scores hadsignificantly improved postoperatively. No neurovascular or other majorcomplications were directly associated with the use of the device.Conclusions: Arthroscopic all-inside repair using the FasT-Fix device appears to be a safeand effective procedure

  20. Is Surgery Always Needed for Meniscal Tears of the Knee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A meniscal tear is a common and disabling knee injury affecting many Americans at some point in their ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Knee Injuries and Disorders Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  1. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness. PMID:16810354

  2. Concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ya; Jun ZHANG; Zhang, Shu; Li, Rui; Yue, Xianhu

    2015-01-01

    Background: To identify and characterize the concomitant ligamentous and meniscal injuries in floating knee. Methods: A total of 37 cases of floating knee were enrolled. Arthroscopic or open surgical examination of the knee, Lachman test, posterior drawer’s test, and varus and valgus stress tests under anesthesia were carried out to determine the incidence of knee injury. Results: Through arthroscopic and open surgical examinations, a medial meniscal tear was detected in 14 (37.8%) cases and ...

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of a Lateral Meniscal Cyst with Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal cysts are a relatively uncommon occurrence that may result in pain and disability in the knee. It is widely believed that meniscal cysts are secondary to fluid extrusion from a meniscus tear. Typically, diagnosis of a meniscal cyst typically requires magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to delineate the cyst and any associated injuries. With improvements in sonographic technology, ultrasound has emerged as a sensitive modality for detection of meniscal cysts. We present a patient with a contraindication to MRI who was diagnosed with a lateral meniscal cyst by musculoskeletal ultrasound and treated with an ultrasound-guided lateral meniscal cyst aspiration and injection.

  4. A retrospective analysis of risk factors for meniscal co-morbidities in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korula Mani Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The single factor that significantly affects incidence of meniscal co-morbidity in ACL injury is the delay in presentation (i.e. the time to surgery. The incidence of lateral meniscal tears as well as medial meniscal tears increased with delay in surgery. This should guide us toward recommending all patients irrespective of age, gender, or mode of injury to undergo early reconstruction, thereby reducing the likelihood of developing meniscal pathology.

  5. Posterior horn medial meniscal root tear: the prequel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether subarticular marrow changes deep to the posterior horn medial meniscal root anchor might predict subsequent medial meniscal root tear. Fifteen patients with MR-diagnosed posterior horn medial meniscal root (PHMMR) tear and a knee MRI antecedent to the tear were identified at three imaging centers over a 7-year period. The pre- and post-tear MR images were evaluated for marrow signal changes deep to the root anchor, meniscal root signal intensity, medial compartment articular cartilage thinning, and meniscal body extrusion. Images of 29 age- and gender-matched individuals with two MRIs of the same knee were reviewed as a control group. MRI in 11 of 15 (73 %) cases with subsequent PHMMR tear demonstrated linear subcortical marrow edema deep to the meniscal root anchor on the antecedent MRI compared to only 1 of 29 (3 %) non-tear controls (p < 0.0001). The abnormal signal resolved on post-tear MRI in all but two patients. Cyst-like changes deep to the PHMMR were present on initial MRI in three of 15 (23 %) cases and three of 29 (10 %) controls, persisting in all but one case on follow-up imaging. The PHMMR was gray on the initial MRI in seven of 15 (47 %) of cases that developed tears compared to four of 29 (14 %) controls (p < 0.0001). There was medial meniscal extrusion (MME) prior to tear in two of 15 (13 %) patients and in ten of 15 (67 %) patients after PHMMR failure. In the control group, MME was present in one (3 %) and three (10 %) of 29 subjects on the initial and follow-up MRIs, respectively. Articular cartilage loss was noted in two of 15 (15 %) cases before tear and nine of 15 (69 %) on follow-up imaging, as compared to one (3 %) and four (14 %) of 29 subjects in the control group. Subcortical marrow edema deep to the PHMMR may result from abnormal stresses and thus be a harbinger of meniscal root failure. This hypothesis is supported by resolution of these marrow signal changes after root tear. Following tear, extrusion of the

  6. Posterior horn medial meniscal root tear: the prequel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, H. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, New York, NY (United States); Morrison, W. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DiFelice, G.S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Vaidya, N. [Crystal Run Healthcare, Middletown, NY (United States); Winalski, C.S. [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    To determine whether subarticular marrow changes deep to the posterior horn medial meniscal root anchor might predict subsequent medial meniscal root tear. Fifteen patients with MR-diagnosed posterior horn medial meniscal root (PHMMR) tear and a knee MRI antecedent to the tear were identified at three imaging centers over a 7-year period. The pre- and post-tear MR images were evaluated for marrow signal changes deep to the root anchor, meniscal root signal intensity, medial compartment articular cartilage thinning, and meniscal body extrusion. Images of 29 age- and gender-matched individuals with two MRIs of the same knee were reviewed as a control group. MRI in 11 of 15 (73 %) cases with subsequent PHMMR tear demonstrated linear subcortical marrow edema deep to the meniscal root anchor on the antecedent MRI compared to only 1 of 29 (3 %) non-tear controls (p < 0.0001). The abnormal signal resolved on post-tear MRI in all but two patients. Cyst-like changes deep to the PHMMR were present on initial MRI in three of 15 (23 %) cases and three of 29 (10 %) controls, persisting in all but one case on follow-up imaging. The PHMMR was gray on the initial MRI in seven of 15 (47 %) of cases that developed tears compared to four of 29 (14 %) controls (p < 0.0001). There was medial meniscal extrusion (MME) prior to tear in two of 15 (13 %) patients and in ten of 15 (67 %) patients after PHMMR failure. In the control group, MME was present in one (3 %) and three (10 %) of 29 subjects on the initial and follow-up MRIs, respectively. Articular cartilage loss was noted in two of 15 (15 %) cases before tear and nine of 15 (69 %) on follow-up imaging, as compared to one (3 %) and four (14 %) of 29 subjects in the control group. Subcortical marrow edema deep to the PHMMR may result from abnormal stresses and thus be a harbinger of meniscal root failure. This hypothesis is supported by resolution of these marrow signal changes after root tear. Following tear, extrusion of the

  7. Failure properties and strain distribution analysis of meniscal attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Diego F; Maes, Jason A; Magee, Sarah D; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2007-01-01

    The menisci are frequently injured due to both degeneration and traumatic tearing. It has been suggested that the success of a meniscal replacement is dependent on several factors, one of which is the secure fixation and firm attachment of the replacement to the tibial plateau. Therefore, the objectives of the current study were to (1) determine the failure properties of the meniscal horn attachments, and (2) determine the strain distribution over their surfaces. Eight bovine knee joints were used to study the mechanical response of the meniscal attachments. Three meniscal attachments from one knee of each animal were tested in uniaxial tension at 2%/s to determine the load deformation response. During the tests, the samples were marked and local strain distributions were determined with a video extensometer. The linear modulus of the medial anterior attachment (154+/-134 MPa) was significantly less than both the medial posterior (248+/-179 MPa, p=0.0111) and the lateral anterior attachment (281+/-214 MPa, p=0.0007). Likewise, the ultimate strain for the medial anterior attachments (13.5+/-8.8%) was significantly less than the medial posterior (23+/-13%, p0.05). No significant differences in ultimate strain or moduli across the surface of the attachments were noted. Based on the data obtained, a meniscal replacement would need different moduli for each of the different attachments. However, the attachments appear to be homogeneous. PMID:17359982

  8. Advances and Prospects in Tissue-Engineered Meniscal Scaffolds for Meniscus Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The meniscus plays a crucial role in maintaining knee joint homoeostasis. Meniscal lesions are relatively common in the knee joint and are typically categorized into various types. However, it is difficult for inner avascular meniscal lesions to self-heal. Untreated meniscal lesions lead to meniscal extrusions in the long-term and gradually trigger the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA is complex. Partial meniscectomy, which is the primary method to treat a meniscal injury, only relieves short-term pain; however, it does not prevent the development of knee OA. Similarly, other current therapeutic strategies have intrinsic limitations in clinical practice. Tissue engineering technology will probably address this challenge by reconstructing a meniscus possessing an integrated configuration with competent biomechanical capacity. This review describes normal structure and biomechanical characteristics of the meniscus, discusses the relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA, and summarizes the classifications and corresponding treatment strategies for meniscal lesions to understand meniscal regeneration from physiological and pathological perspectives. Last, we present current advances in meniscal scaffolds and provide a number of prospects that will potentially benefit the development of meniscal regeneration methods.

  9. Marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau: possible association with medial meniscal root tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report two cases of marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau associated with medial meniscal root tears. Both patients sustained knee dislocations, with complete tears of the posterior horn medial meniscal root. One sustained a ''reverse Segond fracture''; the other sustained an ''anteromedial impingement fracture'' of the tibial plateau. The meniscal root tears were arthroscopically confirmed and repaired. In the first patient, the integrity of the meniscal root repair was confirmed at a 6-month follow-up arthroscopy for lysis of adhesions. In the second patient, follow-up MRI at 10 months demonstrated a healed meniscal root. The association of medial meniscal root tear with marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  10. Marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau: possible association with medial meniscal root tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelsohn, Eliyahu [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Umans, Hilary [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ardsley, NY (United States); DiFelice, Gregory S. [Jacobi Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ardsley, NY (United States)

    2007-01-15

    We report two cases of marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau associated with medial meniscal root tears. Both patients sustained knee dislocations, with complete tears of the posterior horn medial meniscal root. One sustained a ''reverse Segond fracture''; the other sustained an ''anteromedial impingement fracture'' of the tibial plateau. The meniscal root tears were arthroscopically confirmed and repaired. In the first patient, the integrity of the meniscal root repair was confirmed at a 6-month follow-up arthroscopy for lysis of adhesions. In the second patient, follow-up MRI at 10 months demonstrated a healed meniscal root. The association of medial meniscal root tear with marginal fractures of the medial tibial plateau has not been previously reported. (orig.)

  11. All-inside meniscal repair using the RapidLoc device

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Cengiz; Asik, Mehmet; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Atalar, Ata Can; Erdil, Mehmet; Taser, Omer F.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Although conventional suture techniques yield satisfactory results in the treatment of meniscal ruptures, they are inherent with long operative time and high complication rates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of meniscal repair with the use of the RapidLoc device. Methods: The study included 57 consecutive patients (all males; mean age 24 years; range 17 to 33 years) who underwent meniscal repair with the RapidLoc device. The mean time from injury to surg...

  12. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  13. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya [Department of Radiology, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Swirsky, Stephen M. [Department of Orthopedics, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mintz, Douglas [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  14. The Value of Sonography in Diagnosis of Meniscal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Forouzmehr

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the high incidence of meniscal injuries, a cost-effective, noninvasive, and also accurate diagnostic modality is highly needed. This study was conducted to assess the diagnostic value of sonography in detecting meniscus tears in comparison with arthrography. Methods: A total of 136 patients with symptoms of meniscal injury were examined with both sonography and arthrography by separate radiologists. The sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values of sonography were calculated versus arthrography. Results: The sensitivity of sonography in diagnosing meniscus tear was 75 percent, specificity 88 percent, positive predictive value 80 percent, and negative predictive value 85 percent. Conclusion: Our results show that we can’t yet replace other methods with higher diagnostic value with sonography completely but regarding its advantages, it can be used along with other routine modalities. Keywords: Meniscus Tear, Sonography, Arthrography, Diagnostic Value.

  15. Value of modern sonography in the assessment of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of modern ultrasonography in diagnostic imaging of meniscal tears. One hundred and sixty menisci were evaluated in 80 patients (42 females, 38 males, mean age = 36.2 years, range = 16–70 years). Inclusion criteria for the study were twofold: clinical suspicion of meniscal injury and clinical indication for arthroscopy. Knee examination was performed with the Voluson 730 Expert ultrasound system (General Electric). After sonographic examination, all patients underwent arthroscopic procedures within 1–4 days. The final diagnosis of meniscal tears was taken from surgical reports. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sonographic examination in the assessment of meniscal tears amounted to 85.4%, 85.7%, 67.3% and 94.4%, respectively. The statistical parameters were not statistically different in medial and lateral menisci. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), weight, physical activity, mechanism on injury, and time lapse from injury did not have a statistically significant impact on the usefulness of ultrasonography. The highest sensitivity (>90%) was obtained in medial menisci and in patients with a BMI > 25. The highest specificity (>90%) was obtained in lateral menisci, in patients after twisting injuries, in sports injuries, and in recent injuries (time lapse from the injury <1 month). The positive predictive value (PPV) of sonographic examination was higher than 90% only in recent injuries (<1 month), however, the negative predictive value of ultrasound is high, being less than 90% in males with lesions of lateral menisci and in sequelae of sports injuries

  16. Evaluation of meniscal subluxation of the knee with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the normal meniscal position and meniscal subluxation by means of MR imaging. The normal position of the meniscus was determined by measuring the distance between the peripheral meniscal borders and the tibial plateau, as seen on coronal, sagittal and oblique MR images of 40 normal knees. For 33 abnormal knees in which outward subluxation of the meniscus from the tibial plateau was noted, the involved site, the predisposing factor, and the frequency of meniscus tearing were analyzed. In normal knees, the peripheral border of the meniscus extruded 3mm or less from the peripheral border of the tibial plateau. Among 33 abnormal knees, in which 5mm or more outward subluxation of the meniscus was seen, 19 menisci were medial and 14 were lateral. Among the 19, the body was involved in 12, the anterior horn in six, and the posterior horn in one. With regard to the 14 lateral subluxations, involvement of the posterior horn occurred in ten, of both the body and posterior horn in two, of the anterior horn in one, and of the body in one. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, seen in 89% of such cases, and in lateral subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear, which occurred in 79% of cases. Medial meniscus tear was noted in 89% of medial meniscus subluxations and lateral meniscus tear in 43% of lateral subluxations. Meniscal subluxation was easily detected by MR imaging of the knee. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, and in lateral meniscus subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear. A torn meniscus frequently co-occurred.

  17. Meniscal position on routine MR imaging of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, T.T. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Milstein Hospital Building 2-121, 177 Fort Washington Ave., New York, NY 10032 (United States)]|[Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States); Staron, R.B. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Milstein Hospital Building 2-121, 177 Fort Washington Ave., New York, NY 10032 (United States); Feldman, F. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Milstein Hospital Building 2-121, 177 Fort Washington Ave., New York, NY 10032 (United States); Cepel, E. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Milstein Hospital Building 2-121, 177 Fort Washington Ave., New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    1997-07-07

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of meniscal protrusion (i.e. location of the outer edge of a meniscus beyond the tibial articular surface), and to determine its relationship with internal derangement, joint effusion, and degenerative arthropathy. Design and patients. Sagittal and coronal MR images of 111 abnormal and 46 normal knees were evaluated for the presence of meniscal protrusion. We set 25% as the minimum amount of displacement considered abnormal because this was the smallest amount of displacement we could confidently discern. Presence of meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, joint effusion, or osteophytosis was also recorded. Results and conclusion. Normal examinations demonstrated protrusion of the medial meniscus in 6.5% of sagittal images and 15% of coronal images, and of the lateral meniscus in 2% and 13%, respectively. Fisher`s exact test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the normal and abnormal groups for the medial meniscus on both sagittal (P<0.0001) and coronal (P=0.01) images, but not for the lateral meniscus in either plane (P>0.2). A protruding medial meniscus was associated with effusion and osteophytosis (P<0.05) but not with meniscal or ACL tear (P>0.1). Posterior protrusion of the lateral meniscus was only associated with ACL injury (P<0.0001); protruding anterior horns and bodies of lateral menisci were not associated with any of the four abnormalities. It is concluded that the medial meniscus may occasionally protrude more than 25% of its width, but protrusion is more often due to effusion and osteophytes. Protrusion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is associated with ACL insufficiency, while protrusion of the body and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus is a normal variant. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  18. Evaluation of meniscal subluxation of the knee with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the normal meniscal position and meniscal subluxation by means of MR imaging. The normal position of the meniscus was determined by measuring the distance between the peripheral meniscal borders and the tibial plateau, as seen on coronal, sagittal and oblique MR images of 40 normal knees. For 33 abnormal knees in which outward subluxation of the meniscus from the tibial plateau was noted, the involved site, the predisposing factor, and the frequency of meniscus tearing were analyzed. In normal knees, the peripheral border of the meniscus extruded 3mm or less from the peripheral border of the tibial plateau. Among 33 abnormal knees, in which 5mm or more outward subluxation of the meniscus was seen, 19 menisci were medial and 14 were lateral. Among the 19, the body was involved in 12, the anterior horn in six, and the posterior horn in one. With regard to the 14 lateral subluxations, involvement of the posterior horn occurred in ten, of both the body and posterior horn in two, of the anterior horn in one, and of the body in one. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, seen in 89% of such cases, and in lateral subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear, which occurred in 79% of cases. Medial meniscus tear was noted in 89% of medial meniscus subluxations and lateral meniscus tear in 43% of lateral subluxations. Meniscal subluxation was easily detected by MR imaging of the knee. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, and in lateral meniscus subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear. A torn meniscus frequently co-occurred

  19. Value of modern sonography in the assessment of meniscal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareluk, Pawel, E-mail: pwareluk@wum.edu.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, ul. Kondratowicza 8, 03-242 Warsaw (Poland); Szopinski, Kazimierz T., E-mail: kszopinski@wum.edu.pl [Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, ul. Nowogrodzka 59, 02-006 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of modern ultrasonography in diagnostic imaging of meniscal tears. One hundred and sixty menisci were evaluated in 80 patients (42 females, 38 males, mean age = 36.2 years, range = 16–70 years). Inclusion criteria for the study were twofold: clinical suspicion of meniscal injury and clinical indication for arthroscopy. Knee examination was performed with the Voluson 730 Expert ultrasound system (General Electric). After sonographic examination, all patients underwent arthroscopic procedures within 1–4 days. The final diagnosis of meniscal tears was taken from surgical reports. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sonographic examination in the assessment of meniscal tears amounted to 85.4%, 85.7%, 67.3% and 94.4%, respectively. The statistical parameters were not statistically different in medial and lateral menisci. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), weight, physical activity, mechanism on injury, and time lapse from injury did not have a statistically significant impact on the usefulness of ultrasonography. The highest sensitivity (>90%) was obtained in medial menisci and in patients with a BMI > 25. The highest specificity (>90%) was obtained in lateral menisci, in patients after twisting injuries, in sports injuries, and in recent injuries (time lapse from the injury <1 month). The positive predictive value (PPV) of sonographic examination was higher than 90% only in recent injuries (<1 month), however, the negative predictive value of ultrasound is high, being less than 90% in males with lesions of lateral menisci and in sequelae of sports injuries.

  20. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  1. Association of peripheral vertical meniscal tears with anterior cruciate ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to describe a type of meniscal tear seen on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the peripheral vertical tear, and to determine the prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in knees with this type of meniscal tear compared to knees with other types of meniscal tears. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective review of 200 knee MR examinations with imaging diagnoses of 'meniscal tear' was performed to assess the location and morphology of the meniscal tear, and to assess the status of the ACL. Nineteen peripheral vertical meniscal tears were identified in 17 patients, 14 of whom had acute ACL tears, prior ACL reconstruction, or chronic ACL deficiency. Three peripheral vertical tears were seen in the setting of a normal ACL. Of the 183 examinations with other types of meniscal tears, there were 17 cases with acute ACL tears, prior ACL reconstruction, or chronic ACL deficiency. The difference in the prevalence of ACL tear, reconstruction, or deficiency in knees with meniscal tears of the peripheral vertical type (82.4%) compared with the prevalence of ACL tear, reconstruction, or deficiency in knees with other types of meniscal tears (9.3%) was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The calculated specificity of the presence of peripheral vertical tear morphology in detecting an ACL injury in patients with meniscal tears was 98.2%. Peripheral vertical meniscal tears, particularly when involving the posterior horn, are highly associated with ACL tear, deficiency, or reconstruction. The finding of this type of tear on knee MR imaging should prompt close inspection of the ACL for evidence of acute or chronic injury, and its presence may help make the diagnosis of ACL tear in equivocal cases. (orig.)

  2. Association of peripheral vertical meniscal tears with anterior cruciate ligament tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, Emily N.; Gage, Jeffrey A.; Lacy, Joe N. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this article is to describe a type of meniscal tear seen on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the peripheral vertical tear, and to determine the prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in knees with this type of meniscal tear compared to knees with other types of meniscal tears. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective review of 200 knee MR examinations with imaging diagnoses of 'meniscal tear' was performed to assess the location and morphology of the meniscal tear, and to assess the status of the ACL. Nineteen peripheral vertical meniscal tears were identified in 17 patients, 14 of whom had acute ACL tears, prior ACL reconstruction, or chronic ACL deficiency. Three peripheral vertical tears were seen in the setting of a normal ACL. Of the 183 examinations with other types of meniscal tears, there were 17 cases with acute ACL tears, prior ACL reconstruction, or chronic ACL deficiency. The difference in the prevalence of ACL tear, reconstruction, or deficiency in knees with meniscal tears of the peripheral vertical type (82.4%) compared with the prevalence of ACL tear, reconstruction, or deficiency in knees with other types of meniscal tears (9.3%) was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The calculated specificity of the presence of peripheral vertical tear morphology in detecting an ACL injury in patients with meniscal tears was 98.2%. Peripheral vertical meniscal tears, particularly when involving the posterior horn, are highly associated with ACL tear, deficiency, or reconstruction. The finding of this type of tear on knee MR imaging should prompt close inspection of the ACL for evidence of acute or chronic injury, and its presence may help make the diagnosis of ACL tear in equivocal cases. (orig.)

  3. Meniscal position on routine MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of meniscal protrusion (i.e. location of the outer edge of a meniscus beyond the tibial articular surface), and to determine its relationship with internal derangement, joint effusion, and degenerative arthropathy. Design and patients. Sagittal and coronal MR images of 111 abnormal and 46 normal knees were evaluated for the presence of meniscal protrusion. We set 25% as the minimum amount of displacement considered abnormal because this was the smallest amount of displacement we could confidently discern. Presence of meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, joint effusion, or osteophytosis was also recorded. Results and conclusion. Normal examinations demonstrated protrusion of the medial meniscus in 6.5% of sagittal images and 15% of coronal images, and of the lateral meniscus in 2% and 13%, respectively. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the normal and abnormal groups for the medial meniscus on both sagittal (P0.2). A protruding medial meniscus was associated with effusion and osteophytosis (P0.1). Posterior protrusion of the lateral meniscus was only associated with ACL injury (P<0.0001); protruding anterior horns and bodies of lateral menisci were not associated with any of the four abnormalities. It is concluded that the medial meniscus may occasionally protrude more than 25% of its width, but protrusion is more often due to effusion and osteophytes. Protrusion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is associated with ACL insufficiency, while protrusion of the body and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus is a normal variant. (orig.). With 4 figs

  4. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  5. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  6. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  7. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Brian [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Mann, Sumeer A. [Department of Radiology, University of Alberta, Walter Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2B7 (Canada); King, Chris [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, Bruce B., E-mail: bruce.forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  8. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Khodamorad Jamshidi; Hooman Yahazadeh; Abolfazl Bagherifard

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  9. Meniscal and cruciate ligaments tears diagnosed with MR imaging versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR studies of knee joints in 37 patients were performed. The clinical diagnostics was traumatic lesions of menisci or cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy of the knee joint was performed in 21 patients. MR showed meniscal lesion in 25 patients and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions in 18 patients. Arthroscopy showed meniscal lesions in 16 of 21 patients and ACL lesions in 11 of 21 patients. MR correlated with arthroscopy in 16 of examined menisci and 15 of 21 examined ACL. (author)

  10. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  11. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas [NSI, Merritt Island, FL (United States); University of Central Florida School of Medicine, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  12. The relationship between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes and incident medial meniscal tears in women over a 1-year period assessed with 3.0 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hunter, David J. [The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Marra, Monica D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H. [Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hellio Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Wyman, Bradley T. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Intrasubstance meniscal signal changes not reaching the articular surface on fast spin echo (FSE) sequences are considered to represent mucoid degeneration on MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of prevalent intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears of the medial meniscus detected on 3.0 T MRI over a 1-year period. A total of 161 women aged {>=}40 years participated in a longitudinal 1-year observational study of knee osteoarthritis. MRI (3.0 T) was performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up. The anterior horn, body, and posterior horn of the medial meniscus were scored by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) system. Four grades were used to describe the meniscal morphology: grade 0 (normal), grade 1 (intrasubstance signal changes not reaching the articular surface), grade 2 (single tears), and grade 3 (complex tears and maceration). Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to evaluate whether baseline intrasubstance signal changes (grade 1) predict incident meniscal tears/maceration (grades 2 and/or 3) in the same subregion of the medial meniscus, when compared to subregions without pathology as the reference group (grade 0). Medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes at baseline did not predict tears at follow-up when evaluating the anterior and posterior horns (left-sided p-values 0.06 and 0.59, respectively). No incident tears were detected in the body. We could not demonstrate an association between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears over a 1-year period. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, electrochemistry and biological evaluation of some binuclear transition metal complexes of bicompartmental ONO donor ligands containing benzo[b]thiophene moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra Raj, K.; Vivekanand, B.; Nagesh, G. Y.; Mruthyunjayaswamy, B. H. M.

    2014-02-01

    A series of new binucleating Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of bicompartmental ligands with ONO donor were synthesized. The ligands were obtained by the condensation of 3-chloro-6-substituted benzo[b]thiophene-2-carbohydrazides and 4,6-diacetylresorcinol. The synthesized ligands and their complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and various spectroscopic techniques. Elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-Visible, TG-DTA, magnetic measurements, molar conductance and powder-XRD data has been used to elucidate their structures. The bonding sites are the oxygen atom of amide carbonyl, azomethine nitrogen and phenolic oxygen for ligands 1 and 2. The binuclear nature of the complexes was confirmed by ESR spectral data. TG-DTA studies for some complexes showed the presence of coordinated water molecules and the final product is the metal oxide. All the complexes were investigated for their electrochemical activity, only the Cu(II) complexes showed the redox property. Cu(II) complexes were square planar, whereas Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes were octahedral. Powder-XRD pattern have been studied in order to test the degree of crystallinity of the complexes and unit cell calculations were made. In order to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial activity of metal ions upon chelation, both the ligands and their metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial and antifungal activities by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method. The results showed that the metal complexes were found to be more active than free ligands. The DNA cleaving capacities of all the complexes were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis method against supercoiled plasmid DNA. Among the compounds tested for antioxidant capacity, ligand 1 displayed excellent activity than its metal complexes.

  14. Repairing Posteromedial Meniscocapsular Separation: A Technique Using Inside-Out Meniscal Repair Needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anant; Usman, Sajeer; Sabnis, Bhushan; Kini, Abhishek

    2016-02-01

    Posteromedial meniscocapsular separation of the knee has received renewed interest, with many articles describing a high incidence in association with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Various techniques have been described to address these lesions using all-inside meniscal repair sutures or using rotator cuff repair instruments through the posteromedial portal. Most orthopaedic surgeons are accustomed to using the "inside-out" meniscal repair technique with a double-armed suture. This technique is cost-effective and, in our opinion, more efficient in repairing such tears. We present our technique of repairing peripheral meniscocapsular lesions using an inside-out meniscal repair system. We believe that this technique is easily reproducible, is less time-consuming, and ensures a good "bite" of the capsular tissue, producing a robust repair. PMID:27073773

  15. Large lateral meniscal ganglion cyst extending into the intercondylar fossa of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Alwin; Eberhardt, Christian; Hailer, Nils P

    2004-07-01

    We report the case of a 31-year-old, otherwise healthy man with a large intra-articular meniscal ganglion cyst (27.7 x 13.5 mm) originating from the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus. Clinically, the patient presented with knee pain in a squatting position. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large intra-articular cyst in the posterior compartment. At arthroscopic surgery, the ganglion cyst was found in the intercondylar space posteriorly to the posterior cruciate ligament. After removal of the ganglion cyst, a horizontal tear in the dorsal horn of the lateral meniscus was revealed and treated by partial meniscectomy. To our knowledge, a meniscal ganglion cyst originating from the lateral meniscus and extending into the joint is an extremely rare event, with only two previous reported cases. We review the current literature on the pathogenesis, distribution, and treatment of meniscal ganglion cysts. PMID:15243414

  16. Transosseous Medial Meniscal Root Repair Using a Modified Mason-Allen Suture Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Caldwell, Paul E; Pearson, Sara E

    2015-12-01

    Medial meniscal tears are among the most common injuries to the knee joint. Loss of the meniscus has been linked to increased contact pressures on the adjacent articular cartilage and progression of degenerative changes in the knee. A subset of tears known as "root tears" involves the insertion of the posterior horn of the meniscus to the bone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for root tears led to undesirable outcomes, which prompted surgeons to explore restorative procedures. Multiple repair techniques have been presented with an emphasis placed on initial secure fixation and stimulation of potential healing. We present an arthroscopic-assisted technique for medial meniscal root repair with these goals in mind. PMID:27284511

  17. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Rui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica from medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported. Key words: Knee injuries; Arthroscopy; Patellofemoral joint

  18. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of mediopatellar plica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Rui; YANG Liu; GUO Lin

    2011-01-01

    A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica fi.om medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported.

  19. Occupational kneeling and meniscal tears: a magnetic resonance imaging study in floor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Bonde, Jens Peter;

    2009-01-01

    presence of grade 3 MRI signal intensities indicating degenerative tears of the anterior, middle, and posterior one-third of the lateral and medial menisci was assessed on 1.5-Tesla MRI scans. The odds ratio (OR) of meniscal tears was determined among floor layers compared to graphic designers. Using...

  20. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark [Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Hospital of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 {+-} 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 {+-} 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 {+-} 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  1. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 ± 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 ± 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 ± 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  2. An evaluation of meniscal collagenous structure using optical projection tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collagenous structure of menisci is a complex network of circumferentially oriented fascicles and interwoven radially oriented tie-fibres. To date, examination of this micro- architecture has been limited to two-dimensional imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the three-dimensional imaging technique; optical projection tomography (OPT), to visualize the collagenous structure of the meniscus. If successful, this technique would be the first to visualize the macroscopic orientation of collagen fascicles in 3-D in the meniscus and could further refine load bearing mechanisms in the tissue. OPT is an imaging technique capable of imaging samples on the meso-scale (1-10 mm) at a micro-scale resolution. The technique, similar to computed tomography, takes two-dimensional images of objects from incremental angles around the object and reconstructs them using a back projection algorithm to determine three-dimensional structure. Bovine meniscal samples were imaged from four locations (outer main body, femoral surface, tibial surface and inner main body) to determine the variation in collagen orientation throughout the tissue. Bovine stifles (n = 2) were obtained from a local abattoir and the menisci carefully dissected. Menisci were fixed in methanol and subsequently cut using a custom cutting jig (n = 4 samples per meniscus). Samples were then mounted in agarose, dehydrated in methanol and subsequently cleared using benzyl alcohol benzyl benzoate (BABB) and imaged using OPT. Results indicate circumferential, radial and oblique collagenous orientations at the contact surfaces and in the inner third of the main body of the meniscus. Imaging identified fascicles ranging from 80-420 μm in diameter. Transition zones where fascicles were found to have a woven or braided appearance were also identified. The outer-third of the main body was composed of fascicles oriented predominantly in the circumferential direction. Blood vessels were

  3. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p<0.05), but differences in the prevalence and location of meniscal tears were not (p>0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion.

  4. The comparison of the failure strength of meniscus arrows (absorbable fixation material) with different meniscal suturing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cetinkaya, Sarper M.; Boynuk, Burak; Taser, Omer F.

    2004-01-01

    The importance of preserving meniscal tissue in the knee joint is well established recently. Functionally, the menisci have been shown to play a significant role in the knee. The capacity for meniscal healing and repair has also been well documented. The results of arthroscopic repair have been shown to be ar least as good for open repair. Then different arthroscopic meniscus repair techniques have been started to use. More recently, meniscus arrows (Biofix) whick are made of totally absor...

  5. The effect of hip joint muscle exercise on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after meniscal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sun Ja; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Ha Roo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hip muscle strengthening on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after a meniscal injury. [Subjects and Methods] This randomized control study enrolled 24 patients who had undergone arthroscopic treatment after a meniscal injury and began a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into 2 groups of 12 subjects each: gluteus medius resistance exercise group and control group. This study investigate...

  6. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mui, Leonora W.; Engelsohn, Eliyahu; Umans, Hilary [Jacobi Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2007-02-15

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  8. Risk factors for medial meniscal pathology on knee MRI in older U.S. adults: A multicenter prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, Martin; Felson, David T.; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W.; Wang, Ke; Crema, Michel D.; Lynch, John A.; Sharma, Leena; Segal, Neil A; Lewis, Cora E.; Nevitt, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Knee trauma is a known cause of meniscal tear. However, meniscal pathology where the aetiology is often unclear is a frequent finding on knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Our objective was to investigate potential risk factors for medial meniscal lesions or extrusion in middle-aged and elderly persons. Methods Prospective cohort study using population-based subjects from Birmingham, Alabama and Iowa City, Iowa, United States (the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST)). We studied 644 men and women aged 50 to 79 years with or at high risk of knee osteoarthritis (Kellgren and Lawrence grade 0 to 2) but with normal medial meniscal status at baseline. We scored paired baseline and 30-month 1.0T knee MRIs for meniscal lesions and extrusion (pathology) and evaluated the following systemic, knee-specific, and compartment-specific potential risk factors: age, sex, body mass index, bony enlargement of finger joints, knee trauma, leg-length inequality, and knee alignment. Results Of 791 knees, 77 (9.7%) had medial meniscal pathology at 30-months follow-up. Sixty-one of these 77 knees (81%) had no report of trauma during follow-up. Including all potential risk factors in the multivariable model, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for medial meniscal pathology was 4.14 (95% confidence interval 2.06, 8.31) for knee trauma during follow-up, 1.64 (1.00, 2.70) for ≥5 bony enlargements of finger joints (vs. ≤4), and 2.00 (1.18, 3.40) for varus alignment (vs. not varus) at baseline exam. Further, obesity was a risk factor for the development of meniscal extrusion, OR 3.04 (1.04, 8.93) but not for meniscal lesions, OR 1.15 (0.52, 2.54). Conclusions Apart from knee trauma, possible generalised osteoarthritis, expressed as multiple bony enlargements of finger joints, varus alignment, and obesity are risk factors for medial meniscal pathology. PMID:21646417

  9. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion

  10. Double Meniscal Ossicle, the First Description: CT and MRI Findings—Different Etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneeth Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 2 ossicles in the medial meniscus with emphasis on MRI and CT findings. Meniscal ossicle is a rare entity and is quite uncommon on the medial side. By showing the typical signal characteristics and intrameniscal location, MRI can be helpful in distinguishing this from other more clinically significant abnormalities. It should be kept as differential from synovial chondromatosis or sesamoid bones like fabella as management is different for all of these entities.

  11. Clinical knee findings in floor layers with focus on meniscal status

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Lilli; Rytter Søren; Bonde Jens

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported and clinical knee morbidity among floor layers compared to a group of graphic designers, with special attention to meniscal status. Methods We obtained information about knee complaints by questionnaire and conducted a bilateral clinical and radiographic knee examination in 134 male floor layers and 120 male graphic designers. After the exclusion of subjects with reports of earlier knee injuries the odds ...

  12. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries. PMID:23949935

  13. Usefulness of meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio on coronal MRI in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical utility of the meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio (L/M ratio) of the lateral meniscus in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus (IDLM) as compared with the arthroscopic diagnosis, meniscal width to tibial diameter ratio (L/T ratio) and conventional lateral meniscus width criteria. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 41 patients with IDLM who underwent knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy, as well as 50 controls with normal lateral menisci. MRI examinations were interpreted independently by two radiologists, both of whom were blinded to clinical information and radiological reports. Assessment of meniscal width (L), maximal transverse diameter of the lateral meniscus (M), and transverse diameter of the tibia (T) was carried out on central coronal sections that were observed to pass through the medial collateral ligament. L/M and L/T ratios were calculated. These results were correlated with arthroscopic findings and analysed statistically using categorical regression analysis and non-parametric correlation analysis. Using arthroscopic findings as the standard of reference, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for: (1) 12, 13, 14, and 15 mm meniscal width thresholds; (2) 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% L/M ratio thresholds; and (3) 15%, 18%, 20%, and 25% L/T ratio thresholds. Results: The mean L/M ratio of the IDLM was approximately 67% and was statistically significantly higher than the control (44%). The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 50%. The mean L/T ratio of the IDLM was approximately 23% and was statistically significant. The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 18%. The threshold of 13 mm of meniscal width also showed high sensitivity and high specificity. Conclusion: The use of the L/M ratio or L/T ratio in combination with meniscal width criteria may be a useful method for evaluating IDLM

  14. Three-dimensional culture of human meniscal cells: Extracellular matrix and proteoglycan production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton H James

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The meniscus is a complex tissue whose cell biology has only recently begun to be explored. Published models rely upon initial culture in the presence of added growth factors. The aim of this study was to test a three-dimensional (3D collagen sponge microenvironment (without added growth factors for its ability to provide a microenvironment supportive for meniscal cell extracellular matrix (ECM production, and to test the responsiveness of cells cultured in this manner to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β. Methods Experimental studies were approved prospectively by the authors' Human Subjects Institutional Review Board. Human meniscal cells were isolated from surgical specimens, established in monolayer culture, seeded into a 3D scaffold, and cell morphology and extracellular matrix components (ECM evaluated either under control condition or with addition of TGF-β. Outcome variables were evaluation of cultured cell morphology, quantitative measurement of total sulfated proteoglycan production, and immunohistochemical study of the ECM components chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, and types I and II collagen. Result and Conclusion Meniscal cells attached well within the 3D microenvironment and expanded with culture time. The 3D microenvironment was permissive for production of chondroitin sulfate, types I and II collagen, and to a lesser degree keratan sulfate. This microenvironment was also permissive for growth factor responsiveness, as indicated by a significant increase in proteoglycan production when cells were exposed to TGF-β (2.48 μg/ml ± 1.00, mean ± S.D., vs control levels of 1.58 ± 0.79, p

  15. Knee function and knee muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional limitations exist postmeniscectomy, but preoperative data are scarce. PURPOSE: To examine knee function, knee muscle strength and performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears, eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. STUDY DESIGN: Cross......-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-two participants with MRI verified degenerative meniscal tear (35% women, mean age 49 years) answered the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and were tested for isokinetic knee muscle strength and lower extremity performance (one-leg hop for distance, 6 m timed...

  16. MR imaging of the knee following cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the increasing number of surgical procedures performed on the knee, MR imaging of the postoperative knee has gained more and more importance. For the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts and postoperative menisci, basic knowledge of surgical techniques is essential in order to differentiate normal postoperative findings from transplant failure, retears, and complications. This article reviews technical aspects of MR imaging following knee surgery, basic principles of operative techniques for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and therapy of meniscal tears, normal postoperative findings, MR imaging criteria for recurrent lesions, and findings with typical complications. (orig.)

  17. Clinical knee findings in floor layers with focus on meniscal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lilli

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of self-reported and clinical knee morbidity among floor layers compared to a group of graphic designers, with special attention to meniscal status. Methods We obtained information about knee complaints by questionnaire and conducted a bilateral clinical and radiographic knee examination in 134 male floor layers and 120 male graphic designers. After the exclusion of subjects with reports of earlier knee injuries the odds ratio (OR with 95% confidence intervals (CI of knee complaints and clinical findings were computed among floor layers compared to graphic designers, using logistic regression. Estimates were adjusted for effects of body mass index, age and knee straining sports. Using radiographic evaluations, we conducted side-specific sensitivity analyses regarding clinical signs of meniscal lesions after the exclusion of participants with tibiofemoral (TF osteoarthritis (OA. Results Reports of knee pain (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.5–4.6, pain during stair walking (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3–3.9 and symptoms of catching of the knee joint (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4–5.7 were more prevalent among floor layers compared to graphic designers. Additionally, significant more floor layers than graphic designers had clinical signs suggesting possible meniscal lesions: a positive McMurray test (OR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1–5.0 and TF joint line tenderness (OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 2.4–12.0. Excluding floor layers (n = 22 and graphic designers (n = 15 with radiographic TF OA did not alter this trend between the two study groups: a positive McMurray test (OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.9, TF joint line tenderness (OR = 5.0, 95% CI = 2.0–12.5. Conclusion Results indicate that floor layers have a high prevalence of both self-reported and clinical knee morbidity. Clinical knee findings suggesting possible meniscal lesions were significant more prevalent among floor layers compared to a group of low

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To categorise discrepancies in findings of the menisci and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) between arthroscopy and MRI. Materials and methods: The MRIs of 236 patients were retrospectively analysed by an experienced radiologist without knowledge of clinical and/for operative findings. Discrepancies in arthroscopic findings were reevaluated together with the arthroscopist to determine their cause of error. Results: The diagnostic accuracies for injuries of the medial and lateral meniscus and the ACL were 92.4%, 92.4%, and 94.1%. respectively. For the menisci, causes for discrepancies in findings (n=31) were: overinterpretation of central signal intensities with contact to the meniscal surface but without disturbance of the meniscal contour as a tear (n=12), insufficient arthroscopie evaluation of the knee joint (n=11), overlooked tears on MR imaging (n=6), misinterpretation of normal anatomic structures (n=1), ''magic angle'' phenomenon (n=1), and missed tears at MRI (n=1). Causes for discrepancies for the ACL (n=18) were: nearly complete versus complete rupture either at MRI or arthroscopy and vice versa (n=9), insufficient arthroscopic evaluation (n=6), insufficient MRI technique (n=2), and overlooked tear on MR imaging (n=1). Conclusions: Discrepant findings between MRI and arthroscopy may be also due to an insufficient arthroscopic evaluation in clinical routine. The close cooperation between surgeons and radiologists improves the understanding of the methods of each other. (orig.)

  19. The clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of meniscal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunest, J; Oberle, K; Loehnert, J; Hoetzinger, H

    1991-01-01

    This prospective double-blind study was designed to evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging to serve as a diagnostic tool in patients who have a clinically suspected disorder of the meniscus. The imaging studies provided a diagnostic accuracy of 72 per cent, a sensitivity of 88 per cent, and a specificity of 57 per cent. The positive and negative predictive values were 66 and 83 per cent. The diagnostic sensitivity was 94 per cent for lesions of the medial meniscus; this value differed significantly from that of 78 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.05). The 37 per cent specificity for lesions of the medial meniscus was extremely low compared with the rate of 69 per cent for lesions of the lateral meniscus (p less than 0.01). In the intermediate part of the meniscus, the diagnostic sensitivity was 37 per cent on the medial side and 23 per cent on the lateral side; these values were significantly less than the average of 74 per cent for the other meniscal segments (p less than 0.001). The imaging studies provided an over-all accuracy of 67 per cent in the detection of degeneration of the meniscus, 78 per cent in the identification of meniscal tears, and 82 per cent in the delineation of postoperative lesions. PMID:1985979

  20. Using a statistically calibrated biphasic finite element model of the human knee joint to identify robust designs for a meniscal substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, Erin R; Guo, Hongqiang; Gilbert, Susannah L; Hutchinson, Ian D; Maher, Suzanne A; Santner, Thomas J

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes a methodology for selecting a set of biomechanical engineering design variables to optimize the performance of an engineered meniscal substitute when implanted in a population of subjects whose characteristics can be specified stochastically. For the meniscal design problem where engineering variables include aspects of meniscal geometry and meniscal material properties, this method shows that meniscal designs having simultaneously large radial modulus and large circumferential modulus provide both low mean peak contact stress and small variability in peak contact stress when used in the specified subject population. The method also shows that the mean peak contact stress is relatively insensitive to meniscal permeability, so the permeability used in the manufacture of a meniscal substitute can be selected on the basis of manufacturing ease or cost. This is a multiple objective problem with the mean peak contact stress over the population of subjects and its variability both desired to be small. The problem is solved by using a predictor of the mean peak contact stress across the tibial plateau that was developed from experimentally measured peak contact stresses from two modalities. The first experimental modality provided computed peak contact stresses using a finite element computational simulator of the dynamic tibial contact stress during axial dynamic loading. A small number of meniscal designs with specified subject environmental inputs were selected to make computational runs and to provide training data for the predictor developed below. The second experimental modality consisted of measured peak contact stress from a set of cadaver knees. The cadaver measurements were used to bias-correct and calibrate the simulator output. Because the finite element simulator is expensive to evaluate, a rapidly computable (calibrated) Kriging predictor was used to explore extensively the contact stresses for a wide range of meniscal engineering

  1. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-01-01

    arthroscopic meniscus surgery as a primary or secondary procedure in the years 2000 to 2011. Hospital identification codes enabled linkage of performed procedures to specific hospitals. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Yearly incidence of meniscal procedures per 100 000 inhabitants was calculated with...

  2. Meniscal T1rho and T2 measured with 3.0T MRI increases directly after running a marathon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate changes in T1rho and T2 relaxation time in the meniscus using 3.0 T MRI in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners and to compare these findings with those of age-matched healthy subjects. Thirteen marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI including T1rho and T2 mapping sequences before, 48-72 h after, and 3 months after competition. Ten controls were examined at baseline and after 3 months. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous. and other knee abnormalities with WORMS scores. Meniscal segmentation was performed to generate T1rho and T2 maps in six compartments. No differences in morphological knee abnormalities were found before and after the marathon. However, all marathon runners showed a significant increase in T1rho and T2 values after competition in all meniscus compartments (p < 0.0001), which may indicate changes in the biochemical composition of meniscal tissue. While T2 values decreased after 3 months T1rho values remained at a high level, indicating persisting changes in the meniscal matrix composition after a marathon. T2 values in menisci have the potential to be used as biomarkers for identifying reversible meniscus matrix changes indicating potential tissue damage. T1rho values need further study, but may be a valuable marker for diagnosing early, degenerative changes in the menisci following exercise. (orig.)

  3. Meniscal tears of the knee : diagnosis with fast spin-echo MR imaging and role of gadolinium-enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kyung Mi; Jee, Won Hee; Choe, Bo Young; Rhim, Soo A.; Lee, Jung Whee; Ku, Young Mi; Yoon, Young Hyun; Choi, Si Young; Choi, Kyu Ho; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Medical Coll.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of fast spin-echo MR imaging for the diagnosis of meniscal tear to the knee is a matter of debate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of diagnosis of meniscal tears by fast spin-echo MR imaging and the role of gadolinium enhancement. In 68 cases of arthroscopically-proven meniscal tears, MR sensitivity to tear was 93% (63/68) for spin-echo alone and 96% (40/41) for combined fast spin-echo and fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images. MR sensitivity to medial meniscus tear was 98% (40/41) for fast spin-echo alone and 98% (40/41) for combined fast spin-echo and fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images. MR sensitivity to lateral meniscus tear was 85 % (23/27) for fast spin-echo alone and 93% (25/27) for combined fast spin-echo and fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images. Fast spin-echo MR imaging with adequate imaging parameters is suitable for the diagnosis of meniscal tears, and additional fat-suppressed gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging may increase diagnostic sensitivity to such tears. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  4. Prótese meniscal de polímero bioabsorvível: estudo em coelhos Bioresorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis: study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulio Pereira Cardoso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Obter o crescimento de um neomenisco por entre as porosidades da prótese com objetivo de proteger a cartilagem articular do joelho. MÉTODOS: Foram operados 70 joelhos de 35 coelhos Nova Zelândia com idades entre cinco e sete meses, pesando entre dois e 3,8 quilogramas, sendo 22 machos e 13 fêmeas. Submetidos no mesmo tempo cirúrgico à meniscectomia medial nos dois joelhos, em um lado foi implantada prótese meniscal de polímero bioabsorvível composta por 70% de poli (dioxanona e 30% de poli (L-ácido láctico. Realizada eutanásia com diferentes tempos pós-implante. Os côndilos femorais mediais e o neomenisco foram submetidos à análise histológica, observando-se a degradação e absorção da prótese, o crescimento de tecido meniscal na mesma, e o grau de degradação da cartilagem articular dos côndilos femorais, medido pelo histograma. RESULTADOS: Os dados obtidos avaliaram o crescimento de tecido histologicamente semelhante ao menisco normal, com absorção gradual da prótese e a porcentagem de condrócitos no lado controle e no lado com implante da prótese. CONCLUSÕES: Ocorreu crescimento de tecido por entre os poros da prótese com características histológicas semelhantes a do menisco normal de coelho. A cartilagem articular dos côndilos femorais no lado com implante da prótese apresenta maior número de condrócitos em todas as suas camadas.OBJECTIVE: To induce the ingrowth of a neomeniscus between the pores of the prosthesis in order to protect the articular cartilage of the knee. METHODS: 70 knees of 35 New Zealand rabbits were operated. The rabbits were five to seven months old, weighed 2 to 3.8 kilograms. 22 were male and 13 were female. Each animal underwent medial meniscectomy in both knees during the same time of surgery, having a bioresorbable polymeric meniscal prosthesis composed of 70% polydioxanone and 30% L-lactic acid polymer implanted in one side. They were submitted to euthanasia after

  5. Bovine meniscal tissue exhibits age- and interleukin-1 dose-dependent degradation patterns and composition-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Carrie H-Y; Lai, Janice H; Wong, Ivan J; Levenston, Marc E

    2016-05-01

    Despite increasing evidence that meniscal degeneration is an early event in the development of knee osteoarthritis, relatively little is known regarding the sequence or functional implications of cytokine-induced meniscal degradation or how degradation varies with age. This study examined dose-dependent patterns of interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced matrix degradation in explants from the radially middle regions of juvenile and adult bovine menisci. Tissue explants were cultured for 10 days in the presence of 0, 1.25, 5, or 20 ng/ml recombinant human IL-1α. Juvenile explants exhibited immediate and extensive sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) loss and subsequent collagen release beginning after 4-6 days, with relatively little IL-1 dose-dependence. Adult explants exhibited a more graded response to IL-1, with dose-dependent sGAG release and a lower fraction of sGAG released (but greater absolute release) than juvenile explants. In contrast to juvenile explants, adult explants exhibited minimal collagen release over the 10-day culture. Compressive and shear moduli reflected the changes in explant composition, with substantial decreases for both ages but a greater relative decrease in juvenile tissue. Dynamic moduli exhibited stronger dependence on explant sGAG content for juvenile tissue, likely reflecting concomitant changes to both proteoglycan and collagen tissue components. The patterns of tissue degradation suggest that, like in articular cartilage, meniscal proteoglycans may partially protect collagen from cell-mediated degeneration. A more detailed view of functional changes in meniscal tissue mechanics with degeneration will help to establish the relevance of in vitro culture models and will advance understanding of how meniscal degeneration contributes to overall joint changes in early stage osteoarthritis. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:801-811, 2016. PMID:26519862

  6. Fast presurgical magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal tears and concurrent subchondral bone marrow lesions. Study of dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J; d'Anjou, M-A; Cabassu, J; Chailleux, N; Blond, L

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears and subchondral bone marrow lesions have both been described in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture, but their possible concurrence has not been evaluated. In a population of 14 dogs exhibiting signs of stifle pain with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate ligament rupture, a short presurgical 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol including dorsal proton density, dorsal T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, and sagittal fat-saturated dual echo sequences was tested to further investigate these features and illustrate meniscal tears. Interobserver agreement for detection of medial meniscal tears (k=0.83) and bone marrow lesions (k=0.87) was excellent. Consensus MR reading allowed detection of nine out of 12 surgically confirmed medial meniscal tears and there was no false positive. All dogs had cruciate ligament enthesis-related bone marrow lesions in the tibia, femur or both bones. Additionally, among the 12 dogs with confirmed medial meniscal tears, subchondral bone marrow lesions were present in the caudomedial (9 dogs) and caudoaxial (11 dogs) regions of the tibial plateau, resulting in odds ratios (13.6, p=0.12, and 38.3, p=0.04, respectively) that had large confidence intervals due to the small group size of this study. The other two dogs had neither tibial bone marrow lesions in these locations nor medial meniscal tears. These encouraging preliminary results warrant further investigation using this clinically realistic preoperative MR protocol. As direct diagnosis of meniscal tears remained challenging in dogs even with high-field MR, identification of associated signs such as subchondral bone marrow lesions might indirectly allow suspicion of an otherwise unrecognized meniscal tear. PMID:24226972

  7. The effects of lasers and electrosurgical devices on human meniscal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherk, H H; Black, J D; Prodoehl, J A; Diven, J

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of various laser wavelengths on human meniscal tissue in vitro and to compare them with the effects of electrosurgical devices. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser produced the best cutting and ablating effects among the infrared lasers, although the contact neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)lasers were nearly as satisfactory, offering the additional advantage of fiberoptic capability and the ability to be used in saline. The free-beam Nd:YAG laser and coagulation mode electrosurgical device produced unacceptably severe thermal changes. The excimer laser at 308 nm produced the best tissue effect and caused no detectable adjacent thermal change in the tissue. PMID:7641430

  8. Potential pitfalls of a double PCL sign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatanarasimha, Nanda [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Kamath, A. [Royal Gwent Hospital, Department of Accident and Emergency, Newport (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, K.; Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    The double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign is seen on a midline sagittal MR image of the knee as a low-signal-intensity linear band paralleling the antero-inferior part of the PCL. Although the sign has a high specificity for a displaced bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus, it can be mimicked by several normal and abnormal structures in the intercondylar region. Familiarity with these variants and identifying the other features supportive of meniscal injury will help to make a confident diagnosis of bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. (orig.)

