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Sample records for bicompartmental bucket-handle meniscal

  1. MRI of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, T.H.; Hinson, G.W. [Menorah Medical Center, Overland Park, KS (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    A meniscal bucket-handle tear is a tear with an attached fragment displaced from the meniscus of the knee joint. Low sensitivity of MRI for detection of bucket-handle tears (64% as compared with arthroscopy) has been reported previously. We report increased sensitivity for detecting bucket-handle tears with the use of coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images. Results. By using four criteria for diagnosis of meniscal bucket-handle tears, our overall sensitivity compared with arthroscopy was 93% (28 of 30 meniscal bucket-handle tears seen at arthroscopy were detected by MRI). The meniscal fragment was well visualized in all 28 cases on coronal STIR images. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign was seen in 8 of 30 cases, the flipped meniscus was seen in 10 of 30 cases and a fragment in the intercondylar notch was seen in 18 of 30 cases. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dfouni, N.; Garcia, J.; Kindynis, Ph.; Bosson, D.

    1997-01-01

    To define MR signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of this technique. Retrospective study of 30 patients with a meniscal bucket-handle tear and 30 with a different type of tear, all proven by arthroscopy. The following MR signs of a bucket-handle tear were evaluated: 'separate meniscal fragment, 'double posterior cruciate ligament', 'snake sign' and 'double anterior horn'. A correct diagnosis of a bucket-handle tear was only made in 18/30 of patients. Several of the MR signs were seen in the same patient in 17 cases. A double posterior cruciate ligament was present only in cases of medial meniscus tears. The 12 menisci without these signs, and therefore not diagnosed as bucket-handle tears, were all classified as meniscal tears on the basis of signal extending to the meniscal surface. Nine of these were not displaced into the inter-condylar notch at arthroscopy. The interobserver agreement was excellent: kappa 0.88. The diagnosis of a bucket-handle meniscal tear, if it is displaced, can be made when one or more of the four MR evaluated signs are present. Other forms of meniscal tears are only exceptionally diagnosed as bucket-handle tears. (authors)

  3. Bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: meniscal intrusion rather than meniscal extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlossberg, S.; Umans, H.; Flusser, G.; DiFelice, G.S.; Lerer, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of medial meniscal extrusion (MME) versus ''medial meniscal intrusion'' in the setting of bucket handle tears. Images were evaluated for previously reported risk factors for MME, including: medial meniscal root tear, radial tear, degenerative joint disease and joint effusion. Forty-one consecutive cases of bucket handle tear of the medial meniscus were reviewed by consensus by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Imaging was performed using a 1.5 GE Signa MR unit. Patient age, gender, medial meniscal root integrity, MME, medial meniscal intrusion, degenerative joint disease, effusion and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear were recorded. Thirteen females and 27 males (age 12-62 years, median=30 years) were affected; one had bucket handle tear of each knee. Effusion was small in 13, moderate in 9 and large in 18. Degenerative joint disease was mild in three, moderate in two and severe in one. 26 ACL tears included three partial and three chronic. Medial meniscal root tear was complete in one case and partial thickness in two. None of the 40 cases with an intact or partially torn medial meniscal root demonstrated MME. MME of 3.1 mm was seen in the only full-thickness medial meniscal root tear, along with chronic ACL tear, moderate degenerative joint disease and large effusion. Medial meniscal intrusion of the central bucket handle fragment into the intercondylar notch was present in all 41 cases. Given an intact medial meniscal root in the setting of a ''pure'' bucket handle tear, there is no MME. (orig.)

  4. MR imaging of meniscal bucket-handle tears: a review of signs and their relation to arthroscopic classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydingoez, Uestuen; Firat, Ahmet K.; Atay, Ahmet Oe.; Doral, Nedim M.

    2003-01-01

    Our objective was to review the MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears and assess the relevance of these signs to the arthroscopic classification of displaced meniscal tears. Forty-five menisci in 42 patients who had a diagnosis of bucket-handle tear either on MR imaging or on subsequent arthroscopy (in which Dandy's classification of meniscal tears was used) were retrospectively analyzed for MR imaging findings of double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), fragment within the intercondylar notch, absent bow tie, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs. Arthroscopy, which was considered as the gold standard, revealed 41 bucket-handle tears (either diagnosed or not diagnosed by MR imaging) in 38 patients (33 males, 5 females). There was a stastistically significant male preponderance for the occurrence of meniscal bucket-handle tears. Overall, sensitivity and positive predictive value of MR imaging for the detection of meniscal bucket-handle tears were calculated as 90%. Common MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears in arthroscopically proven cases of such tears were the fragment in the notch and absent bow tie signs (98% frequency for each). Double-PCL, flipped meniscus, double-anterior horn, and disproportional posterior horn signs, however, were less common (32, 29, 29, and 27%, respectively). An arthroscopically proven bucket-handle tear was found in all patients who displayed at least three of the six MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears. The presence of three or more MR imaging signs of meniscal bucket-handle tears is highly suggestive of this condition. (orig.)

  5. Bucket-handle meniscal tears of the knee: sensitivity and specificity of MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsay, Theodore A.; Helms, Clyde A.

    2003-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity and specificity of reported MRI signs in the evaluation of bucket-handle tears of the knee.Design and patients A retrospective analysis of 71 knee MR examinations that were read as displaying evidence of a bucket-handle or ''bucket-handle type'' tear was performed. We evaluated for the presence or absence of the absent bow tie sign, the coronal truncation sign, the double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign, the anterior flipped fragment sign, and a fragment displaced into the intercondylar notch. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated relative to the gold standard of arthroscopy. Forty-three of 71 cases were surgically proven as bucket-handle tears. The absent bow tie sign demonstrated a sensitivity of 88.4%. The presence of at least one of the displaced fragment signs had a sensitivity of 90.7%. A finding of both the absent bow tie sign and one of the displaced fragment signs demonstrated a specificity of 85.7%. The double PCL sign demonstrated a specificity of 100%. The anterior flipped meniscus sign had a specificity of 89.7%. Bucket-handle tears of the menisci, reported in about 10% of most large series, have been described by several signs with MRI. This report gives the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for bucket-handle tears using each of these signs independently and in combination. MRI is shown to be very accurate for diagnosing bucket-handle tears when two or more of these signs coexist. (orig.)

  6. Use of the V-sign in the diagnosis of bucket-handle meniscal tear of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Nisha; Patel, Yogita; Opsha, Oleg; Eisemon, Eric; Beltran, Javier; Chen, Qi; Owen, Joshua; Fogel, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Bucket-handle tear is a displaced vertical longitudinal tear of the meniscus. Several signs of the tear have been described on MRI but none in the axial plane. We propose to describe such a sign named the V-sign that is seen at the junction of the displaced fragment and the meniscus, which is in place. MRI imaging of 25 surgically proven bucket-handle tears was reviewed for presence of the V-sign. Two control groups, one with normal menisci (n = 75) and one with surgically proven non-bucket-handle tears (n = 25), were also evaluated. Comparisons for presence or absence of the V-sign were performed among the three groups, and also for other commonly associated signs such as double PCL sign, double delta sign, and presence of ACL tear. Also, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Among those with bucket-handle tear, 72% demonstrated the V-sign while no participant in either control group had the V-sign (P ≤ 0.001). The V-sign occurred in 38% of those with double PCL sign, 55.6% with ACL tear, and 66.7% with double delta sign. The V-sign had higher sensitivity and negative predictive values than other signs related to bucket-handle tear. The V-sign, when seen on an axial plane image, is highly suggestive of bucket-handle tear. Our data suggest the benefit of using the V-sign for detecting bucket-handle tears, perhaps even above other commonly used approaches. (orig.)

  7. Use of the V-sign in the diagnosis of bucket-handle meniscal tear of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nisha [Radiology Associates of Tampa, Tampa, FL (United States); Patel, Yogita [Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, Jamaica, NY (United States); Opsha, Oleg; Eisemon, Eric; Beltran, Javier [Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Chen, Qi [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Owen, Joshua [Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Fogel, Joshua [Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, Department of Economics, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Bucket-handle tear is a displaced vertical longitudinal tear of the meniscus. Several signs of the tear have been described on MRI but none in the axial plane. We propose to describe such a sign named the V-sign that is seen at the junction of the displaced fragment and the meniscus, which is in place. MRI imaging of 25 surgically proven bucket-handle tears was reviewed for presence of the V-sign. Two control groups, one with normal menisci (n = 75) and one with surgically proven non-bucket-handle tears (n = 25), were also evaluated. Comparisons for presence or absence of the V-sign were performed among the three groups, and also for other commonly associated signs such as double PCL sign, double delta sign, and presence of ACL tear. Also, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated. Among those with bucket-handle tear, 72% demonstrated the V-sign while no participant in either control group had the V-sign (P {<=} 0.001). The V-sign occurred in 38% of those with double PCL sign, 55.6% with ACL tear, and 66.7% with double delta sign. The V-sign had higher sensitivity and negative predictive values than other signs related to bucket-handle tear. The V-sign, when seen on an axial plane image, is highly suggestive of bucket-handle tear. Our data suggest the benefit of using the V-sign for detecting bucket-handle tears, perhaps even above other commonly used approaches. (orig.)

  8. Hemi-bucket-handle tears of the meniscus: appearance on MRI and potential surgical implications

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    Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Vinson, Emily N.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Taylor, Dean C.; Garrett, William E. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Box 3810, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-08-15

    To describe a type of meniscus flap tear resembling a bucket-handle tear, named a ''hemi-bucket-handle'' tear; to compare its imaging features with those of a typical bucket-handle tear; and to discuss the potential therapeutic implications of distinguishing these two types of tears. Five knee MR examinations were encountered with a type of meniscus tear consisting of a flap of tissue from the undersurface of the meniscus displaced toward the intercondylar notch. A retrospective analysis of 100 MR examinations prospectively interpreted as having bucket-handle type tears yielded 10 additional cases with this type of tear. Cases of hemi-bucket-handle tears were reviewed for tear location and orientation, appearance of the superior articular surface of the meniscus, presence and location of displaced meniscal tissue, and presence of several classic signs of bucket-handle tears. A total of 15/15 tears involved the medial meniscus, had tissue displaced toward the notch, and were mainly horizontal in orientation. The superior surface was intact in 11/15 (73.3%). In 1/15 (6.7%) there was an absent-bow-tie sign; 6/15 (40%) had a double-PCL sign; 14/15 (93.3%) had a double-anterior horn sign. We describe a type of undersurface flap tear, named a hemi-bucket-handle tear, which resembles a bucket-handle tear. Surgeons at our institution feel this tear would likely not heal if repaired given its predominantly horizontal orientation, and additionally speculate the tear could be overlooked at arthroscopy. Thus, we feel it is important to distinguish this type of tear from the typical bucket-handle tear. (orig.)

  9. Hemi-bucket-handle tears of the meniscus: appearance on MRI and potential surgical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Vinson, Emily N.; Helms, Clyde A.; Taylor, Dean C.; Garrett, William E.

    2012-01-01

    To describe a type of meniscus flap tear resembling a bucket-handle tear, named a ''hemi-bucket-handle'' tear; to compare its imaging features with those of a typical bucket-handle tear; and to discuss the potential therapeutic implications of distinguishing these two types of tears. Five knee MR examinations were encountered with a type of meniscus tear consisting of a flap of tissue from the undersurface of the meniscus displaced toward the intercondylar notch. A retrospective analysis of 100 MR examinations prospectively interpreted as having bucket-handle type tears yielded 10 additional cases with this type of tear. Cases of hemi-bucket-handle tears were reviewed for tear location and orientation, appearance of the superior articular surface of the meniscus, presence and location of displaced meniscal tissue, and presence of several classic signs of bucket-handle tears. A total of 15/15 tears involved the medial meniscus, had tissue displaced toward the notch, and were mainly horizontal in orientation. The superior surface was intact in 11/15 (73.3%). In 1/15 (6.7%) there was an absent-bow-tie sign; 6/15 (40%) had a double-PCL sign; 14/15 (93.3%) had a double-anterior horn sign. We describe a type of undersurface flap tear, named a hemi-bucket-handle tear, which resembles a bucket-handle tear. Surgeons at our institution feel this tear would likely not heal if repaired given its predominantly horizontal orientation, and additionally speculate the tear could be overlooked at arthroscopy. Thus, we feel it is important to distinguish this type of tear from the typical bucket-handle tear. (orig.)

  10. The value of the absent bow tie sign in MRI of bucket-handle tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, Andrew J.B.; Halliday, Tonya; Raby, Nigel

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To assess the accuracy of the absent bow tie sign in diagnosing bucket handle meniscal tears (BHT) of the knee menisci. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a 3-year period, we correlated the MRI and arthroscopic findings and the presence of the various signs. One hundred and seven knees were reviewed: 74 where either MRI or arthroscopy had identified a BHT and 33 which were either normal (31), or a simple tear was identified (2). All cases were reviewed by a single radiologist with a musculoskeletal interest blinded to the original results. Each was assessed for the presence of (1) a central meniscal fragment, (2) the double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) sign, (3) the bow tie sign and (4) the contribution of a 3D-volume sequence. RESULTS: Optimal results were obtained using standard sequences and a 3D-volume sequence, giving a sensitivity of 74% and positive predictive value of 89%. The bow tie sign gave a sensitivity of 71% and positive predictive value of 76%, significantly less than previous reports. The 18 BHTs diagnosed by arthroscopy but missed by MRI showed other abnormal findings at MRI and were not reported as normal. CONCLUSION: We were not able to reproduce the previously reported high sensitivity and specificity of the absent bow tie sign. Despite optimization of all factors, the accurate diagnosis of a bucket handle tear remains difficult, and is most reliably made by identifying a central meniscal fragment, rather than relying on secondary signs such as the absent bow tie sign. Watt, A.J.B. (2000)

  11. MRI of displaced meniscal fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunoski, Brian; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Laor, Tal

    2012-01-01

    A torn meniscus frequently requires surgical fixation or debridement as definitive treatment. Meniscal tears with associated fragment displacement, such as bucket handle and flap tears, can be difficult to recognize and accurately describe on MRI, and displaced fragments can be challenging to identify at surgery. A displaced meniscal fragment can be obscured by synovium or be in a location not usually evaluated at arthroscopy. We present a pictorial essay of meniscal tears with displaced fragments in patients referred to a pediatric hospital in order to increase recognition and accurate interpretation by the radiologist, who in turn can help assist the surgeon in planning appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  12. MRI of displaced meniscal fragments

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    Dunoski, Brian [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Children' s Hospital of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Laor, Tal [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A torn meniscus frequently requires surgical fixation or debridement as definitive treatment. Meniscal tears with associated fragment displacement, such as bucket handle and flap tears, can be difficult to recognize and accurately describe on MRI, and displaced fragments can be challenging to identify at surgery. A displaced meniscal fragment can be obscured by synovium or be in a location not usually evaluated at arthroscopy. We present a pictorial essay of meniscal tears with displaced fragments in patients referred to a pediatric hospital in order to increase recognition and accurate interpretation by the radiologist, who in turn can help assist the surgeon in planning appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  13. Bucket-handle tear of posterior uterine cervical lip in a second ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bucket-handle tear is a laceration of either the anterior lip or the posterior lip of the cervix so that it hangs like the handle of a bucket.These cervical injuries are more common in term deliveries and are associated with various risks factors, including cervical cerclage, induction of labour, young maternal age, assisted ...

  14. MRI findings in bucket-handle tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, Jean; Arizpe, Azael; Chen, David; Barrera, Carlos M.; Ezuddin, Nisreen Shabbir

    2018-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is an intricate ligamentous and cartilaginous structure that helps transmit axial load across the wrist, and provide stability to the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar joints (DRUJ). Because the blood supply to the TFCC varies depending on location, certain types of tears are more amenable to surgical repair than others. Since Palmer proposed his classification system of TFCC tears in 1989, only 1 case of a ''bucket-handle'' type tear has been reported. In this article, we describe two new cases of bucket-handle tears of the TFCC. In both cases, the torn fragment was displaced into a previously undescribed location (intra-articular DRUJ and prestyloid recess). Because this type of injury pattern has not been previously well characterized in the literature and such cases rarely reported, MRI findings have not been fully described and its implications on clinical management have largely yet to be determined. (orig.)

  15. MRI findings in bucket-handle tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex

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    Jose, Jean [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uhealth Sports Medicine Institute, Miami, FL (United States); Arizpe, Azael; Chen, David [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Barrera, Carlos M.; Ezuddin, Nisreen Shabbir [University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2018-03-15

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is an intricate ligamentous and cartilaginous structure that helps transmit axial load across the wrist, and provide stability to the ulnocarpal and distal radioulnar joints (DRUJ). Because the blood supply to the TFCC varies depending on location, certain types of tears are more amenable to surgical repair than others. Since Palmer proposed his classification system of TFCC tears in 1989, only 1 case of a ''bucket-handle'' type tear has been reported. In this article, we describe two new cases of bucket-handle tears of the TFCC. In both cases, the torn fragment was displaced into a previously undescribed location (intra-articular DRUJ and prestyloid recess). Because this type of injury pattern has not been previously well characterized in the literature and such cases rarely reported, MRI findings have not been fully described and its implications on clinical management have largely yet to be determined. (orig.)

  16. Diagnostic value of self-reported mechanical symptoms for diagnosing large meniscal tears in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Meniscal tears, which are longitudinal-vertical tears (e.g. bucket-handle tears) and/or involve all three meniscal sub regions (anterior horn, body and posterior horn), are typically large and assumed to cause patient perceived mechanical knee symptoms (knee grinding or clicking and knee...... catching or locking). However, whether the presence of such mechanical symptoms is useful for diagnosing these forms of meniscus tears is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the diagnostic values of having mechanical symptoms in diagnosing a bucket-handle tear and/or a tear involving all three meniscal sub...... regions in middle-aged and older patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Methods: This study is a secondary analysis of Pihl et al. OARSI 2017. The study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS...

  17. Anamnestic prediction of bucket handle compared to other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Kosashvili, Yona; Thein, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the preoperative anamnestic details between patients with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle and other tear patterns of the medial meniscus in stable knees. A total of 204 patients (mean age 49.3 ± 13 years) were included in the study. The mean age was 49.3 ± 13 years. The study group included 65 patients (63 males, 2 females) with an arthroscopic diagnosis of bucket handle tear and the control group included 139 patients (90 males, 49 females) with non-bucket handle tear patterns. The preoperative clinical assessments of the two groups were analyzed retrospectively. Anamnestic prediction for the diagnosis of a bucket handle tear was based upon various medical history parameters. Multivariate logistic regression was carried out to identify independent anamnestic factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus compared to non-bucket handle tears. Analysis of the multivariate logistic regression yielded 3 statistically significant independent anamnestic risk factors for predicting isolated bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus: male gender (OR, 9.7; 95% CI, 1.1-37.6), locking events (OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.8-11.3) and pain in extension (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.5-23.7). Other preoperative variables such as age, BMI, activity level, comorbidities, duration of symptoms, pain location, preceding injury and its mechanism had no significant effect on tear pattern. Preoperative strong clues for bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus in stable knees are male gender, locking events and limitation in extension. Level III, Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Contact Pressure Analysis Comparing an All-Inside and Inside-Out Surgical Repair Technique for Bucket-Handle Medial Meniscus Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Daniel Cole; Phelps, Brian M; Dahl, Kimi D; Slette, Erik L; Mikula, Jacob D; Dornan, Grant J; Bucci, Gabriella; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Singleton, Steven B

    2017-10-01

    To directly compare effectiveness of the inside-out and all-inside medial meniscal repair techniques in restoring native contact area and contact pressure across the medial tibial plateau at multiple knee flexion angles. Twelve male, nonpaired (n = 12), fresh-frozen human cadaveric knees underwent a series of 5 consecutive states: (1) intact medial meniscus, (2) MCL tear and repair, (3) simulated bucket-handle longitudinal tear of the medial meniscus, (4) inside-out meniscal repair, and (5) all-inside meniscal repair. Knees were loaded with a 1,000-N axial compressive force at 5 knee flexion angles (0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°), and contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were calculated using thin film pressure sensors. No significant differences were observed between the inside-out and all-inside repair techniques at any flexion angle for contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure (all P > .791). Compared with the torn meniscus state, inside-out and all-inside repair techniques resulted in increased contact area at all flexion angles (all P contact pressure at all flexion angles (all P contact pressure at all flexion angles (all P contact area and peak contact pressure between the intact state and inside-out technique at angles ≥45° (all P contact area at 60° and 90° and peak contact pressure at 90° (both P contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure over the tested flexion angles ranged from 498 to 561 mm 2 , 786 to 997 N/mm 2 , and 1,990 to 2,215 N/mm 2 , respectively. Contact area, mean contact pressure, and peak contact pressure were not significantly different between the all-inside and inside-out repair techniques at any tested flexion angle. Both techniques adequately restored native meniscus biomechanics near an intact level. An all-inside repair technique provided similar, native-state-restoring contact mechanics compared with an inside-out repair technique for the treatment of

  19. MRI imaging of displaced meniscal tears: Report of a case highlighting new potential pitfalls of the MRI signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Brar, Rahat; Rana, Shaleen

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been found to be an excellent imaging tool for meniscal injuries. Various MRI signs have been described to detect displaced meniscal injuries, specifically the bucket-handle tears. Although these signs are quite helpful in diagnosing meniscal tears, various pitfalls have also been reported for these signs. Double anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sign refers to presence of a linear hypointense soft tissue anterior to the ACL, which represented the flipped bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Disproportional posterior horn and flipped meniscus signs represent asymmetrically thickened horns of the menisci due to overlying displaced meniscal fragments. We report a case wherein MRI of the knee showed tear and displacement of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) and vastus medialis complex, medial collateral ligament (MCL), and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) mimicking these signs. To our knowledge, internally displaced MPFL and MCLs have not been described as mimics for displaced meniscal fragments

  20. Role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felisaz, Paolo Florent [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy); Alessandrino, Francesco; Perelli, Simone [Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Zanon, Giacomo; Benazzo, Francesco [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Clinica Ortopedica e Traumatologica, Pavia (Italy); Calliada, Fabrizio; Sammarchi, Luigi [Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Radiologia, Diagnostica per Immagini-Istituto di Radiologia, Pavia (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    To elucidate the role of MRI in predicting meniscal tear reparability according to tear type and location in relation to vascular zones. In this retrospective study, two readers evaluated 79 pre-surgical MRIs of meniscal tears arthroscopically treated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Tears were classified according to type into vertical, horizontal, radial, complex, flaps and bucket handle and were considered reparable if the distance measured from the tear to the menisco-capsular junction was less than or equal to 5 mm. Predictions were compared with the surgical procedure performed in arthroscopy. We assessed the diagnostic performance of MRI, agreement between MRI and arthroscopy, and interrater agreement. Then, we conducted an ROC analysis on the distances measured by the first reader and built a multivariate logistic regression model. MRI had a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy, respectively, of 85%, 79%, 86%, 76% and 83% in predicting meniscal tear reparability. Correct predictions for the specific tear pattern were 76% for vertical, 84% for horizontal, 88% for radial, 86% for complex, 84% for flaps and 86% for bucket handle. Agreement between the two readers' predictions and arthroscopy was good (k = 0.65 and 0.61, respectively). Inter-rater agreement was almost excellent (k = 0.79). The ROC analysis revealed sensitivity and specificity of 73% and 83% with a cutoff value of <4 mm (p < 0.001). Anterior cruciate ligament injury and medial meniscal tear increased the likelihood of meniscal tear reparability. MRI can be a reliable and accurate tool to predict the reparability of meniscal tears, with higher prediction rates for bucket-handle tears. (orig.)

  1. Inferomedial displacement of the meniscal free fragment: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorrentino, Fortunato; Iovane, Angelo; Nicosia, Antonio; Candela, Fabrizio; Midiri, Massimo; De Maria, Marcello

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To define the accuracy of Magnetic Resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of inferomedial displacement of the meniscal fragments. Materials and methods. The MR examinations of the knee performed between December 2002 and April 2004 on 676 patients (mean age 32 years) with knee trauma and subsequently subjected to arthroscopy were retrospectively reviewed to assess the presence of bucket-handle meniscal tear and inferomedial displacement of the meniscal free fragment. The MR examinations were performed using a superconductive 0.5 T MR unit with a transmitting/receiving coil dedicated for the extremities. The MR images were acquired with SE T1 and GE T2 sequences in the sagittal, coronal and axial planes with 3 mm thickness and 1 mm gap. The images were independently reviewed by two authors blinded to the arthroscopy findings. In case of disagreement, a third author, unaware of the arthroscopic findings, gave his judgment. Results. On MR images a bucket-handle meniscal tear was identified in 54/676 patients. In 6 out of 54 patients, an inferomedial meniscal fragment displacement of the medical meniscus with associated inflammatory synovial reaction around the distal insertion of the medial homolateral collateral ligament was detected. All cases were confirmed by arthroscopy and no statistical differences between the two authors were observed. Conclusions. MR allows the detection of the inferomedial meniscal fragment displacement and a more correct planning of arthroscopy with a strong reduction of repeat interventions [it

  2. MRI evaluation of the bucket handle tears of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Zhuozhao; Fan Jiadong; Xie Jingxia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of five MR imaging signs in diagnosing the bucket handle tears (BHT) of menisci of the knee. Methods: MR imaging of 139 knees with subsequent arthroscopy exams were retrospectively evaluated. Based on the results of arthroscopy, 19 knees had BHT of menisci. Two radiologists evaluated each MR exam independently, with discrepancies resolved by consensus. Each MR exam was analyzed for five signs: a double posterior cruciate ligament sign, a flipped meniscus sign, an absent bow tie sign, an internal displaced fragment sign, and an abnormal circumferential meniscus sign. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for diagnosing BHT of menisci were calculated for the presence of each individual sign. Results: The sensitivities of these five signs ranged between 52.6% and 89.5%, and specificities ranged between 83.3% and 98.3%, respectively. Positive and negative predictive values ranged between 42.9% and 88.2%, and between 92.7% and 98.3%, respectively. The accuracy of these five signs ranged between 82.7% and 96.4%. Conclusion: BHT of menisci may have many signs on MR imaging. The diagnostic sensitivities of the internal displaced fragment sign and the abnormal circumferential meniscus sign are the highest. The double posterior cruciate ligament sign has the highest specificity and positive predictive value, while the internal displaced fragment sign has the highest negative predictive value and accuracy

  3. MR imaging-based diagnosis and classification of meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jie C; De Smet, Arthur A; Graf, Ben K; Rosas, Humberto G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is currently the modality of choice for detecting meniscal injuries and planning subsequent treatment. A thorough understanding of the imaging protocols, normal meniscal anatomy, surrounding anatomic structures, and anatomic variants and pitfalls is critical to ensure diagnostic accuracy and prevent unnecessary surgery. High-spatial-resolution imaging of the meniscus can be performed using fast spin-echo and three-dimensional MR imaging sequences. Normal anatomic structures that can mimic a tear include the meniscal ligament, meniscofemoral ligaments, popliteomeniscal fascicles, and meniscomeniscal ligament. Anatomic variants and pitfalls that can mimic a tear include discoid meniscus, meniscal flounce, a meniscal ossicle, and chondrocalcinosis. When a meniscal tear is identified, accurate description and classification of the tear pattern can guide the referring clinician in patient education and surgical planning. For example, longitudinal tears are often amenable to repair, whereas horizontal and radial tears may require partial meniscectomy. Tear patterns include horizontal, longitudinal, radial, root, complex, displaced, and bucket-handle tears. Occasionally, meniscal tears can be difficult to detect at imaging; however, secondary indirect signs, such as a parameniscal cyst, meniscal extrusion, or linear subchondral bone marrow edema, should increase the radiologist's suspicion for an underlying tear. Awareness of common diagnostic errors can ensure accurate diagnosis of meniscal tears. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2014.

  4. Reversed double PCL sign: unusual location of a meniscal fragment of the knee observed by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    A 36-year-old woman with tears of the anterior cruciate ligament and medial meniscus received a meniscectomy. The MR images obtained prior to the partial meniscectomy showed a bucket-handle meniscal tear with centrally displaced fragment lying anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), representing a ''double PCL sign''; however, after the meniscectomy, MR images demonstrated a fragment in the space posterior to the PCL where no structure is generally recognized except for the ligament of wrisberg. This article reports a ''reversed'' double PCL sign, caused by inadequate surgical clearance of a bucket-handle tear of the medial meniscus. (orig.)

  5. The iDuo Bi-compartmental Knee Replacement: Our Early Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jemmett

    2016-12-01

    Our early results suggest that the iDuo knee is a good option for those with isolated bi-compartmental disease and outcome scores are comparable with those reported for the BKA. This bi-compartmental design may bridge the gap between the uni-compartmental and total knee replacement. The choice between monolithic or modular designs remains in debate. We will continue to use this prosthesis for a carefully selected group of patients.

  6. Meniscal repair devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F A; Herbert, M A

    2000-09-01

    Meniscal repair devices not requiring accessory incisions are attractive. Many factors contribute to their clinical effectiveness including their biomechanical characteristics. This study compared several new meniscal repair devices with standard meniscal suture techniques. Using a porcine model, axis-of-insertion loads were applied to various meniscal sutures and repair devices. A single device or stitch was placed in a created meniscal tear and a load applied. Both loads and modes of failure were recorded. The load-to-failure data show stratification into 4 distinct statistical groups. Group A, 113 N for a double vertical stitch; group B, 80 N for a single vertical stitch; group C, 57 N for the BioStinger, 56 N for a horizontal mattress stitch, and 50 N for the T-Fix stitch; and group D, 33 N for the Meniscus Arrow (inserted by hand or gun), 32 N for the Clearfix screw, 31 N for the SDsorb staple, 30 N for the Mitek meniscal repair system, and 27 N for the Biomet staple. The failure mechanism varied. Sutures broke away from the knot. The Meniscus Arrow and BioStinger pulled through the inner rim with the crossbar intact. The Clearfix screw failed by multiple mechanisms, whereas 1 leg of the SDsorb staple always pulled out of the outer rim. The Mitek device usually failed by pullout from the inner rim. The Biomet staple always broke at the crosshead or just below it. Although the surgeon should be aware of the material properties of the repair technique chosen for a meniscal repair, this information is only an indication of device performance and may not correlate with clinical healing results.

  7. Analysis of meniscal degeneration and meniscal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton James H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menisci play a vital role in load transmission, shock absorption and joint stability. There is increasing evidence suggesting that OA menisci may not merely be bystanders in the disease process of OA. This study sought: 1 to determine the prevalence of meniscal degeneration in OA patients, and 2 to examine gene expression in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Methods Studies were approved by our human subjects Institutional Review Board. Menisci and articular cartilage were collected during joint replacement surgery for OA patients and lower limb amputation surgery for osteosarcoma patients (normal control specimens, and graded. Meniscal cells were prepared from these meniscal tissues and expanded in monolayer culture. Differential gene expression in OA meniscal cells and normal meniscal cells was examined using Affymetrix microarray and real time RT-PCR. Results The grades of meniscal degeneration correlated with the grades of articular cartilage degeneration (r = 0.672; P HLA-DPA1, integrin, beta 2 (ITGB2, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1, ankylosis, progressive homolog (ANKH and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7, were expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Importantly, many of the genes that have been shown to be differentially expressed in other OA cell types/tissues, including ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 5 (ADAMTS5 and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES, were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells. This consistency suggests that many of the genes detected in our study are disease-specific. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OA is a whole joint disease. Meniscal cells may play an active role in the development of OA. Investigation of the gene expression profiles of OA meniscal cells may reveal new therapeutic targets for OA therapy and also may uncover novel

  8. A biomechanical evaluation of all-inside 2-stitch meniscal repair devices with matched inside-out suture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramappa, Arun J; Chen, Alvin; Hertz, Benjamin; Wexler, Michael; Grimaldi Bournissaint, Leandro; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Nazarian, Ara

    2014-01-01

    Many all-inside suture-based devices are currently available, including the Meniscal Cinch, FasT-Fix, Ultra FasT-Fix, RapidLoc, MaxFire, and CrossFix System. These different devices have been compared in various configurations, but to our knowledge, the Sequent meniscal repair device, which applies running sutures, has not been compared with the Ultra FasT-Fix, nor has it been compared with its suture, No. 0 Hi-Fi, using an inside-out repair technique. To assess the quality of the meniscal repair, all new devices should be compared with the gold standard: the inside-out repair. To that end, this study aims to compare the biomechanical characteristics of running sutures delivered by the Sequent meniscal repair device with 2 vertical mattress sutures applied using the Ultra FasT-Fix device and with 2 vertical mattress sutures using an inside-out repair technique with No. 0 Hi-Fi suture. Controlled laboratory study. Paired (medial and lateral), fresh-frozen porcine menisci were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: Sequent (n = 17), Ultra FasT-Fix (n = 19), and No. 0 Hi-Fi inside-out repair (n = 20). Bucket-handle tears were created in all menisci and were subjected to repair according to their grouping. Once repaired, the specimens were subjected to cyclic loading (100, 300, and 500 cycles), followed by loading to failure. The Sequent and Ultra FasT-Fix device repairs and the suture repair exhibited low initial displacements. The Sequent meniscal repair device demonstrated the lowest displacement in response to cyclic loading. No. 0 Hi-Fi suture yielded the highest load to failure. With the development of the next generation of all-inside meniscal repair devices, surgeons may use these findings to select the method best suited for their patients. The Sequent meniscal repair device displays the least amount of displacement during cyclic loading but has a similar failure load to other devices.

  9. KNEE PROPRIOCEPTION FOLLOWING MENISCAL REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brytsko A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that meniscectomy leads to osteoarthritis of the knee and proprioception impairment. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess retrospectively the joint position sense after meniscal suture and partial medial meniscal resection and to estimate the patients’ satisfaction with knee function. Material and Methods. We evaluated the outcomes of 27 patients after meniscal repair and compared them to those of 24 patients after partial meniscal resection. We estimated the joint position sense at 30°, 45° and 60° of flexion using the Biodex system 4 Pro. All patients were assessed with the IKDC 2000 subjective knee score. Results. A statistically significant worsening in reproducing the injured joint position in comparison to the healthy limb in both groups was observed. These impairments were mostly expressed at 45° and 60° of knee flexion, and were worsening over time in the group of patients who had undergone medial meniscal resection. An average value by the IKDC 2000 scale after 24 months in the meniscorrhaphy group was 76.73 ± 11.17% and 68.93 ± 14.76% after partial medial meniscal resection. Сonclusion. The control over position of the knee is not impaired after meniscal repair. An overall satisfaction with joint function is higher in patients who undergo meniscal suture in comparison to the partial medial meniscal resection group.

  10. Quantifying meniscal kinematics in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brian H; Banks, Scott A; Pozzi, Antonio

    2017-11-06

    The dog has been used extensively as an experimental model to study meniscal treatments such as meniscectomy, meniscal repair, transplantation, and regeneration. However, there is very little information on meniscal kinematics in the dog. This study used MR imaging to quantify in vitro meniscal kinematics in loaded dog knees in four distinct poses: extension, flexion, internal, and external rotation. A new method was used to track the meniscal poses along the convex and posteriorly tilted tibial plateau. Meniscal displacements were large, displacing 13.5 and 13.7 mm posteriorly on average for the lateral and medial menisci during flexion (p = 0.90). The medial anterior horn and lateral posterior horns were the most mobile structures, showing average translations of 15.9 and 15.1 mm, respectively. Canine menisci are highly mobile and exhibit movements that correlate closely with the relative tibiofemoral positions. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Use of porous polyurethanes for meniscal reconstruction and meniscal prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deGroot, JH; deVrijer, R; Pennings, AJ; Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB

    In the past, porous materials made of an aromatic polyurethane (PU) were successfully used for meniscal reconstruction in dogs. Since aromatic PUs yield very toxic fragments upon degradation, a linear PU was synthesized by curing a poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and 1,4-trans-cyclohexane diisocyanate I

  12. Meniscal shear stress for punching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijthof, Gabrielle J M; Meulman, Hubert N; Herder, Just L; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-01-01

    Experimental determination of the shear stress for punching meniscal tissue. Meniscectomy (surgical treatment of a lesion of one of the menisci) is the most frequently performed arthroscopic procedure. The performance of a meniscectomy is not optimal with the currently available instruments. To design new instruments, the punching force of meniscal tissue is an important parameter. Quantitative data are unavailable. The meniscal punching process was simulated by pushing a rod through meniscal tissue at constant speed. Three punching rods were tested: a solid rod of Oslash; 3.00 mm, and two hollow tubes (Oslash; 3.00-2.60 mm) with sharpened cutting edges of 0.15 mm and 0.125 mm thick, respectively. Nineteen menisci acquired from 10 human cadaveric knee joints were punched (30 tests). The force and displacement were recorded from which the maximum shear stress was determined (average added with three times the standard deviation). The maximum shear stress for the solid rod was determined at 10.2 N/mm2. This rod required a significantly lower punch force in comparison with the hollow tube having a 0.15 mm cutting edge (plt;0.01). The maximum shear stress for punching can be applied to design instruments, and virtual reality training environments. This type of experiment is suitable to form a database with material properties of human tissue similar to databases for the manufacturing industry.

  13. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuga, Naoyuki; Oh, Toshihiro

    1996-01-01

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  14. Success of Meniscal Repair at ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Charles; Spindler, Kurt P.; Dunn, Warren R.; Amendola, Annunziata; Andrish, Jack T.; Bergfeld, John A.; Flanigan, David; Jones, Morgan; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wolcott, Michelle; Vidal, Armando; Wolf, Brian R.; Huston, Laura J.; Harrell, Frank E.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Meniscal repair is performed in an attempt to prevent posttraumatic arthritis resulting from meniscal dysfunction after meniscal tears. The socioeconomic implications of premature arthritis are significant in the young patient population. Investigations and techniques focusing on meniscus preservation and healing are now at the forefront of orthopaedic sports medicine. Hypothesis Concomitant meniscal repair with ACL reconstruction is a durable and successful procedure at two year follow-up. Study Design Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods All unilateral primary ACL reconstructions entered in 2002 in a prospective cohort who had meniscal repair at the time of ACLR were evaluated. Validated patient oriented outcome instruments were completed preoperatively and then again at the two-year postoperative time point. Reoperation after the index procedure was also documented and confirmed by operative reports. Results 437 unilateral primary ACL reconstructions were performed with 86 concomitant meniscal repairs (57 medial, 29 lateral) in 84 patients during the study period. Patient follow-up was obtained on 94% (81/86) of the meniscal repairs, allowing confirmation of meniscal repair success (defined as no repeat arthroscopic procedure) or failure. The overall success rate for meniscal repairs was 96% (76/79 patients) at two-year follow-up. Conclusions Meniscal repair is a successful procedure in conjunction with ACL reconstruction. When confronted with a “repairable” meniscal tear at the time of ACL reconstruction, orthopaedic surgeons can expect an estimated >90% clinical success rate at two-year follow-up using a variety of methods as shown in our study. PMID:19465734

  15. Detecting meniscal tears in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeker, B.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Although meniscal tears are a very common phenomenon uncertainty exists about the diagnosis and treatment of meniscal tears in primary care. This thesis aims to provide evidence for general practitioners and physical therapists regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with a suspected

  16. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentacosta, Natasha; Graham, William C; Gersoff, Wayne K

    2016-06-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation has evolved over the years to provide a state-of-the-art technique for the sports medicine surgeon to utilize in preserving contact mechanics and function of the knee in irreparable meniscal pathology. However, this procedure continues to spark considerable debate on proper tissue processing techniques, acceptable indications, methods of implantation, and potential long-term outcomes.

  17. A novel three-input monomolecular logic circuit on a rhodamine inspired bio-compatible bi-compartmental molecular platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistri, Tarun; Bhowmick, Rahul; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya; Ali, Mahammad

    2017-01-01

    Methodological synthesis of a new biocompatible bi-compartmental rhodamine based probe (L 3 ) provides a multi-inputs and multi-outputs molecular logic circuit based on simple chemosensing phenomena. Spectroscopic responses of Cu 2+ and Hg 2+ towards L 3 together with reversible binding of S 2- with L 3 -Cu 2+ and L 3 -Hg 2+ complexes help us to construct a thee-input molecular circuit on their control and sequential addition to a solution of L 3 in a mixed organo-aqueous medium. We have further successfully encoded binary digits out of these inputs and outputs which may convert a three-digit input string into a two-digit output string resulting a simple monomolecular logic circuit. Such a molecular ‘Boolean’ logic operation may improve the complexity of logic gate circuitry and computational speed and may be useful to employ in potential biocompatible molecular logic platforms. - Graphical abstract: A new bi-compartmental molecular system equipped with Rhodamine fluorophore unit provides a Multi-inputs and Multi-outputs Molecular Logic Circuit based on a very simple observation of chemosensing activities.

  18. A novel three-input monomolecular logic circuit on a rhodamine inspired bio-compatible bi-compartmental molecular platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistri, Tarun; Bhowmick, Rahul [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, 188 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya [Molecular & Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, 4 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Ali, Mahammad, E-mail: mali@chemistry.jdvu.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Jadavpur University, 188 Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2017-05-15

    Methodological synthesis of a new biocompatible bi-compartmental rhodamine based probe (L{sup 3}) provides a multi-inputs and multi-outputs molecular logic circuit based on simple chemosensing phenomena. Spectroscopic responses of Cu{sup 2+} and Hg{sup 2+} towards L{sup 3} together with reversible binding of S{sup 2-} with L{sup 3}-Cu{sup 2+} and L{sup 3}-Hg{sup 2+} complexes help us to construct a thee-input molecular circuit on their control and sequential addition to a solution of L{sup 3} in a mixed organo-aqueous medium. We have further successfully encoded binary digits out of these inputs and outputs which may convert a three-digit input string into a two-digit output string resulting a simple monomolecular logic circuit. Such a molecular ‘Boolean’ logic operation may improve the complexity of logic gate circuitry and computational speed and may be useful to employ in potential biocompatible molecular logic platforms. - Graphical abstract: A new bi-compartmental molecular system equipped with Rhodamine fluorophore unit provides a Multi-inputs and Multi-outputs Molecular Logic Circuit based on a very simple observation of chemosensing activities.

  19. Meniscal transplantation: still experimental surgery? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, K; Dhollander, A; Moens, P; Verdonk, K; Verdonk, R; Almqvist, K F; Victor, J

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this review is to give a state of affairs of meniscal transplantation, with the accent on preservation and surgical techniques. All articles were selected by performing a search on the literature by using relevant keywords. The most relevant articles were selected with close attention to the publication date. When a meniscal tear is diagnosed, suture can be an option in the vascular zone, whereas the more frequently affected avascular zone heals poorly. A meniscectomy however is not without consequences, wherefore meniscal transplantation can be seen as a therapeutic option for pain reduction and improvement of function when the meniscus is lost. The meniscal scaffold, allograft and autograft can be currently withheld as possible grafts, where the meniscal scaffolds hold great promise as an alternative to the allograft. Various fixation techniques are therefore developed, where viable, deep frozen as well as cryopreservated allografts seem to give the most promising short term results. The transplantation can be performed using an open as well as an arthroscopic technique, using soft tissue fixation, bone plugs or blocks. De primacy of one technique can't be proven. In general meniscal transplantation can be considered as an acceptable procedure. Since the outcomes of different studies are difficult to compare, an attempt should be made to limit new studies to the comparison of one aspect. We can conclude that larger, more comparative randomised controlled long-term studies are necessary to resolve which techniques can give the best long-term results.

  20. Detection of meniscal injuries using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotysch, M.; Mink, J.H.; Levy, T.; Schwartz, A.; Crues, J.V. III.

    1986-01-01

    Eighty-six knees studied by MR imaging were treated operatively and the surgical-radiologic conditions were reviewed using the following grading system of meniscal signal: grade 1, globular signal within the meniscus that does not involve an articular margin; grade 2, linear signal within the meniscus that does not extend to an articular surface; grade 3, linear or globular signal extending to an articular surface. This grading system was applied to evaluate 86 knees (172 menisci). Eleven menisci had been treated operatively at an earlier period and were excluded. Of 92 grade 1 or 2 menisci, 88 were normal at surgery. Of 69 grade 3 minisci, lesions were associated with meniscal tears in 68 at surgery. MR imaging is an accurate method of evaluating meniscal surgery

  1. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  2. Utility of three-dimensional method for diagnosing meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Suguru; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hirano, Mako; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    MRI of the knee is a useful method for diagnosing meniscal tears. Although the spin echo method is usually used for diagnosing meniscal tears, we examined the utility of thin slice scan with the three-dimensional method. We reviewed 70 menisci in which arthroscopic findings were confirmed. In this series, sensitivity was 90.9% for medial meniscal injuries and 68.8% for lateral meniscal injuries. There were 3 meniscal tears in which we could not detect tears on preoperative MRI. We could find tears in two of these cases when re-evaluated using the same MRI. In conclusion, we can get the same diagnostic rate with the three-dimensional method compared with the spin echo method. Scan time of the three-dimensional method is 3 minutes, on the other hand that of spin echo method in 17 minutes. This slice scan with three-dimensional method is useful for screening meniscal injuries before arthroscopy. (author)

  3. Meniscal repair following meniscectomy: Mechanism and protective effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berjon, J.J.; Munuera, L.; Calvo, M.

    1990-01-01

    Meniscal repair was studied to evaluate the mechanism and its potential protective effects on the articular cartilage in an experimental model consisting of 68 knees of adult dogs on which five different types of medial meniscectomy were performed. The results were assessed by macroscopic, microangiographic, and histological methods, after a sequential follow-up period of 10-450 days. Two different mechanisms of meniscal repair were observed, depending on whether meniscal section had been performed in vascular (total meniscectomy) or avascular (subtotal or partial meniscectomy) zones. It was also observed that the repaired meniscal tissue does not prevent articular cartilage degeneration. This is more closely related to the size of the meniscal fragment preserved at meniscetomy. Due to the biomechanical importance of the meniscus and the lack of functional relevance of the repaired meniscal tissue, the most conservative approach possible to meniscectomy is recommended. (orig.)

  4. Quantifying peri-meniscal synovitis and its relationship to meniscal pathology in osteoarthritis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Rhodes, Laura A. [Leeds General Infirmary, Academic Unit of Medical Physics, The University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Keenan, Anne-Maree; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G. [Leeds General Infirmary, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to validate a semiquantitative scoring system for estimating perimeniscal synovitis in osteoarthritic (OA) knees and to examine the relationship between the extent of synovitis and the degree of meniscal pathology using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty-three subjects with clinically diagnosed OA knee were assessed for peri-meniscal synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Quantitative measurements of synovitis were made by summing areas in consecutive slices within generated regions of interest, and the synovitis was also scored semi-quantitatively using a 0-3 scale. Meniscal pathology (extrusion, degeneration and tearing) was also scored semiquantitatively. Establishment of a correlative relationship was undertaken using Spearman's rho ({rho}). A total of 86 sites were assessed. The semi-quantitative synovitis score correlated well with the quantitative synovitis score ({rho}>0.9). A moderate association between medial meniscal extrusion and synovitis was demonstrated ({rho}=0.762, P<0.000), although this association was not as strong in the lateral compartment ({rho}=0.524, P<0.000). The results suggest the semiquantitative scoring system is valid for assessing perimeniscal synovitis. The relationship between meniscal pathology and adjacent synovitis requires further study. (orig.)

  5. MR imaging of meniscal subluxation in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Tratting, S.; Dobrocky, I.; Steiner, E.; Imhof, H.; Kukla, C.; Nehrer, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish diagnostic criteria for meniscal subluxation, and to determine whether there was any connection between meniscal subluxation and other common meniscal and knee-joint abnormalities. Material and Methods: The normal position of the meniscal body was assessed in 10 asymptomatic volunteers. MR signs of meniscal subluxation were evaluated retrospectively in 60 symptomatic patients with pain the knee, impaired mobility, and/or joint swelling who had no clear diagnosis after the evaluation of case history, clinical examination, and radiography. The criterion for subluxation of the meniscus was defined as a distance of ≥3 mm between the peripheral border of the meniscus and the edge of the tibial plateau. Results: In the volunteers, the mean distance form the medial meniscus to the edge of the tibial plateau was 0.07 mm, and that from the lateral meniscus was 0 mm. In 55 symptomatic patients without meniscal subluxation, the mean distance from the meniscus to the edge of the tribial plateau was 0.27 mm. Five patients (8%) had evidence of meniscal subluxation, 4 in the medial meniscus and one in the lateral meniscus. The most commonly associated knee abnormality was joint effusion in 5 knees and osteoarthritis in 2 knees. Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with painful knees. Meniscal subluxation was associated with other knee abnormalities such as joint effusion or osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  6. Lesão meniscal por fadiga Meniscal injury due to fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Luis Camanho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O intuito do presente estudo é de analisar um grupo de pacientes portadores de lesão meniscal decorrente da falência estrutural sem relação com trauma ou problemas degenerativos, optando por chamá-la de lesão meniscal por fadiga. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados 140 pacientes com lesão meniscal sem causa aparente e, portanto, considerados portadores da lesão meniscal por fadiga. Dentre eles, 85 pacientes eram do sexo masculino e 55 do sexo feminino. O menisco medial foi o mais acometido (92% dos casos. RESULTADOS: Todas as lesões foram diagnosticadas através de exame clínico e ressonância magnética. Os pacientes foram submetidos a meniscectomia por via artroscópica e os resultados foram divididos em dois tipos: bons e maus. Foram encontrados 27% de maus resultados dos quais nove pacientes evoluíram para osteonecrose idiopática. CONCLUSÃO: Concluímos que as lesões por fadiga devem ser analisadas como lesões provocadas por falência, portanto uma patologia sindrômica que pode evoluir para uma osteonecrose idiopática..OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to review a group of patients with meniscal injuries resulting from structural failure unrelated to trauma or degenerative problems to which was given the name "meniscal injury due to fatigue". MATERIAL AND METHOD: Evaluations were made on 140 patients with meniscal injuries without any apparent cause, who were therefore considered to have meniscal injuries due to fatigue. Among these, 85 patients were male and 55 were female. The medial meniscus was the most affected site (92% of the cases. RESULTS: All these injuries were diagnosed by means of clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. The patients underwent meniscectomy by means of arthroscopy and the results were divided into two types: good and poor. Poor results were found in 27% of the cases, among which nine patients progressed to idiopathic osteonecrosis. CONCLUSION: We conclude that

  7. Meniscal allograft transplantation: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bruycker Manolito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This meta-analysis evaluates the mid- to long-term survival outcome of MAT (meniscal allograft transplantation. Potential prognosticators, with particular focus on chondral status and age of the patient at the time of transplantation, were also analysed. Study design: Meta-analysis. Methods: An online database search was performed using following search string: “meniscal allograft transplantation” and “outcome”. A total of 65 articles were analysed for a total of 3157 performed MAT with a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. Subjective and clinical data was analysed. Results: The subjective and objective results of 2977 patients (3157 allografts were analysed; 70% were male, 30% were female. Thirty-eight percent received an isolated MAT. All other patients underwent at least one concomitant procedure. Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome (KOOS, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS scores were analysed. All scores showed a good patient satisfaction at long-term follow-up. The mean overall survival rate was 80.9%. Complication rates were comparable to standard meniscal repair surgery. There was a degenerative evolution in osteoarthritis with at least one grade in 1760 radiographically analysed patients. Concomitant procedures seem to have no effect on the outcome. Age at transplantation is a negative prognosticator. The body mass index (BMI of the patient shows a slightly negative correlation with the outcome of MAT. Conclusions: MAT is a viable solution for the younger patient with chronic pain in the meniscectomised knee joint. The complications are not severe and comparable to meniscal repair. The overall failure rate at final follow-up is acceptable and the allograft heals well in most cases, but MAT cannot be seen as a definitive solution for post-meniscectomy pain. The correct approach to the chronic painful total meniscectomised knee joint thus requires consideration of all

  8. MR imaging of meniscal tears: correlation with history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Cheul; Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Sun Seob; Son, Seok Hyun; Lee, Yung Il; Chung, Duck Hwan; Kim, Kyung Taek; Sohn, Sung Keun; Lee, Jung Yoon

    1994-01-01

    The medial meniscus is injured much more than the lateral meniscus. Because the medial meniscus is much larger in diameter, is thinner in its periphery and narrower in body than the lateral meniscus, and dose not attach to either cruciate ligament. We evaluated correlations with sites of tear and history of trauma. We reviewed retrospectively in 43 patients with meniscal tears on MR(51 cases) and correlated them with history of trauma. The most common site of injury was the posterior horn of the medial meniscuc(32/51), but high incidence of lateral meniscal tear compared with previous reports was seen. In the cases which had history of trauma, the posterior horn of medial meniscus was most commonly injured(26/34) and 5 meniscal tears were combined with meniscal tear in the other site. The tear in the anterior horn of the medial meniscus was seen only in a patient which had history of trauma and combined with meniscal tear in the other site. But in the meniscal tears without definite history of trauma, the incidence of meniscal tear was different from the meniscal tear with history of trauma. The incidence of lateral meniscal tear(11/17) was higher than medial meniscal tear and the posterior horn of lateral meniscus was commonly injured. We concluded that the medial meniscus was commonly injured, especially posterior horn, but in the cases which had no definite history of trauma, the lateral meniscus was commonly injured. An awareness of prevalent site of meniscal injuries may be helpful in the diagnostic interpretation of MR imaging of knee

  9. Meniscal configuration using magnetic resonance imaging; Configuracao meniscal pela ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Arthur da Rocha C.; Turrini, Elisabete; Karoauk, Teresa C.C.; Lederman, Henrique M. [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    1997-04-01

    The authors present a review of the normal meniscal configuration and correlation with anatomic specimens. The images were obtained by magnetic resonance imaging. The images were obtained by magnetic resonance imaging. The authors emphasize the importance of knowing the relationship between the meniscus and the adjacent anatomic structures. (author) 31 refs., 10 figs., tabs.

  10. Gait analysis of patients with an off-the-shelf total knee replacement versus customized bi-compartmental knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry; Foster, Jonathan; Franksen, Natasha; Estes, Jill; Rolston, Lindsey

    2018-04-01

    Newer TKR designs have been introduced to the market with the aim of overcoming common sizing problems with older TKR designs. Furthermore, since a sizable percentage of patients with OA present with disease limited to the medial/lateral knee compartment in addition to the patellofemoral joint, for whom, a customized bi-compartmental knee replacement (BKR) is available as a treatment option. To date, there is very little information regarding knee strength and mechanics during gait for patients implanted with these modern TKR and BKR designs. The purpose of the study was to evaluate knee strength and mechanics during walking for patients with either a modern off the shelf TKR or a customized BKR and compare these findings to a cohort of healthy controls. Twelve healthy controls, eight BKR, and nine TKR patients participated in the study. Maximal isometric knee strength was evaluated. 3D kinematic and kinetic analyses were conducted for level walking. The TKR knee exhibited less peak extensor torque when compared to, both the BKR and control limbs (p < 0.05). The TKR knee had less extensor moment at stance than both the BKR and control knees (p < 0.05). Both the BKR and control knees displayed larger internal rotation at stance than that of the TKR knee (p < 0.05). This study suggests that, for patients that exhibit isolated OA of the tibiofemoral joint, using a customized BKR implant is a viable treatment option and may contribute to superior mechanical advantages.

  11. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang-Yin Ling, Carrie; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M.; Tonks, Catherine A.; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2010-04-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment.

  12. The potential of optical coherence tomography for diagnosing meniscal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Carrie Hang-Yin; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Pozzi, Antonio; Thieman, Kelley M; Tonks, Catherine A; Guo, Shuguang; Xie, Huikai

    2010-01-01

    Meniscal tears are often associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and may lead to pain and discomfort in humans. Maximal preservation of meniscal tissue is highly desirable to mitigate the progression of osteoarthritis. Guidelines of which meniscal tears are amenable to repair and what part of damaged tissues should be removed are elusive and lacking consensus. Images of microstructural changes in meniscus would potentially guide the surgeons to manage the meniscal tears better, but the resolution of current diagnostic techniques is limited for this application. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis of meniscal pathology. Torn medial menisci were collected from dogs with ACL insufficiency. The torn meniscus was divided into three tissue samples and scanned by OCT and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). OCT and SEM images of torn menisci were compared. Each sample was evaluated for gross and microstructural abnormalities and reduction or loss of birefringence from the OCT images. The abnormalities detected with OCT were described for each type of tear. OCT holds promise in non-destructive and fast assessment of microstructural changes and tissue birefringence of meniscal tears. Future development of intraoperative OCT may help surgeons in the decision making of meniscal treatment

  13. Meniscal transplantation: procedures, outcomes, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available James Young, Francois Tudor, Ahmed Mahmoud, Peter Myers Brisbane Orthopaedic & Sports Medicine Centre, Brisbane Private Hospital, Spring Hill, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia Abstract: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT is a possible treatment option for patients with joint pain after meniscectomy. It is necessary that the joint be aligned and stable. Current evidence shows that MAT improves pain and mechanical function in the mid to long term with patients reporting significantly improved outcomes at up to 15 years following surgery. Studies on survivorship showed up to 76% graft survival at 10 years. Recent studies have suggested a chondroprotective effect, but there is, at present, no evidence to support MAT in the prevention of osteoarthritis. This review article reported the current evidence for MAT showing support for fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. However, further research is required to determine the ideal indications for MAT, the optimal graft fixation method, and the safest rehabilitation protocol. Keywords: meniscus, meniscectomy, meniscal allograft transplantation

  14. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawelec, K. M., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E. [Cambridge Centre for Medical Materials, Materials Science and Metallurgy Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Wardale, R. J., E-mail: pawelec.km@gmail.com, E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk [Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  15. Isolated medial meniscal tear in a Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, P A

    2006-01-01

    A three-year-old, female Border Collie was successfully treated for an isolated, torn, medial meniscus by arthroscopic meniscal tear resection. The dog returned to agility competition without recurrence of lameness.

  16. Cell Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    to subsequently guide tissue regeneration , for example, by seeded tissue progenitor cells . To achieve this objective, the first step is to develop...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0104 TITLE: Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cell -Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0104 5c. PROGRAM

  17. Readability of Online Sources Regarding Meniscal Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodax, Jonathan D; Baird, Grayson L; McBride, Trevor; Owens, Brett D

    2017-09-01

    Meniscal injuries are extremely common, with an incidence of 8.3 per 1,000 person/years in young, active individuals. Patients often turn to the internet to glean information about their injuries, and even to guide decision making about treatment. Much research has been done demonstrating that a reading level of eighth grade or lower is appropriate for accurately communicating written information to patients, yet medical practitioners often fail to meet this requirement. To better examine the information patients receive about meniscal injuries, we set out to evaluate the reading level and content of three commonly used search terms on the three search engines with the largest market share. The authors examined the keywords "meniscus tear," "meniscus tear treatment," and "knee pain meniscus" on the three highest market share search engines. The top 10 results from each search were included, and redundancies identified. Unique Web sites were evaluated for source, word count, reading level, and content including advertisements, diagrams, photographs, nonoperative and operative options, and accurate medical information. A total of 23 unique Web sites were identified in our search, including 13 public education sources, 6 academic institutions, and 4 private physicians/groups. Average grade levels of articles ranged from 9.4 to 14.2 (mean, 11.14; standard deviation [SD] 1.46), and Flesch-Kincaid reading ease scores ranged from 23.9 to 68.7 (mean, 55.31; SD, 10.11). Pages from public sources required the highest level of readability (11.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.8-13.2), which was significantly higher than private (11.0, 95% CI: 9.3, 12.7]) and academic (10.9, 95% CI: 8.9-12.9), p  = 0.007 and p  = 0.002, respectively. Further efforts to make appropriate health information available to patients are needed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Posterior horn medial meniscal root tear: the prequel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umans, H. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Lenox Hill Radiology and Imaging Associates, New York, NY (United States); Morrison, W. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DiFelice, G.S. [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Vaidya, N. [Crystal Run Healthcare, Middletown, NY (United States); Winalski, C.S. [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    To determine whether subarticular marrow changes deep to the posterior horn medial meniscal root anchor might predict subsequent medial meniscal root tear. Fifteen patients with MR-diagnosed posterior horn medial meniscal root (PHMMR) tear and a knee MRI antecedent to the tear were identified at three imaging centers over a 7-year period. The pre- and post-tear MR images were evaluated for marrow signal changes deep to the root anchor, meniscal root signal intensity, medial compartment articular cartilage thinning, and meniscal body extrusion. Images of 29 age- and gender-matched individuals with two MRIs of the same knee were reviewed as a control group. MRI in 11 of 15 (73 %) cases with subsequent PHMMR tear demonstrated linear subcortical marrow edema deep to the meniscal root anchor on the antecedent MRI compared to only 1 of 29 (3 %) non-tear controls (p < 0.0001). The abnormal signal resolved on post-tear MRI in all but two patients. Cyst-like changes deep to the PHMMR were present on initial MRI in three of 15 (23 %) cases and three of 29 (10 %) controls, persisting in all but one case on follow-up imaging. The PHMMR was gray on the initial MRI in seven of 15 (47 %) of cases that developed tears compared to four of 29 (14 %) controls (p < 0.0001). There was medial meniscal extrusion (MME) prior to tear in two of 15 (13 %) patients and in ten of 15 (67 %) patients after PHMMR failure. In the control group, MME was present in one (3 %) and three (10 %) of 29 subjects on the initial and follow-up MRIs, respectively. Articular cartilage loss was noted in two of 15 (15 %) cases before tear and nine of 15 (69 %) on follow-up imaging, as compared to one (3 %) and four (14 %) of 29 subjects in the control group. Subcortical marrow edema deep to the PHMMR may result from abnormal stresses and thus be a harbinger of meniscal root failure. This hypothesis is supported by resolution of these marrow signal changes after root tear. Following tear, extrusion of the

  19. Surgical interventions for meniscal tears: a closer look at the evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutsaerts, Eduard L. A. R.; van Eck, Carola F.; van de Graaf, Victor A.; Doornberg, Job N.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the outcomes of various surgical treatments for meniscal injuries including (1) total and partial meniscectomy; (2) meniscectomy and meniscal repair; (3) meniscectomy and meniscal transplantation; (4) open and arthroscopic meniscectomy and (5) various

  20. Meniscal abnormalities in soccer players: prevalence and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Ik; Kwak, Byeung Kook; Shim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang; Seo, Kyung Mook

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to know the prevalence of abnormal meniscal signal on MR imaging in asymptomatic soccer players and its radiologic significance. Using T1 and gradient echo T2 weighted sagittal and coronal MR image, 48 knees in twenty-four full time soccer players were evaluated for the meniscal abnormalities, the status of ligament and existence of joint effusion. Meniscal abnormalities were interpreted using grading system of Lotysch. By using Chi-square method. We analyzed the existence of joint effusion could divide the healing state and healed state of the meniscus. The prevalence of Grade 2 and more and Grade 3 were 42% and 39% of asymptomatic knees. In the 24 knees with meniscus tear, nine of the 14 asymptomatic knee showed effusion while eight of the 10 symptomatic knee did. Of 24 knees with meniscal tear, only eleven knees were related to previous history of major knee trauma. The prevalence of meniscal abnormalities on MR imaging in asymptomatic soccer players was higher (grade 3: 39%) than we expected. The joint effusion was not helpful to divide the healing state and healed state of the meniscus. So we suggest baseline MR imaging in the athletes who have been using the knee vigorously could give decisive information for the interpretation of subsequent MRI that may be performed when the players wounded

  1. T-Fix endoscopic meniscal repair: technique and approach to different types of tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, G R; Richardson, K; Koenig, V

    1995-04-01

    Endoscopic meniscus repair using the T-Fix suture device (Acufex Microsurgical, Inc, Mansfield, MA) allows ease of suture placement for meniscus stability without the problems associated with ancillary incisions such as neurovascular compromise. It is ideal for the central posterior horn tears that are difficult using conventional techniques. Vertical tears, bucket handle tears, flap tears, and horizontal tears can be approached using a temporary "anchor stitch" to stabilize the meniscus before T-Fix repair. The basic method of repair and our approach to these different types of tears is presented.

  2. The role of biomaterials in the treatment of meniscal tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal O. Kean

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive investigations over the recent decades have established the anatomical, biomechanical and functional importance of the meniscus in the knee joint. As a functioning part of the joint, it serves to prevent the deterioration of articular cartilage and subsequent osteoarthritis. To this end, meniscus repair and regeneration is of particular interest from the biomaterial, bioengineering and orthopaedic research community. Even though meniscal research is previously of a considerable volume, the research community with evolving material science, biology and medical advances are all pushing toward emerging novel solutions and approaches to the successful treatment of meniscal difficulties. This review presents a tactical evaluation of the latest biomaterials, experiments to simulate meniscal tears and the state-of-the-art materials and strategies currently used to treat tears.

  3. Meniscal tears, repairs and replacement: their relevance to osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ian

    2011-04-01

    The menisci of the knee are important load sharers and shock absorbers in the joint. Meniscal tears are common, and whenever possible meniscal tears should be surgically repaired. Meniscectomy leads to a significant increased risk of osteoarthritis, and various options now exist for replacing missing menisci, including the use of meniscal scaffolds or the replacement of the entire meniscus by meniscal allograft transplantation. The field of meniscal surgery continues to develop apace, and the future may lie in growing new menisci by tissue engineering techniques.

  4. Arthroscopic Meniscal Allograft Transplantation With Soft-Tissue Fixation Through Bone Tunnels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Tim; Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nick A; Verdonk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Meniscal allograft transplantation improves clinical outcomes for patients with symptomatic meniscus-deficient knees. We describe an established arthroscopic technique for meniscal allograft transplantation without the need for bone fixation of the meniscal horns. After preparation of the meniscal bed, the meniscus is parachuted into the knee through a silicone cannula and the meniscal horns are fixed with sutures through bone tunnels. The body of the meniscus is then fixed with a combination of all-inside and inside-out sutures. This technique is reliable and reproducible and has clinical outcomes comparable with those of bone plug fixation techniques.

  5. MRI versus ultrasonography to assess meniscal abnormalities in acute knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, James L; Cook, Cristi R; Stannard, James P; Vaughn, Gavin; Wilson, Nichole; Roller, Brandon L; Stoker, Aaron M; Jayabalan, Prakash; Hdeib, Moses; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2014-08-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often considered the "gold standard" diagnostic imaging modality for detection of meniscal abnormalities, it is associated with misdiagnosis in as high as 47% of cases, is costly, and is not readily available to a large number of patients. Ultrasonographic examination of the knee has been reported to be an effective diagnostic tool for this purpose with the potential to overcome many of the shortcomings of MRI. The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical usefulness of ultrasonography for diagnosis of meniscal pathology in patients with acute knee pain and compare its diagnostic accuracy to MRI in a clinical setting. With Institutional Review Board approval, patients (n = 71) with acute knee pain were prospectively enrolled with informed consent. Preoperative MRI (1.5 T) was performed on each affected knee using the hospital's standard equipment and protocols and read by faculty radiologists trained in musculoskeletal MRI. Ultrasonographic assessments of each affected knee were performed by one of two faculty members trained in musculoskeletal ultrasonography using a 10 to 14 MHz linear transducer. Arthroscopic evaluation of affected knees was performed by one of three faculty orthopedic surgeons to assess and record all joint pathology, which served as the reference standard for determining presence, type, and severity of meniscal pathology. All evaluators for each diagnostic modality were blinded to all other data. Data were collected and compared by a separate investigator to determine sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), correct classification rate (CCR), likelihood ratios (LR[+] and LR[-]), and odds ratios. Preoperative ultrasonographic assessment of meniscal pathology was associated with Sn = 91.2%, Sp = 84.2%, PPV = 94.5%, NPV = 76.2%, CCR = 89.5%, LR(+) = 5.78, and LR(-) = 0.10. Preoperative MRI assessment of

  6. Advances and Prospects in Tissue-Engineered Meniscal Scaffolds for Meniscus Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The meniscus plays a crucial role in maintaining knee joint homoeostasis. Meniscal lesions are relatively common in the knee joint and are typically categorized into various types. However, it is difficult for inner avascular meniscal lesions to self-heal. Untreated meniscal lesions lead to meniscal extrusions in the long-term and gradually trigger the development of knee osteoarthritis (OA. The relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA is complex. Partial meniscectomy, which is the primary method to treat a meniscal injury, only relieves short-term pain; however, it does not prevent the development of knee OA. Similarly, other current therapeutic strategies have intrinsic limitations in clinical practice. Tissue engineering technology will probably address this challenge by reconstructing a meniscus possessing an integrated configuration with competent biomechanical capacity. This review describes normal structure and biomechanical characteristics of the meniscus, discusses the relationship between meniscal lesions and knee OA, and summarizes the classifications and corresponding treatment strategies for meniscal lesions to understand meniscal regeneration from physiological and pathological perspectives. Last, we present current advances in meniscal scaffolds and provide a number of prospects that will potentially benefit the development of meniscal regeneration methods.

  7. Structural knee joint pathology in patients aged 40 years or older with meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have challenged the tenet that mechanical symptoms of the knee (i.e. the sensation of catching or locking) are caused by degenerative meniscal tears per se and relieved by surgery. We explored the potential associations between meniscal and other knee joint pathologies...... identified at meniscal surgery with the presence of patient-reported mechanical symptoms. Methods: This study included patients aged 40 years or older undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS). Patients were consecutively recruited from February 2013...... score (KOOS), together with information on previous meniscal surgery. At arthroscopy, the operating surgeon recorded information about specific meniscal pathology (tear location, depth, type, length, meniscal tissue quality and circumferential and radial location) and other structural knee pathologies...

  8. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    and then decreased slowly to reach unity after approximately 30 years, adjusted for effects of potential confounders. This relation between baggage handling and meniscal lesions was present for work on the apron which involves lifting in a kneeling or squatting position, but not in the baggage hall, which only...

  9. Human meniscal proteoglycan metabolism in long-term tissue culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, G.; Verdonk, R.; Veys, E. M.; van Daele, P.; de Smet, P.; van den Abbeele, K.; Claus, B.; Baeten, D.

    1996-01-01

    For the purpose of human meniscal allografting, menisci have been maintained viable in in vitro culture. The influence of long-term tissue culture on the extracellular matrix metabolism of the meniscus has been studied. Fetal calf serum (FCS) was used as a supplement for the growth factors necessary

  10. Meniscal injuries in the young, athletically active patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Matthew R; Johnson, Darren L

    2011-02-01

    Meniscal injuries are common in young physically active individuals, particularly those who are involved in contact level 1 sports that involve frequent pivoting, such as soccer and American football. This is a unique population because of their high physical activity at a young age, and it is important that correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment are provided, as the medial and lateral menisci are essential for normal knee function. In this article, we review the anatomy and function of the meniscus, the epidemiology of meniscal tears, and mechanism(s) of injury. Important concomitant injuries are also discussed. When making a diagnosis, relevant patient history, physical examination, and appropriate imaging studies are required. Nonoperative treatment is rarely successful for treating meniscal tears in young athletes, and therefore repair of the torn menisci is often required. We also discuss partial resection (which should only be performed when repair is not possible), as well as rehabilitation protocols after repair has been performed. All of these factors associated with meniscal injuries are important for a physician when diagnosing and treating these often complex injuries.

  11. Identification, Characterization, and Utilization of Adult Meniscal Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    meniscal findings on knee MRI in middle-aged and elderly persons. N. Engl. J. Med. 359, 1108–1115.802 Stem Cell Reports j Vol. 3 j 789–803 j November 11...PBS, pH¼7.4) with protease inhibitors (Pierce Protease Inhibitor Tablets 88266, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Rockford, IL) at 4 1C for less than 24 h

  12. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of meniscal surgery compared with exercise and patient education for treatment of meniscal tears in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Soren Thorgaard; Lind, Martin; Holmich, Per

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Arthroscopic surgery is a very common orthopaedic procedure. While several trials have investigated the effect of knee arthroscopy for middle-aged and older patients with meniscal tears, there is a paucity of trials comparing meniscal surgery with non-surgical treatment for younger...... adults. The aim of this randomised controlled trial (RCT) is to investigate if early arthroscopic surgery is superior to exercise therapy and education, with the option of later surgery if needed, in improving pain, function and quality of life in younger adults with meniscal tears. METHODS AND ANALYSIS......: This is a protocol for a multicentre, parallel-group RCT conducted at six hospitals across all five healthcare regions in Denmark. 140 patients aged 18-40 years with a clinical history and symptoms consistent with a meniscal tear, verified on MRI, found eligible for meniscal surgery by an orthopaedic surgeon...

  13. MR imaging of displaced meniscal tears of the knee. Importance of a 'disproportional posterior horn sign'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.C.; Hsu, C.Y.; Shih, T.T.F.; Huang, K.M.; Li, Y.W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Meniscal tears associated with displaced fragments are clinically significant. We propose the 'disproportional posterior horn sign' as a supportive criterion to identify a posterocentrally displaced meniscal fragment on MR imaging studies. If the meniscal posterior horn in the central portion appears larger than that in the peripheral section, it is considered positive for 'disproportional posterior horn sign'. Material and Methods: MR images obtained in 42 patients with 43 lesions, confirmed to have displaced meniscal tears, were included in this study. The MR images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of the 'disproportional posterior horn sign', as well as the other known signs. Results: The 'disproportional posterior horn sign' was seen in 9 (20.9%) of 43 lesions, including 1 lateral discoid meniscal tear, 5 lateral meniscal tears and 3 medial meniscal tears. Five of them also had other signs of a displaced meniscal fragment. However, the remaining 4 cases only exhibited the 'disproportional posterior horn sign'. For the other MR signs, the 'absent bow tie sign' was detected in 40 (93%) of 43 lesions, the 'flipped meniscus sign' in 27 (62.8%) of 43 lesions, the 'double posterior cruciate ligament sign' in 17 (39.5%) of 43 lesions and the 'notch fragment sign' in 22 (51.2%) of 43 lesions. Conclusion: The 'disproportional posterior horn sign' is helpful in demonstrating a posterocentrally displaced meniscal fragment, especially when other characteristic signs are unremarkable or absent

  14. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya [Department of Radiology, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Swirsky, Stephen M. [Department of Orthopedics, Miami Children' s Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mintz, Douglas [Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  15. Meniscal pathology in children: differences and similarities with the adult meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francavilla, Michael L.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Zamora, Kathryn W.; Sarode, Vijaya; Swirsky, Stephen M.; Mintz, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    The normal meniscus undergoes typical developmental changes during childhood, reaching a mature adult appearance by approximately 10 years of age. In addition to recognizing normal meniscal appearances in children, identifying abnormalities - such as tears and the different types of discoid meniscus and meniscal cysts, as well as the surgical implications of these abnormalities - is vital in pediatric imaging. The reported incidence of meniscal tears in adolescents and young adults has increased because of increased sports participation and more widespread use of MRI. This review discusses the normal appearance of the pediatric meniscus, meniscal abnormalities, associated injuries, and prognostic indicators for repair. (orig.)

  16. A Cohort Study on Meniscal Lesions among Airport Baggage Handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Brauer, Charlotte; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    socioeconomic background and less knee-straining work. Baggage handlers lifted suitcases with an average weight of approximately 15 kg, in total approximately five tonnes during a 9-hour workday. The cohort was followed in the National Patient Register and Civil Registration System. The outcome was a first time......Meniscal lesions are common and may contribute to the development of knee arthrosis. A few case-control and cross-sectional studies have identified knee-straining work as risk factors for meniscal lesions, but exposure-response relations and the role of specific exposures are uncertain...... of unskilled men employed at Copenhagen Airport or in other companies in the metropolitan Copenhagen area from 1990 to 2012 (the Copenhagen Airport Cohort). The cohort at risk included 3,307 airport baggage handlers with heavy lifting and kneeling or squatting work tasks and 63,934 referents with a similar...

  17. Value of modern sonography in the assessment of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareluk, Pawel; Szopinski, Kazimierz T.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of modern ultrasonography in diagnostic imaging of meniscal tears. One hundred and sixty menisci were evaluated in 80 patients (42 females, 38 males, mean age = 36.2 years, range = 16–70 years). Inclusion criteria for the study were twofold: clinical suspicion of meniscal injury and clinical indication for arthroscopy. Knee examination was performed with the Voluson 730 Expert ultrasound system (General Electric). After sonographic examination, all patients underwent arthroscopic procedures within 1–4 days. The final diagnosis of meniscal tears was taken from surgical reports. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sonographic examination in the assessment of meniscal tears amounted to 85.4%, 85.7%, 67.3% and 94.4%, respectively. The statistical parameters were not statistically different in medial and lateral menisci. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), weight, physical activity, mechanism on injury, and time lapse from injury did not have a statistically significant impact on the usefulness of ultrasonography. The highest sensitivity (>90%) was obtained in medial menisci and in patients with a BMI > 25. The highest specificity (>90%) was obtained in lateral menisci, in patients after twisting injuries, in sports injuries, and in recent injuries (time lapse from the injury <1 month). The positive predictive value (PPV) of sonographic examination was higher than 90% only in recent injuries (<1 month), however, the negative predictive value of ultrasound is high, being less than 90% in males with lesions of lateral menisci and in sequelae of sports injuries

  18. Evaluation of meniscal subluxation of the knee with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Jae Kyu; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Yun Hyeon; Chung, Tae Woong

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the normal meniscal position and meniscal subluxation by means of MR imaging. The normal position of the meniscus was determined by measuring the distance between the peripheral meniscal borders and the tibial plateau, as seen on coronal, sagittal and oblique MR images of 40 normal knees. For 33 abnormal knees in which outward subluxation of the meniscus from the tibial plateau was noted, the involved site, the predisposing factor, and the frequency of meniscus tearing were analyzed. In normal knees, the peripheral border of the meniscus extruded 3mm or less from the peripheral border of the tibial plateau. Among 33 abnormal knees, in which 5mm or more outward subluxation of the meniscus was seen, 19 menisci were medial and 14 were lateral. Among the 19, the body was involved in 12, the anterior horn in six, and the posterior horn in one. With regard to the 14 lateral subluxations, involvement of the posterior horn occurred in ten, of both the body and posterior horn in two, of the anterior horn in one, and of the body in one. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, seen in 89% of such cases, and in lateral subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear, which occurred in 79% of cases. Medial meniscus tear was noted in 89% of medial meniscus subluxations and lateral meniscus tear in 43% of lateral subluxations. Meniscal subluxation was easily detected by MR imaging of the knee. The common predisposing factor in medial meniscus subluxation was osteoarthritis, and in lateral meniscus subluxation, anterior cruciate ligament tear. A torn meniscus frequently co-occurred

  19. Value of modern sonography in the assessment of meniscal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareluk, Pawel, E-mail: pwareluk@wum.edu.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Second Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, ul. Kondratowicza 8, 03-242 Warsaw (Poland); Szopinski, Kazimierz T., E-mail: kszopinski@wum.edu.pl [Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, ul. Nowogrodzka 59, 02-006 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the accuracy of modern ultrasonography in diagnostic imaging of meniscal tears. One hundred and sixty menisci were evaluated in 80 patients (42 females, 38 males, mean age = 36.2 years, range = 16–70 years). Inclusion criteria for the study were twofold: clinical suspicion of meniscal injury and clinical indication for arthroscopy. Knee examination was performed with the Voluson 730 Expert ultrasound system (General Electric). After sonographic examination, all patients underwent arthroscopic procedures within 1–4 days. The final diagnosis of meniscal tears was taken from surgical reports. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of sonographic examination in the assessment of meniscal tears amounted to 85.4%, 85.7%, 67.3% and 94.4%, respectively. The statistical parameters were not statistically different in medial and lateral menisci. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), weight, physical activity, mechanism on injury, and time lapse from injury did not have a statistically significant impact on the usefulness of ultrasonography. The highest sensitivity (>90%) was obtained in medial menisci and in patients with a BMI > 25. The highest specificity (>90%) was obtained in lateral menisci, in patients after twisting injuries, in sports injuries, and in recent injuries (time lapse from the injury <1 month). The positive predictive value (PPV) of sonographic examination was higher than 90% only in recent injuries (<1 month), however, the negative predictive value of ultrasound is high, being less than 90% in males with lesions of lateral menisci and in sequelae of sports injuries.

  20. MRI diagnosis in meniscal tears: a Meta analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaosheng; Xu Jianrong; Hua Jia; Wang Baisong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To perform a Meta-analysis to evaluate the overall diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspected meniscal tears. Methods: All the papers concerning the diagnosis of meniscal tears using MRI in both English and Chinese published from 1998 to 2004 had been searched and reviewed, and the studies with the arthroscopy as the gold standard were adopted as eligible. Statistical analysis was performed employing SAS 8.0. Heterogeneity of the included articles was tested, which was used to select proper effect model to calculate pooled weighted sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) analyses were performed for tears of both menisci. Finally, subgroup analysis on magnetic field strength was performed. Results: Totally 11 studies were met the inclusion criteria with a total of 1221 patients. The pooled indexes of diagnostic performance and SROC demonstrated a high discriminatory power for detecting tears of the medial and lateral menisci. The value of TPR * for medial and lateral menisci showed no significant difference (0.90, 0.86, respectively, Z=0.11, P>0.05). Subgroup analysis demonstrated no statistically significant difference on diagnostic performance for various magnetic field strength (P>0.05). Conclusion: MRI is a highly accurate diagnostic tool for detecting tears of the medial and lateral menisci. At present, there is no evidence to ascertain that higher magnetic field strength improves discriminatory power for meniscal tears. (authors)

  1. Discrimination of meniscal cell phenotypes using gene expression profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Son

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of quantitative and objective metrics to assess cartilage and meniscus cell phenotypes contributes to the challenges in fibrocartilage tissue engineering. Although functional assessment of the final resulting tissue is essential, initial characterization of cell sources and quantitative description of their progression towards the natural, desired cell phenotype would provide an effective tool in optimizing cell-based tissue engineering strategies. The purpose of this study was to identify quantifiable characteristics of meniscal cells and thereby find phenotypical markers that could effectively categorize cells based on their tissue of origin (cartilage, inner, middle, and outer meniscus. The combination of gene expression ratios collagen VI/collagen II, ADAMTS-5/collagen II, and collagen I/collagen II was the most effective indicator of variation among different tissue regions. We additionally demonstrate a possible application of these quantifiable metrics in evaluating the use of serially passaged chondrocytes as a possible cell source in fibrocartilage engineering. Comparing the ratios of the passaged chondrocytes and the native meniscal cells may provide direction to optimize towards the desired cell phenotype. We have thus shown that measurable markers defining the characteristics of the native meniscus can establish a standard by which different tissue engineering strategies can be objectively assessed. Such metrics could additionally be useful in exploring the different stages of meniscal degradation in osteoarthritis and provide some insight in the disease progression.

  2. Impact of type of meniscal tear on radiographic and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Englund, M; Roos, Ewa M.; Lohmander, L S

    2003-01-01

    To investigate long-term radiographic and patient-relevant outcome of isolated limited meniscectomy with regard to type of meniscal tear and extent of surgical resection.......To investigate long-term radiographic and patient-relevant outcome of isolated limited meniscectomy with regard to type of meniscal tear and extent of surgical resection....

  3. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.G. Oei (Edwin); I.M. Koster (Ingrid); J.H.J. Hensen; S.S. Boks (Simone); H.P.A. Wagemakers (Harry); B.W. Koes (Bart); D. Vroegindeweij (Dammis); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. Methods: We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40

  4. In vitro synthesis of tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds for meniscal fibrocartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Jennifer J; Baker, Lindsay; Ballard, George A; Ott, Jesse

    2013-12-03

    Meniscal injury is a common cause of lameness in the dog. Tissue engineered bioscaffolds may be a treatment option for meniscal incompetency, and ideally would possess meniscus- like extracellular matrix (ECM) and withstand meniscal tensile hoop strains. Synovium may be a useful cell source for meniscal tissue engineering because of its natural role in meniscal deficiency and its in vitro chondrogenic potential. The objective of this study is to compare meniscal -like extracellular matrix content of hyperconfluent synoviocyte cell sheets ("HCS") and hyperconfluent synoviocyte sheets which have been tensioned over wire hoops (tensioned synoviocyte bioscaffolds, "TSB") and cultured for 1 month. Long term culture with tension resulted in higher GAG concentration, higher chondrogenic index, higher collagen concentration, and type II collagen immunoreactivity in TSB versus HCS. Both HCS and TSB were immunoreactive for type I collagen, however, HCS had mild, patchy intracellular immunoreactivity while TSB had diffuse moderate immunoreactivity over the entire bisocaffold. The tissue architecture was markedly different between TSB and HCS, with TSB containing collagen organized in bands and sheets. Both HCS and TSB expressed alpha smooth muscle actin and displayed active contractile behavior. Double stranded DNA content was not different between TSB and HCS, while cell viability decreased in TSB. Long term culture of synoviocytes with tension improved meniscal- like extra cellular matrix components, specifically, the total collagen content, including type I and II collagen, and increased GAG content relative to HCS. Future research is warranted to investigate the potential of TSB for meniscal tissue engineering.

  5. Sonographic Imaging of Meniscal Subluxation in Patients with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Ko

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation is a prominent feature on weight-bearing sonographic imaging in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis and could be considered as a risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis. By using musculoskeletal ultrasonography, one can detect this occult meniscal derangement early before the appearance of radiographic signs of osteoarthritis.

  6. Effective Treatment of an Apparent Meniscal Injury Using the Mulligan Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J. Rhinehart

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present a clinic case demonstrating the effectiveness of the Mulligan Concept (MC in treating an apparent meniscal injury. The utilization of the MC in the evaluation and treatment of a 20-year-old soccer player with an apparent acute meniscal injury is presented. Background: Meniscal injuries are common knee injuries. The MC is a therapeutic intervention strategy applied as both a treatment-based evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Treatment: The patient was successfully treated in four treatment sessions using the MC. The patient experienced minimal clinically-important differences on a variety of global and regional patient-rated outcomes. Uniqueness: To the author’s knowledge, there are currently no published case reports of using the MC in clinical practice to treat an apparent meniscal pathology. Conclusion: The MC can be utilized as an evaluation and treatment technique in patients suspected of having meniscal pathology in the knee.

  7. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare patient reported outcomes from before surgery to 52 weeks after surgery between individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic meniscal tears and those for degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Comparative prospective cohort study. SETTING: Four public......-55, and undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (defined by a combination of age and symptom onset). INTERVENTIONS: Both participant groups underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for a meniscal tear, with operating surgeons recording relevant information......% women) with a traumatic or degenerative meniscal tear (n=141, mean age 38.7 years (standard deviation 10.9); n=256, 46.6 years (6.4); respectively) were included in the main analysis. At 52 weeks after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, 55 (14%) patients were lost to follow-up. Statistically...

  8. Performance of PROMIS for Healthy Patients Undergoing Meniscal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kyle J; Glass, Natalie; Anthony, Chris A; Hettrich, Carolyn M; Albright, John; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-06-07

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed as an extensive question bank with multiple health domains that could be utilized for computerized adaptive testing (CAT). In the present study, we investigated the use of the PROMIS Physical Function CAT (PROMIS PF CAT) in an otherwise healthy population scheduled to undergo surgery for meniscal injury with the hypotheses that (1) the PROMIS PF CAT would correlate strongly with patient-reported outcome instruments that measure physical function and would not correlate strongly with those that measure other health domains, (2) there would be no ceiling effects, and (3) the test burden would be significantly less than that of the traditional measures. Patients scheduled to undergo meniscal surgery completed the PROMIS PF CAT, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Marx Knee Activity Rating Scale, Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires. Correlations were defined as high (≥0.7), high-moderate (0.61 to 0.69), moderate (0.4 to 0.6), moderate-weak (0.31 to 0.39), or weak (≤0.3). If ≥15% respondents to a patient-reported outcome measure obtained the highest or lowest possible score, the instrument was determined to have a significant ceiling or floor effect. A total of 107 participants were analyzed. The PROMIS PF CAT had a high correlation with the SF-36 Physical Functioning (PF) (r = 0.82, p ceiling effects, with 0% of the participants achieving the lowest and highest score, respectively. The PROMIS PF CAT correlates strongly with currently used patient-reported outcome measures of physical function and demonstrates no ceiling effects for patients with meniscal injury requiring surgery. It may be a reasonable alternative to more burdensome patient-reported outcome measures.