  9. PCL tibial avulsion with an associated medial meniscal tear in a child: a case report on diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries from tibial avulsions are rare in the paediatric setting. One would need a high index of suspicion as clinical examination may be difficult, especially in the early period. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic modality for this condition and other associated injuries within the knee. We report a rare case in which the patient had a PCL avulsion off the tibial insertion site with an associated posterior horn medial meniscal tear off the posterior capsule. He was treated through open reduction and internal fixation of the avulsed fragment with suture repair of the meniscal tear. We emphasize the importance of diagnosing and managing associated intra-articular injuries when dealing with the rare condition of PCL tibial avulsion in the paediatric setting.

  10. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths

  11. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, M.J. [Department of Radiology Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: allymattsampson@hotmail.com; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R. [Department of Orthopaedics, Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland); Eustace, S.J. [Department of Radiology Sports Surgery Clinic, Santry Demesne, Dublin (Ireland); Shine, S. [Department of Radiology, Cappagh Hospital, Finglas, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-10-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths.

  12. One strategy for arthroscopic suture fixation of tibial intercondylar eminence fractures using the Meniscal Viper Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochiai Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Principles for the treatment of tibial intercondylar eminence fracture are early reduction and stable fixation. Numerous ways to treatment of this fracture have been invented. We designed a simple, low-invasive, and arthroscopic surgical strategy for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture utilizing the Meniscal Viper Repair System used for arthroscopic meniscal suture. Methods We studied 5 patients, who underwent arthroscopic suture fixation that we modified. The present technique utilized the Meniscal Viper Repair System for arthroscopic suture of the meniscus. With one handling, a high-strength ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene(UHMWPE suture can be passed through the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL and the loops for suture retrieval placed at both sides of ACL. Surgical results were evaluated by the presence or absence of bone union on plain radiographs, postoperative range of motion of the knee joint, the side-to-side differences measured by Telos SE, and Lysholm scores. Results The reduced position achieved after surgery was maintained and good function was obtained in all cases. The mean distance of tibia anterior displacement and assessment by Lysholm score showed good surgical results. Conclusion This method simplified the conventional arthroscopic suture fixation and increased its precision, and was applicable to Type II fractures that could be reduced, as well as surgically indicated Types III and IV. The present series suggested that our surgical approach was a useful surgical intervention for tibial intercondylar eminence fracture.

  13. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Van Der Straeten

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA after meniscectomy. We investigated (1 the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2 most important factors affecting survivorship and (3 OA progression.From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA or total removal of the MAT.Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15-57; 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2-24.3years, 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%, 186 MAT were in situ (56.5% whilst 90 (27.4% had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%. Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9-16.3 at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1% compared to ≥35 years (8.0% (p = 0.017. In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0% compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6% (p = 0.003. Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years (p = 0.010. 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1-11 for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001. Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs.MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship 51.9% at 20.2 years, but patients and healthcare payers

  14. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byttebier, Paul; Eeckhoudt, Annelies; Victor, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA) after meniscectomy. We investigated (1) the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2) most important factors affecting survivorship and (3) OA progression. Methods From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA) or total removal of the MAT. Results Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15–57); 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2–24.3years), 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%), 186 MAT were in situ (56.5%) whilst 90 (27.4%) had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%). Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9–16.3) at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1%) compared to ≥35 years (8.0%) (p = 0.017). In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0%) compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6%) (p = 0.003). Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years) (p = 0.010). 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1–11) for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001). Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs). Conclusions MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship

  15. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lance, Valentin; Heilmeier, Ursula R.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, Benjamin [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, San Francisco (United States)

    2014-11-16

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of the clinical signs of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Dhavalakumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The diagnostic accuracy of anterior drawer (AD sign, Lachman test and the pivot shift test for anterior cruciate ligament injury and McMurray test for medial and lateral meniscus is varied with sensitivity and specificity ranging from 2 to 100%. Generally, it is accepted that the pivot shift test is the most specific test to diagnose anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears and that the Lachman test is more sensitive than AD sign. This study was undertaken to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and efficiency for the above-mentioned diagnostic tests. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight male patients with clinical ACL injury were examined in the outpatient department and under anaesthesia, the findings were compared with arthroscopy. Result: The sensitivity and specificity for the Lachman test, AD sign and pivot shift test performed in the outpatient setting are 78.6 and 100%, 89.3 and 100%, and 75 and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for the Lachman test, AD sign, and pivot shift test performed under anesthesia are 92.9 and 100%, 92.9 and 100%, and 100 and 100%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the McMurray test for medial and lateral meniscus were 35.7 and 85.7% and 22.2 and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: The Lachman test, AD sign and pivot shift test are highly specific tests to diagnose ACL laxity in a non-acute setting; pivot shift test under anesthesia is the most sensitive and specific test for diagnosing ACL laxity in a non-acute setting and the McMurray test is not a sensitive test to diagnose meniscal injury in the presence of ACL injury.

  17. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  18. The effect of hip joint muscle exercise on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after meniscal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Ja; Kim, Young Mi; Kim, Ha Roo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hip muscle strengthening on muscle strength and balance in the knee joint after a meniscal injury. [Subjects and Methods] This randomized control study enrolled 24 patients who had undergone arthroscopic treatment after a meniscal injury and began a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into 2 groups of 12 subjects each: gluteus medius resistance exercise group and control group. This study investigated muscle strength and balance in the knee joint flexor, extensor, and abductor during an 8-week period. [Results] Measurements of knee extensor muscle strength revealed no significant difference between the control group and the experimental group. Measurements of abductor muscle strength, however, identified a significant difference between the 2 groups. The groups did not differ significantly with regard to balance measurements. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that this subject should be approached in light of the correlation between the hip abductor and injury to the lower extremities.

  19. Diagnoses of meniscal and cruciate ligament injuries using magnetic resonance imaging of the knee. Comparison with the findings of arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As previously reported, MRI is found to be useful in the evaluation of meniscal and cruciate ligament injuries. But at our institute, however, due to frequent in consistencies between MRI and arthroscopic findings, we investigated problem knees by MRI and compared the findings with those using arthroscopy subsequently performed. Twenty-eight cases with medial and lateral meniscus, and 31 cases with anterior and posterior crucial ligament were examined. The field strength of MRI was 1.0 Tesla, and images were measured by the T2 weighted gradient echo method. Sensitivity for medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, anterior cruciate ligament, and posterior cruciate ligament was 60, 38, 33, and 20 percent respectively, specificity was 78, 90, 91, and 89 percent respectively, and accuracy was 75, 75, 74, and 77 percent respectively. These values are lower compared with other reports. Diagnoses of meniscal and cruciate ligament injuries from magnetic resonance imaging of the knee at our institute are not confidential. For improvement, the scanning and imaging methods, must be changed and a new sophisticated MRI scanner is desirable. (author)

  20. EFFECTIVENESS OF OPEN KINEMATIC CHAIN EXERCISES VERSUS CLOSED KINEMATIC CHAIN EXERCISES OF KNEE IN MENISCAL INSTABILITY ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Seshagirirao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The most common form of meniscal injury is mechanical failure of the tissue due to degeneration or trauma resulting in a tear. In a recent study by Shaji et al (2013 states that OKC and CKC are used often in clinical settings to treat patient’s lower extremity injuries. No study is there on effect of OKC and CKC on strength and stability of knee in meniscal instability. Materials and Methods: Thirty athletes were randomly selected into two groups of fifteen each based on inclusion and exclusion criteria and were given OKC exercises in one group, CKC exercises in another for one month. Pre-treatment and post-treatment values of hamstrings and quadriceps muscle strength and knee function score were measured and analysed statistically. Results: Results showed that P value is < 0.0001 for strength in hamstrings (OKC extremely significant and P value is 0.0080 for quadriceps (OKC very significant and P value is 0.0004 for stability in both groups is extremely significant. Conclusion: OKC and CKC exercises both were effective in improving knee strength and stability, but in OKC strength improvement is better than CKC and in CKC stability is better improved.

  1. Efecto de la sutura y adición de células troncales mesenquimales adultas en la regeneración meniscal. Estudio de la expresión de factores de crecimiento en conejos

    OpenAIRE

    Comellas Melero, Nerea

    2012-01-01

    Conservar la mayor parte posible de tejido meniscal funcional en la cirugía de las lesiones meniscales es una regla esencial de este tipo de intervenciones sobre todo cuando se trata de pacientes jóvenes. La resección meniscal tiene efectos deletéreos evidentes en la función a largo plazo de la rodilla; 10 4, 341 . Pese a esto, las técnicas actuales de sutura meniscal tienen limitaciones relacionadas con las características mecánicas y bioquímicas del menisco; de manera que las lesiones que s...

  2. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  3. Oxygen tension is a determinant of the matrix-forming phenotype of cultured human meniscal fibrochondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola B Adesida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Meniscal cartilage displays a poor repair capacity, especially when injury is located in the avascular region of the tissue. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies to generate functional meniscus substitutes is a promising approach to treat meniscus injuries. Meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFC can be used in this approach. However, MFC are unable to retain their phenotype when expanded in culture. In this study, we explored the effect of oxygen tension on MFC expansion and on their matrix-forming phenotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MFC were isolated from human menisci followed by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 mediated cell expansion in monolayer culture under normoxia (21%O(2 or hypoxia (3%O(2. Normoxia and hypoxia expanded MFC were seeded on to a collagen scaffold. The MFC seeded scaffolds (constructs were cultured in a serum free chondrogenic medium for 3 weeks under normoxia and hypoxia. Constructs containing normoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under normoxia while those formed from hypoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under hypoxia. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, the constructs were assessed biochemically, histologically and for gene expression via real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays. The results showed that constructs under normoxia produced a matrix with enhanced mRNA ratio (3.5-fold higher; p<0.001 of collagen type II to I. This was confirmed by enhanced deposition of collagen II using immuno-histochemistry. Furthermore, the constructs under hypoxia produced a matrix with higher mRNA ratio of aggrecan to versican (3.5-fold, p<0.05. However, both constructs had the same capacity to produce a glycosaminoglycan (GAG -specific extracellular matrix. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide evidence that oxygen tension is a key player in determining the matrix phenotype of cultured MFC. These findings suggest that the use of normal and low oxygen tension during MFC expansion and subsequent neo

  4. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  5. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Lawrence S.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Caoili, Elaine; Kalume-Brigido, Monica [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Wojtys, Edward [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Box 391, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Sports Medicine Program, Department of MedSport, 24 Frank Lloyd Wright Drive, Box 391, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-05-15

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  6. Morphologic characterization of meniscal root ligaments in the human knee with magnetic resonance microscopy at 11.7 and 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Biswas, Reni; DiCamillo, Paul; Statum, Sheronda; Tafur, Monica; Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To determine the feasibility of using MR microscopy to characterize the root ligaments of the human knee at both ultra-high-field (11.7 T) and high-field (3 T) strengths. Seven fresh cadaveric knees were used for this study. Six specimens were imaged at 11.7 T and one specimen at 3 T using isotropic or near-isotropic voxels. Histologic correlation was performed on the posteromedial root ligament of one specimen. Meniscal root ligament shape, signal intensity, and ultrastructure were characterized. High-resolution, high-contrast volumetric images were generated from both MR systems. Meniscal root ligaments were predominantly oval in shape. Increased signal intensity was most evident at the posteromedial and posterolateral root ligaments. On the specimen that underwent histologic preparation, increased signal intensity corresponded to regions of enthesis fibrocartilage. Collagen fascicles were continuous between the menisci and root ligaments. Predominantly horizontal meniscal radial tie fibers continued into the root ligaments as vertical endoligaments. MR microscopy can be used to characterize and delineate the distinct ultrastructure of the root ligaments on both ultra-high-field- and high-field-strength MR systems. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of regeneration in meniscal lesions by use of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Maria L; Pérez-Castrillo, Saúl; Sánchez-Lázaro, Jaime A; Prieto-Fernández, Julio G; López-González, Maria E; Lobato-Pérez, Sandra; Colaço, Bruno J; Olivera, Elías R; Villar-Suárez, Vega

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the ability to regenerate an equine meniscus by use of a collagen repair patch (scaffold) seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). SAMPLE 6 female Hispano-Breton horses between 4 and 7 years of age; MSCs from BM and AT were obtained for the in vitro experiment, and the horses were subsequently used for the in vivo experiment. PROCEDURES Similarities and differences between MSCs derived from BM or AT were investigated in vitro by use of cell culture. In vivo assessment involved use of a meniscus defect and implantation on a scaffold. Horses were allocated into 2 groups. In one group, defects in the medial meniscus were treated with MSCs derived from BM, whereas in the other group, defects were treated with MSCs derived from AT. Defects were created in the contralateral stifle joint but were not treated (control samples). RESULTS Both types of MSCs had universal stem cell characteristics. For in vivo testing, at 12 months after treatment, treated defects were regenerated with fibrocartilaginous tissue, whereas untreated defects were partially repaired or not repaired. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that MSCs derived from AT could be a good alternative to MSCs derived from BM for use in regenerative treatments. Results also were promising for a stem cell-based implant for use in regeneration in meniscal lesions. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Because of similarities in joint disease between horses and humans, these results could have applications in humans. PMID:27347833

  8. Incidence of MRI intensity changes in the knee meniscus. Comparing asymptomatic and symptomatic knees without meniscal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI has become the most frequently used imaging technique in diagnosing knee joint diseases. However, a number of factors may change the intensity of the meniscus on MR images, even in normal knees. The question remains when and to what degree the change in intensity appears with age, how aging is related to MR image grades, and how the development of symptoms is related to a change in intensity. To answer these questions, the present study investigated MR images of the menisci of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with knee diseases other than meniscal lesions to determine intrameniscal intensity changes. 163 knees in 133 subjects who underwent MRI for the knee joint (s) were examined. The coronal and the sagittal planes were imaged with T1 weighted imaging and GE slice thickness of 5 mm. MR images were classified as Grade 0 to 4. In knees of patients under 40 years of age, a change in intensity was only rarely observed in the menisci of normal knees, though it was frequently observed in those of symptomatic knees. By contrast, in the knees of patients 40 years or older, a change in intensity was frequently observed in the menisci of both normal and symptomatic knees. MRI is useful because of its convenience, low invasiveness, and high diagnostic ability. However, MR images of the meniscus should be read carefully, because the incidence of changes in intensity increases with aging or inflammation, and in symptomatic knees, the intensity change is occasionally exaggerated resulting in incorrect diagnosis. (author)

  9. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  10. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  11. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  12. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  13. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  14. Targeted transplantation of iron oxide-labeled, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in promoting meniscus regeneration following a rabbit massive meniscal defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    QI, YIYING; YANG, ZHIGAO; DING, QIANHAI; ZHAO, TENGFEI; HUANG, ZHONGMING; FENG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Repair of a massive meniscal defect remains a challenge in the clinic. However, targeted magnetic cell delivery, an emerging technique, may be useful in its treatment. The present study aimed to determine the effect of targeted intra-articular injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) in a rabbit model of a massive meniscal defect. ASCs may be directly labeled and almost 100% of the ASCs were labeled with SPIO after 24 h; these SPIO-labeled ASCs may be orientated by magnet. The centrifuged SPIO-labeled ASCs precipitations may be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anterior half of the medial meniscus of 18 New Zealand Rabbits was excised. After 7 days, the rabbits were randomized to injections of 2×106 SPIO-labeled ASCs, 2×106 unlabeled ASCs or saline. Permanent magnets were fixed to the outside of the operated joints for one day, and after 6 and 12 weeks, the knee joints were examined using MRI, gross and histological observation, and Prussian blue staining. Marked hypointense artifacts caused by SPIO-positive cells in the meniscus were detected using MRI. Histological observation revealed that the anterior portion of the meniscus was similar to the native tissue, demonstrating typical fibrochondrocytes surrounded by richer extracellular matrix in the SPIO-ASCs group. Collagen-rich matrix bridging the interface and the neo-meniscus integrated well with its host meniscus. Furthermore, degenerative changes occurred in all groups, but intra-articular injection of SPIO-ASCs or ASCs alleviated these degenerative changes. Prussian blue staining indicated that the implanted ASCs were directly associated with the regenerated tissue. Overall, targeted intra-articular delivery of SPIO-ASCs promoted meniscal regeneration whilst providing protective effects from osteoarthritic damage. PMID:26893631

  15. Evaluation of meniscal tears of the knee: the usefulness of fat-suppressed conventional spin-echo T1-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the usefulness of the fat-suppressed (FS) conventional spin-echo (CSE) sequence for the diagnosis of meniscal tears. We retrospectively reviewed 323 MR images of the knee, the standard of reference being the findings of arthroscopy. In all knees, fast SE proton density-weighted and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and double-echo in steady state (DESS) sagittal images were obtained, and during 202 MR Procedures, FS-CSE T1-weighted sagittal images were also obtained. The results of MR imaging were then correlated with those of arthroscopy, the accuracy with which meniscal tears were diagnosed being compared between two groups: group I (202 knees for which FS-CSE T1-weighted sagittal images were obtained), and group II (121 knees for which these images were not obtained). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. In group 1, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 94.7%, 92.4% and 93.5%, respectively, for the medial meniscus, and 83.3%, 95.7% and 90.5% for the lateral meniscus. In group II, the corresponding findings were 92.5%, 94% and 93.3%; and 87.3%, 98.2% and 92.5%. The differences between the groups were not statistically significant (ρ >0.05) For meniscal tears of the knee, the addition of FS-CSE T1-weighted MR imaging to the fast SE proton density-weighted, T2-weighted and DESS sequences does not enhance diagnostic accuracy

  16. 前交叉韧带损伤合并半月板损伤的研究进展%Research progress on anterior cruciate ligament lesions with concurrent meniscal tears

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐聪; 黄长明; 范华强

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament ( ACL ) lesions are common sports injuries in the knee joint, and ACL reconstruction is widely used in the treatment of ACL lesions. However, the patients with ACL lesions often have other associated injuries, among which meniscal tears are the most common. In recent years, arthroscopic doctors pay more and more attention to the combined injuries and carry out a lot of experimental and clinical studies. In this paper, the relationship between meniscal tears and ACL lesions and treatment progress on the combined injuries are summarized.

  17. Dynamic Alterations in Microarchitecture, Mineralization and Mechanical Property of Subchondral Bone in Rat Medial Meniscal Tear Model of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Gang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The properties of subchondral bone influence the integrity of articular cartilage in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA. However, the characteristics of subchondral bone alterations remain unresolved. The present study aimed to observe the dynamic alterations in the microarchitecture, mineralization, and mechanical properties of subchondral bone during the progression of OA. Methods: A medial meniscal tear (MMT operation was performed in 128 adult Sprague Dawley rats to induce OA. At 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks following the MMT operation, cartilage degeneration was evaluated using toluidine blue O staining, whereas changes in the microarchitecture indices and tissue mineral density (TMD, mineral-to-collagen ratio, and intrinsic mechanical properties of subchondral bone plates (BPs and trabecular bones (Tbs were measured using micro-computed tomography scanning, confocal Raman microspectroscopy and nanoindentation testing, respectively. Results: Cartilage degeneration occurred and worsened progressively from 2 to 12 weeks after OA induction. Microarchitecture analysis revealed that the subchondral bone shifted from bone resorption early (reduced trabecular BV/TV, trabecular number, connectivity density and trabecular thickness [Tb.Th], and increased trabecular spacing (Tb.Sp at 2 and 4 weeks to bone accretion late (increased BV/TV, Tb.Th and thickness of subchondral bone plate, and reduced Tb.Sp at 8 and 12 weeks. The TMD of both the BP and Tb displayed no significant changes at 2 and 4 weeks but decreased at 8 and 12 weeks. The mineral-to-collagen ratio showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks for the Tb and from 8 weeks for the BP after OA induction. Both the elastic modulus and hardness of the Tb showed a significant decrease from 4 weeks after OA induction. The BP showed a significant decrease in its elastic modulus from 8 weeks and its hardness from 4 weeks. Conclusion: The microarchitecture, mineralization and mechanical

  18. Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Marott, Jacob Louis;

    2012-01-01

    An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic...... knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis....

  19. Editorial Commentary: Book? … Book Report? … or Just a New Chapter in an Ongoing Story?: Knee Partial Meniscectomy Has Limited Benefit for "Nonobstructive" Meniscal Tears, but We Need to Know if Patients Have Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Knee partial meniscectomy has limited benefit for "nonobstructive" meniscal tears, but we need to know if included patients have osteoarthritis. Research on outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus nonsurgical treatment must consider not only signs and symptoms but also imaging findings, to determine the indications for surgical versus nonsurgical in a selected patient. PMID:27594333

  20. Diagnostic performance of 3D TSE MRI versus 2D TSE MRI of the knee at 1.5 T, with prompt arthroscopic correlation, in the detection of meniscal and cruciate ligament tears*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lorenzato, Mário Müller; Salim, Rodrigo; Kfuri-Junior, Maurício; Crema, Michel Daoud

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the diagnostic performance of the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo (3D TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the performance of the standard two-dimensional turbo spin-echo (2D TSE) protocol at 1.5 T, in the detection of meniscal and ligament tears. Materials and Methods Thirty-eight patients were imaged twice, first with a standard multiplanar 2D TSE MR technique, and then with a 3D TSE technique, both in the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. The patients underwent knee arthroscopy within the first three days after the MRI. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, we determined the diagnostic performance and agreement. Results For detecting anterior cruciate ligament tears, the 3D TSE and routine 2D TSE techniques showed similar values for sensitivity (93% and 93%, respectively) and specificity (80% and 85%, respectively). For detecting medial meniscal tears, the two techniques also had similar sensitivity (85% and 83%, respectively) and specificity (68% and 71%, respectively). In addition, for detecting lateral meniscal tears, the two techniques had similar sensitivity (58% and 54%, respectively) and specificity (82% and 92%, respectively). There was a substantial to almost perfect intraobserver and interobserver agreement when comparing the readings for both techniques. Conclusion The 3D TSE technique has a diagnostic performance similar to that of the routine 2D TSE protocol for detecting meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament tears at 1.5 T, with the advantage of faster acquisition. PMID:27141127

  1. Defining the Value of Future Research to Identify the Preferred Treatment of Meniscal Tear in the Presence of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Losina

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM is extensively used to relieve pain in patients with symptomatic meniscal tear (MT and knee osteoarthritis (OA. Recent studies have failed to show the superiority of APM compared to other treatments. We aim to examine whether existing evidence is sufficient to reject use of APM as a cost-effective treatment for MT+OA.We built a patient-level microsimulation using Monte Carlo methods and evaluated three strategies: Physical therapy ('PT' alone; PT followed by APM if subjects continued to experience pain ('Delayed APM'; and 'Immediate APM'. Our subject population was US adults with symptomatic MT and knee OA over a 10 year time horizon. We assessed treatment outcomes using societal costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs, incorporating productivity costs as a sensitivity analysis. We also conducted a value-of-information analysis using probabilistic sensitivity analyses.Calculated ICERs were estimated to be $12,900/QALY for Delayed APM as compared to PT and $103,200/QALY for Immediate APM as compared to Delayed APM. In sensitivity analyses, inclusion of time costs made Delayed APM cost-saving as compared to PT. Improving efficacy of Delayed APM led to higher incremental costs and lower incremental effectiveness of Immediate APM in comparison to Delayed APM. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that PT had 3.0% probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay (WTP threshold of $50,000/QALY. Delayed APM was cost effective 57.7% of the time at WTP = $50,000/QALY and 50.2% at WTP = $100,000/QALY. The probability of Immediate APM being cost-effective did not exceed 50% unless WTP exceeded $103,000/QALY.We conclude that current cost-effectiveness evidence does not support unqualified rejection of either Immediate or Delayed APM for the treatment of MT+OA. The amount to which society would be willing to pay for additional information

  2. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial’s inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider

  3. Diagnostic criterial to differentiate medial meniscal injury from degenerative changes on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP knee SPECT in patients with chronic knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, June Key; Kang, Won Jun; So, Young; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hwan Jeong [Wonkwang University College of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    In patients with chronic knee pain, the diagnostic performance of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP knee SPECT for internal derangement of knee is deteriorated due to degenerative changes. In this study, we tried to establish diagnostic criteria to differentiate medial meniscal injury (MMI) from degenerative change (DC) when the uptake in increased in medial compartment. A total of 49 knee SPECT of the patients with chronic(more than 3 months) knee pain, which showed increased {sup 99m}Tc-MDP uptake in the medial compartment, were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by arthroscopy. On knee SPECT, 3 diagnosic criteria for MMI were investigated. In Criterion, I, MMI was diagnosed when crescentic uptake was observed in the medial tibial plateau. In Criterion II, crescentic uptake was further classified into anterior, mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns, according to the location of maximal uptake; and only crescentic mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns were diagnosed as MMI. In Criterion III, MMI was diagnosed when medial tibial plateau showed higher activity then medial femoral condyle. The diagnostic performance of the 3 criteria was compared. The sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 14% in Criterion I, 89% and 38% in Criterion II, and 75% and 67% in Criterion III, respectively. Criterion III had significantly improve diagnostic performance, especially, specificity. In this study, we established a practical diagnostic criterion to differentiate MMI from DC on knee SPECT. The result is helpful to improve the diagnostic value of knee SPECT as a screening test for chronic knee pain.

  4. Diagnostic criterial to differentiate medial meniscal injury from degenerative changes on 99mTc-MDP knee SPECT in patients with chronic knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In patients with chronic knee pain, the diagnostic performance of 99mTc-MDP knee SPECT for internal derangement of knee is deteriorated due to degenerative changes. In this study, we tried to establish diagnostic criteria to differentiate medial meniscal injury (MMI) from degenerative change (DC) when the uptake in increased in medial compartment. A total of 49 knee SPECT of the patients with chronic(more than 3 months) knee pain, which showed increased 99mTc-MDP uptake in the medial compartment, were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by arthroscopy. On knee SPECT, 3 diagnosic criteria for MMI were investigated. In Criterion, I, MMI was diagnosed when crescentic uptake was observed in the medial tibial plateau. In Criterion II, crescentic uptake was further classified into anterior, mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns, according to the location of maximal uptake; and only crescentic mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns were diagnosed as MMI. In Criterion III, MMI was diagnosed when medial tibial plateau showed higher activity then medial femoral condyle. The diagnostic performance of the 3 criteria was compared. The sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 14% in Criterion I, 89% and 38% in Criterion II, and 75% and 67% in Criterion III, respectively. Criterion III had significantly improve diagnostic performance, especially, specificity. In this study, we established a practical diagnostic criterion to differentiate MMI from DC on knee SPECT. The result is helpful to improve the diagnostic value of knee SPECT as a screening test for chronic knee pain

  5. Evolução funcional da reparação do menisco por implante absorvível Functional evolution of meniscal repair using absorbable implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldo Lino Júnior

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a evolução funcional dos joelhos submetidos à reparação da ruptura longitudinal do menisco com o implante absorvível flecha (arrow. MÉTODOS: Entre junho de 1997 e fevereiro de 2001, 23 pacientes com idade média de 26 anos foram avaliados. O seguimento médio foi de quatro meses (45-96. Realizaram-se 19 reparações mediais e quatro laterais. Os pacientes foram avaliados no pré e no pós-operatório quanto à função, de acordo com a escala de Lysholm e, no pós-operatório, pelo IKDC. RESULTADOS: Para melhor compreensão, os 23 indivíduos tratados foram divididos em três grupos. Vinte e um apresentaram lesão do ligamento cruzado anterior e 11 foram submetidos à reconstrução ligamentar (grupo I, com resultados considerados satisfatórios. Dez dos 21 pacientes com lesão do LCA não foram submetidos à reconstrução ligamentar (grupo II, dos quais cinco evoluíram satisfatoriamente, sem necessidade de reconstrução ligamentar, cinco, com queixa de instabilidade e foram submetidos à reconstrução ligamentar. Quatro desses pacientes apresentaram o menisco íntegro e uma ruptura do menisco medial. Dois apresentaram LCA intacto (grupo III, um evoluiu satisfatoriamente e outro apresentou ruptura do menisco lateral. De acordo com a escala de Lysholm, a média pré-operatória foi de 57,53 e a média pós-operatória, de 86,95, representando melhora estatisticamente significativa (Wilcoxon p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional evolution of knees after repair of longitudinal meniscal rupture with absorbable arrow implant. METHODS: Between June 1997 and February 2001, 23 patients with a mean age of 26.3 years were evaluated. The mean follow-up time was 72.87 months (45-96. We performed 19 medial and 4 lateral meniscal repairs. The patients were pre- and postoperatively evaluated regarding joint function according to the Lysholm scale, and, postoperatively, according to IKDC. RESULTS: For better understanding, the 23

  6. Correlation of histological examination of meniscus with MR images; Focused on high signal intensity of the meniscus not caused by definite meniscal tear and impact on MR diagnosis of tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun Ai; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Ju Hong; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To document the causes of high signal intensity of the meniscus which is not caused by definite meniscal tears on MR imaging, through correlation with histological examination. For the correlation between the MR image and histology, we obtained prospectively 31 meniscal specimens from 21 patients. Proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo MR images were used. Minimal tear, thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration of the central layer, and radial tie fibers were detected upon histological examination, and were correlated with the corresponding MR images. Minimal tear of the lamellar layer was seen in 60 zones out of 100 slides. On MR images, 29 (48.3%) of these 60 zones had high signal intensity. Thinning of the lamellar layer was seen in 24 zones, with 7 (29.2%) having high signal intensity. 57 central zones showed degenerative change in the central layer and high signal intensity on all corresponding MR images. Radial tie fibers in the central layer appeared as high signal intensity areas. Minimal tear and thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration and radial tie fibers of the central layer of the meniscus cause high signal intensity on MR images.

  7. MRI of the knee: how do field strength and radiologist's experience influence diagnostic accuracy and interobserver correlation in assessing chondral and meniscal lesions and the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krampla, W.; Roesel, M.; Svoboda, K.; Nachbagauer, A.; Gschwantler, M.; Hruby, W. [Donauspital, Radiology Department, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-06-15

    Accuracy of MRI reports is taken for granted. In this paper the inter-observer reliability in the interpretation of meniscal lesions, degree of chondropathy, and integrity of the ACL was analyzed while taking the radiologist's experience and field strength into account. Fifty-two MRI studies of knees were interpreted by 11 radiologists independently. Twenty-two were acquired on 1.0-T, 20 on 1.5-T, and 10 on 3.0-T systems. Four of the radiologists had more than 5 years and seven had 3 to 5 years of experience in interpreting MRI studies. The findings were compared with the intra-operative findings. Inter-observer variance, specificity, and sensitivity were evaluated for each field strength. Inter-observer correlation ranged between 0.370 for cartilage lesions and 0.597 for meniscal tears. Correlation values did not increase with experience or field strength. The number of false reports was dependent on the observer, but not on field strength. The rate of false interpretations was significantly higher for most criteria in the less experienced group. In conclusion, inter-observer correlation was low, although the diagnostic criteria were defined. The use of the classification scheme should be standardized by uniform training. Radiologist experience seems to be more important than field strength. (orig.)

  8. 半月板运动性损伤的组织工程修复:国际研究趋势与未来%Tissue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury: International research trends and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨小宁

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The depth study of disciplines, such as tissue engineering, genetic engineering, biomechanics and materials science, provides a new approach for the treatment of meniscal injuries.OBJECTIVE: To multivariately analyze the literatures on the tissue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury through Scopus database and to summarize the application progress of tissue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury.METHODS: A retrieval was performed for the literature of the tissue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury, using the key words of "meniscus, sports injuries, tissue engineering, repair" between January 2002 and December 2011 in Scopus database. The retrieval results were analyzed, and the trends were described in words and graphics.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: A total of 245 literatures on the issue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury were retrieved in Scopus database, in which most of paper were published as original articles. Eight articles were identified as classic literatures. The overall number of literature had an upward trend from 2002 to 2011. United States and England published more literature than other countries, which play an important role in the field of tissue-engineered repair of exercise-induced meniscal injury. Most of literatures were published from Rice University, University of Pennsylvania, and Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre. Biomaterials published most papers in this field (n=15, 6.12%). This paper provides a valuable reference for researchers to understand the overview and present situation of this field.%背景:骨组织工程学、基因工程、生物力学以及材料学等学科研究的深入,为半月板损伤的治疗提供了新途径.目的:利用Scopus数据库文献检索和深度分析功能,对于半月板运动损伤的组织工程修复的文献资料趋势进行多层次探讨分析,总结半月板运动损伤的组织工程修复的应用进展.

  9. The usefulness of MRI and arthroscopy in the diagnosis and treatment of soft-tissue injuries associated with split-depression fractures of the lateral tibial condyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkkinen, M; Madanat, R; Mäkinen, T J; Mustonen, A; Koskinen, S K; Lindahl, J

    2014-12-01

    The role of arthroscopy in the treatment of soft-tissue injuries associated with proximal tibial fractures remains debatable. Our hypothesis was that MRI over-diagnoses clinically relevant associated soft-tissue injuries. This prospective study involved 50 consecutive patients who underwent surgical treatment for a split-depression fracture of the lateral tibial condyle (AO/OTA type B3.1). The mean age of patients was 50 years (23 to 86) and 27 (54%) were female. All patients had MRI and arthroscopy. Arthroscopy identified 12 tears of the lateral meniscus, including eight bucket-handle tears that were sutured and four that were resected, as well as six tears of the medial meniscus, of which five were resected. Lateral meniscal injuries were diagnosed on MRI in four of 12 patients, yielding an overall sensitivity of 33% (95% confidence interval (CI) 11 to 65). Specificity was 76% (95% CI 59 to 88), with nine tears diagnosed among 38 menisci that did not contain a tear. MRI identified medial meniscal injuries in four of six patients, yielding an overall sensitivity of 67% (95% CI 24 to 94). Specificity was 66% (95% CI 50 to 79), with 15 tears diagnosed in 44 menisci that did not contain tears. MRI appears to offer only a marginal benefit as the specificity and sensitivity for diagnosing meniscal injuries are poor in patients with a fracture. There were fewer arthroscopically-confirmed associated lesions than reported previously in MRI studies. PMID:25452365

  10. 膝关节韧带损伤及伴发半月板损伤的MRI分析%Knee ligaments injuries and associated meniscal tears:a MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙百胜; 郑雷; 纪丙军; 姜辉; 何伟华; 李永亮

    2013-01-01

    合损伤,再次为ACL、PCL、MCL联合损伤;MRI诊断多发韧带损伤的敏感性、特异性、准确性均较单发韧带损伤下降;多发韧带损伤较单发韧带损伤更易伴发 MM、LM损伤;多发韧带组与单发韧带组比较,虽然MRI诊断伴发MM、LM损伤敏感性无明显差异,但特异性、准确性均较单发韧带组明显降低。%Objective To evaluate the characteristics of isolated and combined ligament injuries of knee joint, and compare the accuracy of MR imaging between above two type ligament injuries, incidence rate and diagnostic accuracy of concomitant meniscal tear. Methods MR images of 187 patients with ligament injuries proved clinically were reviewed. Results Among 187 patients, isolated ligament injury was seen in 103 cases and combined ligament injury in 84 cases. In isolated ligament injury group, there were 38 cases of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, 36 cases of medial collateral ligament (MCL) tear, 14 cases of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear, 10 cases of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) tear, 3 cases of patellar tendon (PT) tear, 2 cases of lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tear, which concomitant with 35 cases of medial meniscal (MM) tear and 23 cases of lateral meniscal (LM) tear. In combined ligaments injury group, there were 37 combined ACL and MCL injuries, 21 combined ACL and PCL injuries, 10 combined ACL, PCL, and MCL injuries, 8 combined MPFL and MCL injuries, 4 combined ACL, MCL, and MPFL injuries, 2 combined ACL and PT injuries, 2 combined ACL, PCL, and LCL injuries, which concomitant with 43 cases of MM tear and 35 cases of LM tear. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing ligament tears to be 90.3%, 97.7%and 96.4%respectively in isolated ligament injury group, and 81.5%, 88.4% and 85.9% respectively significant(P0.05). Conclusions ACL injury is the most common injury in isolated ligament injury group, followed by MCL injury. Combined ACL and MCL injuries are the most common

  11. Effect of recirculation and regional counting rate on reliability of noninvasive bicompartmental CBF measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on data from routine intravenous Xe133-rCBF studies in 50 patients, using Obrist's algorithm the effect of counting rate statistics and amount of recirculating activity on reproducibility of results was investigated at five simulated counting rate levels. Dependence of the standard deviation of compartmental and noncompartmental flow parameters on recirculation and counting rate was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. Those regression equations permit determination of the optimum accuracy that may be expected from individual flow measurements. Mainly due to a delay of the start-of-fit time an exponential increase in standard deviation of flow measurements was observed as recirculation increased. At constant start-of-fit, however, a linear increase in standard deviation of compartmental flow parameters only was found, while noncompartmental results remained constant. Therefore, and in regard to other studies of potential sources of error, an upper limit of 2.5 min for the start-of-fit time and usage of noncompartmental flow parameters for measurements affected by high recirculation are suggested

  12. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...... Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or worse. RESULTS: At assessment A, we found tibiofemoral radiographic OA in 107 subjects' index knee (48%) of which 41 subjects (38%) had bilateral tibiofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 151 (68%) and 71 (32%). At assessment A, we found...... patellofemoral OA in 32 subjects' index knee (14%) of which 11 (34%) had bilateral patellofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 51 (23%) and 19 (37%). There was an increase of the sum of joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte grades in the tibiofemoral joint of 144 subjects' index knee...

  13. Repair of full-thickness meniscal defect with human insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ gene-enhanced tissue engineering%人胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ基因增强组织工程修复全层半月板缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海宁; 王英振; 吕成昱; 周峰; 续宗耀

    2013-01-01

    目的 建立全层无血运区半月板缺损模型,观察人胰岛素样生长因子Ⅰ (human insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ,hIGF-Ⅰ)基因修饰骨髓间充质干细胞(bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells,BMSCs)复合可注射藻酸钙凝胶修复半月板缺损的效果. 方法 制造成年山羊半月板前角无血运区全层缺损模型.实验分为四组,即基因增强组织工程(gene-enhanced tissue engineering,GETE)组(GETE组):用hIGF-Ⅰ基因转染的BMSCs复合可注射藻酸钙凝胶修复半月板缺损;BMSCs组:用BMSCs复合藻酸钙凝胶修复缺损;空载体组:用藻酸钙凝胶空载体修复缺损;对照组:缺损旷置,不做任何修复.术后4,8,16周时相点行大体观察;光镜、电镜观察修复组织变化;测定修复组织中蛋白聚糖含量. 结果 GETE组修复半月板缺损在4~ 16周效果逐渐改善,缺损完全被修复组织填充,色白质韧,结合紧密,与正常半月板组织相似,大体观察优于其他各组;光镜下可见细胞随凝胶纤维排列分布,载体纤维间隙大多为细胞分泌基质所充填,细胞排列密集,基质分布均匀;扫描电镜观察到纤维排列规整紧密,纤维间缝隙为致密的细胞外基质填充;修复组织中蛋白聚糖含量较高,但与正常半月板仍有差异. 结论 转染hIGF-Ⅰ基因的BMSCs复合可注射藻酸钙凝胶可改善全层半月板缺损的修复效果.%Objective To establish a model of full-thickness avascular meniscal defect to assess outcome of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) modified with human insulin-like growth factor Ⅰ (hIGF-Ⅰ) gene and compounded with injectable calcium alginate gel in repair of meniscal defect.Methods Models of full-thickness defect were created in the anterior comer of meniscus in goats,an area lacking of blood supply.The trial categorized the models to four groups:gene-ehanced tissue engineering (GETE) group (hIGF-Ⅰ transfected BMSCs were mixed with calcium alginate gel

  14. 关节镜下全关节内FasT-Fix技术缝合修复半月板损伤36例%Arthroscopic repair of meniscal tears by FasT-Fix technique: a report of 36 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王予彬; 王惠芳; 朱文辉; 崔芳; 袁锋; 卢亮宇; 孙文琳

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess clinical outcomes of FasT-Fix technique in repair of meniscal injury under arthroscope. Methods A total of 36 cases (37 knees) of mensical tears were repaired with FasF-Fix technique. There were 26 males and 10 females, at mean age of 26 years (14-51 years). Eighteen meniscal tears were located in zone Ⅱ, 16 in zone Ⅲ and 3 in zone Ⅳ. The average length of the tear was 2.2 cm (1.0-3.0 cm). Results There were no any signs of early complications after sur gery. All cases were followed up For 6-26 months (mean 16 months). According to Lysholm scoring scale system ,the average score of operated knees was increased from preoperative 44.13+12.56 to postopera tive 80.24+12.67 (P<0.01). After operation, all the patients could move the knee joint at normal range, except for one case who had a limitation of 20 degree flexion, with no pain or interlocking symptom. All cases returned to original work and/or could continue sports game. Conclusion The FasT-Fix technique is a simple, safe and effective method for repair of properly selected meniscal tears.%目的 探讨关节镜下用FasT-Fix技术全关节内缝合修复半月板损伤的临床应用效果,评价其临床意义.方法 关节镜下用FasT-Fix技术全关节内缝合修复36例患者37个半月板损伤,其中男26例,女10例;年龄14-51岁,平均26岁.半月板损伤分区:Ⅱ区18例,Ⅲ区16例,Ⅳ区3例.撕裂长度平均为2.2 cm(1.0-3.0 cm).结果 所有患者术后均无早期并发症发生.随访时间6-26个月,平均16个月,除1侧膝关节屈曲受限20°外,其余膝关节伸屈功能正常,无疼痛及交锁症状.所有患者均恢复原工作、生活、运动.Lysholm评分:术前(44.13+12.56)分,术后(80.24+12.67)分(P<0.01).结论 对于合适的半月板损伤患者,FasT-Fix缝合系统是一种简便、快速、安全、有效的全关节内缝合方法.

  15. Biomechanical Evaluation of Knee Kinematics after ACL Reconstructions in Anatomic SB and DB - Technique with Additional Medial Meniscus Suture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorbach, Olaf; Herbort, Mirco; Engelhardt, Martin; Kieb, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical evaluation of knee laxity after single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscus suture. Methods: Kinematics of the intact knee were determined in 12 human cadaver specimens in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load (aTT) and a combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Subsequently, the ACL was resected following the creation of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. A standard repair of the medial meniscus was performed using 3 inside-out horizontal sutures. Finally, The ACL was reconstructed using an anatomic single-bundle (6) or double-bundle technique (6). Knee kinematics were determined following every sub-step. Results: Significant increase of aTT in the ACL-deficient knee was found with significant increase in the ACL-deficient knee with additional medial meniscal injury (p=.003; p=.009). ACL reconstructions significantly decreased aTT compared to the ACL-deficient knee. No significant differences were found between the intact knee and the ACL reconstructed knee with additional meniscal repair. In response to a simulated pivot shift, aTT in the intact knee significantly increased in the ACL-deficient knee as well as in the meniscus injured/meniscus-sutured knee (p=.003;p=.007). No significant differences were found between the ACL-deficient and ACL reconstructed knee with additional meniscal repair. SB as well as DB ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscal repair restored knee kinematics compared to the intact knee. Comparison of SB versus DB ACL reconstruction did not reveal any significant differences neither in a simulated Lachman test nor in response to a simulated pivot shift (p=.05). Conclusion: aTT as well as aTT in response to a combined rotatory load significantly increased with ACL deficiency compared to the intact knee, additional medial meniscal injury further increased aTT. Anatomic

  16. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  17. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2013-07-03

    Extensive studies have explored the dynamics of the ocular surface fluid, though theoretical investigations are typically limited to the use of the lubrication approximation, which is not guaranteed to be uniformly valid a-priori throughout the tear meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity and subsequent epithelial damage. Hence, we have explored the accuracy of the standard lubrication approximation for the tear film by explicit comparisons with the 2D Navier-Stokes model, considering both stationary and moving eyelids. Our results demonstrate that the lubrication model is qualitatively accurate except in the vicinity of the eyelids. In particular, and in contrast to lubrication theory, the solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations predict a distinct absence of fluid flow, and thus convective mixing in the region adjacent to the tear film contact line. These observations not only support emergent hypotheses concerning the formation of Marx\\'s line, a region of epithelial cell staining adjacent to the contact line on the eyelid, but also enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of the flow profile near the tear film contact line. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in assessment of Meniscal and ACL tear: Correlation with arthroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yaqoob, Jamal; Alam, Muhammad Shahbaz; Khalid, Nadeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in injuries related to anterior cruciate ligament and menisci and compare its effectiveness with that of arthroscopy. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Radiology & Medical Imaging of Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from September 2012 to March 2014. Fifty four patients (including 30 men and 24 women) with internal derangement of knee referred ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  20. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  1. [A woman with a locked knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, A R; van Raay, J J A M

    2015-01-01

    A 25-year-old female presented with locking of the left knee after an assertiveness training. The MRI scan showed a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. The medial meniscus was dislocated into the intercondylar fossa, in which the image of a second posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) was simulated. This is also called a 'double PCL sign'. PMID:26959734

  2. In vivo three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging of rat knee osteoarthritis model induced using meniscal transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xiang J. Wang

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: MRI offers in vivo information on the pathogenesis change of rat knee OA induced with menisectomy. It can serve as a supplement technique to histology, as it is particularly useful for longitudinal follow-up of OA model development.

  3. Development of 50 kV ultra-fast dipole-quadrupole kicker for bucket-by-bucket beam handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-fast dipole / quadrupole field variable kicker was developed for bucket-by-bucket handling of a beam and tested with a 1 GeV electron beam from the SPring-8 linac. The kicker produces dipole field to quadrupole field by changing the driving voltage and polarity. The kicker was tested with 50 kV pulse generator and the high kick field was expected in the kicker. For dipole kick, the kicker does not impose the horizontal aperture. (author)

  4. XROMM analysis of rib kinematics during lung ventilation in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Moritz, Sabine; Ritter, Dale A

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional rotations of ribs during breathing are typically described as bucket-handle rotation about a dorsoventrally oriented axis, pump-handle rotation about a mediolateral axis, and caliper rotation about a rostrocaudal axis. In amniotes with double-headed ribs, rib motion is constrained primarily to one degree-of-freedom (DOF) rotation about an axis connecting the two rib articulations. However, in Squamata, the ribs are single headed and the hemispherical costovertebral joints permit rotations with three DOF. In this study, we used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM ) to quantify rib rotation during deep breathing in four green iguanas. We found that rib rotation was strongly dominated by bucket-handle rotation, thus exhibiting nearly hinge-like motion, despite the potential for more complex motions. The vertebral and sternal segments of each rib did not deform measurably during breathing, but they did move relative to each other at a thin, cartilaginous intracostal joint. While standing still and breathing deeply, four individual iguanas showed variability in their rib postures, with two breathing around a highly inflated posture, and two breathing around a posture with the ribs folded halfway back. Bucket-handle rotations showed clear rostrocaudal gradients, with rotation increasing from the third cervical to the first or second dorsal rib, and then decreasing again caudally, a pattern that is consistent with the intercostal muscles in the rostral intercostal spaces being the primary drivers of inspiration. The constrained, primarily bucket-handle rotations observed here during breathing do not help to explain the evolution of permissive, hemispherical costovertebral joints in squamates from the more constrained, double-headed rib articulations of other amniotes. PMID:26596531

  5. Biomechanical Evaluation of Knee Kinematics after ACL Reconstructions in Anatomic SB and DB - Technique with Additional Medial Meniscus Suture

    OpenAIRE

    Lorbach, Olaf; Herbort, Mirco; Engelhardt, Martin; Kieb, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Biomechanical evaluation of knee laxity after single- and double-bundle ACL reconstruction with additional medial meniscus suture. Methods: Kinematics of the intact knee were determined in 12 human cadaver specimens in response to a 134-N anterior tibial load (aTT) and a combined rotatory load of 10 Nm valgus and 4 Nm internal tibial rotation using a robotic/universal force moment sensor testing system. Subsequently, the ACL was resected following the creation of a bucket-handle t...