  9. Meniscal position on routine MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.T.; Staron, R.B.; Feldman, F.; Cepel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of meniscal protrusion (i.e. location of the outer edge of a meniscus beyond the tibial articular surface), and to determine its relationship with internal derangement, joint effusion, and degenerative arthropathy. Design and patients. Sagittal and coronal MR images of 111 abnormal and 46 normal knees were evaluated for the presence of meniscal protrusion. We set 25% as the minimum amount of displacement considered abnormal because this was the smallest amount of displacement we could confidently discern. Presence of meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, joint effusion, or osteophytosis was also recorded. Results and conclusion. Normal examinations demonstrated protrusion of the medial meniscus in 6.5% of sagittal images and 15% of coronal images, and of the lateral meniscus in 2% and 13%, respectively. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the normal and abnormal groups for the medial meniscus on both sagittal (P 0.2). A protruding medial meniscus was associated with effusion and osteophytosis (P 0.1). Posterior protrusion of the lateral meniscus was only associated with ACL injury (P<0.0001); protruding anterior horns and bodies of lateral menisci were not associated with any of the four abnormalities. It is concluded that the medial meniscus may occasionally protrude more than 25% of its width, but protrusion is more often due to effusion and osteophytes. Protrusion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is associated with ACL insufficiency, while protrusion of the body and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus is a normal variant. (orig.). With 4 figs

  10. Chondral Injuries and Irreparable Meniscal Tears Among Adolescents With Anterior Cruciate Ligament or Meniscal Tears Are More Common in Patients With Public Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ariel A; Mancini, Nickolas S; Solomito, Matthew J; Nissen, Carl W; Milewski, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Access to health care services is a critical component of health care reform and may differ among patients with different types of insurance. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to compare adolescents with private and public insurance undergoing surgery for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and/or meniscal tears. We hypothesized that patients with public insurance would have a delayed presentation from the time of injury and therefore would have a higher incidence of chondral injuries and irreparable meniscal tears and lower preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores than patients with private insurance. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a retrospective study of patients under 21 years of age undergoing ACL reconstruction and/or meniscal repair or debridement from January 2013 to March 2016 at a single pediatric sports medicine center. Patients were identified by a search of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. A chart review was performed for insurance type; preoperative diagnosis; date of injury, initial office visit, and surgery; preoperative IKDC score; intraoperative findings; and procedures. The study group consisted of 119 patients (mean age, 15.0 ± 1.7 years). Forty-one percent of patients had private insurance, while 59% had public insurance. There were 27 patients with isolated meniscal tears, 59 with combined meniscal and ACL tears, and 33 with isolated ACL tears. The mean time from injury to presentation was 56 days (range, 0-457 days) in patients with private insurance and 136 days (range, 0-1120 days) in patients with public insurance ( P = .02). Surgery occurred, on average, 35 days after the initial office visit in both groups. The mean preoperative IKDC score was 53 in both groups. Patients with meniscal tears with public insurance were more likely to require meniscal debridement than patients with private insurance (risk ratio [RR], 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.1; P = .02). Patients with public insurance

  11. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  12. Surgical interventions for meniscal tears: a closer look at the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsaerts, Eduard L A R; van Eck, Carola F; van de Graaf, Victor A; Doornberg, Job N; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the outcomes of various surgical treatments for meniscal injuries including (1) total and partial meniscectomy; (2) meniscectomy and meniscal repair; (3) meniscectomy and meniscal transplantation; (4) open and arthroscopic meniscectomy and (5) various different repair techniques. The Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Register, Cochrane Database, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched for all (quasi) randomized controlled clinical trials comparing various surgical techniques for meniscal injuries. Primary outcomes of interest included patient-reported outcomes scores, return to pre-injury activity level, level of sports participation and persistence of pain using the visual analogue score. Where possible, data were pooled and a meta-analysis was performed. A total of nine studies were included, involving a combined 904 subjects, 330 patients underwent a meniscal repair, 402 meniscectomy and 160 a collagen meniscal implant. The only surgical treatments that were compared in homogeneous fashion across more than one study were the arrow and inside-out technique, which showed no difference for re-tear or complication rate. Strong evidence-based recommendations regarding the other surgical treatments that were compared could not be made. This meta-analysis illustrates the lack of level I evidence to guide the surgical management of meniscal tears. Level I meta-analysis.

  13. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...... established knee OA was present in 43% of patients undergoing knee arthroscopy for meniscal tear....

  14. Painful locking of the knee due to bucket handle tear of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Rui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 A case of swelling and anterior painful knee due to tear of mediopatellar plica is reported. The patient also felt clunk of the patellofemoral joint and knee locking. Under arthroscopic examination, a thick and fibrous plica was found medial to patellar, and a bucket tear along the plica from medial patellar retinaculum to infrapatellar fat pad. Polarized microscopic examination showed collagen fiber fragment and loss of light reflecting property. Neuroimmunohistology suggested up-regulation of synovial plica innervation in the area around the crack. This may be related to the pain. The bucket tear of mediopatellar plicacaused pain and lock of knee are more common than previously reported. Key words: Knee injuries; Arthroscopy; Patellofemoral joint

  15. The role of an axial MR scan on the diagnosis a meniscal tear of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Suk Keu; Kim, Baek Hyun; Hong, Suk Joo; Seol, Hae Young

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the role of standard axial MR images for the diagnosis for meniscal tears of the knee. Forty-five patients with a prior MRI examination that underwent arthroscopic surgery of the knee due to clinical impression of a meniscal tear were included in the study group. The sequence for meniscal evaluation was an axial fat-saturated proton density-weighted image with a 4 mm slice thickness. Axial MR images were independently reviewed by two radiologists and were compared with findings of arthroscopy. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of the axial MR scan for the diagnosis of the meniscal tear were calculated. A total 90 menisci of 45 patients were evaluated in the axial MR scans. Forty-two patients had meniscal tears, and two of the patients had tears in both menisci; thus, a total of 44 meniscal tears were found by arthroscopy. For meniscal tears, the sensitivity of the axial plane was 76.2%, the specificity was 89.1% and the accuracy was 81.1%. False negative meniscal tears were seen in 12 cases and false positive meniscal tears were seen in 5 cases on the axial MR images. In standard knee MRI examinations, axial images may be valuable for the detection and localization of meniscal tears

  16. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  17. Delay in surgery predisposes to meniscal and chondral injuries in anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical delay predicts an increase in medial meniscal and lateral articular injuries justifying early rather than delayed reconstruction in ACL deficient knees. Increasing age is positively related to intraarticular injuries while females are more susceptible to lateral articular injuries.

  18. MRI as an accurate tool for the diagnosis and characterization of different knee joint meniscal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman F. Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: MRI of the knee will give the orthopedic surgeons ability to select suitable treatment and arthroscopic interference for their patients. MRI has high accuracy in meniscal tears diagnosis allowing accurate grading of them.

  19. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Brian; Mann, Sumeer A.; King, Chris; Forster, Bruce B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  20. Integrity of articular cartilage on T2 mapping associated with meniscal signal change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Brian [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Mann, Sumeer A. [Department of Radiology, University of Alberta, Walter Mackenzie Health Sciences Center, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2B7 (Canada); King, Chris [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada); Forster, Bruce B., E-mail: bruce.forster@vch.ca [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, UBC Hospital, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5 (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between T2 relaxation values (T2 RVs) within the superficial zone of articular cartilage and different types of meniscal degeneration/tear. Materials and methods: A review of 310 consecutive knee MRIs which included an 8 echo T2 relaxation sequence, in patients referred for standard clinical indications, was performed independently and in blinded fashion by 2 observers. The posterior horns of the medial and lateral menisci were each evaluated and divided into 4 subgroups: Normal (control), Grade I/II meniscal signal, Grade III meniscal signal-simple tear (Grade III-S), and Grade III meniscal signal-complex tear (Grade III-C). After exclusion criteria were applied, the medial meniscal group consisted of 65 controls and 133 patients, while the lateral meniscal group consisted of 143 controls and 55 patients. T2 RVs were measured by an observer blinded to the clinical history and MRI grading. Measurements were obtained over the superficial zone of femoral and tibial articular cartilage adjacent to the center of the posterior horn of each meniscus to ensure consistency between measurements. Analysis of covariance adjusting for age and gender was used to compare T2 RVs between patients and controls. Results: T2 RVs were significantly increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears compared to controls over the medial tibial plateau (MTP; p = 0.0001) and lateral tibial plateau (LTP; p = 0.0008). T2 RVs were not increased in patients with Grade III-C meniscal tears over the medial femoral condyle (MFC; p = 0.11) or lateral femoral condyle (LFC; p = 0.99). Grade I/II meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.15), LFC (p = 0.69), MTP (p = 0.42), or LTP (p = 0.50). Grade III-S meniscal signal was not associated with elevated T2 RVs over the MFC (p = 0.54), LFC (p = 0.43), MTP (p = 0.30), or LTP (p = 0.38). Conclusion: Grade III-C meniscal tears are associated with

  1. Meniscal root entrapment of an osteochondritis dissecans loose body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher R; McMonagle, Joseph S; Garrett, William E

    2014-09-01

    Loose bodies are relatively common in the knee. On radiographs they can often be seen in the medial and lateral gutters, intercondylar notch, and the posterior compartment. At times an apparent loose body is not free to move in the knee because it has been covered by synovium and is no longer mobile. It is uncommon for an osteochondral loose body to become incorporated into meniscal tissue. We report a case of an apparent loose body becoming incorporated into the posterior horn and root of the medial meniscus. We are not aware that this condition has been previously reported. Because removing the entire loose body would have destabilized the posterior root of the medial meniscus, it is important to be aware of this potential occurrence.

  2. Meniscal and cruciate ligaments tears diagnosed with MR imaging versus arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Kruczynski, J.; Bruszewski, J.

    1993-01-01

    MR studies of knee joints in 37 patients were performed. The clinical diagnostics was traumatic lesions of menisci or cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy of the knee joint was performed in 21 patients. MR showed meniscal lesion in 25 patients and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) lesions in 18 patients. Arthroscopy showed meniscal lesions in 16 of 21 patients and ACL lesions in 11 of 21 patients. MR correlated with arthroscopy in 16 of examined menisci and 15 of 21 examined ACL. (author)

  3. Cartilage Degeneration, Subchondral Mineral and Meniscal Mineral Densities in Hartley and Strain 13 Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yubo; Scannell, Brian P; Honeycutt, Patrick R; Mauerhan, David R; H, James Norton; Hanley Jr, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a joint disease involved in articular cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and synovial membrane. This study sought to examine cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) and meniscal mineral density (MD) in male Hartley, female Hartley and female strain 13 guinea pigs to determine the association of cartilage degeneration with subchondral BMD and meniscal MD. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD in 12 months old guinea pigs were examined with histochemistry, X-ray densitometry and calcium analysis. We found that male Hartley guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration, subchondral BMD and meniscal MD than female Hartley guinea pigs, but not female strain 13 guinea pigs. Female strain 13 guinea pigs had more severe cartilage degeneration and higher subchondral BMD, but not meniscal MD, than female Hartley guinea pigs. These findings indicate that higher subchondral BMD, not meniscal MD, is associated with more severe cartilage degeneration in the guinea pigs and suggest that abnormal subchondral BMD may be a therapeutic target for OA treatment. These findings also indicate that the pathogenesis of OA in the male guinea pigs and female guinea pigs are different. Female strain 13 guinea pig may be used to study female gender-specific pathogenesis of OA. PMID:26401159

  4. A new hydrogel for the conservative treatment of meniscal lesions: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Claudio; Rigotti, Stefano; Screpis, Daniele; Giordan, Nicola; Piovan, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    this study aimed to investigate the efficacy of intra-articular (IA) administration of a hydrogel formulation obtained from a hyaluronic acid (HA) derivative (HYADD4(®)) in the management of meniscal tears and in meniscal tear repair. fifty subjects with degenerative meniscal tears were enrolled into this single-site, observer-blind, parallel-group study. Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and after 14, 30 and 60 days. Clinical outcomes included: pain reduction (Visual Analog Scale), improvement of knee functionality (WOMAC questionnaire), reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion (MRI-confirmed) and SF-36 questionnaire scores. Local tolerability and safety were also investigated. a significant reduction in VAS pain (p< 0.001) in favor of HYADD4(®) was recorded at day 14 and maintained at all the follow-up assessments. Data on knee functionality were in line with the VAS pain assessment results. A significant reduction in length and depth of the meniscal lesion, assessed using MRI, was found in the HYADD4(®) group compared to the control group (p<0.001). the results of this study may indicate a new treatment option in the conservative management of patients complaining of pain due to meniscal tears. The MRI data suggest that the hydrogel formulation of HA used in this study may also play a role in the healing process of the lesion. Level I, prospective randomized clinical trial.

  5. Similar failure rate in immediate post-operative weight bearing versus protected weight bearing following meniscal repair on peripheral, vertical meniscal tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Bryan; Gronbeck, Kyle R; Yue, Ruixian Alexander; Tompkins, Marc A

    2017-08-16

    Post-operative weight bearing after meniscal repair is a point of debate among physicians. This study sought to evaluate whether patients adhering to an immediate WBAT rehabilitation programme have a higher failure rate compared to those adhering to a more traditional, protected, NWB status following meniscal repair. The null hypothesis was that there would be no difference in failure between the two groups. A retrospective review of meniscal repair patients greater than 5 years from surgery was performed for patients receiving meniscal repair treatment. Patients were categorized by post-surgical weight-bearing status, either NWB or WBAT, and then analysed for failure of repair. Failure was defined as re-operation on the torn meniscus. The study controlled for variables including age at surgery, sex, height, weight, and BMI, classification of tear type, acuity of the tear, repair location (medial or lateral), repair location within the meniscus, repair technique, and concomitant procedures. Re-operations were performed in 61 of 157 patients [38.9%]. There was no difference between weight-bearing groups for failure of meniscus repair (n.s.). The tears were acute vertical tears located in the posterior horn and body. For the 61 patients with re-operation, the average time to re-operation was 2.2 years with 10 [16%] > 5 years from surgery, 17 [28%] 2-5 years from surgery, and 34 [56%] bearing groups for rate of re-operation (n.s.). Weight bearing as tolerated after meniscal repair for peripheral, vertical tears does not result in a higher failure rate than traditional, non-weight bearing over a five-year follow-up period. The clinical relevance is that, based on these data, it may be appropriate to allow weight bearing as tolerated following meniscal repair of peripheral, vertical tears. Retrospective cohort study, Level III.

  6. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas [NSI, Merritt Island, FL (United States); University of Central Florida School of Medicine, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  7. Cost effectiveness of meniscal allograft for torn discoid lateral meniscus in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramme, Austin J; Strauss, Eric J; Jazrawi, Laith; Gold, Heather T

    2016-09-01

    A discoid meniscus is more prone to tears than a normal meniscus. Patients with a torn discoid lateral meniscus are at increased risk for early onset osteoarthritis requiring total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Optimal management for this condition is controversial given the up-front cost difference between the two treatment options: the more expensive meniscal allograft transplantation compared with standard partial meniscectomy. We hypothesize that meniscal allograft transplantation following excision of a torn discoid lateral meniscus is more cost-effective compared with partial meniscectomy alone because allografts will extend the time to TKA. A decision analytic Markov model was created to compare the cost effectiveness of two treatments for symptomatic, torn discoid lateral meniscus: meniscal allograft and partial meniscectomy. Probability estimates and event rates were derived from the scientific literature, and costs and benefits were discounted by 3%. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to test model robustness. Over 25 years, the partial meniscectomy strategy cost $10,430, whereas meniscal allograft cost on average $4040 more, at $14,470. Partial meniscectomy postponed TKA an average of 12.5 years, compared with 17.30 years for meniscal allograft, an increase of 4.8 years. Allograft cost $842 per-year-gained in time to TKA. Meniscal allografts have been shown to reduce pain and improve function in patients with discoid lateral meniscus tears. Though more costly, meniscal allografts may be more effective than partial meniscectomy in delaying TKA in this model. Additional future long term clinical studies will provide more insight into optimal surgical options.

  8. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David [Department of Radiology, Neuroimaging Institute, 27 East Hibiscus Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2002-12-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  9. MR accuracy and arthroscopic incidence of meniscal radial tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, Thomas; Shapiro, Marc; Williams, David

    2002-01-01

    A meniscal radial tear is a vertical tear that involves the inner meniscal margin. The tear is most frequent in the middle third of the lateral meniscus and may extend outward in any direction. We report (1) the arthroscopic incidence of radial tears, (2) MR signs that aid in the detection of radial tears and (3) our prospective accuracy in detection of radial tears. Design and patients. Three musculoskeletal radiologists prospectively read 200 consecutive MR examinations of the knee that went on to arthroscopy by one orthopedic surgeon. MR images were assessed for location and MR characteristics of radial tears. MR criteria used for diagnosis of a radial tear were those outlined by Tuckman et al.: truncation, abnormal morphology and/or lack of continuity or absence of the meniscus on one or more MR images. An additional criterion used was abnormal increased signal in that area on fat-saturated proton density or T2-weighted coronal and sagittal images. Prospective MR readings were correlated with the arthroscopic findings.Results. Of the 200 consecutive knee arthroscopies, 28 patients had radial tears reported arthroscopically (14% incidence). MR readings prospectively demonstrated 19 of the 28 radial tears (68% sensitivity) when the criteria for diagnosis of a radial tear were truncation or abnormal morphology of the meniscus. With the use of the additional criterion of increased signal in the area of abnormal morphology on fat-saturated T2-weighted or proton density weighted sequences, the prospective sensitivity was 25 of 28 radial tears (89% sensitivity). There were no radial tears described in MR reports that were not demonstrated on arthroscopy (i.e., there were no false positive MR readings of radial tears in these 200 patients). Radial tears are commonly seen at arthroscopy. There was a 14% incidence in this series of 200 patients who underwent arthroscopy. Prospective detection of radial tears was 68% as compared with arthroscopy when the criteria as

  10. The relationship between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes and incident medial meniscal tears in women over a 1-year period assessed with 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, Michel D.; Hunter, David J.; Roemer, Frank W.; Li, Ling; Marra, Monica D.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Hellio Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Wyman, Bradley T.; Guermazi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Intrasubstance meniscal signal changes not reaching the articular surface on fast spin echo (FSE) sequences are considered to represent mucoid degeneration on MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of prevalent intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears of the medial meniscus detected on 3.0 T MRI over a 1-year period. A total of 161 women aged ≥40 years participated in a longitudinal 1-year observational study of knee osteoarthritis. MRI (3.0 T) was performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up. The anterior horn, body, and posterior horn of the medial meniscus were scored by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) system. Four grades were used to describe the meniscal morphology: grade 0 (normal), grade 1 (intrasubstance signal changes not reaching the articular surface), grade 2 (single tears), and grade 3 (complex tears and maceration). Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to evaluate whether baseline intrasubstance signal changes (grade 1) predict incident meniscal tears/maceration (grades 2 and/or 3) in the same subregion of the medial meniscus, when compared to subregions without pathology as the reference group (grade 0). Medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes at baseline did not predict tears at follow-up when evaluating the anterior and posterior horns (left-sided p-values 0.06 and 0.59, respectively). No incident tears were detected in the body. We could not demonstrate an association between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears over a 1-year period. (orig.)

  11. The relationship between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes and incident medial meniscal tears in women over a 1-year period assessed with 3.0 T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, Michel D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hunter, David J. [The University of Sydney, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney (Australia); Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Li, Ling [New England Baptist Hospital, Division of Research, Boston, MA (United States); Marra, Monica D. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States); Institute of Diagnostic Imaging (IDI), Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H. [Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Department of Biomechanics, Medicine and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor Apparatus, and Department of Internal Medicine, Radiology Division, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Hellio Le Graverand, Marie-Pierre; Wyman, Bradley T. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Quantitative Imaging Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Intrasubstance meniscal signal changes not reaching the articular surface on fast spin echo (FSE) sequences are considered to represent mucoid degeneration on MRI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of prevalent intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears of the medial meniscus detected on 3.0 T MRI over a 1-year period. A total of 161 women aged {>=}40 years participated in a longitudinal 1-year observational study of knee osteoarthritis. MRI (3.0 T) was performed at baseline and 12-month follow-up. The anterior horn, body, and posterior horn of the medial meniscus were scored by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists using the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) system. Four grades were used to describe the meniscal morphology: grade 0 (normal), grade 1 (intrasubstance signal changes not reaching the articular surface), grade 2 (single tears), and grade 3 (complex tears and maceration). Fisher's exact test and the Cochran-Armitage trend test were performed to evaluate whether baseline intrasubstance signal changes (grade 1) predict incident meniscal tears/maceration (grades 2 and/or 3) in the same subregion of the medial meniscus, when compared to subregions without pathology as the reference group (grade 0). Medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes at baseline did not predict tears at follow-up when evaluating the anterior and posterior horns (left-sided p-values 0.06 and 0.59, respectively). No incident tears were detected in the body. We could not demonstrate an association between prevalent medial meniscal intrasubstance signal changes with incident tears over a 1-year period. (orig.)

  12. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of meniscal cysts: preliminary clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMahon, P.J.; Brennan, D.D.; Duke, D.; Forde, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage of symptomatic meniscal cysts. Materials and methods: Patients with lateral knee joint tenderness and swelling and confirmed meniscal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were consecutively enrolled for ultrasound-guided percutaneous cyst aspiration. Cysts were injected with local anaesthetic and steroid before completion of procedure. All 18 patients (all male, average age 33 years) were subsequently followed up (average time 10 months) and meniscal cyst symptoms assessed by questionnaire. Fischer's exact test used to analyse the data. Results: In every case the procedure was well tolerated, and each patient indicated that they would be willing to have a repeat procedure in the future. Ten patients reported complete resolution of symptoms secondary to therapeutic cyst aspiration and had resumed participation in high-performance sport. Two patients reported a satisfactory sustained response, reporting only occasional 'twinges of pain'. In the remaining six patients, symptoms returned after an initial pain-free period. The pain-free period ranged from 1-8 weeks. In this study, patient outcome did not significantly correlate with any meniscal cyst characteristic. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided percutaneous aspiration of meniscal cysts is a well-tolerated, simple, and safe procedure. In this small patient series, it was associated with positive early results with favourable outcomes in the mid to long-term. It should be considered in patients unsuitable for surgical debridement or as an interim therapy if surgery is delayed or postponed

  13. A comparison of arthrography to clinical diagnostics for diagnosing meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuer, H.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative investigation as to the exactness of clinical and arthrographical diagnostics was carried out on 176 patients who were clinically examined and operated on in the period of 1972-1980. Using solely clinical diagnostics, the total rate of exactness was 90,9%, the exactness regarding the internal meniscal lesion being significantly higher (94.2%) than that regarding external meniscal lesion (76.7%). Using solely arthrographic diagnostics, the total rate of exactness was 82%, the rate for internal meniscus being significantly lower (83.9%) than that obtained using clinical diagnostics. As for the external meniscus, the exactness of arthrography differs only slightly from clinical diagnostics with 74.7%. The most frequent sources of error in arthorgraphy were found to be lesions of the posterior horn at the internal meniscus. In cases of external meniscal lesions, especially when an internal meniscal lesion was existing at the same time, both examination methods failed in 5 cases. For routine diagnosing of meniscal lesions, arthrography is not necessary. An accurate clinical examination and anamnesis bring very good and exact results and should therefore be given absolute priority. (orig./MG) [de

  14. An anatomical study of normal meniscal roots with isotropic 3D MRI at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Ahong; Zheng Zhuozhao; Shang Yao; Tian Chunyan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To clarify the morphological features of normal meniscal roots on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with an isotropic 3D proton density-weighted (PDW) sequence. Materials: 3D PDW MR was performed in sixty-two patients at 3 T before knee arthroscopy. MR images of 34 normal medial menisci and 33 intact lateral menisci confirmed by arthroscopy were retrospectively evaluated. MR signals, insertion sites, dimensions and courses of four meniscal roots were recorded. Results: The anterior root of medial meniscus (ARMM) was typically hypointense, while the posterior root of medial meniscus (PRMM) and the anterior root of lateral meniscus (ARLM) were prone to be hyperintense or showing a comblike signal, and the posterior root of lateral meniscus (PRLM) was usually hypointense or comblike on PDW MR images. ARMM and PRLM had more complex and diverse insertion patterns than ARLM and PRMM. There were significant statistical differences of the lengths, widths, heights and course angles among four meniscal roots (all P < 0.001). Conclusions: The signal intensity of each meniscal root can be hypointense, hyperintense, or comblike on 3D PDW MR images. ARMM and PRLM have more complex and diverse insertion patterns than ARLM and PRMM. The dimensions and courses of four meniscal roots all differ.

  15. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A recent study reported a large increase in the number of meniscal procedures from 2000 to 2011 in Denmark. We examined the nation-wide distribution of meniscal procedures performed in the private and public sector in Denmark since different incentives may be present and the use...... of these procedures may differ from region to region. SETTING: We included data on all patients who underwent an arthroscopic meniscal procedure performed in the public or private sector in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Data were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register on patients who underwent arthroscopic...... for public and private procedures for each region. RESULTS: Incidence of meniscal procedures increased at private and at public hospitals. The private sector accounted for the largest relative and absolute increase, rising from an incidence of 1 in 2000 to 98 in 2011. In 2011, the incidence of meniscal...

  16. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option. Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  17. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kise, Nina Jullum; Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. DESIGN: Randomised controlled superiority trial. SETTING: Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy...... clinics in Norway. PARTICIPANTS: 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. INTERVENTIONS: 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial....... Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider supervised exercise therapy as a treatment option.Trial registration www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01002794)....

  18. Successful anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal repair in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Young; Cho, Tae-Joon; Lee, Myung Chul; Han, Hyuk-Soo

    2018-03-20

    A case of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with meniscal repair in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient is reported. A 24-year-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta type 1a suffered from a valgus extension injury resulting in tear of ACL and medial meniscus. She underwent an arthroscopic-assisted ACL reconstruction and medial meniscus repair. Meniscal tear at the menisco-capsular junction of the posterior horn of medial meniscus was repaired with three absorbable sutures via inside-out technique. ACL reconstruction was then performed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. The patient was followed up for 1 year with intact ACL grafts and healed medial meniscus. This case report showed that successful ACL reconstruction and meniscal repair is possible in an osteogenesis imperfecta patient.Level of evidence V.

  19. MR diagnosis of meniscal tears of the knee: analysis of error patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyck, Pieter; Gielen, Jan; D'Anvers, Jan; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Dossche, Lieven; Van Gestel, Jozef; Parizel, Paul M

    2007-11-01

    Despite high accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosing meniscal tears, MR findings do not always agree with surgical findings. We performed a blinded, retrospective study to analyze the nature and frequency of errors in the MR diagnosis of meniscal tears. Medical records of 100 consecutive patients who underwent MR and arthroscopy of the knee at our institution were reviewed. Twelve patients underwent prior meniscal surgery. Twenty-three patients had 27 discrepancies between MR and surgical findings. These were independently reviewed by two additional musculoskeletal radiologists in a double blinded fashion. Original incorrect diagnoses were categorized as either unavoidable, interpretation error or equivocal for meniscal tear. MR accuracy was 88% for the medial and 85% for the lateral meniscus. Of 27 incorrect MR diagnoses, 12 (44%) were unavoidable, 10 (37%) equivocal and 5 (19%) interpretation errors. Of the 67 medial meniscal tears, 12 (18%) were missed. Eight (67%) of these 12 were categorized as equivocal, including three postoperative menisci. Of 30 lateral tears, 12 (40%) were missed, 7 (58%) of which were categorized as unavoidable. Of these 12, 11 (92%) showed fraying of the inner edge, which was shaved at arthroscopy (n = 8) or had stable tear treated conservatively (n = 3). There were three false-positive diagnoses, all occuring in the lateral meniscus, two of which were unavoidable and one interpretation error. Of all missed lateral meniscal tears, most are unavoidable and related to confusion between what represents fraying and what represents a tear. Unavoidable false-positive diagnoses are infrequent and may be related to incomplete arthroscopic evaluation. Subtle or equivocal findings still make MR diagnosis difficult, even for experienced radiologists.

  20. Evaluation of Meniscal Mechanics and Proteoglycan Content in a Modified Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Coatney, Garrett A.; Haverkamp, John H.; Button, Keith D.; DeCamp, Charlie; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) develops as a result of traumatic loading that causes tears of the soft tissues in the knee. A modified transection model, where the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and both menisci were transected, was used on skeletally mature Flemish Giant rabbits. Gross morphological assessments, elastic moduli, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) coverage of the menisci were determined to quantify the amount of tissue damage 12 weeks post injury. This study is one of the first to monitor meniscal changes after inducing combined meniscal and ACL transections. A decrease in elastic moduli as well as a decrease in GAG coverage was seen. PMID:24749144

  1. Is radiographic measurement of bony landmarks reliable for lateral meniscal sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Kim, Taik-Seon; Lim, Hong-Chul; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy of meniscal measurement methods is still in debate. The authors' protocol for radiologic measurements will provide reproducible bony landmarks, and this measurement method of the lateral tibial plateau will correlate with the actual anatomic value. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five samples of fresh lateral meniscus with attached proximal tibia were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Each sample was obtained without damage to the meniscus and bony attachment sites. The inclusion criterion was mild to moderate osteoarthritis in patients with mechanical axis deviation of less than 15°. Knees with lateral compartment osteoarthritic change or injured or degenerated menisci were excluded. For the lateral tibial plateau length measurements, the radiographic beam was angled 10° caudally at neutral rotation, which allowed differentiation of the lateral plateau cortical margins from the medial plateau. The transition points were identified and used for length measurement. The values of length were then compared with the conventional Pollard method and the anatomic values. The width measurement was done according to Pollard's protocol. For each knee, the percentage deviation from the anatomic dimension was recorded. Intraobserver error and interobserver error were calculated. The deviation of the authors' radiographic length measurements from anatomic dimensions was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm. The deviation of Pollard's radiographic length measurements was 4.1 ± 2.0 mm. With respect to accuracy-which represents the frequency of measurements that fall within 10% of measurements-the accuracy of authors' length was 98%, whereas for Pollard's method it was 40%. There was a good correlation between anatomic meniscal dimensions and each radiologic plateau dimensions for lateral meniscal width (R(2) = .790) and the authors' lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .823) and fair correlation for Pollard's lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .660). The reliability of each

  2. Epidemiology of isolated meniscal injury and its effect on performance in athletes from the National Basketball Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Peter C; Starkey, Chad; Lombardo, Stephen; Vitti, Gary; Kharrazi, F Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The current incidence and outcomes of meniscal injury have not been quantified in professional athletes. To describe the incidence, risk, amount of time lost, and effect on performance for isolated meniscal injury in athletes from the National Basketball Association (NBA). Demographic factors predicting the risk of meniscal tears and the effect of injury in return to play were also investigated. Descriptive epidemiology study. A centralized database was queried to identify meniscal injuries occurring in the NBA over 21 seasons. The frequency of injury, time lost, game exposures, and incidence, rate, and risk were calculated. The preinjury and postinjury player efficiency rating (PER) was used to identify changes in player performance. We identified 129 isolated meniscal tears in NBA athletes during a 21-season span. From this number, 77 (59.7%) involved the lateral meniscus and 52 (40.3%) the medial meniscus. Injuries occurred more frequently in games. The lateral meniscus had a statistically significant higher injury rate. Both left and right knees were equally affected. The number of days missed for lateral meniscal tears and medial meniscal tears was 43.8 ± 35.7 days and 40.9 ± 29.7 days, respectively, and was not statistically different. There was a significant inverse relationship between age and rate of lateral meniscal tears, with lateral meniscal tears more likely to occur up to age 30 years; beyond that medial meniscal tears were more common. Players with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 25 had a significantly increased risk of meniscal tears compared with players with a BMI less than 25, specifically with an increased risk of lateral meniscal tears. Twenty-five players (19.4%) did not return to play. For those who did, upon returning to competition, there was no statistical change in PER from their preinjury status, and the mean number of seasons completed was 4.1 ± 3.7 seasons. The lateral meniscus is more frequently torn than the medial meniscus

  3. Longitudinal follow-up of patients with conservatively treated and arthroscopically repaired peripheral meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, A.L.; Mink, J.H.; Rothman, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    Tears involving the peripheral third of the meniscus represent an important subgroup of meniscal injuries due to their unique ability to heal by synovial ingrowth and vascular proliferation. Serial MR images were obtained in 14 patients with arthroscopically proved peripheral meniscal tears to assess changes in MR appearance associated with meniscal healing. Six patients were treated conservatively, and eight underwent arthroscopic repair. All patients were considered clinically stable and presumably healed based on commonly accepted orthopedic criteria. Persistent grade 3 signal was seen in all patients up to 6 months after injury. In two patients more than 14 months after repair, grade 3 signal was present but decreased. In no patient did the signal entirely resolve. The authors concluded that signal from conservatively treated and repaired meniscal tears may persist long after the tear has become asymptomatic and presumable healed. This likely reflects known histologic differences between the native meniscus and reparative fibrocartilage. Persistence of grade 3 signal should not be interpreted as reflective of nonhealing in patients with persistent symptoms or as evidence of another tear in those with recurrent symptoms

  4. Meniscal tissue regeneration in porous 50/50 copoly(L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone) implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J. H.; Zijlstra, F. M.; Kuipers, HW; Pennings, A. J.; Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB

    Porous materials of a high-molecular-weight 50/50 copolymer of L-lactide and epsilon-caprolactone with different compression moduli were used for meniscal repair. In contrast to the previously used 4,4'-diphenylmethane and 1,6-trans-cyclohexane diisocyanates containing polyurethanes, degradation

  5. Meniscal replacement using a porous polymer prosthesis : A preliminary study in the dog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB; Nielsen, HKL; deGroot, JH; Pennings, AJ

    A porous polyurethane prosthesis was used to replace the lateral meniscus in the dog. After an initial ingrowth of fibrous tissue, the prostheses became filled with tissue strongly resembling normal meniscal fibrocartilage. Although less severe than seen after total meniscectomy, cartilage

  6. Usefulness of turbo spin-echo MR imaging in meniscal tears of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gun Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Chung, Jin Young; Han, Tae Il; Jang, Hong Im; Kim, Ji Min; Han, Hyun Young; Song, Mun Kab; Yang, Chang Kyu

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and diagnostic accuracy of turbo spin-echo(TSE) proton-density and T2-weighted images of meniscal tears of the knee. We retrospectively evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of TSE proton density and T2-weighted images of meniscal tears confirmed arthroscopically or surgically in 47 patients(98 menisci). The routine TSE parameters used in all patients were the dual echo sequence with sagittal proton density and T2-weighed images(4000/16, 90/5/2 [TR/effectiveTE/ETL/NEX]), and fat-suppressed coronal proton density and T2-weighted images. The chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of TSE proton density images for the detection of meniscal tears were 93.9%, 93.8%, and 93.9%, respectively, in the medial meniscus, and 92.9%, 91.4%, and 91.8% in the lateral. On T2-weighted images the corresponding figures were 87.9%, 8%, and 89.8%, respectively, in the medial meniscus, and 64.3%, 91.4%, and 83.7% in the lateral. With regard to sensitivity and accuracy, TSE proton density images of meniscal tears were superior to TSE T2-weighted images.=20

  7. Meniscectomy versus meniscal repair: 10 years radiological and clinical results in vertical lesions in stable knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, C; Dalmay, F; Ehkirch, F P; Cucurulo, T; Laporte, C; Le Henaff, G; Potel, J F; Pujol, N; Rochcongar, G; Salledechou, E; Seil, R; Gunepin, F-X; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2015-12-01

    Surgical management of meniscal lesion consists of either a meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Although repair offers immediate recovery after surgery, it is also associated with higher rates of revision. A meniscectomy, on the other hand is known to be associated with an early onset of osteoarthritis. The present study compared clinical and radiological results at 10 years between meniscectomy and meniscal repair in isolated vertical lesion in an otherwise stable knee. The hypothesis was that repair shows functional and radiological benefit over meniscectomy. A multi-centric retrospective comparative study of 32 patients (24 male, 8 female). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years (range, 10-13 years). There were 10 meniscal repairs (group R) and 22 meniscectomies (group M), in 17 right and 15 left knees. Mean age at surgery was 33.45±12.3 years (range, 9-47 years). There were 28 medial and 4 lateral meniscal lesions; 26 were in the red-red zone and 6 in red-white zone. Functional score: KOOS score was significantly higher in group R than M on almost all parameters: 98±4.69 versus 77.38±21.97 for symptoms (P=0.0043), 96.89±7.20 versus 78.57±18.9 for pain (P=0.0052), 99.89±0.33 versus 80.88±19.6 for daily life activities (P=0.0002), 96.11±9.83 versus 54.05±32.85 for sport and leisure (P=0.0005), but 91±16.87 versus 68.15±37.7 for quality of life (P=0.1048). Radiology score: in group R, 7 patients had no features of osteoarthritis, and 2 had grade 1 osteoarthritis. In group M, 5 patients had grade 1 osteoarthritis, 10 grade 2, 3 grade 3 and 3 grade 4. Mean quantitative score was 0 (mean, 0.22±0.44) in-group R and 2 (mean, 2.19±0.98) in group M (P<0.0001). At more than 10year's follow-up, functional scores were significantly better with meniscal repair than meniscectomy on all parameters of the KOOS scale except quality of life. Functional and radiological scores correlated closely. These results show that meniscal repair for vertical lesions in stable knees

  8. An evaluation of meniscal collagenous structure using optical projection tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, Stephen HJ; Ronsky, Janet L; Rattner, Jerome B; Shrive, Nigel G; Jamniczky, Heather A

    2013-01-01

    The collagenous structure of menisci is a complex network of circumferentially oriented fascicles and interwoven radially oriented tie-fibres. To date, examination of this micro- architecture has been limited to two-dimensional imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of the three-dimensional imaging technique; optical projection tomography (OPT), to visualize the collagenous structure of the meniscus. If successful, this technique would be the first to visualize the macroscopic orientation of collagen fascicles in 3-D in the meniscus and could further refine load bearing mechanisms in the tissue. OPT is an imaging technique capable of imaging samples on the meso-scale (1-10 mm) at a micro-scale resolution. The technique, similar to computed tomography, takes two-dimensional images of objects from incremental angles around the object and reconstructs them using a back projection algorithm to determine three-dimensional structure. Bovine meniscal samples were imaged from four locations (outer main body, femoral surface, tibial surface and inner main body) to determine the variation in collagen orientation throughout the tissue. Bovine stifles (n = 2) were obtained from a local abattoir and the menisci carefully dissected. Menisci were fixed in methanol and subsequently cut using a custom cutting jig (n = 4 samples per meniscus). Samples were then mounted in agarose, dehydrated in methanol and subsequently cleared using benzyl alcohol benzyl benzoate (BABB) and imaged using OPT. Results indicate circumferential, radial and oblique collagenous orientations at the contact surfaces and in the inner third of the main body of the meniscus. Imaging identified fascicles ranging from 80-420 μm in diameter. Transition zones where fascicles were found to have a woven or braided appearance were also identified. The outer-third of the main body was composed of fascicles oriented predominantly in the circumferential direction. Blood vessels were

  9. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark [Department of Traumatology and Sports Injuries, Salzburg (Austria); Forstner, Rosemarie [University Hospital of Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Minnich, Bernd [University of Salzburg, Department of Organismic Biology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 {+-} 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 {+-} 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 {+-} 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  10. Arthroscopic all-inside meniscal repair - Does the meniscus heal? A clinical and radiological follow-up examination to verify meniscal healing using a 3-T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffelner, Thomas; Resch, Herbert; Mayer, Michael; Tauber, Mark; Forstner, Rosemarie; Minnich, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to correlate clinical and radiological results using a 3-T MRI to verify meniscal healing after arthroscopic all-inside meniscus repair. We selected 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with an average age of 31 ± 9 years and retrospective clinical examinations and radiological assessments using a 3-T MRI after all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair were conducted. Repair of the medial meniscus was performed in 19 patients and of the lateral meniscus in eight. In 17 patients (63%), we performed concomitant anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 ± 1.7 years. The Lysholm score and Tegner activity index were used for clinical evaluation. Four grades were used to classify the radiological signal alterations within the meniscus: central globular (grade 1); linear horizontal or band-like (grade 2); intrameniscal alterations and linear signal alterations communicating with the articular surface (grade 3); and complex tears (grade 4). At follow-up, the average Lysholm score was 76 ± 15 points, with ten of the patients placed in group 6 based on the Tegner activity index. MRI examinations revealed no signal alteration in three patients, grade 1 in 0, grade 2 in five, grade 3 in 13, and grade 4 in six. The MRI findings correlated positively with the clinical scores in 21 patients (78%). Correlation of clinical and radiological examination was performed using 3-T MRI. In spite of satisfactory clinical outcomes at follow-up, a radiological signal alteration may still be visible on MRI, which was believed to be scar tissue, but could not be proven definitively. Imaging with a 3-Tesla MRI after meniscal suture surgery provides good but no definitive reliability on meniscus healing and therefore gives no advantage compared to 1.5-T MRI, with good clinical outcome using an all-inside arthroscopic meniscal repair. 3T-MRI can not substitute diagnostic arthroscopy in patients with persistent complaints after

  11. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose — No consensus exists on when to perform arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with a degenerative meniscal tear. Since MRI and clinical tests are not accurate in detecting a symptomatic meniscal lesion, the patient’s symptoms often play a large role when deciding...... when to perform surgery. We determined the prevalence and severity of self-reported knee symptoms in patients eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy due to a degenerative meniscal tear. We investigated whether symptoms commonly considered to be related to meniscus injury were associated...... with early radiographic signs of knee osteoarthritis. Patients and methods — We included individual baseline items from the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score collected in 2 randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment for an MRI-verified degenerative medial meniscal tears in 199 patients aged...

  12. Importance of meniscal injury diagnosis and surgical management in dogs during reconstruction of cranial cruciate ligament rupture: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Beom Seo

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Finally based on the clinical superiority, it is recommended that meniscal injury should be checked and corrected during RCCL reconstruction for getting better clinical outcomes. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(3.000: 311-318

  13. Structural pathology is not related to patient-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Simon Tornbjerg; Nissen, Nis; Englund, Martin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between meniscal tears and other joint pathologies with patient-reported symptoms is not clear. We investigated associations between structural knee pathologies identified at surgery with preoperative knee pain and function in patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal...... of meniscal tears questionnaire, supplemented with information extracted from surgery reports. Following hypothesis-driven preselection of candidate variables, backward elimination regressions were performed to investigate associations between patient-reported outcomes and structural knee pathologies. RESULTS...... surgery. METHODS: This study included 443 patients from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS), a prospective cohort following patients 18 years or older undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery at 4 hospitals between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2014. Patient-reported outcomes, including...

  14. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch

    2015-02-24

    A recent study reported a large increase in the number of meniscal procedures from 2000 to 2011 in Denmark. We examined the nation-wide distribution of meniscal procedures performed in the private and public sector in Denmark since different incentives may be present and the use of these procedures may differ from region to region. We included data on all patients who underwent an arthroscopic meniscal procedure performed in the public or private sector in Denmark. Data were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register on patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscus surgery as a primary or secondary procedure in the years 2000 to 2011. Hospital identification codes enabled linkage of performed procedures to specific hospitals. Yearly incidence of meniscal procedures per 100,000 inhabitants was calculated with 95% CIs for public and private procedures for each region. Incidence of meniscal procedures increased at private and at public hospitals. The private sector accounted for the largest relative and absolute increase, rising from an incidence of 1 in 2000 to 98 in 2011. In 2011, the incidence of meniscal procedures was three times higher in the Capital Region than in Region Zealand. Our study identified a large increase in the use of meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark. The increase was particularly conspicuous in the private sector as its proportion of procedures performed increased from 1% to 32%. Substantial regional differences were present in the incidence and trend over time of meniscal procedures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Combined osteochondral allograft and meniscal allograft transplantation: a survivorship analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getgood, Alan; Gelber, Jonathon; Gortz, Simon; De Young, Alison; Bugbee, William

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) and osteochondral allografting (OCA) as individual treatment modalities for select applications is well established. MAT and OCA are considered symbiotic procedures due to a complementary spectrum of indications and reciprocal contraindications. However, few outcomes of concomitant MAT and OCA have been reported. This study is a retrospective review of patients who received simultaneous MAT and OCA between 1983 and 2011. Forty-eight (twenty-nine male: nineteen female) patients with a median age of 35.8 years (15-66) received combined MAT and OCA procedures between 1983 and 2011. Forty-three patients had received previous surgery with a median of 3 procedures (1-11 procedures). The underlying diagnosis was trauma (tibial plateau fracture) in 33 % with osteoarthritis predominating in 54.2 % of cases. Thirty-one patients received a lateral meniscus, 16 received a medial meniscus and one patient received bilateral MAT. The median number of OCAs was two per patient (1-5 grafts), with a median graft area of 15 cm(2) (0.7-41 cm(2)). There were 21 unipolar, 24 bipolar (tibiofemoral) and three multifocal lesions. Thirty-six MATs constituted a compound tibial plateau OCA with native meniscus attached. At follow-up, failure was defined as any procedure resulting in removal or revision of one or more of the grafts. Patients completed the modified Merle d'Aubigné and Postel (18-point) scale, Knee Society Function (KS-F) score, and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Patient satisfaction was also captured. Twenty-six of 48 patients (54.2 %) required reoperation, but only 11 patients (22.9 %) were noted to have failed (10 MAT and 11 OCA). The mean time to failure was 3.2 years (95 % CI 1.5-4.9 years) and 2.7 years (95 % CI 1.3-4.2 years) for MAT and OCA, respectively. The 5-year survivorship was 78 and 73 % for MAT and OCA respectively, and 69 and 68 % at 10 years. Six of

  16. Biological knee reconstruction for combined malalignment, meniscal deficiency, and articular cartilage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Hussey, Kristen; Wilson, Hillary; Pilz, Kyle; Gupta, Anil K; Gomoll, Andreas; Cole, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patient-reported outcomes in those undergoing the triad of simultaneous osteotomy, meniscal transplantation, and articular cartilage repair. Patients undergoing simultaneous meniscal transplantation, distal femoral or proximal tibial osteotomy, and articular cartilage surgery by a single surgeon (B.J.C.) were analyzed. Meniscal transplantation was performed using bone-in-slot techniques. Distal femoral and high tibial osteotomies were performed for valgus and varus malalignment, respectively. Microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation, and osteochondral autograft or allograft were performed for articular cartilage disease. Validated patient-reported and surgeon-measured outcomes were collected. Preoperative and postoperative outcomes and medial versus lateral disease were compared using Student t tests. Eighteen participants (mean age, 34 ± 7.8 years; symptomatic patients, 7.4 ± 5.6 years; 2.4 ± 1.0 surgical procedures before study enrollment; mean follow-up, 6.5 ± 3.2 years) were analyzed. Two thirds of participants had medial compartment pathologic conditions and one third had lateral compartment pathologic processes. At final follow-up, there were statistically significant clinically meaningful improvements in International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective classification, Lysholm score, and 4 Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) subscores. Postoperative 12-item short form (SF-12) physical and mental component scores were not significantly different from preoperative scores. The Kellgren-Lawrence classification grade was 1.5 ± 1.1 at 2.5 ± 3.0 years after surgery. There was a significantly higher preoperative SF-12 physical composite score (PCS) in participants with lateral compartment pathologic conditions (v medial compartment conditions) (P = .011). Although there were 13 reoperations in 10 patients (55.5% reoperation rate), only one patient was converted to knee arthroplasty (5

  17. Comparison of CT and MRI in patients with tibial plateau fracture: can CT findings predict ligament tear or meniscal injury?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mui, Leonora W.; Engelsohn, Eliyahu; Umans, Hilary

    2007-01-01

    (1) To determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of ligament tear and avulsion in patients with tibial plateau fracture. (2) To evaluate whether the presence or severity of fracture gap and articular depression can predict meniscal injury. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist retrospectively reviewed knee CT and MRI examinations of 41 consecutive patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with tibial plateau fractures. Fracture gap, articular depression, ligament tear and footprint avulsions were assessed on CT examinations. The MRI studies were examined for osseous and soft tissue injuries, including meniscal tear, meniscal displacement, ligament tear, and ligament avulsion. CT demonstrated torn ligaments with 80% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Only 2% of ligaments deemed intact on careful CT evaluation had partial or complete tears on MRI. Although the degree of fracture gap and articular depression was significantly greater in patients with meniscal injury compared with those without meniscal injury, ROC analysis demonstrated no clear threshold for gap or depression that yielded a combination of high sensitivity and specificity. In the acute setting, CT offers high sensitivity and specificity for depicting osseous avulsions, as well as high negative predictive value for excluding ligament injury. However, MRI remains necessary for the preoperative detection of meniscal injury. (orig.)

  18. Trajectory of self-reported pain and function and knee extensor muscle strength in young patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Østengaard, Lasse; Cardy, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    . PATIENTS AND INTERVENTION: People aged 30 years or younger undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear. OUTCOMES: and comparator: (1) Self-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery compared to a non-operative control group (2). Knee extensor strength in the leg undergoing surgery...... the trajectory of self-reported pain and function in patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative treatments for young patients with meniscal tears. Knee extensor strength seemed to be impaired up to 12 months after surgery in young patients undergoing surgery for meniscal tears...

  19. The use of MRI in the investigation of lateral meniscal tear post medial unicompartmental knee replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanil H. Ajwani, MBChB, BSc (Hons, MRCS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of lateral knee pain in patients with a medial unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR is complex. The native lateral compartment structures are prone to the same injuries as patients with normal knees. Historical reports of lateral meniscal injury post medial UKR have argued MRI evaluation is obsolete due to artefact caused by the prosthesis. We report a case of lateral meniscal injury in a patient two years after successful medial UKR. We identified the offending pathology via utilization of MRI scanners adopting metal artefact reduction sequences (MARS. The MARS MRI protocol helps clinicians accurately and non-invasively evaluate soft tissue structures in knees with metal prostheses. It also allows surgeons to accurately counsel patients and provides a higher degree of certainty in treating the pathology.

  20. The role of meniscal tissue in joint protection in early osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Rene; Madry, Henning; Shabshin, Nogah; Dirisamer, Florian; Peretti, Giuseppe M; Pujol, Nicolas; Spalding, Tim; Verdonk, Peter; Seil, Romain; Condello, Vincenzo; Di Matteo, Berardo; Zellner, Johannes; Angele, Peter

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that partial meniscectomy leads to early onset of osteoarthritis (OA). A strong correlation exists between the amount and location of the resected meniscus and the development of degenerative changes in the knee. On the other hand, osteoarthritic changes of the joint alter the structural and functional integrity of meniscal tissue. These alterations might additionally compromise the limited healing capacity of the meniscus. In young, active patients without cartilage damage, meniscus therapy including partial meniscectomy, meniscus suture, and meniscus replacement has proven beneficial effects in long-term studies. Even in an early osteoarthritic milieu, there is a relevant regenerative potential of the meniscus and the surrounding cartilage. This potential should be taken into account, and meniscal surgery can be performed with the correct timing and the proper indication even in the presence of early OA.

  1. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Resorlu Mustafa; Doner Davut; Karatag Ozan; Toprak Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed al...

  2. Cell-Based Meniscal Repair Using an Aligned Bioactive Nanofibrous Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Engineering . Overlap: None Title: “Development of Novel Bioartificial Ligament Using Autologous Biological Scaffold and Cells” Grant#: W81XWH-13-2-0030...patient to rapid joint degeneration (i.e., osteoarthritis). Tissue engineering approaches, including the combination of cells, scaffolds, and...electrospun nano/microfibers comprising engineered scaffolds can mimic the ultrastructure of the native meniscal extracellular matrix (ECM); when seeded with

  3. Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle: associated ligament and meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Lee, Jae Gue; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam

    2004-01-01

    Kissing contusion between the posterolateral tibial plateau and lateral femoral condyle is frequently found in association with a tear of the anterior cruciate liagment (ACL). The purpose of this study was to determine which ligamentous and meniscal tears are associated with kissing contusion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings depicted by 323 consecutive MR images of the knee and confirmed at arthroscopy. For the diagnosis of disruption, ligaments, medial menisci (MM) and lateral menisci (LM) were evaluated using accepted criteria. We compared the prevalence and location of meniscal and ligamentous tears between group I (44 knees with kissing contusion) and group II (279 knees without kissing contusion). For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used. ACLs were torn in all 44 knees (100%) with kissing contusion, and 78 (28%) of 279 without kissing contusion. There were ten medial collateral ligament (MCL) tears (23%) in group I, and 17 MCL tears (6%), five lateral collateral ligament (LCL) tears (2%) and ten posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears (4%) in group II. In group I, meniscal tears were found in 22 MM (50%) and in 19 LM (43%), while in group II, they occurred in 128 MM (46%) and 128 LM (46%), In group I, 17 (77%) of 22 MM tears and 13 (68%) of 19 LM tears were located in the posterior horn, while in group II, the corresponding figures were 97/128 (76%) and 60 of 128 (47%). The differing prevalence of ACL and MCL tears between the groups was statistically significant (p 0.05). Although kissing contusion was a highly specific sign of ACL tears, its presence was also significant among MCL tears. There was no significant difference in meniscal tears with or without kissing contusion

  4. Diagnosing Snapping Sartorius Tendon Secondary to a Meniscal Cyst Using Dynamic Ultrasound Avoids Incorrect Surgical Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Asopa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of painful snapping in the medial aspect of the knee of a 40-year-old man, following a knee hyperflexion injury. Dynamic real-time ultrasonography determined that the snapping was due to the distal tendon of sartorius passing over a medial meniscal cyst. The patient subsequently underwent arthroscopic decompression of the cyst instead of an inappropriate hamstring tendon harvest procedure, with complete resolution of symptoms.

  5. Meniscal tears: comparison of half-Fourier technique and conventional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabana, Wael; Maeseneer, Michel de; Machiels, Freddy; Ridder, Filip de; Osteaux, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether half-Fourier MR image acquisition technique can provide similar information to that of conventional MR acquisition technique for evaluation of meniscal tears. Materials and methods: We studied 101 menisci in 52 patients who were referred for evaluation of meniscal tears. Sagittal MR images of the knee were obtained for all patients by using proton density and T2-weighted SE sequences on a 1-T clinical system. The half-Fourier technique and conventional technique were used for all patients. All other imaging parameters were identical for both sequences (TR/TE=2400/20,70; 3 mm slice thickness; 200x256 matrix; field of view, 200; one signal acquired). Both sets of images were filmed with standard window and level settings. Images were randomised and interpreted independently by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Images were also subjectively assessed for image quality using a five-point grading scale. Results: On half-Fourier images, Reader 1 interpreted 23 menisci as torn, compared to 28 for Reader 2. On conventional images, Reader 1 interpreted 24 menisci as torn, compared to 26 for Reader 2. Agreement between interpretation of the conventional and that of the half-Fourier images was 99% for Reader 1, and 98% for Reader 2. Agreement between readers for the half-Fourier images was 95%, and for the conventional images 96%. No statistically significant difference was found in the subjective evaluation of image quality between the conventional and half-Fourier images. Conclusion: The half-Fourier acquisition technique compares favourably with the conventional technique for the evaluation of meniscal tears

  6. Development of a Micronized Meniscus Extracellular Matrix Scaffold for Potential Augmentation of Meniscal Repair and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monibi, Farrah A; Bozynski, Chantelle C; Kuroki, Keiichi; Stoker, Aaron M; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Sherman, Seth L; Cook, James L

    2016-12-01

    Decellularized scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix (ECM) hold promise for repair and regeneration of the meniscus, given the potential for ECM-based biomaterials to aid in stem cell recruitment, infiltration, and differentiation. The objectives of this study were to decellularize canine menisci to fabricate a micronized, ECM-derived scaffold and to determine the cytocompatibility and repair potential of the scaffold ex vivo. Menisci were decellularized with a combination of physical agitation and chemical treatments. For scaffold fabrication, decellularized menisci were cryoground into a powder and the size and morphology of the ECM particles were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Histologic and biochemical analyses of the scaffold confirmed effective decellularization with loss of proteoglycan from the tissue but no significant reduction in collagen content. When washed effectively, the decellularized scaffold was cytocompatible to meniscal fibrochondrocytes, synoviocytes, and whole meniscal tissue based on the resazurin reduction assay and histologic evaluation. In an ex vivo model for meniscal repair, radial tears were augmented with the scaffold delivered with platelet-rich plasma as a carrier, and compared to nonaugmented (standard-of-care) suture techniques. Histologically, there was no evidence of cellular migration or proliferation noted in any of the untreated or standard-of-care treatment groups after 40 days of culture. Conversely, cellular infiltration and proliferation were noted in scaffold-augmented repairs. These data suggest the potential for the scaffold to promote cellular survival, migration, and proliferation ex vivo. Further investigations are necessary to examine the potential for the scaffold to induce cellular differentiation and functional meniscal fibrochondrogenesis.

  7. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  8. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Patients and methods Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Results Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. Conclusions We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear. PMID:29333118

  9. Occupational kneeling and meniscal tears: a magnetic resonance imaging study in floor layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Søren; Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and degenerative meniscal tears. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both knees was conducted in 92 male floor layers and 49 male graphic designers (referents), with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 42-70 yrs). The prese......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between occupational kneeling and degenerative meniscal tears. METHODS: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both knees was conducted in 92 male floor layers and 49 male graphic designers (referents), with a mean age of 55.6 years (range 42-70 yrs......). The presence of grade 3 MRI signal intensities indicating degenerative tears of the anterior, middle, and posterior one-third of the lateral and medial menisci was assessed on 1.5-Tesla MRI scans. The odds ratio (OR) of meniscal tears was determined among floor layers compared to graphic designers. Using...... logistic regression, models were adjusted for age, body mass index, and knee-straining sports. RESULTS: Degenerative tears were significantly more prevalent in the medial meniscus among floor layers than among graphic designers [OR 2.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10-4.98] and significantly more floor...

  10. Reliability and Validity of the IKDC, KOOS, and WOMAC for Patients With Meniscal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Graaf, Victor A; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Scholtes, Vanessa A B; Mutsaerts, Eduard L A R; Poolman, Rudolf W

    2014-06-01

    Several patient-reported outcome measurements are used to measure functional outcome after treatment of meniscal injuries. However, for comparison of study results, there is a need for a uniform and standardized approach of measuring functional outcome. Selection of the instrument should be based on the quality of its measurement properties, and only the best instrument can be justified to be used. This study aimed to determine and compare the measurement properties of the Dutch-language versions of the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Subjective Knee Form, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) in a homogeneous group of patients with meniscal tears. Cohort study (design); Level of evidence, 2. Patients on the waiting list for meniscal surgery and patients between 6 weeks and 6 months after meniscal surgery were included (n = 75). Patients were excluded if they received an arthroplasty or had surgery on the anterior cruciate ligament. Internal consistency (Cronbach alpha), test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]), measurement error (SEM), smallest detectable difference (SDD), content validity, construct validity (factor analysis and hypothesis testing), and floor and ceiling effects were determined. Results for the IKDC, KOOS dimensions, and WOMAC dimensions, respectively, were as follows: Cronbach alpha = .90, .72-.95, and .84-.95; ICC = 0.93, 0.84-0.89, and 0.77-0.89; SEM = 5.3, 7.0-12.6, and 7.3-12.2; SDD = 14.6, 19.4-35.0, and 20.2-33.9; hypotheses testing confirmation = 100%, 86%, and 85%. Floor effects within the SDD from the minimum score were found for the KOOS Sports/Recreation and Quality of Life dimensions. Ceiling effects within the SDD from the maximum score were found for the KOOS Activities of Daily Living and for all WOMAC dimensions. The IKDC showed the best performance on all measurement properties, implying that the IKDC

  11. [SPECIFIC DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF "RIPPLE SIGN" OF MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE UNDER ARTHROSCOPE IN MEDIAL LONGITUDINAL MENISCAL TEARS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren Shiyou; Sun, Limang; Chen, Guofei; Jiang, Changqing; Zhang, Xintao; Zhang Wentao

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the reliability of the "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle in the diagnosis of medial longitudinal meniscal tears under arthroscope. Between June 2013 and June 2014, 56 patients with knee injuries were included. There were 35 males and 21 females with an average age of 22.2 years (range, 12-38 years). The causes of injury were sports in 40 cases, falling in 10 cases, and traffic accident in 6 cases. The injury was located at the left knee in 22 cases and at the right knee in 34 cases. The disease duration was 10-40 days (mean, 20.2 days). Of 56 patients, 15 cases had simple medial meniscal injury; 41 cases had combined injuries, including anterior cruciate ligament injury in 38 cases, posterior cruciate ligament injury in 2 cases, and patellar dislocation in 1 case. The "ripple sign" was observed under arthroscope before operation. Repair of medial meniscal injury and reconstruction of cruciate ligament were performed. The positive "ripple sign" was seen under arthroscope in all patients, who were diagnosed to have longitudinal meniscal tears, including 23 cases of mild "ripple sign" , 28 cases of moderate "ripple sign", and 5 cases of severe "ripple sign". The "ripple sign" on the upper surface of the medial femoral condyle is a reliable diagnostic evidence of medial longitudinal meniscal tears.

  12. Association of MRI findings and expert diagnosis of symptomatic meniscal tear among middle-aged and older adults with knee pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Bhushan R; Losina, Elena; Smith, Savannah R; Martin, Scott D; Wright, R John; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2016-04-11

    Our aim was to examine the association between an expert clinician's impression of symptomatic meniscal tears and subsequent MRI in the context of middle-aged and older adults with knee pain. Patients older than 45 were eligible for this IRB-approved substudy if they had knee pain, had not undergone MRI and saw one of two orthopaedic surgeons experienced in the diagnosis of meniscal tear. The surgeon rated their confidence that the patient's symptoms were due to meniscal tear. The patient subsequently had a 1.5 or 3.0 T MRI within 6 months. We examined the association between presence of meniscal tear on MRI and the surgeon's confidence that the knee pain was due to meniscal tear using a χ(2) test for trend. Of 84 eligible patients, 63% were female, with a mean age of 64 years and a mean BMI of 27. The surgeon was confident that symptoms emanated from a tear among 39%. The prevalence of meniscal tear on MRI overall was 74%. Among subjects whose surgeon indicated high confidence that symptoms were due to meniscal tear, the prevalence was 80% (95% CI 63-90%). Similarly, the prevalence was 87% (95% CI 62-96%) among those whose surgeon had medium confidence and 64% (95% CI 48-77%) among those whose surgeon had low confidence (p = 0.12). Meniscal tears were frequently found on MRI even when an expert clinician was confident that a patient's knee symptoms were not due to a meniscal tear, indicating that providers should use MRI sparingly and cautiously to confirm or rule out the attribution of knee pain to meniscal tear.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal injuries in sports: incidence, time of practice until injury, and limitations caused after trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astur, Diego Costa; Xerez, Marcos; Rozas, João; Debieux, Pedro Vargas; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo; Cohen, Moises

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of ACL and meniscal injuries in a population of recreational and elite athletes from Brazil and the relation of these injuries with their sports activities. This was a prospective observational study of 240 patients with ACL and/or meniscal injuries submitted to surgical treatment. Data of patients and sport modality, as well as Tegner score were registered in the first clinical evaluation. The patients were divided into three groups: (1) isolated rupture of the ACL; (2) ACL injury associated with meniscal injury; (3) isolated menisci injury. The majority of the patients belonged to group 1 (44.58%), followed by group 2 (30.2%) and 3 (25%). Most patients were soccer players. The mean time from sport practice to injury in group 1 was 17.81 years. In group 2, it was 17.3 years, and in group 3, 26.91 years. Soccer athletes presented ACL injury in 0.523/1000 h of practice and meniscal injury in 0.448/1000 h of practice. Before the injury, the mean Tegner score obtained for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 7.18, 7.34, and 6.53, respectively. After knee injury, those values were 3.07, 3.18, and 2.87, respectively. Soccer was the sport that caused the majority of lesions, regardless the group. Furthermore, patients from groups 1 and 2 had less time of practice prior to the injury (17.81 and 17.3 years) than the patients of group 3 (26.91 years). Women presented a higher risk to develop ACL and meniscal injuries in 1000 h of game/practice. Running, volleyball, and weightlifting are in ascending order of risk for ACL and/or meniscal injury. Regarding the return to sport practice, the efficiency of all athletes was impaired because of the injury.

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal injuries in sports: incidence, time of practice until injury, and limitations caused after trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Costa Astur

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of ACL and meniscal injuries in a population of recreational and elite athletes from Brazil and the relation of these injuries with their sports activities. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study of 240 patients with ACL and/or meniscal injuries submitted to surgical treatment. Data of patients and sport modality, as well as Tegner score were registered in the first clinical evaluation. The patients were divided into three groups: (1 isolated rupture of the ACL; (2 ACL injury associated with meniscal injury; (3 isolated menisci injury. RESULTS: The majority of the patients belonged to group 1 (44.58%, followed by group 2 (30.2% and 3 (25%. Most patients were soccer players. The mean time from sport practice to injury in group 1 was 17.81 years. In group 2, it was 17.3 years, and in group 3, 26.91 years. Soccer athletes presented ACL injury in 0.523/1000 h of practice and meniscal injury in 0.448/1000 h of practice. Before the injury, the mean Tegner score obtained for groups 1, 2, and 3 were 7.18, 7.34, and 6.53, respectively. After knee injury, those values were 3.07, 3.18, and 2.87, respectively. CONCLUSION: Soccer was the sport that caused the majority of lesions, regardless the group. Furthermore, patients from groups 1 and 2 had less time of practice prior to the injury (17.81 and 17.3 years than the patients of group 3 (26.91 years. Women presented a higher risk to develop ACL and meniscal injuries in 1000 h of game/practice. Running, volleyball, and weightlifting are in ascending order of risk for ACL and/or meniscal injury. Regarding the return to sport practice, the efficiency of all athletes was impaired because of the injury.

  15. What is the best way to fix a polyurethane meniscal scaffold? A biomechanical evaluation of different fixation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeman, Francois; Corten, Kristoff; Mylle, Michiel; Van Herck, Bert; Verdonk, René; Verdonk, Peter; Bellemans, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Ingrowth of meniscal tissue into a meniscal scaffold can be optimized by securely fixing the scaffold into the meniscal remnants. The purpose of this research was to test and compare commonly used suture types and suture materials to fix a meniscal scaffold. Forty fresh porcine menisci were used. All tests used the same polyurethane-based scaffold. The load to failure of horizontal, vertical and diagonal sutures with PDS 0 and with Ethibond 0, and diagonal sutures with Ultra Fast-Fix(®) and Sequent(®) to fix a meniscal scaffold were tested. Five tests were conducted for each configuration. All constructs failed in the scaffold at a mean pullout force of 50.6 N (SD 12.7). Inferior results were noted for vertical sutures (40.1 N, SD 6.3) compared to horizontal (49.8 N, SD 5.5, p = 0.0007) and diagonal (51.7 N, SD 15.6, p = 0.024) sutures and for Ethibond 0 (41.4 N, SD 6.2) compared to PDS 0 (51.3 N, SD 12.9, p = 0.001). When comparing the diagonal suture placements, only Ethibond 0 (42.9 N, SD 5.4) showed significantly inferior results compared to PDS 0 (60.1 N, SD 16.9, p = 0.03), Ultra Fast-Fix(®) (60.1 N, SD 9.3, p = 0.004) and Sequent(®) (65.8 N, SD 4.4, p < 0.0001). The most common failure mode when fixing a polyurethane-based meniscal scaffold is suture pull-through of the scaffold in the distraction mode. This happens at a rather low pullout force and might preclude the use of this scaffold clinically. Vertical sutures and Ethibond 0 multifilament braided sutures fail at lower forces, and the tested commercial devices show promising results.

  16. Usefulness of meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio on coronal MRI in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.J.; Lee, S.Y.; Park, N.-H.; Chung, E.C.; Park, J.Y.; Kim, M.S.; Lee, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical utility of the meniscal width to transverse diameter ratio (L/M ratio) of the lateral meniscus in the diagnosis of incomplete discoid lateral meniscus (IDLM) as compared with the arthroscopic diagnosis, meniscal width to tibial diameter ratio (L/T ratio) and conventional lateral meniscus width criteria. Materials and methods: This retrospective study sample included 41 patients with IDLM who underwent knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy, as well as 50 controls with normal lateral menisci. MRI examinations were interpreted independently by two radiologists, both of whom were blinded to clinical information and radiological reports. Assessment of meniscal width (L), maximal transverse diameter of the lateral meniscus (M), and transverse diameter of the tibia (T) was carried out on central coronal sections that were observed to pass through the medial collateral ligament. L/M and L/T ratios were calculated. These results were correlated with arthroscopic findings and analysed statistically using categorical regression analysis and non-parametric correlation analysis. Using arthroscopic findings as the standard of reference, sensitivity and specificity were calculated for: (1) 12, 13, 14, and 15 mm meniscal width thresholds; (2) 40%, 50%, 60%, and 70% L/M ratio thresholds; and (3) 15%, 18%, 20%, and 25% L/T ratio thresholds. Results: The mean L/M ratio of the IDLM was approximately 67% and was statistically significantly higher than the control (44%). The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 50%. The mean L/T ratio of the IDLM was approximately 23% and was statistically significant. The best diagnostic discrimination was achieved using a threshold of 18%. The threshold of 13 mm of meniscal width also showed high sensitivity and high specificity. Conclusion: The use of the L/M ratio or L/T ratio in combination with meniscal width criteria may be a useful method for evaluating IDLM

  17. Prevalence of Discoid Meniscus During Arthroscopy for Isolated Lateral Meniscal Pathology in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Henry B; Wise, Kelsey; LaMont, Lauren; Copley, Lawson; Wilson, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Meniscus tears in the young patient are becoming more prevalent. Knowledge of presenting characteristics and morphology can affect treatment decisions. The purpose of this study was to review and evaluate all the isolated lateral meniscus pathology that required arthroscopic treatment in a pediatric sports medicine practice and compare presenting characteristics between those with a discoid meniscus and those with normal meniscal morphology. We performed a retrospective review of all isolated lateral meniscus arthroscopic procedures from 2003 to 2012 in a high-volume pediatric sports practice. Presentation, radiographs, and intraoperative findings were reviewed. The prevalence and clinical findings of a discoid meniscus in this population and among all age groups were compared with those with a meniscus tear occurring in a normal meniscus. Two hundred and sixty-one arthroscopies were performed for symptomatic isolated lateral menisci pathology. Of these, 75% were discoid in nature; the remainder was tears occurring in normal menisci. Ninety-six of 99 patients (97%) with lateral meniscus pathology under the age of 13 had a discoid meniscus and 66% presented with no injury. There was a transition within the population at 14 years of age, with a rise in the incidence of normal meniscal body tears. Even after this transition point, meniscal pathology incidence remained notable; 59% of isolated lateral meniscus pathology in patients between the ages of 14 and 16 years old were a discoid meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging criteria for discoid meniscus (3 consecutive sagittal cuts or coronal mid-compartment measure) were unreliable after the age of 13 years old. The ratio of complete to incomplete discoids in all age groups was 4 to 3. In conclusion, discoid menisci have a high prevalence in isolated lateral meniscus pathology requiring knee arthroscopy. Clinical presentation, imaging, characteristics, and treatment may be different among different age groups. In the

  18. Knee function and knee muscle strength in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensrud, Silje; Risberg, May Arna; Roos, Ewa M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Functional limitations exist postmeniscectomy, but preoperative data are scarce. PURPOSE: To examine knee function, knee muscle strength and performance in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears, eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. STUDY DESIGN: Cross......-sectional study. METHODS: Eighty-two participants with MRI verified degenerative meniscal tear (35% women, mean age 49 years) answered the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and were tested for isokinetic knee muscle strength and lower extremity performance (one-leg hop for distance, 6 m timed...

  19. A history of meniscal surgery: from ancient times to the twenty-first century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, B; Moran, C J; Tarabella, V; Viganò, A; Tomba, P; Marcacci, M; Verdonk, R

    2016-05-01

    The science and surgery of the meniscus have evolved significantly over time. Surgeons and scientists always enjoy looking forward to novel therapies. However, as part of the ongoing effort at optimizing interventions and outcomes, it may also be useful to reflect on important milestones from the past. The aim of the present manuscript was to explore the history of meniscal surgery across the ages, from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Herein, some of the investigations of the pioneers in orthopaedics are described, to underline how their work has influenced the management of the injured meniscus in modern times. Level of evidence V.

  20. Risk factors, diagnosis and non-surgical treatment for meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Ingelsrud, Lina Holm

    2018-01-01

    quantitatively or qualitatively, as appropriate. Strength of evidence was determined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation framework. Low-quality evidence suggested that overweight (degenerative tears, k=3), male sex (k=4), contact and pivoting sports (k=2...... investigated exercise versus surgery (k=2) or the effect of surgery in addition to exercise (k=5) for degenerative meniscal tears. There was moderate level of evidence for exercise improving self-reported pain (Effect Size (ES)-0.51, 95% CI -1.16 to 0.13) and function (ES -0.06, 95% CI -0.23 to 0...

  1. Biomechanical testing of new meniscal repair techniques containing ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Schroeder, F Alexander; Aziz-Jacobo, Jorge; Sutker, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of current meniscal repair techniques containing ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture with and without cyclic loading. Vertical longitudinal cuts made in porcine menisci were secured with a single repair device. Noncycled and cycled (500 cycles) biomechanical tests were performed on the following groups: group 1, No. 2-0 Mersilene vertical suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ); group 2, No. 2-0 Orthocord vertical suture (DePuy Mitek, Westwood, MA); group 3, No. 0 Ultrabraid vertical suture (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA); group 4, No. 2-0 FiberWire vertical suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL); group 5, vertically oriented mattress suture by use of an Ultra FasT-Fix device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) with No. 0 Ultrabraid; group 6, vertically oriented mattress suture by use of a RapidLoc A2 device (DePuy Mitek) with No. 2-0 Orthocord suture; group 7, vertically oriented stitch by use of a MaxFire device with MaxBraid PE suture (Biomet Sports Medicine, Warsaw, IN); and group 8, an obliquely oriented stitch of No. 0 UHMWPE suture inserted by use of a CrossFix device (Cayenne Medical, Scottsdale, AZ). Endpoints were failure loads, failure modes, stiffness, and cyclic displacement. Mean single-pull loads were calculated for Ultra FasT-Fix (121 N), FiberWire (110 N), MaxFire (130 N), Mersilene (84 N), Orthocord (124 N), RapidLoc A2 (86 N), CrossFix (77 N), and Ultrabraid (109 N). After 500 cyclic loads, the Orthocord (222 N) repair was stronger than the others: Ultra FasT-Fix (110 N), FiberWire (117 N), MaxFire (132 N), Mersilene (89 N), RapidLoc A2 (108 N), CrossFix (95 N), and Ultrabraid (126 N) (P Fix, RapidLoc A2, and MaxFire) were comparable to the isolated UHMWPE-containing suture repairs on single-failure load testing. UHMWPE-containing suture repairs are stronger than braided polyester suture repairs, but pure UHMWPE suture (Ultrabraid) elongated more during cycling. Orthocord suture is significantly

  2. Evaluación de desenlace: trasplante meniscal versus segunda meniscectomía

    OpenAIRE

    Manrique Otero, Diana Marcela; Moncaleano Ruiz, Viviana; Peña Cruz, Nancy Tatiana; Ramírez Trujillo, Paula; Romero Mora, Jaime Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: El incremento de pacientes sintomáticos de rodilla y la osteoartrosis en jóvenes con limitadas posibilidades terapéuticas después de una meniscectomía, genera la búsqueda de alternativas terapéuticas. A pesar que es poco utilizado en Colombia, el trasplante meniscal es una propuesta para el manejo sintomático. Según cifras norteamericanas, se practican entre 700.000 a 1.500.000 artroscopias de rodilla anualmente, el 50% termina en meniscectomía y de este un 40% persiste...

  3. Comparison of SPECT bone scintigraphy with MRI for diagnosis of meniscal tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmasebi, Mohammad-naghi; Saghari, Mohsen; Moslehi, Masoud; Gholamrezanezhad, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphy has been considered as competitive to MRI, but limited data are available on the accuracy of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) compared with MRI for the assessment of meniscal tears. Our objective was to assess the value of SPECT in comparison to MRI. Between January 2003 and March 2004, sixteen patients were studied with both modalities and the accuracy rates of SPECT scan results, and MRI findings in the diagnosis of meniscal tears were compared. Arthroscopy was the gold standard. The respective sensitivity rate, specificity rate, and positive and negative predictive accuracies of MRI were 89%, 94%, 93%, and 79% and for SPECT those were 78%, 94%, 94%, and 88%. There was good agreement on the presence or absence of tears between two modalities (κ statistic = 0.699). SPECT and MRI are both valuable imaging techniques. SPECT is a useful alternative when MRI is unavailable or unsuitable and it is beneficial when more possible accuracy is desired (such as when MRI results are either inconclusive or conflict with other clinical data)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Herrig, A.; Grebe, P.; Runkel, M.; Regentrop, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To categorise discrepancies in findings of the menisci and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) between arthroscopy and MRI. Materials and methods: The MRIs of 236 patients were retrospectively analysed by an experienced radiologist without knowledge of clinical and/for operative findings. Discrepancies in arthroscopic findings were reevaluated together with the arthroscopist to determine their cause of error. Results: The diagnostic accuracies for injuries of the medial and lateral meniscus and the ACL were 92.4%, 92.4%, and 94.1%. respectively. For the menisci, causes for discrepancies in findings (n=31) were: overinterpretation of central signal intensities with contact to the meniscal surface but without disturbance of the meniscal contour as a tear (n=12), insufficient arthroscopie evaluation of the knee joint (n=11), overlooked tears on MR imaging (n=6), misinterpretation of normal anatomic structures (n=1), ''magic angle'' phenomenon (n=1), and missed tears at MRI (n=1). Causes for discrepancies for the ACL (n=18) were: nearly complete versus complete rupture either at MRI or arthroscopy and vice versa (n=9), insufficient arthroscopic evaluation (n=6), insufficient MRI technique (n=2), and overlooked tear on MR imaging (n=1). Conclusions: Discrepant findings between MRI and arthroscopy may be also due to an insufficient arthroscopic evaluation in clinical routine. The close cooperation between surgeons and radiologists improves the understanding of the methods of each other. (orig.) [de

  5. The association between reduced knee joint proprioception and medial meniscal abnormalities using MRI in knee osteoarthritis: results from the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Knoop, J; Hunter, D J; Klein, J-P; van der Leeden, M; Knol, D L; Reiding, D; Voorneman, R E; Gerritsen, M; Roorda, L D; Lems, W F; Dekker, J

    2013-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is characterized by pain and activity limitations. In knee OA, proprioceptive accuracy is reduced and might be associated with pain and activity limitations. Although causes of reduced proprioceptive accuracy are divergent, medial meniscal abnormalities, which are highly prevalent in knee OA, have been suggested to play an important role. No study has focussed on the association between proprioceptive accuracy and meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. To explore the association between reduced proprioceptive accuracy and medial meniscal abnormalities in a clinical sample of knee OA subjects. Cross-sectional study in 105 subjects with knee OA. Knee proprioceptive accuracy was assessed by determining the joint motion detection threshold in the knee extension direction. The knee was imaged with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. Number of regions with medial meniscal abnormalities and the extent of abnormality in the anterior and posterior horn and body were scored according to the Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) method. Multiple regression analyzes were used to examine whether reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA subjects. Mean proprioceptive accuracy was 2.9° ± 1.9°. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected medial meniscal abnormalities were found in the anterior horn (78%), body (80%) and posterior horn (90%). Reduced proprioceptive accuracy was associated with both the number of regions with meniscal abnormalities (P knee complaints. This is the first study showing that reduced proprioceptive accuracy is associated with medial meniscal abnormalities in knee OA. The study highlights the importance of meniscal abnormalities in understanding reduced proprioceptive accuracy in persons with knee OA. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a Chinese version of the Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool: cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, W W; Wang, W; Xu, W D

    2016-08-15

    The Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET) is a questionnaire designed to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with meniscal pathology. Our study aims to culturally adapt and validate the WOMET into a Chinese version. We translated the WOMET into Chinese. Then, a total of 121 patients with meniscal pathology were invited to participate in this study. To assess the test-retest reliability, the Chinese version WOMET was completed twice at 7-day intervals by the participants. The construct validity was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient or Spearman's correlation to test for correlations among the Chinese version WOMET and the eight domains of Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score. Responsiveness was tested by comparison of the preoperative and postoperative scores of the Chinese version WOMET. The test-retest reliability of the overall scale and different domains were all found to be excellent. The Cronbach's α was 0.90. The Chinese version WOMET correlated well with other questionnaires which suggested good construct validity. We observed no ceiling and floor effects of the Chinese version WOMET. We also found good responsiveness for the effect size, and the standardized response mean values were 0.86 and 1.11. The Chinese version of the WOMET appears to be reliable and valid in evaluating patients with meniscal pathology.

  7. Comparison of osmotic swelling influences on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage tissue mechanics in compression and shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An M; Levenston, Marc E

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of the circumferential collagen bundles to the anisotropic tensile stiffness of meniscal tissue has been well described, the implications of interactions between tissue components for other mechanical properties have not been as widely examined. This study compared the effects of the proteoglycan-associated osmotic swelling stress on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage (AC) mechanics by manipulating the osmotic environment and tissue compressive offset. Cylindrical samples were obtained from the menisci and AC of bovine stifles, equilibrated in phosphate-buffered saline solutions ranging from 0.1× to 10×, and tested in oscillatory torsional shear and unconfined compression. Biochemical analysis indicated that treatments and testing did not substantially alter tissue composition. Mechanical testing revealed tissue-specific responses to both increasing compressive offset and decreasing bath salinity. Most notably, reduced salinity dramatically increased the shear modulus of both axially and circumferentially oriented meniscal tissue explants to a much greater extent than for cartilage samples. Combined with previous studies, these findings suggest that meniscal proteoglycans have a distinct structural role, stabilizing, and stiffening the matrix surrounding the primary circumferential collagen bundles. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Meniscal T1rho and T2 measured with 3.0T MRI increases directly after running a marathon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehling, Christoph [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Luke, Anthony [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Stahl, Robert [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Baum, Thomas; Joseph, Gabby; Pan, Judong; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    To prospectively evaluate changes in T1rho and T2 relaxation time in the meniscus using 3.0 T MRI in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners and to compare these findings with those of age-matched healthy subjects. Thirteen marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI including T1rho and T2 mapping sequences before, 48-72 h after, and 3 months after competition. Ten controls were examined at baseline and after 3 months. All images were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists identifying and grading cartilage, meniscal, ligamentous. and other knee abnormalities with WORMS scores. Meniscal segmentation was performed to generate T1rho and T2 maps in six compartments. No differences in morphological knee abnormalities were found before and after the marathon. However, all marathon runners showed a significant increase in T1rho and T2 values after competition in all meniscus compartments (p < 0.0001), which may indicate changes in the biochemical composition of meniscal tissue. While T2 values decreased after 3 months T1rho values remained at a high level, indicating persisting changes in the meniscal matrix composition after a marathon. T2 values in menisci have the potential to be used as biomarkers for identifying reversible meniscus matrix changes indicating potential tissue damage. T1rho values need further study, but may be a valuable marker for diagnosing early, degenerative changes in the menisci following exercise. (orig.)

  9. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-02-01

    Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

  10. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. Patients and methods We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. Results In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 105 person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 105 person-years in 1997 to 97 per 105 person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. Interpretation The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries. PMID:26122621

  11. Bonding of human meniscal and articular cartilage with photoactive 1,8-naphthalimide dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Nosir, Hany R.; Jackson, Robert W.; Matthews, James Lester; Lewis, David E.; Utecht, Ronald E.; Yuan, Dongwu

    1996-05-01

    This study focused on meniscal cartilage repair by using the laser-activated photoactive 1,8- naphthalimide dye N,N'-bis-{6-[2-(2-(2- aminoethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxyethyl]amino-1H-benz (de)isoquinolin-1,3(2H)-dion-2- yl}-1,11-diamino-3,6,9-trioxaundecane. Harvested cadaveric human menisci were debrided and carved into strips 1 mm thick, 10 mm long, and 3 mm wide. Each strip was divided into two flaps, the surface painted with photoactive dye, the painted surfaces overlapped, the sample wrapped in Saran film, and the composite sandwiched between two glass slides at a pressure of approximately 3 kg/cm2. The sample then was transilluminated by argon ion laser light of 457.9-nm wavelength at a power density of 200 mW/cm2 with exposure times up to 5 h (3902 J/cm2 energy density). Essentially, the same procedures were performed for human femoral articular cartilage samples. Control experiments were conducted with laser irradiation alone and with dye alone. All the specimens were stored in isotonic saline solution for 2 h after irradiation to ensure hydration. The bond shear-strength was then tested and samples prepared for optical and electron transmission microscopy. Shear strength values of up to 1.8 kg/cm2 for meniscal tissues and 1.2 kg/cm2 for articular cartilaginous tissues were obtained for exposures of 3902 J/cm2. Shear strength values of approximately 0.9 kg/cm2 and 0.4 kg/cm2, respectively, for meniscus and cartilage were obtained with 459 J/cm2 exposure. Dye- and light-only controls exhibited 0 kg/cm2 shear strength values. Microscopy revealed close contact at the bonded surface in the laser-activated, dye-treated-specimens. This study shows that the laser-activated photoactive dyes have the capability of athermally bonding the meniscal and articular cartilage surfaces.

  12. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  13. International Meniscus Reconstruction Experts Forum (IMREF) 2015 Consensus Statement on the Practice of Meniscal Allograft Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getgood, Alan; LaPrade, Robert F; Verdonk, Peter; Gersoff, Wayne; Cole, Brian; Spalding, Tim

    2016-08-25

    Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) has become relatively commonplace in specialized sport medicine practice for the treatment of patients with a symptomatic knee after the loss of a functional meniscus. The technique has evolved since the 1980s, and long-term results continue to improve. However, there still remains significant variation in how MAT is performed, and as such, there remains opportunity for outcome and graft survivorship to be optimized. The purpose of this article was to develop a consensus statement on the practice of MAT from key opinion leaders who are members of the International Meniscus Reconstruction Experts Forum so that a more standardized approach to the indications, surgical technique, and postoperative care could be outlined with the goal of ultimately improving patient outcomes. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Canine stifle stability following cranial cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscal release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, T.; Kristiansen, S.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    stifle stability was evaluated in right pelvic limbs from canine cadavers under three different test situations (intact, CrCL deficient and medial meniscal release (MMR)). Dogs were euthanized for reasons unrelated to the study, owner approval given for research use and institutional ethical approval...... to an intact stifle PTA between 95.5° and 97°. The mean maximal CTS in CrCL deficient stifles was 52.8% of intact marker separation distance, occurring at an average joint angle of 130°, equivalent to an intact PTA of 109°.After MMR, CTS initiated significantly earlier in extension, at a joint angle of 65...... meniscus, but did not cause a significant change in the maximal amount of CTS....