  6. Evolução funcional da reparação do menisco por implante absorvível Functional evolution of meniscal repair using absorbable implants

    OpenAIRE

    Waldo Lino Júnior

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Avaliar a evolução funcional dos joelhos submetidos à reparação da ruptura longitudinal do menisco com o implante absorvível flecha (arrow). MÉTODOS: Entre junho de 1997 e fevereiro de 2001, 23 pacientes com idade média de 26 anos foram avaliados. O seguimento médio foi de quatro meses (45-96). Realizaram-se 19 reparações mediais e quatro laterais. Os pacientes foram avaliados no pré e no pós-operatório quanto à função, de acordo com a escala de Lysholm e, no pós-operatório, pelo IK...

  7. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging. A phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C; Larsson, H B;

    1988-01-01

    .5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32...

  8. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel, Jasper van [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N. [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1{sub GD} on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1{sub GD} in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD}. A trend towards lower T1{sub GD} in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1{sub GD} ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1{sub GD} compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  9. Uso de células madre pluripotenciales extraídas de grasa y del plasma rico en plaquetas como potenciadores en sutura meniscal. Estudio en un modelo de menisco de conejo

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Heredia, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Las lesiones meniscales son un lesión frecuente en nuestra práctica clínica. El tratamiento más utilizado en la meniscectomía parcial. La meniscectomía parcial o total favorece la aparición de cambios degenerativos precoces en la articulación de la rodilla. Varios estudios han demostrado la capacidad de reparación de lesiones meniscales que se sitúan en zona periférica vascularizada, por contra de las lesiones localizadas en zona avascular que presenta bajas tasas de reparación. Diversos estu...

  10. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1GD on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1GD in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1GD was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1GD in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1GD. A trend towards lower T1GD in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1GD ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1GD was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1GD compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1GD suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  11. Clinical Results and MRI Arthrography Evaluation of Meniscal Repair with FasT-Fix System%FasT-Fix半月板缝合的临床疗效与MRI造影评估愈合研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚熹; 余家阔; 敖英芳

    2010-01-01

    目的:了解关节镜下使用FasT-Fix系统进行半月板缝合的临床疗效与MRI造影下的愈合情况.方法:2006年4月至2007年7月,17例患者、18侧损伤半月板在我所应用Fast-Fix系统进行了关节镜下全内的半月板缝合,所有患者同时进行了交叉韧带重建,于术后平均11个月进行临床随访,依照Barrett标准评价半月板缝合的临床愈合情况,并对随访患者进行IKDC、Lysholm和Tegner评分.所有18侧半月板应用MR/造影评价半月板愈合情况.结果:18侧缝合的半月板有17侧得到了临床愈合,临床愈合率为94.4%.平均IKDC评分由术前的46.4分提高至术后的75.2分,平均Lysholm评分由术前的44.8分提高至术后的80.6分,平均Tegner评分由术前的2.5分提高至术后的5.4分.MRI造影显示18侧半月板中13侧为完全愈合,2侧为部分层厚不愈合,3侧为全层厚不愈合,总愈合率为83.3%,完全愈合率为72.2%.结论:应用Fast-Fix系统进行半月板缝合具有很好的临床效果,MRI造影显示有较高的愈合率.

  12. Advances in combining gene therapy with cell and tissue engineering-based approaches to enhance healing of the meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, M; McNulty, A L; Mauck, R L; Setton, L A; Guilak, F; Madry, H

    2016-08-01

    Meniscal lesions are common problems in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, and injury or loss of the meniscus accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite a variety of therapeutic options in the clinics, there is a critical need for improved treatments to enhance meniscal repair. In this regard, combining gene-, cell-, and tissue engineering-based approaches is an attractive strategy to generate novel, effective therapies to treat meniscal lesions. In the present work, we provide an overview of the tools currently available to improve meniscal repair and discuss the progress and remaining challenges for potential future translation in patients. PMID:27063441

  13. Subclinical speckled perifollicular melanosis of the scalp.

    OpenAIRE

    Petit, Ludivine; Saint Leger, Didier; Loussouarn, Genevieve; Pierard, Gérald

    2002-01-01

    Based on the clinical presentation of some skin pigmentation disorders it is thought that a bicompartmental functional system exists in the epidermal melanocyte population. It corresponds to the perifollicular and interfollicular compartments, respectively. The present study was undertaken looking for the presence of such a system on scalp unaffected by pigmentary disorders. The scalps of 100 men with incipient to severe androgenic alopecia were examined using a videocamera equipped with an i...

  14. The distribution and elimination of Bothrops erythromelas venom labeled with {sup 131} I after intravenous injection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, M.L. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia]. E-mail: rocha@cascavel.uefs.br

    1999-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies can be used to study the systemic effects of snake venoms and to develop standard serotherapy protocols for envenomation. Bothrops erythromelas is probably responsible for most of the snakebite in Pernambuco. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of B. erythromelas venom (BeV) in mice, and to evaluate the efficacy of bothropic antivenom. BeV showed bicompartmental distribution in the blood of the experimental animals. (author)

  15. The distribution and elimination of Bothrops erythromelas venom labeled with 131 I after intravenous injection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharmacokinetic studies can be used to study the systemic effects of snake venoms and to develop standard serotherapy protocols for envenomation. Bothrops erythromelas is probably responsible for most of the snakebite in Pernambuco. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of B. erythromelas venom (BeV) in mice, and to evaluate the efficacy of bothropic antivenom. BeV showed bicompartmental distribution in the blood of the experimental animals. (author)

  16. Meniscus tears of the knee: Postarthrogram high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-eight knees with clinically suspected meniscal tears were examined with high resolution computed tomography(HRCT) immediately following double contrast arthrography. All subsequently underwent arthroscopy. The findings of postarthrogram HRCT and arthroscopy were compared to evaluated the usefulness of postarthrogram HRCT in diagnosis of the meniscal tears. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of HRCT were 96.2%. 83.3% and 92.1% respectively. The anatomic details of the meniscal tears were clearly visible on the HRCT scans. Sagittal and coronal reformation views well visualized the horizontal tears and the relationship of torn meniscal fragments, and well differential the peripheral tears from the synovial recess. Our result indicate that postarthrogram HRCT not only is a sensitive and effective method for the detection and characterization of the meniscal tears, but also provides arthroscopists with the appropriate surgical plans

  17. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears

  18. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lefevre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears.

  19. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Nicolas; Naouri, Jean Francois; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears. PMID:27057352

  20. MR diagnosis of periarticular cystic space-occupying growths in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MR images of the knee joint of 100 successively examined patients were evaluated in retrospect with regard to periarticular cystic lesions. There were 18 popliteal cysts, 8 meniscal cysts and 4 ganglion cysts. Localisation and internal structure of the lesions were of main importance in respect of differential diagnosis. All meniscal cysts were associated with horizontal meniscal tears. Spin-echo and 3D gradient-echo images did not enable differentiation because of signal intensity values. A spin-echo sequence with long repetition time in double-echo technique was best suited to assess the periarticular cystic lesions as well as the intraarticular pathological changes which were often concomitant. (orig.)

  1. MR diagnosis of periarticular cystic space-occupying growths in the knee joint. Magnetresonanztomographische Diagnostik periartikulaerer, zystischer Raumforderungen am Kniegelenk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueckel, C. (Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kantonsspital Basel, Universitaetsklinik (Germany)); Kaim, A. (Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kantonsspital Basel, Universitaetsklinik (Germany))

    1993-04-01

    The MR images of the knee joint of 100 successively examined patients were evaluated in retrospect with regard to periarticular cystic lesions. There were 18 popliteal cysts, 8 meniscal cysts and 4 ganglion cysts. Localisation and internal structure of the lesions were of main importance in respect of differential diagnosis. All meniscal cysts were associated with horizontal meniscal tears. Spin-echo and 3D gradient-echo images did not enable differentiation because of signal intensity values. A spin-echo sequence with long repetition time in double-echo technique was best suited to assess the periarticular cystic lesions as well as the intraarticular pathological changes which were often concomitant. (orig.)

  2. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at meniscal repairs in general, there’s some mixed data out showing whether we can actually prevent arthritis, ... of my research interests. We have recently presented data at the major orthopedic meetings to show that ...

  3. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... team here in Miami, Florida, and is a sports fellowship trained orthopedic surgeon who will be doing ... Well, preventing meniscal tears in the young and athletic-type population like this gentleman, you know, very ...

  4. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, ... a comment, please complete the following form: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Images × Image Gallery ...

  5. Three-dimensional MR imaging of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of a three-dimensional (3D) imaging system was evaluated using a newly developed workstation. Fifteen knee joints with meniscal tears confirmed by arthroscopic examinations underwent 3D magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These 3D data sets were processed into 3D display by multiplanar reformation (MPR) and the volume rendering technique, and the features of the meniscal tears were compared with those on conventional two-dimensional (2D) MR images. The 3D images with MPR provided higher detectability and more descriptive delineation of the meniscal tears than the 2D images. With its powerful image processing capacity, the workstation facilitated high-speed, high-quality 3D display and provided precise views of meniscal cleavages for the planning of surgical treatment. The independent processing system permitted efficient throughput of the MR data and eliminated wasteful filming processes. (author)

  6. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  7. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, ... a comment, please complete the following form: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Please help us ...

  8. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... look at meniscal repairs in general, there’s some mixed data out showing whether we can actually prevent ... medical conditions, which we call comorbid conditions, which add to the, you know, to the delays and ...

  9. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... we think, based on an MRI scan, as well as clinically on his examination. So we’re ... Can you tell us anything about preventing this. Well, preventing meniscal tears in the young and athletic- ...

  10. Calculation of patient skin dose from diagnostic x-ray procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief letter describes a simple, cheap modification to the Stoker technique for double contrast knee arthrography, which provides excellent joint distraction and immobilisation with minimum effort, useful in particular for the evaluation of meniscal injuries. (U.K.)

  11. Comprehensive selection of reference genes for expression studies in meniscus injury using quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego Costa; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo; Debieux, Pedro; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2016-06-10

    The meniscus plays critical roles in the knee function. Meniscal tears can lead to knee osteoarthritis. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding meniscus tears, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. We evaluated the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using meniscus samples of (1) 19 patients with isolated meniscal tears, (2) 20 patients with meniscal tears and combined anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL), and (3) 11 controls without meniscal tears. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper DataAssist and RefFinder software packages and comparative ΔCt method. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene. However, GenEx software demonstrated that two or more reference genes should be used for gene expression normalization, which was confirmed when we evaluated TGFβR1 expression using several reference gene combinations. HPRT1+TBP was the most frequently identified pair from the analysis of samples of (1) meniscal tear samples of patients with a concomitant ACL tears, (2) all meniscal tears, and (3) all samples. HPRT1+GAPDH was the most frequently identified pair from the analysis of samples of isolated meniscal tear samples and controls. In the analysis involving only controls, GAPDH+18S was the most frequently identified pair. In the analysis of only isolated meniscal tear samples and in the analysis of meniscal tear samples of patients with concomitant ACL tears and controls, both HPRT1+TBP and HPRT1+GAPDH were identified as suitable pairs. If the gene expression study aims to compare non-injured meniscus, isolated meniscal tears and meniscal tears of patients with ACL tears as three independent groups, the trio of HPRT1+TBP+GAPDH is the most suitable

  12. Large increase in arthroscopic meniscus surgery in the middle-aged and older population in Denmark from 2000 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background - Arthroscopic meniscal surgery is the most common orthopedic procedure, and the incidence has increased in Denmark over the last 10 years. Concomitantly, several randomized controlled trials have shown no benefit of arthroscopic procedures including arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in...... and 2011. Interpretation - The incidence of meniscal procedures performed in Denmark doubled from 2000 to 2011, with the largest increase in middle-aged and older patients. This increase contrasts with the mounting evidence showing no added benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy over non...

  13. Meniscectomy: indications, procedure, outcomes, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetzberger H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hermann Anetzberger,1 Christof Birkenmaier,2 Stephan Lorenz3 1Orthopädische Gemeinschaftspraxis am OEZ, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Orthopedics, Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany Abstract: Meniscal injuries are among the most frequent reasons for knee problems. The goal of this manuscript is to review the biomechanical relevance of the human knee's menisci in relation to surgical indications, surgical techniques, rehabilitation, and outcomes. In order to identify the relevant literature, we performed a PubMed search for the years ranging from 1980–2013 using the following search terms: meniscus; biomechanical function; meniscectomy; meniscal repair; and clinical outcome. The meniscus helps to distribute the forces between the tibial and femoral articular cartilage layers in a load-sharing capacity. Meniscus damage or meniscectomy intuitively leads to an overloading of the cartilage and, hence, to the development of osteoarthrosis. Precise knowledge of meniscal shape and function, of the type of injury, of surgical techniques, as well as of postsurgical rehabilitative care are of decisive importance for an individually-adjusted treatment strategy. Other underlying coexisting knee pathologies also need to be considered. The diagnosis of a meniscal injury is based upon clinical history, physical examination, and imaging studies. The treatment of a meniscal lesion includes conservative, as well as operative, procedures. The goals of surgery are to reduce pain and disability, as well as to preserve meniscal function without causing additional cartilage damage. The resection of meniscal tissue should be restricted to as much as is necessary, and as little as is reasonably possible. Postoperative rehabilitation serves the purpose of improving functional deficits and pain, as well as of restoring a good range of

  14. Biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel for knee meniscus applications, including comparison with human donor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer C; Curley, Colin; Tierney, Paul; Kennedy, James E

    2016-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was the biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel, in order to assess its potential for use as an artificial meniscal implant. Aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was treated with a sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) solution to precipitate out the polyvinyl alcohol resulting in a pliable hydrogel. The freeze-thaw process, a strictly physical method of crosslinking, was employed to crosslink the hydrogel. Development of a meniscal shaped mould and sample housing unit allowed the production of meniscal shaped hydrogels for direct comparison to human meniscal tissue. Results obtained show that compressive responses were slightly higher in PVA/Na2SO4 menisci, displaying maximum compressive loads of 2472N, 2482N and 2476N for samples having undergone 1, 3 and 5 freeze-thaw cycles respectively. When compared to the human meniscal tissue tested under the same conditions, an average maximum load of 2467.5N was observed. This suggests that the PVA/Na2SO4 menisci are mechanically comparable to the human meniscus. Biocompatibility analysis of PVA/Na2SO4 hydrogels revealed no acute cytotoxicity. The work described herein has innovative potential in load bearing applications, specifically as an alternative to meniscectomy as replacement of critically damaged meniscal tissue in the knee joint where repair is not viable. PMID:26700574

  15. Evaluation of Midterm Clinical Results of All inside Suture Technique in Meniscus Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Gül

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair at an average 5-year follow-up. Methods: Thirty-two patients (29 males 3 females; 19 right knees, 13 left knees, who underwent arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair, were included in the study. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging were the main diagnostic tools. The mean age of the patients was 28 years (23-41 years. ACL reconstruction was performed in the same session in 12 patients with meniscal injury associated with ACL tear. Preoperative and postoperative functional knee scores of the patients were assessed by modified Marshall functional knee scores in their last follow-up. Results: The mean follow-up period was 58 months (range 49- 81. Marshall knee scores in the last follow-up were found to be excellent in 23 patients, good - in 8 patients, and moderate in 1 patient. ACL reconstruction was performed in the same session in 12 patients with meniscal injury associated with ACL tear. A statistically significant functional improvement was detected in patients with meniscal repair after 5 years. Conclusion: This study showed that all-inside meniscal repair technique is an easy and reliable method for the treatment of meniscus tears. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2015; 53:47-51

  16. Relevant traumatic injury of the knee joint-MRI follow-up after 7-10 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, Michel D. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)], E-mail: michelcrema@hotmail.com; Marra, Monica D. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)], E-mail: monica_dmarra@hotmail.com; Guermazi, A. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)], E-mail: ali.guermazi@bmc.org; Bohndorf, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Klinikum Augsburg, Stenglinstr. 2, 86156 Augsburg (Germany)], E-mail: klaus.bohndorf@klinikum-augsburg.de; Roemer, Frank W. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, FGH Building, 3rd floor, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Klinikum Augsburg, Stenglinstr. 2, 86156 Augsburg (Germany)], E-mail: frank.roemer@bmc.org

    2009-12-15

    Objective: To evaluate prospectively the history of relevant traumatic knee injuries at least 7 years after trauma by MRI focusing on the development of degenerative changes. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients without baseline degenerative changes had a follow-up knee MRI several years after relevant knee injury (interval baseline-follow-up was 9.1 years, S.D. {+-}1.3 years). Relevant knee injury was defined as complete cruciate or collateral ligament rupture, traumatic meniscal tear or osteochondral injury. Baseline MRI examinations were evaluated for traumatic ligamentous, chondral, meniscal and osseous lesions. Follow-up MRIs were evaluated for ligamentous and meniscal status, articular surface and incidence of degenerative changes such as cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow lesions. Results: Among the 11 patients who had a complete rupture of the ACL at baseline, 3 (27.3%) presented with cartilage loss. Among the eight patients who had suffered a post-traumatic meniscal tear at baseline, four (50%) presented with cartilage loss at follow-up. Among the five patients who had an osteochondral fracture at baseline, two (40%) presented with cartilage loss at follow-up imaging. Cartilage loss in all cases was observed adjacent to the subregions where meniscal damage and/or osteochondral incongruence was/were present at follow-up imaging. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the post-traumatic or postsurgical meniscal damage and the persistence of an irregular articular surface may have played a role in the subsequent loss of cartilage in our patient population.

  17. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation of the menisci of the knee joint using three-dimensional isotropic resolution fast spin-echo imaging: diagnostic performance in 250 patients with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of FSE-Cube, a three-dimensional isotropic resolution intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo sequence, with a routine magnetic resonance (MR) protocol at 3.0 T for detecting surgically confirmed meniscal tears of the knee joint in a large patient population. FSE-Cube was added to a routine MR protocol performed at 3.0 T on 250 patients who underwent subsequent knee arthroscopy. Three radiologists independently used FSE-Cube during one review and the routine MR protocol during a second review to detect medial and lateral meniscal tears. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears were determined for all readers combined. McNemar's tests were used to compare diagnostic performance between FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol. FSE-cube and the routine MR protocol had similar sensitivity (95.5%/95.3% respectively, P=0.94) and similar specificity (69.8%/74.0% respectively, P=0.10) for detecting 156 medial meniscal tears. FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity than the routine MR protocol (79.4%/85.0% respectively, P < 0.05) but similar specificity (83.9%/82.2% respectively, P=0.37) for detecting 89 lateral mensical tears. For lateral meniscal tears, FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the routine MR protocol for detecting 19 root tears but similar sensitivity (P=0.17-1.00) for detecting all other tear locations and types. FSE-Cube had diagnostic performance similar to a routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears except for a significantly lower sensitivity for detecting lateral meniscal tears, which was mainly attributed to decreased ability to identify lateral meniscus root tears. (orig.)

  19. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Madison (United States); Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Statistics, Madison (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Madison (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  20. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  1. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases the Levels of Catabolic Molecules and Cellular Dedifferentiation in the Meniscus of a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Shon, Oog-Jin; Park, Se-Il; Kim, Han-Jun; Kim, Sukyoung; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Do, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Despite the susceptibility to frequent intrinsic and extrinsic injuries, especially in the inner zone, the meniscus does not heal spontaneously owing to its poor vascularity. In this study, the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), containing various growth factors, on meniscal mechanisms was examined under normal and post-traumatic inflammatory conditions. Isolated primary meniscal cells of New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were incubated for 3, 10, 14 and 21 days with PRP(−), 10% PRP (PRP(+)), IL(+) or IL(+)PRP(+). The meniscal cells were collected and examined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Culture media were examined by immunoblot analyses for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) catabolic molecules. PRP containing growth factors improved the cellular viability of meniscal cells in a concentration-dependent manner at Days 1, 4 and 7. However, based on RT-PCR, meniscal cells demonstrated dedifferentiation, along with an increase in type I collagen in the PRP(+) and in IL(+)PRP(+). In PRP(+), the aggrecan expression levels were lower than in the PRP(−) until Day 21. The protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were higher in each PRP group, i.e., PRP(+) and IL(+)PRP(+), at each culture time. A reproducible 2-mm circular defect on the meniscus of NZW rabbit was used to implant fibrin glue (control) or PRP in vivo. After eight weeks, the lesions in the control and PRP groups were occupied with fibrous tissue, but not with meniscal cells. This study shows that PRP treatment of the meniscus results in an increase of catabolic molecules, especially those related to IL-1α-induced inflammation, and that PRP treatment for an in vivo meniscus injury accelerates fibrosis, instead of meniscal cartilage. PMID:26784189

  2. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Choong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hyung [Inha University Hospital, Clinical Trail Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ryuh Sup [Inha University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  3. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Hospital - Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Tielinen, Laura; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero [Helsinki University Hospital - Traumatology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-15

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  4. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  5. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint; Les collections kystiques du genou en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, N.; Cotten, A.; Dewatre, F.; Chastanet, P.; Gougeon, F. [Hopital R. Salengro, C.H.U., 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-09-01

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors). 46 refs.

  6. Mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) may be injured by various mechanisms. Each mechanism is know to produce specific combinations of ligamentous and meniscal abnormalities. This paper reports that this project was undertaken to evaluate the ability of MR imaging to characterize fully these different patterns of ACL injury. Two hundred fifty knee MR examinations in patients with suspected ACL injury were reviewed retrospectively. The presence of ACL injury and associated ligamentous, capsular, meniscal, and bone marrow abnormalities were correlated with the clinical history and mechanism of injury. Surgical or arthroscopic follow-up was available in all patients. As expected, ACL injuries were found to have a broad spectrum of associated abnormalities identified by MR imaging. Several mechanism-specific patterns of ligamentous and meniscal injury were observed; however, patterns of bone marrow edema and injury proved to be the most useful in predicting the mechanism of injury

  7. Single photon emission computed tomography scanning in the diagnosis of knee pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vellala RP

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. To evaluate the role of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT bone scan for the diagnosis of knee lesions in routine clinical practice. METHODS. 40 consecutive case records were examined in patients who underwent a SPECT scan prior to knee arthroscopy in routine clinical practice. The accuracy of clinical examination, SPECT scan results, and arthroscopic findings (as the gold standard in diagnosing knee lesions were compared. RESULTS. The sensitivity of SPECT scans in detecting medial meniscal, lateral meniscal, anterior cruciate ligament lesions, osteochondral defects, and chondromalacia patellae was 77%, 14%, 33%, 50%, and 74%, respectively. The specificities for the same structural lesions were high at 89%, 94%, 97%, 94%, and 69%, respectively. CONCLUSION. SPECT bone scan appears to be useful in the diagnosis of knee pathology in routine practice and in selecting patients for arthroscopy, especially most useful for the diagnosis of medial meniscal tears.

  8. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Roos, H P; Roos, E M;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To map by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative MRI (qMRI) concomitant fractures and meniscal injuries, and location and volume of traumatic bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the acutely anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee. To relate BML location and volume to cortical...... depression fractures, meniscal injuries and patient characteristics. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-one subjects (26% women, mean age 26 years) with an ACL rupture to a previously un-injured knee were studied using a 1.5T MR imager within 3 weeks from trauma. Meniscal injuries and fractures were classified...... by type, size and location. BML location and volume were quantified using a multi-spectral image data set analyzed by computer software, edited by an expert radiologist. RESULTS: Fractures were found in 73 (60%) knees. In 67 (92%) of these knees at least one cortical depression fracture was found...

  9. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors)

  10. Relevant traumatic injury of the knee joint-MRI follow-up after 7-10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate prospectively the history of relevant traumatic knee injuries at least 7 years after trauma by MRI focusing on the development of degenerative changes. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients without baseline degenerative changes had a follow-up knee MRI several years after relevant knee injury (interval baseline-follow-up was 9.1 years, S.D. ±1.3 years). Relevant knee injury was defined as complete cruciate or collateral ligament rupture, traumatic meniscal tear or osteochondral injury. Baseline MRI examinations were evaluated for traumatic ligamentous, chondral, meniscal and osseous lesions. Follow-up MRIs were evaluated for ligamentous and meniscal status, articular surface and incidence of degenerative changes such as cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow lesions. Results: Among the 11 patients who had a complete rupture of the ACL at baseline, 3 (27.3%) presented with cartilage loss. Among the eight patients who had suffered a post-traumatic meniscal tear at baseline, four (50%) presented with cartilage loss at follow-up. Among the five patients who had an osteochondral fracture at baseline, two (40%) presented with cartilage loss at follow-up imaging. Cartilage loss in all cases was observed adjacent to the subregions where meniscal damage and/or osteochondral incongruence was/were present at follow-up imaging. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the post-traumatic or postsurgical meniscal damage and the persistence of an irregular articular surface may have played a role in the subsequent loss of cartilage in our patient population.

  11. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  12. Change perspective to increase diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease! A new approach: the axial scan of the meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Filippou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (US is a relevant tool in the study of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP deposition disease. However, differential diagnosis of hyperechoic deposits within the fibrocartilage can be difficult; moreover, US study is limited by the need of an adequate acoustic window. We describe a US scanning technique that offers a new viewpoint in the study of knee meniscal structure: a longitudinal scan performed according to the long axis of meniscus. This technique proves to be particularly useful for the identification of CPP deposition, but could also improve the US diagnostic utility and accuracy in other meniscal pathologies.

  13. Traumatic Knee Evaluation with 0.2T MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Jelavić-Kojić, F.; Kerner, I.; Bojanić, I.; Pećina, M.; Marotti, M.; Sučić, Z.

    2002-01-01

    The possibilities of MR diagnosing knee pathology on high field scanners of 1T and 1.5T are well known. A sensitivity of 87%-100% and specificity of 64%-100% in diagnosing meniscal pathology are quoted in the literature. The aim of this work was to define the sensitivity and specificity of evaluation of meniscal lesions and cruciate ligament tears with a 0.2T permanent magnet of low field strength, as well as of other associated lesions of the bone, cartilage and collateral ligaments. We wish...

  14. Fabrication and characterization of anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds for advanced drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalani G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ghulam Jalani,* Chan Woo Jung,* Jae Sang Lee, Dong Woo Lim Department of Bionano Engineering, College of Engineering Sciences, Hanyang University, Education Research Industry Cluster at Ansan Campus, Ansan, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Stimuli-responsive, polymer-based nanostructures with anisotropic compartments are of great interest as advanced materials because they are capable of switching their shape via environmentally-triggered conformational changes, while maintaining discrete compartments. In this study, a new class of stimuli-responsive, anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds with physically and chemically distinct compartments was prepared via electrohydrodynamic cojetting with side-by-side needle geometry. These nanofibers have a thermally responsive, physically-crosslinked compartment, and a chemically-crosslinked compartment at the nanoscale. The thermally responsive compartment is composed of physically crosslinkable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide poly(NIPAM copolymers, and poly(NIPAM-co-stearyl acrylate poly(NIPAM-co-SA, while the thermally-unresponsive compartment is composed of polyethylene glycol dimethacrylates. The two distinct compartments were physically crosslinked by the hydrophobic interaction of the stearyl chains of poly(NIPAM-co-SA or chemically stabilized via ultraviolet irradiation, and were swollen in physiologically relevant buffers due to their hydrophilic polymer networks. Bicompartmental nanofibers with the physically-crosslinked network of the poly(NIPAM-co-SA compartment showed a thermally-triggered shape change due to thermally-induced aggregation of poly(NIPAM-co-SA. Furthermore, when bovine serum albumin and dexamethasone phosphate were separately loaded into each compartment, the bicompartmental nanofibers with anisotropic actuation exhibited decoupled, controlled release profiles of both drugs in response to a temperature. A new class of multicompartmental nanofibers could be

  15. Expression of collagen type I in unaltered and osteoarthritic menisci of knee joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladojević Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Knee osteoarthritis is a progressive degenerative disease which affects meniscal tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in collagen type I expression in macroscopically unaltered and osteoarthritic menisci, and correlate the expression with the grade of macroscopic damage, age and body mass index of patients, preoperative condition of anterior cruciate ligament, angulation and knee contracture. Material and Methods. The control group consisted of 10 macroscopically unaltered menisci, while the experimental group had 35 osteoarthritic menisci. Besides macroscopic grading of meniscal damage, the analysis of collagen type I expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining with the corresponding antibody using semiquantitative scale scores and quantitative parameters: intensity of expression and stained area size. Results. The results of semiquantitative evaluation showed a statistically significant decrease in collagen type I expression in osteoarthritic menisci, which correlated with an increase in macroscopic damage grade. The results of quantitative evaluation did not show a statistically significant decrease in the expression. In posterior meniscal horns, a more intense collagen type I expression was seen in the women, as well as a positive correlation of quantitatively evaluated expression with body mass index. Collagen type I expression in the anterior horns was significantly lower in varus alignment. Conclusion. In the semiquantitative evaluation, collagen type I expression in osteoarthritic menisci was significantly lower compared to macroscopically unchanged menisci. The decrease in the expression level correlates with the increase in the grade of macroscopic meniscal damage. There was no statistically significant difference in the quantitative evaluation of expression.

  16. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling w...... work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks....

  17. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  18. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... meniscal tears in the young and athletic-type population like this gentleman, you know, very active, obviously ... you would, of knee arthritis in the female population. So, Dr. Lavernia, you’re saying that there’s ...

  19. Are Applied Growth Factors Able to Mimic the Positive Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Meniscus in the Avascular Zone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Zellner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal lesions in the avascular zone are still a problem in traumatology. Tissue Engineering approaches with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs showed successful regeneration of meniscal defects in the avascular zone. However, in daily clinical practice, a single stage regenerative treatment would be preferable for meniscus injuries. In particular, clinically applicable bioactive substances or isolated growth factors like platelet-rich plasma (PRP or bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7 are in the focus of interest. In this study, the effects of PRP and BMP7 on the regeneration of avascular meniscal defects were evaluated. In vitro analysis showed that PRP secretes multiple growth factors over a period of 8 days. BMP7 enhances the collagen II deposition in an aggregate culture model of MSCs. However applied to meniscal defects PRP or BMP7 in combination with a hyaluronan collagen composite matrix failed to significantly improve meniscus healing in the avascular zone in a rabbit model after 3 months. Further information of the repair mechanism at the defect site is needed to develop special release systems or carriers for the appropriate application of growth factors to support biological augmentation of meniscus regeneration.

  20. Mechanoreceptors in the Anterior Horn of the Equine Medial Meniscus: an Immunohistochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemery, E; Gabriel, A; Grulke, S; Piret, J; Toppets, V; Antoine, N

    2016-04-01

    Lameness due to stifle and especially meniscal lesions is frequent in equine species. In humans, mechanoreceptors involved in proprioceptive function are well studied. Given the high incidence of meniscal injuries in horses, and the lack of information concerning them in equine menisci, our objective was to study these corpuscles in six healthy anterior horns of the equine medial meniscus, which is the most common localisation reported for equine meniscal injuries. Immunohistochemical stainings were performed using antibodies against high molecular weight neurofilaments and glial fibrillary acidic proteins. From a purely fundamental point of view, our work highlights for the first time the presence of Ruffini, Pacini and Golgi corpuscles in equine meniscus. They were found, isolated or in clusters and always located at the vicinity of blood vessels, at the level of the anterior horn of the equine medial meniscus. This morphological approach could serve as a basis for clinical studies, to evaluate the impact of these corpuscles on the poor sportive prognosis in equine meniscal tears. PMID:25904399

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, rotator cuff and labrum tears in the shoulder) and in imaging of the spine (because both the bones and the spinal cord can ... suspected spine injury or other complicated injuries, 3-D reconstructed CT ...

  2. Arthroscopic Assessment and Treatment of Dancers' Knee Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Daniel M.; Campbell, Pat

    1985-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of 16 dancers with dance-related knee injuries which defied conservative treatment showed 15 meniscal tears and 4 cases of chondromalacia patellae. Partial arthroscopic meniscectomy was used to treat the tears. The results were excellent, with 13 of the 16 returning to preoperative levels of dance activity. (MT)

  3. Can Structural Joint Damage Measured with MR Imaging Be Used to Predict Knee Replacement in the Following Year?

    OpenAIRE

    Roemer, Frank W.; Kwoh, C. Kent; Hannon, Michael J.; Hunter, David J.; Eckstein, Felix; Wang, Zhijie; Boudreau, Robert M.; John, Markus R.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Knees that exhibit multiple subregions with severe cartilage damage, multiple subregions with bone marrow lesions, medial meniscal damage, and presence of synovitis and effusion are at increased risk for knee replacement when compared with matched knees that do not exhibit these features.

  4. Knee Pain and the Weekend Warriors

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... say about four months before he’s back to running-type activities. That’s usually the protocol for meniscal ... inside your bathing suit on the beach and running on that bathing suit. It’s a raw surface ...

  5. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  6. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: wuh5@mcmaster.ca; Webber, C. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Fuentes, C.O. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Benson, R.; Beattie, K. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jabbari, F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Levy, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Sports Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine and Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  7. MRI profiles of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of correct diagnosis of disorders of menisci is considered to exceed 95% by arthrography and arthroscopy, but these examinations are both invasive and effective only for evaluation of changes on the surface of meniscus. Diagnosis of injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is difficult by athrography, and that of injury of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is difficult by arthroscopy. MRI is a non-invasive examination that allows the diagnosis of changes of the surface and the inside of the meniscus. This study reviewed 44 cases in which MRI findings could be confirmed by arthroscopy or at operating among 114 patients who underwent MRI to rule out the possibility of meniscus injury during the period between August 1988 and June 1991. The total number of patients who underwent MRI during this period was 6,983. The apparatus used was a 1.5-Tesla superconductive MR system, and evaluation was based mainly on the control T1-weighted image obtained by the spin-echo mode and sagittal image double-echo sequence. Characteristics of MRI were described as follows. Four cases of injury of the medial meniscus are (1) typical bucket-handle injury; (2) horizontal tear visible by arthroscopy; (3) horizontal tear difficult to observe by arthroscopy; (4) horizontal tear after partial meniscectomy under arthroscopy. Four cases of injury of the lateral meniscus are (1) multiple tear and artifact of foreign body of needle-fragment; (2) longitudinal tear; (3) multiple injury of discoid meniscus; (4) locking of discoid meniscus. MRI was considered to be advantageous over arthrography or arthroscopy in injury of medial meniscus (especially horizonal tear extending to the lower surface on the tibial side), meniscus ganglion, injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and discoid menisci of children. From the findings in these 44 cases, MRI is considered to provide important information for the diagnosis of injury of menisci. (author)

  8. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lilli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA, meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9 and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5, respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the

  9. CORRELATION OF TIBIAL MENISCUS WITH TIBIAL PLATEAU AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soniya Arunkumar Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The condyles of femur and tibia are not having the perfect congruent articular surfaces to adapt each other. To overcome this incongruity there exist tibial menisci over the tibial plateau. Loss of tibial menisci would result in devastating effect on the normal functioning of knee joint. Meniscal allograft or synthetic implants are the alternatives suggested to restore the contact pressure following the meniscectomy operations. Size of menisci required for this allograft or synthetic implant procedures following meniscectomy can be determined. Present study done emphasizes on calculation of meniscal dimension by measuring the tibial plateau dimensions, using various analytical procedures and deriving the relevant formulae. Study Design: In the present study different parameters of tibial meniscus were measured after exposure of knee joint. These measurements were done with digital Vernier calliper and a measuring scale. Results: Mean MML, MMW, MMC were 42.28±3.71mm, 31.67±3.40mm, 101.46± 6.89mm. Mean LML, LMW, LMC were 32.73±3.08mm, 33.22±3.37mm, 97.61± 7.32mm respectively. Some of the linear equations derived from the study are as follows. y = 0.71*x + 9.01mm, here y=medial meniscal length and x= length of medial tibial plateau; y = 0.48*x + 16.55mm here y=medial meniscal width and x= width of medial tibial plateau; y = 0.84*x + 5.61mm here y= Lateral meniscal width and x= lateral tibial plateau width etc. Conclusion: It can be easily judged that a graft which is too small in the size to fit the desired knee joint can be trapped beneath the condyles of femur. This might result in early damage to it due to disproportionate pressure acting on small meniscus. Whereas a large meniscus to a knee joint which is loose in fitting could also turn out to be ineffective due to disproportionate pressure distribution. Present Anthropometric study provides quantitative formulae to determine the meniscal dimensions, which may help to design

  10. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Koo

    Full Text Available The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs. Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8 in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4 in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years and 30 years (range: 14-62 years in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001, and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001. A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001. LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001. Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001. Meniscal extrusion is

  11. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the cause and characteristics of truncation artifacts producing intrameniscal signal and simulating meniscal degeneration or tear of MR images. Ten normal volunteers were imaged with 1.5- and 0.3-T MR systems, with 3-mm sections, sagittal 1,700/30 and coronal 1,700/30 sequences, 16-30-cm fields of view, 128 x 256 and 256 x 256 matrices. A Plexiglas knee phantom immersed in an oil bath, which recreated the size and shape of normal menisci and the cortical bone contours of the femur and tibia, was similarly imaged. In the Plexiglas phantom, truncation artifacts produced from the boundaries of the menisci and femoral and tibial surfaces created linear intrameniscal signal that simulated meniscal tear

  12. Clinics in diagnostic imaging. 141. Complete anterior cruciate ligament tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hollie M Y; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2012-09-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with right knee pain and swelling following a football injury. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed a complete anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and lateral meniscal tears. The torn ACL was repaired with a graft obtained from the semitendinosus muscle, and the menisci were debrided. The mechanisms of injury to the ACL are varied and may be due to direct or indirect contact with the knee as well as with twisting injuries. Knowledge of the ACL's normal anatomy, together with MR imaging technique and understanding of the appearance of the lesion on MR examination, is crucial to aid in the identification of an ACL tear. Diagnosis of an ACL tear should be based on direct MR imaging signs, although indirect signs may be helpful, particularly in chronic tears. Other associated injuries to be aware of include meniscal and other ligamentous injuries. Normal ACL graft and post-ACL graft reconstruction complications are also briefly discussed. PMID:23023908

  13. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  14. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  15. Animal models for meniscus repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deponti, Daniela; Di Giancamillo, Alessia; Scotti, Celeste; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Martin, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The meniscus plays an important role in knee function and mechanics. Meniscal lesions, however, are common phenomena and this tissue is not able to achieve spontaneous successful repair, particularly in the inner avascular zone. Several animal models have been studied and proposed for testing different reparative approaches, as well as for studying regenerative methods aiming to restore the original shape and function of this structure. This review summarizes the gross anatomy, function, ultrastructure and biochemical composition of the knee meniscus in several animal models in comparison with the human meniscus. The relevance of the models is discussed from the point of view of basic research as well as of clinical translation for meniscal repair, substitution and regeneration. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of each model for various research directions are critically discussed. PMID:23712959

  16. Accuracy of MRI patterns in evaluating anterior cruciate ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the different patterns of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears on MRI and the prevalence and accuracy of these patterns. Images were obtained on high-tesla and low-tesla units and the results compared to determine whether field strength affects the interpretation using the grading system. In 172 patients who underwent knee MRI (109 knees with high-tesla units and 63 knees with low-tesla units) and arthroscopy, there was a total of 91 arthroscopically proven ACL tears. Five patterns of ACL tears were observed and designated as type 1 (diffuse increase in signal on T2-weighted images and enlargement of the ligament, 48%); type 2 (horizontally oriented ACL, 21%); type 3 (nonvisualization of the ACL, 18%); type 4 (discontinuity of the ACL, 11%); and type 5 (vertically oriented ACL, 2%). The positive predictive value (PPV) for type 2, 4, and 5 patterns was 100% for both field strengths; for type 3 PPV was just above 80% for both field strengths. The PPV value for type 1 was 90% for the high-tesla unit and 79% for the low-tesla, unit, which was not statistically significant. Combining the results of both field strengths, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 89%, respectively. Arthroscopic results were also used to determine the association between meniscal and ACL tears. Only 13% of ACL tears were isolated, the rest being associated with meniscal tears. Forty-five percent of medial meniscal and 50% of lateral meniscal tears were associated with an ACL tear, and 94% of ACLs were torn when both menisci were torn. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of Lachman and Anterior Drawer Tests for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi Makhmalbaf; Ali Moradi; Saeid Ganji; Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2013-01-01

      Background: The knee joint is prone to injury because of its complexity and weight-bearing function. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures happen in young and physically active population and can result in instability, meniscal tears, and articular cartilage damage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of Lachman and anterior drawer test in ACL injury in compare with arthroscopy.   Methods: In a descriptive, analytical study from 2009 to 2013, 653 patients who were suspecte...

  18. Meniscotibial (coronary) ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preservation of the meniscus whenever possible is essential in maintaining knee stability and preventing premature osteoarthritis. Peripheral meniscal tears are the most amenable to surgical repair. This study evaluates the peripheral attachments of the medial meniscus and focuses on a specific tear limited to the meniscotibial ligament (coronary ligament). The diagnosis is made arthrographically when the medial meniscus floats above the tibial plateau without separating completely from the capsule. The lateral meniscus is rarely involved in this type of injury. (orig.)

  19. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    OpenAIRE

    David Simon; Randy Mascarenhas; Bryan M. Saltzman; Meaghan Rollins; Bach, Bernard R.; Peter MacDonald

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the...

  20. Compressive cyclic ratcheting and fatigue of synthetic, soft biomedical polymers in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew T; Safranski, David L; Smith, Kathryn E; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2016-02-01

    The use of soft, synthetic materials for the replacement of soft, load-bearing tissues has been largely unsuccessful due to a lack of materials with sufficient fatigue and wear properties, as well as a lack of fundamental understanding on the relationship between material structure and behavior under cyclic loads. In this study, we investigated the response of several soft, biomedical polymers to cyclic compressive stresses under aqueous conditions and utilized dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry to evaluate the role of thermo-mechanical transitions on such behavior. Studied materials include: polycarbonate urethane, polydimethylsiloxane, four acrylate copolymers with systematically varied thermo-mechanical transitions, as well as bovine meniscal tissue for comparison. Materials showed compressive moduli between 2.3 and 1900MPa, with polycarbonate urethane (27.3MPa) matching closest to meniscal tissue (37.0MPa), and also demonstrated a variety of thermo-mechanical transition behaviors. Cyclic testing resulted in distinct fatigue-life curves, with failure defined as either classic fatigue fracture or a defined increased in maximum strain due to ratcheting. Our study found that polymers with sufficient dissipation mechanisms at the testing temperature, as evidenced by tan delta values, were generally tougher than those with less dissipation and exhibited ratcheting rather than fatigue fracture much like meniscal tissue. Strain recovery tests indicated that, for some toughened polymers, the residual strain following our cyclic loading protocol could be fully recovered. The similarity in ratcheting behavior, and lack of fatigue fracture, between the meniscal tissue and toughened polymers indicates that such polymers may have potential as artificial soft tissue. PMID:26479427

  1. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN KNEE MENISCI AND LIGAMENTOUS INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of clinical diagnosis compared to MRI findings in ligamentous and meniscal injuries with respect to arthroscopic confirmation as a gold standard. METHODS 485 patients with knee injuries were prospectively assessed by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging and correlated after therapeutic arthroscopy. The overall accuracy, clinically productive values of sensitivity and specificity was derived. The actual value of the test with respect to positive predictive and negative predictive value was also derived, taking arthroscopic findings as confirmatory. The overall partial and total agreement among the clinical, MRI and arthroscopy was documented. RESULTS The overall accuracy for clinical examination was 85, 92, 100 and 100 and accuracy for MRI was 90, 97, 97 and 97 for detecting medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, ACL and PCL tears respectively. Clinically lateral meniscus tears are difficult to diagnose clinically with negative predictive value (90 whereas ACL injuries do not need MRI for diagnosis as evident by a high negative predictive value (100 of clinical examination. Total agreement with the clinical findings confirmed by arthroscopy was 64.40% which was relatively high as compared to total agreement of MRI findings which was only 31.50%. We found similar total agreement versus total disagreement of both clinical and MRI to be only 2.74% indicating very high accuracy in clinical diagnosis of meniscal and ligamentous injuries combined. CONCLUSION The clinical evaluation alone is sufficient to diagnose meniscal and ACL/PCL pathologies and MRI should be considered only as a powerful negative diagnostic tool. The arthroscopy decision should not be heavily dependent on MRI for ligamentous injuries but reverse is true for meniscal lesions. MR evaluation functions as a powerful negative diagnostic tool to rule out doubtful and complex knee injuries.

  2. Traces and burrowing behaviors of the Cicada nymph Cicadetta calliope: Neoichnology and paleoecological significance of extant soil-dwelling insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.J.; Hasiotis, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    This study documents the traces and burrowing behaviors of nymphs of the prairie cicada Cicadetta calliope (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), as observed in neoichnological experiments. Cicada nymphs were collected from the C horizons of sandy Fluvents along the Kansas River east of Lawrence, Kansas. The nymphs appeared to be fifth instars, 13-17 mm long and 6-7 mm wide. Nymphs were placed in plastic enclosures containing layers of colored, moist, very fine-grained sand. They burrowed immediately, excavating air-filled, sediment-enclosed cells between 20 mm and 40 mm long and averaging 9 mm wide. Burrowing was completed in three stages: (1) sediment in the forward portion of the cell was excavated and rolled into a ball with the forelimbs; (2) the nymph turned 180?? using a forward roll, and moved to the back of the cell; and (3) the sediment ball was pushed up against the back wall of the cell and kneaded with the forelimbs into a thin layer. Resulting burrow traces are sinuous and distinctly meniscate and demonstrate that insect larvae construct meniscate, backfilled burrows in well-drained terrestrial settings. Cicadetta calliope nymphs and their traces are excellent analogs for meniscate trace fossils commonly found in late Paleozoic-Cenozoic alluvial deposits and paleosols. Such meniscate trace fossils are useful for interpreting the paleoenvironment and paleohydrogeology of the units in which they are found. In addition, such backfilled burrows can be used to supplement the fossil record of cicada-like hemipterans, currently known only from the latest Permian to the Early Triassic. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of a short-duration 3 Tesla magnetic resonance protocol for diagnosing stifle joint lesions in dogs with non-traumatic cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Galindo-Zamora, Vladimir; Dziallas, Peter; Ludwig, Davina C; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the preferred diagnostic tool to evaluate internal disorders of many joints in humans; however, the usefulness of MR imaging in the context of osteoarthritis, and joint disease in general, has yet to be characterized in veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of short-duration 3 Tesla MR imaging for the evaluation of cranial and caudal cruciate ligament, meniscal and cartilage damage, as well as the d...

  4. Der Effekt von Wachstumsfaktoren auf die Proliferation von humanen Fibrochondrozyten aus unterschiedlichen avaskulären Regionen des Meniskus

    OpenAIRE

    Martinek, Stefanie

    2005-01-01

    In der vorliegenden experimentellen Arbeit wurde der Effekt von drei verschiedenen Wachstumsfaktoren, Transforming growth factor a (TGFa), Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) und Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), auf die Proliferation zweier verschiedener Populationen menschlicher Meniskuszellen gemessen. Unter Verwendung von 16 Menisci aus 4 weißen Neuseeland Kaninchen wurde zunächst das Verhalten von Menisci in einer Gewebekultur untersucht. Die steril entnommenen Kaninchen-Menisc...

  5. Lesiones del ligamento cruzado anterior. Nuevas opciones de tratamiento mediante ingenier??a de tejidos

    OpenAIRE

    Bol??var Arroyo, V??ctor; Raya Villarraso, Ana; Garrido-G??mez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Las lesiones del ligamento cruzado anterior (LCA) constituyen una causa frecuente de lesiones en poblaci??n joven. Al tratarse de una estructura intraarticular, el ligamento cruzado lesionado no cicatriza de forma similar al de otros ligamentos extraarticulares, de forma que entre los cabos de ruptura no se interpone el co??gulo de fibrina que aparece en las fases iniciales de la cicatrizaci??n. La ruptura del LCA conlleva la aparici??n de inestabilidad de rodilla, da??o meniscal ...

  6. Femoral condyle insufficiency fractures: associated clinical and morphological findings and impact on outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the characteristics of femoral condyle insufficiency fracture (FCIF) lesions and their relative associations with the risk of clinical progression. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Seventy-three patients (age range, 19-95) were included after excluding patients with post-traumatic fractures, bone marrow infarct, osteochondritis dissecans, or underlying tumor. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists classified morphologic findings including lesion diameter, associated bone marrow edema pattern, and associated cartilage/meniscus damage. Electronic medical charts were evaluated for symptoms, risk factors, and longitudinal outcomes, including total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Imaging characteristics were correlated with clinical findings, and comparison of outcome groups was performed using a regression model adjusted for age. The majority of patients with FCIF were women (64.4 %, 47/73), on average 10 years older than men (66.28 ± 15.86 years vs. 56.54 ± 10.39 years, p = 0.005). The most common location for FCIF was the central weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle; overlying full thickness cartilage loss (75.7 %, 53/70) and ipsilateral meniscal injury (94.1 %, 64/68) were frequently associated. Clinical outcomes were variable, with 23.9 % (11/46) requiring TKA. Cartilage WORMS score, adjacent cartilage loss, and contralateral meniscal injury, in addition to decreased knee range of motion at presentation, were significantly associated with progression to TKA (p < 0.05). FCIF are frequently associated with overlying cartilage loss and ipsilateral meniscal injury. The extent of cartilage loss and meniscal damage, in addition to loss of knee range of motion at the time of presentation, are significantly associated with clinical progression. (orig.)