  15. Dynamic compression of human and ovine meniscal tissue compared with a potential thermoplastic elastomer hydrogel replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M; Boncella, Katie; Lewis, Jackson T; Bailey, Travis S; Haut Donahue, Tammy L

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how human meniscal tissue responds to loading regimes mimetic of daily life as well as how it compares to larger animal models is critical in the development of a functionally accurate synthetic surrogate. Seven human and eight ovine cadaveric meniscal specimens were regionally sectioned into cylinders 5 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick along with 10 polystyrene-b-polyethylene oxide block copolymer-based thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) hydrogels. Samples were compressed to 12% strain at 1 Hz for 5000 cycles, unloaded for 24 h, and then retested. No differences were found within each group between test one and test two. Human and ovine tissue exhibited no regional dependency (p Human samples relaxed quicker than ovine tissue or the TPE hydrogel with modulus values at cycle 50 not significantly different from cycle 5000. Ovine menisci were found to be similar to human menisci in relaxation profile but had significantly higher modulus values (3.44 MPa instantaneous and 0.61 MPa after 5000 cycles compared with 1.97 and 0.11 MPa found for human tissue) and significantly different power law fit coefficients. The TPE hydrogel had an initial modulus of 0.58 MPa and experienced less than a 20% total relaxation over the 5000. Significant differences in the magnitude of compressive modulus between human and ovine menisci were observed, however the relaxation profiles were similar. Although statistically different than the native tissues, modulus values of the TPE hydrogel material were similar to those of the human and ovine menisci, making it a material worth further investigation for use as a synthetic replacement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2722-2728, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Regional and depth variability of porcine meniscal mechanical properties through biaxial testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, A; Hurtig, M B; Gordon, K D

    2015-01-01

    The menisci in the knee joint undergo complex loading in-vivo resulting in a multidirectional stress distribution. Extensive mechanical testing has been conducted to investigate the tissue properties of the knee meniscus, but the testing conditions do not replicate this complex loading regime. Biaxial testing involves loading tissue along two different directions simultaneously, which more accurately simulates physiologic loading conditions. The purpose of this study was to report mechanical properties of meniscal tissue resulting from biaxial testing, while simultaneously investigating regional variations in properties. Ten left, fresh porcine joints were obtained, and the medial and lateral menisci were harvested from each joint (twenty menisci total). Each menisci was divided into an anterior, middle and posterior region; and three slices (femoral, deep and tibial layers) were obtained from each region. Biaxial and constrained uniaxial testing was performed on each specimen, and Young's moduli were calculated from the resulting stress strain curves. Results illustrated significant differences in regional mechanical properties, with the medial anterior (Young's modulus (E)=11.14 ± 1.10 MPa), lateral anterior (E=11.54 ± 1.10 MPa) and lateral posterior (E=9.0 ± 1.2 MPa) regions exhibiting the highest properties compared to the medial central (E=5.0 ± 1.22 MPa), medial posterior (E=4.16 ± 1.13 MPa) and lateral central (E=5.6 ± 1.20 MPa) regions. Differences with depth were also significant on the lateral meniscus, with the femoral (E=12.7 ± 1.22 MPa) and tibial (E=8.6 ± 1.22 MPa) layers exhibiting the highest Young's moduli. This data may form the basis for future modeling of meniscal tissue, or may aid in the design of synthetic replacement alternatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment of Painful, Irreparable Partial Meniscal Defects With a Polyurethane Scaffold: Midterm Clinical Outcomes and Survival Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhollander, Aad; Verdonk, Peter; Verdonk, René

    2016-10-01

    A biodegradable polyurethane scaffold was designed to fulfill a challenging clinical need in the treatment of patients with painful, irreparable partial meniscal defects. The use of an acellular polyurethane scaffold for new tissue generation in irreparable, partial meniscal defects provides both midterm pain relief and improved functionality. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. A total of 44 patients with irreparable, partial meniscal defects (29 medial and 15 lateral) were implanted with a polyurethane scaffold in a prospective, single-arm proof-of-principle study with a minimum 5-year follow-up. Clinical outcomes were measured with the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at baseline and at 2- and 5-year follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the meniscal implant and cartilage status of the index compartment. Kaplan-Meier time-to-treatment failure distributions were also performed. Removal of the scaffold, conversion to a meniscal transplant, or unicompartmental/total knee arthroplasty was used as endpoints. Seven patients were lost to follow-up (15.9%). The patients who participated in this study showed significant clinical improvement after surgery (mean [±SD] at baseline, 2 years, and 5 years: 56.2 ± 21.6, 24.6 ± 22.7, and 19.3 ± 26.9, respectively [VAS]; 206.5 ± 79.7, 329.8 ± 108.9, and 333.6 ± 112.2, respectively [total KOOS]). MRI of the scaffolds showed a smaller sized implant when compared with the native meniscus with an irregular surface at 2- and 5-year follow-up. A stable cartilage status of the index compartment at 5-year follow-up was demonstrated in 46.7% of patients compared with the baseline status. During the follow-up period, 62.2% of the implants survived. At final follow-up, 66.7% of the medial scaffolds were still functioning versus 53.8% of the lateral scaffolds. A polyurethane meniscal implant can

  18. PCL tibial avulsion with an associated medial meniscal tear in a child: a case report on diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries from tibial avulsions are rare in the paediatric setting. One would need a high index of suspicion as clinical examination may be difficult, especially in the early period. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent diagnostic modality for this condition and other associated injuries within the knee. We report a rare case in which the patient had a PCL avulsion off the tibial insertion site with an associated posterior horn medial meniscal tear off the posterior capsule. He was treated through open reduction and internal fixation of the avulsed fragment with suture repair of the meniscal tear. We emphasize the importance of diagnosing and managing associated intra-articular injuries when dealing with the rare condition of PCL tibial avulsion in the paediatric setting.

  19. Joint line tenderness and McMurray tests for the detection of meniscal lesions: what is their real diagnostic value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Marco; Ciriello, Vincenzo; Menghi, Amerigo; Aulisa, Angelo G; Rabini, Alessia; Marzetti, Emanuele

    2013-06-01

    To assess the interobserver concordance of the joint line tenderness (JLT) and McMurray tests, and to determine their diagnostic efficiency for the detection of meniscal lesions. Prospective observational study. Orthopedics outpatient clinic, university hospital. Patients (N=60) with suspected nonacute meniscal lesions who underwent knee arthroscopy. Not applicable. Patients were examined by 3 independent observers with graded levels of experience (>10y, 3y, and 4mo of practice). The interobserver concordance was assessed by Cohen-Fleiss κ statistics. Accuracy, negative and positive predictive values for prevalence 10% to 90%, positive (LR+) and negative (LR-) likelihood ratios, and the Bayesian posttest probability with a positive or negative result were also determined. The diagnostic value of the 2 tests combined was assessed by logistic regression. Arthroscopy was used as the reference test. No interobserver concordance was determined for the JLT. The McMurray test showed higher interobserver concordance, which improved when judgments by the less experienced examiner were discarded. The whole series studied by the "best" examiner (experienced orthopedist) provided the following values: (1) JLT: sensitivity, 62.9%; specificity, 50%; LR+, 1.26; LR-, .74; (2) McMurray: sensitivity, 34.3%; specificity, 86.4%; LR+, 2.52; LR-, .76. The combination of the 2 tests did not offer advantages over the McMurray alone. The JLT alone is of little clinical usefulness. A negative McMurray test does not modify the pretest probability of a meniscal lesion, while a positive result has a fair predictive value. Hence, in a patient with a suspected meniscal lesion, a positive McMurray test indicates that arthroscopy should be performed. In case of a negative result, further examinations, including imaging, are needed. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Wing P.; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yue-Cune; Ho, Wei-Pin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  1. Radiographic joint space narrowing in osteoarthritis of the knee: relationship to meniscal tears and duration of pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wing P. [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Huang, Guo-Shu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Hsu, Shu-Mei [Taipei Medical University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Public Health, Taipei (China); Chang, Yue-Cune [Tamkang University, Department of Mathematics, Taipei County (China); Ho, Wei-Pin [Taipei Medical University-Wan Fang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Taipei (China)

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study was to assess, with knee radiography, joint space narrowing (JSN) and its relationship to meniscal tears, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures, articular cartilage erosion, and duration of pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A total of 140 patients who had knee osteoarthritis and underwent primary total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, with unicompartmental medial tibiofemoral JSN (grade 1 or greater) and normal lateral compartments, were recruited. Polytomous logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between JSN and risk factors. All patients with JSN were categorized as grade 1 (n=14, 10.0%), grade 2 (n=64, 45.7%), or grade 3 (n=62, 44.3%). Women presented with indications for a TKR at a younger age than men (mean age, 69 vs 73 years, P<0.05). There were 123 (87.9%) meniscal tears and 58 (41.4%) partial (insufficient or attenuated ACL fibers) and 10 (7.1%) complete ACL ruptures; 115 of 134 (85.8%) patients had moderate to severe cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN was correlated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears [odds ratio (OR) 6.00, 95% CI 1.29-27.96 for grade 2 vs grade 1 JSN] and duration of knee pain (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.53 for grade 3 vs grade 1 JSN). A higher grade of JSN was not correlated with a higher frequency of ACL rupture or articular cartilage erosion. A higher grade of JSN is associated with a higher frequency of meniscal tears and long duration of knee pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  2. Three Tesla MRI for the diagnosis of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament pathology: a comparison to arthroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, M.J.; Jackson, M.P.; Moran, C.J.; Moran, R.; Eustace, S.J.; Shine, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Materials and methods: Sixty-one consecutive patients were identified who were referred for evaluation of suspected intra-articular pathology with a 3 T MRI and who, subsequently, underwent an arthroscopic procedure of the knee were included for the study. Two musculoskeletal radiologists interpreted the images. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were then calculated for the MRI versus the arthroscopic findings as a reference standard. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the overall detection of meniscal tears in this study was 84 and 93%, respectively. The results for the medial meniscus separately were 91 and 93% and for the lateral 77 and 93%. The evaluation of ACL integrity was 100% sensitive and specific. The meniscal tear type was correctly identified in 75% of cases and its location in 94%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates good results of 3 T MRI in the evaluation of the injured knee. Caution should still be given to the interpretation on MRI of a lateral meniscus tear, and it is suggested that the standard diagnostic criteria of high signal reaching the articular surface on two consecutive image sections be adhered to even at these higher field strengths

  3. Fibrochondrogenic potential of synoviocytes from osteoarthritic and normal joints cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds for meniscal tissue engineering in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Warnock

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are a common cause of stifle lameness in dogs. Use of autologous synoviocytes from the affected stifle is an attractive cell source for tissue engineering replacement fibrocartilage. However, the diseased state of these cells may impede in vitro fibrocartilage formation. Synoviocytes from 12 osteoarthritic (“oaTSB” and 6 normal joints (“nTSB” were cultured as tensioned bioscaffolds and compared for their ability to synthesize fibrocartilage sheets. Gene expression of collagens type I and II were higher and expression of interleukin-6 was lower in oaTSB versus nTSB. Compared with nTSB, oaTSB had more glycosaminoglycan and alpha smooth muscle staining and less collagen I and II staining on histologic analysis, whereas collagen and glycosaminoglycan quantities were similar. In conclusion, osteoarthritic joint—origin synoviocytes can produce extracellular matrix components of meniscal fibrocartilage at similar levels to normal joint—origin synoviocytes, which makes them a potential cell source for canine meniscal tissue engineering.

  4. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath enhances fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in a large harvest site defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Yasuda, Kazunori; Kondo, Eiji; Katsura, Taro; Tanabe, Yoshie; Kimura, Masashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2010-04-01

    Concerning meniscal tissue regeneration, many investigators have studied the development of a tissue-engineered meniscus. However, the utility still remains unknown. Implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect may significantly enhance fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect. Controlled laboratory study. Seventy-five mature rabbits were used in this study. In each animal, an anterior one-third of the right medial meniscus was resected. Then, the animals were divided into the following 3 groups of 25 rabbits each: In group 1, no treatment was applied to the meniscal defect. In group 2, the defect was covered with a fascia sheath. In group 3, after the resected meniscus was fragmented into small pieces, the fragments were grafted into the defect. Then, the defect with the meniscal fragments was covered with a fascia sheath. In each group, 5 rabbits were used for histological evaluation at 3, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery, and 5 rabbits were used for biomechanical evaluation at 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Histologically, large round cells in group 3 were scattered in the core portion of the meniscus-shaped tissue, and the matrix around these cells was positively stained by safranin O and toluisin blue at 12 weeks. The histological score of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 and group 2. Biomechanically, the maximal load and stiffness of group 3 were significantly greater than those of groups 1 and 2. This study clearly demonstrated that implantation of autogenous meniscal fragments wrapped with a fascia sheath into the donor site meniscal defect significantly enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration in vivo in the defect at 12 weeks after implantation in the rabbit. This study proposed a novel strategy to treat a large defect after a meniscectomy.

  5. Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Does Not Prevent or Delay Progression of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Van Der Straeten

    Full Text Available Meniscal tears are common knee injuries. Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT has been advocated to alleviate symptoms and delay osteoarthritis (OA after meniscectomy. We investigated (1 the long-term outcome of MAT as a treatment of symptomatic meniscectomy, (2 most important factors affecting survivorship and (3 OA progression.From 1989 till 2013, 329 MAT were performed in 313 patients. Clinical and radiographic results and MAT survival were evaluated retrospectively. Failure was defined as conversion to knee arthroplasty (KA or total removal of the MAT.Mean age at surgery was 33 years (15-57; 60% were males. No-to-mild cartilage damage was found in 156 cases, moderate-to-severe damage in 130. Simultaneous procedures in 118 patients included cartilage procedures, osteotomy or ACL-reconstruction. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (0.2-24.3years, 5 patients were deceased and 48 lost (14.6%, 186 MAT were in situ (56.5% whilst 90 (27.4% had been removed, including 63 converted to a KA (19.2%. Cumulative allograft survivorship was 15.1% (95% CI:13.9-16.3 at 24.0 years. In patients <35 years at surgery, survival was significantly better (24.1% compared to ≥35 years (8.0% (p = 0.017. In knees with no-to-mild cartilage damage more allografts survived (43.0% compared to moderate-to-severe damage (6.6% (p = 0.003. Simultaneous osteotomy significantly deteriorated survival (0% at 24.0 years (p = 0.010. 61% of patients underwent at least one additional surgery (1-11 for clinical symptoms after MAT. Consecutive radiographs showed significant OA progression at a mean of 3.8 years (p<0.0001. Incremental Kellgren-Lawrence grade was +1,1 grade per 1000 days (2,7yrs.MAT did not delay or prevent tibiofemoral OA progression. 19.2% were converted to a knee prosthesis at a mean of 10.3 years. Patients younger than 35 with no-to-mild cartilage damage may benefit from MAT for relief of symptoms (survivorship 51.9% at 20.2 years, but patients and healthcare payers

  6. Effect of radial meniscal tear on in situ forces of meniscus and tibiofemoral relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Yuta; Mae, Tatsuo; Fujie, Hiromichi; Shino, Konsei; Ohori, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-02-01

    To clarify the effect of the radial tear of the lateral meniscus on the in situ meniscus force and the tibiofemoral relationship under axial loads and valgus torques. Ten intact porcine knees were settled to a 6-degree of freedom robotic system, while the force and 3-dimensional path of the knees were recorded via Universal Force Sensor (UFS) during 3 cycles of 250-N axial load and 5-Nm valgus torque at 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° of knee flexion. The same examination was performed on the following 3 meniscal states sequentially; 33, 66, and 100% width of radial tears at the middle segment of the lateral meniscus, while recording the force and path of the knees via UFS. Finally, all paths were reproduced after total lateral meniscectomy and the in situ force of the lateral meniscus were calculated with the principle of superposition. The radial tear of 100% width significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused tibial medial shift and valgus rotation at 30°-60° of knee flexion in both testing protocols. Under a 250-N axial load at 60° of knee flexion, the in situ force decreased to 36 ± 29 N with 100% width of radial tear, which was 122 ± 38 N in the intact state. Additionally, the tibia shifted medially by 2.1 ± 0.9 mm and valgusrotated by 2.5 ± 1.9° with the complete radial tear. However, the radial tear of 33 or 66% width had little effect on either the in situ force or the tibial position. A radial tear of 100% width involving the rim significantly decreased the in situ force of the lateral meniscus and caused medial shift and valgus rotation of the tibia, whereas a radial tear of up to 66% width produced only little change. The clinical relevance is that loss of meniscal functions due to complete radial tear can lead to abnormal stress concentration in a focal area of cartilage and can increase the risk of osteoarthritis in the future.

  7. Risk factors, diagnosis and non-surgical treatment for meniscal tears: evidence and recommendations: a statement paper commissioned by the Danish Society of Sports Physical Therapy (DSSF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Ingelsrud, Lina Holm; Skou, Søren Thorgaard

    2018-05-01

    This statement aimed at summarising and appraising the available evidence for risk factors, diagnostic tools and non-surgical treatments for patients with meniscal tears. We systematically searched electronic databases using a pragmatic search strategy approach. Included studies were synthesised quantitatively or qualitatively, as appropriate. Strength of evidence was determined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation framework. Low-quality evidence suggested that overweight (degenerative tears, k=3), male sex (k=4), contact and pivoting sports (k=2), and frequent occupational kneeling/squatting (k=3) were risk factors for meniscal tears. There was low to moderate quality evidence for low to high positive and negative predictive values, depending on the underlying prevalence of meniscal tears for four common diagnostic tests (k=15, n=2474). Seven trials investigated exercise versus surgery (k=2) or the effect of surgery in addition to exercise (k=5) for degenerative meniscal tears. There was moderate level of evidence for exercise improving self-reported pain (Effect Size (ES)-0.51, 95% CI -1.16 to 0.13) and function (ES -0.06, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.11) to the same extent as surgery, and improving muscle strength to a greater extent than surgery (ES -0.45, 95% CI -0.62 to -0.29). High-quality evidence showed no clinically relevant effect of surgery in addition to exercise on pain (ES 0.18, 95% 0.05 to 0.32) and function (ES, 0.13 95% CI -0.03 to 0.28) for patients with degenerative meniscal tears. No randomised trials comparing non-surgical treatments with surgery in patients younger than 40 years of age or patients with traumatic meniscal tears were identified. Diagnosis of meniscal tears is challenging as all clinical diagnostic tests have high risk of misclassification. Exercise therapy should be recommended as the treatment of choice for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal lesions. Evidence on

  8. Evaluation of changes in vertical ground reaction forces as indicators of meniscal damage after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumble, Troy N; Billinghurst, R Clark; Bendele, Alison M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether decreases in peak vertical force of the hind limb after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) would be indicative of medial meniscal damage in dogs. 39 purpose-bred adult male Walker Hounds. The right CrCL was transected arthroscopically. Force plate measurements of the right hind limb were made prior to and 2, 4, 10, and 18 weeks after transection of the CrCL. Only dogs with > or =10% decreases in peak vertical force after week 2 were considered to have potential meniscal damage. Dogs that did not have > or =10% decreases in peak vertical force at any time point after week 2 were assigned to group 1. Group 2 dogs had > or =10% decreases in peak vertical force from weeks 2 to 4 only. Group 3 and 4 dogs had > or =10% decreases in peak vertical force from weeks 4 to 10 only or from weeks 10 to 18 only, respectively. Damage to menisci and articular cartilage was graded at week 18, and grades for groups 2 to 4 were compared with those of group 1. The percentage change in peak vertical force and impulse area was significantly different in groups 2 (n = 4), 3 (4), and 4 (4) at the end of each measurement period (weeks 4, 10, and 18, respectively) than in group 1 (27). The meniscal grade for groups 2 to 4 was significantly higher than for group 1. A > or =10% decrease in peak vertical force had sensitivity of 52% and accuracy of 72% for identifying dogs with moderate to severe medial meniscal damage. In dogs with transected or ruptured CrCLs, force plate analysis can detect acute exacerbation of lameness, which may be the result of secondary meniscal damage, and provide an objective noninvasive technique that delineates the temporal pattern of medial meniscal injury.

  9. Patient-reported outcome measures for patients with meniscal tears: a systematic review of measurement properties and evaluation with the COSMIN checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Robert; Beard, David J; Price, Andrew J; Hopewell, Sally

    2017-01-01

    Objective Meniscal tears occur frequently in the population and the most common surgical treatment, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, is performed in approximately two million cases worldwide each year. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarise and critically appraise the evidence for the use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in patients with meniscal tears. Design A systematic review was undertaken. Data on reported measurement properties were extracted and the quality of the studies appraised according to Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments. Data sources A search of MEDLINE, Embase, AMED and PsycINFO, unlimited by language or publication date (last search 20 February 2017). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Development and validation studies reporting the measurement properties of PROMs in patients with meniscal tears were included. Results 11 studies and 10 PROMs were included. The overall quality of studies was poor. For measurement of symptoms and functional status, there is only very limited evidence supporting the selection of either the Lysholm Knee Scale, International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form or the Dutch version of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. For measuring health-related quality of life, only limited evidence supports the selection of the Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET). Of all the PROMs evaluated, WOMET has the strongest evidence for content validity. Conclusion For patients with meniscal tears, there is poor quality and incomplete evidence regarding the validity of the currently available PROMs. Further research is required to ensure these PROMs truly reflect the symptoms, function and quality of life of patients with meniscal tears. PROSPERO registration number CRD42017056847. PMID:29030413

  10. Comparison of gait and pathology outcomes of three meniscal procedures for induction of knee osteoarthritis in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cake, M A; Read, R A; Corfield, G; Daniel, A; Burkhardt, D; Smith, M M; Little, C B

    2013-01-01

    Meniscectomy (MX) of sheep induces a well-established animal model of human osteoarthritis (OA). This study compared the clinical (lameness) and pathological outcomes of unilateral, complete medial MX vs two less traumatic and more easily performed meniscal destabilisation procedures. Four-year old wethers (n = 6/group) underwent sham operation, cranial pole release (CPR), mid-body transection (MBT) or total MX of the medial meniscus. Joints were assessed for gross pathology (cartilage erosion and osteophytes), histomorphometry, two histopathology scoring methods (modified Mankin-type and Pritzker score), and immunohistology for ADAMTS- and MMP-cleaved neoepitopes, at 12 weeks post-op. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) were determined by force plate in a subset (n = 4/group) at baseline, 2.5, 8, and 12 weeks post-op. Gross pathology scores of operated groups differed significantly from sham animals (P osteophyte formation. Similarly, histopathology scores were significantly elevated vs sham but did not differ between operated groups at P subchondral sclerosis, suggesting some residual biomechanical effect from the destabilised but intact meniscus. Few significant differences were noted between operated groups in force plate analyses, though gait abnormalities appeared to be least in CPR sheep, and most persistent (>12 weeks) in MBT animals. The well-validated ovine MX model and the simpler meniscal destabilisation procedures resulted in broadly similar joint pathology and lameness. Meniscal CPR or MBT, as easier and more clinically relevant procedures, may represent preferred models for the induction of OA and evaluation of potential disease-modifying therapies. Copyright © 2012 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronal oblique imaging of the knee: Can it increase radiologists' confidence in diagnosing posterior root meniscal tears?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagranda, B.U.; Leeman, J.; Costello, J.M.; Rafiee, B.; Harner, C.D.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the utility of the coronal oblique sequence in the interrogation of posterior root meniscal lesions. Materials and methods: Following international review board approval, 62 consecutive knee arthroscopy cases were referred to the musculoskeletal (MSK) radiologists from the same orthopaedic surgeon for imaging/surgical correlation of the posterior meniscal roots. Of 62 cases, 45 lateral and 46 medial menisci met the inclusion criteria. Imaging evaluation was performed with standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, including a coronal oblique proton density sequence. Two blinded fellowship-trained MSK radiologists independently evaluated the menisci on standard sequences indicating whether a tear was identified and then specifying a confidence score using a scale of 1–3 on each study interpreted. Immediately thereafter, the coronal oblique sequence was evaluated using the same method. Statistics were performed on meniscal lesions involving the posterior horn/root junction or isolated root tears comparing confidence scores. Results: Reader A identified nine posterior horn/root junction tears and 14 isolated root tears. Following the addition of the coronal oblique sequence, confidence scores increased in three of 14 (21.4%) isolated root tears. All three final reads were concordant with arthroscopy. Reader B identified 10 posterior horn/root junction tears and 19 isolated root tears. The confidence score increased in six cases: five of 19 (26.3%) isolated root tears and one of 10 (10%) posterior horn/root junction tears. All six final reads were concordant with arthroscopy. Kappa coefficients indicated near perfect agreement. Conclusion: The coronal oblique sequence increased reader confidence in nearly 24% of the posterior root cases identified in this series

  12. Association of weight change with progression of meniscal intrasubstance degeneration over 48 months. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao Guimaraes, Julio [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); DASA Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Liu, Felix [University of California, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schwaiger, Benedikt J.; Gersing, Alexandra S.; Facchetti, Luca; Bucknor, Matthew D.; Chanchek, Nattagan; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group (MQIR), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2018-03-15

    To investigate the association of weight change over 48 months with progression of meniscal intrasubstance degeneration (MID). We studied 487 subjects with MID at baseline and after 48 months using 3-T MRI with the same protocol (FSE sequences with and without fat suppression). These participants lost weight (≥3%, n = 141), had moderate weight gain (3-10%, n = 77), substantial weight gain (>10%, n = 15) or maintained stable weight (n = 254). Progression of MID to a meniscal tear was assessed using the WORMS grading system and compared among weight change groups using logistic regression. ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to study the differences in subjects' characteristics. Progression of MID increased from weight loss to substantial weight gain (p < 0.001) and was significantly more likely with both moderate weight gain (odds ratio [OR], 4.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4-8.9) and substantial weight gain (OR, 9.5; 95% CI 3.2-28.5) compared to stable weight. Results were similar in both menisci for moderate weight gain (medial: OR, 6.8; 95% CI 3.5-11.3; lateral: OR, 2.6; 95% CI 1.1-6.6) and substantial weight gain (medial: OR, 21.0; 95% CI 5.1-80.7; lateral: OR, 9.7; 95% CI 0.95-100.2). Weight gain is associated with an increased likelihood that meniscal intrasubstance degeneration will progress with the risk increasing with greater weight gain. (orig.)

  13. MR imaging of the knee following cruciate ligament reconstruction and meniscal surgery; MRT des Kniegelenks nach Kreuzband- und Meniskusoperationen

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    Woertler, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2009-03-15

    Due to the increasing number of surgical procedures performed on the knee, MR imaging of the postoperative knee has gained more and more importance. For the evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament grafts and postoperative menisci, basic knowledge of surgical techniques is essential in order to differentiate normal postoperative findings from transplant failure, retears, and complications. This article reviews technical aspects of MR imaging following knee surgery, basic principles of operative techniques for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and therapy of meniscal tears, normal postoperative findings, MR imaging criteria for recurrent lesions, and findings with typical complications. (orig.)

  14. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

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    Lance, Valentin; Heilmeier, Ursula R.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, Benjamin [University of California, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, San Francisco (United States)

    2014-11-16

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging characteristics and clinical symptoms related to displaced meniscal flap tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lance, Valentin; Heilmeier, Ursula R.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M.; Ma, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to analyze the flap tear location, direction of displacement and size on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, (2) to describe associated knee abnormalities including presence of effusion, synovitis, bone marrow edema pattern or ligamentous tear, and (3) to assess clinical findings found with flap tears, including the pain score, and determine differences between operative and nonoperative groups. A retrospective radiology database search over the last 3 years identified 238 patients with flap tears, of which ultimately 58 with isolated flap tears were included after exclusion of patients with other significant knee internal derangement, severe degenerative change or prior surgery. MR studies of the knee were analyzed by two radiologists. Imaging characteristics were correlated with associated knee abnormalities and clinical findings. Statistical analysis employed linear and logistic regression models. Inter- and intrareader reliability was calculated. The medial meniscus was the most common site of flap tears (52/60, 87 %), with inferior displacement (47/60, 78 %). The degree of tibial cartilage loss had a positive correlation with the visual analog pain scale (p = 0.03). Patients who underwent arthroscopy were younger than those who did not (p = 0.01) and more likely to have a positive clinical McMurray test (p = 0.01). Medially and inferiorly displaced flap tears are the most common tear pattern. Those undergoing arthroscopy are more likely to have positive meniscal signs on clinical examination. A greater degree of cartilage loss involving the tibia on MR imaging was associated with increasing visual analog pain scores. (orig.)

  16. IL-10 ameliorates TNF-α induced meniscus degeneration in mature meniscal tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, P; Häfelein, K; Preusse-Prange, A; Bayer, A; Seekamp, A; Kurz, B

    2017-05-16

    Joint inflammation causes meniscus degeneration and can exacerbate post-traumatic meniscus injuries by extracellular matrix degradation, cellular de-differentiation and cell death. The aim of this study was to examine whether anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 exerts protective effects in an in vitro model of TNF-α-induced meniscus degeneration. Meniscus tissue was harvested from the knees of adult cows. After 24 h of equilibrium explants were simultaneously treated with bovine TNF-α and IL-10. After an incubation time of 72 h cell death was measured histomorphometrically (nuclear blebbing, NB) and release of glycosaminoglycans (GAG, DMMB assay) and nitric oxide (NO, Griess-reagent) were analysed. Transcription levels (mRNA) of matrix degrading enzymes, collagen type X (COL10A1) and nitric oxide synthetase 2 (NOS2) were measured by quantitative real time PCR. TNF-α-dependent formation of the aggrecanase-specific aggrecan neoepitope NITEGE was visualised by immunostaining. Differences between groups were calculated using a one-way ANOVA with a Bonferroni post hoc test. Administration of IL-10 significantly prevented the TNF-α-related cell death (P .001), release of NO (P .003) and NOS2 expression (P .04). Release of GAG fragments (P .001), NITEGE formation and expression of MMP3 (P .007), -13 (P .02) and ADAMTS4 (P .001) were significantly reduced. The TNF-α-dependent increase in COL10A1 expression was also antagonized by IL-10 (P .02). IL-10 prevented crucial mechanisms of meniscal degeneration induced by a key cytokine of OA, TNF-α. Administration of IL-10 might improve the biological regeneration and provide a treatment approach in degenerative meniscus injuries and in conditions of post-traumatic sports injuries.

  17. T1-weighted vs. short-TE-long-TR images. Usefulness for knee MR examinations of ligament and meniscal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Hideho; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Shiotani, Seiji [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare short-TE-long-TR images with T1-weighed images in knee MR examinations. Sagittal MR images of the knee were obtained in 31 patients with knee pain. T1-weighted images were obtained by the spin-echo technique (TR/TE =350/15), and short-TE-long-TR images by fast spin-echo (TR/TE =1300/15) with an echo-train length of 5. Contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) of the anterior cruciate ligament and synovial space, meniscus and articular cartilage, and meniscal lesion and normal meniscus were compared between short-TE-long-TR images and T1-weighted images. On each of the three examinations, short-TE-long-TR images provided significantly higher CNRs than T1-weighted images. It was concluded that short-TE-long-TR images can be a useful alternative to T1-weighted images in evaluating the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal lesions. (author)

  18. Anterolateral ligament abnormalities in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture are associated with lateral meniscal and osseous injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Smet, Eline de; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Clockaerts, Stefan [University College Hospitals, Department of Orthopaedics, London (United Kingdom); Vanhoenacker, Filip M. [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium); Lambrecht, Valerie [Ghent University Hospital and University of Ghent, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Kristien [Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Department of Biostatistics, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the frequency of anterolateral ligament (ALL) injury in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and to analyse its associated injury patterns. Ninety patients with acute ACL rupture for which MRI was obtained within 8 weeks after the initial trauma were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists assessed the status of the ALL on MRI by consensus. The presence or absence of an ALL abnormality was compared with the existence of medial and lateral meniscal tears diagnosed during arthroscopy. Associated collateral ligament and osseous injuries were documented with MRI. Forty-one of 90 knees (46 %) demonstrated ALL abnormalities on MRI. Of 49 knees with intact ALL, 15 (31 %) had a torn lateral meniscus as compared to 25 torn lateral menisci in 41 knees (61 %) with abnormal ALL (p = 0.008). Collateral ligament (p ≤ 0.05) and osseous injuries (p = 0.0037) were more frequent and severe in ALL-injured as compared with ALL-intact knees. ALL injuries are fairly common in patients with acute ACL rupture and are statistically significantly associated with lateral meniscal, collateral ligament and osseous injuries. (orig.)

  19. T1-weighted vs. short-TE-long-TR images. Usefulness for knee MR examinations of ligament and meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Hideho; Wada, Mitsuyoshi; Shiotani, Seiji; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare short-TE-long-TR images with T1-weighed images in knee MR examinations. Sagittal MR images of the knee were obtained in 31 patients with knee pain. T1-weighted images were obtained by the spin-echo technique (TR/TE =350/15), and short-TE-long-TR images by fast spin-echo (TR/TE =1300/15) with an echo-train length of 5. Contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) of the anterior cruciate ligament and synovial space, meniscus and articular cartilage, and meniscal lesion and normal meniscus were compared between short-TE-long-TR images and T1-weighted images. On each of the three examinations, short-TE-long-TR images provided significantly higher CNRs than T1-weighted images. It was concluded that short-TE-long-TR images can be a useful alternative to T1-weighted images in evaluating the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal lesions. (author)

  20. The contribution of 3D quantitative meniscal and cartilage measures to variation in normal radiographic joint space width—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Melanie; Wirth, Wolfgang; Emmanuel, Katja; Culvenor, Adam G.; Eckstein, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore to what extent three-dimensional measures of the meniscus and femorotibial cartilage explain the variation in medial and lateral femorotibial radiographic joint space width (JSW), in healthy men and women. Methods: The right knees of 87 Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference participants (no symptoms, radiographic signs or risk factors of osteoarthritis; 37 men, 50 women; age 55.0 ± 7.6; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) were assessed. Quantitative measures of subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness and meniscal position and morphology were computed from segmented magnetic resonance images. Minimal and medial/lateral fixed-location JSW were determined from fixed-flexion radiographs. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the contribution of demographic, cartilage and meniscal parameters to JSW in healthy subjects. Results: The correlation with (medial) minimal JSW was somewhat stronger for cartilage thickness (0.54 ≤ r ≤ 0.67) than for meniscal (−0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.50) or demographic measures (−0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.48), in particular in men. In women, in contrast, the strength of the correlations of cartilage thickness and meniscal measures with minimal JSW were in the same range. Fixed-location JSW measures showed stronger correlations with cartilage thickness (r ≥ 0.68 medially; r ≥ 0.59 laterally) than with meniscal measures (r ≤ |0.32| medially; r ≤ |0.32| laterally). Stepwise regression models revealed that meniscal measures added significant independent information to the total variance explained in minimal JSW (adjusted multiple r 2 = 58%) but not in medial or lateral fixed-location JSW (r 2 = 60/51%, respectively). Conclusions: In healthy subjects, minimal JSW was observed to reflect a combination of cartilage and meniscal measures, particularly in women. Fixed-location JSW, in contrast, was found to be dominated by variance in cartilage thickness in both men and women, with somewhat higher correlations between

  1. The contribution of 3D quantitative meniscal and cartilage measures to variation in normal radiographic joint space width—Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.roth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Wirth, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.wirth@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404, Ainring (Germany); Emmanuel, Katja, E-mail: katja.emmanuel@icloud.com [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Paracelsus Medical University, Müllner Hauptstraße 48, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Culvenor, Adam G., E-mail: adam.culvenor@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Plenty Road, Bundoora, 3086, Victoria (Australia); Eckstein, Felix, E-mail: felix.eckstein@pmu.ac.at [Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg & Nuremberg, Strubergasse 21, 5020, Salzburg (Austria); Chondrometrics GmbH, Ulrichshöglerstrasse 23, 83404, Ainring (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Objective: To explore to what extent three-dimensional measures of the meniscus and femorotibial cartilage explain the variation in medial and lateral femorotibial radiographic joint space width (JSW), in healthy men and women. Methods: The right knees of 87 Osteoarthritis Initiative healthy reference participants (no symptoms, radiographic signs or risk factors of osteoarthritis; 37 men, 50 women; age 55.0 ± 7.6; BMI 24.4 ± 3.1) were assessed. Quantitative measures of subregional femorotibial cartilage thickness and meniscal position and morphology were computed from segmented magnetic resonance images. Minimal and medial/lateral fixed-location JSW were determined from fixed-flexion radiographs. Correlation and regression analyses were used to explore the contribution of demographic, cartilage and meniscal parameters to JSW in healthy subjects. Results: The correlation with (medial) minimal JSW was somewhat stronger for cartilage thickness (0.54 ≤ r ≤ 0.67) than for meniscal (−0.31 ≤ r ≤ 0.50) or demographic measures (−0.15 ≤ r ≤ 0.48), in particular in men. In women, in contrast, the strength of the correlations of cartilage thickness and meniscal measures with minimal JSW were in the same range. Fixed-location JSW measures showed stronger correlations with cartilage thickness (r ≥ 0.68 medially; r ≥ 0.59 laterally) than with meniscal measures (r ≤ |0.32| medially; r ≤ |0.32| laterally). Stepwise regression models revealed that meniscal measures added significant independent information to the total variance explained in minimal JSW (adjusted multiple r{sup 2} = 58%) but not in medial or lateral fixed-location JSW (r{sup 2} = 60/51%, respectively). Conclusions: In healthy subjects, minimal JSW was observed to reflect a combination of cartilage and meniscal measures, particularly in women. Fixed-location JSW, in contrast, was found to be dominated by variance in cartilage thickness in both men and women, with somewhat higher correlations

  2. Oxygen tension is a determinant of the matrix-forming phenotype of cultured human meniscal fibrochondrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola B Adesida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Meniscal cartilage displays a poor repair capacity, especially when injury is located in the avascular region of the tissue. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies to generate functional meniscus substitutes is a promising approach to treat meniscus injuries. Meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFC can be used in this approach. However, MFC are unable to retain their phenotype when expanded in culture. In this study, we explored the effect of oxygen tension on MFC expansion and on their matrix-forming phenotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MFC were isolated from human menisci followed by basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 mediated cell expansion in monolayer culture under normoxia (21%O(2 or hypoxia (3%O(2. Normoxia and hypoxia expanded MFC were seeded on to a collagen scaffold. The MFC seeded scaffolds (constructs were cultured in a serum free chondrogenic medium for 3 weeks under normoxia and hypoxia. Constructs containing normoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under normoxia while those formed from hypoxia-expanded MFC were subsequently cultured under hypoxia. After 3 weeks of in vitro culture, the constructs were assessed biochemically, histologically and for gene expression via real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays. The results showed that constructs under normoxia produced a matrix with enhanced mRNA ratio (3.5-fold higher; p<0.001 of collagen type II to I. This was confirmed by enhanced deposition of collagen II using immuno-histochemistry. Furthermore, the constructs under hypoxia produced a matrix with higher mRNA ratio of aggrecan to versican (3.5-fold, p<0.05. However, both constructs had the same capacity to produce a glycosaminoglycan (GAG -specific extracellular matrix. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide evidence that oxygen tension is a key player in determining the matrix phenotype of cultured MFC. These findings suggest that the use of normal and low oxygen tension during MFC expansion and subsequent neo

  3. Development and Characterization of UHMWPE Fiber-Reinforced Hydrogels For Meniscal Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Julianne Leigh

    Meniscal tears are the most common orthopedic injuries to the human body. The current treatment of choice, however, is a partial meniscectomy that leads to osteoarthritis proportional to the amount of tissue removed. As a result, there is a significant clinical need to develop materials capable of restoring the biomechanical contact stress distribution to the knee after meniscectomy and preventing the onset of osteoarthritis. In this work, a fiber-reinforced hydrogel-based synthetic meniscus was developed that allows for tailoring of the mechanical properties and molding of the implant to match the size, shape, and property distribution of the native tissue. Physically cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels were reinforced with ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fibers and characterized in compression (0.1-0.8 MPa) and tension (0.1-250 MPa) showing fine control over mechanical properties within the range of the human meniscus. Morphology and crystallinity analysis of PVA hydrogels showed increases in crystallinity and PVA densification, or phase separation, with freeze-thaw cycles. A comparison of freeze-thawed and aged, physically cross-linked hydrogels provided insight on both crystallinity and phase separation as mechanisms for PVA gelation. Results indicated both mechanisms independently contributed to hydrogel modulus for freeze-thawed hydrogels. In vitro swelling studies were performed using osmotic solutions to replicate the swelling pressure present in the knee. Minimal swelling was observed for hydrogels with a PVA concentration of 30-35 wt%, independently of hydrogel freeze-thaw cycles. This allows for independent tailoring of hydrogel modulus and pore structure using freeze-thaw cycles and swelling behavior using polymer concentration to match a wide range of properties needed for various soft tissue applications. The UHMWPE-PVA interface was identified as a significant weakness. To improve interfacial adhesion, a novel

  4. Establishment of novel meniscal scaffold structures using polyglycolic and poly-l-lactic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomohiko; Otsuki, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Okamoto, Yoshinori; Inoue, Tae; Sakamoto, Yuki; Sato, Hideki; Neo, Masashi

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate various types of meniscus scaffolds that mimic the meniscus structure, and to establish a novel cell-free meniscus scaffold with polyglycolic acid or poly-l-lactic acid. Four types of scaffolds were implanted into Japanese white rabbits: poly-l-lactic acid sponge poly-l-lactic acid, PGA-coated PLLA sponge, PGA lamination, and film-coated PGA lamination. Samples were harvested at 8 and 12 weeks after implantation, and a compression stress test was performed. The meniscus size and Ishida scores were evaluated for regenerated tissue. Immunohistochemistry was analyzed by anti-type I, II and X collagen antibodies to investigate the structure of the regenerated tissue, and by anti-iNOS antibody to investigate the inflammatory tissue of the meniscus. The cell nuclei of lymphocytes and foreign body multinucleated giant cells were counted in hematoxylin and eosin staining. Modified Mankin scores for cartilage degeneration were used for assessment after Safranin-O/Fast Green staining. The biomechanical test showed that l- and film-coated PGA lamination exhibited greater strength than s- and PGA-coated PLLA sponge. At 12 weeks, the size of meniscus and the Ishida score in implanted film-coated PGA lamination were improved significantly compared with the defect groups. The type II collagen staining intensity in the PGA lamination lamination is significantly higher than the defect at eight weeks. The staining intensity of iNOS and number of lymphocytes significantly increased in sponge poly-l-lactic acid at eight weeks, and increased in p-PLLA at 12 weeks. Foreign body multinucleated giant cells in implantation groups appeared, especially at eight weeks. The Mankin score for film-coated PGA lamination was significantly lower than for the defect at 12 weeks. Novel meniscal scaffolds especially PGA should possess not only biological but also biomechanical functions. In conclusions, film-coated PGA lamination was the beneficial property

  5. Value of Fat-Suppressed Proton-Density-Weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences in Detecting Meniscal Lesions: Comparison with Arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Schaefer, P.J.; Brossmann, J.; Frahm, C.; Hilgert, R.E.; Heller, M.; Jahnke, T.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate fat-suppressed (FS) proton-density-weighted (PDw) turbo spin-echo (TSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal lesions. Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 31 knee joints were imaged on a 1.5T MR scanner before arthroscopy using the following sequences: (a) coronal and sagittal FS-PDw TSE (TR/TE: 4009/15 ms); (b) coronal T1w SE (TR/TE: 722/20 ms), and sagittal PDw TSE (TR/TE: 3800/15 ms). Other imaging parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, FOV 160 mm, matrix 256x256. A total of 186 meniscal regions (62 menisci; anterior horn, body, posterior horn) were evaluated. Standard of reference was arthroscopy. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (npv), positive predictive value (ppv), and accuracy were calculated. Results: Arthroscopically, meniscal lesions were detected in 55/186 segments (35 medial and 20 lateral meniscal lesions). Sensitivity, specificity, npv, ppv, and accuracy for combination of coronal and sagittal FS PDw TSE were 91.4%, 98.3%, 95%, 97%, and 93.5% for the medial meniscus, and 90%, 98.6%, 97.3%, 94.7%, and 96.8% for the lateral. The results were comparable to the combination of coronal T1w SE and sagittal PDw TSE for the medial (88.6%, 98.3%, 93.4%, 96.9%, 91.4%) and the lateral (90%, 95.9%, 97.2%, 85.7%, 92.5%) meniscus. Conclusion: FS PDw TSE-MR sequences are an excellent alternative for the detection of meniscal lesions in comparison with diagnostic arthroscopy

  6. A 12-week supervised exercise therapy program for young adults with a meniscal tear: Program development and feasibility study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T.; Thorlund, Jonas B.

    2018-01-01

    on clinical expertise and available evidence. Six patients (age range 22–39 years) considered eligible for meniscal surgery by an orthopedic surgeon underwent the program. Patients completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and evaluated the program during a semi-structured qualitative...... interview. Feedback from patients was included to finalize the exercise therapy program. Median improvements (Range) in KOOS subscales were 15 (0–33) for Pain, 11 (−11 to 50) for Symptoms, 16 (3–37) for Function in daily living, 23 (10–45) for Function in sport and recreation, and 9 (−6 to 31) for Quality...... of life. The patients found the program relevant and effective with only a few short-lasting adverse events and important clinical improvements after four to ten weeks. Physical therapist supervision was considered important. No patients wanted surgery up to 6 month after the exercise therapy program...

  7. Posterior horn lateral meniscal tears simulating meniscofemoral ligament attachment in the setting of ACL tear: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Lawrence S.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Jamadar, David A.; Caoili, Elaine; Kalume-Brigido, Monica; Wojtys, Edward

    2007-01-01

    We have noted apparent far lateral meniscal attachment of the meniscofemoral ligament (MFL) with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. This study evaluates MFL attachment and association with posterior horn lateral meniscus (PHLM) tear. Nine months of knee arthroscopy reports were reviewed to classify the PHLM and ACL as torn or normal. After excluding those with prior knee surgery, MR images were reviewed by two radiologists to determine the number of images lateral to PCL, which showed the ligaments of Humphrey and Wrisberg visible as structures separate from the PHLM. Any patient with abnormal PHLM surface signal not continuous with the MFL was excluded. MRI findings were compared with arthroscopy using Student's t test and Fisher's exact test. Of the 54 participants, 5 had PHLM tears and 49 were normal. Twenty-one had ACL tears; all those with an PHLM tear had an ACL tear. The ligament of Humphrey inserted on average 0.9 consecutive images lateral to the PCL without an PHLM tear and 4.7 with an PHLM tear; the ligament of Wrisberg inserted on average 3.0 consecutive images without an PHLM tear and 4.5 with an PHLM tear (slice thickness/gap = 3 mm/0.5 mm). There was a significant association between PHLM tear and number of images (p = 0.0028), and between ACL tear and this type of PHLM tear (p = 0.0064). Apparent far lateral meniscal extension of a meniscofemoral ligament (greater than or equal to four images lateral to the PCL) should be considered as a possible PHLM tear, especially in the setting of an ACL tear. (orig.)

  8. Meniscal allograft transplantation. Part 1: systematic review of graft biology, graft shrinkage, graft extrusion, graft sizing, and graft fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Taylor, Dean C; Rill, Brian; Lock, Terrence; Moutzouros, Vasilius; Kolowich, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    To provide a systematic review of the literature regarding five topics in meniscal allograft transplantation: graft biology, shrinkage, extrusion, sizing, and fixation. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed (MEDLINE), ScienceDirect, and EBSCO-CINAHL databases. Articles were classified only in one topic, but information contained could be reported into other topics. Information was classified according to type of study (animal, in vitro human, and in vivo human) and level of evidence (for in vivo human studies). Sixty-two studies were finally included: 30 biology, 3 graft shrinkage, 11 graft extrusion, 17 graft size, and 6 graft fixation (some studies were categorized in more than one topic). These studies corresponded to 22 animal studies, 22 in vitro human studies, and 23 in vivo human studies (7 level II, 10 level III, and 6 level IV). The principal conclusions were as follows: (a) Donor cells decrease after MAT and grafts are repopulated with host cells form synovium; (b) graft preservation alters collagen network (deep freezing) and causes cell apoptosis with loss of viable cells (cryopreservation); (c) graft shrinkage occurs mainly in lyophilized and gamma-irradiated grafts (less with cryopreservation); (d) graft extrusion is common but has no clinical/functional implications; (e) overall, MRI is not superior to plain radiograph for graft sizing; (f) graft width size matching is more important than length size matching; (g) height appears to be the most important factor influencing meniscal size; (h) bone fixation better restores contact mechanics than suture fixation, but there are no differences for pullout strength or functional results; and (i) suture fixation has more risk of graft extrusion compared to bone fixation. Systematic review of level II-IV studies, Level IV.

  9. Analysis of medical service use of knee osteoarthritis and knee meniscal and ligament injuries in Korea: a cross-sectional study of national patient sample data

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Chang Yong; Lee, Yoon Jae; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-riong; Koh, Wonil; Cha, Yun-Yeop; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Hwang, Eui-Hyoung; Suhr, Kristin; Kim, Mia; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) and meniscal and ligament injuries of the knee are the two most common knee disorders in Korea. The aim of this study was to analyze the demographic characteristics, medical service use and related costs for these disorders, and the results are expected to help inform practitioners, researchers, and policy-makers. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate incidence and patient characteristics, and to assess current medical service use, usual care, and medical ...

  10. Comparison of spin echo T1-weighted sequences versus fast spin-echo proton density-weighted sequences for evaluation of meniscal tears at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Andrew B.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Wu, Jim S.; Smart, L.R.; Medvecky, Michael J.; Haims, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    At our institution, fast spin-echo (FSE) proton density (PD) imaging is used to evaluate articular cartilage, while conventional spin-echo (CSE) T1-weighted sequences have been traditionally used to characterize meniscal pathology. We sought to determine if FSE PD-weighted sequences are equivalent to CSE T1-weighted sequences in the detection of meniscal tears, obviating the need to perform both sequences. We retrospectively reviewed the records of knee arthroscopies performed by two arthroscopy-focused surgeons from an academic medical center over a 2-year period. The preoperative MRI images were interpreted independently by two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists who graded the sagittal CSE T1 and FSE PD sequences at different sittings with grades 1-5, where 1 = normal meniscus, 2 = probable normal meniscus, 3 indeterminate, 4 = probable torn meniscus, and 5 = torn meniscus. Each meniscus was divided into an anterior and posterior half, and these halves were graded separately. Operative findings provided the gold standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the two sequences. There were 131 tears in 504 meniscal halves. Using ROC analysis, the reader 1 area under curve for FSE PD was significantly better than CSE T1 (0.939 vs. 0.902, >95% confidence). For reader 2, the difference met good criteria for statistical non-inferiority but not superiority (0.913 for FSE PD and 0.908 for CSE T1; >95% non-inferiority for difference at most of -0.027). FSE PD-weighted sequences, using our institutional protocol, are not inferior to CSE T1-weighted sequences for the detection of meniscal tears and may be superior. (orig.)

  11. Morphologic characterization of meniscal root ligaments in the human knee with magnetic resonance microscopy at 11.7 and 3 T

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    Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Biswas, Reni; DiCamillo, Paul; Statum, Sheronda; Tafur, Monica; Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    To determine the feasibility of using MR microscopy to characterize the root ligaments of the human knee at both ultra-high-field (11.7 T) and high-field (3 T) strengths. Seven fresh cadaveric knees were used for this study. Six specimens were imaged at 11.7 T and one specimen at 3 T using isotropic or near-isotropic voxels. Histologic correlation was performed on the posteromedial root ligament of one specimen. Meniscal root ligament shape, signal intensity, and ultrastructure were characterized. High-resolution, high-contrast volumetric images were generated from both MR systems. Meniscal root ligaments were predominantly oval in shape. Increased signal intensity was most evident at the posteromedial and posterolateral root ligaments. On the specimen that underwent histologic preparation, increased signal intensity corresponded to regions of enthesis fibrocartilage. Collagen fascicles were continuous between the menisci and root ligaments. Predominantly horizontal meniscal radial tie fibers continued into the root ligaments as vertical endoligaments. MR microscopy can be used to characterize and delineate the distinct ultrastructure of the root ligaments on both ultra-high-field- and high-field-strength MR systems. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of MR imaging with FSE and DESS for the diagnosis of meniscal tears in 316 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Gue; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Hong, Hyun Pyo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a magnetic resonance(MR) imaging strategy that primarily uses fast spin-echo(SE) sequences for the diagnosis of meniscal tears. The original clinical interpretations of MR images in 316 patients who underwent imaging for suspected internal derangement of a knee joint were correlated with results from subsequent arthroscopy (mean interval:48.9 days). In all patients, MR examinations included double-echo fast SE T2-weighted sagittal and coronal imaging and double-echo steady state (DESS) sequence sagittal imaging. In 199 patients fat-suppressed conventional SE T1-weighted sagittal imaging was used. In cases in which interpretation was erroneous, imaging findings and arthroscopy reports were reviewed. For ISO confirmed tears of the medial meniscus, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 94%, 93%, and 94%, respectively, while respective values for 147 confirmed tears of the lateral meniscus were 85%, 97%, and 91%. These values are within the ranges recently reported for imaging strategies relying predominantly on conventional SE sequences. Of the 12 false-positive tears of the medial meniscus, five menisci showed a high signal contacting the surface on only one image and seven, that in all cases were located in the periphery of the posterior horn, showed such signal on more than one image. Of the six false-positive tears of the lateral meniscus, three menisci showed a high signal contacting the surface on only one image. Of the nine false-negative tears of the medial meniscus, eight menisci showed an abnormal signal that did not demonstrate definitive contact with the surface. Of the 22 false-negative tears of the lateral meniscus, 18 menisci showed this same type of signal. Fast SE imaging of the knee can be an alternative to conventional SE imaging for the detection of meniscal tears. Most errors in our series were due to either an abnormal signal that failed to show definitive contact with the surface, a high signal which contacted

  13. The relation between chondromalacia patella and meniscal tear and the sulcus angle/ trochlear depth ratio as a powerful predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Hatice; Zateri, Coskun; Nusran, Gurdal; Goksel, Ferdi; Aylanc, Nilufer

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relation between chondromalacia patella and the sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio as a marker of trochlear morphology. In addition, we also planned to show the relationship between meniscus damage, subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness as a marker of obesity, patellar tilt angle and chondromalacia patella. Patients with trauma, rheumatologic disease, a history of knee surgery and patellar variations such as patella alba and patella baja were excluded. Magnetic resonance images of the knees of 200 patients were evaluated. Trochlear morphology from standardized levels, patellar tilt angle, lateral/medial facet ratio, subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness from 3 locations and meniscus injury were assessed by two specialist radiologists. Retropatellar cartilage was normal in 108 patients (54%) at radiological evaluation, while chondromalacia patella was determined in 92 (46%) cases. Trochlear sulcus angle and prepatellar subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness were significantly high in patients with chondromalacia patella, while trochlear depth and lateral patellar tilt angle were low. The trochlear sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio was also high in chondromalacia patella and was identified as an independent risk factor at regression analysis. Additionally, medial meniscal tear was observed in 35 patients (38%) in the chondromalacia patella group and in 27 patients (25%) in the normal group, the difference being statistically significant (P = 0.033). An increased trochlear sulcus angle/trochlear depth ratio is a significant predictor of chondromalacia patella. Medial meniscus injury is more prevalent in patients with chondromalacia patella in association with impairment in knee biomechanics and the degenerative process.

  14. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

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    Takahashi, Kenji, E-mail: Kenji-am@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Hashimoto, Sanshiro, E-mail: info@msorc.jp [Minami-Shinjuku Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Clinic, 2-16-7 Yoyogi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 151-0053 (Japan); Nakamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakamura@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Mori, Atsushi, E-mail: atsu@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Sato, Akiko, E-mail: akiko-sato@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan); Majima, Tokifumi, E-mail: tkmajima@iuhw.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasu-shiobara, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan); Takai, Shinro, E-mail: takai-snr@nms.ac.jp [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8603 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis.

  15. Medial meniscal posterior root/horn radial tears correlate with cartilage degeneration detected by T1ρ relaxation mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hashimoto, Sanshiro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Mori, Atsushi; Sato, Akiko; Majima, Tokifumi; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Posterior radial tears in medial meniscus associate T1ρ values of cartilage. • Posterior radial tears relate to cartilage degeneration even in early-stage osteoarthritis. • Abnormalities in meniscus on MRI are useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis. - Abstract: Objective: This study aimed to identify factors on routine pulse sequence MRI associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Materials and methods: This study included 137 subjects with knee pain. T1ρ values were measured in the regions of interest on the surface layer of the cartilage on mid-coronal images of the femorotibial joint. Assessment of cartilage, subchondral bone, meniscus and ligaments was performed using routine pulse sequence MRI. Radiographic evaluation for osteoarthritis was also performed. Results: Multiple regression analysis revealed posterior root/horn tears to be independent factors increasing the T1ρ values of the cartilage in the medial compartment of the femorotibial joint. Even when adjusted for radiographically defined early-stage osteoarthritis, medial posterior meniscal radial tears significantly increased the T1ρ values. Conclusions: This study showed that posterior root/horn radial tears in the medial meniscus are particularly important MRI findings associated with cartilage degeneration observed on T1ρ relaxation mapping. Morphological factors of the medial meniscus on MRI provide findings useful for screening early-stage osteoarthritis

  16. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin-Wook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Seok-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2004-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Thirty-eight consecutive patients sho underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3%-96.7%, respectively and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3%-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities

  17. Study of correlation between clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopic findings in meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash R Puri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approx. 28% of patients presents to orthopedic OPD with complaints of knee pain. Common medical complications include an unstable knee, chronic knee pain, and post traumatic arthritis. Aim: To study the correlation between clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and arthroscopic findings in knee injuries. Materials and Methods: About 30 cases with history of rotational injury having knee pain and recurrent swelling were subjected to study. Results: MRI had better sensitivity (0.95 vs. 0.85 and specificity (1.0 vs. 0.5 in comparison with clinical examination for medial meniscus. In lateral meniscus injury (sensitivity 0.65 vs. 0.61 and specificity 0.95 vs. 0.92 and in ACL injury (Sensitivity 0.77 vs. 0.8 and specificity 1.0 vs. 0.96 the sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus clinical examination showed minimal difference. Conclusion: Our conclusion is that carefully performed clinical examination can give equal or better diagnosis of meniscal and ACL injuries in comparison with MRI scan. MRI may be used as an additional tool for diagnosis.

  18. Chronic anterior cruciate ligament tears and associated meniscal and traumatic cartilage lesions: evaluation with morphological sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlychou, Marianna; Fezoulidis, Ioannis V. [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Radiology, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Hantes, Michalis; Michalitsis, Sotirios; Malizos, Konstantinos [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece); Tsezou, Aspasia [University Hospital of Larissa, Department of Molecular Genetics and Cytogenetics, Medical School of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    2011-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic efficacy of morphological sequences at 3.0 T MR imaging in detecting anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscal pathology and traumatic cartilage legions in young patients with chronic deficient anterior cruciate ligament knees. This prospective study included 43 patients (39 male) between the age of 15 and 37 years (mean age 22.6 years) with a history of knee injury sustained at least 3 months prior to the decision to repair a torn ACL. All patients underwent a 3.0 T MR scan with the same standard protocol, including intermediate-weighted and three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation and subsequently surgical reconstruction of the ACL, along with meniscal and cartilage repair, when necessary. All ACL tears were correctly interpreted by 3.0 T MR images. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of the medial meniscus was 93.7%, the specificity 92.6%, the positive predictive value 88.2% and the negative predictive value 95.8%. The sensitivity of the MR scans regarding tears of lateral meniscus was 85.7%, the specificity was 93.1%, the positive predictive value 85.7% and the negative predictive value 93.1%. With regard to the grading of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient indicated moderate agreement for grade I and II cartilage lesions (0.5), substantial agreement for grade III and IV cartilage lesions (0.70 and 0.66) and substantial agreement for normal regions (0.75). Regarding location of the cartilage lesions, Cohen's kappa coefficient varied between almost perfect agreement in the lateral femoral condyle and no agreement in the trochlea. In the setting of chronic ACL deficiency, MR imaging at 3.0 T achieves satisfactory diagnostic performance regarding meniscal and ligamentous pathology. In the detection of cartilage lesions MRI is less successful. (orig.)

  19. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P.; Grainger, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  20. Meniscal tear evaluation. Comparison of a conventional spin-echo proton density sequence with a fast spin-echo sequence utilizing a 512x358 matrix size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, M.A.; Robinson, P. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J., E-mail: andrew.grainger@leedsth.nhs.u [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Aim: To determine the sensitivities, specificities, and receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs) for sagittal conventional spin-echo proton density (SE-PD) and fast spin-echo proton density (FSE-PD) sequences in the diagnosis of meniscal tears when compared to arthroscopic findings utilizing increased FSE matrix acquisition size. Method and materials: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 97 knees (194 menisci) were independently and prospectively interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists over four separate readings at least 3 weeks apart. Readings 1 and 2 included images in all three planes in accordance with the standard protocol with either a SE or FSE sagittal PD, at readings 3 and 4 just the SE or FSE sagittal PD sequences were reported. The FSE sequence was acquired with an increased matrix size, compared to the SE sequence, to provide increased resolution. Menisci were graded for the presence of a tear and statistical analysis to calculate sensitivity and specificity was performed comparing to arthroscopy as the reference standard. ROC analysis for the diagnosis of meniscal tears on the SE and FSE sagittal sequences was also evaluated. Reader concordance for the SE and FSE sequences was calculated. Results: Sixty-seven tears were noted at arthroscopy; 60 were detected on SE and 56 on FSE. The sensitivity and specificity for SE was 90 and 90%, and for FSE was 84 and 94%, respectively, with no significant difference. ROC analysis showed no significant difference between the two sequences and kappa values demonstrated a higher level of reader agreement for the FSE than for the SE reading. Conclusion: Use of a FSE sagittal PD sequence with an increased matrix size provides comparable performance to conventional SE sagittal PD when evaluating meniscal disease with a modern system. The present study indicates an increased level of concordance between readers for the FSE sagittal sequence compared to the conventional SE.

  1. Culture of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes on synthetic tissue scaffolds towards meniscal tissue engineering: a preliminary cell-seeding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Warnock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tissue engineering is a new methodology for addressing meniscal injury or loss. Synovium may be an ideal source of cells for in vitro meniscal fibrocartilage formation, however, favorable in vitro culture conditions for synovium must be established in order to achieve this goal. The objective of this study was to determine cellularity, cell distribution, and extracellular matrix (ECM formation of equine fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS cultured on synthetic scaffolds, for potential application in synovium-based meniscal tissue engineering. Scaffolds included open-cell poly-L-lactic acid (OPLA sponges and polyglycolic acid (PGA scaffolds cultured in static and dynamic culture conditions, and PGA scaffolds coated in poly-L-lactic (PLLA in dynamic culture conditions.Materials and Methods. Equine FLS were seeded on OPLA and PGA scaffolds, and cultured in a static environment or in a rotating bioreactor for 12 days. Equine FLS were also seeded on PGA scaffolds coated in 2% or 4% PLLA and cultured in a rotating bioreactor for 14 and 21 days. Three scaffolds from each group were fixed, sectioned and stained with Masson’s Trichrome, Safranin-O, and Hematoxylin and Eosin, and cell numbers and distribution were analyzed using computer image analysis. Three PGA and OPLA scaffolds from each culture condition were also analyzed for extracellular matrix (ECM production via dimethylmethylene blue (sulfated glycosaminoglycan assay and hydroxyproline (collagen assay. PLLA coated PGA scaffolds were analyzed using double stranded DNA quantification as areflection of cellularity and confocal laser microscopy in a fluorescent cell viability assay.Results. The highest cellularity occurred in PGA constructs cultured in a rotating bioreactor, which also had a mean sulfated glycosaminoglycan content of 22.3 µg per scaffold. PGA constructs cultured in static conditions had the lowest cellularity. Cells had difficulty adhering to OPLA and the PLLA

  2. Effectiveness and biocompatibility of a novel biological adhesive application for repair of meniscal tear on the avascular zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takahito; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Imade, Shinji; Kumahashi, Nobuyuki; Uchio, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated the effectiveness and safety of a newly developed biological adhesive for repair of meniscal tear. The adhesive was composed of disuccinimidyl tartrate (DST) as a crosslinker and human serum albumin (HSA) as a hardener. To determine adequate concentration, bonding strength was measured using a tensiometer 5 min after applying the adhesive on the avascular zone tear of porcine meniscus; it was compared with the strengths of commercially available cyanoacrylate-based and fibrin-based adhesives. In vivo examination was performed using Japanese white rabbits, creating longitudinal tears on the avascular zone of meniscus and applying DST-HSA adhesive. Three months after operation the rabbits were sacrificed and tension test and histological evaluation were performed. Bonding strength was measured in three porcine meniscus groups: (i) only suturing, (ii) suturing after applying the adhesive on surface and (iii) suturing using an adhesive-soaked suture. The optimum concentrations were 0.1 mmol of DST and 42 w/v% of HAS. Bonding strength was greatest with cyanoacrylate-based adhesive, followed by DST-HSA adhesive, and fibrin-based adhesive. No inflammation was observed in the synovium or surrounding tissues 3 months after using the DST-HSA adhesive. Bonding strength was greatest with DST-HSA adhesive-soaked suturing group (77 ± 6 N), followed by suturing only group (61 ± 5 N) and surface adhesive application group (60 ± 8 N). The newly developed DST-HSA adhesive is considered safe and may be effective in enforcement of bonding of avascular zone tear of the meniscus.

  3. Confocal arthroscopy-based patient-specific constitutive models of cartilaginous tissues - II: prediction of reaction force history of meniscal cartilage specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Zeike A; Kirk, Thomas B; Miller, Karol

    2007-10-01

    The theoretical framework developed in a companion paper (Part I) is used to derive estimates of mechanical response of two meniscal cartilage specimens. The previously developed framework consisted of a constitutive model capable of incorporating confocal image-derived tissue microstructural data. In the present paper (Part II) fibre and matrix constitutive parameters are first estimated from mechanical testing of a batch of specimens similar to, but independent from those under consideration. Image analysis techniques which allow estimation of tissue microstructural parameters form confocal images are presented. The constitutive model and image-derived structural parameters are then used to predict the reaction force history of the two meniscal specimens subjected to partially confined compression. The predictions are made on the basis of the specimens' individual structural condition as assessed by confocal microscopy and involve no tuning of material parameters. Although the model does not reproduce all features of the experimental curves, as an unfitted estimate of mechanical response the prediction is quite accurate. In light of the obtained results it is judged that more general non-invasive estimation of tissue mechanical properties is possible using the developed framework.

  4. Relationship between years in the trade and the development of radiographic knee osteoarthritis and MRI-detected meniscal tears and bursitis in floor layers. A cross-sectional study of a historical cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    An increased risk of developing knee disorders including radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been shown among workers with kneeling working demands. There may also be a dose-related association between duration of employment in occupations with kneeling work and development of radiographic...... knee OA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected meniscal tears and bursitis....

  5. Diagnostic Validity of Combining History Elements and Physical Examination Tests for Traumatic and Degenerative Symptomatic Meniscal Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décary, Simon; Fallaha, Michel; Frémont, Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Feldman, Debbie E; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Vendittoli, Pascal-André; Desmeules, François

    2017-10-27

    The current approach to the clinical diagnosis of traumatic and degenerative symptomatic meniscal tears (SMTs) proposes combining history elements and physical examination tests without systematic prescription of imaging investigations, yet the evidence to support this diagnostic approach is scarce. To assess the validity of diagnostic clusters combining history elements and physical examination tests to diagnose or exclude traumatic and degenerative SMT compared with other knee disorders. Prospective diagnostic accuracy study. Patients were recruited from 2 orthopedic clinics, 2 family medicine clinics, and from a university community. A total of 279 consecutive patients who underwent consultation for a new knee complaint. Each patient was assessed independently by 2 evaluators. History elements and standardized physical examination tests performed by a physiotherapist were compared with the reference standard: an expert physicians' composite diagnosis including a clinical examination and confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging. Participating expert physicians were orthopedic surgeons (n = 3) or sport medicine physicians (n = 2). Penalized logistic regression (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator) was used to identify history elements and physical examination tests associated with the diagnosis of SMT and recursive partitioning was used to develop diagnostic clusters. Diagnostic accuracy measures were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+/-) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eighty patients had a diagnosis of SMT (28.7%), including 35 traumatic tears and 45 degenerative tears. The combination a history of trauma during a pivot, medial knee pain location, and a positive medial joint line tenderness test was able to diagnose (LR+ = 8.9; 95% CI 6.1-13.1) or exclude (LR- = 0.10; 95% CI 0.03-0.28) a traumatic SMT. Combining a history of

  6. Defining the Value of Future Research to Identify the Preferred Treatment of Meniscal Tear in the Presence of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Losina

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM is extensively used to relieve pain in patients with symptomatic meniscal tear (MT and knee osteoarthritis (OA. Recent studies have failed to show the superiority of APM compared to other treatments. We aim to examine whether existing evidence is sufficient to reject use of APM as a cost-effective treatment for MT+OA.We built a patient-level microsimulation using Monte Carlo methods and evaluated three strategies: Physical therapy ('PT' alone; PT followed by APM if subjects continued to experience pain ('Delayed APM'; and 'Immediate APM'. Our subject population was US adults with symptomatic MT and knee OA over a 10 year time horizon. We assessed treatment outcomes using societal costs, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, and calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs, incorporating productivity costs as a sensitivity analysis. We also conducted a value-of-information analysis using probabilistic sensitivity analyses.Calculated ICERs were estimated to be $12,900/QALY for Delayed APM as compared to PT and $103,200/QALY for Immediate APM as compared to Delayed APM. In sensitivity analyses, inclusion of time costs made Delayed APM cost-saving as compared to PT. Improving efficacy of Delayed APM led to higher incremental costs and lower incremental effectiveness of Immediate APM in comparison to Delayed APM. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses indicated that PT had 3.0% probability of being cost-effective at a willingness-to-pay (WTP threshold of $50,000/QALY. Delayed APM was cost effective 57.7% of the time at WTP = $50,000/QALY and 50.2% at WTP = $100,000/QALY. The probability of Immediate APM being cost-effective did not exceed 50% unless WTP exceeded $103,000/QALY.We conclude that current cost-effectiveness evidence does not support unqualified rejection of either Immediate or Delayed APM for the treatment of MT+OA. The amount to which society would be willing to pay for additional information

  7. Trajectory of self-reported pain and function and knee extensor muscle strength in young patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tears: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Østengaard, Lasse; Cardy, Nathan; Wilson, Fiona; Jørgensen, Claus; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the trajectory of patient reported pain and function and knee extensor muscle strength over time in young individuals undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Systematic review and meta-analysis METHODS: Six databases were searched up to October 13th, 2016. People aged 30 years or younger undergoing surgery for a meniscal tear. and comparator: (1) Self-reported pain and function in patients undergoing meniscal surgery compared to a non-operative control group (2). Knee extensor strength in the leg undergoing surgery compared to a healthy control group or the contra-lateral leg. Methodological quality was assessed using the SIGN 50 guidelines. No studies were found on patient reported pain and function. Six studies, including 137 patients were included in the analysis on knee extensor muscle strength. Knee extensor muscle strength was impaired in the injured leg prior to surgery and was still reduced compared with control data up to 12 months after surgery (SMD: -1.16) (95% CI: -1.83; -0.49). All included studies were assessed to have a high risk of bias. No studies were found comparing the trajectory of self-reported pain and function in patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative treatments for young patients with meniscal tears. Knee extensor strength seemed to be impaired up to 12 months after surgery in young patients undergoing surgery for meniscal tears. The results of the present study should be interpreted with caution due to a limited number of available studies with high risk of bias including relatively few patients. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of the Thessaly test, standardised clinical history and other clinical examination tests (Apley's, McMurray's and joint line tenderness) for meniscal tears in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Anthony, Iain; Francq, Bernard; Brooksbank, Katriona; Downie, Paul; Powell, Andrew; Jones, Bryn; MacLean, Angus; McConnachie, Alex; Norrie, John

    2015-08-01

    Reliable non-invasive diagnosis of meniscal tears is difficult. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used but is expensive and incidental findings are problematic. There are a number of physical examination tests for the diagnosis of meniscal tears that are simple, cheap and non-invasive. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the Thessaly test and to determine if the Thessaly test (alone or in combination with other physical tests) can obviate the need for further investigation by MRI or arthroscopy for patients with a suspected meniscal tear. Single-centre prospective diagnostic accuracy study. Although the study was performed in a secondary care setting, it was designed to replicate the results that would have been achieved in a primary care setting. Two cohorts of patients were recruited: patients with knee pathology (n = 292) and a control cohort with no knee pathology (n = 75). Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of the Thessaly test in determining the presence of meniscal tears. Participants were assessed by both a primary care clinician and a musculoskeletal clinician. Both clinicians performed the Thessaly test, McMurray's test, Apley's test, joint line tenderness test and took a standardised clinical history from the patient. The Thessaly test had a sensitivity of 0.66, a specificity of 0.39 and a diagnostic accuracy of 54% when utilised by primary care clinicians. This compared with a sensitivity of 0.62, a specificity of 0.55 and diagnostic accuracy of 59% when used by musculoskeletal clinicians. The diagnostics accuracy of the other tests when used by primary care clinicians was 54% for McMurray's test, 53% for Apley's test, 54% for the joint line tenderness test and 55% for clinical history. For primary care clinicians, age and past history of osteoarthritis were both significant predictors of MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears. For musculoskeletal clinicians age and a positive diagnosis of meniscal tears on clinical history

  9. Association of medial meniscal extrusion with medial tibial osteophyte distance detected by T2 mapping MRI in patients with early-stage knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Shinnosuke; Ishijima, Muneaki; Kaneko, Haruka; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Liu, Lizu; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Futami, Ippei; Yusup, Anwajan; Takamura, Tomohiro; Arita, Hitoshi; Shiozawa, Jun; Aoki, Takako; Takazawa, Yuji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shigeki; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Okada, Yasunori; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-09-12

    Medial meniscal extrusion (MME) is associated with progression of medial knee osteoarthritis (OA), but no or little information is available for relationships between MME and osteophytes, which are found in cartilage and bone parts. Because of the limitation in detectability of the cartilage part of osteophytes by radiography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the rate of development and size of osteophytes appear to have been underestimated. Because T2 mapping MRI may enable us to evaluate the cartilage part of osteophytes, we aimed to examine the association between MME and OA-related changes, including osteophytes, by using conventional and T2 mapping MRI. Patients with early-stage knee OA (n = 50) were examined. MRI-detected OA-related changes, in addition to MME, were evaluated according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score. T2 values of the medial meniscus and osteophytes were measured on T2 mapping images. Osteophytes surgically removed from patients with end-stage knee OA were histologically analyzed and compared with findings derived by radiography and MRI. Medial side osteophytes were detected by T2 mapping MRI in 98% of patients with early-stage knee OA, although the detection rate was 48% by conventional MRI and 40% by radiography. Among the OA-related changes, medial tibial osteophyte distance was most closely associated with MME, as determined by multiple logistic regression analysis, in the patients with early-stage knee OA (β = 0.711, p T2 values of the medial meniscus were directly correlated with MME in patients with early-stage knee OA, who showed ≥ 3 mm of MME (r = 0.58, p = 0.003). The accuracy of osteophyte evaluation by T2 mapping MRI was confirmed by histological analysis of the osteophytes removed from patients with end-stage knee OA. Our study demonstrates that medial tibial osteophyte evaluated by T2 mapping MRI is frequently observed in the patients with early-stage knee OA, showing

  10. WITHDRAWN: Exercise for treating anterior cruciate ligament injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage of the knee in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Amanda H; Howe, Tracey E; Grant, Margaret; Gray, Heather G

    2011-05-11

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The ACL may be damaged in isolation but often other ligaments and menisci are implicated. The injury may be managed surgically or conservatively. Injury causes pain, effusion and inflammation leading to alteration in muscle function. Regaining muscular control is essential if the individual wishes to return to pre-injury level of function and patients will invariably be referred for rehabilitation. To present the best evidence for effectiveness of exercise used in the treatment of ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage to the knee in adults, on return to work and pre-injury levels of activity. We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (October 2006), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1996 to October 2006), EMBASE (1980 to October 2006), other databases and reference lists of articles. We included randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials testing exercise programmes designed to treat adults with ACL injuries in combination with collateral ligament and meniscal damage. Included trials randomised participants to receive any combination of the following: no care, usual care, a single-exercise intervention, and multiple-exercise interventions. The primary outcome measures of interest were returning to work and return to pre-injury level of activity post treatment, at six months and one year. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Five trials (243 participants) evaluated different exercise programmes following ACL reconstruction and one trial (100 participants) compared supervised with self-monitored exercises as part of conservative treatment. No study compared the effect of exercise versus

  11. Diagnostic criterial to differentiate medial meniscal injury from degenerative changes on 99mTc-MDP knee SPECT in patients with chronic knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, June Key; Kang, Won Jun; So, Young; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul; Yoo, Jae Ho; Lee, Myung Chul; Jeong, Hwan Jeong

    2003-01-01

    In patients with chronic knee pain, the diagnostic performance of 99m Tc-MDP knee SPECT for internal derangement of knee is deteriorated due to degenerative changes. In this study, we tried to establish diagnostic criteria to differentiate medial meniscal injury (MMI) from degenerative change (DC) when the uptake in increased in medial compartment. A total of 49 knee SPECT of the patients with chronic(more than 3 months) knee pain, which showed increased 99m Tc-MDP uptake in the medial compartment, were included in this study. The diagnosis was confirmed by arthroscopy. On knee SPECT, 3 diagnosic criteria for MMI were investigated. In Criterion, I, MMI was diagnosed when crescentic uptake was observed in the medial tibial plateau. In Criterion II, crescentic uptake was further classified into anterior, mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns, according to the location of maximal uptake; and only crescentic mid, posterior, and diffuse patterns were diagnosed as MMI. In Criterion III, MMI was diagnosed when medial tibial plateau showed higher activity then medial femoral condyle. The diagnostic performance of the 3 criteria was compared. The sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 14% in Criterion I, 89% and 38% in Criterion II, and 75% and 67% in Criterion III, respectively. Criterion III had significantly improve diagnostic performance, especially, specificity. In this study, we established a practical diagnostic criterion to differentiate MMI from DC on knee SPECT. The result is helpful to improve the diagnostic value of knee SPECT as a screening test for chronic knee pain

  12. Single-leaf partial meniscectomy in extensive horizontal tears of the discoid lateral meniscus: Does decreased peripheral meniscal thickness affect outcomes? (Mean four-year follow-up).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Won; Chun, Yong-Min; Choi, Chong-Hyuk; Kim, Sung-Jae; Jung, Min; Han, Joon-Woo; Kim, Sung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether single-leaf partial meniscectomy in horizontal tears along the entire discoid lateral meniscus has any advantages in clinical and radiological results compared with other meniscectomies in discoid lateral meniscus. A total of 145 patients with a horizontal tear pattern in symptomatic lateral discoid meniscus were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-seven patients had undergone full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy (group A), 60 had undergone conventional partial meniscectomy (saucerization) maintaining peripheral meniscal height (group B), and 58 patients had undergone total meniscectomy (group C). Each patient was evaluated with the Lysholm knee score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective grading, and modified Kellgren-Lawrence grade in plain radiography at their last follow-up. Group C had inferior functional results to groups A and B on the Lysholm knee score and IKDC subjective score. There was no significant difference between groups A and B. Group C fared significantly worse than groups A and B (p=0.003, pmeniscus tears, the full-extent single-leaf partial meniscectomy group had no adverse results compared with the total meniscectomy group and was not significantly different compared to the conventional partial meniscectomy group. Cohort study. Level III, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Three-Dimensional Coculture of Meniscal Cells and Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Collagen Type I Hydrogel on a Small Intestinal Matrix-A Pilot Study Toward Equine Meniscus Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Antje; Ribitsch, Iris; Reboredo, Jenny; Dürr, Julia; Egerbacher, Monika; Jenner, Florien; Walles, Heike

    2017-05-01

    Meniscal injuries are the most frequently encountered soft tissue injuries in the equine stifle joint. Due to the inherent limited repair potential of meniscal tissue, meniscal injuries do not only affect the meniscus itself but also lead to impaired joint homeostasis and secondary osteoarthritis. The presented study compares 3D coculture constructs of primary equine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and meniscus cells (MC) seeded on three different scaffolds-a cell-laden collagen type I hydrogel (Col I gel), a tissue-derived small intestinal matrix scaffold (SIS-muc) and a combination thereof-for their qualification to be applied for meniscus tissue engineering. To investigate cell attachment of primary MC and MSC on SIS-muc matrix SEM pictures were performed. For molecular analysis, lyophilized samples of coculture constructs with different cell ratios (100% MC, 100% MSC, and 50% MC and 50% MSC, 20% MC, and 80% MSC) were digested and analyzed for DNA and GAG content. Active matrix remodeling of 3D coculture models was indicated by matrix metalloproteinases detection. For comparison of tissue-engineered constructs with the histologic architecture of natural equine menisci, paired lateral and medial menisci of 15 horses representing different age groups were examined. A meniscus phenotype with promising similarity to native meniscus tissue in its GAG/DNA expression in addition to Col I, Col II, and Aggrecan production was achieved using a scaffold composed of Col I gel on SIS-muc combined with a coculture of MC and MSC. The results encourage further development of this scaffold-cell combination for meniscus tissue engineering.

  14. The Value of History, Physical Examination, and Radiographic Findings in the Diagnosis of Symptomatic Meniscal Tear among Middle-Age Subjects with Knee Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeffrey N.; Smith, Savannah R.; Yang, Heidi Y.; Martin, Scott D.; Wright, John; Donnell-Fink, Laurel A.; Losina, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the utility of clinical history, radiographic and physical exam findings in the diagnosis of symptomatic meniscal tear (SMT) in patients over age 45, in whom concomitant osteoarthritis is prevalent. Methods In a cross-sectional study of patients from two orthopedic surgeons’ clinics we assessed clinical history, physical examination and radiographic findings in patients over 45 with knee pain. The orthopedic surgeons rated their confidence that subjects’ symptoms were due to MT; we defined the diagnosis of SMT as at least 70% confidence. We used logistic regression to identify factors independently associated with diagnosis of SMT and we used the regression results to construct an index of the likelihood of SMT. Results In 174 participants, six findings were associated independently with the expert clinician having ≥70% confidence that symptoms were due to MT: localized pain, ability to fully bend the knee, pain duration <1 year, lack of varus alignment, lack of pes planus, and absence of joint space narrowing on radiographs. The index identified a low risk group with 3% likelihood of SMT. Conclusion While clinicians traditionally rely upon mechanical symptoms in this diagnostic setting, our findings did not support the conclusion that mechanical symptoms were associated with the expert’s confidence that symptoms were due to MT. An index that includes history of localized pain, full flexion, duration <1 year, pes planus, varus alignment, and joint space narrowing can be used to stratify patients according to their risk of SMT and it identifies a subgroup with very low risk. PMID:27390312

  15. The influence of a change in the meniscus cross-sectional shape on the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint and meniscal extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Ferenc, Tomasz; Baczkowski, Boguslaw

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a change in the meniscus cross sectional shape on its position and on the biomechanics of a knee joint. One main finite element model of a left knee joint was created on the basis of MRI images. The model consisted of bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. Eight variants of this model with an increased or decreased meniscus height were then prepared. Nonlinear static analyses with a fixed flexion/extension movement for a compressive load of 1000 N were performed. The additional analyses for those models with a constrained medio-lateral relative bone translation allowed for an evaluation of the influence of this translation on a meniscus external shift. It was observed that a decrease in the meniscus height caused a decrease in the contact area, together with a decrease in the contact force between the flattened meniscus and the cartilage. For the models with an increased meniscus height, a maximal value of force acting on the meniscus in a medio-lateral direction was obtained. The results have shown that the meniscus external shift was approximately proportional to the meniscus slope angle, but that relationship was modified by a medio-lateral relative bone translation. It was found that the translation of the femur relative to the tibia may be dependent on the geometry of the menisci. The results have suggested that a change in the meniscus geometry in the cross sectional plane can considerably affect not only the meniscal external shift, but also the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint as well as the congruency of the knee joint.

  16. The influence of a change in the meniscus cross-sectional shape on the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint and meniscal extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daszkiewicz, Karol; Witkowski, Wojciech; Chróścielewski, Jacek; Ferenc, Tomasz; Baczkowski, Boguslaw

    2018-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a change in the meniscus cross sectional shape on its position and on the biomechanics of a knee joint. Methods One main finite element model of a left knee joint was created on the basis of MRI images. The model consisted of bones, articular cartilages, menisci and ligaments. Eight variants of this model with an increased or decreased meniscus height were then prepared. Nonlinear static analyses with a fixed flexion/extension movement for a compressive load of 1000 N were performed. The additional analyses for those models with a constrained medio-lateral relative bone translation allowed for an evaluation of the influence of this translation on a meniscus external shift. Results It was observed that a decrease in the meniscus height caused a decrease in the contact area, together with a decrease in the contact force between the flattened meniscus and the cartilage. For the models with an increased meniscus height, a maximal value of force acting on the meniscus in a medio-lateral direction was obtained. The results have shown that the meniscus external shift was approximately proportional to the meniscus slope angle, but that relationship was modified by a medio-lateral relative bone translation. It was found that the translation of the femur relative to the tibia may be dependent on the geometry of the menisci. Conclusions The results have suggested that a change in the meniscus geometry in the cross sectional plane can considerably affect not only the meniscal external shift, but also the medio-lateral translation of the knee joint as well as the congruency of the knee joint. PMID:29447236

  17. Correlation of histological examination of meniscus with MR images; Focused on high signal intensity of the meniscus not caused by definite meniscal tear and impact on MR diagnosis of tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chun Ai; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, In Hwan; Lee, Ju Hong; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Chonbuk National University College of Medicine, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To document the causes of high signal intensity of the meniscus which is not caused by definite meniscal tears on MR imaging, through correlation with histological examination. For the correlation between the MR image and histology, we obtained prospectively 31 meniscal specimens from 21 patients. Proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo MR images were used. Minimal tear, thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration of the central layer, and radial tie fibers were detected upon histological examination, and were correlated with the corresponding MR images. Minimal tear of the lamellar layer was seen in 60 zones out of 100 slides. On MR images, 29 (48.3%) of these 60 zones had high signal intensity. Thinning of the lamellar layer was seen in 24 zones, with 7 (29.2%) having high signal intensity. 57 central zones showed degenerative change in the central layer and high signal intensity on all corresponding MR images. Radial tie fibers in the central layer appeared as high signal intensity areas. Minimal tear and thinning of the lamellar layer, degeneration and radial tie fibers of the central layer of the meniscus cause high signal intensity on MR images.

  18. MRI of the knee: how do field strength and radiologist's experience influence diagnostic accuracy and interobserver correlation in assessing chondral and meniscal lesions and the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampla, W.; Roesel, M.; Svoboda, K.; Nachbagauer, A.; Gschwantler, M.; Hruby, W.

    2009-01-01

    Accuracy of MRI reports is taken for granted. In this paper the inter-observer reliability in the interpretation of meniscal lesions, degree of chondropathy, and integrity of the ACL was analyzed while taking the radiologist's experience and field strength into account. Fifty-two MRI studies of knees were interpreted by 11 radiologists independently. Twenty-two were acquired on 1.0-T, 20 on 1.5-T, and 10 on 3.0-T systems. Four of the radiologists had more than 5 years and seven had 3 to 5 years of experience in interpreting MRI studies. The findings were compared with the intra-operative findings. Inter-observer variance, specificity, and sensitivity were evaluated for each field strength. Inter-observer correlation ranged between 0.370 for cartilage lesions and 0.597 for meniscal tears. Correlation values did not increase with experience or field strength. The number of false reports was dependent on the observer, but not on field strength. The rate of false interpretations was significantly higher for most criteria in the less experienced group. In conclusion, inter-observer correlation was low, although the diagnostic criteria were defined. The use of the classification scheme should be standardized by uniform training. Radiologist experience seems to be more important than field strength. (orig.)

  19. A combination of biomolecules enhances expression of E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene leading to increased cell proliferation in primary human meniscal cells: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Mamatha M; Elakkiya, V; Gopinathan, J; Sabarinath, C; Shanthakumari, S; Sahanand, K Santosh; Dinakar Rai, B K; Bhattacharyya, Amitava; Selvakumar, R

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates the impact of biomolecules (biotin, glucose, chondroitin sulphate, proline) as supplement, (individual and in combination) on primary human meniscus cell proliferation. Primary human meniscus cells isolated from patients undergoing meniscectomy were maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The isolated cells were treated with above mentioned biomolecules as individual (0-100 µg/ml) and in combinations, as a supplement to DMEM. Based on the individual biomolecule study, a unique combination of biomolecules (UCM) was finalized using one way ANOVA analysis. With the addition of UCM as supplement to DMEM, meniscal cells reached 100 % confluency within 4 days in 60 mm culture plate; whereas the cells in medium devoid of UCM, required 36 days for reaching confluency. The impact of UCM on cell viability, doubling time, histology, gene expression, biomarkers expression, extra cellular matrix synthesis, meniscus cell proliferation with respect to passages and donor's age were investigated. The gene expression studies for E-cadherin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR∆) using RT-qPCR and immunohistochemical analysis for Ki67, CD34 and Vimentin confirmed that UCM has significant impact on cell proliferation. The extracellular collagen and glycosaminoglycan secretion in cells supplemented with UCM were found to increase by 31 and 37 fold respectively, when compared to control on the 4th day. The cell doubling time was reduced significantly when supplemented with UCM. The addition of UCM showed positive influence on different passages and age groups. Hence, this optimized UCM can be used as an effective supplement for meniscal tissue engineering.

  20. Effect of recirculation and regional counting rate on reliability of noninvasive bicompartmental CBF measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, K.

    1985-01-01

    Based on data from routine intravenous Xe133-rCBF studies in 50 patients, using Obrist's algorithm the effect of counting rate statistics and amount of recirculating activity on reproducibility of results was investigated at five simulated counting rate levels. Dependence of the standard deviation of compartmental and noncompartmental flow parameters on recirculation and counting rate was determined by multiple linear regression analysis. Those regression equations permit determination of the optimum accuracy that may be expected from individual flow measurements. Mainly due to a delay of the start-of-fit time an exponential increase in standard deviation of flow measurements was observed as recirculation increased. At constant start-of-fit, however, a linear increase in standard deviation of compartmental flow parameters only was found, while noncompartmental results remained constant. Therefore, and in regard to other studies of potential sources of error, an upper limit of 2.5 min for the start-of-fit time and usage of noncompartmental flow parameters for measurements affected by high recirculation are suggested

  1. Patellofemoral Joint Arthroplasty: Our Experience in Isolated Patellofemoral and Bicompartmental Arthritic Knees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sabatini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Isolated patellofemoral (PF arthritis is rare, and there is no complete agreement about the best surgical treatment. The operative treatments are total knee arthroplasty and patellofemoral replacement (PFR. The incidence of many early complications of PF arthroplasty has decreased with the introduction of newer designs. Nowadays, the main cause of revision surgery is the progression of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. In the past, PF arthroplasty was contraindicated in patients with evidence of osteoarthritis or pain in medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartments. The improvement in implant designs and surgical techniques has allowed the addition of a monocompartmental arthroplasty for the medial or lateral tibiofemoral compartment. In this work, we evaluate our first experience with PF arthroplasty and its combination with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Materials and Methods From May 2014 to March 2016, we treated 14 patients. An isolated PF arthroplasty was performed in six knees (five patients, and a combined PF and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty was performed in nine cases. We observed a significant improvement in the clinical and functional Knee Society Scores (KSSs after surgery in our patients. Results We obtained good results in our cases both for clinical and functional KSSs. Patellar clunk was recorded in one case. Discussion and Conclusion We are going toward a new attitude in which partial osteoarthritic changes could be treated with partial resurfacing prosthetic solutions such as unicompartmental, bi–unicompartmental or PFR alone, or unicompartmental combined, which respects the cruciates and achieves maximal bone preservation, which is vital, particularly, for young patients.