  7. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPICALLY ASSISTED ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING PATELLAR BTB GRAFT: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 45 CASES

    OpenAIRE

    Suresh,; Yatish; Sridhara Murthy; Ravish; Somashekar; Vinod

    2014-01-01

    : In today’s world high velocity road traffic accidents, sports activities and increased fitness awareness, ACL injuries is a common clinical problem. Once upon a time ACL rupture led to a relatively safe existence and was thought to be of less significance. Now with improved knee kinematics and clinical skills, it has been established that post ACL injury, the prevalence of clinically significant meniscal damage increases with time and is associated with increasing disability...

  8. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    OpenAIRE

    David Logerstedt; Amelia Arundale; Andrew Lynch; Lynn Snyder-Mackler

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTInjuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and ...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in osteoarthritis of the knee: correlation with radiographic and scintigraphic findings.

    OpenAIRE

    McAlindon, T E; Watt, I; McCrae, F; Goddard, P.; Dieppe, P A

    1991-01-01

    Twelve knees with a range of severity of knee osteoarthritis were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and technetium-99m labelled hydroxymethylene diphosphonate scintigraphy. Five magnetic resonance pulse sequences were evaluated. Proton density (TR = 1000, TE = 26 ms) and STIR (TR = 1500, TI = 100, TE = 30 ms) were chosen for further use. Abnormalities shown by MRI included joint effusions, meniscal disruption, hyaline cartilage thinning, subchondral signal changes, pseudocysts, and...

  10. Ganglion cyst of the Hoffa's fat pad of the knee joint

    OpenAIRE

    Bagul, Rahul R; Savaskar, Vivek; MALHOTRA, ROHIT; Patel, Sachin

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of ganglion cyst of Hoffa's fat pad of knee joint. These lesions are asymptomatic in most cases and are often misdiagnosed as meniscal or ligamentous lesions of the knee joint. The final diagnosis was done with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee joint, and the lesion was treated with surgery. It was not possible to resect the lesion through arthroscope, so open resection and complete excision of the cyst was done.

  11. An Intra-tendonous ganglion cyst causing impingement between the anterior cruciate ligament and anterior root of the medial meniscus: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Guolong, Mei; Zhi, Gao; Yong, Hu

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several reports of symptomatic ganglion cysts near the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and lateral and medial meniscus, but symptomatic ganglia arising from the anterior horn of the medial meniscus to the ACL have not been reported. Here we report the arthroscopic resection of a ganglion cyst arising from the anterior horn of the medial meniscus with a meniscal tear to the ACL. Case presentation A 43-year-old female presented with a 10...

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on biochemical and physical properties of human menisci (preliminary data)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The menisci, composed mostly of water (-70%) and collagen (-20%, predominantly type I), are integral structural components of human knee, aiding in shock absorption, joint stability, lubrication, and nutrition. Total or partial meniscectomies are associated with altered load bearing across the knee, frequently resulting in degenerative osteoarthritis. Therefore meniscal replacement has been advocated in case of extensive meniscus damage or after its removal. Among different natural and artificial materials, the use of meniscal allografts is the most promising method. However, the application of non-sterilised menisci is connected with the risk of infection disease transmission. The aim of the initial part of our study was to assess the effect of ionising radiation on biochemical properties of human menisci preserved with various methods and then irradiated with a dose 35 kGy. Twenty eight menisci from cadaveric donors were procured using standard operating procedures and then divided into the following groups: 1) fresh menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 2) fresh menisci irradiated at room temperature (RT); 3) lyophilised menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 4) lyophilised menisci irradiated at RT. Samples from each experimental group were irradiated with a dose of 35 kGy with 10 MeV electron accelerator. Non-irradiated menisci served as controls. Meniscal allografts were pulverised in the liquid nitrogen mill and quantitatively extracted to measure neutral soluble collagen (NSC) and acid soluble collagen (ASC) by colorimetric assay of hydroxyproline, released under extraction from tissue samples. The amount of released hydroxyproline reflects the level of collagen degradation caused by ionising radiation. As in our previous studies concerning other connective tissue allografts (bones, tendons), collagen fragmentation in menisci was also affected by preservation and sterilisation conditions. The choice of proper conditions allows one to diminish the

  13. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Traditional plain film arthrography can achieve reasonable accuracy and is an accepted method of investigation of patients with knee pain and possible meniscal tear. Multi-detector CT can potentially provide a more detailed and accurate examination due to its high-resolution crosssectional and multi-planar capabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of our technique. All patients who underwent a multi-detector CT knee arthrogram in an initial 8 month period were identified. Initially the referring clinician was contacted. If the patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon the outcome of orthopaedic review was recorded using clinical, arthroscopic and / or MRI follow-up of the patient population. One hundred and twelve patients had a Multi-detector CT knee arthrogram performed within and 8 month period. Follow-up information was received in 69.7% of patients. Of these 68.9% had orthopaedic assessment - of which 69.2% underwent a knee arthroscopy.There was total agreement of findings in 67%, agreement of meniscal findings in 67% and chondral findings in 100%. Overall, orthopaedic opinion agreed with CT findings in 76.9%. At this stage, all meniscal tears not described in the initial CT arthrogram report have in retrospect been visible. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography is an accurate and elegant technique for investigation of knee pain, providing information in a format familiar to those reporting knee MRI. There is an initial learning curve. The technique is particularly useful in chondral assessment. It is accurate for meniscal pathology, although caution and recognition of potential pitfalls is required. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J.; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal o...

  15. Femoral condyle insufficiency fractures: associated clinical and morphological findings and impact on outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plett, Sara K.; Hackney, Lauren A.; Heilmeier, Ursula; Nardo, Lorenzo; Zhang, Chiyuan A.; Link, Thomas M. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yu, Aihong [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-15

    To determine the characteristics of femoral condyle insufficiency fracture (FCIF) lesions and their relative associations with the risk of clinical progression. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Seventy-three patients (age range, 19-95) were included after excluding patients with post-traumatic fractures, bone marrow infarct, osteochondritis dissecans, or underlying tumor. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists classified morphologic findings including lesion diameter, associated bone marrow edema pattern, and associated cartilage/meniscus damage. Electronic medical charts were evaluated for symptoms, risk factors, and longitudinal outcomes, including total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Imaging characteristics were correlated with clinical findings, and comparison of outcome groups was performed using a regression model adjusted for age. The majority of patients with FCIF were women (64.4 %, 47/73), on average 10 years older than men (66.28 ± 15.86 years vs. 56.54 ± 10.39 years, p = 0.005). The most common location for FCIF was the central weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle; overlying full thickness cartilage loss (75.7 %, 53/70) and ipsilateral meniscal injury (94.1 %, 64/68) were frequently associated. Clinical outcomes were variable, with 23.9 % (11/46) requiring TKA. Cartilage WORMS score, adjacent cartilage loss, and contralateral meniscal injury, in addition to decreased knee range of motion at presentation, were significantly associated with progression to TKA (p < 0.05). FCIF are frequently associated with overlying cartilage loss and ipsilateral meniscal injury. The extent of cartilage loss and meniscal damage, in addition to loss of knee range of motion at the time of presentation, are significantly associated with clinical progression. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of posterior horn tears of the lateral meniscus using a thin axial plane: the zip sign - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ''zip'' sign is a newly described form of meniscal tear progressing from the distal insertion of menisco-femoral ligaments (MFLs) through the lateral meniscal wall; the tear occurs during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the zip sign on knee MRI within the context of ACL injuries. From a series of 261 MR examinations for acute knee injury, we selected 97 patients with both MR and arthroscopic data for a retrospective blinded review. The zip sign was defined on axial thin MR sections as a straight line from the distal insertion of MFLs in association with five sagittal images lateral to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) where the MFLs were identified. Sensitivity and specificity in detecting lateral meniscal tears before and after having defined the zip sign were calculated. Sensitivity in detecting the tears of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus (PHLM) reached 87.5% (CI 0.68-0.97) after zip sign criteria were defined. The zip sign has excellent inter-observer agreement, K > 0.90. The zip sign indicates a lesion at the insertion site of MFLs into the PHLM on thin axial images associated with sagittal MR sections that may improve MR sensitivity in detecting PHLM tears. (orig.)

  17. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ARTHROSCOPICALLY ASSISTED ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION USING PATELLAR BTB GRAFT: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 45 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : In today’s world high velocity road traffic accidents, sports activities and increased fitness awareness, ACL injuries is a common clinical problem. Once upon a time ACL rupture led to a relatively safe existence and was thought to be of less significance. Now with improved knee kinematics and clinical skills, it has been established that post ACL injury, the prevalence of clinically significant meniscal damage increases with time and is associated with increasing disability and arthrosis. Ligament reconstruction has not been shown to prevent arthrosis, but studies show that it appears to reduce the risk of subsequent meniscal injury and improve anteroposterior knee motion and facilitates return to high level sporting activities. As surgical techniques like Arthroscopy improve the ability to tackle complex problems, complex decisions regarding Meniscal repair and transplantation, Cartilage repair and regeneration are now commonplace, as are decisions regarding the need for Osteotomies in Arthritically unstable knees. Arthroscopic reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament with patellar bone - tendon - bone graft is minimally invasive and is relatively quick and simple to perform, although attention to detail as required for good results. Thus arthroscopy helps in diagnosis and treatment of internal derangement and on extra articular reconstruction.

  18. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Avcu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker’s cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient.

  19. Knee joint examinations by magnetic resonance imaging: The correlation of pathology, age, and sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Avcu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of our study was to investigate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies and the distribution of knee joint pathologies according to age and sex. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed using the clinical data of patients evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee joint. Data from 308 patients examined between August 2002 and July 2003 were included into this study. A Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the pathological findings and the age and sex of the patients. Results: The ages of the patients ranged between 1 and 74 years (mean: 43.3 years. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tears, medial collateral ligament degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. There was a significant correlation between male gender and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well as medial collateral ligament injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with medial collateral ligament injury, lateral collateral ligament injury, Baker′s cyst, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Chondromalacia patellae was significantly correlated with anterior cruciate ligament injury, patellae alta, and osteochondral lesion. Bursitis (in 53.2% of the patients followed by grade-II meniscal degeneration (in 43% of the patients were the most common knee pathologies observed by MRI. Conclusions: MRI findings of select knee pathologies are significantly correlated with each other and the age and sex of the patient.

  20. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of posterior horn tears of the lateral meniscus using a thin axial plane: the zip sign - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoye, P.Y.; Ravey, J.N.; Dubois, C.; Barbier, L.P.; Ferretti, G. [CHU Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et d' Imagerie Medicale, B.P 217, Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Courvoisier, A.; Saragaglia, D. [CHU Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Grenoble (France)

    2011-01-15

    The ''zip'' sign is a newly described form of meniscal tear progressing from the distal insertion of menisco-femoral ligaments (MFLs) through the lateral meniscal wall; the tear occurs during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the zip sign on knee MRI within the context of ACL injuries. From a series of 261 MR examinations for acute knee injury, we selected 97 patients with both MR and arthroscopic data for a retrospective blinded review. The zip sign was defined on axial thin MR sections as a straight line from the distal insertion of MFLs in association with five sagittal images lateral to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) where the MFLs were identified. Sensitivity and specificity in detecting lateral meniscal tears before and after having defined the zip sign were calculated. Sensitivity in detecting the tears of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus (PHLM) reached 87.5% (CI 0.68-0.97) after zip sign criteria were defined. The zip sign has excellent inter-observer agreement, K > 0.90. The zip sign indicates a lesion at the insertion site of MFLs into the PHLM on thin axial images associated with sagittal MR sections that may improve MR sensitivity in detecting PHLM tears. (orig.)

  1. Vacuum phenomenon: prevalence and appearance in the knee with 3 T magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the prevalence of vacuum phenomenon (VP) in the knee on magnetic resonance (MR) images, describe the imaging features that characterize VP, and assess how often VP mimics pathological knee lesions. Consecutive knee MR studies performed on a 3 T MR system over a 9-month period were retrospectively reviewed by one radiologist who then selected studies with findings potentially indicating VP. Three experienced musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed these cases in consensus to confirm the presence of VP and to assess the shape, size, and signal of VP; the presence of magnetic susceptibility artifacts; and the ability of MR sequences to show VP. A total of 914 consecutive exams from 875 patients (524 men; mean age, 35 years) were reviewed. Vacuum phenomenon was found in 12 patients (prevalence 1.3%). In six (50%) patients, VP mimicked a meniscal tear, with four cases simulating a torn medial discoid meniscus. The VP signal was not easily differentiated from meniscal signal on most sequences in most cases (9/12). Gradient-recalled echo (GRE) localizer images proved most definitive, with 3D SPACE images the next most effective. Fast spin echo (FSE) images were only occasionally able to differentiate VP from meniscus. Rarely recognized on MR, VP can mimic meniscal pathology, potentially leading to inappropriate surgery. Because differentiation of VP from the meniscus is challenging on FSE at 3 T, radiologists should become familiar with the appearance of VP and review GRE localizer or 3D images carefully to avoid misinterpretation. (orig.)

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Iopamidol 370 in infants and children during ivp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetic parameters of Iopamidol 370 (a non-ionic water organic iodine compound) during ivp in infants and children. All children examined in the study had symptomatic recurrent urinary tract infections; they were divided into three groups according to age (0-24 months; 25-72 months; 73-120 months). The contrast medium was injected in a dose of 1 ml/kg + 6 ml. Blood and urine samples were taken at regular time intervals over a 24-hour period in children, whereas in infants only blood samples were collected. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using a bi-compartmental open model, as follows: t1/2α(h)=0.33; t1/2β(h)=1.92; Vc (l/kg)=0.40; Vβ(l/kg)=0.20; Cl(l/kg)=0.16. These values were not significantly different, as far as the patients were concerned, from those reported in literature for adults

  3. Evaluation of biexponential relaxation processes by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the complexity of biologic tissues, a monoexponential behaviour is usually assumed when estimating relaxation processes in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study was designed to evaluate the potential of biexponential decomposition of T1 and T2 relaxation curves obtained at 1.5 tesla (T). Measurements were performed on a phantom of bicompartmental perspex boxes with combinations of different CuSO4 concentrations. T1 determination was based on a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery pulse sequence. T2 determination was provided by a multiple spin echo sequence with 32 echoes. Applying biexponential curve analysis, a significant deviation from a monoexponential behaviour was recognized at a ratio of corresponding relaxation rates of about 3 and 2, estimating T1 and T2 relaxation, respectively (p < 0.01, F-test). Requiring and SD ≤ 10% for each set of parameters, the biexponential model was accepted when this ratio exceeded a factor of 5 and 8, respectively. Referring to 'expected' T1 and T2 values, however, an accuracy within 20% only was observed at ratios of at least 6 and 15. It is concluded that quantitative estimation of individual and specific relaxation components in complex biologic tissues by MRI may prove very difficult. (orig.)

  4. An inhibitor of neuronal exocytosis (DD04107) displays long-lasting in vivo activity against chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsati, Berta; Carreño, Cristina; Curto-Reyes, Verdad; Valenzuela, Belen; Duart, María José; Van den Nest, Wim; Cauli, Omar; Beltran, Beatriz; Fernandez, Jimena; Borsini, Franco; Caprioli, Antonio; Di Serio, Stefano; Veretchy, Mario; Baamonde, Ana; Menendez, Luis; Barros, Francisco; de la Pena, Pilar; Borges, Ricardo; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    Small peptides patterned after the N terminus of the synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a member of the protein complex implicated in Ca(2+)-dependent neuronal exocytosis, inhibit in vitro the release of neuromodulators involved in pain signaling, suggesting an in vivo analgesic activity. Here, we report that compound DD04107 (palmitoyl-EEMQRR-NH(2)), a 6-mer palmitoylated peptide that blocks the inflammatory recruitment of ion channels to the plasma membrane of nociceptors and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from primary sensory neurons, displays potent and long-lasting in vivo antihyperalgesia and antiallodynia in chronic models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, such as the complete Freund's adjuvant, osteosarcoma, chemotherapy, and diabetic neuropathic models. Subcutaneous administration of the peptide produced a dose-dependent antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic activity that lasted ≥24 h. The compound showed a systemic distribution, characterized by a bicompartmental pharmacokinetic profile. Safety pharmacology studies indicated that the peptide is largely devoid of side effects and substantiated that the in vivo activity is not caused by locomotor impairment. Therefore, DD04107 is a potent and long-lasting antinociceptive compound that displays a safe pharmacological profile. These findings support the notion that neuronal exocytosis of receptors and neuronal algogens pivotally contribute to chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain and imply a central role of peptidergic nociceptor sensitization to the pathogenesis of pain. PMID:22393248

  5. Clonal selection drives genetic divergence of metastatic medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaochong; Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian; Dupuy, Adam J; Shih, David J H; Witt, Hendrik; Croul, Sidney; Bouffet, Eric; Fults, Daniel W; Eberhart, Charles G; Garzia, Livia; Van Meter, Timothy; Zagzag, David; Jabado, Nada; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Scheetz, Todd E; Pfister, Stefan M; Korshunov, Andrey; Li, Xiao-Nan; Scherer, Stephen W; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Akagi, Keiko; MacDonald, Tobey J; Koster, Jan; McCabe, Martin G; Sarver, Aaron L; Collins, V Peter; Weiss, William A; Largaespada, David A; Collier, Lara S; Taylor, Michael D

    2012-02-23

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, arises in the cerebellum and disseminates through the cerebrospinal fluid in the leptomeningeal space to coat the brain and spinal cord. Dissemination, a marker of poor prognosis, is found in up to 40% of children at diagnosis and in most children at the time of recurrence. Affected children therefore are treated with radiation to the entire developing brain and spinal cord, followed by high-dose chemotherapy, with the ensuing deleterious effects on the developing nervous system. The mechanisms of dissemination through the cerebrospinal fluid are poorly studied, and medulloblastoma metastases have been assumed to be biologically similar to the primary tumour. Here we show that in both mouse and human medulloblastoma, the metastases from an individual are extremely similar to each other but are divergent from the matched primary tumour. Clonal genetic events in the metastases can be demonstrated in a restricted subclone of the primary tumour, suggesting that only rare cells within the primary tumour have the ability to metastasize. Failure to account for the bicompartmental nature of metastatic medulloblastoma could be a major barrier to the development of effective targeted therapies. PMID:22343890

  6. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF DIAGNOSTIC METHODS IN KNEE INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzoleva-Tolevska Roza

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:This study is analyzing the role and significance of the three diagnostic methods (clinical diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy, in establishing accurate diagnosis in knee injuries. The goal is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of each diagnostic method, using arthroscopy as gold standard. Material and Methods: We examined 70 patients with knee injuries. Clinical diagnosis was established using patient’s history and positive clinical tests for meniscal lesions, ACL injury and articular cartilage lesions. All patients underwent MRI on a 1.5 T magnet for MRI diagnosis. This was followed by arthroscopy for making the final diagnosis. Results: We analyzed the results of clinical tests for meniscal, ligamentous and articular cartilage injuries of the patients in both groups. Validity of the clinical tests was compared to the results got from MRI and arthroscopy. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis versus MRI diagnosis for medial(69.6% vs. 68.5% and lateral (84% vs. 82.6%meniscal lesions was almost identical. Accuracy of clinical diagnosis compared with the accuracy of MRI diagnosis for ACL injuries was higher (91.3% vs. 81.4%. Accuracy (85.5% vs. 72.8% of clinical diagnosis versus MRI diagnosis for articular cartilage lesions was better. Conclusion: Affirmation of clinical diagnosis in this study is a result of usage of standard clinical signs and tests which are fundamental in establishing clinical diagnosis of knee injuries. MRI is a diagnostic method which enriches the diagnostic process. Arthroscopy is defined as superior diagnostic method, also a gold standard for comparison of the other two diagnostic methods.

  8. The MRI study of usefulness for the injury of cruciate ligaments and menisci in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From March 1988 through February 1989, 80 knees from 76 consecutive patients have been examined by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI scans were available for review in 47 knees (43 patients) which were concurrently examined by arthroscopy. Sagittal appearances of the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) were morphologically classified into (I) disappearance (signal disappearance of the normal ACL); (II) tear on the side of the femur; (III) midsubstance tear (tear in the central part); (IV) incomplete tear (swelling associated with some tonicity); (V) tear on the side of the tibia; and (VI) others (unclassified). Using arthroscopy as the standard, an overall diagnostic accuracy of this classification was 70%. Depending upon the time of MRI scanning, it varied from 80% within 2 weeks after injury to 65% after 2 weeks. When swelling associated with some tonicity was seen on sagittal views, the presence or absence of tear in the ACL and the posterior cruciate ligaments was easy to diagnose (diagnostic accuracy of 98% for ACL and 100% for PCL). Meniscal tears of the knee were graded on a scale of 0-4: 0= homogeneously low signal intensities; 1= irregular signal intensities within the menisci without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 2= linear shadow without communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 3= linear or spherical shadow with communicating or contact to the marginal joint; 4= disappearance of signals in the menisci. The menisci scored as scales 3 or more was judged as having tear. A diagnostic accuracy for meniscal tears was 88%. MRI may prove to be useful for screening the presence or absence of meniscal tears. (N.K.)

  9. When should the external approach be resorted to in the arthroscopic treatment of perimeniscal cyst?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombaci Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meniscal cysts very often cause meniscal tears and especially when it is peripheral, some of the healthy parts of meniscus might be needlessly sacrificed. In particular conditions, extraarticular approaches might save some menisci. In the present study, we evaluated the conditions which required using the extraarticular approach in addition to the arthroscopic procedure, to maximally preserve the meniscus. Methods: Eight patients with perimeniscal cysts were evaluated retrospectively. One cyst was localized within the medial meniscus and seven in the lateral meniscus. The mean age was 36.13 (range; 19–63 years, mean follow-up time, 27.3 (range; 12–47 months. Patients were evaluated by using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS to measure pain relief and “Lysholm score” to measure functional improvement. In all patients except one, in which the cystic cavity was connected with the joint at the periphery of the meniscus, the cyst was drained from the intraarticular opening. When the cyst was too large (three cases and in one case where a large amount of meniscus was preserved for reasons mentioned above, additional extraarticular drainage was carried out. Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS were 6 (range; 2–8 and 1.55 (range; 0–3 (p = 0.00058 and Lysholm scores were 64.75 (range; 48–86 and 93.11 (range; 80–100 (p = 0.0014, respectively. Discussion: In cysts, which have very limited or no connection with the joint on the most peripheral region of the meniscus and/or are larger than the meniscus height, extraarticular drainage of the cyst might produce unnecessary meniscal loss and function. In the extraarticular drainage, scrapping the walls of the cyst, while inspecting with an arthroscope, reduces recurrence of the cyst.

  10. Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 ± 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 ± 0.57 mm. The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification. (orig.)

  11. Popliteal cysts in children: prevalence, appearance and associated findings at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, M.; Debaere, C.; Desprechins, B.; Osteaux, M. (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Jette (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology)

    1999-08-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of Baker's cysts on MR images in a paediatric orthopaedic population, to investigate the association of Baker's cyst with joint fluid and joint disorders in children, and to compare the MR appearance of Baker's cysts in children with that previously reported in adults. Materials and methods. Reports from 393 MR studies of the knee performed in children aged from 1 to 17 years were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of a Baker's cyst, joint effusion, meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament tear, or any other joint disorder. Results. A Baker's cyst was identified in 6.3 % (25/393) of patients. The MR images and clinical charts of patients with a Baker's cyst were reviewed. None of the 25 patients with a Baker's cyst had an associated anterior cruciate ligament tear or meniscal tear. Two patients had osteochondritis dissecans and two others had synovial disease (infection and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis). Joint fluid was demonstrated in 16 % (4/25) of patients with a Baker's cyst. There was no statistically significant association between presence of a Baker's cyst and presence of joint fluid. Conclusions. Baker's cyst is less prevalent in a paediatric orthopaedic population than in an adult population. In children, it seems that Baker's cyst is seldom associated with joint fluid, meniscal tear, or anterior cruciate ligament tear. On MR images, a communication between the Baker's cyst and the joint was not demonstrated in any of the patients. In addition, the presence of debris and cyst leakage was not observed. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 11 refs.

  12. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Laura M. [Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, John Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States); Parellada, J.Antoni; Parker, Laurence; Schweitzer, Mark E. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Gibbon Building Suite 3390, 111 South 11th St., 19107-5098, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  13. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  14. Unique Anatomic Feature of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament in Knees Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Yoshikawa, Masahiro; Nakamae, Atsuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ikuta, Yasunari; Hayashi, Seiju; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the knee is a disorder in juveniles and young adults; however, its etiology still remains unclear. For OCD at the medial femoral condyle (MFC), it is sometimes observed that the lesion has a connection with fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). Although this could be important information related to the etiology of MFC OCD, there is no report examining an association between the MFC OCD and the PCL anatomy. Purpose: To investigate the anatomic features of knees associated with MFC OCD, focusing especially on the femoral attachment of the PCL, and to compare them with knees associated with lateral femoral condyle (LFC) OCD and non-OCD lesions. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients (46 knees) with OCD lesions who had undergone surgical treatment. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, the PCL attachment at the lateral wall of the MFC was measured on the coronal sections, and the knee flexion angle was also measured on the sagittal sections. As with non-OCD knees, we reviewed and analyzed 25 knees with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and 16 knees with meniscal injuries. Results: MRIs revealed that the femoral PCL footprint was located in a significantly more distal position in the patients with MFC OCD compared with patients with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. There was no significant difference in knee flexion angle among the 4 groups. Conclusion: The PCL in patients with MFC OCD attached more distally at the lateral aspect of the MFC compared with knees with LFC OCD and ACL and meniscal injuries. PMID:27294170

  15. 田径训练中膝关节半月板损伤原因及预防%Reason and Protective Methods of Meniscus Injury during Track and Field Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道明

    2015-01-01

    Knee-joint is a significant hub of the human body in activity, which plays an important role in athletic training. The knee-joint is more likely to be damaged especially in the high strength of athletic training. Meniscus cartilage plays a key role in maintaining the normal function of the knee-joint, its functions include the loading, shock absorption, keeping stability of the knee-joint, lubricating joints and generating the proprioception, etc. Meniscal injury is very common in all kinds of knee-joint injury because of the complexity of the meniscus’ structure and function, especially for the track and field athlete. It has a far-reaching significance for learning of the microanatomic basis, functional character and injury reason of the meniscal, and taking positively and effectively preventive measures to keep athlete’s meniscal health and competitive level.%在田径训练中,膝关节起着重要的作用。半月板软骨对于维持正常的膝关节功能非常重要,其功能有承受负荷、震荡吸收、维持膝关节稳定性、润滑关节和产生本体感觉等,由于其自身结构和执行功能的复杂性,使半月板损伤在膝关节损伤中十分多见,尤以田径运动员为多发。了解半月板的解剖基础和功能性质及其损伤原因,采取积极有效的预防措施,对于维持田径运动员半月板健康及其竞技水平具有重要意义。

  16. Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosy, Jonathan D.; Mandalia, Vipul I.; Anaspure, Rahul [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 ± 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 ± 0.57 mm. The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification. (orig.)

  17. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients. PMID:11572120

  18. Magnetic resonance analysis of loaded meniscus deformation: a novel technique comparing participants with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish a novel method of quantifying meniscal deformation using loaded MRI. More specifically, the goals were to evaluate the (1) accuracy, (2) inter-rater reliability, (3) intra-rater reliability, and (4) scan-rescan reliability. The secondary purpose of this experiment was to evaluate group differences in meniscal deformation in participants with and without radiographic knee OA. Weight-bearing 3-T MRIs of the knee in full extension and 30 of flexion were processed to create 3D models of meniscal deformation. Accuracy was assessed using a custom-designed phantom. Twenty-one participants either with or without signs of OA were evaluated, and another six participants (14 knees, one subject was scanned twice) underwent repeated imaging to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), root-mean squared error (RMSE), and root-mean-square percent coefficient-of-variation (RMS%CV) analyses were performed. Exploratory comparisons were made between those with and without OA to evaluate potential group differences. All variables were found to be accurate with RMSE ranging from 0.08 to 0.35 mm and 5.99 to 14.63 mm2. Reproducibility of peak anterior-posterior meniscal deformation was excellent (ICC > 0.821; p < 0.013) with RMS%CV for intra-rater ranging from 0.06 to 1.53 % and 0.17 to 1.97 %, inter-rater ranging from 0.10 to 7.20 % and 3.95 to 18.53 %, and scan-rescan reliability ranging from 1.531 to 7.890 % and 4.894 to 9.142 %, for distance and area metric, respectively. Participants with OA were found to have significantly greater anterior horn movement of both the medial (p = 0.039) and lateral meniscus (p = 0.015), and smaller flexed medial meniscus outer area (p = 0.048) when compared to controls. MRI-based variables of meniscus deformation were found to be valid in participants with and without OA. Significant differences were found between those with and without radiographic OA; further study is warranted. (orig.)

  19. MRI in clinically questionable posttraumatic knee joint lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MRI examination was performed on 31 patients with clinically questionable posttraumatic knee joint lesions. A broad range of intra- and extraarticular pathological changes was found. The correlation of MRI with arthroscopy and surgery showed a correct MRI diagnosis in 78% of the meniscal lesions (n=18) and in 89% of the anterior cruciate ligament ruptures (n=9). An analysis of false positive and false negative MRI diagnoses was made. MRI offers the opportunity for noninvasive complex assessment of knee joint structures and is of particular value in the diagnosis of posttraumatic knee joint lesions. (orig.)

  20. Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Structure, Injuries and Regenerative Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahi Shirazi, Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Khademhosseini, Ali; Dehghani, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most vulnerable ligaments of the knee. ACL impairment results in episodic instability, chondral and meniscal injury and early osteoarthritis. The poor self-healing capacity of ACL makes surgical treatment inevitable. Current ACL reconstructions include a substitution of torn ACL via biological grafts such as autograft, allograft. This review provides an insight of ACL structure, orientation and properties followed by comparing the performance of various constructs that have been used for ACL replacement. New approaches, undertaken to induce ACL regeneration and fabricate biomimetic scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26545750

  1. Magnetic resonance analysis of loaded meniscus deformation: a novel technique comparing participants with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Toran D. [California State University, Department of Physical Therapy, Sacramento, CA (United States); Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Wu, Samuel; Kumar, Deepak; Wyatt, Cory; Souza, Richard B. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    To establish a novel method of quantifying meniscal deformation using loaded MRI. More specifically, the goals were to evaluate the (1) accuracy, (2) inter-rater reliability, (3) intra-rater reliability, and (4) scan-rescan reliability. The secondary purpose of this experiment was to evaluate group differences in meniscal deformation in participants with and without radiographic knee OA. Weight-bearing 3-T MRIs of the knee in full extension and 30 of flexion were processed to create 3D models of meniscal deformation. Accuracy was assessed using a custom-designed phantom. Twenty-one participants either with or without signs of OA were evaluated, and another six participants (14 knees, one subject was scanned twice) underwent repeated imaging to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), root-mean squared error (RMSE), and root-mean-square percent coefficient-of-variation (RMS%CV) analyses were performed. Exploratory comparisons were made between those with and without OA to evaluate potential group differences. All variables were found to be accurate with RMSE ranging from 0.08 to 0.35 mm and 5.99 to 14.63 mm{sup 2}. Reproducibility of peak anterior-posterior meniscal deformation was excellent (ICC > 0.821; p < 0.013) with RMS%CV for intra-rater ranging from 0.06 to 1.53 % and 0.17 to 1.97 %, inter-rater ranging from 0.10 to 7.20 % and 3.95 to 18.53 %, and scan-rescan reliability ranging from 1.531 to 7.890 % and 4.894 to 9.142 %, for distance and area metric, respectively. Participants with OA were found to have significantly greater anterior horn movement of both the medial (p = 0.039) and lateral meniscus (p = 0.015), and smaller flexed medial meniscus outer area (p = 0.048) when compared to controls. MRI-based variables of meniscus deformation were found to be valid in participants with and without OA. Significant differences were found between those with and without radiographic OA; further study is warranted. (orig.)

  2. ROLE OF MRI IN EVALUATION OF TRAUMATIC KNEE INJURIE S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : MRI is an accurate, noninvasive imaging modality for evaluation of knee injuries, and determines the patient management, saving them f rom unnecessary arthroscopy. Our study focuses on the fundamental biomechanical forces und erlying the most common injuries and correlate MRI findings with specific traumatic mecha nisms. We conducted a retrospective study on 138 patients having prior history of knee trauma. The studies evaluated cruciate ligament tears, collateral ligament injuries, chondromalacia patella, bone marrow contusions, joint effusions, tendon tear, meniscal tear and osteoarth ritis.

  3. Isokinetic assessment of the flexor-extensor balance of the knee in athletes with total rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament Avaliação isocinética do equilíbrio flexo-extensor do joelho nos atletas com ruptura total do ligamento cruzado anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Sérgio A. P. Terreri; Marco A. Ambrósio; André Pedrinelli; Roberto F.M. Albuquerque; Felix Andrusaitis; Júlia Maria D. Greve; João G. Carazzato; Marco Martins Amatuzzi

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the flexor-extensor group of muscles of the knee in young athletes diagnosed with a total rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Eighteen knees of 18 athletes (14 men and 4 women) with an average age of 21.6 years (range 16-32 years) were assessed with a Cybex 6000 model isokinetic apparatus. The average interval between occurrence of the injury and assessment was 10.2 months (range 2 - 48 months). There was an associated meniscal injury in ei...

  4. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gans, Itai; Ganley, Theodore J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bedoya, Maria A.; Ho-Fung, Victor [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre

  5. Artrografía de la rodilla con doble contraste: Valor diagnóstico en las lesiones de los meniscos

    OpenAIRE

    RAÚL FERNÁNDEZ VITORTES; ÁLVARO FERNÁNDEZ VIERA; ANTULIO PIÑEIRO VÁZQUEZ; TERESA CUADRADO CISNERO; NORMA HERNÁNDEZ DARIAS

    1997-01-01

    Se realiza un estudio en 100 pacientes, atendidos por el Departamento de Radiología del Hospital "Celia Sánchez Manduley" de Manzanillo, con sintomatología clínica sugestiva de lesión meniscal, a los cuales se les practica la artrografía de la rodilla con doble contraste en el período comprendido entre enero de 1987 y diciembre de 1993; se impresionaron primero radiografías simples de rodilla con vistas anteroposterior, lateral y axial; después la artrocentesis para la inyección de contrastes...

  6. MRI of injuries of the medial collateral ligaments of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequency and characteristics of lesions of the medial collateral ligaments (MCL) were studied by MRI in 155 patients with trauma to the knee. There were abnormalities of the MCL in 38% of cases with ligamentous injuries and in 27% these were combined with meniscal tears. 11% of these patients showed isolated rupture of MCL and as a result of the MRI findings were treated conservatively. By means of T2*-weighted images the individual lesions could be accurately localised. Characteristical findings have been defined. (orig.)

  7. The effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on bone curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, D J; Lohmander, Stefan; Makovey, J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the 5-year longitudinal changes in bone curvature after acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and identify predictors of such changes. METHODS: In the KANON-trial (ISRCTN 84752559), 111/121 young active adults with an acute ACL tear to a previously un-injured knee...... MR images. Curvature (mm(-1)) was determined for femur, tibia, medial/lateral femur, trochlea, medial/lateral tibia. Age, sex, treatment, BMI, meniscal injury, osteochondral fracture on baseline MR images were tested for association. RESULTS: Over 5 years, curvature decreased in each region (P < 0...

  8. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre

  9. MRI of ganglion cysts in uncommon sites or with atypical appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganglion cysts are common lesions which are most often found around the hands and feet. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is seldom performed; cysts are identified incidentally on MR images obtained for the purpose of evaluating other disorders. Clinically complicated ganglions are often confused with other more serious tumors, and MR examination is thus requested. Ganglions arising from uncommon sites or showing unusual MR findings can lead to wrong diagnosis. Thus, a thorough knowledge of potential sites and of the MR findings of unusual ganglion cysts, including complicated ganglions, cruciate ligament ganglion cysts, meniscal cysts, labral cysts, ganglions in shoulder notches and tarsal tunnels, and intermuscular ganglion cysts

  10. MRI of ganglion cysts in uncommon sites or with atypical appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Uk; Kook, Shin Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Youn, Eun Kyung; Park, Jun Yong [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglion cysts are common lesions which are most often found around the hands and feet. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is seldom performed; cysts are identified incidentally on MR images obtained for the purpose of evaluating other disorders. Clinically complicated ganglions are often confused with other more serious tumors, and MR examination is thus requested. Ganglions arising from uncommon sites or showing unusual MR findings can lead to wrong diagnosis. Thus, a thorough knowledge of potential sites and of the MR findings of unusual ganglion cysts, including complicated ganglions, cruciate ligament ganglion cysts, meniscal cysts, labral cysts, ganglions in shoulder notches and tarsal tunnels, and intermuscular ganglion cysts.

  11. Significant Weight Loss May Delay or Eliminate the Need for Total Knee Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey H. DeClaire; Savich, Tatjana T.; B. S. Adrienne LeGasse Montgomery; Olayinka K. Warritay

    2014-01-01

    A 48-year-old morbidly obese woman with a left medial meniscal tear and moderately severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) reported for 14-month follow-up visit from arthroscopic surgery. She reported a resolution of pain, swelling and an improved range of motion (ROM). The patient was first evaluated 14 months ago, and at that time was considered a strong candidate for total knee replacement due to her limited (ROM), knee pain, swelling and functional impairment. At a 3 month visit prior to ...

  12. MRI of radial displacement of the meniscus in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus of the knees in the study population with MR imaging, and to establish MRI diagnostic criteria for radial displacement of the meniscus and displacement index. Methods: MR signs of radial displacement of the meniscus were evaluated retrospectively in 398 patients with knee symptoms who were examined with non- weight bearing MR images from Jan. 2000 to Feb. 2004. The patients younger than 18 years old, with joint effusion or serious arthropathy were excluded and 312 patients were eligible to be enrolled in this study. The criterion for radial displacement of the meniscus was defined as the location of the edge of meniscal body beyond the femoral and tibial outer border line. A displacement index, defined as the ratio of meniscal overhang to meniscal width, was used to quantify meniscal displacement. Results: The prevalence of radial displacement of the meniscus was 16.7% (52/312) and 13.9% (21/151) in right knee and 19.3% (31/161 )in left knee, respectively. There was no significant difference between left and right knee (χ2=1.60, P>0.05) and the ratio between medial and lateral meniscus was 7.8:1. The average displacement index was 0.54±0.24. The displacement indices were significant higher in older group (F=3.63, P<0.05). The incidence and indices of radial displacement of the meniscus for patients under or above 50 year older were 12.0%(17/142), 0.46±0.22 and 20.6% (35/170), 0.64±0.20, respectively. Difference was highly significant (t=0.84, P<0.01). Conclusion: It was concluded that radial displacement of the meniscus in knees was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with knee symptoms. The incidence increased in older age group. Further investigations were recommended to understand the etiology and clinical significance of the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus. (authors)

  13. [Ultrasonographic examination of the stifle joint in the dog. Part 1: ultrasonographic anatomy, standardized scanning protocol and common indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayseh, K; Kramer, M; Ondreka, N

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a cost-effective, non-invasive technique, which can be performed in conscious dogs. It frequently contributes valuable and even crucial diagnostic information in cases with hind limb lameness originating from the stifle joint. The first part of the article introduces the technical requirements and limitations as well as the standardized scanning protocol and ultrasonographic anatomy of the stifle joint. Ultrasonographic features encountered in common pathologies of the stifle joint (joint effusion, cranial cruciate ligament rupture and meniscal pathologies) are presented. Sonographic diagnostics of other pathologies of the canine stifle joint will be described in the second part of this article. PMID:25812809

  14. Use of a whole-slide imaging system to assess the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joint sections of arthritic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, J.; Liang, Q; Wang, Y.; Mooney, RA; Boyce, BF; Xing, L. (Lei)

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence and alteration of lymphatic vessels in joints of arthritic mice using a whole-slide imaging system. Joints and long bone sections were cut from paraffin blocks of two mouse models of arthritis: meniscal-ligamentous injury (MLI)-induced osteoarthritis (OA) and TNF transgene (TNF-Tg)-induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MLI-OA mice were fed a high fat diet to accelerate OA development. TNF-Tg mice were treated with lymphatic growth factor VEGF-C virus to stimulate lym...

  15. Imaging of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruch-Bilfeld, M; Lapegue, F; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has now an indisputable role for the diagnosis of meniscus and ligament injuries of the knee. Some technical advances have improved the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging so that diagnoses, which may change the therapeutic approach, such as a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament or confirmation of unstable meniscal injuries, are now made easier. This article describes the essential about magnetic resonance imaging technique and pathological results for the menisci, collateral ligaments and damage to the central pivot of the cruciate knee ligaments. PMID:27452631

  16. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions 2. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10-6) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10-4 vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10-4 mm2/s, p = 1.3 . 10-20). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  17. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federau, C.; Becce, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (CHUV) and University of Lausanne, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sumer, S.; Wintermark, M. [University of Virginia, Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiology, Charlottesville, VA (United States); O' Brien, K. [University of Geneva, Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions <0.5 cm in minimal diameter and hemodynamic instability. IVIM imaging was performed at 3 T, using a standard spin-echo Stejskal-Tanner pulsed gradients diffusion-weighted sequence, using 16 b values from 0 to 900 s/mm{sup 2}. Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10{sup -6}) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10{sup -4} vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10{sup -4} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 1.3 . 10{sup -20}). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  18. Estimation of glomerular filtration rate by sinistrin clearance using various approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buclin, T; Sechaud, R; Bertschi, A P; Decosterd, L A; Belaz, N; Appenzeller, M; Burnier, M; Biollaz, J

    1998-03-01

    Two protocols for the determination of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) from sinistrin clearance are considered: a bolus injection and a bolus followed by infusion. On both occasions, serial blood and urine samplings are scheduled up to 6 h. Four calculation methods are compared for estimating GFR from the data obtained during each protocol: classical UV/P (ratio of urinary excretion rate over plasma concentration) after bolus or bolus plus infusion; 2-point (log-linear slope multiplied by apparent volume of distribution); D/AUC (ratio of dose over area under the curve) after bolus; and Rin/P (ratio of infusion rate over steady-state concentration) during infusion. Some refinements of the calculations are devised. Data are simulated by running a bicompartmental pharmacokinetic model with renal elimination, and contaminating the values with an array of random errors. The statistical performance of the respective calculation methods is assessed by graphical means. The UV/P method performs poorly during 2 hours following the bolus; on both bolus and infusion data, it suffers from imprecision on the urinary volume. The 2-point method is acceptable between 1 and 4 h after bolus; later, the estimates become much less precise. The D/AUC method appears highly reliable when integrating the concentrations up to 3 h after bolus; it requires extrapolation towards infinity. The Rin/P method is satisfactory if applied later than 3 to 4 h after the loading dose. The advantages and drawbacks of each methods must be evaluated in relation with the particular clinical setting in which GFR is to be estimated. D/AUC represents the most advisable approach for snapshot renal testing in subjects or patients without important renal impairment. PMID:9574452

  19. Mechanical Integrity of a Decellularized and Laser Drilled Medial Meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Emily H; Matuska, Andrea M; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2016-03-01

    Since the meniscus has limited capacity to self-repair, creating a long-lasting meniscus replacement may help reduce the incidence of osteoarthritis (OA) after meniscus damage. As a first step toward this goal, this study evaluated the mechanical integrity of a decellularized, laser drilled (LD) meniscus as a potential scaffold for meniscal engineering. To evaluate the decellularization process, 24 porcine menisci were processed such that one half remained native tissue, while the other half was decellularized in sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). To evaluate the laser drilling process, 24 additional menisci were decellularized, with one half remaining intact while the other half was LD. Decellularization did not affect the tensile properties, but had significant effects on the cyclic compressive hysteresis and unconfined compressive stress relaxation. Laser drilling decreased the Young's modulus and instantaneous stress during unconfined stress relaxation and the circumferential ultimate strength during tensile testing. However, the losses in mechanical integrity in the LD menisci were generally smaller than the variance observed between samples, and thus, the material properties for the LD tissue remained within a physiological range. In the future, optimization of laser drilling patterns may improve these material properties. Moreover, reseeding the construct with cells may further improve the mechanical properties prior to implantation. As such, this work serves as a proof of concept for generating decellularized, LD menisci scaffolds for the purposes of meniscal engineering. PMID:26720513

  20. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  1. MR findings of knee injuries in skiing: relation with the mechanism of injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the MR findings of knee injuries in skiing and to explain the mechanism of injury with MR findings. We reviewed MR findings of 18 patients with history of knee injuries in skiing. The MR images were evaluated retrospectively to identify the ligament injuries, bone lesions and meniscal injuries. Ligament injuries were seen in 16 patients, bone contusions in 16 patients, meniscal lesions in two patients. The most common group of injury was anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries with bone contusion on posterior lip of the lateral tibial plateau (LTP). The second common group of injury was isolated ACL injury with bone contusions on the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and posterior lip of the LTP. We considered that the mechanism of injury of the former group may be correlated with the valgus torque with secondary anterior displacement of the tibia and the latter group may be correlated with the pivot shift phenomenon. MR may play an important role in the diagnosis of knee injuries in skiing and its findings may explain the mechanism of injury

  2. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: fuldemyildirim@yahoo.com; Basaran, Ceyla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylab@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: emkayahanulu@yahoo.com; Uyusur, Arzu [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuuyusur@yahoo.com; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: caglat@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Muhtesem Agildere, A. [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: amuhtesem@superonline.com

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  3. MR imaging of tibial plateau fractures : evaluation of fracture types and associated soft tissue injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing fracture types and soft tissue injuries associated with tibial plateau fractures. MRI was performed in 38 patients with tibial plateau fractures, each of which was classified according to the Schatzker system. We evaluated MR images and assessed the prevalence of each fracture type and accompanying soft tissue injuries. We also assessed whether ligamentous injury correlated with the extent of articular depression, splitting, and comminution. In 24 patients, diagnosis was based on MRI and operative or arthroscopic findings, and in 14 patients, on MRI alone. The totals of fracture types I, II, III, IV, V and VI were 4(11%), 15(39%), 6(16%), 4(11%), 4(11%), and 5 cases (13%), respectively. In 30 cases (79%), there were associated ligamentous or meniscal injuries. Medial collateral ligaments and lateral menisci were injured in 17(45%) and 14 cases (37%), respectively. Type II and IV fracture patterns were associated with soft tissue injuries in 14 of 15 cases (93%) and 4 of 4 cases (100%), respectively. As the extent of articular depression increased and the extent of bony comminution decreased, there was an increased prevalence of accompanying ligamentous injuries. In tibial plateau fractures, MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality for the evaluation of both fracture type and accompanying ligamentous or meniscal injuries

  4. The Relationship between Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury and Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears are a common injury, particularly in the athletic and youth populations. The known association between ACL injury and subsequent osteoarthritis (OA of the knee merits a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the ACL-injured knee and osteoarthritis. ACL injury, especially with concomitant meniscal or other ligamentous pathology, predisposes the knee to an increased risk of osteoarthritis. ACL insufficiency results in deterioration of the normal physiologic knee bending culminating in increased anterior tibial translation and increased internal tibial rotation. This leads to increased mean contact stresses in the posterior medial and lateral compartments under anterior and rotational loading. However, surgical reconstruction of the ACL has not been shown to reduce the risk of future OA development back to baseline and has variability based on operative factors of graft choice, timing of surgery, presence of meniscal and chondral abnormalities, and surgical technique. Known strategies to prevent OA development are applicable to patients with ACL deficiency or after ACL reconstruction and include weight management, avoidance of excessive musculoskeletal loading, and strength training. Reconstruction of the ACL does not necessarily prevent osteoarthritis in many of these patients and may depend on several external variables.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The appearances of knee injuries on MR imaging are less well documented in children than adults. Some patterns of injury are shared by both groups of patients, e. g. meniscal damage. The frequency of specific injuries may differ, e. g. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Congenital abnormality, coexistent pathology and previous treatment of the knee appear to be associated with meniscal problems. Discoid menisci are seen most frequently in children and have unique features on MR scans. Cruciate ligament tears are difficult to diagnose in the smallest children. The ACL may not be identified due to its small size. Normal bone marrow signal may be confused with marrow infiltration or bone microfracture. Radiographically occult fractures around the knee appear to be strongly associated with ligamentous injury as in adult patients. Osteochondral fractures, osteochondral lesions and articular cartilage damage are revealed on MR scans, but their long-term effects are uncertain. It is possible to diagnose a range of knee injuries on MR scans in children. The biggest diagnostic challenge is in pre-school children. (orig.). With 9 figs., 1 tab

  6. O'Donoghue's triad: magnetic resonance imaging evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to search for magnetic resonance imaging evidence of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in knees with proven tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial meniscus; the three abnormalities that make up O'Donoghue's triad. Although the MCL injury can be unapparent clinically, knee joint stability may be compromised. The superficial portion of the MCL was evaluated on 19 MR studies of 16 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL and medial meniscal tears. MCL thicknesses were compared to those on MR images of 19 normal knees. The injured knees were of 13 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 19 to 56 years; the normal knees were of 10 men and 9 women, ranging in age from 19 to 55 years. The medial collateral ligaments of all injured knees were abnormal, and, as a group, they had greater thicknesses and more intraligamentous thickness variability than normal knees. The MR appearance of both ACL and medial meniscal tears served as indirect evidence of MCL injury, with irregular MCL thickening indicative of prior injury. (orig.)

  7. Risk Factors for Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Brent A; Cain, E Lyle; Pflugner, Ryan; Fleisig, Glenn S; Young, Bradley L; Boohaker, Hikel A; Swain, Thomas A; Andrews, James R; Dugas, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for revision surgery following primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods A retrospective analysis of 2,965 patients who underwent a primary ACL reconstruction were separated into two groups: those who returned to our center for revision of their reconstruction (n = 67) and those who did not return to our center for revision of their reconstruction (n = 2,898). Patient characteristics assessed at the time of primary reconstruction include age, gender, graft type, graft source, meniscal and/or chondral injury, sport, side of effected extremity, level of competition, and surgeon. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify significant, independent associations with the need for revision. Results The portion of patients who returned for revision reconstruction after primary ACL reconstruction was 2.3% (67/2,965). Age (p sport type (p = 0.007), and level of participation (p sport type or level of competition, age (p = 0.014) and surgeon (p = 0.041) were independently associated with revision. Gender, extremity (R vs. L), meniscal or chondral injury, and graft characteristics were not associated with revision. Conclusion Revision of primary ACL reconstructions is independently associated with age and choice of surgeon at the time of primary reconstruction. PMID:26238768

  8. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:27274735

  9. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential of the inner avascular zone. Following a series of studies and clinical trials, tissue engineering is considered a promising prospect for meniscus repair and regeneration. As one of the key factors in tissue engineering, cells are believed to be highly beneficial in generating bionic meniscus structures to replace injured ones in patients. Therefore, cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering play a fundamental role in meniscal regeneration. According to current studies, the main cell-based strategies for meniscus tissue engineering are single cell type strategies; cell coculture strategies also were applied to meniscus tissue engineering. Likewise, on the one side, the zonal recapitulation strategies based on mimicking meniscal differing cells and internal architectures have received wide attentions. On the other side, cell self-assembling strategies without any scaffolds may be a better way to build a bionic meniscus. In this review, we primarily discuss cell seeds for meniscus tissue engineering and their application strategies. We also discuss recent advances and achievements in meniscus repair experiments that further improve our understanding of meniscus tissue engineering.

  10. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  11. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Sung Suk; Eun, Choong Kie [Inje Univ., College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee.

  12. Non-traumatic Thickening of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyun Jun; Park, Jin Gyoon; Song, Sang Gook [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of non-traumatic thickening of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and to evaluate the associated lesions. Between January 2003 and August 2005, 44 knees of 44 patients who had thickened ACLs on MR images and had no history of knee trauma were analyzed retrospectively. The normal thickness of the ACL was measured on axial T2-weighted images of 40 healthy adult knees. The MR imaging findings of the thickened ACLs and associated lesions were analyzed. In 40 cases of healthy knees, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 3-6 mm. In 44 cases of non-traumatic thickening of the ACL, the thickness of the proximal ACL was 8-14 mm. There was an increased signal intensity and ill-defined border in all cases of thickened ACLs, linear low-signal intensity fibers parallel to the long axis of the thickened ACL (celery stalk appearance) in 24 cases, and entrapment in 10 cases. With respect to associated lesions, there was osteoarthritis in 40 cases, meniscal tears in 42 cases, and degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament in 7 cases. Non-traumatic thickening of the ACL was associated with osteoarthritis and meniscal tears in almost all cases and showed increased signal intensity and ill-defined borders simulating acute ligamentous tears

  13. MR findings of knee injuries in skiing: relation with the mechanism of injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Jung, Seung Mun; Shin, Myung Jin [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of knee injuries in skiing and to explain the mechanism of injury with MR findings. We reviewed MR findings of 18 patients with history of knee injuries in skiing. The MR images were evaluated retrospectively to identify the ligament injuries, bone lesions and meniscal injuries. Ligament injuries were seen in 16 patients, bone contusions in 16 patients, meniscal lesions in two patients. The most common group of injury was anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries with bone contusion on posterior lip of the lateral tibial plateau (LTP). The second common group of injury was isolated ACL injury with bone contusions on the lateral femoral condyle (LFC) and posterior lip of the LTP. We considered that the mechanism of injury of the former group may be correlated with the valgus torque with secondary anterior displacement of the tibia and the latter group may be correlated with the pivot shift phenomenon. MR may play an important role in the diagnosis of knee injuries in skiing and its findings may explain the mechanism of injury.

  14. MR imaging before arthroscopy in knee joint disorders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the current literature examining the relative merits of arthroscopy and MR imaging of the knee. Material and Methods: All papers comparing MR imaging with arthroscopy published within the last 10 years according to Medline were collected and read. Results: Technology has improved considerably during recent years allowing detailed non-invasive visualization of the knee. In particular, the development of cheaper whole-body and dedicated low-field MR units has opened up for non-invasive inspection of the knee at reasonable cost. Meniscal tears can be detected with accuracy rates of around 90% and rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament with accuracy rates of around 93% compared to arthroscopy. However, arthroscopy is not the ideal gold standard, since it has weak points, e.g. peripheral meniscal tears or osteochondritis without apparent damage to the cartilage. Conclusion: Based on the overwhelming literature it seems safe to conclude that MR examinations of the knee should be performed before arthroscopy is undertaken. (orig.)

  15. MRI in diagnostic of soft tissue damages by fractures of lateral tibial plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The knee is one of the most often injured joint. Fractures of tibial condyles are the most common articular damages. Koton and Berg call them „bumper“ fractures the tibia plateau is vulnerable to both high- and low-energy injury mechanisms due to its vulnerable position in the lower extremity. It must bear significant weight and sustain significant impact and deceleration forces with little skeletal constraint, and has scant surrounding soft tissue and a tethered medial and lateral integument. Furthermore, the tibial plateau has relatively forgiving ligamentous attachments that must allow for a large range of motion in a single plane. Not surprisingly, given the diversity of injury, management of these fractures has come to include a wide variety of treatment strategies. traditionally, ligament injury associated with plateau fractures has been diagnosed indirectly with stress radiographs and physical examination. With increasing use of more sensitive MRI and arthroscopy, associated ligament and meniscus injuries have been found in significant percentages of plateau fractures. these soft tissue injuries consist primarily of MCL lesions, meniscal injuries, and ACL disruptions. However, studies addressing associated soft tissue injuries all agree that neither the type of plateau fracture nor the presence or absence of ligament injury correlates with the incidence of meniscal tears

  16. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  17. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  18. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  19. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  20. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  1. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  2. Knee arthroscopies: who gets them, what does the radiologist report, and what does the surgeon find?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkvist, Dan; Dahlberg, Leif E; Neuman, Paul; Englund, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Several randomized controlled trials have not shown any added benefit of arthroscopy over placebo surgery or physiotherapy in middle-aged patients with knee symptoms without trauma. We studied the characteristics of the knee arthroscopies performed in southern Sweden. Patients and methods From the orthopedic surgical records from 2007–2009 in the Skåne region of Sweden (with a population of 1.2 million), we retrieved ICD-10 diagnostic codes and selected all 4,096 arthroscopies that were diagnosed peroperatively with code M23.2 (derangement of meniscus due to old tear or injury) or code M17 (knee osteoarthritis). We extracted information on cartilage and meniscus status at arthroscopy, and we also randomly sampled 502 of these patients from the regional archive of radiology and analyzed the preoperative prevalence of radiographic or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined osteoarthritis. Results 2,165 (53%) of the 4,096 arthroscopies had the diagnostic code M23.2 or M17. In this subgroup, 1,375 cases (64%) had typical findings consistent with degenerative meniscal tear (i.e. that correspond to a degenerative meniscal tear in at least a third of all arthroscopies). Of the randomly sampled patients, the preoperative prevalence of radiological knee osteoarthritis was 46%. Interpretation There is a discrepancy between evidence-based medicine treatment guidelines and clinical practice regarding the amount of knee arthroscopies performed in patients with symptoms of degenerative knee disease. PMID:26012547

  3. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  4. MRI FINDINGS OF INTERNAL DERANGEMENT OF KNEE IN TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Ningappa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To evaluate ligament and meniscal injuries and secondary signs , using MRI . 2. To analyse the types and grades of the tears. MATERIALS AND METHODS : MR imaging studies of knee was performed in 200 patients, presenting to the department of radiodiagnosis, BMCRI from September - 2013 to September - 2014 with history of trauma and clinical suspicion of internal der angement of knee. Various sequences in coronal, sagittal and axial planes were obtained. RESULTS : Out of 200 patients evaluated , medial meniscus tear was the most common internal derangement. 94 patients showed medial meniscus tear and associated anterior cruciate ligament tear was found in 76 patients. Medial collateral ligament sprain was seen in 18 patients, lateral meniscus injury was seen in 26 patients, lateral collateral ligament injury was seen in 8 patients, posterior cruciate ligament injury was s een in 16 patients, 20 patients showed cartilage defect and 18 percent showed no internal derangement. Associated secondary signs such as bone contusions were seen in 60 individuals and minimal to moderate joint effusion was seen in 74 individuals. CONCLUS ION : MRI is an accurate, non - invasive modality in detecting ligament and meniscal injury of knee. It shows great capability in classifying them into types and grades. Special sequences are useful and should be included in the protocol.

  5. A prospective study on time to recovery in 254 injured novice runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Oestergaard Nielsen

    Full Text Available Describe the diagnoses and the time to recovery of running-related injuries in novice runners.Prospective cohort study on injured runners.This paper is a secondary data analysis of a 933-person cohort study (DANO-RUN aimed at characterizing risk factors for injury in novice runners. Among those sustaining running-related injuries, the types of injuries and time to recovery is described in the present paper. All injured runners were diagnosed after a thorough clinical examination and then followed prospectively during their recovery. If they recovered completely from injury, time to recovery of each injury was registered.A total of 254 runners were injured. The proportion of runners diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome was 15%, 10% for patellofemoral pain, 9% for medial meniscal injury, 7% for Achilles tendinopathy and 5% for plantar fasciitis. Among the 220 runners (87% recovering from their injury, the median time to recovery was 71 days (minimum  = 9 days, maximum  = 617 days.Medial tibial stress syndrome was the most common injury followed by patellofemoral pain, medial meniscal injury and Achilles tendinopathy. Half of the injured runners were unable to run 2×500 meters without pain after 10 weeks. Almost 5% of the injured runners received surgical treatment.

  6. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  7. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee

  8. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  9. The valuable use of Microsoft Kinect™ sensor 3D kinematic in the rehabilitation process in basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidot, Ariel; Favaretto, Guillermo; Frisoli, Melisa; Gemignani, Diego; Gumpel, Gustavo; Massuh, Roberto; Rayan, Josefina; Turin, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Subjects who practice sports either as professionals or amateurs, have a high incidence of knee injuries. There are a few publications that show studies from a kinematic point of view of lateral-structure-knee injuries, including meniscal (meniscal tears or chondral injury), without anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The use of standard motion capture systems for measuring outdoors sport is hard to implement due to many operative reasons. Recently released, the Microsoft Kinect™ is a sensor that was developed to track movements for gaming purposes and has seen an increased use in clinical applications. The fact that this device is a simple and portable tool allows the acquisition of data of sport common movements in the field. The development and testing of a set of protocols for 3D kinematic measurement using the Microsoft Kinect™ system is presented in this paper. The 3D kinematic evaluation algorithms were developed from information available and with the use of Microsoft’s Software Development Kit 1.8 (SDK). Along with this, an algorithm for calculating the lower limb joints angles was implemented. Thirty healthy adult volunteers were measured, using five different recording protocols for sport characteristic gestures which involve high knee injury risk in athletes.

  10. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. PMID:27484043

  11. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  12. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O'Keefe, Regis J

    2016-03-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26363286

  13. Cysts of the semilunar cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the studies listed in the bibliography, this dissertation reports on the pathology, clinical symptoms and radiology of cysts of the semilunar cartilage. The author analyses 118 cases of his own, with special regard to the results of pneumo-arthrographic investigations carried through according to a special technique by Schaefer. In the course of this work, measurements of the meniscal base are for the first time used as radiological criteria indicating the presence of a cyst of the semilunar cartilage. Furthermore the well-known radiological signs of cysts, such as bone defects according to Albert and Keller, light central spot in the meniscal body, as well as Rauber's sign and horizontal rupture, are investigated as to the frequency of their incidence. For that purpose all the X-ray pictures were subjected to a further dose scrutiny. A list of all the 118 cases with their clinical and radiological data is found in the annex, together with the results of the operations and patho-anatomical investigations. (orig.)

  14. Microstructural characterization of CPPD and hydroxyapatite crystal depositions on human menisci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsamenis, Orestis L. [Bioengineering Research Group, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Karoutsos, Vagelis [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Kontostanos, Konstantinos; Panagiotopoulos, Elias C. [Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Rio, Patras (Greece); Papadaki, Helen [Department of Anatomy-Histology-Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Rio, Patras (Greece); Bouropoulos, Nikolaos [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes - FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2012-11-15

    Meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue composed mainly of water and a dense elaborate collagen network with a predominantly circumferential alignment. Crystal formation and accumulation on meniscal tissue is frequently observed especially in elderly. In this study, we used X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and FT-Raman for the structural identification of the depositions and Optical microscopy, Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) and Atomic Force microscopy (AFM), in order to investigate the structural relationship between the crystal deposits and the collagen fibers of human meniscal tissues. We are reporting on the formation of intercalary ''colonies'' of Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate (CPPD) crystals with two distinct morphologies corresponding to the monoclinic and the triclinic phase, as well as the formation of micro-aggregations composed of nano-crystalline HAP aggregations which are developed along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers without extensively disturbing the collagens arrangement. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. 磁共振成像对膝关节运动性损伤诊断价值的评估%Assessment of MRI value in diagnosis of knee joint sports injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林家秋; 林中尧; 李坚; 潘玲

    2015-01-01

    目的 通过膝关节损伤的磁共振成像(MRI)表现和膝关节镜结果的比较,得出MRI定性诊断膝关节损伤的敏感性和准确性,评价MRI在膝关节损伤诊断中的价值. 方法 选取我院2014年1月至12月完整的112例膝关节损伤的手术记录和本院MRI检查结果,并将两者作对比.结果 以膝关节镜为金标准,112例中,韧带损伤伴断裂或撕裂62例,MRI检查的符合率为90.3%;内外侧半月板复杂性损伤86个(包括纵形、水平撕裂, 桶柄状损伤),MR检查为3度损伤有88个, 符合率92.8%; 盘状半月板31例;MRI检查的符合率为90.3%.结论 MRI是对韧带,半月板损伤的无创性检查,其敏感性、特异性、准确性都较高,提示韧带轻度损伤以及半月板的Ⅰ-Ⅱ级损伤,须慎行膝关节检查.%Objective On the basis of comparing MRI performance of knee injuries and knee arthroscopy re-sults ,it was found that MRI have high sensitivity and accuracy for the diagnosis of knee injury , and also can evalu-ate the value of the knee injury diagnosis. Methods Retrospectively analyze complete surgical recording and MRI findings of 112 cases with knee injury from January 2014 to December 2014 ,then compare the diagnosis. Results Knee arthroscopy was regarded as a gold standard,of 112 cases, there were 62 cases of ligament injury with fracture or tear, with the coincidence of 90.3% by MRI,86 cases of medial and lateral meniscus complex injury (including lon-gitudinal, horizontal tear and bucket handle-like injury), 3 cases of Level 3 injury by MR, with the coincidence of 92.8%; 31 cases of discoid meniscus with the coincidence of 90.3% by MRI. Conclusion MRI is a noninvasive ex-amination for ligament and meniscus injury with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, which suggests that a mild ligament injury andⅠ-Ⅱgrade meniscus damage should underwent knee examination with cautious.

  16. Bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee joint MRI : relationship between its location and associated injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Baek Hyun; Jung, Hoe Seok; Na, Eui Sung; Seol, Hye Young; Cha, In Ho; Lim, Hong Chul [Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the location of bone signal abnormality and associated injury, as seen on MR, in patients with acute knee joint injury. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with acute knee injury and bone signal abnormalities on MR were included in this study. The femur and tibia were each divided into six compartments, namely the anteromedial, medial, posteromedial,anterolateral, lateral, and posterolateral ; these were obtained in each knee joint. We evaluated the location of bone signal abnormality and the corresponding arthroscopic or operative findings of injury to ligaments and menisci. Cases with signal abnormalities involving more than three compartments were excluded. Results : Bone signal abnormalities were demonstrated in 51 compartments. Most(84%, 43/51) were noted in the lateral half of the knee joint, the most common location being the tibio- posterolateral compartment(13/51). The femoro-lateral(11/51) and tibio- anterolateral compartment(8/51) were the next most common locations. All cases(13/13)with bone signal abnormality in the tibio- posterolateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament,while 9 of 11 cases(81%) with abnormality in the femoro- lateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the tibio- anterolateral compartment had tears at the posterior cruciate ligament ; 31 of 43 cases (72%) with abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint had tears at the medial collateral ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the medial half of the knee joint had tears at the medial meniscus, but no lateral meniscal tear was found. Among patients with signal abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint, the tear was lateral meniscal in nine of 43 cases(21%) and medial meniscal in six of 43(14%). Conclusion : The location of bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee MR, inpatients with

  17. Identification of Suitable Reference Genes for Investigating Gene Expression in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury by Using Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Ferreira Leal

    Full Text Available The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is one of the most frequently injured structures during high-impact sporting activities. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding ACL tears and healing failure. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR has emerged as an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluated the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1, and TBP by using ACL samples of 39 individuals with ACL tears (20 with isolated ACL tears and 19 with ACL tear and combined meniscal injury and of 13 controls. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper DataAssist, and RefFinder software packages and the comparative ΔCt method. ACTB was the best single reference gene and ACTB+TBP was the best gene pair. The GenEx software showed that the accumulated standard deviation is reduced when a larger number of reference genes is used for gene expression normalization. However, the use of a single reference gene may not be suitable. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of FN1 and PLOD1. We observed that at least 3 reference genes should be used. ACTB+HPRT1+18S is the best trio for the analyses involving isolated ACL tears and controls. Conversely, ACTB+TBP+18S is the best trio for the analyses involving (1 injured ACL tears and controls, and (2 ACL tears of patients with meniscal tears and controls. Therefore, if the gene expression study aims to compare non-injured ACL, isolated ACL tears and ACL tears from patients with meniscal tear as three independent groups ACTB+TBP+18S+HPRT1 should be used. In conclusion, 3 or more genes should be used as reference genes for analysis of ACL samples of individuals with and without ACL tears.

  18. MRI in definition of bleeding source, lesion pattern and therapy in haemarthros of the knee; Die MRT beim Haemarthros des Kniegelenks: Bestimmung von Blutungsursachen, Verletzungsmustern und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, G. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Juergensen, I. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Leier, S. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Rauber, K. [Abt. Diagnostische Radiologie, Klinikum der Justus-Liebig-Universitaet, Giessen (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    Patients with haemarthros of the knee were examined by MRI and arthroscopy to identify the bleeding source and to determine surgical or conservative therapy. A prospective study was performed on 120 patients who underwent MRI and arthroscopy, point lesions and bleeding sources were documented separately on a standardised form. Arthroscopy demonstrated a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament in 86%, meniscal tears in 55%, disruption of collateral ligaments in 17%, osteochondral lesions in 5% and tears of capsule or plicae in 13%. Disruption of cruciate ligaments caused haemorrhage in all but three cases. In contrast, only meniscal tears located very adjacent to the meniscal basement had bled. Those types of osteochondral lesions caused haemorrhage characterised on MRI by destruction of the subchondral plate and overlying cartilage. Severe lesions of the knee were diagnosed by MRI in 71% to 100%, slight lesions in 13% to 40% of the cases. Single, combined and bland lesions were accurately diagnosed in MRI which permitted a correct prediction of surgical and conservative therapy in 96% and 80%. Morphological criteria in MRI permit identification of bleeding sources in haemarthros of the knee. Different lesion patterns can be separated for the planning of therapy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei gesichertem Haemarthros des Knies wurde geprueft, ob mit der MRT Angaben zur Blutungsursache moeglich sind und die relevanten Verletzungsmuster fuer die folgende konservative oder operative Therapie exakt beschrieben werden koennen. In einer prospektiven Studie wurden 120 Patienten mit akutem Haemarthros des Knies nacheinander mit der MRT und der Arthroskopie untersucht. Alle Laesionen und Blutungsquellen wurden getrennt fuer beide Methoden auf standardisierten Erhebungsboegen fuer die Arthroskopie registriert. Arthroskopisch wurden Rupturen der vorderen Kreuzbaender in 86%, Meniskusrisse in 55%, Rupturen der Kollateralbaender in 17%, subchondrale Laesionen in 5% und Kapsel- bzw

  19. MRI reporting by radiographers: The construction of an objective structured examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, K.J. [Allied Health Professions Department, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.j.piper@canterbury.ac.uk; Buscall, K.L. [Allied Health Professions Department, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, Kent CT1 1QU (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: The aim was to construct a bank of general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations where good agreement was demonstrated between three independent radiological reports. The bank was subsequently to be used to assess radiographers' ability to accurately report at the end of an accredited programme; Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) Clinical Reporting (MRI-General Investigations). Method: Eighty-seven examinations (33 knee, 36 lumbar spine and 18 internal auditory meatus-IAM) were initially reported by two radiologists. Seventy-two of these examinations (25 knee, 29 lumbar spine and 18 IAM) were subsequently reported by a third radiologist. Interobserver agreement was assessed by estimating the total, positive and negative % agreement rates; and by use of the weighted or unweighted kappa values. Knee reports were analysed for meniscal tears, and degenerative meniscus (264 meniscal sites); ligament injury (ACL; PCL; MCI; and LCL; 132 ligament sites); bone bruise; effusion; fracture and/or osteochondral defect. Lumbar spine reports were analysed for disc morphology (bulge, protrusion, extrusion and/or annular tear-180 intervertebral disc levels); degenerative disc disease; Modic endplate changes; cord compression; spinal stenosis; nerve root involvement; vertebral collapse, primary tumour or metastases; and other incidental findings. IAM reports were analysed for acoustic neuroma and vascular loop. Results: Agreement in the knee reports varied mainly between moderate ({kappa} = 0.46) for ligament injury to very good [almost perfect] ({kappa} = 0.86) for meniscal tears, although agreement for degenerative meniscus was only fair ({kappa} = 0.3). Variation in the lumbar spine reports ranged predominantly between moderate ({kappa} = 0.54) for disc bulge/protrusion to fair ({kappa} = 0.32) for Modic endplate changes to good [substantial] ({kappa} = 0.79) for tumour/metastases. Agreement for the presence of acoustic neuroma was very good [almost perfect

  20. MRI reporting by radiographers: The construction of an objective structured examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim was to construct a bank of general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigations where good agreement was demonstrated between three independent radiological reports. The bank was subsequently to be used to assess radiographers' ability to accurately report at the end of an accredited programme; Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) Clinical Reporting (MRI-General Investigations). Method: Eighty-seven examinations (33 knee, 36 lumbar spine and 18 internal auditory meatus-IAM) were initially reported by two radiologists. Seventy-two of these examinations (25 knee, 29 lumbar spine and 18 IAM) were subsequently reported by a third radiologist. Interobserver agreement was assessed by estimating the total, positive and negative % agreement rates; and by use of the weighted or unweighted kappa values. Knee reports were analysed for meniscal tears, and degenerative meniscus (264 meniscal sites); ligament injury (ACL; PCL; MCI; and LCL; 132 ligament sites); bone bruise; effusion; fracture and/or osteochondral defect. Lumbar spine reports were analysed for disc morphology (bulge, protrusion, extrusion and/or annular tear-180 intervertebral disc levels); degenerative disc disease; Modic endplate changes; cord compression; spinal stenosis; nerve root involvement; vertebral collapse, primary tumour or metastases; and other incidental findings. IAM reports were analysed for acoustic neuroma and vascular loop. Results: Agreement in the knee reports varied mainly between moderate (κ = 0.46) for ligament injury to very good [almost perfect] (κ = 0.86) for meniscal tears, although agreement for degenerative meniscus was only fair (κ = 0.3). Variation in the lumbar spine reports ranged predominantly between moderate (κ = 0.54) for disc bulge/protrusion to fair (κ = 0.32) for Modic endplate changes to good [substantial] (κ = 0.79) for tumour/metastases. Agreement for the presence of acoustic neuroma was very good [almost perfect] (κ = 1.0). Forty cases

  1. Bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee joint MRI : relationship between its location and associated injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between the location of bone signal abnormality and associated injury, as seen on MR, in patients with acute knee joint injury. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with acute knee injury and bone signal abnormalities on MR were included in this study. The femur and tibia were each divided into six compartments, namely the anteromedial, medial, posteromedial,anterolateral, lateral, and posterolateral ; these were obtained in each knee joint. We evaluated the location of bone signal abnormality and the corresponding arthroscopic or operative findings of injury to ligaments and menisci. Cases with signal abnormalities involving more than three compartments were excluded. Results : Bone signal abnormalities were demonstrated in 51 compartments. Most(84%, 43/51) were noted in the lateral half of the knee joint, the most common location being the tibio- posterolateral compartment(13/51). The femoro-lateral(11/51) and tibio- anterolateral compartment(8/51) were the next most common locations. All cases(13/13)with bone signal abnormality in the tibio- posterolateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament,while 9 of 11 cases(81%) with abnormality in the femoro- lateral compartment had tears at the anterior cruciate ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the tibio- anterolateral compartment had tears at the posterior cruciate ligament ; 31 of 43 cases (72%) with abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint had tears at the medial collateral ligament. Six of eight cases(75%) with signal abnormality in the medial half of the knee joint had tears at the medial meniscus, but no lateral meniscal tear was found. Among patients with signal abnormality in the lateral half of the knee joint, the tear was lateral meniscal in nine of 43 cases(21%) and medial meniscal in six of 43(14%). Conclusion : The location of bone signal abnormality, as seen on knee MR, inpatients with

  2. Imaging of postarthroscopic complications after knee injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most common joint injuries in professional and recreational sports participants and also in the total population are knee injuries. Arthroscopy is indicated if this modality will improve the patient outcome and potential long-term complications can be avoided. Although uncommon, complications following arthroscopy are mostly evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For planning further therapy strategies following postarthroscopic complications, e.g. if anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is required, digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are helpful. This article provides an overview of the different procedures for surgical treatment which are a prerequisite for the analysis of postarthroscopic images. In addition typical complications after treatment of meniscal and chondral injuries as well as after ACL reconstruction are described and typical signs in MRI, radiography and CT are explained in detail. (orig.)

  3. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, W.J. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  4. Anatomic Factors that May Predispose Female Athletes to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Edward C; Boguszewski, Daniel V; Joshi, Nirav B; Wang, Dean; McAllister, David R

    2015-01-01

    Female athletes are 2 to 10 times more likely to injure their anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) than male athletes. There has been greater recognition of this gender discrepancy because female participation in competitive athletics has increased. Previous investigators have divided risk factors into hormonal, neuromuscular response, and anatomic subgroups. Gender variation within these groups may help explain the higher incidence of ACL injury in women. The purpose of this article is to review research examining female-specific anatomy that may predispose women to ACL injury. Specifically, we discuss how women may have increased tibial and meniscal slopes, narrower femoral notches, and smaller ACL, which may place the ACL at risk from injury. These anatomic factors, combined with other female-specific risk factors, may help physicians and researchers better understand why women appear to be more prone to ACL injury. PMID:26359837

  5. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children. PMID:22511069

  6. MR evaluation of the knee following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging of the knee after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventy-five MR examinations were performed in 52 patients following ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon autografts. MR imaging demonstrated a well-defined autograft in 63 of 70 clinically stable autografts. Of 5 clinically lax reconstructions, none appeared will defined on MR images. Compared with the clinical examination, MR imaging was 90.7% accurate. MR imaging demonstrated time-related healing of the patellar tendon donor site, with persistent thickening indicative of tendinitis. Positions of the femoral and tibial bone tunnels could be assessed. Knee joint effusions tended to resolve completely within 7 months after operations, with the presence and degree of effusion in the earlier postoperative interval being unrelated to the clinical outcome. Ancillary disorders in the knee, such as meniscal tears and osteochondral defects, could also be evaluated in this postoperative population

  7. Imaging of the knee joint with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knee joint is frequently affected by trauma as well as degenerative and inflammatory disorders, involving the internal structures (i.e. ligaments, menisci, cartilage, synovial membrane) and the adjacent bones. Plain radiographs represent an indispensable basis for diagnosis. For further analysis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice, and has widely replaced computed tomography, arthrography and stress examinations. Extensive experience has been accumulated in MRI of the knee joint in recent years. In addition, advances in MRI technology have had a major impact on diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, diagnosis of various lesions of the knee joint, such as meniscal and ligamental injuries, aseptic necrosis, lesions of the hyaline cartilage, occult fractures and inflammatory lesions will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. MRI of Hoffa's fat pad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saddik, D. [Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, OX3 7LD, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Mayne The Avenue Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); McNally, E.G. [Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, OX3 7LD, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Richardson, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2004-08-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa is commonly injured but rarely discussed in the radiological literature. Abnormalities within it most commonly are the consequences of trauma and degeneration, but inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the synovium can be confined to the fat pad. The commonest traumatic lesions follow arthroscopy, but intrinsic signal abnormalities can also be due to posterior and superior impingements syndromes and following patellar dislocation. Infrapatellar plica syndrome may also be traumatic in aetiology. The precise aetiology of ganglion cysts is not understood; the principal differential diagnosis is a meniscal or cruciate cyst. Hoffa's fat pad contains residual synovial tissue, meaning that primary neoplastic conditions of synovium may originate and be confined to the fat pad. Inflammatory changes along the posterior border of the pad may also be used to help differentiate effusion from acute synovitis on unenhanced MR examinations. (orig.)

  9. What's new in osteoarthritis pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading musculoskeletal cause of disability in the Western society. Despite this, it is still difficult to gain a precise definition of what osteoarthritis actually is. The methods used for the study are narrative review and viewpoint focussing on the knee. It is well known that there is a modest correlation between X-ray changes and pain. Improvements in imaging have shown that osteoarthritis should be regarded as an umbrella term for a number of pathophysiological processes leading to pain and/or cartilage loss. If these are inside the joint (such as bone marrow lesions, cartilage defects or meniscal tear) then they can be considered osteoarthritis, while those outside the joint (such as obesity, weak muscles and vitamin D deficiency) could be considered the osteoarthritis syndrome. These improvements in basic science are leading to lesion-specific therapies indicating the importance of trying to pinpoint causes of pain in the individual. PMID:26899891

  10. El valor de la exploración clínica y de la resonancia magnética nuclear en el diagnóstico de las lesiones meniscales.

    OpenAIRE

    Zain Elabidein, Nasor

    2002-01-01

    [spa] En esta tesis se realiza un estudio comparativo y analítico, que ordena la población del estudio en dos grupos A y B, con el objetivo de la descripción, valoración, análisis, evaluación y comprobación de los datos específicos de la valoración de acertada identificación, desarrollo y precisión del método clínico y del método de imágenes de RMN (en adición del método clínico) para realizar el diagnóstico de una posible lesión meniscal (interna y/o externa) aislada o acompañada de otras le...

  11. Comparative study between the Spin-echo and 3-D fast imaging techniques in the Knee evaluation with magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out a retrospective analysis of the results of magnetic resonance (MR) studies in 20 patients, comparing two different sequences. We compared a 2-D spin-echo (SE2D) sequence with a 3-D fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP3D) sequence in the attempt to compare the reliability of each in the detection of knee injuries. Arthroscopy was employed as a control technique. Our study revealed no statistically significant difference between the two sequences, although the overall sensitivity for the detection of meniscal lesions was slightly greater with the FISP3D sequence; however, the reliability in the detection of ruptures of the posterior cruciate ligament is less with this sequence than with the SE2D sequence. Both sequences showed very low sensitivity in the detection of hyaline cartilage injuries. (Author) 14 refs

  12. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP and return to activity criteria (RTAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Logerstedt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTInjuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and safe to return to sport. A system centered on specific indicators that can be used to develop a comprehensive profile to monitor rehabilitation progression and to establish return to activity criteria is recommended to clear athletes to begin a progressive and systematic approach to activities and sports. Integration of a sports knee injury performance profile with return to activity criteria can guide clinicians in facilitating an athlete's safe return to sport, prevention of subsequent injury, and life-long knee joint health.

  13. Pain and knee function in relation to degree of bone bruise after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkopek, K; Warming, Torsten; Neergaard, K;

    2012-01-01

    imaging (MRI) scan was performed shortly after the injury, and at 2 weeks, 1 month and 2 months. The patients reported the level of pain every day and filled in a Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score sheet in connection with MRI. For every MRI of the knee, volume of bone bruise was calculated, and...... intensity was visually graded. Our study showed a reduction of the pain to 50% approximately 2 weeks after the injury, at which time the bone bruise was at maximum. There was a significant relationship between pain and the volume and intensity of the bone bruise in the medial tibia condyle, as well as pain...... and the bone bruise volume of the lateral femoral condyle. Patients with bone bruise of the medial tibia and patients with meniscal lesions had more pain. It is suggested that pain and decreased function after acute ACL injury most likely is related to soft tissue and cartilage injury and not to bone...

  14. Health technology assessment of magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huysse, W.C.J. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: Wouter.huysse@ugent.be; Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: Koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be

    2008-02-15

    A search of the available literature was performed and the role of MR imaging of the knee is discussed. Based on this search the authors concluded that MR has a high sensitivity in detecting any abnormalities in the knee but it does not have the same diagnostic accuracy as a clinical investigation performed by a trained knee specialist when all knee injuries are taken together. It does lead to a decrease in the number of surgical interventions due to its high negative predictive value. For the detection of meniscal injury, MR has the same accuracy as arthroscopy and should be performed in order to avoid unnecessary surgical interventions. A negative MR also obviates further investigation in suspected cartilage damage. This is not true for anterior and posterior cruciate ligament problems where MRI is less accurate than clinical investigation.

  15. Changes in knee joint load indices from before to 12 months after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, J B; Holsgaard-Larsen, A; Creaby, M W;

    2016-01-01

    25.8 (3.4) kg/m(2)) without radiographic knee OA before and 12 months after medial APM. Static alignment was assessed by radiography and self-reported outcomes by Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). RESULTS: Peak KAM and KAM impulse increased in the APM leg compared to the contra......OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) are at increased risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Meniscal damage and/or surgery may alter knee joint loading to increase OA risk. We investigated changes in knee joint loading following medial APM surgery, compared with the...... contra-lateral leg. METHODS: We estimated indices of knee joint loading (external peak knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse and peak knee flexion moment (KFM)) normalized to body size (i.e., body mass (BM) and height (HT)) using 3D gait analysis in 23 patients (17 men, mean (SD) 46.2 (6.4) years, BMI...

  16. Questionário específico para sintomas do joelho "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale": tradução e validação para a língua portuguesa Specific questionnaire for knee symptoms - the "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale": translation and validation into Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Peccin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As doenças do joelho apresentam conseqüências variadas para a função e a qualidade de vida do indivíduo. Para traduzir, validar e verificar as propriedades de medida do questionário específico para sintomas do joelho "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale" para a língua portuguesa, selecionamos, por conveniência, 50 pacientes (29 homens e 21 mulheres, média de idade 38,7 anos com lesão de joelho (lesão meniscal, lesão do ligamento cruzado anterior, condromalácia ou artrose. A reprodutibilidade e a concordância ordinal inter e intra-entrevistador foram excelentes (alfa = 0,9. A concordância nominal inter-entrevistadores foi boa (Kappa = 0,7 e intra-entrevistador, excelente (Kappa = 0,8. No processo de validação, correlacionamos o questionário Lysholm com a escala numérica da dor (r=-0,6; p=0,001 e com o índice de Lequesne (r= -0,8; p=0,001. As correlações entre o Lysholm e a avaliação global da saúde pelo paciente e pelo terapeuta apresentaram-se fracas e não significantes. As correlações entre o questionário Lysholm e o SF-36 foram significantes nos aspectos físicos (r = 0,4; p = 0,04, de dor (r = 0,5; p = 0,001 e de capacidade funcional (r = 0,7; p = 0,0001. Concluímos que a tradução e adaptação cultural do "Lysholm knee scoring scale" para o nosso idioma apresentou reprodutibilidade e validade em pacientes com lesão meniscal, lesão do ligamento cruzado anterior, condromalácia ou artrose do joelho.Knee diseases present variable consequences for an individual’s function and quality of life. For the purposes of translating, validating and checking the measurement properties of the specific questionnaire for knee symptoms - the "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale" - into Portuguese, we selected, for convenience, 50 patients (29 males and 21 females, mean age = 38.7 years with knee injuries (meniscal injury, anterior cruciate ligament injury, chondromalacia or arthrosis. Reproducibility and ordinal consistency inter- and

  17. Questionário específico para sintomas do joelho "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale": tradução e validação para a língua portuguesa Specific questionnaire for knee symptoms - the "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale": translation and validation into Portuguese

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Stella Peccin; Rozana Ciconelli; Moisés Cohen

    2006-01-01

    As doenças do joelho apresentam conseqüências variadas para a função e a qualidade de vida do indivíduo. Para traduzir, validar e verificar as propriedades de medida do questionário específico para sintomas do joelho "Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale" para a língua portuguesa, selecionamos, por conveniência, 50 pacientes (29 homens e 21 mulheres, média de idade 38,7 anos) com lesão de joelho (lesão meniscal, lesão do ligamento cruzado anterior, condromalácia ou artrose). A reprodutibilidade e a con...

  18. Large infrapatellar ganglionic cyst of the knee fat pad: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Apostolos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Large ganglionic cystic formations arising from the infrapatellar fat pad are quite uncommon and only a few are mentioned in the literature. An open excision in these cases is mandatory. Case presentation We report the case of a large infrapatellar fat pad ganglion in a 37-year-old Greek man with chronic knee discomfort. The ganglionic cyst originated from the infrapatellar fat pad and had no intrasynovial extension. The final diagnosis was determined with magnetic resonance imaging of the knee, and the lesion was treated with surgery. Conclusions These lesions are asymptomatic in most cases but often are misdiagnosed as meniscal or ligamentous lesions of the knee joint. Nowadays, the therapeutic trend for such lesions is arthroscopic excision, but when there is a large ganglion, as in this case report, the treatment should be an open and thorough resection. This report is intended mostly but not exclusively for clinical physicians and radiologists.

  19. Tumor like swellings arising from Hoffa′s fat pad: A report of three patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant D Ghate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three rare cases of tumor-like conditions arising from Hoffa′s fat pad (HFP. Patients were having persistent knee pain, the cause of which was not diagnosed by the general physician, and then were referred to us for knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the lesions to be arising from HFP (ganglion cysts and hemangioma, as was suggested by clinical findings. Anatomy, pathology, and radiological features of the Hoffa′s disease are described here to increase awareness in orthopedic community of this rare but interesting disease which is often misdiagnosed as meniscal pathology. These cases illustrate that increased cognizance can facilitate timely intervention which will prevent morbidity of the patient.

  20. MRI of Hoffa's fat pad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa is commonly injured but rarely discussed in the radiological literature. Abnormalities within it most commonly are the consequences of trauma and degeneration, but inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the synovium can be confined to the fat pad. The commonest traumatic lesions follow arthroscopy, but intrinsic signal abnormalities can also be due to posterior and superior impingements syndromes and following patellar dislocation. Infrapatellar plica syndrome may also be traumatic in aetiology. The precise aetiology of ganglion cysts is not understood; the principal differential diagnosis is a meniscal or cruciate cyst. Hoffa's fat pad contains residual synovial tissue, meaning that primary neoplastic conditions of synovium may originate and be confined to the fat pad. Inflammatory changes along the posterior border of the pad may also be used to help differentiate effusion from acute synovitis on unenhanced MR examinations. (orig.)

  1. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, A.; Glaser, C.; Reiser, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilian Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  2. MR findings in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability. Recent advances in drug discovery techniques and improvements in understanding the pathophysiology of osteoarthritic disorders have resulted in an unprecedented number of new therapeutic agents. Of all imaging modalities, radiography has been the most widely used for the diagnosis and management of the progression of knee OA. Magnetic resonance imaging is a relatively recent technique and its applications to osteoarthritis have been limited. Compared with conventional radiography, MR imaging offers unparalleled discrimination among articular soft tissues by directly visualizing all components of the knee joint simultaneously and therefore allowing the knee joint to be evaluated as a whole organ. In this article we present the MR findings in knee OA including cartilage abnormalities, osteophytes, bone edema, subarticular cysts, bone attrition, meniscal tears, ligament abnormalities, synovial thickening, joint effusion, intra-articular loose bodies, and periarticular cysts. (orig.)

  3. Musculoskeletal MR: knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive, specific, and accurate noninvasive method for diagnosing internal derangement of the knee. During the past 15 years knowledge of pathologic conditions of the knee had evolved significantly. Beyond the basic principles of imaging knee injuries great impact was made on the understanding of indirect or collateral findings, even in rare diseases. In this article the spectrum of disorders of the knee are reviewed and an overview of the current literature is given. This includes considerations about how to achieve a high-standard MR imaging study of the knee, and principles of imaging anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal tears. A focus is put on distinct diseases including intra-articular and intraosseous ganglion cysts, iliotibial band friction syndrome, transient osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, and imaging of the articular cartilage. (orig.)

  4. [Ultrasonographic examination of the stifle joint in the dog. Part 2: Impaired wound healing and neoplastic, congenital, developmental, degenerative and traumatic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayseh, K; Kramer, M; Ondreka, N

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a cost-effective, non-invasive technique, which can be performed in conscious dogs. It frequently contributes valuable and even crucial diagnostic information in patients with lameness attributed to the stifle joint. Within the first part of this article, technical requirements and limitations as well as the standardized scanning protocol and ultrasonographic anatomy of the stifle joint are described. Additionally, ultrasonographic features of common pathologies of the stifle joint, including cranial cruciate ligament rupture and meniscal pathologies, are discussed. The second part of the article focuses on the ultrasonographic approach to other, less common pathologies of the canine stifle joint, including impaired wound healing and congenital, neoplastic, developmental and traumatic disorders. PMID:25966794

  5. A chemical mixer with dark-green nails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence K; Harding, John

    2015-01-01

    Nails are integral extensions of the skin and they together form the largest organ of the human body. Changes in nail appearance can be due to external insults or internal pathologies, and nail signs have to be interpreted in light of a good history. We present an interesting case of a man who developed dark-green discolouration of his nails over a short period of time. His work as a chemical mixer rendered him susceptible to hazardous chemical exposure. A notification was filed and the local Occupational Health Department discovered insufficient protective gear and lack of protocols regarding hazards of isocyanate-based resin. The patient also reported washing utensils with bare hands. Based on the meniscal demarcation borders between the discoloured and normal areas, plus a positive bacterial culture from nail clippings, the final diagnosis of isocyanate-resin-induced onycholysis with secondary Pseudomonas infection remained as the most likely clinical diagnosis. PMID:26040827

  6. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: findings in the pediatric age group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Findings in 31 pediatric patients with pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported. The average age was 14 years and the average duration of symptoms was 21.4 months. Internal derangements were found in 29 patients (94%) and degenerative arthritis in 13 (42%). In 12 patients (39%), the problem could be traced to an injury to the jaw. Secondary condylar hypoplasia was associated with the meniscal abnormality in 3 patients (10%). Further awareness of internal derangements of the TMJ in the pediatric population should permit greater recognition of their etiology. It is important that threatment be initiated as soon as possible, not only to minimize the development of osseous disease in young adults but also to prevent facial growth deformities

  7. Biomechanics of the anterior cruciate ligament: Physiology, rupture and reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnick, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Herbort, Mirco

    2016-02-18

    The influences and mechanisms of the physiology, rupture and reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) on kinematics and clinical outcomes have been investigated in many biomechanical and clinical studies over the last several decades. The knee is a complex joint with shifting contact points, pressures and axes that are affected when a ligament is injured. The ACL, as one of the intra-articular ligaments, has a strong influence on the resulting kinematics. Often, other meniscal or ligamentous injuries accompany ACL ruptures and further deteriorate the resulting kinematics and clinical outcomes. Knowing the surgical options, anatomic relations and current evidence to restore ACL function and considering the influence of concomitant injuries on resulting kinematics to restore full function can together help to achieve an optimal outcome. PMID:26925379

  8. Uranium hetero-bimetallic complexes: synthesis, structure and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis is to synthesize molecular complexes with uranium and transition metal ions in close proximity, to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between them. We decided to use Schiff bases as assembling ligands, which are unusual for uranium (IV). Although the simplest Schiff bases, such as H2Salen, lead to ligand exchange reactions, the bi-compartmental Schiff base H4L6 (bis(3-hydroxy-salicylidene) - 2,2-dimethyl-propylene) allows the crystal structure determination of the complex [L6Cu(pyr)]U[L6Cu].2pyr, obtained by reaction of the metallo-ligand H2L6Cu with U(acac)4. In this manner, the complexes [L6Co(pyr)]2U and [L6Ni(pyr)]2U.pyr were also isolated, as well as the compounds in which the paramagnetic ions have been exchanged by the diamagnetic ions ZnII, ZrIV and ThIV': [L6Zn(pyr)]2U, [L6Cu]2Zr and [L6Cu(pyr)]Th[L6Cu].2pyr. These complexes are the first which involve three metallic centres assembling by the means of a hexa-dentate Schiff base. The crystalline structures show, for all these complexes, the outstanding orthogonal arrangement of the two fragments L6M around the central atom which is in a dodecahedral environment of eight oxygen atoms of two Schiff bases. The syntheses of the isostructural complexes Cu2II and Zn2U in which the uranium (IV) ion is close, in the first one, to the paramagnetic ion CuII and, in the second one, to the diamagnetic ion ZnII, has allowed the use of the empiric method to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between an f element and a transition metal. The comparison of the magnetic behaviour of two complexes Cu2U and Zn2U, expressed by the variation of χT vs T, reveals the ferromagnetic interaction in the heart of the triad Cu-U-Cu. The magnetic behaviour of the complexes Cu2Th et Cu2Zr which does not show any coupling between the two copper (II) ions and the weak antiferromagnetic interaction in the Ni2U compound, favour the hypothesis of ferromagnetic coupling between UIV and Cu

  9. Muscle MCT4 Content Is Correlated with the Lactate Removal Ability during Recovery Following All-Out Supramaximal Exercise in Highly-Trained Rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Hugo; Bourdin, Muriel; Féasson, Léonard; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Denis, Christian; Freund, Hubert; Messonnier, Laurent A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test if the lactate exchange (γ1) and removal (γ2) abilities during recovery following short all-out supramaximal exercise correlate with the muscle content of MCT1 and MCT4, the two isoforms of the monocarboxylate transporters family involved in lactate and H(+) co-transport in skeletal muscle. Eighteen lightweight rowers completed a 3-min all-out exercise on rowing ergometer. Blood lactate samples were collected during the subsequent passive recovery to assess an individual blood lactate curve (IBLC). IBLC were fitted to the bi-exponential time function: La(t) = [La](0) + A1(1 - [Formula: see text]) + A2(1 - [Formula: see text]) where [La](0) is the blood lactate concentration at exercise completion and the velocity constants γ1 and γ2 denote the lactate exchange and removal abilities, respectively. An application of the bi-compartmental model of lactate distribution space allowed estimation of the lactate removal rate at exercise completion [LRR(0)]. Biopsy of the right vastus lateralis was taken at rest to measure muscle MCT1 and MCT4 content. Fiber type distribution, activity of key enzymes and capillary density (CD) were also assessed. γ1 was correlated with [La](0) (r = -0.54, P < 0.05) but not with MCT1, MCT4 or CD. γ2 and LRR(0) were correlated with MCT4 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01 and r = 0.73, P < 0.001, respectively) but not with MCT1 or cytochrome c oxidase activity. These findings suggest that the lactate exchange ability is highly dependent on the milieu so that the importance of the muscle MCT1 and MCT4 content in γ1 was hidden in the present study. Our results also suggest that during recovery following all-out supramaximal exercise in well-trained rowers, MCT4 might play a significant role in the distribution and delivery of lactate for its subsequent removal. PMID:27375499

  10. Feasibility of [123I]-meta-iodobenzylguanidine dynamic 3-D kinetic analysis in vivo using a CZT ultrafast camera: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No data are yet available in the literature concerning 3-D [123I]-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ([123I]-MIBG) kinetics in vivo. In this study we investigated the feasibility of dynamic 3-D [123I]-MIBG kinetic analysis using a CZT ultrafast camera. The study group comprised 16 patients consecutively scheduled for [123I]-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy for clinical purpose who were studied using a CZT camera (NM530c, GE). Dynamic acquisition in list mode was simultaneously started with a bolus injection of the radiotracer (185-370 MBq) for an overall duration of 900 s. A temporal series of 3-D volumes was reconstructed from the first 150 s of dynamic acquisition with a temporal resolution of 5 s. A summed cardiac image was also reconstructed to serve as reference for blood pool (BP) and left ventricle (LV) wall identification. BP and LV volumes of interest (VOIs) were manually drawn to cover the whole heart and automatically reported on the reframed volumes. Time-activity curves (TACs) for the BP and LV were extracted by averaging the signal intensity in the respective VOI in each time frame. BP TACs were fitted to a gamma variate model while LV TACs were fitted to a bicompartmental model. TAC analysis was feasible in all patients with good interobserver reproducibility. BP TACs were well described by a gamma variate model as they represent the first pass of the tracer. The first compartment of LV TACs corresponded to contamination spillover of the LV signal from the BP signal. The LV second compartment characterized the uptake of the tracer in the myocardium quantified in terms of maximum signal intensity value (6.95 ± 2.76 counts/mm3/s2), maximum up-slope value (0.36 ± 0.15 counts/mm3/s) and normalized washout of the signal value (7.0 ± 0.6 %). Using CZT technology and dynamic 3-D acquisition, analysis of [123I]-MIBG radiotracer kinetics in vivo is feasible and may provide pathophysiological information in addition to that available with standard planar and SPECT imaging

  11. Feasibility of [{sup 123}I]-meta-iodobenzylguanidine dynamic 3-D kinetic analysis in vivo using a CZT ultrafast camera: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinti, Erica; Giorgetti, Assuero [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); Positano, Vincenzo; Marzullo, Paolo [Fondazione CNR/Regione Toscana ' ' G. Monasterio' ' , Pisa (Italy); CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    No data are yet available in the literature concerning 3-D [{sup 123}I]-meta-iodobenzylguanidine ([{sup 123}I]-MIBG) kinetics in vivo. In this study we investigated the feasibility of dynamic 3-D [{sup 123}I]-MIBG kinetic analysis using a CZT ultrafast camera. The study group comprised 16 patients consecutively scheduled for [{sup 123}I]-MIBG cardiac scintigraphy for clinical purpose who were studied using a CZT camera (NM530c, GE). Dynamic acquisition in list mode was simultaneously started with a bolus injection of the radiotracer (185-370 MBq) for an overall duration of 900 s. A temporal series of 3-D volumes was reconstructed from the first 150 s of dynamic acquisition with a temporal resolution of 5 s. A summed cardiac image was also reconstructed to serve as reference for blood pool (BP) and left ventricle (LV) wall identification. BP and LV volumes of interest (VOIs) were manually drawn to cover the whole heart and automatically reported on the reframed volumes. Time-activity curves (TACs) for the BP and LV were extracted by averaging the signal intensity in the respective VOI in each time frame. BP TACs were fitted to a gamma variate model while LV TACs were fitted to a bicompartmental model. TAC analysis was feasible in all patients with good interobserver reproducibility. BP TACs were well described by a gamma variate model as they represent the first pass of the tracer. The first compartment of LV TACs corresponded to contamination spillover of the LV signal from the BP signal. The LV second compartment characterized the uptake of the tracer in the myocardium quantified in terms of maximum signal intensity value (6.95 ± 2.76 counts/mm{sup 3}/s{sup 2}), maximum up-slope value (0.36 ± 0.15 counts/mm{sup 3}/s) and normalized washout of the signal value (7.0 ± 0.6 %). Using CZT technology and dynamic 3-D acquisition, analysis of [{sup 123}I]-MIBG radiotracer kinetics in vivo is feasible and may provide pathophysiological information in addition to that

  12. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  13. Glenohumeral kinematics after soft tissue interposition graft and glenoid reaming: A cadaveric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbis, Nickolas G; Weber, Alexander E; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Cole, Brian J; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of young patients with glenohumeral arthritis is controversial. Resurfacing of the glenoid with biologic interposition and reaming of the glenoid have been suggested as potential treatment options. The goal of this study was to determine the change in glenohumeral contact pressures in interposition arthroplasty, as well as glenoid reaming in an arthritis model. We hypothesized that interposition with meniscal allograft will lead to the best normalization of contact pressure throughout the glenohumeral range of motion. Materials and Methods: Eight fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were tested in static positions of humeral abduction with a compressive load. Glenohumeral contact area, contact pressure, and peak force were determined sequentially for (1) intact glenoid (2) glenoid with cartilage removed (arthritis model) (3) placement of lateral meniscus allograft (4) placement of Achilles allograft (5) arthritis model with reamed glenoid. Results: The arthritis model demonstrated statistically higher peak pressures than intact glenoid and glenoid with interpositional allograft. Meniscal and Achilles allograft lowered mean contact pressure and increased contact area to a level equal to or more favorable than the control state. In contrast, the reamed glenoid did not show any statistical difference from the arthritis model for any of the recorded measures. Conclusion: Glenohumeral contact pressure is significantly improved with interposition of allograft at time zero compared to an arthritic state. Our findings suggest that concentric reaming did not differ from the arthritic model when compared to normal. These findings favor the use of allograft for interposition as a potential treatment option in patients with glenoid wear. PMID:27293292

  14. Radiological classification of meniscocapsular tears of the anterolateral portion of the lateral meniscus of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an arthroscopic-MRI correlation study of acute injuries to the knee it was found that anterolateral meniscocapsular separations of the lateral aspect of the knee were missed on MRI reporting. Eighty sports-related injuries of the knee were seen by experienced orthopaedic surgeons at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and at the National Sports Centre, Malaysia from January 1996 to July 1997. Fifty of the patients were suspected to have meniscal tears that were either lateral or medial on clinical examination and they were sent for MRI. Many of these patients were tertiary referrals. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations in 27 of the 50 patients were reported as not showing any intrasubstance or obvious meniscocapsular tears, but arthroscopy performed on them revealed anterolateral meniscocapsular tears of the lateral meniscus of varying degrees in nine of these patients. In retrospect the tears could be seen on MRI, and a pattern to the tears was noted and classified as follows. Type 0, normal; type 1, torn inferior or superior meniscocapsular attachment; type 2, both meniscofemoral and meniscotibial ligaments torn but with minimal separation of meniscus and capsule by fluid or synovitis; and type 3, marked separation of meniscus and capsule by fluid (> 3 mm). Ten patients who did not undergo arthroscopy for various personal and financial reasons underwent MRI which showed type 1 and type 2 tears, and were treated conservatively. These patients were all asymptomatic after 4-6 weeks with regard to clinical signs, suggesting a lateral meniscal tear. Magnetic resonance imaging therefore does reveal minor degrees of meniscocapsular tears anterolaterally when one understands the normal anatomy in this region. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Body Mass Index, Modulated by Lateral Posterior Tibial Slope, Predicts ACL Injury Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojicic, Katherine M.; Beaulieu, Melanie L.; Krieger, Daniel Imaizumi; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Wojtys, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Intervention strategies to prevent ACL injury rely on increasing knowledge of risk factors. While several modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for ACL rupture have been identified, the interaction between them remains unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between BMI and several knee geometries as potential risk factors for ACL injury. We hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of an increased posterior tibial slope or middle cartilage slope would increase risk of ACL injury. We also hypothesized that an increased BMI in the presence of a decreased posterior meniscal height or meniscal bone angle would result in an increased risk of ACL injury. Methods: Sagittal knee MRI files from 76 ACL-injured and 42 non-injured subjects were gathered from the institution’s archive. The PTS, MCS, PMH, and MBA were measured using the circle method and compared with BMI from the subject demographic. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate logistical regression. Figure 1 details measurements made for each knee geometry. Results: Univariate analysis of PTS showed increases in PTS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.043, OR =1.12). Univariate analysis of MCS showed increases of MCS significantly increase the odds of ACL tear (p = 0.037, OR = 1.12). Multivariate analysis of PTS and BMI centered around the mean (PTS*cBMI) showed increases of PTS in combination with increases in cBMI significantly increases the odds of ACL rupture (p value = .050, OR = 1.03). Table 1 shows predicted increases in ACL injury risk for combinations of increases in PTS and BMI. Conclusion: An increase in BMI will increase the risk of ACL tear when an increase in lateral posterior tibial slope is present. An increase in lateral posterior tibial slope or lateral middle cartilage slope increases the risk of an ACL tear.