  2. Meniscal tear. Diagnostic errors in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, M. C.; Recondo, J. A.; Gervas, C.; Fernandez, E.; Villanua, J. A.M.; Salvador, E.

    2003-01-01

    To analyze diagnostic discrepancies found between magnetic resonance (MR) and arthroscopy, and the determine the reasons that they occur. Two-hundred and forty-eight MR knee explorations were retrospectively checked. Forty of these showed diagnostic discrepancies between MR and arthroscopy. Two radiologists independently re-analyzed the images from 29 of the 40 studies without knowing which diagnosis had resulted from which of the two techniques. Their interpretations were correlated with the initial MR diagnosis, MR images and arthroscopic results. Initial errors in MR imaging were classified as either unavoidable, interpretive, or secondary to equivocal findings. Eleven MR examinations could not be checked since their corresponding imaging results could not be located. Of 34 errors found in the original diagnoses, 12 (35.5%)were classified as unavoidable, 14 (41.2%) as interpretative and 8 (23.5%) as secondary to equivocal findings. 41.2% of the errors were avoided in the retrospective study probably due to our department having greater experience in interpreting MR images, 25.5% were unavailable even in the retrospective study. A small percentage of diagnostic errors were due to the presence of subtle equivocal findings. (Author) 15 refs

  3. Osteoarthritis of the knee after meniscal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, P T; Lohmander, L S; Englund, M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence, incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA) in a cohort of subjects with previous meniscectomy. METHODS: We assessed 221 subjects (177 men and 44 women) with weight bearing knee radiography twice (assessment A and B) with a follow-up time...... Kellgren and Lawrence grade 2 or worse. RESULTS: At assessment A, we found tibiofemoral radiographic OA in 107 subjects' index knee (48%) of which 41 subjects (38%) had bilateral tibiofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 151 (68%) and 71 (32%). At assessment A, we found...... patellofemoral OA in 32 subjects' index knee (14%) of which 11 (34%) had bilateral patellofemoral OA. At assessment B, the corresponding figures were 51 (23%) and 19 (37%). There was an increase of the sum of joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophyte grades in the tibiofemoral joint of 144 subjects' index knee...

  4. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dašić Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Meniscal injuries are common in professional or recreational sports as well as in daily activities. If meniscal lesions lead to physical impairment they usually require surgical treatment. Arthroscopic treatment of meniscal injuries is one of the most often performed orthopedic operative procedures. Methods. The study analyzed the results of arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy in 213 patients in a 24-month period, from 2006, to 2008. Results. In our series of arthroscopically treated medial meniscus tears we noted 78 (36.62% vertical complete bucket handle lesions, 19 (8.92% vertical incomplete lesions, 18 (8.45% longitudinal tears, 35 (16.43% oblique tears, 18 (8.45% complex degenerative lesions, 17 (7.98% radial lesions and 28 (13.14% horisontal lesions. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC score was 49.81%, 1 month after the arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy the mean IKDC score was 84.08%, and 6 months after mean IKDC score was 90.36%. Six months after the procedure 197 (92.49% of patients had good or excellent subjective postoperative clinical outcomes, while 14 (6.57% patients subjectively did not notice a significant improvement after the intervention, and 2 (0.93% patients had no subjective improvement after the partial medial meniscectomy at all. Conclusion. Arthroscopic partial medial meniscetomy is minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure and in well selected cases is a method of choice for treatment of medial meniscus injuries when repair techniques are not a viable option. It has small rate of complications, low morbidity and fast rehabilitation.

  5. MR imaging of the injured meniscus of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Naotaka; Imamura, Kiyohiko; Uematsu, Koichi; Iwamura, Yuichi; Ohniwa, Hideo; Ishii, Masayoshi

    1992-01-01

    MR imagings (0.5 Tesla 5 mm slice, TR/TE: 510-620 msec/27-30) of the injured menisci in 38 knees of 38 patients (28 men and 10 women, with an average age of 25.9) were compared with their arthroscopic findings and classified into two types, the one with linear high-density area and the non-linear one. Menisci with longitudinal tears in 10 knees of 17 and with horizontal tears in 4 of 8 showed a linear high-density area in MRI, but the others including menisci with transverse tears (in 8 knees) or bucket-handle tears (in 7 knees) showed a non-linear high density area. These results may be due to both the angle between the tear and the slice lines of MR imaging, and the degeneration of menisci. The MRI of normal menisci in 10 knees were also investigated. A false-positive high-density area was often seen at the synovia-meniscal junction in the coronal plane of MR imaging and was seen at the posterior or anterior menisci in the saggital plane. (author)

  6. Meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Mininder S; Tepolt, Frances A; Vavken, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Meniscal pathology in skeletally immature patients includes meniscal tears and discoid lateral meniscus. Total or subtotal meniscectomy may occur in patients with discoid lateral meniscus or severe meniscal tears. Meniscal transplantation may be an option in skeletally immature patients status after total or subtotal meniscectomy with knee symptoms or dysfunction. This study focuses on the surgical technique and short-term outcomes of meniscus transplantation in skeletally immature patients. We reviewed our clinical database for skeletally immature patients who had undergone meniscus transplantation with a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patients were contacted, invited for a physical exam, and asked to complete a Pedi-IKDC, Lysholm, and Tegner outcomes questionnaire. The study protocol was approved by the responsible institutional review board. Three patients (two females/one male) were eligible for the study, each of whom responded to our invitation indicating availability for physical exam and questionnaire. Two patients had undergone subtotal discoid meniscus resection, leading to early lateral compartment degeneration. One patient developed advanced degeneration after a delay in treatment for a medial bucket-handle tear associated with anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 12.6±2.3 years. At a mean follow-up of 31±20 months, the mean Pedi-IKDC score was 68.3±4, the mean Lysholm was 55.7±22.3, and the median Tegner was 7 points. There were no indications of growth deformity during the regular postoperative radiological assessments. One patient required subsequent lysis of adhesions along the lateral mini arthrotomy and mobilization under anesthesia. The other two patients were able to return to sports at the same level as before meniscus transplantation and were able to do so within 9 months postoperatively. Over-resection of discoid menisci as well as untreated meniscus injury, the latter typically in

  7. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2013-07-03

    Extensive studies have explored the dynamics of the ocular surface fluid, though theoretical investigations are typically limited to the use of the lubrication approximation, which is not guaranteed to be uniformly valid a-priori throughout the tear meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity and subsequent epithelial damage. Hence, we have explored the accuracy of the standard lubrication approximation for the tear film by explicit comparisons with the 2D Navier-Stokes model, considering both stationary and moving eyelids. Our results demonstrate that the lubrication model is qualitatively accurate except in the vicinity of the eyelids. In particular, and in contrast to lubrication theory, the solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations predict a distinct absence of fluid flow, and thus convective mixing in the region adjacent to the tear film contact line. These observations not only support emergent hypotheses concerning the formation of Marx\\'s line, a region of epithelial cell staining adjacent to the contact line on the eyelid, but also enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of the flow profile near the tear film contact line. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  8. Identification, Characterization, and Utilization of Adult Meniscal Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    selected for Homo sapiens , 251,430 entries). Further details, especially about normalization proce- dures, have already been published (Christian et al...mice. 0   2   4   6   8   10   12   8  wk  MSPC   24  wk  MSPC   Ex pr es si on  le ve l  r el at iv e   to

  9. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.; Breward, C. J. W.; Gaffney, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity

  10. Patient reported outcomes in patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for traumatic or degenerative meniscal tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Englund, Martin; Christensen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    orthopaedic departments in the Region of Southern Denmark. Participants were recruited between 1 February 2013 and 31 January 2014, and at one of the original four hospitals from 1 February 2014 to 31 January 2015. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals selected from Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark, aged 18...... on knee pathology. Patient reported outcomes were recorded via online questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was the average between-group difference in change on four of five subscales of the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS). The four subscales covered pain, symptoms...

  11. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Endo, H.; Ikeda, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  12. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Endo, H. [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Tennodai, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  13. Patient-reported symptoms and changes up to 1 year after meniscal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Pihl, Kenneth; Nissen, Nis

    2018-01-01

    , knee pain in general, pain when twisting and bending the knee and climbing stairs (88-98%), while the most common functional limitations were difficulty bending to the floor, squatting, twisting, kneeling, and knee awareness (97-99%). Knee pain in general and knee awareness improved most 1 year after...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of chondral, meniscal and cruciate ligaments injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli; Fridmann, Marcos William; Arbo, Rodrigo Di Mare; Vieira, Jose Francisco; Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga da; Pires, Luiz Antonio Simoes; Abreu, Armando; Abreu, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee. Materials and methods: Seventy-two patients have been submitted to MRI previously to arthroscopy of the knee performed by a single surgeon and utilized as a comparative standard method. Sensitivity, specificity, values of likelihood and rate of interobserver agreement have been evaluated. Results: The kappa agreement coefficient between MRI and arthroscopy was very good for lesions in the anterior cruciate ligament (0.84), good for lateral meniscus (0.75), reasonable for medial meniscus (0.50) and poor for chondral lesions (< 0.50). MRI has demonstrated high sensitivity for tears in the anterior cruciate ligament (94%) and in the medial meniscus (92%), good sensitivity for lesions in the lateral meniscus (80%), and low sensitivity for lesions in all of the chondral zones (< 50%), while the specificity has been excellent for all the chondral, and ligamentous structures, besides the lateral menisci analyzed (more than 97%), and reasonable (65%) for the medial meniscus. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of intra-articular knee lesions, as already demonstrated by similar results reported both in the Brazilian and international literature. (author)

  15. Patient-reported symptoms and changes up to 1 year after meniscal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Pihl, Kenneth; Nissen, Nis

    2018-01-01

    Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and 1 question on knee stability. Severity of each item was scored as none, mild, moderate, severe, or extreme. Improvements were evaluated using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test and effect size (ES). Results - The most common symptoms were knee grinding and clicking...

  16. MENISCAL REPAIR BY FIBROCARTILAGE - AN EXPERIMENTAL-STUDY IN THE DOG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, HWB; VETH, RPH; NIELSEN, HKL; DEGROOT, JH; PENNINGS, AJ; KUIJER, R

    Longitudinal lesions in the avascular part of the dog's meniscus were repaired by implantation of a porous polyurethane. Ingrowing repair tissue was characterized by biochemical and immunological analysis. Histologically, repair tissue initially was composed of fibrous tissue containing type I

  17. Effect of Knee Extensor Strength on Incident Radiographic and Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis in Individuals with Meniscal Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Felson, David T; Segal, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    months. Separate binomial regression analyses with robust standard errors adjusted for age, history of knee surgery, physical activity level and clinic site were conducted for men and women. RESULTS: High knee extensor strength (normalized by allometric scaling) was associated with a reduced risk...... of radiographic knee OA in women (relative risk: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.94) but not in men (0.56; 0.27 to 1.16). High knee extensor strength did not protect against the development of symptomatic knee OA, either in women or in men. CONCLUSION: The results only partly confirm the hypothesis that high knee...

  18. Meniscal repair by fibrocartilage in the dog : Characterization of the repair tissue and the role of vascularity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, RPH; Jansen, HWB; Nielsen, HKL; deGroot, JH; Pennings, AJ; Kuijer, R

    Lesions in the avascular part of 20 canine menisci were repaired by implantation of a porous polyurethane. Seven menisci were not repaired and served as controls. The repair tissue was characterized by biochemical and immunological analysis. The role of vascularity in healing was studied by

  19. XROMM analysis of rib kinematics during lung ventilation in the green iguana, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Moritz, Sabine; Ritter, Dale A

    2016-02-01

    The three-dimensional rotations of ribs during breathing are typically described as bucket-handle rotation about a dorsoventrally oriented axis, pump-handle rotation about a mediolateral axis, and caliper rotation about a rostrocaudal axis. In amniotes with double-headed ribs, rib motion is constrained primarily to one degree-of-freedom (DOF) rotation about an axis connecting the two rib articulations. However, in Squamata, the ribs are single headed and the hemispherical costovertebral joints permit rotations with three DOF. In this study, we used X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM ) to quantify rib rotation during deep breathing in four green iguanas. We found that rib rotation was strongly dominated by bucket-handle rotation, thus exhibiting nearly hinge-like motion, despite the potential for more complex motions. The vertebral and sternal segments of each rib did not deform measurably during breathing, but they did move relative to each other at a thin, cartilaginous intracostal joint. While standing still and breathing deeply, four individual iguanas showed variability in their rib postures, with two breathing around a highly inflated posture, and two breathing around a posture with the ribs folded halfway back. Bucket-handle rotations showed clear rostrocaudal gradients, with rotation increasing from the third cervical to the first or second dorsal rib, and then decreasing again caudally, a pattern that is consistent with the intercostal muscles in the rostral intercostal spaces being the primary drivers of inspiration. The constrained, primarily bucket-handle rotations observed here during breathing do not help to explain the evolution of permissive, hemispherical costovertebral joints in squamates from the more constrained, double-headed rib articulations of other amniotes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. recurrent traumatic posterior hip dislocation in labral avulsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003; 54(3):520-529. 5. Dameron, T.B Jr. Bucket-handle tear of acetabular labrum accompanying posterior dislocation of the hip. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1959; 41(1): 131-134. 6. Lieberman, J.R., Altchek, D.W. and Salvati,. E.A. Recurrent dislocation of a hip with a labral lesion: treatment with a modified Bankart-type repair.

  1. Displacement of the medial meniscus within the passive motion characteristics of the human knee joint: an RSA study in human cadaver knees.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, T. van; Buma, P.; Scholten, J.G.; Kampen, A. van; Veth, R.P.H.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate an in vitro human cadaver knee-joint model for the evaluation of the meniscal movement during knee-joint flexion. The question was whether our model showed comparable meniscal displacements to those found in earlier meniscal movement studies in vivo.

  2. Potential Market for New Meniscus Repair Strategies: Evaluation of the MOON Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetzer, Gary B.; Spindler, Kurt P.; Amendola, Annunziato; Andrish, Jack T.; Bergfeld, John A.; Dunn, Warren R.; Flanigan, David C.; Jones, Morgan; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Marx, Robert G.; Matava, Matthew J.; McCarty, Eric C.; Parker, Richard D.; Wolcott, Michelle; Vidal, Armando; Wolf, Brian R.; Wright, Rick W.

    2013-01-01

    Background An estimated 200,000 ACL reconstructions are performed each year in the United States. The presence of concomitant meniscus tears and subsequent treatment at the time of ACL reconstruction may determine long-term outcomes of these knees. The authors contend that a substantial number of these meniscal tears are treated in a fashion that reduces meniscal function and that new technologies are needed to treat meniscal tears in a fashion that preserves function. A large cohort of patients with meniscal tears is needed to demonstrate this need. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence of meniscal tears, describe tear morphology, and selected treatment in the MOON prospective longitudinal cohort of ACL reconstruction. We also will demonstrate based on national statistics the large potential market that exists for future tissue engineering aimed at preserving meniscal function. Methods A multicenter cohort of 1014 patients undergoing ACL reconstruction between January 2002 and December 2003 were evaluated. All procedures were performed by nine fellowship trained sports medicine orthopaedic surgeons. Data on patient demographics, presence of a meniscus tear at time of ACL reconstruction, tear morphology, and meniscal treatment were collected prospectively. Meniscal tears were categorized into three potential tissue engineering treatment strategies: all-biologic repair, advanced repair, and scaffold replacement. Results 1014 ACL reconstructions were performed over the two year period. The median age at the time of surgery was 24 years. Thirty-six percent of the knees had medial meniscal tears and 44% of the knees had lateral meniscal tears. Longitudinal tears were the most common tear morphology. The most frequent treatment modality was partial meniscectomy (60%). Thirty percent of medial meniscal tears and 10% of lateral meniscal tears could be treated with all-biologic repair, 32% of medial meniscal tears and 28% of lateral meniscal tears could

  3. The distribution and elimination of Bothrops erythromelas venom labeled with 131 I after intravenous injection in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies can be used to study the systemic effects of snake venoms and to develop standard serotherapy protocols for envenomation. Bothrops erythromelas is probably responsible for most of the snakebite in Pernambuco. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of B. erythromelas venom (BeV) in mice, and to evaluate the efficacy of bothropic antivenom. BeV showed bicompartmental distribution in the blood of the experimental animals. (author)

  4. The distribution and elimination of Bothrops erythromelas venom labeled with {sup 131} I after intravenous injection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, M.L. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Zoologia]. E-mail: rocha@cascavel.uefs.br

    1999-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies can be used to study the systemic effects of snake venoms and to develop standard serotherapy protocols for envenomation. Bothrops erythromelas is probably responsible for most of the snakebite in Pernambuco. The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of B. erythromelas venom (BeV) in mice, and to evaluate the efficacy of bothropic antivenom. BeV showed bicompartmental distribution in the blood of the experimental animals. (author)

  5. Arthroscopic meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tears reduces knee pain but is not cost-effective in a routine health care setting: a multi-center longitudinal observational study using data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, J J; Govers, T M; Buma, P; Rovers, M M; Hannink, G

    2018-02-01

    It is disputed whether arthroscopic meniscectomy is an (cost-) effective treatment for degenerative meniscus tears in day-to-day clinical practice. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic meniscectomy in subjects with knee osteoarthritis, in routine clinical practice, while taking into account the increased risk for future knee replacement surgery. We compared cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic meniscectomy compared to no surgery. We used a state transition (Markov) simulation model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic meniscectomy compared to no surgery in subjects with knee osteoarthritis (age range 45-79 years). Data used in the preparation of the current study were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (AOI) database. We applied a 9 years' time horizon (which is equal to the current OAI study follow up period), and evaluated cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective. The main outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (Euros per quality adjusted life-year (QALY) gained). Arthroscopic meniscectomy was associated with 8.09 (SD ± 0.07) QALYs at a cost of € 21,345 (SD ± 841), whereas the no surgery was associated with 8.05 (SD ± 0.07) QALYs at a cost of € 16,284 (SD ± 855). For arthroscopic meniscectomy, the incremental cost per QALY gained was € 150,754. In day-to-day clinical practice, arthroscopic meniscectomy in subjects with knee osteoarthritis is associated with € 150,754 per QALY gained, which exceeds the generally accepted willingness to pay (WTP) (range € 20,000-€ 80,000). Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiel, Jasper van; Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G.; Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N.; Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan; Weinans, Harrie

    2014-01-01

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1 GD on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1 GD in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD . A trend towards lower T1 GD in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1 GD ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1 GD compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1 GD suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  7. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM) in patients with knee osteoarthritis: relation with meniscal degeneration on conventional MRI, reproducibility, and correlation with dGEMRIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiel, Jasper van [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kotek, Gyula; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oei, Edwin H.G. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reijman, Max; Bos, Pieter K.; Verhaar, Jan A.N. [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bron, Esther E.; Klein, Stefan [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Weinans, Harrie [University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess (1) whether normal and degenerated menisci exhibit different T1{sub GD} on delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the meniscus (dGEMRIM), (2) the reproducibility of dGEMRIM and (3) the correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients. In 17 OA patients who underwent dGEMRIM twice within 7 days, meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was calculated. Meniscus pathology was evaluated on conventional MRI. T1{sub GD} in normal and degenerated menisci were compared using a Student's t-test. Reproducibility was assessed using ICCs. Pearson's correlation was calculated between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD}. A trend towards lower T1{sub GD} in degenerated menisci (mean: 402 ms; 95 % CI: 359-444 ms) compared to normal menisci (mean: 448 ms; 95 % CI: 423-473 ms) was observed (p = 0.05). Meniscus T1{sub GD} ICCs were 0.85-0.90. The correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} was moderate in the lateral (r = 0.52-0.75) and strong in the medial compartment (r = 0.78-0.94). Our results show that degenerated menisci have a clear trend towards lower T1{sub GD} compared to normal menisci. Since these results are highly reproducible, meniscus degeneration may be assessed within one delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI simultaneously with cartilage. The strong correlation between meniscus and cartilage T1{sub GD} suggests concomitant degeneration in both tissues in OA, but also suggests that dGEMRIC may not be regarded entirely as sulphated glycosaminoglycan specific. (orig.)

  8. Problems in the diagnosis of metaphyseal fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinman, Paul K.

    The radiographic projection influences the appearance of the metaphyseal fragment. If the long axis of the metaphysis and the radiographic projection are at right angles, the thicker peripheral margin of the metaphyseal fragment will be viewed end-on as a relatively discrete triangular bony fragment. A caudally or cranially angulated radiographic projection results in a curvilinear bony density that represents the dense peripheral margin of the fracture fragment that has been separated from the metaphysis. Thus, in one projection a fragment may appear as a corner fracture, and in another view, as a bucket-handle lesion. From autopsy and clinical studies it is evident that bruising overlying CMLs is often absent. (orig.)

  9. An experimental study of reconstructive procedures in lesions of the meniscus. Use of synovial flaps and carbon fiber implants for artificially made lesions in the meniscus of the rabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veth, R. P.; den Heeten, G. J.; Jansen, H. W.; Nielsen, H. K.

    1983-01-01

    Reconstructive procedures were investigated in meniscal lesions in 25 rabbits. Large meniscal defects were repaired with either a synovial flap or a carbon fiber implant. Fibrous tissue healing with occasional areas of fibrocartilage occurred after both types of reconstruction. When carbon fibers

  10. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederveen, D.; Bakker, C.J.G.; Scholten, F.G.; Feldberg, N.A.M.; Postma, J.H.; Vis, H. van der

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients suspected of having meniscal lesions, were examined bt magnetic resonance (MR) and arthroscopy, MR and arthroscopy corelate well for meniscal and cruciate ligament lesions. Damage of the articular cartilage was, however, not detected by MR (author). 15 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  12. A novel method for fabrication of biodegradable scaffolds with high compression moduli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeGroot, JH; Kuijper, HW; Pennings, AJ

    1997-01-01

    It has been previously shown that, when used for meniscal reconstruction, porous copoly(L-lactide/epsilon-caprolactone) implants enhanced healing of meniscal lesions owing to their excellent adhesive properties. However, it appeared that the materials had an insufficient compression modulus to

  13. Loaded versus unloaded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the knee: Effect on meniscus extrusion in healthy volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Patel

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that medial meniscal extrusion significantly increased during loading, specifically in those low KL scores (0 and 1 and in KL score of 3. Loaded MRI may more accurately determine the extent of medial meniscal extrusion in particular in those with no to minimal OA.

  14. The meniscus tear. State of the art of rehabilitation protocols related to surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizziero, Antonio; Ferrari, Raffaello; Giannotti, Erika; Ferroni, Costanza; Poli, Patrizia; Masiero, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Meniscal injuries represent one of the most frequent lesions in sport practicing and in particular in soccer players and skiers. Pain, functional limitation and swelling are typical symptoms associated with meniscal tears. Epidemiological studies showed that all meniscal lesions, in different sports athletes, involves 24% of medial meniscus, while 8% of lateral meniscus and about 20-30% of meniscal lesions are associated with other ligament injuries. Meniscal tears can be treated conservatively or surgically. Surgery leads in many cases to complete resolution of symptoms and allows the return to sport activity. However many studies show that this treatment can induce more frequently the development of degenerative conditions if not correctly associated to a specific rehabilitation protocol. The aim of this article is to compare different timing in specific rehabilitation programs related to the most actual surgical options.

  15. Meniscus tears of the knee: Postarthrogram high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Do, Young Soo; You, Jin Jong; Gong, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-eight knees with clinically suspected meniscal tears were examined with high resolution computed tomography(HRCT) immediately following double contrast arthrography. All subsequently underwent arthroscopy. The findings of postarthrogram HRCT and arthroscopy were compared to evaluated the usefulness of postarthrogram HRCT in diagnosis of the meniscal tears. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of HRCT were 96.2%. 83.3% and 92.1% respectively. The anatomic details of the meniscal tears were clearly visible on the HRCT scans. Sagittal and coronal reformation views well visualized the horizontal tears and the relationship of torn meniscal fragments, and well differential the peripheral tears from the synovial recess. Our result indicate that postarthrogram HRCT not only is a sensitive and effective method for the detection and characterization of the meniscal tears, but also provides arthroscopists with the appropriate surgical plans

  16. Shelbourne's update of the O'Donoghue knee triad in a 17-year-old male Rugby player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan

    2013-01-23

    Acute athletic knee injuries are often caused by a combination of valgus impact with external rotation of the tibia leading to a triad of injuries involving medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament disruption with associated meniscal damage. This injury pattern has been greatly discussed in the literature with conflicts of opinion and evidence as to whether medial or lateral meniscal pathology has a higher incidence. This case report introduces a 17-year-old male athlete with this unhappy triad It will evaluate the clinical assessment which suggested a medial meniscal lesion follow the patient through arthroscopy revealing a lateral meniscal tear in addition to complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and grade 2 medial collateral ligament tear. It will go on to look at the evidence base for the relative incidence of lateral and medial meniscal injuries and will evaluate the role of MRI in assessing acute athletic knee injuries.

  17. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lefevre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears.

  18. Repair of Avascular Meniscus Tears with Electrospun Collagen Scaffolds Seeded with Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jihye; Sovani, Sujata; Glembotski, Nicholas E; Du, Jiang; Jin, Sungho; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2016-03-01

    The self-healing capacity of an injured meniscus is limited to the vascularized regions and is especially challenging in the inner avascular regions. As such, we investigated the use of human meniscus cell-seeded electrospun (ES) collagen type I scaffolds to produce meniscal tissue and explored whether these cell-seeded scaffolds can be implanted to repair defects created in meniscal avascular tissue explants. Human meniscal cells (derived from vascular and avascular meniscal tissue) were seeded on ES scaffolds and cultured. Constructs were evaluated for cell viability, gene expression, and mechanical properties. To determine potential for repair of meniscal defects, human meniscus avascular cells were seeded and cultured on aligned ES collagen scaffolds for 4 weeks before implantation. Surgical defects resembling "longitudinal tears" were created in the avascular zone of bovine meniscus and implanted with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds and cultured for 3 weeks. Tissue regeneration and integration were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry, mechanical testing, and magentic resonance imaging. Ex vivo implantation with cell-seeded collagen scaffolds resulted in neotissue that was significantly better integrated with the native tissue than acellular collagen scaffolds or untreated defects. Human meniscal cell-seeded ES collagen scaffolds may therefore be useful in facilitating meniscal repair of avascular meniscus tears.

  19. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Nicolas; Naouri, Jean Francois; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears. PMID:27057352

  20. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  1. MR Imaging of a Posterior Root Tear of the Medial Meniscus: Diagnostic Accuracy of Various Tear Configurations and Associated Knee Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyang Mi; Shim, Jae Chan; Kim, Jin Goo; Lee, Jae Myeong; Nam, Mee Young; Lee, Ghi Jai; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the various tear configurations in a medial meniscal posterior horn root tear and assess whether any correlation exists with other associated knee abnormalities in MR imaging. A retrospective review of 146 preoperative knee MR images were performed by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The tear configuration and other abnormalities were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of each configuration in the medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were calculated. A total of 48 medial meniscal posterior horn root tears including 38 full-thickness radial, 7 partial-thickness radial, and 3 complex tears were confirmed during arthroscopy. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the detection of medial meniscal posterior horn root tear were 92% (44/48), 99% (97/98), and 97% (141/146), respectively. For each tear configuration, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82% (31/38), 97% (105/108), and 93% (136/146) for full-thickness radial tears, respectively, and 43% (3/7), 94% (131/139), and 91% (134/146) for partial-thickness radial tears, respectively. The incidence of degenerative joint disease was 85% (41/48) for the tear group, revealing a strong association. In patients with a root tear and with degenerative joint disease, the incidence of high grade cartilage defects involving the medial femoral condyle was at 80% (33/41), compared to 56% (23/41) for the presence of medial meniscal extrusion. In contrast, a similar comparison of incidence for patients with no root tears but with degenerative joint disease was at 68% (17/25) and 26% (8/31), respectively. MR imaging is very sensitive for the detection of medial meniscal root tears, but has reduced the accuracy with regard to each tear configuration. Medial meniscal root tears showed a strong association with degenerative joint disease. High grade cartilage defects of the medial femoral condyle and medial meniscal extrusions also

  2. Pathological fracture of the manubrium sternum of unknown aetiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    during which time he experienced pain over the left anterior third and ... consisted of a solitary medial meniscal tear of the right knee ... healing fracture site, and the investigations revealed no evidence of a tumour or structural abnormality.

  3. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Do ...

  4. Prosthetic replacement of the medial meniscus in cadaveric knees - Does the prosthesis mimic the functional behavior of the native meniscus?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tienen, TG; Verdonschot, N; Heijkants, RGJC; Buma, R; Scholten, JGF; van Kampen, A; Veth, RPH

    2004-01-01

    Meniscus replacement by a polymer meniscus prosthesis in dogs resulted in generation of new meniscal tissue. Hypothesis: Optimal functioning of the prosthesis would involve realistic deformation and motion patterns of the prosthesis during knee joint motion. Study Design: Controlled laboratory

  5. Review: Modelling of meniscus of knee joint during soccer kicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrul Hisham Mohd Adib, Mohd; Firdaus Jaafar, Mohd

    2013-12-01

    Knee is a part of the body that located between thigh and shank is one of the most complicated and largest joints in the human body. The common injuries that occur are ligaments, meniscus or bone fracture. During soccer games, the knee is the most critical part that will easily injure due to the shock from an external impact. Torn meniscus is one of the effects. This study will investigate the effect towards the meniscus within the knee joint during soccer ball kicking. We conduct a literary review of 14 journals that discuss the general view of meniscus and also soccer kicking. The selected topics for this review paper are meniscal function, meniscal movement, meniscal tears and also instep kick. As a finding, statistics show that most meniscal tears (73%) occurred in athletes who were soccer players, basketball players or skiers. The tear is frequently happening at the medial side rather than lateral side with a percentage of 70%.

  6. Advances in combining gene therapy with cell and tissue engineering-based approaches to enhance healing of the meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, M; McNulty, A L; Mauck, R L; Setton, L A; Guilak, F; Madry, H

    2016-08-01

    Meniscal lesions are common problems in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine, and injury or loss of the meniscus accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Despite a variety of therapeutic options in the clinics, there is a critical need for improved treatments to enhance meniscal repair. In this regard, combining gene-, cell-, and tissue engineering-based approaches is an attractive strategy to generate novel, effective therapies to treat meniscal lesions. In the present work, we provide an overview of the tools currently available to improve meniscal repair and discuss the progress and remaining challenges for potential future translation in patients. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Large increase in arthroscopic meniscus surgery in the middle-aged and older population in Denmark from 2000 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlund, Jonas B; Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background - Arthroscopic meniscal surgery is the most common orthopedic procedure, and the incidence has increased in Denmark over the last 10 years. Concomitantly, several randomized controlled trials have shown no benefit of arthroscopic procedures including arthroscopic partial meniscectomy i...

  8. Meniscectomy: indications, procedure, outcomes, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anetzberger H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hermann Anetzberger,1 Christof Birkenmaier,2 Stephan Lorenz3 1Orthopädische Gemeinschaftspraxis am OEZ, Munich, Germany; 2Department of Orthopedics, Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich, Munich, Germany; 3Department of Orthopedic Sports Medicine, Technical University of Munich, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich, Germany Abstract: Meniscal injuries are among the most frequent reasons for knee problems. The goal of this manuscript is to review the biomechanical relevance of the human knee's menisci in relation to surgical indications, surgical techniques, rehabilitation, and outcomes. In order to identify the relevant literature, we performed a PubMed search for the years ranging from 1980–2013 using the following search terms: meniscus; biomechanical function; meniscectomy; meniscal repair; and clinical outcome. The meniscus helps to distribute the forces between the tibial and femoral articular cartilage layers in a load-sharing capacity. Meniscus damage or meniscectomy intuitively leads to an overloading of the cartilage and, hence, to the development of osteoarthrosis. Precise knowledge of meniscal shape and function, of the type of injury, of surgical techniques, as well as of postsurgical rehabilitative care are of decisive importance for an individually-adjusted treatment strategy. Other underlying coexisting knee pathologies also need to be considered. The diagnosis of a meniscal injury is based upon clinical history, physical examination, and imaging studies. The treatment of a meniscal lesion includes conservative, as well as operative, procedures. The goals of surgery are to reduce pain and disability, as well as to preserve meniscal function without causing additional cartilage damage. The resection of meniscal tissue should be restricted to as much as is necessary, and as little as is reasonably possible. Postoperative rehabilitation serves the purpose of improving functional deficits and pain, as well as of restoring a good range of

  9. Proton density-weighted MR imaging of the knee: fat suppression versus without fat suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Sun Ki; Jee, Won-Hee; Kim, Jung-Man

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression for detecting meniscal tears. The study involved 48 patients who underwent arthroscopy less than 3 months after proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression. Sagittal images were independently reviewed by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Medial and lateral menisci were separately analyzed in terms of anterior horn, body, and posterior horn. Interobserver agreement was assessed using κ coefficients. The McNemar test was used to determine any differences between the two methods in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Arthroscopy findings were used as the diagnostic reference standard. Arthroscopy revealed 71 tears involving 85 meniscal segments: 34 medial meniscal segments and 51 lateral meniscal segments. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each radiologist were 95% (81/85), 92% (186/203), and 93% (267/288), and 93% (79/85), 93% (189/203), and 93% (268/288) when using fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging, and 91% (77/85), 93% (189/203), and 92% (266/288), and 91% (77/85), 93% (188/203), and 92% (265/288) when using proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression, respectively. Interobserver agreement for meniscal tears was very high with proton-weighted imaging with (κ = 0.87) or without (κ = 0.86) fat suppression. There were no significant differences for detection of medial meniscal tears when using proton density-weighted imaging with or without fat suppression for both readers (p > 0.05). Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging can replace proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression for the detection of meniscal tears. (orig.)

  10. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively. (orig.)

  11. Proton density-weighted MR imaging of the knee: fat suppression versus without fat suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So-Yeon; Kim, Sun Ki [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jee, Won-Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Catholic University of Korea, Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Man [Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression for detecting meniscal tears. The study involved 48 patients who underwent arthroscopy less than 3 months after proton density-weighted imaging with and without fat suppression. Sagittal images were independently reviewed by two radiologists for the presence of meniscal tears. Medial and lateral menisci were separately analyzed in terms of anterior horn, body, and posterior horn. Interobserver agreement was assessed using {kappa} coefficients. The McNemar test was used to determine any differences between the two methods in terms of sensitivity and specificity. Arthroscopy findings were used as the diagnostic reference standard. Arthroscopy revealed 71 tears involving 85 meniscal segments: 34 medial meniscal segments and 51 lateral meniscal segments. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each radiologist were 95% (81/85), 92% (186/203), and 93% (267/288), and 93% (79/85), 93% (189/203), and 93% (268/288) when using fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging, and 91% (77/85), 93% (189/203), and 92% (266/288), and 91% (77/85), 93% (188/203), and 92% (265/288) when using proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression, respectively. Interobserver agreement for meniscal tears was very high with proton-weighted imaging with ({kappa} = 0.87) or without ({kappa} = 0.86) fat suppression. There were no significant differences for detection of medial meniscal tears when using proton density-weighted imaging with or without fat suppression for both readers (p > 0.05). Fat-suppressed proton density-weighted imaging can replace proton density-weighted imaging without fat suppression for the detection of meniscal tears. (orig.)

  12. Biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel for knee meniscus applications, including comparison with human donor samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer C; Curley, Colin; Tierney, Paul; Kennedy, James E

    2016-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was the biomechanical analysis of a salt-modified polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel, in order to assess its potential for use as an artificial meniscal implant. Aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was treated with a sodium sulphate (Na2SO4) solution to precipitate out the polyvinyl alcohol resulting in a pliable hydrogel. The freeze-thaw process, a strictly physical method of crosslinking, was employed to crosslink the hydrogel. Development of a meniscal shaped mould and sample housing unit allowed the production of meniscal shaped hydrogels for direct comparison to human meniscal tissue. Results obtained show that compressive responses were slightly higher in PVA/Na2SO4 menisci, displaying maximum compressive loads of 2472N, 2482N and 2476N for samples having undergone 1, 3 and 5 freeze-thaw cycles respectively. When compared to the human meniscal tissue tested under the same conditions, an average maximum load of 2467.5N was observed. This suggests that the PVA/Na2SO4 menisci are mechanically comparable to the human meniscus. Biocompatibility analysis of PVA/Na2SO4 hydrogels revealed no acute cytotoxicity. The work described herein has innovative potential in load bearing applications, specifically as an alternative to meniscectomy as replacement of critically damaged meniscal tissue in the knee joint where repair is not viable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extrusion of the medial meniscus in knee osteoarthritis assessed with a rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet MRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Francesco; Revelli, Matteo; Piccazzo, Riccardo; Astengo, Davide; Camellino, Dario; Puntoni, Matteo; Muda, Alessandro; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the influence of weight-bearing on tibiofemoral osteoarthritis, including medial meniscal extrusion, by using a low-field (0.25 T) rotating clino-orthostatic permanent-magnet magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, and to analyse correlations of medial meniscal extrusion with the patient's Kellgren-Lawrence score, body mass index, and all the osteoarthritis features of the WORMS scoring system. Twenty-six patients (69.2% women and 30.8% men; mean age 67 ± 9.7 years) with medial tibiofemoral knee osteoarthritis were prospectively enrolled and MR sequences were acquired in both clino- and orthostatic position. MR images were assessed by two independent radiologists, according to the WORMS scale. Medial meniscal extrusion was measured and its clino-orthostatic difference (∆MME) was calculated. Intra- and inter-observer agreement of the WORMS Global Score readings was high by Cohen's K test (>0.81). No significant clino-orthostatic changes in the scoring parameters of the medial tibiofemoral joint were shown by Wilcoxon's test. Medial meniscal extrusion measured on orthostatic images was significantly higher than that measured in clinostatic position (p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, the Kellgren-Lawrence score, WORMS Global Score, cartilage loss, meniscal damage, and osteophytes were significantly correlated to ∆MME (p < 0.005). Using a multiple regression model, tibiofemoral cartilage loss was found to correlate independently with ∆MME (p = 0.0499). Medial meniscal extrusion, evaluated with an open-configuration, rotating MR scanner, increased from the clinostatic to the orthostatic position. ∆MME, a new meniscal parameter, correlated with several important features of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis.

  14. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Fine, Jason P.

    2005-01-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  15. Is intra-articular pathology associated with MCL edema on MR imaging of the non-traumatic knee?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Madison (United States); Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Statistics, Madison (United States); University of Wisconsin, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Madison (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Edema surrounding the medial collateral ligament (MCL) is seen on MR imaging in patients with MCL injuries and in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis in the non-traumatic knee. Because we noted MCL edema in patients without prior trauma or osteoarthritis, we studied the association between intra-articular pathology and MCL edema in patients without knee trauma. We evaluated the MR examinations of 247 consecutive patients (121 male, 126 female with a mean age of 44 years) without recent trauma for the presence of edema surrounding the MCL, meniscal and ACL tears, medial meniscal extrusion, medial compartment chondromalacia, and osteoarthritis. The percentages of patients illustrating MCL edema with and without each type of pathology were compared using Fisher's exact test to determine if there was a statistically significant association. We found MCL edema in 60% of 247 patients. MCL edema was present in 67% of patients with medial meniscal tears, 35% with lateral meniscal tears, 100% with meniscal extrusion of 3 mm or more, 78% with femoral chondromalacia, 82% with tibial chondromalacia, and 50% with osteoarthritis. The percentage of patients with edema increased with the severity of the chondromalacia. These associations were all statistically significant (p <0.02). The mean age of those with MCL edema was 49.7 years compared with 34.9 years without MCL edema (p <0.001). Patient gender and ACL tear did not correlate with MCL edema. Nine (4%) of the 247 patients had MCL edema without intra-articular pathology. None of these 9 patients had MCL tenderness or joint laxity on physical examination. We confirmed that MCL edema is associated with osteoarthritis, but is also associated with meniscal tears, meniscal extrusion, and chondromalacia. In addition, MCL edema can be seen in patients without intra-articular pathology, recent trauma or MCL abnormality on physical examination. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of the menisci of the knee joint using three-dimensional isotropic resolution fast spin-echo imaging: diagnostic performance in 250 patients with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Davis, Kirkland W.; Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Woods, Michael A.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of FSE-Cube, a three-dimensional isotropic resolution intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo sequence, with a routine magnetic resonance (MR) protocol at 3.0 T for detecting surgically confirmed meniscal tears of the knee joint in a large patient population. FSE-Cube was added to a routine MR protocol performed at 3.0 T on 250 patients who underwent subsequent knee arthroscopy. Three radiologists independently used FSE-Cube during one review and the routine MR protocol during a second review to detect medial and lateral meniscal tears. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears were determined for all readers combined. McNemar's tests were used to compare diagnostic performance between FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol. FSE-cube and the routine MR protocol had similar sensitivity (95.5%/95.3% respectively, P=0.94) and similar specificity (69.8%/74.0% respectively, P=0.10) for detecting 156 medial meniscal tears. FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity than the routine MR protocol (79.4%/85.0% respectively, P < 0.05) but similar specificity (83.9%/82.2% respectively, P=0.37) for detecting 89 lateral mensical tears. For lateral meniscal tears, FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the routine MR protocol for detecting 19 root tears but similar sensitivity (P=0.17-1.00) for detecting all other tear locations and types. FSE-Cube had diagnostic performance similar to a routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears except for a significantly lower sensitivity for detecting lateral meniscal tears, which was mainly attributed to decreased ability to identify lateral meniscus root tears. (orig.)

  17. Platelet-Rich Plasma Increases the Levels of Catabolic Molecules and Cellular Dedifferentiation in the Meniscus of a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Rim Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the susceptibility to frequent intrinsic and extrinsic injuries, especially in the inner zone, the meniscus does not heal spontaneously owing to its poor vascularity. In this study, the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP, containing various growth factors, on meniscal mechanisms was examined under normal and post-traumatic inflammatory conditions. Isolated primary meniscal cells of New Zealand white (NZW rabbits were incubated for 3, 10, 14 and 21 days with PRP(−, 10% PRP (PRP(+, IL(+ or IL(+PRP(+. The meniscal cells were collected and examined using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Culture media were examined by immunoblot analyses for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP catabolic molecules. PRP containing growth factors improved the cellular viability of meniscal cells in a concentration-dependent manner at Days 1, 4 and 7. However, based on RT-PCR, meniscal cells demonstrated dedifferentiation, along with an increase in type I collagen in the PRP(+ and in IL(+PRP(+. In PRP(+, the aggrecan expression levels were lower than in the PRP(− until Day 21. The protein levels of MMP-1 and MMP-3 were higher in each PRP group, i.e., PRP(+ and IL(+PRP(+, at each culture time. A reproducible 2-mm circular defect on the meniscus of NZW rabbit was used to implant fibrin glue (control or PRP in vivo. After eight weeks, the lesions in the control and PRP groups were occupied with fibrous tissue, but not with meniscal cells. This study shows that PRP treatment of the meniscus results in an increase of catabolic molecules, especially those related to IL-1α-induced inflammation, and that PRP treatment for an in vivo meniscus injury accelerates fibrosis, instead of meniscal cartilage.