  16. Reconstruction of ACL Ligament rupture: results of 96 operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmasebi MN

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL is one of the main knee stabilizing ligaments. Because of high incidence of ACL tearing especially in young athletes its reconstruction is very important. The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term results of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures using four strand hamstring auto graft and Bone patellar tendon autograph. "nMethods: The study group included 96 patients (3 female and 93 male with ACL teared who had been referred to our center in 5 years period (2002-2007. The subject which were Accessed in this study included meniscal injury concomitant chondral injury, determine the most common cause of ACL tearing, comparision of IKDC and lysholm score in all patients before and after surgery, and limitation of rang of motion of knee post operation. "nResults: Involvement was in the right knee in 38 patients and in the left knee in 58 patients. Mean age of patients was 27.6 years (19-48. Mean surgical delay was 18 month (1-77. The most common cause of tear was playing soccer. Meniscal injury was in 78 patients. (Medial meniscus in 63 patients, lateral meniscus in 29 patients Concommitent chondral injury was in 54 patients (56.25%. 68% of patients returned to preoperative functions sport activity. There was no limitation in extension and there was 6 patients limitation in flexion about 20º. In last visit of patients IKDS in class A and B was 96. "nConclusion: It is seem that arthroscopic reconstruction of ACL is a safe and good method in treatment of Knee stability. Use of IKDC and lysholm score for comparision of patients before and after surgery is helpful. The operation should be done early after injury. Reconstruction of ACL in older patients in the abscense of DJD is effective.

  17. Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) MR imaging in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus: Focusing on reader-defined axial reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Daekeon; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sungjun; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of fat-suppressed (FS) three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) imaging in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus, including the reader-defined reformatted axial (RDA) plane. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with arthroscopically confirmed radial or root tears of the meniscus underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 2D and FS 3D VISTA sequences. MRIs were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement were calculated for radial and root tears. Both radiologists reported confidence scale for the presence of meniscal tears in 2D axial imaging, 3D axial imaging, and RDA imaging, based on a five-point scale. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare confidence scale. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FS 3D VISTA MR imaging versus 2D MR imaging were as follows: 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively in reader 1, and 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 83%, 91%, and 87%, respectively, in reader 2. Interobserver agreement for detecting meniscal tears was excellent (κ = 1) with FS 3D VISTA. The confidence scale was significantly higher for 3D axial images than 2D imaging (p = 0.03) and significantly higher in RDA images than 3D axial image in detecting radial and root tears. Conclusions: FS 3D VISTA had a better diagnostic performance in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus. The reader-defined reformatted axial plane obtained from FS 3D VISTA MR imaging is useful in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus.

  18. MRI evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: assessment in routine 1.5-T scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partezani Helito, Camilo; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Kawamura Demange, Marco [University of Sao Paulo, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Knee Surgery Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Partezani Helito, Paulo Victor; Pereira Costa, Hugo; Bordalo-Rodrigues, Marcelo [University of Sao Paulo, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    This study evaluated the ability of routine 1.5-T MRI scans to visualize the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and describe its path and anatomic relations with lateral knee structures. Thirty-nine 1.5-T MRI scans of the knee were evaluated. The scans included an MRI knee protocol with T1-weighted sequences, T2-weighted sequences with fat saturation, and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. Two radiologists separately reviewed all MRI scans to evaluate interobserver reliability. The ALL was divided into three portions for analyses: femoral, meniscal, and tibial. The path of the ALL was evaluated with regard to known structural parameters previously studied in this region. At least a portion of the ALL was visualized in 38 (97.8 %) cases. The meniscal portion was most visualized (94.8 %), followed by the femoral (89.7 %) and the tibial (79.4 %) portions. The three portions of the ALL were visualized in 28 (71.7 %) patients. The ALL was characterized with greater clarity on the coronal plane and was visualized as a thin, linear structure. The T1-weighted sequences showed a statistically inferior ligament visibility frequency. With regard to the T2 and PD evaluations, although the visualization frequency in PD was higher for the three portions of the ligament, only the femoral portion showed significant values. The ALL can be visualized in routine 1.5-T MRI scans. Although some of the ligament could be depicted in nearly all of the scans (97.4 %), it could only be observed in its entirety in about 71.7 % of the tests. (orig.)

  19. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laberge, Marc A.; Baum, Thomas; Virayavanich, Warapat; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, M.C.; Lynch, J.; McCulloch, C.E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 37), and obese (BMI {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  20. Internal derangement of the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacksin, M.F.; Zurlo, J.V. [Department of Radiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States); Levy, A.S. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, University Hospital, Newark, NJ 07103-2426 (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Objective. This study uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to delineate the types and frequencies of injuries seen in the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. We also compare the results of the orthopedic knee examination with the MR findings. Design and patients. MR imaging of the ipsilateral knee was performed on 34 patients with closed femoral shaft fractures. Indications for knee MR imaging included knee pain at the time of fracture, soft tissue swelling or an effusion of the knee, or a positive knee examination under anesthesia. The patients had a mean age of 27 years and all were stabilized with intramedullary nails. Imaging was performed a mean time of 2.5 days after surgery. All patients had knee examinations done under anesthesia, and the MR results were compiled and compared with the clinical examinations. Results. Ninety-seven percent of patients demonstrated knee effusions. Twenty-seven percent of patients demonstrated meniscal tears, with the posterior horn of the medial meniscus most frequently torn. The medial collateral ligament was the most frequent site of ligamentous injury (38%) followed by the posterior cruciate ligament (21%). Fifty percent of patients had injuries of the extensor mechanism. Bone bruises were noted in 32% of patients. Articular cartilage injuries were confined to the patella in four cases. One occult tibial plateau fracture and one meniscocapsular separation were seen. Conclusions. There is a common incidence of both ligamentous and meniscal injury to the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. MR imaging can be useful in assessing the extent of injury, and may reveal findings unsuspected after clinical examination of the knee. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 13 refs.

  1. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won [Eulji Medical College, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined.

  2. Diagnostic Efficacy in Knee MRI Comparing Conventional Technique and Multiplanar Reconstruction with One-Millimeter FSE PDW Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Y.C.; Kim, S.S.; Chung, H.W.; Choe, B.K.; Ahn, J.H. [Dept. of Radiolog y, Kangwon National Univ. School of Medicine, Kangwon-do (Korea)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has proved to be an excellent tool in diagnosing injuries of the cruciate ligaments and menisci. However, multiple planes and sometimes optimal oblique or double-oblique scan planes are needed due to the variability in the positioning of important structures, which means there is a lower throughput and longer scanning time. Purpose: To compare the performance of a 1-mm-thickness fast spin-echo (FSE) proton-density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging technique with multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in diagnosing tears of the menisci and cruciate ligaments with that of conventional MR imaging. Material and Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients underwent preoperative conventional and 1-mm-thickness FSE PDW MR imaging with subsequent knee arthroscopic surgery. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the status of the cruciate ligaments and menisci using two sets of MR images (method A: conventional images including seven sequences, taking 26 min; method B: 1-mm-thickness FSE PDW images with MPR, taking 7 min 20 s). The diagnostic efficacies of both methods for tears of the cruciate ligament and menisci were calculated and compared. Results: Arthroscopic surgery revealed 10 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, one posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tear, and 26 meniscal tears. The diagnostic values of both methods were 100% for a cruciate ligament tear. The diagnostic values (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value) for meniscal tears were 90%, 100%, 96%, 100%, and 94% for method A, and 95%, 100%, 98%, 100%, and 97% for method B, respectively. There were no significant differences in the diagnostic values between methods A and B. Conclusion: 1-mm-slice-thickness FSE PDW imaging with MPR showed comparable performance in diagnosing tears of the cruciate ligaments and menisci to conventional sequences but the scan time was much shorter. Therefore, this technique (method B) might

  3. Magnetic resonance tomography in the diagnosis of intraarticular tibial plateau fractures: value for fracture classification and spectrum of fracture-associated soft tissue injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray tomography in assessing the type of fracture, degree of comminution and amount of articular surface depression in acute tibial condylar fractures and to describe the associated soft tissue injuries diagnosed with MRI. Method: 27 patients with acute tibial plateau fractures were investigated usig linear X-ray tomography and MRI employing T1-weighted and proton density turbo spin echo, STIR, and T2-weighted gradient echo images. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification system. The degrees of depression and comminution were measured and soft tissue injuries were recorded. Results: Fractures were classified as type B1 in 7, as B2 in 6, and as B3 in 6 cases by MRI. More complex C-type fractures were diagnosed in 8 cases. MR and X-ray grading were consistent with the exception of two B3 fractures, which were graded as B1 by X-ray tomography. X-ray tomography under-estimated the degree of comminution. 63% of the patients had either meniscal tears or complete ruptures of their cruciate or collateral ligaments. Ten meniscal tears were diagnosed in 9 of 27 patients. Complete tears of the anterior cruciate ligament were seen in 4, and avulsions of the posterior cruciate ligament in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI allows a detailed assessment of acute tibial plateau fractures and can replace conventional X-ray tomography. The high rate of fracture-associated soft tissue lesions makes MRI an especially valuable tool. (orig.)

  4. Clinical characteristics of 4355 patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Yu; AO Ying-fang; WANG Jian-quan; MA Yong; ZHANG Xin; WANG Jia-ning; ZHU Jing-xian

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical features of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are important for its prevention,diagnosis and treatment.However,few studies have reported such data,especially in China.The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of ACL injury on a large cohort.Methods Between 1993 and 2007,a total of 4355 ACL deficient inpatients (612 athletes and 3743 non-athletes) were registered.Data were collected using a special database system.And the distributions of characteristics in different groups were compared and analyzed statistically.Results All subjects were confirmed with ACL tear during surgery.Statistical analysis revealed that the percentage of females in Athlete Group was significantly higher than that in Non-athlete Group (56.05% vs.24.95%,P<0.001).This study also found that sports trauma was the main cause of ACL tears.Soccer,basketball,judo,wrestling and track and field were the five most responsible activities for athletes.The average injury time for athletes was significantly shorter than that for non-athletes (413.3 days vs.717.5 days,P<0.001).Three thousand nine hundred and eight cases were ordered ACL reconstruction (76.04% single-bundle,18.30% double-bundle).Three hundred and forty-five patients (7.92%)were combined with other ligaments injuries,2667 (61.24%) were found with various grades of cartilage lesions,and 3377 (77.54%) were found with meniscal injury.Conclusions Sports trauma was the main cause of ACL tears in China,and reconstruction had become the principal surgical choice.In order to restore knee joint stability and reduce the incidence of cartilage and meniscal injury,patienttailored ACL reconstruction should be suggested at the right moment.

  5. Internal derangement of the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. This study uses magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to delineate the types and frequencies of injuries seen in the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. We also compare the results of the orthopedic knee examination with the MR findings. Design and patients. MR imaging of the ipsilateral knee was performed on 34 patients with closed femoral shaft fractures. Indications for knee MR imaging included knee pain at the time of fracture, soft tissue swelling or an effusion of the knee, or a positive knee examination under anesthesia. The patients had a mean age of 27 years and all were stabilized with intramedullary nails. Imaging was performed a mean time of 2.5 days after surgery. All patients had knee examinations done under anesthesia, and the MR results were compiled and compared with the clinical examinations. Results. Ninety-seven percent of patients demonstrated knee effusions. Twenty-seven percent of patients demonstrated meniscal tears, with the posterior horn of the medial meniscus most frequently torn. The medial collateral ligament was the most frequent site of ligamentous injury (38%) followed by the posterior cruciate ligament (21%). Fifty percent of patients had injuries of the extensor mechanism. Bone bruises were noted in 32% of patients. Articular cartilage injuries were confined to the patella in four cases. One occult tibial plateau fracture and one meniscocapsular separation were seen. Conclusions. There is a common incidence of both ligamentous and meniscal injury to the knee after ipsilateral femoral shaft fracture. MR imaging can be useful in assessing the extent of injury, and may reveal findings unsuspected after clinical examination of the knee. (orig.)

  6. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI 2, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2, n = 37), and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  7. Meniscus and ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knee is one of the major weight-bearing joints and is relatively exposed to trauma. Capsuloligamentous structures are essential to provide joint stability and - in turn - persistent instability bears a risk for osteoarthritis that needs timely and comprehensive diagnosis. Using MRI it may be beneficial to routinely apply (T)SE sequences in all three major planes as a basic protocol and to add additional sequences according to the clinical information available and imaging findings in the basic protocol. Especially fat-suppressed sequences (STIR, T2w/PDw FS TSE) are very useful because they sensitively depict bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP)-like changes. This finding often alerts the reader to - sometimes only discrete - underlying pathologies and may - if found in typical locations - give information about the mechanism of injury and thus lead the radiologist to look for specific concomitant capsuloligamentous, cartilage, and/or meniscal injury. BMEP is quite prominent in contusion injury, whereas often it is but discrete in avulsion lesions. There is extensive literature about the signs, possible pitfalls, and the accuracy of MRI for the diagnosis of specific pathologies such as meniscal tears or cruciate or collateral ligament ruptures. However, combined injuries of more than one structure are frequent and affect the therapeutic approach. Thus, the primary goal of the radiologist is to go beyond the description of any isolated lesion and to give a comprehensive description of (or to reliably exclude) any injury to other structures. A necessary prerequisite to accomplish this is a thorough knowledge of the - in some locations - complex anatomic relationships, pitfalls, and locations where lesions typically occur and where they may be overlooked. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage abnormalities of the far posterior femoral condyle of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogino, Shuhei; Huang, Thomas; Watanabe, Atsuya; Iranpour-Boroujeni, Tannaz; Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)), e-mail: hiroshi@uci.edu

    2010-01-15

    Background: Incidental articular cartilage lesions of the far posterior femoral condyle (FPFC) are commonly detected. Whether or not these cartilage lesions are symptomatic or clinically significant is unknown. Purpose: To characterize and assess prevalence of articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC and associated bone marrow edema (BME) and/or internal derangements through magnetic resonance (MR) images. Material and Methods: 654 knee MR examinations were reviewed retrospectively. Sagittal fast spin-echo proton density-weighted images with and without fat suppression were acquired with a 1.5T scanner, and were evaluated by two readers by consensus. The following factors were assessed: 1) the prevalence of cartilage abnormalities, 2) laterality, 3) the type of cartilage abnormalities, 4) cartilage abnormality grading, 5) associated BME, 6) complications such as meniscal injury and cruciate ligament injury, and 7) knee alignment (femorotibial angle [FTA]). Results: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC were demonstrated in 157 of the 654 patients (24%). Of these, 40 patients demonstrated medial and lateral FPFC cartilage abnormalities and were thus counted as 80 cases. Focal lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 117 of 197 cases (59.4%), while diffuse lateral FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 24 of 197 cases (12.2%). Focal medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 23 of 197 cases (11.6%), while diffuse medial FPFC abnormalities were demonstrated in 33 of 197 cases (16.8%). No statistically significant pattern of associated BME, FTA, or internal derangements including meniscal and cruciate ligament injury was demonstrated. Conclusion: Articular cartilage abnormalities of the FPFC are common and were demonstrated in 24% of patients or 30% of cases. Lateral FPFC abnormalities occur 2.5 times more frequently than medial FPFC abnormalities and were more frequently focal compared with medial cohorts. BME is associated in 36.5% of cases

  9. MRI evaluation of the anterolateral ligament of the knee: assessment in routine 1.5-T scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the ability of routine 1.5-T MRI scans to visualize the anterolateral ligament (ALL) and describe its path and anatomic relations with lateral knee structures. Thirty-nine 1.5-T MRI scans of the knee were evaluated. The scans included an MRI knee protocol with T1-weighted sequences, T2-weighted sequences with fat saturation, and proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin-echo sequences. Two radiologists separately reviewed all MRI scans to evaluate interobserver reliability. The ALL was divided into three portions for analyses: femoral, meniscal, and tibial. The path of the ALL was evaluated with regard to known structural parameters previously studied in this region. At least a portion of the ALL was visualized in 38 (97.8 %) cases. The meniscal portion was most visualized (94.8 %), followed by the femoral (89.7 %) and the tibial (79.4 %) portions. The three portions of the ALL were visualized in 28 (71.7 %) patients. The ALL was characterized with greater clarity on the coronal plane and was visualized as a thin, linear structure. The T1-weighted sequences showed a statistically inferior ligament visibility frequency. With regard to the T2 and PD evaluations, although the visualization frequency in PD was higher for the three portions of the ligament, only the femoral portion showed significant values. The ALL can be visualized in routine 1.5-T MRI scans. Although some of the ligament could be depicted in nearly all of the scans (97.4 %), it could only be observed in its entirety in about 71.7 % of the tests. (orig.)

  10. FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF ACCELERATED REHABILITATION IN ARTHROSCOPIC ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH BONE PATELLAR TENDON BONE GRAFT A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranyakumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION An ideal rehabilitation program post anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction enables an individual to return to pre injury levels at a faster rate with minimal to no risk of reinjury to the graft. Rehabilitation protocols have changed considerably over time in the past. It has become “aggressive”, meaning an intensive rehabilitation which includes greater variety of exercises and sports related training. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of our study is to assess the outcome of accelerated rehabilitation post anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction. METHODOLOGY 106 patients were operated by a single surgeon underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone patella tendon bone graft and partial meniscectomy for associated meniscal tear. Patients were put on an accelerated rehabilitation protocol designed in our institute on first post-operative day, under the guidance of a physical therapist in consultation with the operated surgeon. Patients were followed up at 3 weeks, 6 months and 9 months, post onset of rehabilitation, patients were assessed using KT1000 Arthrometer and Lysholm knee scoring system. RESULTS Out of 106 patients, who were selected, 96(91% were males and 10(9% were females. The mean pre-operative Lysholm score was 55.09. Post operatively, while on accelerated rehabilitation program the Lysholm scores were 69.73 at 3 weeks, 89.13 at 6 months and 89.19 at 9 months. In our pre-operative evaluation mean KT 1000 arthrometer score was 10.53 and post-operative at six months was 3.49. At nine months 105 patients had excellent results whereas 1 patient had good result. CONCLUSION Accelerated rehabilitation protocol enables the patient to functionally recover faster to pre injury levels. A rehabilitation protocol for 6 months is sufficient in enabling a patient to get back to pre-injury levels. Functional outcome is the same with or without associated meniscal injuries.

  11. Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) MR imaging in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus: Focusing on reader-defined axial reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of fat-suppressed (FS) three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) imaging in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus, including the reader-defined reformatted axial (RDA) plane. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with arthroscopically confirmed radial or root tears of the meniscus underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 2D and FS 3D VISTA sequences. MRIs were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement were calculated for radial and root tears. Both radiologists reported confidence scale for the presence of meniscal tears in 2D axial imaging, 3D axial imaging, and RDA imaging, based on a five-point scale. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare confidence scale. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FS 3D VISTA MR imaging versus 2D MR imaging were as follows: 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively in reader 1, and 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 83%, 91%, and 87%, respectively, in reader 2. Interobserver agreement for detecting meniscal tears was excellent (κ = 1) with FS 3D VISTA. The confidence scale was significantly higher for 3D axial images than 2D imaging (p = 0.03) and significantly higher in RDA images than 3D axial image in detecting radial and root tears. Conclusions: FS 3D VISTA had a better diagnostic performance in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus. The reader-defined reformatted axial plane obtained from FS 3D VISTA MR imaging is useful in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus

  12. Sutura de menisco com implantes absorvíveis Meniscus suture with absorbable implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo José Hernandez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Os autores avaliam clinicamente 19 pacientes (19 joelhos - 15 meniscos mediais e 5 laterais submetidos à sutura de menisco, utilizando 2 tipos de implantes absorvíveis (ácido polilático Arrow® e Clear fix®. O estudo compõe-se de 15 homens e 4 mulheres com idades entre 16 e 44 anos, com média de 26,8 anos. O tempo de seguimento médio foi de 24 meses, com mínimo de 18 e máximo de 32 meses. A técnica operatória constituiu-se da sutura de um ou ambos os meniscos (1 caso, via artroscópica com Arrow® em 15 pacientes e Clear fix® em 4. Dos 19 indivíduos, 6 foram submetidos à sutura meniscal isolada, 11 associada à reconstrução do LCA e 2 à reconstrução do LCA com osteotomia valgizante da tíbia. Os resultados foram avaliados segundo exame físico incluindo as manobras de Appley e Mc Murray. A avaliação funcional pré e pós-operatória do joelho foi realizada pela escala de Lysholm modificada. Todos os pacientes tiveram suas manobras meniscais negativadas no pós-operatório. A pontuação média pré-operatória segundo a escala de Lysholm foi de 39,8 subindo para 91,5 no pós-operatório. Os autores concluem que a sutura de menisco, utilizando implantes absorvíveis, tem se mostrado eficiente até o momento, e que tecnicamente ela é mais simples que a sutura convencional.The authors clinically assessed 19 patients (19 knees - 15 medial meniscus and 5 lateral meniscus submitted to meniscus suture using 2 kinds of absorbable implants (polylactic acid Arrow® and Clear fix®. The study is composed of 15 males and 4 females, ages ranging 16 - 44 years old (average = 26.8 years old. The mean follow-up time was 24 months, ranging from 18 to 32 months, at most. The surgical technique was constituted of a suture in one or both meniscus (1 case, through arthroscopy with Arrow® in 15 patients and Clear fix® in 4. From the 19 individuals, 6 were submitted to isolated meniscal suture, 11 combined to ACL reconstruction and 2 to ACL

  13. Use of acupuncture after arthroscopic knee surgery and its relationship to pain, physical activity and need of walking aid Acupuntura em relação a dor, atividade física e a necessidade de apoio para a marcha, no pós-operatório das cirurgias artroscópicas no joelho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rassen Saidah

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Acupuncture in the postoperative arthroscopic knee surgery, using "The Opposite Side" technique from the Traditional Chinese Medicine. The 36 pain in the knee were grouped according to the disorders found during the arthroscopic surgery: 50% with isolated lesion of the medial meniscus, 19.44% with lesion of the medial meniscus associated to knee arthrosis ,11.11% with lesion of lateral meniscus associated to knee arthrosis, 8.33% with isolated lesion of lateral meniscus of the knee, 2.77% lesion of both isolated meniscus, 2.77%with lesion of both isolated meniscus, 2.77% with chrondomalacia patella, and 2.77% were free body carrier. Group I, 18 patients (Acupuncture were submitted to 20 acupuncture session. Contralateral points of acupuncture were performed in the injured knee. Group II, 18 patients (Physiotherapy were submitted to 20 physiotherapy sessions under the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The non-parametrical analysis of the results showed that either the subjective data (pain intensity, difficulty in walking, in crouching, on going upstairs/downstairs, on running, on using some support walking presented good results in the majority of the studied parameters. Although, the results of the treatment were similar, the acupuncture showed better results since it presented earlier improvement than the physiotherapy.O presente estudo teve a finalidade de avaliar a eficácia da Acupuntura no pós-operatório das cirurgias artroscópicas no joelho utilizando-se a técnica "ao oposto" da Medicina Tradicional Chinesa. Os 36 pacientes portadores de gonalgias foram distribuídos conforme a patologia encontrada nas artroscopias cirúrgicas: 50,0% tinham lesão do menisco medial isolada, 19,44% lesão meniscal medial associada à artrose de joelho, 11,11% lesão meniscal lateral associada à artrose de joelho, 8,33% lesão meniscal lateral isolada de joelho, 2

  14. Distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon: MR imaging with anatomic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon with MR imaging, correlated with findings in cadavers. Four fresh cadaveric specimens were studied with 3-T MR imaging. Sequences included proton density (PD) sequences (TE, 13; TR, 4957; FOV, 170 x 170; matrix, 424 x 413; NA, 2; slice thickness, 2.5 mm) in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes and 3D fast field echo (FFE) sequences (TR 9.4; TE 6.9; FOV, 159 x 105; matrix, 200 x 211; NA, 2; slice thickness, 0.57 mm). One specimen was dissected and three specimens were sectioned with a bandsaw in the axial, coronal, and sagittal plane. The sections were photographed and correlated with MR images. To standardize the analysis, the semimembranosus muscle and tendon were assessed at seven levels for the axial sections, and at three levels for the coronal and sagittal sections. Anatomic dissection revealed six insertions of the distal semimembranosus tendon: direct arm, anterior arm, posterior oblique ligament extension, oblique popliteal ligament extension, distal tibial expansion (popliteus aponeurosis), and meniscal arm. Axial MR images showed five of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament extension, posterior oblique ligament extension, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images showed four of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament arm, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images were ideal for showing the direct arm insertion, but were less optimal than the axial images for showing the other insertions. The anterior arm was seen but volume averaging was present with the gracilis tendon. Coronal MR images optimally revealed the anterior arm, although magic angle artifact was present at its posterior aspect. The common semimembranosus tendon and meniscal arm were also well depicted. The division in anterior arm, direct arm, and oblique popliteal ligament arm was poorly seen on coronal images due to

  15. Distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon: MR imaging with anatomic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeseneer, Michel de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam; Milants, Annemieke; Ridder, Filip de; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest University, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Cattrysse, Erik [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Experimental Anatomy, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the distal insertions of the semimembranosus tendon with MR imaging, correlated with findings in cadavers. Four fresh cadaveric specimens were studied with 3-T MR imaging. Sequences included proton density (PD) sequences (TE, 13; TR, 4957; FOV, 170 x 170; matrix, 424 x 413; NA, 2; slice thickness, 2.5 mm) in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes and 3D fast field echo (FFE) sequences (TR 9.4; TE 6.9; FOV, 159 x 105; matrix, 200 x 211; NA, 2; slice thickness, 0.57 mm). One specimen was dissected and three specimens were sectioned with a bandsaw in the axial, coronal, and sagittal plane. The sections were photographed and correlated with MR images. To standardize the analysis, the semimembranosus muscle and tendon were assessed at seven levels for the axial sections, and at three levels for the coronal and sagittal sections. Anatomic dissection revealed six insertions of the distal semimembranosus tendon: direct arm, anterior arm, posterior oblique ligament extension, oblique popliteal ligament extension, distal tibial expansion (popliteus aponeurosis), and meniscal arm. Axial MR images showed five of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament extension, posterior oblique ligament extension, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images showed four of six insertions: direct arm, anterior arm, oblique popliteal ligament arm, and distal tibial expansion. Sagittal MR images were ideal for showing the direct arm insertion, but were less optimal than the axial images for showing the other insertions. The anterior arm was seen but volume averaging was present with the gracilis tendon. Coronal MR images optimally revealed the anterior arm, although magic angle artifact was present at its posterior aspect. The common semimembranosus tendon and meniscal arm were also well depicted. The division in anterior arm, direct arm, and oblique popliteal ligament arm was poorly seen on coronal images due to

  16. THE FUNCTIONAL OUTCOME OF MANAGEMENT OF SCHATZKER TYPE II AND III TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES TREATED WITH INDIRECT ELEVATION, PERCUTANEOUS FIXATION AND BONE GRAFTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheshagiri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Damage to the joint is more extensive in tibia plateau fractures than the roentgenograms Indicate. It may be associated with soft tissue trauma, ligament injuries (4-33% medial Collateral ligament being the most common, meniscal injuries (20%, lateral collateral Ligament injury (3%, peroneal nerve injuries (3%. Posttraumatic arthritis is associated with residual instability or axial malalignment rather than joint depression. So we use minimally invasive approach to the depressed tibial plateau fractures (Schatzker type II & III. MATERIALS AND METHODS 32 patients were studied. They were followed up for maximum of 3yrs and a minimum of 1.5yrs with an average of 2.2yrs. Inclusion criteria included those patients with an age group between 20yrs and 60yrs, joint depression more than 3mm. Patients with open fracture, severe osteoporotic bones and with radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis are excluded from the study. CT was done in all patients. Mean age group was 28.8yrs and 19(76% were males; the mean articular depression was 11.32 mm measured in CT. Pre-op evaluation includes x-rays of the knee, stress x-rays if needed, and CT was done with 2mm limited cuts. Cancellous Bone graft was taken from opposite tibia through a 3-4cm long incision made below the tibial tuberosity over the medial aspect of the tibia. Cortical window was made in the affected limb, just enough to introduce the punch, and its position was confirmed under c-arm and depressed fragment was elevated with punch and reduction was held with k wires in subarticular plane and later two cannulated cancellous screws was introduced and the defect packed with bone grafts, Post-operatively all patients were immobilized with plaster of Paris (POP for 3 weeks and then mobilized. RESULTS The mean duration of the follow up was 2.2yrs. Results were excellent in 21 patients (84%, good 3(12% and fair in 1 patients (4% according to anatomic and functional criteria by Hohl and Luck

  17. Ressonância magnética da osteonecrose do joelho: estudo de 19 casos Magnetic resonance imaging of knee osteonecrosis: a study of 19 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Leme da Cunha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os achados epidemiológicos, clínicos e de ressonância magnética da osteonecrose das porções distal do fêmur e proximal da tíbia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Avaliação de 19 pacientes (12 mulheres e 7 homens, sem história prévia de fatores causais, com achados à ressonância magnética sugestivos de osteonecrose do platô tibial ou côndilo femoral. RESULTADOS: Verificou-se a presença de anormalidades osteocondrais em 63,1% dos casos e em 73,6% destes houve associação com lesão meniscal ipsilateral. Houve também importante associação com edema na medular óssea em correspondência (grau III em 16 casos. CONCLUSÃO: A ressonância magnética demonstrou ser um método não invasivo com boa sensibilidade no diagnóstico da osteonecrose do joelho, bem como das lesões associadas, sendo mais frequente nas mulheres (63% dos casos.OBJECTIVE: To describe epidemiological, clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteonecrosis in the distal femur and proximal tibia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Evaluation of 19 patients (12 women and 7 men, with no previous history of causative factors, with magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of osteonecrosis in the tibial plateau or femoral condyle. RESULTS: Osteochondral abnormalities were observed in 63.1% of the cases; in 73.6% of them, such abnormality was associated with ipsilateral meniscal lesion. Also, a significant association with bone marrow edema (grade III in 16 cases was observed. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated to be a noninvasive method with good sensitivity in the diagnosis of knee osteonecrosis as well as of associated lesions which are most frequently found in women (63% of cases.

  18. Identification of factors associated with the development of knee osteoarthritis in a young to middle-aged cohort of patients with knee complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huétink, Kasper; Stoel, Berend C; Watt, Iain; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Bloem, Johan L; Malm, Steve H; Van't Klooster, Ronald; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA) development in a young to middle-aged population with sub-acute knee complaints. This, in order to define high risk patients who may benefit from early preventive or future disease modifying therapies. Knee OA development visible on radiographs and MR in 319 patients (mean age 41.5 years) 10 years after sub-acute knee complaints and subjective knee function (KOOS score) was studied. Associations between OA development and age, gender, activity level, BMI, meniscal or anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions, OA in first-degree relatives and radiographic hand OA were determined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. OA on radiographs and MR in the TFC is associated with increased age (OR: 1.10, 95 % 1.04-1.16 and OR: 1.07, 95 % 1.02-1.13). TFC OA on radiographs only is associated with ACL and/or meniscal lesions (OR: 5.01, 95 % 2.14-11.73), presence of hand OA (OR: 4.69, 95 % 1.35-16.32) and higher Tegner activity scores at baseline before the complaints (OR: 1.20, 95 % 1.01-1.43). The presence of OA in the TFC diagnosed only on MRI is associated with a family history of OA (OR: 2.44, 95 % 1.18-5.06) and a higher BMI (OR: 1.13, 95 % 1.04-1.23). OA in the PFC diagnosed on both radiographs and MR is associated with an increased age (OR: 1.06, 95 % 1.02-1.12 and OR: 1.05, 95 % 1.00-1.09). PFC OA diagnosed on radiographs only is associated with a higher BMI (OR: 1.12, 95 % 1.02-1.22). The presence of OA in the PFC diagnosed on MR only is associated with the presence of hand OA (OR: 3.39, 95 % 1.10-10.50). Compared to normal reference values, the study population had significantly lower KOOS scores in the different subscales. These results show that knee OA development in young to middle aged patients with a history of sub-acute knee complaints is associated with the presence of known risk factors for knee OA. OA is already visible on radiographs and MRI after 10

  19. Surgeons' knowledge about the costs of orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohman, Lebur; Hadi, Saifullah; Whitwell, George

    2014-08-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate consultant surgeons' knowledge about the costs of implants for various joint surgeries. METHODS. Questionnaires were distributed to consultant orthopaedic surgeons at 2 hospitals. Respondents were asked to estimate the implant costs of any brand for low-demand and high-demand total hip replacement (THR), total knee replacement (TKR), uni-compartmental knee replacement, arthroscopy shaver blade, total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) fixation, and meniscal repair. The actual cost of each implant was obtained from the manufacturer. RESULTS. 16 consultant surgeons completed the questionnaires. The respective mean estimated and actual costs for a low-demand THR implant were £1714 (range, £600-3000) and £1448 (range, £985- 2335), with an overestimation of 18.4%. The respective costs for a high-demand THR implant were £2172 (range, £600-6000) and £1737 (range, £1192-2335), with an overestimation of 25%. The respective costs for a TKR implant were £1550 (range, £600-6000) and £1316 (range, £995-1535), with an overestimation of 17.8%. The respective costs for a uni-compartmental knee replacement implant were £1040 (range, £600-2000) and £1296 (range, £698-1470), with an underestimation of 19.7%. The respective costs for an arthroscopy shaver blade were £110 (range, £75-150) and £94 (range, £80-100), with an overestimation of 16.6%. The respective costs for a total ACL fixation implant were £246 (range, £80-500) and £306 (range, £272-335), with an underestimation of 19.4%. The respective costs for a meniscal repair implant were £153 (range, £50-250) and £242 (range, £170-260), with an underestimation of 37%. CONCLUSION. The knowledge among consultant orthopaedic surgeons about implant costs was poor. To reduce implant costs, cooperation between surgeons and hospital managers and measures to increase surgeons' awareness about cost-reduction programmes are needed. PMID:25163960

  20. Uranium hetero-bimetallic complexes: synthesis, structure and magnetic properties; Complexes heterobimetalliques de l'uranium: synthese, structure et proprietes magnetiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Borgne, Th

    2000-10-04

    The aim of this thesis is to synthesize molecular complexes with uranium and transition metal ions in close proximity, to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between them. We decided to use Schiff bases as assembling ligands, which are unusual for uranium (IV). Although the simplest Schiff bases, such as H{sub 2}Salen, lead to ligand exchange reactions, the bi-compartmental Schiff base H{sub 4}L{sup 6} (bis(3-hydroxy-salicylidene) - 2,2-dimethyl-propylene) allows the crystal structure determination of the complex [L{sup 6}Cu(pyr)]U[L{sup 6}Cu].2pyr, obtained by reaction of the metallo-ligand H{sub 2}L{sup 6}Cu with U(acac){sub 4}. In this manner, the complexes [L{sup 6}Co(pyr)]{sub 2}U and [L{sup 6}Ni(pyr)]{sub 2}U.pyr were also isolated, as well as the compounds in which the paramagnetic ions have been exchanged by the diamagnetic ions Zn{sup II}, Zr{sup IV} and Th{sup IV}': [L{sup 6}Zn(pyr)]{sub 2}U, [L{sup 6}Cu]{sub 2}Zr and [L{sup 6}Cu(pyr)]Th[L{sup 6}Cu].2pyr. These complexes are the first which involve three metallic centres assembling by the means of a hexa-dentate Schiff base. The crystalline structures show, for all these complexes, the outstanding orthogonal arrangement of the two fragments L{sup 6}M around the central atom which is in a dodecahedral environment of eight oxygen atoms of two Schiff bases. The syntheses of the isostructural complexes Cu2{sup II} and Zn{sub 2}U in which the uranium (IV) ion is close, in the first one, to the paramagnetic ion Cu{sup II} and, in the second one, to the diamagnetic ion Zn{sup II}, has allowed the use of the empiric method to determine the nature of the magnetic interaction between an f element and a transition metal. The comparison of the magnetic behaviour of two complexes Cu{sub 2}U and Zn{sub 2}U, expressed by the variation of {chi}T vs T, reveals the ferromagnetic interaction in the heart of the triad Cu-U-Cu. The magnetic behaviour of the complexes Cu{sub 2}Th et Cu{sub 2}Zr which does not

  1. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia patients, a basis for optimizing the dosing regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galactéros Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxyurea (HU is the first approved pharmacological treatment of sickle cell anemia (SCA. The objectives of this study were to develop population pharmacokinetic(PK-pharmacodynamic(PD models for HU in order to characterize the exposure-efficacy relationships and their variability, compare two dosing regimens by simulations and develop some recommendations for monitoring the treatment. Methods The models were built using population modelling software NONMEM VII based on data from two clinical studies of SCA adult patients receiving 500-2000 mg of HU once daily. Fetal hemoglobin percentage (HbF% and mean corpuscular volume (MCV were used as biomarkers for response. A sequential modelling approach was applied. Models were evaluated using simulation-based techniques. Comparisons of two dosing regimens were performed by simulating 10000 patients in each arm during 12 months. Results The PK profiles were described by a bicompartmental model. The median (and interindividual coefficient of variation (CV of clearance was 11.6 L/h (30%, the central volume was 45.3 L (35%. PK steady-state was reached in about 35 days. For a given dosing regimen, HU exposure varied approximately fivefold among patients. The dynamics of HbF% and MCV were described by turnover models with inhibition of elimination of response. In the studied range of drug exposures, the effect of HU on HbF% was at its maximum (median Imax was 0.57, CV was 27%; the effect on MCV was close to its maximum, with median value of 0.14 and CV of 49%. Simulations showed that 95% of the steady-state levels of HbF% and MCV need 26 months and 3 months to be reached, respectively. The CV of the steady-state value of HbF% was about 7 times larger than that of MCV. Simulations with two different dosing regimens showed that continuous dosing led to a stronger HbF% increase in some patients. Conclusions The high variability of response to HU was related in part to pharmacokinetics and

  2. Incidence of Soft-Tissue Injuries in Patients with Posterolateral Tibial Plateau Fractures: A Retrospective Review from 2009 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanqing; Cao, Fujiang; Liu, Minghui; Wang, Jiantao; Jia, Shikong

    2016-08-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine the incidence of soft-tissue injuries in patients with posterolateral tibial plateau fractures. Methods The data of 265 patients who had sustained posterolateral tibial plateau fractures between May 2009 and Aug 2014 were retrospectively reviewed using a picture archiving and communication system. Fractures were classified according to the Schatzker, AO/OTA, and quadrant classification systems. Soft-tissue injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), lateral collateral ligament (LCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), lateral meniscus, and medial meniscus injuries, were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Results The overall incidence of ACL and PCL tears was 80 and 36%, respectively. Nine (36%) patients sustained ACL footprint avulsions and three (12%) had complete ACL tears. A total of 19 (76%) patients had LCL injuries, and 15 (64%) had MCL injuries. The incidence of lateral meniscus tears was 48%, while that of medial meniscus tears was 4%. Conclusion Posterolateral tibial plateau fractures were associated with a high incidence of soft-tissue injuries, especially ACL footprint avulsions and lateral meniscus tears. The preoperative MRI examination was important for surgeons to decide whether the ligament and meniscal injuries should be treated simultaneously with the repair of the bone fractures. PMID:27183240

  3. A-B Hourglass Technique in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a period of 2 years starting from April 2000 to November 2002, fifty (50) cases of torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) were treated and followed up using our simple modified technique in a retrospective non-randomized study conducted in Saudi-German Hospital, Saudi Arabia. All of which had torn ACL either isolated or associated with meniscal tear. Some of our study group was subjected arthroscopic interference in the same knee before either in the form of ACL reconstruction using P-T-B graft or for menisectomy. During this study per-operative evaluation, intra-operative technique and post-operative follow-up were standardized, with maximum follow-up period of 19 months and minimum follow-up period of 9 month. The final outcome was graded according to Lyshom knee score (1982). The mean age at surgery was 26.5 (from 17 to 36 years). The study group included 11 isolated torn ACL, 29 torn ACL with tear in the medial meniscus, 4 torn ACL with lateral meniscus tear and 6 cases with torn ACL associated with tear in both menisci. All of the cases were treated using the same technique. (author)

  4. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  5. In Vitro Testing of Scaffolds for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Meniscus Tissue Engineering—Introducing a New Biocompatibility Scoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix P. Achatz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A combination of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and scaffolds seems to be a promising approach for meniscus repair. To facilitate the search for an appropriate scaffold material a reliable and objective in vitro testing system is essential. This paper introduces a new scoring for this purpose and analyzes a hyaluronic acid (HA gelatin composite scaffold and a polyurethane scaffold in combination with MSCs for tissue engineering of meniscus. The pore quality and interconnectivity of pores of a HA gelatin composite scaffold and a polyurethane scaffold were analyzed by surface photography and Berliner-Blau-BSA-solution vacuum filling. Further the two scaffold materials were vacuum-filled with human MSCs and analyzed by histology and immunohistochemistry after 21 days in chondrogenic media to determine cell distribution and cell survival as well as proteoglycan production, collagen type I and II content. The polyurethane scaffold showed better results than the hyaluronic acid gelatin composite scaffold, with signs of central necrosis in the HA gelatin composite scaffolds. The polyurethane scaffold showed good porosity, excellent pore interconnectivity, good cell distribution and cell survival, as well as an extensive content of proteoglycans and collagen type II. The polyurethane scaffold seems to be a promising biomaterial for a mesenchymal stem cell-based tissue engineering approach for meniscal repair. The new score could be applied as a new standard for in vitro scaffold testing.

  6. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint meniscus; Le menisque de l`ATM en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujol, A.; Pharaboz, C. [Hopital des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (France); Foucart, J.M.; Carpentier, D.; Pajoni, D. [Paris-7 Univ., 75 (France); Deffrennes, D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-09-01

    The continuing improvement of the MRI`s equipments and softwares led us to a continuous adaptation of the exam technique. We use today a bilateral coil technique, 3 inches in diameter. Four slices are performed for each articulation (4 mm thick) in the true sagittal plane. A fast spin echo, balanced in proton density, for one minute, allows the study of 15 steps inside a full open/close cycle. Oblique coronal cuts are also performed parallel to the long axis of the condyle in a T 1-weighted spin echo sequence in close and half-open positions. The analysis of 350 subjects allows to detail more precisely the meniscal displacement. Beside the classic anterior luxation, the meniscus slips medially, laterally and may rotate. These different situations may be isolated or combined. The dynamic study is specifically useful in the displacement with reduction exams. It enables permits to point out the timing of the disk disturbances: this information may be of great help in therapeutic decisions. (authors). 17 refs., 24 figs.

  7. MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuing improvement of the MRI's equipments and softwares led us to a continuous adaptation of the exam technique. We use today a bilateral coil technique, 3 inches in diameter. Four slices are performed for each articulation (4 mm thick) in the true sagittal plane. A fast spin echo, balanced in proton density, for one minute, allows the study of 15 steps inside a full open/close cycle. Oblique coronal cuts are also performed parallel to the long axis of the condyle in a T 1-weighted spin echo sequence in close and half-open positions. The analysis of 350 subjects allows to detail more precisely the meniscal displacement. Beside the classic anterior luxation, the meniscus slips medially, laterally and may rotate. These different situations may be isolated or combined. The dynamic study is specifically useful in the displacement with reduction exams. It enables permits to point out the timing of the disk disturbances: this information may be of great help in therapeutic decisions. (authors). 17 refs., 24 figs

  8. Retrospective Evaluation Of MRI Findings Of Knee Joint In 255 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Mete

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrospective evaluation of knee MRI obtained from 255 cases and to demonstrate most common knee joint pathologies in our region.In our study knee joints of 255 cases who admitted to different clinics of our hospital with various complains of knee between October 1996 and December 1998 were examined in wide spectrum with MRI. Via 1.0 Tesla MRI device and special knee coil in sagittal, coronal and axial plains MRI images were obtained. The number of male and female patients were 173 and 82 and their ages were ranged between 14 and 70, and the mean age was 3413.The most common knee pathologies were intra-articular fluid (%58.04, medial (%46,66 and lateral (%12.55 meniscal injuries, anterior cruciate ligament injury (%17.25 and osteoarthritis (%14.9. The other important lesions were degeneration of medial and lateral meniscus, Baker’s cyst, bursitis, posterior cruciate ligament injury , medial and lateral collateral ligament injuries, synovial hypertrophy, chondromalasia of patella, and contusion.In our images of knee the most common lesions were injuries of meniscus and ligament. Because of being noninvasive technique for knee joint pathologies, capacity of multiplanar imaging, high contrast resolution and chance of detailed anatomic evaluation MR imaging was found to be most appropriate imaging technique for knee joint pathologies.

  9. The anterior cruciate ligament-lateral meniscus complex: A histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kodama, Yuya; Maehara, Ami; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-03-01

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus (LM) dives underneath the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Although the distinct role of meniscal attachments has been investigated, the relationship between the LM anterior insertion (LMAI) and ACL tibial insertion (ACLTI) remains unclear. This study histologically analyzed the LMAI and ACLTI. Samples were divided into four regions in an anterior-to-posterior direction. Histological measurements of these insertion sites were performed using safranin O-stained coronal sections. Distribution and signal densities of type I and II collagen were quantified. The ACLTI and LMAI formed the ACL-LM complex via fiber connections. The anterior part of the ACLTI had a widespread attachment composed of dense fibers. Attachment fibers of the LMAI became dense and wide gradually at the middle-to-posterior region. The ACL-LM transition zone (ALTZ) was observed between the LMAI and the lateral border of the ACLTI at the middle part of the ACL tibial footprint. Type II collagen density of the LMAI was higher than that of the ACLTI and ALTZ. Our results can help create an accurate tibial bone tunnel within the dense ACL attachment during ACL reconstruction surgery. PMID:26631325

  10. MR of physeal fractures of the adolescent knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, B.J.; Strouse, P.J. [Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, University of Michigan Health System, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess physeal fractures of the pediatric knee identified by MR imaging and to describe the MR findings of such fractures. The authors reviewed 315 consecutive pediatric knee MR examinations done to assess for traumatic injury. The MR images were reviewed for evidence of physeal fracture. Fractures were classified by the Salter-Harris system, and associated findings and injuries were noted. Plain radiographs and medical records were reviewed. Seven distal femoral physeal fractures (Salter II, n = 6; Salter III, n = 1) and two proximal tibia physeal fractures (Salter III, n = 1; complex Salter IV, n = 1) were identified. Magnetic resonance demonstrated widening of a portion of the physis with visualization of a metaphyseal/epiphyseal fracture line. Periosteal elevation was observed in six cases. Four patients had associated ligamentous or meniscal injuries. Plain radiographs were available for review in eight patients. Bone abnormalities suggesting fracture were evident in six of eight patients; however, the fracture was fully delineated in only one patient. The diagnosis or confirmation of fracture by MR changed clinical management in seven of eight patients in whom follow-up was available. Physeal fractures of the pediatric knee are occasionally diagnosed by MR. Magnetic resonance provides improved delineation of non-displaced physeal fractures of the knee, while simultaneously allowing for evaluation of soft tissue structures. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  12. MRI evaluation of the posterior meniscus root tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the value of MRI for diagnosing the posterior meniscus root tear. Methods: MR examinations of 30 patients with tear of the posterior meniscus root confirmed by knee arthroscopies were retrospectively reviewed. Of the 30 patients, 17 with posterior medial meniscus root tear (MMRT) and 13 with posterior lateral meniscus root tear (LMRT). The diagnostic sensitivity of' MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was analyzed. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the detection rate of MRI for MMRT with that for LMRT. Results: All 17 cases with MMRT and 9 cases out of 13 with LMRT were correctly diagnosed by MRI and the diagnostic sensitivity of MRI for the posterior meniscus root tear was 86.7% (26/30). The main MR appearance of the posterior meniscus root tear was distortion of the meniscal root, with its low signal replaced by abnormal high signal. The detection rate of MRI for MMRT (17/17) was significantly greater than that for LMRT (9/13) (P=0.026). The prevalence of MMRT associated with meniscus extrusion (15/17) was significantly greater than that of LMRT (6/13) (P=0.020), but the prevalence of MMRT associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury (5/17) was significantly lower than that of LMRT (11/13) (P=0.004). Conclusion: MRI is a relatively good method for detection of posterior meniscus root tears and associated injuries. (authors)

  13. Accuracy of Lachman and Anterior Drawer Tests for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Makhmalbaf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: The knee joint is prone to injury because of its complexity and weight-bearing function. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL ruptures happen in young and physically active population and can result in instability, meniscal tears, and articular cartilage damage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of Lachman and anterior drawer test in ACL injury in compare with arthroscopy.   Methods: In a descriptive, analytical study from 2009 to 2013, 653 patients who were suspected to ACL rapture were entered the study. Statistical analysis was performed by the usage of SPSS 19.0. Multiple comparison procedure was performed for comparing data between clinical examination and arthroscopic findings and their relation with age and sex. Results: Mean age of patients was 28.3±7.58 years (range from 16 to 68 years. From 428 patients, 41.2% (175 patients were between 26 and 35, 38.8% (165 ones between 15 and 25 and 20% (85 patients over 36 years. 414 patients were male (97.2% and 12 were female (2.8%. Sensitivity of anterior drawer test was 94.4% and sensitivity of Lachman test was 93.5%. Conclusion: The diagnosis and decision to reconstruct ACL injury can be reliably made regard to the anterior drawer and Lachman tests result. The tests did not have privilege to each other. These test accuracy increased considerably under anesthesia especially in women.

  14. Solvent-free fabrication of micro-porous polyurethane amide and polyurethane-urea scaffolds for repair and replacement of the knee-joint meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaans, C J; Belgraver, V W; Rienstra, O; de Groot, J H; Veth, R P; Pennings, A J

    2000-12-01

    New porous polyurethane urea and polyurethane amide scaffolds for meniscal reconstruction have been developed in a solvent-free process. As soft segments, copolymers of 50/50 L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone have been used. After terminating the soft segment with diisocyanates, chain extension was performed with adipic acid and water. Reaction between the isocyanate groups and adipic acid or water provides carbon dioxide and results in a porous polymer. Extra hydroxyl-terminated prepolymer was added in order to regulate the amount of carbon dioxide formed in the foaming reaction. Furthermore, salt crystals ranging in size from 150 to 355 microm were added in order to induce macroporosity. The pore size was regulated by addition of surfactant and by the use of ultrasonic waves. The resulting porous polymer scaffolds exhibit good mechanical properties like a high-compression modulus of 150 kPa. Chain extension with adipic acid results in better mechanical properties due to better defined hard segments. This results from the lower nucleophilicity of carboxylic acids compared to water and alcohols. By adjusting the reaction conditions, materials in which macropores are interconnected by micropores can be obtained. On degradation only non-toxic products will be released; importantly, the materials were obtained by a simple, reproducible and solvent-free procedure. PMID:11055293

  15. MR findings in iliotibial band syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, G.; Yamato, M. [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi-ken 321-02 (Japan); Tamai, K. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Tochigi-ken (Japan); Takahashi, J. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shimizu Municipal Hospital, Shimizu (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Objective. To elucidate the MR findings in iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Design and patients. The subjects comprised four patients (five knees) with lateral knee pain: two athletes and two non-athletes. One non-athlete was engaged in work requiring repetitive knee movement, and the other suffered from Cushing syndrome and had bilateral abnormalities. All patients were suspected of having a lateral meniscal tear prior to MR examination, but physical examination following provisional MR diagnosis warranted the final diagnosis. MR studies included fast spin echo sagittal imaging, fat-saturated fast spin echo proton density coronal imaging, and T2* radial imaging. Twelve normal volunteers were examined. Results and conclusion. Fat-saturated coronal imaging demonstrated an ill-defined, high-intensity area deep to the ITB. T2* radial imaging showed an identical, but less conspicuous, abnormality. The MR finding suggested soft tissue inflammation and/or edema rather than focal fluid collection in the bursae. The signal alteration predominated in the region beneath the posterior fibers of the ITB, thus supporting the current opinion that the posterior fibers of the ITB are tighter against the lateral femoral epicondyle than the anterior fibers. The ITB itself did not show any signal alteration or increased thickness. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lu [Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Shanghai Tissue Engineering Center, Shanghai 9th People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Spector, Myron, E-mail: luzhangmd@gmail.co [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  17. Obesity-related juvenile form of cartilage lesions: a new affliction in the knees of morbidly obese children and adolescents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widhalm, Harald K.; Marlovits, Stefan; Vecsei, Vilmos [Medical University of Vienna, Center for Joints and Cartilage, Department of Traumatology, Vienna (Austria); Welsch, Goetz H. [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University Hospital of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Dirisamer, Albert [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Neuhold, Andreas [Private Hospital Rudolfinerhaus, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Griensven, Martijn van [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Experimental and Clinical Traumatology, Vienna (Austria); Seemann, Rudolf [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Cranio-Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, Kurt [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-03-15

    Overweight and obesity are afflictions that lead to an increased risk of health problems including joint problems. The aim of the study was to assess the condition of articular cartilage in obese adolescent patients suffering from knee pain. MRI of 24 knees of 20 morbidly obese patients, mean age 14.2 years, was performed in an open 1.0 Tesla MR system, where the cartilage, the quality and structure of the menisci, and the presence or absence of surrounding changes was examined. In all patients a cartilage lesion in at least one region of the knee could be detected. Retropatellar cartilage lesions have been found in 19 knees. Ten cartilage lesions grade I, and four lesions grade II have been described in the lateral compartment of the knee, whereas the medial compartment showed in eight cases a grade I, in 13 cases a grade II and in two cases a grade III cartilage lesion. Meniscal changes were assessed in most patients. Morbidly obese children and adolescents show major abnormalities in the articular cartilage of the knee. Whether obesity alone is the causal factor for the development of the pattern of these changes, remains to be seen. (orig.)

  18. CURENT LANDMARKS IN THE ATHLETES’ RECOVERY WITH MENISCO-LIGAMENTARY INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Predescu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available For over 30 years the recovery and reeducation post - surgery protocols are beeing adapted to the progressmade in the field of surgical techniques. The surgical revolution of the meniscal and ligament pathology,determined by the use of the arthroscope was followed by a new approach of the recovery of patients withmeniscectomy with or without associated ligamentoplastyFrom the theoretical point of view, the reeducation has to allow stimulations which would favor thereformation of the colagen fibres in the injured structures. In practice, though, the goal of the recovery processaims at a stable and functional knee, which allows the reintegration of the athlete in the training and competitionactivities as soon as possible, beeing known that the removal from the competitive activities has a negativeimpact all the more powerful if the inactivity is longer..The arthroscopy, through the minimal suffering inflicted, allows a much quicker resumption of activitycompared to the classical meniscectomy. This was, actually, the major argument for using this surgical techniquewith performance athletes, and afterwards in major population.There are many recovery protocols. Some of them are conservatory (24, 69, 89, whilst others are extremelyagressive, accelerated (10, 219, 221. The general opinion tends towards an active reeducation with the fast andcomplete recovery of the extension (170, 175. All aim toward the same thing: the return of the athlete to thecompetition activity as soon as possible, without the risk of a recurrent injury.

  19. MR imaging of the meniscofemoral ligament : incidence and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Min; Yoo, Wjoo Kyoung; Suh, Jin Suck; Jeon, Pyeong Jeon; Hwang, Geum Joo; Kim, Yoo Cheol; Lee, Hae Yeon [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-05-01

    To demonstrate the incidence and variation of the meniscofemoral ligament in Koreans. A total of 100 MR studies of 95 patients were reviewed with special attention to the appearance and incidence of the meniscofemoral ligaments. The ligament. the ligament of Wrisberg was classified according to proximal insertion : type I, insertion at the posterofemoral condyle ; type II, insertion at the distal portion of the posterior cruciate ligament ; type III, insertion at the distal portion of the posterior cruciate ligament. on T2-weighted images, the high signal at the meniscal insertion of the meniscofemoral ligament was classified according to its shape. The ligament o Humprey was observed in 17 cases and the ligament of Wrisberg was in 90 : type I in 41 cases ; type II, 19 cases ; type III, in 28 cases ; unclassified , in 2 cases. In 77 cases, the cleft with high signal intensity was seen between the menicsofemoral ligament and the posterior cruciate ligament. From our results, the incidence of the ligament of Wrisberg on MRI was more prevelant than the ligament of Humprey. An exact knowledge of the meniscofemoral ligament could be helpful in distinguishing it from pathologic lesions.

  20. MRI diagnosis of ACL bundle tears: value of oblique axial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Alex W.H.; Griffith, James F.; Hung, Esther H.Y. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China); Law, Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick S.H. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2013-02-15

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of oblique axial intermediate weighting MR imaging in detecting partial thickness anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundle tears. The study protocol was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Sixty-one subjects (43 male, 18 female; mean age 27.4 years; range 9 to 57 years) with clinically suspected ACL tear or meniscal tear between September 2009 and January 2011 were studied with MRI and arthroscopy. Detection of partial tear for the ACL as a whole and for each ACL bundle by protocol A (standard orthogonal sequences) and protocol B (standard orthogonal sequences plus oblique axial intermediate weighted imaging) was compared in a blinded fashion. Performance characteristics for protocol A and protocol B were compared using sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and ROC curves. A two-tailed p value of <0.05 indicated statistical significance. Fifteen (24.6%) normal, 15 (24.6%) partial and 31 complete tears were diagnosed by arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of protocol A for the diagnosis of partial tear of the ACL was 33%, 87% and 74%, while for protocol B the values were 87%, 87% and 87% respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) for the diagnosis of partial ACL tear and individual bundle tear was higher for protocol B, although this difference did not reach statistical significance (p > 0.05). The addition of oblique axial imaging to standard MR imaging improves diagnostic accuracy for detecting partial tears of the ACL as well as individual bundle tears of the ACL. (orig.)

  1. Diagnosis of popliteus injuries with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.R. [Providence Milwaukie Hospital, OR (United States); Quinn, S.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); Wensel, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Arizona School of Medicine, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kim, J.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Michigan State Univ. Clinical Center, East Lansing, MI (United States); Demlow, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Good Samaritan Hospital and Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The study included 24 patients where the diagnoses of popliteal injuries were prospectively made based on MR appearances. The study group was taken from 2412 consecutive knee MRIs. The injuries were characterized as to involving the muscular or tendinous portions of the popliteus apparatus. In 95.8% (23/24) of patients, the tears of the popliteus involved the muscular portion. The injuries were either partial and interstitial or complete. Three patients had tears of both the muscular and tendinous portions or the tendon alone. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were torn in 16.7% (4/24) and 29.2% (7/24) of patients, respectively. There were medial and lateral meniscal tears in 45.8% (11/24) and 25% (6/24) of patients, respectively. There were injuries of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments in 8.3% (2/24) and 4.2% (1/24) of patients, respectively. Bone bruises and/or fractures were seen in 33.3% (8/24) patients. In 8.3% (2/24) of patients, the popliteus injury was an isolated finding. (orig./MG)

  2. MR imaging findings in early osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karachalios, Theofilos E-mail: kar@med.uth.gr; Zibis, Aristidis; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Roidis, Nikolaos

    2004-06-01

    Purpose: To carry out a modern diagnostic survey among patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of early osteoarthritis of the knee. Materials and methods:A magnetic resonance imaging survey was performed on 70 patients (82 knees) with a mean age of 59 years. (range, 40-71 years) who had chronic knee pain, clinical diagnosis of early osteoarthritis of the knee and conventional knee radiographs classified as 1 and 2 on the Kellgren-Lawrence scale. Results: A variety of different disorders was found; degenerative meniscal lesions with or without ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in 70.7% of the knees, osteonecrosis of the femoral and tibial condyles in 9.75%, osteophytes and degenerative articular cartilage lesions in 8.54%, transient osteoporosis in 2.44% and benign neoplasms and cysts in 6.1%. Conclusions: The existence of such a heterogenous group of disorders in these 'early osteoarthritic knees' may explain failures in treatment and it may justify a modern MRI imaging approach to proper diagnosis.

  3. Diognostic accuracy of MR imaging and pattern of injury in the posterior cruciate ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging in posterior cruciate ligament(PCL) injuries, to describe the variety of these injuries and to assess the type and frequency of associated knee injuries. We retrospetively analysed 75 cases with knee injuries. In all cases, the presence of a PCL tear was determined by arthroscopy or surgery and the type of tear and patterns of associated knee injuries were described. Twenty-eight PCL tears were identified with arthroscopy or surgery. Figures for the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR diagnosis for the PCL injury were 86%, 94% and 91% respectively. Twenty-one cases(75%) had complete PCL tears and seven (25%) had partial tears. The commonest tear site was midsubstance(18 cases, 64.3%). Twenty-seven cases(96%) had associated knee injuries ; the remaining patient (4%) had isolated PCL injuries, There were 19 cases(68%) of ligamentous injuries, ten(36%) of meniscal tear, ten (36%) of bony injuries, and 20 (71%) of joint effusions. Of the ligamentous injuries, those involving the medial collateral ligament were most often seen(10 cases, 36%). MR imaging is an accurate method for the detection and evaluation of PCL injury and associated knee abnormalities

  4. Diognostic accuracy of MR imaging and pattern of injury in the posterior cruciate ligament injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Hyup; Kim, Jang Ho; Kim, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Young; Lee, Jong Gil [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Hae Gyung [St. Fransisco Hospital, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MR imaging in posterior cruciate ligament(PCL) injuries, to describe the variety of these injuries and to assess the type and frequency of associated knee injuries. We retrospetively analysed 75 cases with knee injuries. In all cases, the presence of a PCL tear was determined by arthroscopy or surgery and the type of tear and patterns of associated knee injuries were described. Twenty-eight PCL tears were identified with arthroscopy or surgery. Figures for the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR diagnosis for the PCL injury were 86%, 94% and 91% respectively. Twenty-one cases(75%) had complete PCL tears and seven (25%) had partial tears. The commonest tear site was midsubstance(18 cases, 64.3%). Twenty-seven cases(96%) had associated knee injuries ; the remaining patient (4%) had isolated PCL injuries, There were 19 cases(68%) of ligamentous injuries, ten(36%) of meniscal tear, ten (36%) of bony injuries, and 20 (71%) of joint effusions. Of the ligamentous injuries, those involving the medial collateral ligament were most often seen(10 cases, 36%). MR imaging is an accurate method for the detection and evaluation of PCL injury and associated knee abnormalities.

  5. MR imaging of the knee : Three-dimensional fourier transform GRASS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Lee, Young Uk; Youn, Eun Kyung; No, In Gye; Chin, Seoung Bum; Kim, Joon Sik; Choi, Jae Yeul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-04-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional(3D) Fourier transform(FT) gradient refocused acquisition in steady state (GRASS) technique for MR imaging of the knee. Sixty-three knees in 61 patients were imaged on the 1.5T MR system. We compared 3DFT GRASS technique with 2D spin echo(SE) technique in terms of conspicuousness of the lesions of internal knee structures based on the results of arthroscopy or open surgery. As a SE technique, sagittal T1-and T2-weighted, and coronal fat-suppressed T2-weighted sequences were performed using 3D GRASS technique, and we also evaluated arbitrarily reformatted images produced from the original axial voxel images. For the depiction of the tear, 3DFT GRASS was superior to 2D SE in three cases of medial meniscus, one of lateral meniscus, and two of anterior cruciate ligament. Specificity of 3D GRASS was also higher than that of 2D SE in evaluation of lateral meniscus and anterior cruiciate ligament. There was no significant difference in MR diagnosis for tears of the posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. 3D GRASS was superior in evaluating the extent and morphology of the torn menisci. The 3DFT GRASS technique was comparable or even superior to the 2D SE technique in the evaluation of the internal structure of the knee, and can be expected to supplement standard MR knee techniques, especially in complicated cases of meniscal or ligamentous tears.

  6. MRI of articular cartilaginous lesions. MRI findings in osteoarthritis of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was carried out to assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging for imaging of the knee joint, especially for detecting articular cartilaginous lesions associated with osteoarthritis of the knee. A total of 141 patients with osteoarthritis were examined (23 males, 118 females). Their age range was 40-93 (mean age 66.2). Using radiotherapy examinations, patients were classified according to Hokkaido University Classification Criteria; 22, 49, 46, 16, and 8 patients were classified as Type I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Articular cartilage defects were examined using MRI, and the number of such defects increased as the X-ray stage progressed. The appearance of a low signal intensity area in the bone marrow was examined using MRI, and the number of patients observed to have such areas increased as the x-ray stages progressed. JOA OA scores were significantly low for patients with meniscal tears. Patients were classified and results reviewed using MRI examinations. Classification by MRI of articular cartilage lesions correlated with the JOA OA scores. Low signal intensity areas in the bone marrow were frequently observed in advanced osteoarthritis cases, and there was correlation between FTA and MRI classifications of these areas. MRI is extremely valuable in detecting articular cartilage lesions in the knee joint, showing those lesions which cannot be detected by conventional radiography examinations. Thus, MRI is judged to be a clinically useful method for diagnosis of osteoarthritis. (author)

  7. Comparison between two.magnetic resonance sequences (spin-echo and gradient-echo) in the analysis of lesions of the knee joint meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the diagnostic reliability, the proportion of common diagnoses and the degree of agreement between the results of two magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in the diagnosis of lesions of the meniscus of the knee. One hundred consecutive patients were studied prospectively by MR (1,5 Teslas). All of them underwent T1-weighted spin-echo and T1 and T2-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The final diagnosis was based on the combined results of four imaging sequences. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive (NPV) in terms of the final diagnosis were calculated for each meniscus and MR technique. The chi.squared test and kappa test were employed for the statistical analysis. There were discrepancies between the final diagnosis and the spin-echo sequence in 4 cases and between the final diagnosis and the gradient-echo sequences in 5 Both spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences showed the same diagnostic reliabilities: sensitivity of 0.98, specificity of 0.99, PPV of 0.98 and NPV of 0.99. The correlation between the two sequences was highly significant (chi-squared, p < 0.001) with a very high rate of agreement (kappa=0.84). The two sequences can be considered equally reliable in the study of meniscal lesions. (Author) 7 refs

  8. The Use of Biologic Agents in Athletes with Knee Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopka, Michaela; Bradley, James P

    2016-07-01

    Biologic agents are gaining popularity in the management of bony and soft tissue conditions about the knee. They are becoming the mainstay of nonoperative therapy in the high-demand athletic population. The most well-studied agents include platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells-both of which have shown promise in the treatment of various conditions. Animal and clinical studies have demonstrated improved outcomes following PRP treatment in early osteoarthritis of the knee, as well as in chronic patellar tendinopathy. Early clinical evidence also lends support for PRP in the augmentation of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Research investigating the role of biologic agents in collateral ligament and meniscal injuries is ongoing. Studies assessing the utility of stem cells have shown encouraging results in the setting of osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, strict regulations by the FDA continue to restrict their application in clinical practice. A major limitation in the interpretation of current data is the significant variability in the harvesting and preparation of both PRP and stem cells. As the volume and quality of evidence continue to grow, biologic agents are poised to become an integral component of comprehensive patient care throughout all orthopedic specialties. PMID:27206071

  9. Value of scintiscanning using 99mTc-MDP to assess disorders of the knee and ankle joints in orthopedic patients as compared to that of X-ray procedures. Die Wertigkeit der Scintigraphie mit 99m Tc-MDP bei Knie- und Fussgelenksaffektionen des orthopaedischen Krankenguts im Vergleich zur Roentgendiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyer, B.

    1983-10-20

    Relevant analyses were carried out on the basis of the data of 100 patients. The radiopharmaceutical examinations were performed using a scanner two hours after injection of 10 mCi 99mTc-MDP. Following interpretation of the density patterns, the concentration quotients of the scintiscans were calculated to permit a semi-quantitative assessment to be made. As far as arthropathies were concerned, the scintiscans did not contribute much useful information to diagnose patellar chondropathy at an early stage of the disease, nor were they seen to offer any decisive advantages over X-ray examinations in degenerative disorders of the joints. Scintiscanning was also found an unsuitable method to differentiate athritis from arthrosis. Under certain circumstances, joint scintiscanning may have an additional indication in the diagnosis of meniscitis. In rheumatoid arthritis and Sudeck's syndrome the scintiscans were found to be in better agreement with the clinical symptoms than the corresponding X-ray findings. In soft tissue disorders scintiscanning did not appear to be an adequate method to obtain additional diagnostic information. On the other hand, all types of osteopathy caused by inflammation, necrosis, neoplasms or cysts are clearly falling within the domaine of scintiscanning. Foot deformities were invariably seen to be associated with locallised concentration of the tracer substance. Owing to the limited specifity of radiopharmaceutical investigations using 99mTc-MDP, concentional X-ray examinations will indispensable in the vast majority of cases. (TRV).

  10. MR imaging of the knee in marathon runners before and after competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To evaluate the findings in MRI-studies of the knee in recreational long-distance runners after competition and to assess the reversibility of the findings.Design and patients. Eight recreational long-distance runners underwent MRI studies of the knee before, immediately after and 6-8 weeks after taking part in the Vienna City Marathon. The studies were evaluated regarding alterations of pre-existing lesions and new pathological findings.Results. In six runners without major pre-existing alterations no negative effects were experienced. In one runner with pre-existing grade III alterations of the menisci, signs of progressive osteoarthritis were experienced 2 months after the competition. In all other cases increased meniscal signal alterations and minor signal changes in the bone marrow after the race were transitory.Conclusion. In healthy individuals no negative long-term-effects were experienced. Pre-existing high-grade lesions of the menisci might be a predisposing risk for osteoarthritis, triggered by the stress of long-distance running. (orig.)

  11. Obesity-related juvenile form of cartilage lesions: a new affliction in the knees of morbidly obese children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overweight and obesity are afflictions that lead to an increased risk of health problems including joint problems. The aim of the study was to assess the condition of articular cartilage in obese adolescent patients suffering from knee pain. MRI of 24 knees of 20 morbidly obese patients, mean age 14.2 years, was performed in an open 1.0 Tesla MR system, where the cartilage, the quality and structure of the menisci, and the presence or absence of surrounding changes was examined. In all patients a cartilage lesion in at least one region of the knee could be detected. Retropatellar cartilage lesions have been found in 19 knees. Ten cartilage lesions grade I, and four lesions grade II have been described in the lateral compartment of the knee, whereas the medial compartment showed in eight cases a grade I, in 13 cases a grade II and in two cases a grade III cartilage lesion. Meniscal changes were assessed in most patients. Morbidly obese children and adolescents show major abnormalities in the articular cartilage of the knee. Whether obesity alone is the causal factor for the development of the pattern of these changes, remains to be seen. (orig.)

  12. Características clínicas, por resonancia magnética y artroscópica de las lesiones meniscales de la rodilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura María Pons Porrata

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y transversal de 53 pacientes con diagnóstico clínico y por resonancia magnética de afección meniscal, atendidos en el Hospital General Docente "Dr. Juan Bruno Zayas Alfonso" de Santiago de Cuba, desde enero de 2011 hasta diciembre de 2012. En la serie prevalecieron las lesiones meniscales en los más jóvenes, con edad media de 43 años y similar para ambos sexos, así como el antecedente de trauma (58,5%, con manifestaciones de dolor, dificultad para la marcha y aumento de volumen en el total de integrantes; asimismo, las lesiones se localizaron fundamentalmente en la rodilla derecha, en el menisco externo y en los cuernos posteriores de ambos meniscos. Los tipos de lesiones más diagnosticadas resultaron ser las roturas incompletas, las completas y los cambios degenerativos, asociadas fundamentalmente a sinovitis. Existió excelente relación diagnóstica entre la resonancia magnética y la artroscopia

  13. Artrografía de la rodilla con doble contraste: Valor diagnóstico en las lesiones de los meniscos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAÚL FERNÁNDEZ VITORTES

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza un estudio en 100 pacientes, atendidos por el Departamento de Radiología del Hospital "Celia Sánchez Manduley" de Manzanillo, con sintomatología clínica sugestiva de lesión meniscal, a los cuales se les practica la artrografía de la rodilla con doble contraste en el período comprendido entre enero de 1987 y diciembre de 1993; se impresionaron primero radiografías simples de rodilla con vistas anteroposterior, lateral y axial; después la artrocentesis para la inyección de contrastes, seguidamente la exploración fluoroscópica e impresión de acechos en distintos grados de rotación de la rodilla. Finalmente se revisaron sus historias clínicas y se estableció la relación clínico-radiológica-quirúrgica, que en la serie resultó adecuada en el 88,8 %, lo que evidenció el valor diagnóstico del estudio.

  14. Plastia de ligamento cruzado anterior con injerto de tendones isquiotibiales sin desinserción tibial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge César Paz Usó

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Después de una lesión de ligamento cruzado anterior, muchos pacientes no pueden seguir desempeñando sus actividades cotidianas o deportivas habituales. Algunos pacientes sufren roturas meniscales secundarias y gonartrosis. El objetivo de este trabajo es mostrar una técnica quirúrgica de simple ejecución, que permite un pronto restablecimiento de los pacientes a sus actividades cotidianas. A 96 pacientes del Hospital Regional 1° de Octubre, ISSSTE, se les realizó plastia de ligamento cruzado anterior por artroscopia mediante técnica de injerto de tendones isquiotibiales sin desinserción de la tibia (técnica de Lipscomb. Se utilizó únicamente un tornillo interferencial biodegradable como sujeción. El tiempo de evolución del estudio fue de noviembre de 2002 a octubre de 2006. Las edades fluctuaron entre 16 y 52 años. Hubo 86 (89.5% hombres, con daño meniscal agregado en 57 casos (53%. El tiempo de recuperación para regresar a sus actividades laborales fue de dos meses en promedio. Es una técnica quirúrgica simple, rápida y barata, con insumos mínimos que puede realizarse en cualquier centro hospitalario, con manejo ambulatorio y rápida recuperación.

  15. SPECT bone scintigraphy of medial collateral ligament/meniscus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Acute or chronic knee pain is common amongst athletic persons. MRI is generally regarded as the best test, but is not widely available and may lack specificity in meniscal tears and cruciate injury. Bone scan with SPECT is an appealing alternative since it is relatively cheap and easily obtained. Further, a number of investigators have published data indicating sensitivity and specificity exceeding 85%. The purpose of the study is to determine typical scintigraphic findings in medial collateral ligament or medial meniscus injury. We present a small group of patients with acute knee trauma in whom arthroscopy and/or clinical follow-up indicated medial collateral ligament injury. Bone scans were undertaken after 900-1000 MBq of 99mTc-MDP with immediate blood pool, delayed planar images and SPECT acquired on a Picker Prism 2000. SPECT was obtained with high resolution collimators and 20 sec/stop for 180 deg each. SPECT images showed focal radiopharmaceutical accumulation in the medial proximal tibial shaft and medial femoral condyle, corresponding to the superficial layer of the medial collateral ligament (best seen on coronal images). Disruption of the deep layer and/or medial meniscus can be suspected with abnormal uptake in part or all of the meniscus (best seen on transverse images). We conclude that acute/chronic medial collateral ligament injury can be detected on bone scintigraphy with abnormal uptake at the predicted anatomic site of attachment

  16. Arthroscopically assisted treatment for Schatzker type I-V tibial plateau fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Xiao-jun; YANG Liu; GUO Lin; CHEN Guang-xing; DAI Gang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical outcome of arthroscopically assisted treatment for tibial plateau fractures.Methods: A total of 39 patients with tibial plateau fractures were treated by arthroscopic fixation from February 2002 to December 2005,including 11 patients with bony avulsion of the anterior cruciate ligament and 19 with meniscal injury.There were 4 cases of type I fracture,12 type II,9 type III,12 type IV and 2 type V according to Schatzker criteria.Firstly,the combined injuries were treated.Then the plateau fractures with the displacement over 3 mm or more were reduced and fixed.Finally,the internal fixation was observed by X-ray equipment.Postoperative management was early motion and delayed weight bearing.Results: All the fractures healed in 3 or 4 months.All patients were followed up for 1 to 5 years after operation.No case had severe complications,such as poor wound healing,infection,osteofascial compartment syndrome and osteoarthritis.According to the Rasmussen scoring system,36 cases obtained excellent or good results and the other 3 cases had moderate clinical results.The average score was 26 ± 3.Conclusions: As an adjuvant treatment of intraarticular fractures such as tibial plateau fracture,arthroscopy has many advantages.It can treat associated intraarticular soft tissue components,visualize the chondral surface reduction,lavage the hematoma and smaller loose fragments,decrease soft tissue dissection,reduce the risk of scarring and promote rapid recovery.

  17. MRI diagnosis of meniscus injury of the knee%磁共振诊断膝关节半月板损伤200例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付江; 牛尚甫

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨磁共振对半月板损伤程度和分型的价值.方法:对磁共振诊断的208个损伤半月板进行回顾性分析.结果:208个损伤半月板中,内侧137个,外侧71个;Ⅰ级损伤31个,Ⅱ级94个,Ⅲ级83个,均经手术或关节镜证实为撕裂伤.结论:磁共振能清楚显示半月板损伤,是诊断半月板损伤的理想方法.%Objective: To evaluate the value of MRI in determining the sort and degree of meniscus injury. Methods: The MRI of 208 cases of meniscus injury was reviewed. Results: Among the 208 cases, 137 of the injury were seen in the wall of the meniscus and 71 in the lateral side. Thirty-one cases were determined as meniscus injury degree Ⅰ ,94 as degree Ⅱ and 83 as degree Ⅲ by arthroscopy. Eighty-three cases were proved to be meniscal tear by surgery or arthroscopy. Conclusions: MRI can clearly demonstrate the meniscus injury in the knee. It is considered to be a good method in diagnosing meniscus injury.

  18. CT versus MRI in the study of the articular diseases of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a comparison between the diagnostic accuracy of Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the articular pathologies of the knee. CT and MRI were performed in 30 patients who subsequently underwent surgery. CT and MRI results were compared on three bases: technique, definition of normal anatomy, and diagnostic accuracy. CT allowed a standardization of the technique, while MRI was superior in defining normal anatomy - especially in the study of capsulo-ligamentous structures. In all cases the use of both CT and MRI allowed a correct diagnosis, showing the site, extent and gravity of the lesion. CT proved to be superior to MRI in 4 cases, while MRI corrected CT diagnosis in 11 cases; in 15 patients both techniques had the same diagnostic accuracy. Meniscal tears were better identified by CT, while MRI was superior in the detection of ligamentous lesions and in the characterization of PVNS and tendinitis of the patellar tendon. In conclusion, MRI should be performed in selected cases only, or when CT cannot be trusted; on the other hand, it might also be used as a first-choice diagnostic procedure for synovial pathologies and acute lesions of the anterior cruciate ligament

  19. CT and MR imaging of the knee joint in the ''plica syndrome''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Synovial plicae'' are present in 60% of adult knees and can be the cause of a nonspecific clinical picture known as the plica syndrome. Direct high-resolution CT and MR imaging were performed on 30 patients with serious clinical signs of plica syndrome. All patients underwent anthroscopy. Twelve infrapetallar, eight suprapatellar, and 22 medical synovial plicae were shown (in 12 cases two different plicae were present). In seven cases there were other associated lesions: one case of patellar tendinitis, three medial meniscus lesions, one lateral diskoid meniscus, and two patellar subluxations. The diagnostic accuracy of both CT and MR imaging were compared with arthroscopy. CT always showed the plicae and defined their types, locations, and associations with other lesions. MR imaging was superior to CT in characterizing the morphology of the plica (related with symptomatology) and in showing the femoral and patellar chondromalacia secondary to the plica itself. MR imaging was equally accurate in revealing the tendinitis and the patellar subluxations, but CT was superior in displaying the meniscal lesions and the diskoid meniscus

  20. Magnetic Resonance Microscopic Images with 50-mm Field-of-View of the Medial Aspect of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To demonstrate the utility of microscopic images with field-of-view of 50 mm in delineation of the medial aspect of the knee, including fascial plane, superficial and deep layers of the medial collateral ligament (MCL), and the medial meniscus. Material and Methods: Using a phantom, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy coil with a diameter of 47 mm was calculated and compared with that of a regular coil. Four cadaveric knees were imaged by microscopy and resected to confirm the morphologies. Sixty-nine patients with internal derangement were examined by routine and microscopic imaging. Comparing the paired images for delineation of the above-mentioned structures, a qualitative image analysis was performed. Results: SNRs of the MR microscopy coil were higher than those of the regular coil. MR microscopy readily demonstrated the multilayered appearance of the fascial plane and both layers of the MCL in cadavers and patients. In cases with MCL tears, ruptured stumps were identified by microscopy. MR microscopy delineated tiny cleavages in cases with meniscal tears. The mean values of qualitative evaluation of the MR microscopy were significantly higher than those of the routine imaging. Conclusion: High-resolution imaging delineated fine structures of the medial aspect of the knee

  1. The MRI appearance of cystic lesions around the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review presents a comprehensive illustrated overview of the wide variety of cystic lesions around the knee. The aetiology, clinical presentation, MRI appearances and differential diagnosis are discussed. Bursae include those related to the patella as well as pes anserine, tibial collateral ligament, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, iliotibial and fibular collateral ligament-biceps femoris. The anatomical extension, imaging features and clinical significance of meniscal cysts are illustrated. Review of ganglia includes intra-articular, extra-articular, intraosseous and periosteal ganglia, highlighting imaging findings and differential diagnoses. The relationship between proximal tibiofibular joint cysts and intraneural peroneal nerve ganglia is discussed. Intraosseous cystic lesions, including insertional and degenerative cysts, as well as lesions mimicking cysts of the knee are described and illustrated. Knowledge of the location, characteristic appearance and distinguishing features of cystic masses around the knee as well as potential imaging pitfalls such as normal anatomical recesses and atypical cyst contents on MR imaging aids in allowing a specific diagnosis to be made. This will prevent unnecessary additional investigations and determine whether intra-articular surgery or conservative management is appropriate. (orig.)

  2. Radial tunnel syndrome caused by ganglion cyst: treatment by arthroscopic cyst decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileti, Joseph; Largacha, Mauricio; O'Driscoll, Shawn W

    2004-05-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve at the elbow can lead to one of 2 clinical entities. Posterior interosseous syndrome is primarily a motor deficiency of the posterior interosseous nerve, and radial tunnel syndrome presents as pain along the radial tunnel and extensor muscle mass. The radial nerve can be compressed at a number of sites around the elbow. In addition, numerous mass lesions reported in the literature can cause compressive neuropathy of the radial nerve at the elbow. Standard surgical management for persistent radial tunnel syndrome that is refractory to nonsurgical treatment is open decompression of the radial nerve. Cysts occurring in other joints are commonly treated arthroscopically. Supraglenoid cysts of the shoulder, meniscal cysts in the knee, and dorsal wrist ganglia are routinely treated with arthroscopic decompression or excision with management of the underlying etiology of the cyst. We present a case of radial tunnel syndrome caused by a ganglion cyst of the proximal radioulnar joint that was treated using arthroscopic excision of the cyst and decompression of the radial nerve. PMID:15122155

  3. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  4. MR findings in iliotibial band syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To elucidate the MR findings in iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Design and patients. The subjects comprised four patients (five knees) with lateral knee pain: two athletes and two non-athletes. One non-athlete was engaged in work requiring repetitive knee movement, and the other suffered from Cushing syndrome and had bilateral abnormalities. All patients were suspected of having a lateral meniscal tear prior to MR examination, but physical examination following provisional MR diagnosis warranted the final diagnosis. MR studies included fast spin echo sagittal imaging, fat-saturated fast spin echo proton density coronal imaging, and T2* radial imaging. Twelve normal volunteers were examined. Results and conclusion. Fat-saturated coronal imaging demonstrated an ill-defined, high-intensity area deep to the ITB. T2* radial imaging showed an identical, but less conspicuous, abnormality. The MR finding suggested soft tissue inflammation and/or edema rather than focal fluid collection in the bursae. The signal alteration predominated in the region beneath the posterior fibers of the ITB, thus supporting the current opinion that the posterior fibers of the ITB are tighter against the lateral femoral epicondyle than the anterior fibers. The ITB itself did not show any signal alteration or increased thickness. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Clinical consequences of bone bruise around the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the relation between bone bruise and (peri-)articular derangement and to assess the impact of bone bruise on presentation and short term course of knee complaints. We recorded MR abnormalities in 664 consecutive patients with sub-acute knee complaints. Patients were divided in four groups: patients with and without intra-articular knee pathology, subdivided in patients with and without bone bruise. We assessed function and symptoms at the time of MR and 6 months thereafter. Bone bruises were diagnosed in 124 of 664 patients (18.7%). Patients with bone bruise had significantly more complete ACL, lateral meniscal, MCL and LCL tears. Both with and without intra-articular pathology patients with bone bruise had a significantly poorer function at the time of MR (Noyes score of, respectively, 313.21 versus 344.81 and 306.98 versus 341.19). Patients with bone bruise and intra-articular pathology showed significantly more decrease in activity (decrease of Tegner score from 6.28 to 2.12 versus 5.70-2.55). At 6 months there were no significant differences in clinical parameters between the four groups. We concluded that bone bruise in combination with MCL tear is an important cause of initial clinical impairment in patients with sub-acute knee complaints. Clinical improvement within 6 months is more pronounced than in patients without bone bruise. (orig.)

  6. MR imaging of the knee : Three-dimensional fourier transform GRASS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional(3D) Fourier transform(FT) gradient refocused acquisition in steady state (GRASS) technique for MR imaging of the knee. Sixty-three knees in 61 patients were imaged on the 1.5T MR system. We compared 3DFT GRASS technique with 2D spin echo(SE) technique in terms of conspicuousness of the lesions of internal knee structures based on the results of arthroscopy or open surgery. As a SE technique, sagittal T1-and T2-weighted, and coronal fat-suppressed T2-weighted sequences were performed using 3D GRASS technique, and we also evaluated arbitrarily reformatted images produced from the original axial voxel images. For the depiction of the tear, 3DFT GRASS was superior to 2D SE in three cases of medial meniscus, one of lateral meniscus, and two of anterior cruciate ligament. Specificity of 3D GRASS was also higher than that of 2D SE in evaluation of lateral meniscus and anterior cruiciate ligament. There was no significant difference in MR diagnosis for tears of the posterior cruciate, medial collateral, and lateral collateral ligaments. 3D GRASS was superior in evaluating the extent and morphology of the torn menisci. The 3DFT GRASS technique was comparable or even superior to the 2D SE technique in the evaluation of the internal structure of the knee, and can be expected to supplement standard MR knee techniques, especially in complicated cases of meniscal or ligamentous tears

  7. Diagnostic Efficiency of MR Imaging of the Knee. Relationship to time Interval between MR and Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficiency of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of knee lesions and how the results are influenced by the time interval between MR and arthroscopy. 248 knees studied by MR were retrospectively analyzed, as well as those which also underwent arthroscopy. Arthroscopy was considered to be the gold standard, MR diagnostic capacity was evaluated for both meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index were calculated for the set of all knees included in the study (248), for those in which the time between MR and arthroscopy was less than or equal to three months (134) and for those in which the time between both procedures was less than or equal to one month. Sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index of the MR had global values of 96.5%, 70% and 71%, respectively. When the interval between MR and arthroscopy was less than or equal to three months, sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index were 95.5%, 75% and 72%, respectively. When it was less than or equal to one month, sensitivity was 100%, specificity was 87.5% and Kappa index was 91%. MR is an excellent tool for the diagnosis of knee lesions. Higher MR values of sensitivity, specificity and Kappa index are obtained when the time interval between both procedures is kept to a minimum. (Author) 11 refs

  8. The effect of observer experience on the accuracy of knee MRI interpretation: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on knee MRI has traditionally used experienced musculoskeletal radiologists to assess the performance of knee MRI. These observers are not representative of the typical experience level of radiologists reporting knee MRI in Australia. The accuracy of knee MRI in the Australian setting is therefore uncertain. A preliminary study was performed to determine the influence of observer experience on the accuracy of knee MRI. Eleven knee MRI studies were reviewed by eight different radiologists (three experienced, five less experienced). In each case the diagnoses and diagnostic confidence were recorded, the latter by means of a visual analogue scale. Arthroscopy was used as the gold standard for meniscal, cruciate and cartilage pathology. The standard for other diagnoses was set by consensus of the two most experienced observers. The experienced observers exhibited superior diagnostic accuracy (p < 0.05) and higher sensitivity. Diagnostic confidence was higher (p < 0.05) when true positive diagnoses were made by experienced and inexperienced observers. This preliminary study suggests a link between observer experience and the diagnostic accuracy and diagnostic confidence of observers reporting knee MRI. Copyright (1999) Australian Institute of Radiography

  9. High-resolution MR imaging of the knee at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to examine the practical feasibility of using a 3.0-T MR unit to obtain high-quality, high-resolution images of the knee joint, one human cadaveric and 5 porcine knees were imaged with the 3.0-T unit. Sets of T1-weighted spin echo images were obtained with in-plane resolution of 0.195x0.39 mm and an acquisition time of approximately 5 min. Two porcine knees were also imaged with the 1.0-T unit with an identical imaging protocol and the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios were measured on images at 3 T and 1 T. The 3-T MR system provided detailed delineation of the knees. Deep layers of the medial collateral ligament and associated fine fibers beneath the medial and lateral collateral ligament were demarcated. We observed precise demonstration of the tibial attachment of the anterior cruciate ligament, irregularity of the meniscal free edge, and conjoint tendon formation together with the lateral collateral ligament and the biceps femoris tendon. Compared to the 1-T unit, the S/N ratio with the 3-T unit was increased by a factor of 1.39 to 1.72. Due to the potential advantage of obtaining detailed images, the 3-T MR system suggests a practical utility for fine demonstration of the knee morphology

  10. Significant Weight Loss May Delay or Eliminate the Need for Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. DeClaire

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old morbidly obese woman with a left medial meniscal tear and moderately severe degenerative joint disease (DJD reported for 14-month follow-up visit from arthroscopic surgery. She reported a resolution of pain, swelling and an improved range of motion (ROM. The patient was first evaluated 14 months ago, and at that time was considered a strong candidate for total knee replacement due to her limited (ROM, knee pain, swelling and functional impairment. At a 3 month visit prior to her initial evaluation the patient voluntarily enrolled in a nutritional and exercise program overseen by a licensed personal trainer and kinesiologist. At her final evaluation 14 months later, it was noted that in addition to her improved knee symptoms, the patient lost 15% of her initial bodyweight and exhibited significant gains in quadriceps strength. Her clinical exam and imaging suggested an arrest of progression of her joint disease. It was decided mutually by the patient and physician that she was no longer a candidate for total knee replacement surgery. Although the association between her weight loss and her knee DJD can only be hypothesized, this case report may highlight the need to discuss weight loss as an alternative treatment modality for end stage DJD.

  11. Significant weight loss may delay or eliminate the need for total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeClaire, Jeffrey H; Savich, Tatjana T; Montgomery, B S Adrienne LeGasse; Warritay, Olayinka K

    2014-05-01

    A 48-year-old morbidly obese woman with a left medial meniscal tear and moderately severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) reported for 14-month follow-up visit from arthroscopic surgery. She reported a resolution of pain, swelling and an improved range of motion (ROM). The patient was first evaluated 14 months ago, and at that time was considered a strong candidate for total knee replacement due to her limited (ROM), knee pain, swelling and functional impairment. At a 3 month visit prior to her initial evaluation the patient voluntarily enrolled in a nutritional and exercise program overseen by a licensed personal trainer and kinesiologist. At her final evaluation 14 months later, it was noted that in addition to her improved knee symptoms, the patient lost 15% of her initial bodyweight and exhibited significant gains in quadriceps strength. Her clinical exam and imaging suggested an arrest of progression of her joint disease. It was decided mutually by the patient and physician that she was no longer a candidate for total knee replacement surgery. Although the association between her weight loss and her knee DJD can only be hypothesized, this case report may highlight the need to discuss weight loss as an alternative treatment modality for end stage DJD. PMID:24932398

  12. Hoffa's recess in the infrapatellar fat pad of the knee on MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkur, A; Adaletli, I; Sirikci, A; Kervancioglu, R; Bayram, M

    2005-03-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad of Hoffa is a structure that is located in the space between the back side of the patellar ligament and the real capsule. It is routinely visualized on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and shape of a fluid-like indentation at the inferior posterior margin of the infrapatellar fat pad of the knee (recess) and to look for a relation between the liquid image in the fat pad and joint effusion. Three hundred and fifty consecutive MR imaging examinations of the knee were evaluated for the presence, location, size and shape of a recess in the infrapatellar fat pad and existence of joint effusion. The study population consisted of 145 females and 205 males aged between 5 and 80 years old (mean age 37.5 years). The recess in the infrapatellar fat pad was revealed on MR imaging in 54 of 350 knees (15.43%) and had a variable shape, consisting of 35 linear or ovoid (64.81%), five pipe-shaped (9.26%) and 14 globular (25.92%). Additionally, one ganglion cyst was observed in the infrapatellar fat pad. Globular and pipe-shaped recesses may be confused with cystic infrapatellar fat pad pathologies such as ganglion cyst, meniscal cyst, loose body or nodular synovitis. The existence of an infrapatellar fat pad may not be related to the presence of joint effusion. PMID:15316759

  13. The musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year's literature continues to show an amazing variety of new entities and new ways of looking at old ones. The contributions of CT and MRI to the diagnosis of musculoskeletal disease abound. Particularly noteworthy is the promise of CT and MRI in the study of the temporomandibular joint and the menisces of the knee. Ultrasonography of the rotator cuff of the should is gaining in popularity. CT is being applied more widely to the study of injuries of the feet, particularly for tarsometatarsal fracture-dislocation injuries. Insufficiency stress fractures of the pelvis and sacrum are being reported more frequently now that the entity is being recognized. The entity of pustulotic-arthroosteitis emerges again, this time with widespread involvement, including the spine. In the realm of osseous neoplasms, the osseous lipoma may be made more readily diagnosable by CT demonstration of calcium within the lesion. Several interesting contributions of CT to the diagnosis of spinal disease relate to erosion of cortical bones by herniated disc material, as well as disc space hypodensity in CT as the first radiologic sign of postoperative diskitis. Anatomical variants are always interesting, and herein are digests on a new notch in the upper femur and a discussion of symptomatic variants

  14. MR imaging of lipoma arborescens and the associated lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, J.C.; Barcelo, J.; Villalon, M. [Magnetic Resonance Unit, Ressonancia Girona, Clinica Girona (Spain); Aldoma, J.; Delgado, E. [Centre Diagnostic Pedralbes, Barcelona (Spain); Zapater, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Palamos, Palamos, Girona (Spain)

    2003-09-01

    Objective: To describe the typical features of lipoma arborescens on MR imaging with pathologic correlation and to evaluate the associated lesions within the joints. Design and patients: The MR imaging findings of 32 patients with the diagnosis of lipoma arborescens of the knee (n=32) and shoulder (n=1) were reviewed. The diagnosis of lipoma arborescens was confirmed by the histologic findings in 12 cases and the other 21 cases were diagnosed by the characteristic MR imaging features. One patient had bilateral lipoma arborescens of the knee joint. Results: MR imaging showed a typical pattern of villous lipomatous proliferation of the synovium in all cases, as a diffuse pattern in 79% (26/33) of cases and as a dominant mass-like lesion in 21% (7/33) of cases. The associated MR pathology in the knee was (n=32): joint effusion (100%), degenerative changes (87%), meniscal tear (72%), synovial cysts (38%), bone erosions (25%), chondromatosis (13%), patellar subluxation (6%) and discoid meniscus (3%). In all cases except two there was associated pathology of the knee. MR imaging showed an associated rotator cuff tear in the lipoma arborescens of the shoulder. Conclusion: The characteristic MR features of lipoma arborescens allows an accurate diagnosis of this rare lesion, which is almost always associated with other chronic pathology of the joint in the elderly. (orig.)

  15. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Guelden [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: gsahin@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Demirtas, Mehmet [Department of Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established.

  16. Pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic procedure in the knee☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Isolani, Guilherme Rufini; Baracho, Filipe Ribas; de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula Gebert; Ridder Bauer, Luiz Antônio; Namba, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review all cases of pseudoaneurysm in the literature, in predominantly arthroscopic procedures on the knee, and to report on a case of pseudoaneurysm that we treated. A bibliographic search was conducted for scientific articles published in Brazilian and foreign periodicals over the last 23 years. Forty-seven cases were found, in 40 articles. In addition to these 47 cases, there was the case that we treated, which was also included in the data. Among the operations that progressed with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, 60% were cases of meniscal injuries and 23%, anterior cruciate ligament injuries. In 46% of the cases, the artery affected with the popliteal, and in 21%, the inferomedial genicular artery. The commonest clinical symptom was pain (37%), followed by pulsating tumor (31%), edema of the calf (12%) and hemarthrosis (11%). The median time taken to make the diagnosis was 11 days, but it ranged from one day to 10 weeks after the procedure. Although rare, pseudoaneurysms are a risk that is inherent to arthroscopic surgery. All patients should be made aware of the vascular risks, even in small-scale procedures. PMID:26229905

  17. [The dynamic complex of the temporomandibular meniscus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couly, G; Hureau, J; Vaillant, J M

    1975-12-01

    The existence of meniscocapsular insertions of the temporal, masseter and external pterygoid muscles complicates the scheme of capsulo-meniscal dynamics. Our findings do indeed agree with those of DUBECQ (Bordeaux); but we think that the insertions of the masseter and the temporal are not only fine tracts. In the embryon, the meniscus is the preglossal mekelian conjunctival blastema, which receives the 3 masticatory muscles on its anterior border. In the adult, menisco-capsulo-muscular relationships are not modified; inspite of considerable functional adaptation of the articulation to varied stimuli, the menisco-capsular apparatus seems to be triply controlled by 3 musculo-masticatory bands, owing to the anterior premeniscal tendinous lamina, in histological continuity with the meniscus and rich in corpuscles of deep sensitivity. The resultant of the tridirectional muscular traction of the masseter, external pterygoid and temporal is a force in the postero-anterior oblique direction, downwards and forwards, which allows the meniscus to stretch, as was shown by Pr Delaire, and thus to have a sub-temporal sliding pathway of 8 to 12 mm. The three muscle bundles external pterygoid, temporal and masseter constitute the dynamic complex of the meniscus. PMID:1063432

  18. In vitro analysis of laser meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsness, C T; Akl, Y; Nelson, S J; Liaw, L H; Smith, C F; Marshall, G J

    1995-01-01

    Partial meniscectomies were performed on 32 fresh human meniscal autopsy specimens. The following laser systems were tested: carbon dioxide (CO2), neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG), and excimer. Meniscectomies with these lasers were compared with scalpel, mechanical, and electrocautery meniscectomies. Lasers were applied to specimens in and out of normal saline. Routine hematoxylin and eosin and sirius red sections were prepared for each specimen, and the depths of thermal changes were analyzed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the meniscectomy interface. Among these specimens, the scalpel and mechanical meniscectomies showed the least extension of cellular changes (range, 10-15 nm). The excimer laser caused the least tissue changes of the lasers tested. Tissue changes were less extensive with the pulsed CO2 laser than with the holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and KTP lasers. Scanning electron microscopy showed that use of the scalpel meniscectomy resulted in the smoothest meniscectomy edge, followed by use of the excimer, CO2, holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and KTP lasers. The most surface disruption occurred with electrocautery. Meniscectomies under saline required more energy and took longer in each case, with the holmium:YAG, neodymium:YAG, and CO2 laser cutting the best. Saline meniscectomies showed less thermal change. The CO2 and KTP lasers cut best in air. PMID:7641441

  19. Age changes of the knee menisci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on MR signal changes in the menisci due to degenerative disease that can be confused with those of a tear. The value of MR imaging in analysis of degenerated menisci was studied. MR imaging followed by careful specimen preparation allowed correlation of gross pathologic findings in 308 3-mm-thick sections in 20 cadaveric knees with T1-weighted, proton density, T2-weighted, and gradient-echo images (multiplanar gradient recalled [MPGR]). The age range of cadavers was 56-88 years (mean, 73.8). A subset of 179 images was read blindly and compared with the corresponding anatomic sections and histologic slides. The accuracy of the combined spin-echo images in the analysis of meniscal degeneration was 80.4%, the sensitivity was 81.4%, and the specificity was 80.1%. The corresponding results for the MPGR images were 68.7%, 87.8%, and 63.0%, respectively. Mucoid degeneration generated signal behavior similar to that described for tears. The more circumscribed nature of the signal and the persistence of the increased signal on T2-weighted images in tears were helpful for differentiation

  20. Focal changes of the anticular cartilage in the femorotibial joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the value of routine MR sequences in detecting focal changes in the femorotibial hyaline cartilage. T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo images were acquired in 20 cadaveric knees (cadavers aged 56-88 years; mean, 73.8 years). Three hundred eight coronal and sagittal (3-mm) anatomic sections were prepared, allowing identification of 85 areas of cartilage fissuring, fibrillation, or ulceration. Initially, MR images and anatomic sections were correlated in an unblinded fashion. Subsequently, images of a subset of 35 pathologic and 35 normal cartilage surfaces were blindly evaluated. In the unblinded study, 61 lesions were detectable on T1-weighted images, 59 with meniscal windows, 51 on proton density images, 58 on T2-weighted images, and 57 on gradient-echo images. A fissure usually manifested as a focus of abnormal signal. Ulcers and fibrillation presented as more extensive irregular signal, often accompanied by subchondral sclerosis. In the blinded study, the sensitivity was 71.4% for the detection of focal cartilage changes, the specificity was 68.6%, and the accuracy was 70%. Single fissures and superficial ulcers accounted for the majority of false-negative results

  1. Condromatose sinovial Synovial chondromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neylor Pace Lasmar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Paciente masculino, 34 anos de idade, apresentou dor forte em joelho esquerdo associado à incapacidade funcional sem fator desencadeante aparente. Procurou atendimento médico em dezembro de 2006, quando lhe foram prescritos AINES. Após um ano relatou aumento do edema e da dor no local. Foi encaminhado ao especialista em joelho com suspeita de lesão meniscal. Ao exame, foram detectados edema intenso da articulação com limitação de movimento, dor exacerbada e punção articular negativa; como não apresentava alterações nas radiografias simples, foi solicitado exame de ressonância magnética do joelho. Ao exame de ressonância magnética, evidenciou-se volumoso acúmulo de líquido intra-articular, associado à acentuada proliferação sinovial, destacando-se espessamentos focais formando grumos com sinal intermediário em T1 e T2 e discreto hipossinal em T2 sugestivo de sinovite vilonodular pigmentada com meniscos e ligamentos íntegros. Paciente foi submetido a artroscopia do joelho esquerdo que evidenciou fragmentos irregulares e esbranquiçados, sendo então realizada artrotomia com retirada da lesão e sinovectomia ampla, o material foi enviado para exame anatomopatológico, o qual evidenciou presença de condromatose sinovial. Após oito meses de cirurgia, o paciente apresenta-se sem queixas, joelho esquerdo com amplitude de 130º sem derrame articular ou sinais inflamatórios. A condromatose sinovial é uma metaplasia benigna rara da membrana sinovial, originando a formação de corpos livres cartilaginosos no espaço articular de difícil diagnóstico, já que 95% dos nódulos, quando não calcificados, podem passar desapercebidos radiologicamente.Male patient, 34 years old, had severe pain in his left knee in association with functional incapacitation, with no apparent triggering factor. He sought medical attention in December 2006, at which time he was prescribed NSAIDS. After a year, reported increased swelling and pain at

  2. Magnetic resonance tomography in the diagnosis of intraarticular tibial plateau fractures: value for fracture classification and spectrum of fracture-associated soft tissue injuries; Die Magnetresonanztomographie in der Diagnostik der intraartikulaeren Tibiakopffraktur: Stellenwert bei der Frakturklassifikation und Spektrum der frakturbegleitenden Weichteilverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischbach, R.; Maintz, D.; Zaehringer, M.; Landwehr, P. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Prokop, A. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfall-, Hand- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie

    2000-07-01

    Purpose: To compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray tomography in assessing the type of fracture, degree of comminution and amount of articular surface depression in acute tibial condylar fractures and to describe the associated soft tissue injuries diagnosed with MRI. Method: 27 patients with acute tibial plateau fractures were investigated usig linear X-ray tomography and MRI employing T{sub 1}-weighted and proton density turbo spin echo, STIR, and T{sub 2}-weighted gradient echo images. Fractures were classified according to the AO classification system. The degrees of depression and comminution were measured and soft tissue injuries were recorded. Results: Fractures were classified as type B1 in 7, as B2 in 6, and as B3 in 6 cases by MRI. More complex C-type fractures were diagnosed in 8 cases. MR and X-ray grading were consistent with the exception of two B3 fractures, which were graded as B1 by X-ray tomography. X-ray tomography under-estimated the degree of comminution. 63% of the patients had either meniscal tears or complete ruptures of their cruciate or collateral ligaments. Ten meniscal tears were diagnosed in 9 of 27 patients. Complete tears of the anterior cruciate ligament were seen in 4, and avulsions of the posterior cruciate ligament in 2 patients. Conclusion: MRI allows a detailed assessment of acute tibial plateau fractures and can replace conventional X-ray tomography. The high rate of fracture-associated soft tissue lesions makes MRI an especially valuable tool. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Vergleich der Magnetoresonanztomographie (MRT) und der konventionellen Verwischungstomographie in der Beurteilung von Frakturtyp, Fragmentierung und der Gelenkflaechenimpression sowie Beschreibung der MR-tomographisch diagnostizierten Weichteilverletzungen bei Patienten mit Tibiakopffraktur. Methode: 27 Patienten mit akuten Tibiakopffrakturen wurden mittels linearer Verwischungstomographie und MRT unter Verwendung einer T{sub 1}-gewichteten sowie einer

  3. Tratamento fisioterapêutico após reconstrução do ligamento cruzado anterior Physiotherapy after reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitê Pereira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar se há diferença da evolução na reabilitação dos indivíduos submetidos à reconstrução do LCA através das técnicas osso-tendão patelar-osso ou enxerto quádruplo do semitendíneo e grácil através de uma revisão da literatura. Utilizaram-se as bases de dados eletrônicas: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE e PEDro. Os critérios de inclusão foram: ensaio clínico randomizado e aleatório com ou sem metanálise; participantes com lesão do LCA associada ou não a lesão meniscal e que foram submetidos à ligamentoplastia e à reabilitação fisioterapêutica; intervenção cirúrgica através das técnicas de reconstrução osso-tendão patelar-osso ou enxerto quádruplo do semitendíneo e grácil; ensaios clínicos que comparem a diferença da evolução na recuperação funcional; estudos publicados nos idiomas: português, inglês e espanhol, no período de 1997 a junho de 2011. Foram encontrados cinco ensaios clínicos que preenchessem os critérios de inclusão. Não foram observadas diferenças clínicas e funcionais entre as técnicas, porém, com recomendação para uma reabilitação menos agressiva e com maior atenção no fortalecimento dos isquiotibiais quando estes são utilizados como enxerto.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the existence of differences in the rehabilitation of patients after ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts, through a literature revision. The researched databases were MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, COCHRANE and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were published studies with methodology draw from randomized clinical trials with or without meta-analysis, individuals with ACL injury, associated or not to meniscal injury, submitted to ligamentoplasty using the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft and the four-strand semitendinosus and gracilis tendon grafts and physiotherapy; clinical trials

  4. Evaluation of the lesions of synovial-lined clefts in the Hoffa's infrapatella fat pad with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad there are two synovial clefts, horizontal and vertical, which communicate with the intra-articular space. Intra-articular lesions can also occur in these clefts, and are often difficult to differentiate from extra-articular lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, using MR imaging, the lesions occurring in these synovial lined clefts, as well as associated abnormalities. Thirty-one knees of 31 patients with lesions in horizontal and vertical clefts in Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad were retrospectively evaluated. Using a 1.5T MR imager, axial, sagittal, and coronal MR images of knees were obtained. Lesions in clefts, degree of joint effusion and associated knee abnormalities were analyzed. Horizontal cleft lesions were noted in 21 cases; there were 17 cystic dilatations, two loose bodies, one synovial chondroma, and one case of pigmented villonodular synovitis(PVNS). Vertical cleft lesions were noted in 15 cases; these comprised 11 cystic dilatations, two loose bodies, one synovial osteochondromatosis, and one PVNS. Among all cases, three cystic dilatations, one loose body, and one PVNS occurred in both horizontal and vertical clefts. Among 25 knees with cystic dilatations of clefts, five showed grade 1, joint effusion, ten grade 2, and ten grade 3, Associated abnormalities were meniscal tear in 16 cases, osteoarthritis in 13, cruciate ligament tear in five, osteochondritis dissecans in three, osteochondral fracture in two, osteonecrosis in one, loose body in one, and synovitis in one. Among synovial-lined clefts in Hoffa's fat pad, the most common lesion was cystic dilatation;there were various associated abnormalities and a close relationship to joint effusion. An awareness of the types of lesions found in clefts is helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring in the area of Hoffa's fat pad.=20

  5. Degenerative joint disease on MRI and physical activity: a clinical study of the knee joint in 320 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined 320 patients with MRI and arthroscopy after an acute trauma to evaluate MRI in diagnosis of degenerative joint disease of the knee in relation to sports activity and clinical data. Lesions of cartilage and menisci on MRI were registered by two radiologists in consensus without knowledge of arthroscopy. Arthroscopy demonstrated grade-1 to grade-4 lesions of cartilage on 729 of 1920 joint surfaces of 320 knees, and MRI diagnosed 14 % of grade-1, 32 % of grade-2, 94 % of grade-3, and 100 % of grade-4 lesions. Arthroscopy explored 1280 meniscal areas and showed degenerations in 10 %, tears in 11.4 %, and complex lesions in 9.2 %. Magnetic resonance imaging was in agreement with arthroscopy in 81 % showing more degenerations but less tears of menisci than arthroscopy. Using a global system for grading the total damage of the knee joint into none, mild, moderate, or severe changes, agreement between arthroscopy and MRI was found in 82 %. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy showed coherently that degree of degenerative joint changes was significantly correlated to patient age or previous knee trauma. Patients over 40 years had moderate to severe changes on MRI in 45 % and patients under 30 years in only 22 %. Knee joints with a history of trauma without complete structural or functional reconstitution showed marked changes on MRI in 57 %, whereas stable joints without such alterations had degenerative changes in only 26 %. There was no correlation of degenerative disease to gender, weight, type, frequency, and intensity of sports activity. Therefore, MRI is an effective non-invasive imaging method for exact localization and quantification of chronic joint changes of cartilage and menisci that recommends MRI for monitoring in sports medicine. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. Bakers' cyst and tibiofemoral abnormalities are more distinctive MRI features of symptomatic osteoarthritis than patellofemoral abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, A W; Mertens, B; Reijnierse, M; Bloem, J L; de Mutsert, R; le Cessie, S; Rosendaal, F R; Kloppenburg, M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate which structural MR abnormalities discriminate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA), taking co-occurrence of abnormalities in all compartments into account. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45–65 years. In 1285 participants (median age 56 years, 55% women, median body mass index (BMI) 30 kg/m2), MRI of the right knee were obtained. Structural abnormalities (osteophytes, cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), subchondral cysts, meniscal abnormalities, effusion, Baker's cyst) at 9 patellofemoral and tibiofemoral locations were scored following the knee OA scoring system. Symptomatic OA in the imaged knee was defined following the American College of Rheumatology criteria. Logistic ridge regression analyses were used to investigate which structural abnormalities discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic OA, crude and adjusted for age, sex and BMI. Results Symptomatic knee OA was present in 177 individuals. Structural MR abnormalities were highly frequent both in individuals with OA and in those without. Baker's cysts showed the highest adjusted regression coefficient (0.293) for presence of symptomatic OA, followed by osteophytes and BMLs in the medial tibiofemoral compartment (0.185–0.279), osteophytes in the medial trochlear facet (0.262) and effusion (0.197). Conclusions Baker's cysts discriminate best between individuals with and without symptomatic knee OA. Structural MR abnormalities, especially in the medial side of the tibiofemoral joint and effusion, add further in discriminating symptomatic OA. Baker's cysts may present as a target for treatment. PMID:27252896

  7. Imaging of postarthroscopic complications after knee injuries; Bildgebung postarthroskopischer Komplikationen nach Knieverletzungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und muskuloskelettale Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria); Skrbensky, G. von [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinik fuer Orthopaedie, Wien (Austria)

    2012-11-15

    The most common joint injuries in professional and recreational sports participants and also in the total population are knee injuries. Arthroscopy is indicated if this modality will improve the patient outcome and potential long-term complications can be avoided. Although uncommon, complications following arthroscopy are mostly evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For planning further therapy strategies following postarthroscopic complications, e.g. if anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is required, digital radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are helpful. This article provides an overview of the different procedures for surgical treatment which are a prerequisite for the analysis of postarthroscopic images. In addition typical complications after treatment of meniscal and chondral injuries as well as after ACL reconstruction are described and typical signs in MRI, radiography and CT are explained in detail. (orig.) [German] Kniegelenkverletzungen sind nicht nur bei Profisportlern, sondern auch in der Gesamtbevoelkerung die haeufigsten Gelenkverletzungen. Die Indikation zur arthroskopischen Operation wird gestellt, wenn im Vergleich zur konservativen Therapie ein besseres Ergebnis postarthroskopisch zu erwarten ist und potenzielle Spaetkomplikationen verhindert werden koennten. Die selten aber dennoch auftretenden postarthroskopischen Komplikationen werden zumeist mit der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) abgeklaert. Zur weiteren Therapieplanung nach Komplikationen, z. B. wenn eine Kreuzbandrevision notwendig ist, sind die digitale Projektionsradiographie und die Computertomographie (CT) hilfreich. Dieser Artikel bietet eine kurze Uebersicht ueber die unterschiedlichen Operationstechniken, die eine Voraussetzung fuer das Verstaendnis der bildgebenden postoperativen Veraenderungen sind. Weiter wird auf die haeufigsten Komplikationen nach Meniskus- und Knorpeloperationen sowie nach vorderer Kreuzbandrekonstruktion und den damit

  8. Short Term Evaluation of an Anatomically Shaped Polycarbonate Urethane Total Meniscus Replacement in a Goat Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A C T Vrancken

    Full Text Available Since the treatment options for symptomatic total meniscectomy patients are still limited, an anatomically shaped, polycarbonate urethane (PCU, total meniscus replacement was developed. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of the implant in a goat model, with a specific focus on the implant location in the joint, geometrical integrity of the implant and the effect of the implant on synovial membrane and articular cartilage histopathological condition.The right medial meniscus of seven Saanen goats was replaced by the implant. Sham surgery (transection of the MCL, arthrotomy and MCL suturing was performed in six animals. The contralateral knee joints of both groups served as control groups. After three months follow-up the following aspects of implant performance were evaluated: implant position, implant deformation and the histopathological condition of the synovium and cartilage.Implant geometry was well maintained during the three month implantation period. No signs of PCU wear were found and the implant did not induce an inflammatory response in the knee joint. In all animals, implant fixation was compromised due to suture breakage, wear or elongation, likely causing the increase in extrusion observed in the implant group. Both the femoral cartilage and tibial cartilage in direct contact with the implant showed increased damage compared to the sham and sham-control groups.This study demonstrates that the novel, anatomically shaped PCU total meniscal replacement is biocompatible and resistant to three months of physiological loading. Failure of the fixation sutures may have increased implant mobility, which probably induced implant extrusion and potentially stimulated cartilage degeneration. Evidently, redesigning the fixation method is necessary. Future animal studies should evaluate the improved fixation method and compare implant performance to current treatment standards, such as allografts.

  9. Pain following double-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Correlation with morphological graft findings and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To determine the relationship between knee pain following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft placement with morphological graft findings and dynamic contrast enhancement as assessed at MRI. Material and methods: Following institutional review board approval, 37 consecutive patients with double-bundle ACL reconstruction were enrolled. Thirteen patients had pain and 24 were asymptomatic. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 T MRI machine an average of 7.6 months after surgery. Graft-related (increase signal intensity, abnormal orientation, discontinuity, cystic degeneration, anterior translation of lateral tibia, arthrofibrosis), and non-graft related causes of knee pain (meniscal tear, cartilage injury, loose bodies, and synovitis) were evaluated. During dynamic contrast enhancement analysis, peak enhancement (ePeak) was calculated by placing a region of interest at the osteoligamentous interface of each bundle. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables analysis and chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables analysis. Results: There was no difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients regarding morphological graft-related or non-graft-related causes of knee pain. For dynamic contrast enhancement analysis, symptomatic patients had significantly lower ePeak values than asymptomatic patients in the anteromedial (p = 0.008) and posterolateral (p = 0.001) bundles or when using the higher ePeak value in either bundle (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Morphological ACL graft findings as assessed at MRI could not be used to distinguish between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. However, lower ePeak values had a significant association with knee pain. This may indicate poor neovascularization of the graft, potentially leading to graft failure. - Highlights: • Morphologic graft findings of MRI are poorly associated with knee pain. • Lower contrast enhancement values are significantly associated with knee pain

  10. Sport and early osteoarthritis: the role of sport in aetiology, progression and treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini, F; Spalding, T; Andriolo, L; Berruto, M; Denti, M; Espregueira-Mendes, J; Menetrey, J; Peretti, G M; Seil, R; Filardo, G

    2016-06-01

    Sports activities are considered favourable for general health; nevertheless, a possible influence of sports practice on the development of early osteoarthritis (OA) is a cause for concern. A higher incidence of OA in knees and ankles of former high-impact sports players than in those of the normal population has been shown and it is still debatable whether the cause is either to be recognized generically in the higher number of injuries or in a joint overload. The possibility to address knee OA in its early phases may be strictly connected to the modification of specific extrinsic or intrinsic factors, related to the patient in order to save the joint from further disease progression; these include sport practice, equipment and load. Non-surgical therapies such as continuative muscles reinforce and training play a strong role in the care of athletes with early OA, particularly if professional. There is an overall agreement on the need of an early restoring of a proper meniscal, ligament and cartilage integrity in order to protect the knee and resume sports safely, whereas alignment is a point still strongly debatable especially for professional athletes. Remaining questions still to be answered are the risks of different sports in relation to one another, although an actual protective effect of low-impact sports, such as walking, swimming or cycling, has been recognized on the appearance or worsening of OA, the effect of continuing or ceasing to practice a sport on the natural history of early OA, and even following appropriate treatment is still unknown. PMID:27043343

  11. Accuracy of magnetic resonance in identifying traumatic intraarticular knee lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Carlos Eduardo Sanches

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging of the knee in identifying traumatic intraarticular knee lesions. METHOD: 300 patients with a clinical diagnosis of traumatic intraarticular knee lesions underwent prearthoscopic magnetic resonance imaging. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, likelihood ratio for a positive test, likelihood ratio for a negative test, and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were calculated relative to the findings during arthroscopy in the studied structures of the knee (medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and articular cartilage. RESULTS: Magnetic resonance imaging produced the following results regarding detection of lesions: medial meniscus: sensitivity 97.5%, specificity 92.9%, positive predictive value 93.9%, positive negative value 97%, likelihood positive ratio 13.7, likelihood negative ratio 0.02, and accuracy 95.3%; lateral meniscus: sensitivity 91.9%, specificity 93.6%, positive predictive value 92.7%, positive negative value 92.9%, likelihood positive ratio 14.3, likelihood negative ratio 0.08, and accuracy 93.6%; anterior cruciate ligament: sensitivity 99.0%, specificity 95.9%, positive predictive value 91.9%, positive negative value 99.5%, likelihood positive ratio 21.5, likelihood negative ratio 0.01, and accuracy 96.6%; posterior cruciate ligament: sensitivity 100%, specificity 99%, positive predictive value 80.0%, positive negative value 100%, likelihood positive ratio 100, likelihood negative ratio 0.01, and accuracy 99.6%; articular cartilage: sensitivity 76.1%, specificity 94.9%, positive predictive value 94.7%, positive negative value 76.9%, likelihood positive ratio 14.9, likelihood negative ratio 0.25, and accuracy 84.6%. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging is a satisfactory diagnostic tool for evaluating meniscal and ligamentous lesions of the knee, but it is

  12. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  13. PLDLA/PCL-T Scaffold for Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Andrea Rodrigues; Moda, Marlon; Cattani, Silvia Mara de Melo; de Santana, Gracy Mara; Barbieri, Juliana Abreu; Munhoz, Monique Moron; Cardoso, Túlio Pereira; Barbo, Maria Lourdes Peris; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Duek, Eliana Aparecida de Rezende

    2013-04-01

    The inability of the avascular region of the meniscus to regenerate has led to the use of tissue engineering to treat meniscal injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of fibrochondrocytes preseeded on PLDLA/PCL-T [poly(L-co-D,L-lactic acid)/poly(caprolactone-triol)] scaffolds to stimulate regeneration of the whole meniscus. Porous PLDLA/PCL-T (90/10) scaffolds were obtained by solvent casting and particulate leaching. Compressive modulus of 9.5±1.0 MPa and maximum stress of 4.7±0.9 MPa were evaluated. Fibrochondrocytes from rabbit menisci were isolated, seeded directly on the scaffolds, and cultured for 21 days. New Zealand rabbits underwent total meniscectomy, after which implants consisting of cell-free scaffolds or cell-seeded scaffolds were introduced into the medial knee meniscus; the negative control group consisted of rabbits that received no implant. Macroscopic and histological evaluations of the neomeniscus were performed 12 and 24 weeks after implantation. The polymer scaffold implants adapted well to surrounding tissues, without apparent rejection, infection, or chronic inflammatory response. Fibrocartilaginous tissue with mature collagen fibers was observed predominantly in implants with seeded scaffolds compared to cell-free implants after 24 weeks. Similar results were not observed in the control group. Articular cartilage was preserved in the polymeric implants and showed higher chondrocyte cell number than the control group. These findings show that the PLDLA/PCL-T 90/10 scaffold has potential for orthopedic applications since this material allowed the formation of fibrocartilaginous tissue, a structure of crucial importance for repairing injuries to joints, including replacement of the meniscus and the protection of articular cartilage from degeneration. PMID:23593566

  14. MRI assessment of knee osteoarthritis: Knee Osteoarthritis Scoring System (KOSS) - inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility of a compartment-based scoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a scoring system for quantifying osteoarthritic changes of the knee as identified by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and to determine its inter- and intra-observer reproducibility, in order to monitor medical therapy in research studies. Two independent observers evaluated 25 consecutive MR examinations of the knee in patients with previously defined clinical symptoms and radiological signs of osteoarthritis. We acquired on a 1.5 T system: coronal and sagittal proton density- and T2-weighted dual spin echo (SE) images, sagittal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) images with fat suppression, and axial dual turbo SE images with fat suppression. Images were scored for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, bone marrow edema, and for meniscal abnormalities. Presence and size of effusion, synovitis and Baker's cyst were recorded. All parameters were ranked on a previously defined, semiquantitative scale, reflecting increasing severity of findings. Kappa, weighted kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to determine inter- and intra-observer variability. Inter-observer reproducibility was good (ICC value 0.77). Inter- and intra-observer reproducibility for individual parameters was good to very good (inter-observer ICC value 0.63-0.91; intra-observer ICC value 0.76-0.96). The presented comprehensive MR scoring system for osteoarthritic changes of the knee has a good to very good inter-observer and intra-observer reproducibility. Thus the score form with its definitions can be used for standardized assessment of osteoarthritic changes to monitor medical therapy in research studies. (orig.)

  15. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Smith, Maximilian; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gill, Thomas J. [Boston Sports Medicine and Research Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-12-20

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance evaluation of the knee in children and adolescents with achondroplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia. Although the radiographic features are well described, MRI features of the knee in achondroplasia have not been reported. To describe common MRI characteristics of the knee joint in symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. We retrospectively evaluated 10 knee MRI examinations in 8 children and young adults (age range 11-20 years, mean 16.3 years) with achondroplasia. We measured modified Insall-Salvati index, knee flexion angle, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-Blumensaat line angle, ACL-tibial angle, posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) angle, intercondylar notch width index, and intercondylar notch depth index. We compared our findings with an age- and gender-matched control group of 20 children (age range 15-18 years; mean 16 years) with normal knee MRIs. All 10 knees in the achondroplasia group had discoid lateral meniscus; 8 meniscal tears were identified. Patella baja was present in half of the study cases. Greater knee flexion and increased ACL-Blumensaat line and PCL angles were seen in all achondroplasia knees. ACL-tibial angle was similar in the study and in the control group. Children with achondroplasia had deeper A-shape femoral notches that extended more anteriorly than those seen in the control group. MRI findings were confirmed in all seven knees with arthroscopic correlation. Discoid lateral meniscus, often with tear, is a consistent feature in knee MRIs of symptomatic children and adolescents with achondroplasia. Other findings include patella baja, knee flexion, deep A-shape intercondylar notch, increased ACL-Blumensaat line angle and taut PCL. (orig.)

  17. Posteromedial knee friction syndrome: an entity with medial knee pain and edema between the femoral condyle, sartorius and gracilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe MRI features of an entity consisting of medial knee pain and edema between the posteromedial femoral condyle (PMFC), sartorius and/or gracilis tendons and determine whether reduced tendon-bone distances may account for these findings. We retrospectively identified MRI cases of edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons (25 subjects, 26 knees). Two musculoskeletal radiologists independently graded edema and measured the sartorius- and gracilis-PMFC distances and knee flexion angle. Age- and gender-matched subjects with normal knee MRIs (27 subjects, 27 knees) served as controls for measurements. Statistical analyses compared abnormal to control subjects. Sartorius-PMFC and gracilis-PMFC spaces were narrower in abnormal compared to control subjects (1.6 ± 1.0 vs. 2.1 ± 1.2 mm, P = 0.04; 2.3 ± 2.0 vs. 4.6 ± 3.0 mm, P = 0.002, respectively). The knee flexion angle was similar between groups (P > 0.05). In subjects with clinical information, medial knee pain was the main complaint in 58 % (15/26) of abnormal subjects, with 42 % (11/26) having clinical suspicion of medial meniscal tear. Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis was mild in 54 % (14/26), moderate in 35 % (9/26) and severe in 12 % (3/26), and it was most frequent deep to both the sartorius and gracilis (50 %, 13/26). Edema between the PMFC, sartorius and/or gracilis tendons identified on knee MRI may be associated with medial knee pain and may represent a friction syndrome. (orig.)

  18. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hernandez Filho, Guinel [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dirim, Berna [Izmir Atatuerk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karsiyaka, izmir (Turkey); Wangwinyuvirat, Mani [Rajavithi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); Haghigi, Parvitz [University of California, San Diego, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of grading of preoperative internal derangement of knee joint by MRI with 3D-COSMIC sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usefulness of 3D-coherent oscillatory state acquisition for the manipulation of image contrast (COSMIC) sequence is evaluated by comparison of grades of the MR image before surgery and of postoperative finding for the cartilage, ligament and meniscus. The sequence can give images with intensive signals of the joint parts essentially having low T2/T1 values. Subjects are 18 cases (8 M/10 F, average age of 41 y) with degenerated cartilage (15 knees), injured anterior cruciate ligament (9) and meniscus (16). MRI machine used is GE Signa HD x 1.5 T ver. 14 M 5, and coronary and sagittal sections of the knee are COSMIC acquisited with repetition time 8.3 msec, echo time 4.1 msec, bandwidth 50 kHz and slice thickness 2 mm. The cartilage degeneration is graded from Grade 0 to 4 along with Outerbridge's classification by postoperative findings and with 5 defined grades of preoperative morphological MRI findings. Ligament injury is definitively graded in Grade 0-2 with post-/pre-operative findings. Meniscal injury is graded in 0-3 with defined postoperative findings and with modified Mink's classification of preoperative MRI findings. All images are assessed by 3 radiological doctors. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy are evaluated for each joint part above: the accuracies in grading (0-4/3) and region for the cartilage are respectively 69.4-100% and 61.1-83.3%; for ligament, 88.9-83.3% and 88.9%; and for meniscus, 69.4-61.1% and 61.1-77.8%. Grading of the preoperative MRI with 3D-COSMIC sequence is thus shown useful for diagnosing the degree and region of knee derangement. (T.T.)

  20. Clinical Analysis of Knee Meniscus Injury CT, MRI Scan%膝关节半月板损伤CT、MRI平扫分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 李松林; 张小东; 杨根

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the CT and MRI knee scan,the advantages and disadvantages of the diagnosis of meniscal injury,accuracy,and compared to each other.Methods Using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan the diagnosis.Results 37 cases of patients,the CT diagnostic accuracy was 59%,the MRI diagnostic accuracy was 97%,CT finding subtle tibiofibula fractures,calcification.MRI found capsule,joint capsule,a smal amount of ef usion,on the patel ar ligament damage and degeneration.Conclusion Both CT and MRI scan each has its advantages,MRI find out more.With MRI in basic-level hospitals application and imaging diagnosis of knee joint meniscus injury wil leap to a new height.%目的讨论CT与MRI膝关节平扫,诊断半月板损伤的优缺点、准确率及相互对比。方法利用CT和MRI平扫诊断。结果37例患者,CT诊断准确率占59%,MRI诊断准确率占97%,CT发现胫腓骨细微骨折、钙化。MRI发现髌上囊、关节囊少量积液、韧带损伤及变性等异常。结论 CT与MRI两项平扫各具优势,MRI发现病变更多。随着MRI在基层医院应用与开展对膝关节半月板损伤的影像学诊断将会>上一个新的高度。

  1. Does marathon running cause acute lesions of the knee? Evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was conducted into whether running a marathon causes acute alterations in menisci, cartilage, bone marrow, ligaments, or joint effusions, which could be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty-two non-professional marathon runners underwent MRI of the knee before and immediately after running a marathon. Lesions of menisci and cartilage (five-point scale), bone marrow, ligaments (three-point scale), joint effusion, and additional findings were evaluated and a total score was assessed. Before the marathon, grade 1 lesions of the menisci were found in eight runners, and grade 2 lesions in five runners. After the marathon, an upgrading from a meniscal lesion grade 1 to grade 2 was observed in one runner. Before the marathon, grade 1 cartilage lesions were found in three runners, and grade 2 lesions in one runner, all of which remained unchanged after the marathon. Before and after the marathon, unchanged bone marrow edema was present in three runners and unchanged anterior cruciate ligament lesions (grade 1) were seen in two runners. Joint effusions were present in 13 runners in the pre-run scans, slightly increased in four runners after the marathon, and newly occurred in one runner after the marathon. A total score comprising all knee lesions in each runner showed an increase after the marathon in two runners, whereas no runner showed an improvement of the radiological findings (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P>0.05). The evaluation of lesions of the knee with MRI shows that marathon running does not cause severe, acute lesions of cartilage, ligaments, or bone marrow of the knee in well-trained runners. Only subtle changes, such as joint effusions or increased intrameniscal signal alterations, were imaged after running a marathon. (orig.)

  2. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty MRI: impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction MRI on image quality, findings and therapy decision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Sutter, Reto [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology Department, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Grande, Filippo del [Regional Hospital, Radiology, Lugano (Switzerland); Fucentese, Sandro F.; Blatter, Samuel [University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Balgrist University Hospital, Orthopedics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the impact of slice-encoding for metal artefact correction (SEMAC) on image quality, findings, and therapy decision in patients with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Forty-five painful UKAs were examined at 1.5T-MRI (STIR, proton-density(PD)-weighted sequence, each with SEMAC and high-bandwidth). Artefact size, image quality, anatomic depiction, and clinically relevant findings were compared between SEMAC and high-bandwidth (2 readers). In 30 patients, therapy decision was retrospectively assessed by two orthopaedic surgeons without MRI, with high-bandwidth-MRI, and with SEMAC-MRI. SEMAC reduced mean artefact size for STIR (11.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 37.7 cm{sup 2}) and PD (16.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 18.9 cm{sup 2}), p < 0.0005 for both comparisons. SEMAC showed more blurring than high-bandwidth, p < 0.0005. STIR-SEMAC revealed more bone marrow oedema (29 vs. 18 patients, p = 0.001, 30 vs. 13 patients, p < 0.0005, for reader 1 and 2 respectively). PD-SEMAC was worse in detecting meniscal lesions (6 missed, p = 0.031, 9 missed, p = 0.004, by reader 1 and 2 respectively) than PD-high-bandwidth. Revision-surgery was chosen in 12 and 11 patients without MRI (surgeon 1 and 2), with high-bandwidth-MRI in 15 and 14 patients, and with SEMAC-MRI in 19 and 14 patients. STIR-SEMAC was useful in detecting bone marrow oedema and influenced the orthopaedic surgeons' decisions towards surgery, while PD-SEMAC showed no clinical benefit. (orig.)

  3. The impact of combined meniscus tear on quality of life after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harhaji Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. An anterior cruciate ligament injury represents a significant epidemiological problem worldwide, especially due to involving young, sporty and active working-age population. This study has been conducted in order to compare the quality of life of patients who had isolated anterior cruciate ligament tear and of those who suffered from an associated meniscal injury. Material and Methods. This study included 185 patients who had undergone reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament at the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology in Novi Sad from January 1st, 2012 to December 31st, 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: group A consisted of patients who had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction only, and group B consisted of patients who had partial meniscectomy in addition to the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The follow-up period was 12 months. Results. Distribution of patients by gender was significantly in favor of men. In our study, 146 patients were male and 39 patients were female. The average age of patients was 26.1 years overall (16-55 years, being 26.9 years for men, and 23.3 years for female patients. Out of 185 patients, 110 had an isolated anterior cruciate ligament injury, while 75 suffered both meniscus, internal or external, and anterior cruciate ligament injury. Conclusion. The comparison of the quality of life of patients in both groups showed no statistically significant difference. Therefore, we were not able to prove the hypothesis about the superior quality of life of those patients who had suffered from a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament only.

  4. Spiral CT arthrography of multiplanar reconstruction and virtual arthroscopy technique in diagnosis of knee with internal derangements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊传芝; 郝敬明

    2004-01-01

    5Objective:To evaluate the values of spiral CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstruction and virtual arthroscopy technique in diagnosis of internal derangements of the knee. Methods:Ten bovine knees were used for experiment. The menisci, anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and cartilage of these 10 bovine knees were injured with a hook. Each of the joints was injected with 100 mi air, then soon scanned with a PQ6000 spiral computed tomography scanner. The data obtained was input into the work station, and multiplanar reconstruction technique was used to illustrate lesions in the knees. The results of CT diagnosis were compared to those found by gross inspection of the specimens. Clinically, 10 knees of 9 patients diagnosed as internal derangement were evaluated with the same method after 50-70 ml air was injected into each of the joints. Nine months later, the data of 2 patients were used for CT endoscopy reconstruction. The results were compared with intraoperative findings. Results:Experimentally,the sensitivity and specificity were 88.9% and 93.9% by detection of meniscal abnormalities, 85.7% and 100% by detection of cruciate ligament lesions, and 72.7% and 100% by detection of cartilage damage, respectively. Clinically, the sensitivity and specificity were 90. 0% and 95.0% by detection of meulscal lesion. As to ligament, the figures were 85.7% and 100% respectively. Images of virtual arthroscopy simulated the images of real arthroscopy. Conclnsious:Spiral CT arthrography of multiplanar reconstruction technique offers fime images of internal structures of the knee, with clear border and internal structure. It is an accurate method for detecting meulscal, cruciate and collateral ligament and cartilaginous lesions that cause internal derangement of the knee.Virtual arthroscopy technique is a hopeful method for detecting reasons of derangement of the knee.

  5. 关节镜下25例半月板损伤的治疗初步分析%25 cases of meniscus injury treatment under arthroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许海; 曾松旺; 黄凯

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨关节镜下微创技术治疗半月板损伤的临床疗效。方法:对获得随访的25例患者,根据症状、体征来评定疗效,分析近、远期效果。结果:25例27膝,优16例17膝,良7例8膝,可2例2膝,优良率92.6%,术后膝关节Lysholm评分明显高于术前。结论:关节镜下治疗半月板损伤创伤小,符合生物力学要求最大程度保留半月板,恢复膝关节功能。%Objective:To investigate the minimally invasive technique under arthroscopy in the treatment of meniscus injury. Method:for follow-up of 25 patients, short-term and long-term effects were analyzed according to the signs and symptoms evaluation. Result:Among 27 knees of 25 cases,optimal 16 cases of 17 knees , benign 7 cases of 8 knee, fine 2 cases of 2 knees, The excellent was 92.6%, Postoperative knee Lysholm score significantly higher than the preoperative. Conclusion:arthroscopic meniscal injury has the advantages of small trauma, conforming to the requirements of the biomechanics of maximum retainment of the meniscus, and restoration of knee joint function.

  6. MRI features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital do Coracao (HCor), and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miranda, Frederico C.; Braga, Cesar A.P.; Hartmann, Luiz G.C.; Santos, Durval C.B.; Rosemberg, Laercio A. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gill, Corey M. [Department of Neurology and Cancer Center, Pappas Center for Neuro-Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-11-27

    Evaluate the visibility and describe the anatomical features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the knee were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and assessed for the visibility of the anterolateral ligament under direct cross-referencing of axial and coronal images as complete, partial, or non-visible. Distal insertion site (tibial, meniscal), distance to lateral tibial plateau, measurements (length, width, thickness), and associated imaging findings were also tabulated. Clinical and surgical records were also reviewed. Seventy MRI scans from 60 consecutive subjects were included in the study. Mean age was 40 years, body mass 74.9 kg, and height 1.72 m. The subject population was 53 % male, most of the knees were from the left side (51 %), and chronic pain was the main clinical symptom (40 %). Nine knees (13 %) had undergone previous surgery. The anterolateral ligament was identified in 51 % of the knees: completely visible in 11 % and partially visible in 40 %. In all visible cases, the distal insertion site was identified on the tibia, with a mean distance of 5.7 mm to the plateau. A completely visible ligament had a mean length of 33.2 mm, thickness of 5.6 mm, and width of 1.9 mm. Inter-observer agreement for ligament presence was significant (κ = 0.7). Statistical analyses showed a trend to be more visible in men, with a longer length compared with women. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly identifies the anterolateral ligament of the knee in slightly more than half of cases, being partially visible in most of them. In all cases, a tibial insertion is characterized. (orig.)

  7. Successful Return to Sport Following Distal Femoral Varus Osteotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Pramod Babu; Degen, Ryan; Tetreault, Danielle; Krych, Aaron John; Williams, Riley J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Distal femoral varus osteotomy is an effective treatment for unloading valgus knee malalignment; however, there is limited evidence on the ability for patients to return to athletics following this procedure. The purpose of this study is to report the functional outcomes and return to sport for athletic patients that underwent distal femoral varus osteotomy. Methods: A consecutive series of athletic patients that had undergone distal femoral varus osteotomy for symptomatic lateral compartment overload and valgus knee malalignment were prospectively reviewed. All patients had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Radiographs were assessed to determine pre-operative and post-operative alignment. Details regarding sport of interest, ability to return to sport, and timing of return were obtained from the patients. Prospective institutional registries were utilized to collect pre-operative and post-operative Marx Activity Scale and International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC) scores; these values were compared using paired t-tests with p soccer, 2 softball, 2 running, 1 football, 1 basketball, 1 ice hockey, 1 volleyball, 1 rowing) at a mean of 11 months (range: 9-13). Furthermore, all 13 patients demonstrated an improvement in both Marx Activity Scale and IKDC scores after surgery. The mean improvement in Marx Activity Scale was 7 (mean pre-op: 4, mean post-op: 11, p < 0.01), and the mean improvement in IKDC score was 36 (mean pre-op: 53, mean post-op: 89, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Valgus knee malalignment results in overload of the lateral compartment and can severely limit one’s ability to participate in athletic activities. Correction of valgus knee malalignment through distal femoral varus osteotomy - either medial closing wedge or lateral opening wedge - can reliably result in improvement in function and return to sport, provided that concomitant chondral, meniscal, and ligamentous pathology is addressed. Therefore, distal

  8. MRI features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluate the visibility and describe the anatomical features of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the knee were independently reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and assessed for the visibility of the anterolateral ligament under direct cross-referencing of axial and coronal images as complete, partial, or non-visible. Distal insertion site (tibial, meniscal), distance to lateral tibial plateau, measurements (length, width, thickness), and associated imaging findings were also tabulated. Clinical and surgical records were also reviewed. Seventy MRI scans from 60 consecutive subjects were included in the study. Mean age was 40 years, body mass 74.9 kg, and height 1.72 m. The subject population was 53 % male, most of the knees were from the left side (51 %), and chronic pain was the main clinical symptom (40 %). Nine knees (13 %) had undergone previous surgery. The anterolateral ligament was identified in 51 % of the knees: completely visible in 11 % and partially visible in 40 %. In all visible cases, the distal insertion site was identified on the tibia, with a mean distance of 5.7 mm to the plateau. A completely visible ligament had a mean length of 33.2 mm, thickness of 5.6 mm, and width of 1.9 mm. Inter-observer agreement for ligament presence was significant (κ = 0.7). Statistical analyses showed a trend to be more visible in men, with a longer length compared with women. Magnetic resonance imaging clearly identifies the anterolateral ligament of the knee in slightly more than half of cases, being partially visible in most of them. In all cases, a tibial insertion is characterized. (orig.)

  9. Loading of the knee during 3.0 T MRI is associated with significantly increased medial meniscus extrusion in mild and moderate osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Standard knee MRI is performed under unloading (ULC) conditions and not much is known about changes of the meniscus, ligaments or cartilage under loading conditions (LC). The aim is to study the influence of loading of different knee structures at 3 Tesla (T) in subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal controls. Materials and methods: 30 subjects, 10 healthy and 20 with radiographic evidence of OA (10 mild and 10 moderate) underwent 3 T MRI under ULC and LC at 50% body weight. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous abnormalities. The changes between ULC and LC were assessed. For meniscus, cartilage and ligaments the changes of lesions, signal and shape were evaluated. In addition, for the meniscus changes in extrusion were examined. A multivariate regression model was used for correlations to correct the data for the impact of age, gender, BMI. A paired T-Test was performed to calculate the differences in meniscus extrusion. Results: Subjects with degenerative knee abnormalities demonstrated significantly increased meniscus extrusion under LC when compared to normal subjects (p = 0.0008–0.0027). Subjects with knee abnormalities and higher KL scores showed significantly more changes in lesion, signal and shape of the meniscus (80% (16/20) vs. 20% (2/10); p = 0.0025), ligaments and cartilage during LC. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that axial loading has an effect on articular cartilage, ligament, and meniscus morphology, which is more significant in subjects with degenerative disease and may serve as an additional diagnostic tool for disease diagnosis and assessing progression in subjects with knee OA.

  10. Soft tissue twisting injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twisting injuries occur as a result of differential motion of different tissue types in injuries with some rotational force. These injuries are well described in brain injuries but, to our knowledge, have not been described in the musculoskeletal literature. We correlated the clinical examination and MR findings of 20 patients with twisting injuries of the soft tissues around the knee. Design and patients: We prospectively followed the clinical courses of 20 patients with knee injuries who had clinical histories and MR findings to suggest twisting injuries of the subcutaneous tissues. Patients with associated internal derangement of the knee (i.e., meniscal tears, ligamentous or bone injuries) were excluded from this study. MR findings to suggest twisting injuries included linear areas of abnormal dark signal on T1-weighted sequences and abnormal bright signal on T2-weighted or short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences and/or signal to suggest hemorrhage within the subcutaneous tissues. These MR criteria were adapted from those established for indirect musculotendinous junction injuries. Results: All 20 patients presented with considerable pain that suggested internal derangement on physical examination by the referring orthopedic surgeons. All presented with injuries associated with rotational force. The patients were placed on a course of protected weight-bearing of the affected extremity for 4 weeks. All patients had pain relief by clinical examination after this period of protected weight-bearing. Twisting injuries of the soft tissues can result in considerable pain that can be confused with internal derangement of the knee on physical examination. Soft tissue twisting injuries need to be recognized on MR examinations as they may be the cause of the patient's pain despite no MR evidence of internal derangement of the knee. The demonstra