  18. Whole meniscus regeneration using polymer scaffolds loaded with fibrochondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Hua-ding

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To study the feasibility of regenerating a whole menisci using poly- (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV scaffolds loaded with meniscal cells in rabbits undergoing total meniscectomy, and to explore its protective effect on cartilage degeneration. Methods: A solvent casting and particulate leaching technique was employed to fabricate biodegradable PHBV scaffolds into a meniscal shape. The proliferated meniscal cells were seeded onto the polymer scaffolds, transplanted into rabbit knee joints whose lateral menisci had been removed. Eight to 18 weeks after transplantation, the regenerated neomenisci were evaluated by gross and histological observations. Cartilage degeneration was assessed by Mankin score. Results: Eighteen weeks after transplantation, the implants formed neomenisci. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE staining of the neomenisci sections revealed regeneration of fibrocartilage. Type I collagen in the neomenisci was also proved similar to normal meniscal tissue by immunohistochemical analysis and Sirius scarlet trinitrophenol staining. Articular cartilage degeneration was observed 8 weeks after implantation. It was less severe as compared with that in total meniscectomy controls and no further degeneration was observed at 18 weeks. At that time, the regenerated neomenisci strongly resembled normal meniscal fibrocartilage in gross and histological appearance, and its mechani- cal property was also close to that of normal meniscus. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the feasibility of tissue-engineering a whole meniscal structure in total meniscectomy rabbit models using biodegradable PHBV scaffolds together with cultured allogeneic meniscal cells. Cartilage degeneration is decreased. But long-term in vivo investigations on the histological structure and cartilage degeneration of the neomenisci regenerated by this method are still necessary to determine the clinical potential of this tissue

  19. Evaluation of the menisci of the knee joint using three-dimensional isotropic resolution fast spin-echo imaging: diagnostic performance in 250 patients with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Davis, Kirkland W.; Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Woods, Michael A.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of FSE-Cube, a three-dimensional isotropic resolution intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo sequence, with a routine magnetic resonance (MR) protocol at 3.0 T for detecting surgically confirmed meniscal tears of the knee joint in a large patient population. FSE-Cube was added to a routine MR protocol performed at 3.0 T on 250 patients who underwent subsequent knee arthroscopy. Three radiologists independently used FSE-Cube during one review and the routine MR protocol during a second review to detect medial and lateral meniscal tears. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, the sensitivity and specificity of FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears were determined for all readers combined. McNemar's tests were used to compare diagnostic performance between FSE-Cube and the routine MR protocol. FSE-cube and the routine MR protocol had similar sensitivity (95.5%/95.3% respectively, P=0.94) and similar specificity (69.8%/74.0% respectively, P=0.10) for detecting 156 medial meniscal tears. FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity than the routine MR protocol (79.4%/85.0% respectively, P < 0.05) but similar specificity (83.9%/82.2% respectively, P=0.37) for detecting 89 lateral mensical tears. For lateral meniscal tears, FSE-Cube had significantly lower sensitivity (P < 0.05) than the routine MR protocol for detecting 19 root tears but similar sensitivity (P=0.17-1.00) for detecting all other tear locations and types. FSE-Cube had diagnostic performance similar to a routine MR protocol for detecting meniscal tears except for a significantly lower sensitivity for detecting lateral meniscal tears, which was mainly attributed to decreased ability to identify lateral meniscus root tears. (orig.)

  20. Kinematic change of the meniscus and the tibiofemoral joint space in asymptomatic volunteers using a wide bore 3T closed MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Yeo Ju; Kim, Mi Young; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Choong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae Hyung [Inha University Hospital, Clinical Trail Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ryuh Sup [Inha University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate kinematic changes in menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in extension and flexion using asymptomatic volunteers using a wide-bore 3-T closed MRI system. Twenty-two knees from asymptomatic volunteers were examined in knee extension and flexion using a 3-T MRI (sagittal 2D FSE T2-weighted sequence and sagittal 3D isotropic FSE proton density-weighted cube sequence). The meniscal positions, meniscal floating and flounce were evaluated. The widths of the medial and lateral tibiofemoral joint spaces and coronal tibiofemoral angles were measured. In the anteroposterior direction, meniscal extrusion was most frequently seen in the anterior horn of the medial menisci (100 %) in extensions (maximum 6.04 mm). Most of the menisci moved significantly to the posterior side from extension to flexion. The anteroposterior meniscal movement was the greatest for the anterior horn of the medial meniscus and least for the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. In the mediolateral direction, meniscal extrusion was seen in 52 % of the medial menisci in extensions (maximum 1.91 mm) and 29 % of lateral menisci in flexions (maximum 2.36 mm). From the extension to flexion, all medial and lateral menisci moved significantly to the lateral side. Meniscal floating was frequently observed in the posterior horn of medial menisci in extension. Meniscal flounce was frequently seen in lateral menisci in flexion with a widened lateral tibiofemoral joint space gap. The coronal tibiofemoral angle showed medial wedging in flexion, but not in extension. Wide-bore 3-T closed MRI revealed significant kinematic changes in the menisci and tibiofemoral joint spaces in asymptomatic volunteers. (orig.)

  1. Do MRI features at baseline predict radiographic joint space narrowing in the medial compartment of the osteoarthritic knee 2 years later?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madan-Sharma, Ruby; Kornaat, Peter R.; Bloem, Johannes L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet; Botha-Scheepers, Stella A. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Graverand, Marie-Pierre Hellio le [Pfizer Groton, Groton, CT (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of the study was to relate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features at baseline with radiographically determined joint space narrowing (JSN) in the medial compartment of the knee after 2 years in a group of patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis at multiple joint sites. MRI of the knee and standardized radiographs were obtained at baseline and after 2 years in 186 patients (81% female; aged 43-76 years; mean 60 years). MRI was analyzed for bone marrow lesions, cysts, osteophytes, hyaline cartilage defects, joint effusion, and meniscal pathology in the medial compartment. Radiographs were scored semiquantitatively for JSN in the medial tibiofemoral joint using the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) atlas. Radiological progression was defined as {>=}1 grade increase. Associations between baseline magnetic resonance (MR) parameters and subsequent radiographic JSN changes were assessed using logistic regression. Relative risk (RR) was then calculated. Radiographic progression of JSN was observed in 17 (9.1%) of 186 patients. Eleven patients had a Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) score of {>=}2. A significant association was observed between all patients and meniscal tears (RR 3.57; confidence interval (CI) 1.08-10.0) and meniscal subluxation (RR 2.73; CI 1.20-5.41), between KL<2 and meniscal subluxation (RR 11.3; CI 2.49-29.49) and KL {>=} 2 and meniscus tears (RR 8.91; CI 1.13-22.84) and radiographic JSN 2 years later. Follow-up MR in 15 of 17 patients with progressive JSN showed only new meniscal abnormalities and no progression of cartilage loss. Meniscal pathology (tears and/or meniscal subluxation) was the only MRI parameter to be associated with subsequent radiographic progression of JSN in the medial tibiofemoral compartment on a radiograph 2 years later, as assessed by the OARSI score. (orig.)

  2. Estudo artroscópico da articulação do joelho em cães portadores de lesão do ligamento cruzado cranial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Cecilia Tatarunas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to report intra articular changes observed by means of arthroscopic in dogs bearing cranial cruciate ligament injuries. Sixty-three dogs (sixty-five knee joints with naturally occurring cranial cruciate injury were used. The arthroscopy was carried out before the ligament repair and the observed changes were both recorded and reported. According to the results obtained from this research it is significant to mention the presence of plicae on suprapatelar joint pouch; roughness, neovascularization and osteophytes in patella. The lateral meniscus presented axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and complete laceration. The medial meniscus showed bucket handle tear, complete laceration, axial fringe tear, fibrillation, neovascularization and mineralization. The cranial cruciate ligament was completely ruptured, partially ruptured, interstitially ruptured and linked to the structures of the intercondylar notch. The caudal cruciate ligament showed vertical splits, besides fibrillation and partial rupture. Arthroscopy has been used for diagnostic of cranial cruciate ligament injuries in dogs. It permits improved diagnostic capability when evaluating cartilage and sinovial changes, meniscus and ligaments tears.

  3. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  4. MRI of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Tielinen, Laura; Lindahl, Jan; Hirvensalo, Eero

    2006-01-01

    To analyze with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the signal appearance of menisci repaired with bioabsorbable arrows. Forty-four patients with 47 meniscal tears treated with bioabsorbable arrows underwent follow-up conventional MRI examination. The time interval between the surgery and MRI varied from 5 to 67 months (mean 26 months). Twenty-six patients also had concurrent repair of torn anterior cruciate ligament. The following grades were used to classify meniscal signal intensity: (a) G0; low signal intensity on all sequences and regular configuration in every plane, (b) G1; increased signal intensity within the meniscus, not extending to the meniscal surface, (c) G2; increased signal intensity linear in shape, which may or may not communicate with the capsular margin of the meniscus, without extending to the meniscal surface, and (d) G3; increased signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface. Thirteen menisci (27.5%) had normal signal intensity, 13 menisci (27.5%) Grade 1 signal intensity, 9 menisci (19%) Grade 2 signal intensity and 12 menisci (26%) Grade 3 signal intensity. The time difference between operation and MRI was statistically significant between the G0 (36 months) and G3 groups (14 months; P=0.0288). There was no statistical significance in different grades between medial and lateral meniscus or between patients with operated or intact ACL. On physical examination sixteen patients reported slight symptoms, seen evenly in each group. (orig.)

  5. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of modular knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartier, P.; Mammeri, M.; Villers, P.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-five modular total knee replacements, 54 of them unicompartmental, have been reviewed. The average follow-up was three years. The major indication for operation was pain. A precise preoperative radiographic evaluation and a technique for a positioning the components are described. This had led to a significant improvement in the clinical and radiographic results in 67 out of 95 knees which were operated on. The modifications concern the orientation of the tibial cut, the placing of the femoral components and the correction of axial deviation. The main causes of the 13% of failures in our series were either errors in positioning the components or a preoperative diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Unicompartmental replacement gave similar results in both valgus and varus knees, and the morbidity was lower than in the bicompartmental replacements. The best results were obtained in osteoarthristic knees in elderly patients and in posttraumatic osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  6. Fabrication and characterization of anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds for advanced drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalani G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ghulam Jalani,* Chan Woo Jung,* Jae Sang Lee, Dong Woo Lim Department of Bionano Engineering, College of Engineering Sciences, Hanyang University, Education Research Industry Cluster at Ansan Campus, Ansan, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Stimuli-responsive, polymer-based nanostructures with anisotropic compartments are of great interest as advanced materials because they are capable of switching their shape via environmentally-triggered conformational changes, while maintaining discrete compartments. In this study, a new class of stimuli-responsive, anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds with physically and chemically distinct compartments was prepared via electrohydrodynamic cojetting with side-by-side needle geometry. These nanofibers have a thermally responsive, physically-crosslinked compartment, and a chemically-crosslinked compartment at the nanoscale. The thermally responsive compartment is composed of physically crosslinkable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide poly(NIPAM copolymers, and poly(NIPAM-co-stearyl acrylate poly(NIPAM-co-SA, while the thermally-unresponsive compartment is composed of polyethylene glycol dimethacrylates. The two distinct compartments were physically crosslinked by the hydrophobic interaction of the stearyl chains of poly(NIPAM-co-SA or chemically stabilized via ultraviolet irradiation, and were swollen in physiologically relevant buffers due to their hydrophilic polymer networks. Bicompartmental nanofibers with the physically-crosslinked network of the poly(NIPAM-co-SA compartment showed a thermally-triggered shape change due to thermally-induced aggregation of poly(NIPAM-co-SA. Furthermore, when bovine serum albumin and dexamethasone phosphate were separately loaded into each compartment, the bicompartmental nanofibers with anisotropic actuation exhibited decoupled, controlled release profiles of both drugs in response to a temperature. A new class of multicompartmental nanofibers could be

  7. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, N.; Cotten, A.; Dewatre, F.; Chastanet, P.; Gougeon, F.

    1997-01-01

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors)

  8. MRI of cystic collection of the three joint; Les collections kystiques du genou en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, N.; Cotten, A.; Dewatre, F.; Chastanet, P.; Gougeon, F. [Hopital R. Salengro, C.H.U., 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-09-01

    We present the main MR features of cystic lesions around the knee joint. Popliteal cysts are the most frequently seen. The usually result from extrusion of joint fluid into the gastrocnemio-semimembranosus bursa but they can have an atypical location or extension. They are most often due to a meniscal, ligamentous, degenerative or inflammatory joint disease responsible for a chronic joint effusion. Meniscal cysts are always associated with a horizontal tear. Medial meniscal cysts are larger and can extend far from the joint. Bursitis occur as a result of inflammation or infection of a bursa. Their location is stereotyped and they do not communicate with the knee joint. Ganglion cysts or ganglia are benign cystic lesions which can affect peri-articular tissues as well as subchondral bone or cruciate ligaments. MRI is now a simple and noninvasive way of obtaining etiologic diagnosis and guiding therapy. (authors). 46 refs.

  9. Clinical Application of Scaffolds for Partial Meniscus Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Cathal J; Withers, Daniel P; Kurzweil, Peter R; Verdonk, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Meniscal tears are common injuries often treated by partial meniscectomy. This may result in altered joint contact mechanics which in turn may lead to worsening symptoms and an increased risk of osteoarthritis. Meniscal scaffolds have been proposed as a treatment option aimed at reducing symptoms while also potentially reducing progression of degenerative change. There are 2 scaffolds available for clinical use at the present time; Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit. Medium-term to long-term data (4.9 to 11.3 y) demonstrate efficacy of partial meniscus replacement. The patients who seem to benefit most are chronic postmeniscectomy rather than acute meniscal injuries. Herein we report on available clinical data for Collagen Meniscus Implant and Actifit while describing our preferred surgical technique and postoperative rehabilitation program.

  10. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging in identifying the vascular and avascular zones of human meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tan; Chen, Juan; Wu, Bing; Zheng, Dandan; Jiao, Sheng; Song, Yan; Chen, Min

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that the intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging may depict microcirculation of meniscus and the perfusion changes in meniscal disorder. Fifty patients received diffusion-weighted MRI with multiple b-values ranging from 0 to 400 s/mm 2 . The four horns of the menisci were divided into normal, degenerated, and torn groups. IVIM parameters including perfusion fraction (f), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), true diffusion coefficient (D), and the product of f and D* (f D*) of normal meniscal red zone and white zone were derived and compared for microcirculation changes of normal, degenerated, and torn posterior horn of the medial meniscus (PMM). The parameters between red and white zones among the groups were compared. Significant differences were considered when P meniscus and the perfusion changes in meniscal disorder. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1090-1096. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Human Migratory Meniscus Progenitor Cells Are Controlled via the TGF-β Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Hayat; Schminke, Boris; Bode, Christa; Roth, Moritz; Albert, Julius; von der Heyde, Silvia; Rosen, Vicki; Miosge, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    Summary Degeneration of the knee joint during osteoarthritis often begins with meniscal lesions. Meniscectomy, previously performed extensively after meniscal injury, is now obsolete because of the inevitable osteoarthritis that occurs following this procedure. Clinically, meniscus self-renewal is well documented as long as the outer, vascularized meniscal ring remains intact. In contrast, regeneration of the inner, avascular meniscus does not occur. Here, we show that cartilage tissue harvested from the avascular inner human meniscus during the late stages of osteoarthritis harbors a unique progenitor cell population. These meniscus progenitor cells (MPCs) are clonogenic and multipotent and exhibit migratory activity. We also determined that MPCs are likely to be controlled by canonical transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling that leads to an increase in SOX9 and a decrease in RUNX2, thereby enhancing the chondrogenic potential of MPC. Therefore, our work is relevant for the development of novel cell biological, regenerative therapies for meniscus repair. PMID:25418724

  12. Clinical Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Isolated Longitudinal Tear of Medial Meniscus by Vertical Cruciate Double Mattress Sutures with Outside-in Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyied Hamid Barzgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Meniscal tears are one of the most common injuries treated by arthroscopic techniques. Arthroscopic meniscal repair is an accepted way of treatment for meniscal tears. Different arthroscopic techniques for meniscal repair are: inside-out, outside-in and all inside. In the first 2 techniques, meniscus is repaired by sutures and in the later by suture or by commercial ready implants . The goal of current study is assessing clinical results of arthroscopic repair of longitudinal meniscal tears with vertical cruciate double mattress sutures by outside-in technique after 9 months.   Methods: In this case series study, in 13 patients having criteria for engaging the study with longitudinal isolated meniscus tear, arthroscopic meniscal repair was done with vertical cruciate double mattress sutures by outside-in technique and patients were followed for 9 months.   Results: Of 13 patients, there were 12 males (92.3% and one female (7.7% aged 15-38 (average 28.3 years. In follow up period, there was one case (7.7% of irritation by subcutaneous knot. There was not any failure of repair. Average Lysholm score increased from 55.23 to 91.23 after 9 months of follow up, which was statistically significant (p<0.001. At the end of follow up period, there was not any medial joint line tenderness of knee, giving way or significant effusion or pain.   Conclusion: This study shows that this technique has a good short term outcome with no failure and low complications but it is necessary to do more long term studies to prove it.

  13. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus of the knee: What about equivocal errors?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M.; Dossche, Lieven; Weyler, Joost

    2010-01-01

    Background: The significance of borderline magnetic resonance (MR) findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus remains uncertain. Given their higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and greater spatial resolution, these equivocal meniscal tears could be expected to be less frequent using a 3.0T MR system. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears using 3.0T MR, and to study their impact on MR accuracy compared with arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal tears. Material and Methods: The medical records of 100 patients who underwent 3.0T MR imaging and subsequent arthroscopy of the knee were retrospectively reviewed. Two observers interpreted MR images in consensus, and menisci were diagnosed as torn (abnormality on two or more images), equivocal for a tear (abnormality on one image), or intact, using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. The prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears was assessed, and MR accuracy was calculated as follows: first, considering both torn menisci and equivocal diagnoses as positive for a tear; and second, considering only torn menisci as positive for a tear. Results: Evidence of meniscal tears on MR images was equivocal in 12 medial (12%) and three lateral (3%) menisci. Of these equivocal MR diagnoses, tears were found at arthroscopy in eight medial and one lateral meniscus. In our study, the specificity and positive predictive value increased for both the medial and lateral meniscus when only menisci with two or more abnormal images were considered to be torn: from 80% and 89% to 91% and 94% for the medial meniscus, and from 91% and 73% to 93% and 78% for the lateral meniscus, respectively. Conclusion: Subtle findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus still make MR diagnosis difficult, even at 3.0T. We recommend that radiologists should rather be descriptive in reporting subtle or equivocal MR findings, alerting the clinician of possible meniscal tear

  14. MRI of the internal derangement of temporomandibular joint: Comparison with arthrographic and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Dong Ik; Kim, Hyung Gon; Suh, Jung Ho; Jung, Tae Sub

    1993-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings of 100 temporomandibular joints in 78 patients who had complained temporomandibular joint dysfunction. MRI findings were classified according to Wilke's staging criteria. And these findings were compared with arthographic findings in 22 joint and surgical findings in 44 joints. According to Wilke's staging, they were classified into 6 stages of abnormality: stage 0 (33 cases), stage I (19 cases), stage II (10 cases), stage III (18 cases), stage IV (6 cases), stage V (14 cases). Among the 22 cases in which arthography and MRI were done, both studies were well correlated in 10 joints. In 7 joints, MRI was superior to arthography, which correctly demonstrated the meniscal displacement in 2 joints and meniscal deformity in 5 joints. In 5 joints, arthography was superior to MR, which demonstrated the perforation (1 joint), adhesion (2 joints) and recapture of meniscus (2 joints). Compared with surgical findings, MRI correctly demonstrated the displacement of meniscus in all 44 joints. However, in case of the 10 meniscal perforation, MRI demonstrated the meniscal discontinuity in only 4 joints. Retrospective MR findings in 10 proven cases were the defect in posterior attachment in 4, far anterior meniscal displacement without recapture in 8, condylar spur in 4, and close bone to bone contact in 1. In conclusion, MRI as a primary diagnostic modality of temporomandibular joint derangement, is superior for the grading of displacement and deformity of meniscus but inferior for the evaluation of perforation, adhesion and recapture of meniscus to conventional arthrography. In case of the suspected meniscal perforation, arthrographic correlation is recommended preoperatively

  15. Three-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the meniscus of the knee: What about equivocal errors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, Pieter van; Vanhoenacker, Filip M.; Gielen, Jan L.; Parizel, Paul M. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)), e-mail: pieter.van.dyck@uza.be; Dossche, Lieven (Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. Hospital Antwerp and Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Edegem) (Belgium)); Weyler, Joost (Dept. of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Univ. of Antwerp, Antwerp (Wilrijk) (Belgium))

    2010-04-15

    Background: The significance of borderline magnetic resonance (MR) findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus remains uncertain. Given their higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and greater spatial resolution, these equivocal meniscal tears could be expected to be less frequent using a 3.0T MR system. Purpose: To investigate the prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears using 3.0T MR, and to study their impact on MR accuracy compared with arthroscopy in the detection of meniscal tears. Material and Methods: The medical records of 100 patients who underwent 3.0T MR imaging and subsequent arthroscopy of the knee were retrospectively reviewed. Two observers interpreted MR images in consensus, and menisci were diagnosed as torn (abnormality on two or more images), equivocal for a tear (abnormality on one image), or intact, using arthroscopy as the standard of reference. The prevalence of equivocal meniscal tears was assessed, and MR accuracy was calculated as follows: first, considering both torn menisci and equivocal diagnoses as positive for a tear; and second, considering only torn menisci as positive for a tear. Results: Evidence of meniscal tears on MR images was equivocal in 12 medial (12%) and three lateral (3%) menisci. Of these equivocal MR diagnoses, tears were found at arthroscopy in eight medial and one lateral meniscus. In our study, the specificity and positive predictive value increased for both the medial and lateral meniscus when only menisci with two or more abnormal images were considered to be torn: from 80% and 89% to 91% and 94% for the medial meniscus, and from 91% and 73% to 93% and 78% for the lateral meniscus, respectively. Conclusion: Subtle findings that are equivocal for a tear of the knee meniscus still make MR diagnosis difficult, even at 3.0T. We recommend that radiologists should rather be descriptive in reporting subtle or equivocal MR findings, alerting the clinician of possible meniscal tear

  16. In-vivo evaluation of the kinematic behavior of an artificial medial meniscus implant: A pilot study using open-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Tineke; Elsner, Jonathan J; Linder-Ganz, Eran; Cromheecke, Michiel; Shemesh, Maoz; Huysse, Wouter; Verdonk, René; Verstraete, Koenraad; Verdonk, Peter

    2014-09-01

    In this pilot study we wanted to evaluate the kinematics of a knee implanted with an artificial polycarbonate-urethane meniscus device, designed for medial meniscus replacement. The static kinematic behavior of the implant was compared to the natural medial meniscus of the non-operated knee. A second goal was to evaluate the motion pattern, the radial displacement and the deformation of the meniscal implant. Three patients with a polycarbonate-urethane implant were included in this prospective study. An open-MRI was used to track the location of the implant during static weight-bearing conditions, within a range of motion of 0° to 120° knee flexion. Knee kinematics were evaluated by measuring the tibiofemoral contact points and femoral roll-back. Meniscus measurements (both natural and artificial) included anterior-posterior meniscal movement, radial displacement, and meniscal height. No difference (P>0.05) was demonstrated in femoral roll-back and tibiofemoral contact points during knee flexion between the implanted and the non-operated knees. Meniscal measurements showed no significant difference in radial displacement and meniscal height (P>0.05) at all flexion angles, in both the implanted and non-operated knees. A significant difference (P ≤ 0.05) in anterior-posterior movement during flexion was observed between the two groups. In this pilot study, the artificial polycarbonate-urethane implant, indicated for medial meniscus replacement, had no influence on femoral roll-back and tibiofemoral contact points, thus suggesting that the joint maintains its static kinematic properties after implantation. Radial displacement and meniscal height were not different, but anterior-posterior movement was slightly different between the implant and the normal meniscus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mink, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that MR imaging of the knee can accurately evaluate the menisci and the cruciate and collateral ligaments with an accuracy equal to that of conventional anthrography. MR imaging can, as a simple test, definitively assess a wide spectrum of the causes of knee pain, including osteonecrosis/osteochondritis dissecans, chondral and bony fractures, abnormal plicae, and chondromalacia. The presentation focuses on the optimal imaging parameters that will ensure accuracy and maximize patient throughput. The etiology and significance of meniscal signal is discussed, and the criteria for an MR imaging-based diagnosis of meniscal tears, cruciate and collateral ligament and extensor mechanism abnormalities, osteonecrosis, and stress fractures are presented

  18. A Retrospective Analysis of Concurrent Pathology in ACL-Reconstructed Knees of Elite Alpine Ski Racers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Matthew J; Doyle-Baker, Patricia; Heard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    /chondral surgery, 60% of meniscal tears and 80% of chondral lesions had worsened since the time of primary ACLR. CONCLUSION: Concurrent injury was common in this group of elite ski racers. Primary ACL tears were typically accompanied by lateral compartment chondral lesions and complex meniscal tears that worsened...... over time. ACL/MCL tears were the most common multiligament injury pattern.......BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is the most frequent injury in alpine ski racing, and there is a high prevalence of ACL reinjury. Limited data exist on the concurrent pathology with primary ACL tears in elite alpine ski racers and the magnitude of injury progression after primary...

  19. Forward lunge knee biomechanics before and after partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Nielsen, Jonas Høberg; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    partial meniscectomy (APM) on knee joint mechanics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in knee joint biomechanics during a forward lunge in patients with a suspected degenerative meniscal tear from before to three months after APM. METHODS: Twenty-two patients (35-55years old......) with a suspected degenerative medial meniscal tear participated in this study. Three dimensional knee biomechanics were assessed on the injured and contralateral leg before and three months after APM. The visual analogue scale was used to assess knee pain and the Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score was used...

  20. Change perspective to increase diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease! A new approach: the axial scan of the meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Filippou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (US is a relevant tool in the study of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPP deposition disease. However, differential diagnosis of hyperechoic deposits within the fibrocartilage can be difficult; moreover, US study is limited by the need of an adequate acoustic window. We describe a US scanning technique that offers a new viewpoint in the study of knee meniscal structure: a longitudinal scan performed according to the long axis of meniscus. This technique proves to be particularly useful for the identification of CPP deposition, but could also improve the US diagnostic utility and accuracy in other meniscal pathologies.

  1. MRI profiles of menisci of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitano, Kimizo; Akahori, Osamu; Suwa, Shinichi

    1992-01-01

    The rate of correct diagnosis of disorders of menisci is considered to exceed 95% by arthrography and arthroscopy, but these examinations are both invasive and effective only for evaluation of changes on the surface of meniscus. Diagnosis of injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is difficult by athrography, and that of injury of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus is difficult by arthroscopy. MRI is a non-invasive examination that allows the diagnosis of changes of the surface and the inside of the meniscus. This study reviewed 44 cases in which MRI findings could be confirmed by arthroscopy or at operating among 114 patients who underwent MRI to rule out the possibility of meniscus injury during the period between August 1988 and June 1991. The total number of patients who underwent MRI during this period was 6,983. The apparatus used was a 1.5-Tesla superconductive MR system, and evaluation was based mainly on the control T1-weighted image obtained by the spin-echo mode and sagittal image double-echo sequence. Characteristics of MRI were described as follows. Four cases of injury of the medial meniscus are (1) typical bucket-handle injury; (2) horizontal tear visible by arthroscopy; (3) horizontal tear difficult to observe by arthroscopy; (4) horizontal tear after partial meniscectomy under arthroscopy. Four cases of injury of the lateral meniscus are (1) multiple tear and artifact of foreign body of needle-fragment; (2) longitudinal tear; (3) multiple injury of discoid meniscus; (4) locking of discoid meniscus. MRI was considered to be advantageous over arthrography or arthroscopy in injury of medial meniscus (especially horizonal tear extending to the lower surface on the tibial side), meniscus ganglion, injury of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus, and discoid menisci of children. From the findings in these 44 cases, MRI is considered to provide important information for the diagnosis of injury of menisci. (author)

  2. SLAP lesion of the shoulder. MRI evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, A.; Sabatini, M.; Maffey, M.V.; Di Cesare, E.; Masciocchi, C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose of this work is to assess MR potentials in the evaluation of superior glenoid labrum disease and possible associated conditions of the rotator cuff and of the anterior mechanism of the shoulder. 51 patients ( age range 18 to 53 years) with a diagnosis of anteroposterior lesion of the superior glenoid labrum were retrospectively evaluated. MR examinations were performed with a 0.2 T permanent magnet and a dedicated coil, using T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences on mostly coronal-oblique planes. Slice thickness was 4 mm. In 8 cases, the examination was completed with intra-articular injection of contrast agent. Twenty-eight patients were submitted to surgery (arthrotomy in 7 cases; arthroscopy in 21 cases). MRI demonstrated 5 cases of superior labrum irregularities at the level of its glenoid insertional portion (type I lesion); 6 cases of detachment of the superior portion of the labrum (type II); 9 cases of bucket handle tear of the superior labrum with involvement of the insertional portion of the long head of the biceps tendon (type III); 8 cases of superior labrum tear extending within the long head of the biceps tendon (type IV). Subsequent surgery always confirmed the presence of associated lesions, while the superior labrum lesion was not confirmed in 3 patients. In 4 cases, surgical findings provided a different classification of the lesion type than MRI. MRI can be a valuable diagnostic technique in type III and IV lesions of the superior glenoid labrum. It often provides important information about the possible presence of associated diseases, especially of the rotator cuff, which are helpful for treatment planning [it

  3. Development of a fast curing tissue adhesive for meniscus tear repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, Agnieszka Izabela; Hannink, Gerjon; Janssen, Dennis; Buma, Pieter; Grijpma, Dirk W

    2017-01-01

    Isocyanate-terminated adhesive amphiphilic block copolymers are attractive materials to treat meniscus tears due to their tuneable mechanical properties and good adhesive characteristics. However, a drawback of this class of materials is their relatively long curing time. In this study, we evaluate the use of an amine cross-linker and addition of catalysts as two strategies to accelerate the curing rates of a recently developed biodegradable reactive isocyanate-terminated hyper-branched adhesive block copolymer prepared from polyethylene glycol (PEG), trimethylene carbonate, citric acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The curing kinetics of the hyper-branched adhesive alone and in combination with different concentrations of spermidine solutions, and after addition of 2,2-dimorpholinodiethylether (DMDEE) or 1,4-diazabicyclo [2.2.2] octane (DABCO) were determined using FTIR. Additionally, lap-shear adhesion tests using all compositions at various time points were performed. The two most promising compositions of the fast curing adhesives were evaluated in a meniscus bucket handle lesion model and their performance was compared with that of fibrin glue. The results showed that addition of both spermidine and catalysts to the adhesive copolymer can accelerate the curing rate and that firm adhesion can already be achieved after 2 h. The adhesive strength to meniscus tissue of 3.2-3.7 N was considerably higher for the newly developed compositions than for fibrin glue (0.3 N). The proposed combination of an adhesive component and a cross-linking component or catalyst is a promising way to accelerate curing rates of isocyanate-terminated tissue adhesives.

  4. Effect of load on the repair of osteochondral defects using a porous polymer scaffold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, G.J.; de Mulder, E.L.; Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate if a porous polymer scaffold, currently used for partial meniscal replacement in clinical practice, could initiate regeneration and repair of osteochondral defects, and if regeneration and repair were related to mechanical stimulation. Two equally sized

  5. Anatomy and physical examination of the knee menisci: a narrative review of the orthopedic literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Michael D; Howitt, Scott D

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to review the physical examination tests available to a practitioner in order to arrive at a clinical diagnosis or suspicion of a meniscal lesion. The menisci transmit weight bearing forces and increase stability of the knee. The menisci also facilitate nutrition, provide lubrication and shock absorption for the articular cartilage and promote knee proprioception. The combinations of torsional and axial loading appear to be the cause of most meniscal injuries. Diagnosis of acute knee injuries has long been a topic for discussion throughout the orthopedic literature. Many clinical tests and diagnostic studies have been developed to increase the clinician's ability to accurately diagnose these types of disorders of the knee. The accuracy of all diagnostic tests is thought to be dependant upon the skill of the examiner, and the severity and location of the injury. The multitude of tests described to assess meniscal lesions suggests that none are consistently reliable. However, recent research has focused on a composite score to accurately predict meniscus lesions. The combination of a comprehensive history, multiple physical tests and diagnostic imaging for confirmation is typical for a clinical meniscal lesion diagnosis while the gold standard remains the arthroscopic procedure itself.

  6. a comparison of accuracy of clinical tests and mri in the diagnosis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Between January 2011 and December 2015, 147 consecutive patients with previous history of knee injury ... Results: There was a wide variance between clinical diagnosis and MRI reportage for meniscal tears. ..... Musculoskeletal injuries associated with ... (MRI) in the management of knee disorders in a sports.

  7. Early anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction can save meniscus without any complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Ik Hur

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Early ACL reconstruction had excellent clinical results and stability as good as delayed reconstruction without the problem of knee motion, muscle power, and postural control. Moreover, early reconstruction showed the high possibility of meniscal repair. Therefore, early ACL reconstruction should be recommended.

  8. Radiation-induced femoral head necrosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-25

    Mar 25, 2011 ... had open medial menisectomy of the left knee following medial meniscal tear ... postoperative recovery and mobilised full weight-bearing immediately [Figure 6]. ... obtained from the oncologists at the time of this review), and there was a ... previous trauma such as femoral neck fracture, Gaucher's disease ...

  9. Long-Term Data Reveal Rate and Risk Factors for Subsequent Surgeries Following Initial ACL Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rupture of the knee’s ACL is a common sports-related injury. It is associated with other knee problems, such as meniscal tears and knee instability. ... after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Am J of Sports Med. 2013; ... treatment and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases; the ...

  10. Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    tissue biopsy, cryotherapy , brachytherapy, and energy delivery. For the most part, however, image guidance requires expensive intra- operative...Weinand C, Peretti GM, Adams SB Jr, Bonassar LJ, Randolph MA, Gill TJ. An Allogenic Cell- Based Implant for Meniscal Lesions. Am J Sports Med. 2006

  11. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedoya, Maria A.; Jaramillo, Diego [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Radiology Department, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McGraw, Michael H. [Hospitalof theUniversityof Pennsylvania, Divisionof Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Wells, Lawrence [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed. (orig.)

  12. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lilli Kirkeskov; Rytter, Søren; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA), meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling w...... work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks....

  13. Do knees survive the Comrades Marathon? An MRI Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One month after the race, the scan appearance of the overuse injury had either improved or resolved completely. Bone bruising or meniscal damage did not appear to occur, and the presence of increased joint fluid probably relates to stress or injury. South African Medical Journal Vol. 98 (11) 2008: pp. 873-876 ...

  14. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Roos, H P; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To map by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitative MRI (qMRI) concomitant fractures and meniscal injuries, and location and volume of traumatic bone marrow lesions (BMLs) in the acutely anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injured knee. To relate BML location and volume to cortic...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, rotator cuff and labrum tears in the shoulder) and in imaging of the spine (because both the bones and the spinal cord can be evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle ...

  16. Recovery of lower extremity muscle strength and functional performance in middle-aged patients undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganderup, Tina; Jensen, Carsten; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate lower extremity muscle strength and functional performance before and after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. We hypothesized that patients would experience deficiencies in the affected leg at 3 months post-surgery,...

  17. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... views of bone, they provide little information about muscles, tendons or joints. An MRI may be more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, rotator cuff and labrum tears ...

  18. Bonding and fusion of meniscus fibrocartilage using a novel chondroitin sulfate bone marrow tissue adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simson, Jacob A; Strehin, Iossif A; Allen, Brian W; Elisseeff, Jennifer H

    2013-08-01

    The weak intrinsic meniscus healing response and technical challenges associated with meniscus repair contribute to a high rate of repair failures and meniscectomies. Given this limited healing response, the development of biologically active adjuncts to meniscal repair may hold the key to improving meniscal repair success rates. This study demonstrates the development of a bone marrow (BM) adhesive that binds, stabilizes, and stimulates fusion at the interface of meniscus tissues. Hydrogels containing several chondroitin sulfate (CS) adhesive levels (30, 50, and 70 mg/mL) and BM levels (30%, 50%, and 70%) were formed to investigate the effects of these components on hydrogel mechanics, bovine meniscal fibrochondrocyte viability, proliferation, matrix production, and migration ability in vitro. The BM content positively and significantly affected fibrochondrocyte viability, proliferation, and migration, while the CS content positively and significantly affected adhesive strength (ranged from 60±17 kPa to 335±88 kPa) and matrix production. Selected material formulations were translated to a subcutaneous model of meniscal fusion using adhered bovine meniscus explants implanted in athymic rats and evaluated over a 3-month time course. Fusion of adhered meniscus occurred in only the material containing the highest BM content. The technology can serve to mechanically stabilize the tissue repair interface and stimulate tissue regeneration across the injury site.

  19. Effect of polyurethane scaffold architecture on ingrowth speed and collagen orientation in a subcutaneous rat pocket model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mulder, E.L.W.; Hannink, G.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    Clinically used scaffolds are suboptimal in regenerating the highly oriented meniscus fiber structure in full meniscal defects. The objective of this study was to test whether anisotropic porous scaffolds with channels resulted in a more meniscus like matrix organization compared to isotropic porous

  20. Osteonecrosis of the knee following arthroscopic meniscectomy; Osteoenecrosis de rodilla tras meniscectomia artrosocpica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobado, M. C.; Mota, J.; Roca, M. [Instituto Clinico Corachan. Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Primary osteonecrosis of the knee is characterized by acute onset of pain in elderly individuals who present no risk factors. Osteonecrosis following arthroscopic surgery for meniscal repair is a rare occurrence, the etiology of which remains to be determined. The authors present the magnetic resonance findings in a new case and a review of the related literature. (Author) 7 refs.

  1. Osteonecrosis of the knee following arthroscopic meniscectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobado, M. C.; Mota, J.; Roca, M.

    2000-01-01

    Primary osteonecrosis of the knee is characterized by acute onset of pain in elderly individuals who present no risk factors. Osteonecrosis following arthroscopic surgery for meniscal repair is a rare occurrence, the etiology of which remains to be determined. The authors present the magnetic resonance findings in a new case and a review of the related literature. (Author) 7 refs

  2. Are Applied Growth Factors Able to Mimic the Positive Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Regeneration of Meniscus in the Avascular Zone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Zellner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscal lesions in the avascular zone are still a problem in traumatology. Tissue Engineering approaches with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs showed successful regeneration of meniscal defects in the avascular zone. However, in daily clinical practice, a single stage regenerative treatment would be preferable for meniscus injuries. In particular, clinically applicable bioactive substances or isolated growth factors like platelet-rich plasma (PRP or bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7 are in the focus of interest. In this study, the effects of PRP and BMP7 on the regeneration of avascular meniscal defects were evaluated. In vitro analysis showed that PRP secretes multiple growth factors over a period of 8 days. BMP7 enhances the collagen II deposition in an aggregate culture model of MSCs. However applied to meniscal defects PRP or BMP7 in combination with a hyaluronan collagen composite matrix failed to significantly improve meniscus healing in the avascular zone in a rabbit model after 3 months. Further information of the repair mechanism at the defect site is needed to develop special release systems or carriers for the appropriate application of growth factors to support biological augmentation of meniscus regeneration.

  3. rare occurrence of mix stromal tumours: a case report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    obscuring the left cardiac border and meniscal sign, however, no areas of calcification were observed. There was hyponatremia of. 115mmol/L, other laboratory profiles and haemogram were normal. Lack of facility hindered us from doing computed tomography. (CT) of the abdomen. A diagnosis of hyponatremia in a child ...

  4. A comparison of accuracy of clinical tests and MRI in the diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of clinical examination versus Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the diagnoses of meniscal and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears after trauma. Methods: Between January 2011 and December 2015, 147 consecutive patients with previous history of knee injury were seen and ...

  5. Effect of meniscus replacement fixation technique on restoration of knee contact mechanics and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, D D; Chen, P C; Kessler, O; Hoenecke, H R; Colwell, C W

    2011-06-01

    The menisci are important biomechanical components of the knee. We developed and validated a finite element model of meniscal replacement to assess the effect of surgical fixation technique on contact behavior and knee stability. The geometry of femoral and tibial articular cartilage and menisci was segmented from magnetic resonance images of a normal cadaver knee using MIMICS (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). A finite element mesh was generated using HyperWorks (Altair Inc, Santa Ana, CA). A finite element solver (Abaqus v6.9, Simulia, Providence, RI) was used to compute contact area and stresses under axial loading and to assess stability (reaction force generated during anteroposterior translation of the femur). The natural and surgical attachments of the meniscal horns and peripheral rim were simulated using springs. After total meniscectomy, femoral contact area decreased by 26% with a concomitant increase in average contact stresses (36%) and peak contact stresses (33%). Replacing the meniscus without suturing the horns did little to restore femoral contact area. Suturing the horns increased contact area and reduced peak contact stresses. Increasing suture stiffness correlated with increased meniscal contact stresses as a greater proportion of tibiofemoral load was transferred to the meniscus. A small incremental benefit was seen of simulated bone plug fixation over the suture construct with the highest stiffness (50 N/mm). Suturing the rim did little to change contact conditions. The nominal anteroposterior stiffness reduced by 3.1 N/mm after meniscectomy. In contrast to contact area and stress, stiffness of the horn fixation sutures had a smaller effect on anteroposterior stability. On the other hand suturing the rim of the meniscus affected anteroposterior stability to a much larger degree. This model emphasizes the importance of the meniscus in knee biomechanics. Appropriate meniscal replacement fixation techniques are likely to be critical to the clinical

  6. Chronic Changes in the Articular Cartilage and Meniscus Following Traumatic Impact to the Lapine Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Button, Keith D.; Coatney, Garrett A.; Fajardo, Ryan S.; Leikert, Kevin M.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to induce anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal damage, via a single tibiofemoral compressive impact, in order to document articular cartilage and meniscal changes post impact. Tibiofemoral joints of Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single blunt impact that ruptured the ACL and produced acute meniscal damage. Animals were allowed unrestricted cage activity for 12 weeks before euthanasia. India ink analysis of the articular cartilage revealed higher degrees of surface damage on the impacted tibias (p=0.018) and femurs (p<0.0001) compared to controls. Chronic meniscal damage was most prevalent in the medial central and medial posterior regions. Mechanical tests revealed an overall 19.4% increase in tibial plateau cartilage thickness (p=0.026), 34.8% increase in tibial plateau permeability (p=0.054), 40.8% increase in femoral condyle permeability (p=0.029), and 20.1% decrease in femoral condyle matrix modulus (p=0.012) in impacted joints compared to controls. Both the instantaneous and equilibrium moduli of the lateral and medial menisci were decreased compared to control (p<0.02). Histological analyses revealed significantly increased presence of fissures in the medial femur (p = 0.036). In both the meniscus and cartilage there was a significant decrease in GAG coverage for the impacted limbs. Based on these results it is clear that an unattended combined meniscal and ACL injury results in significant changes to the soft tissues in this experimental joint 12 weeks post injury. Such changes are consistent with a clinical description of mid to late stage PTOA of the knee. PMID:25523754

  7. A Study of Acute and Chronic Tissue Changes in Surgical and Traumatically-Induced Experimental Models of Knee Joint Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Pauly, Hannah M.; Button, Keith D.; Fajardo, Ryan S.; DeCamp, Charles E.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to monitor the progression of joint damage in two animal models of knee joint trauma using two non-invasive, clinically available imaging modalities. Methods A 3-T clinical magnet and micro-computed tomography (mCT) was used to document changes immediately following injury (acute) and post-injury (chronic) at time points of 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Joint damage was recorded at dissection and compared to the chronic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) record. Fifteen Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single tibiofemoral compressive impact (ACLF), and 18 underwent a combination of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal transection (mACLT). Results All ACLF animals experienced ACL rupture, and 13 also experienced acute meniscal damage. All ACLF and mACLT animals showed meniscal and articular cartilage damages at dissection. Meniscal damage was documented as early as 4 weeks and worsened in 87% of the ACLF animals and 71% of the mACLT animals. Acute cartilage damage also developed further and increased in occurrence with time in both models. A progressive decrease in bone quantity and quality was documented in both models. The MRI data closely aligned with dissection notes suggesting this clinical tool may be a non-invasive method for documenting joint damage in lapine models of knee joint trauma. Conclusions The study investigates the acute to chronic progression of meniscal and cartilage damage at various time points, and chronic changes to the underlying bone in two models of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), and highlights the dependency of the model on the location, type, and progression of damage over time. PMID:27756698

  8. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: wuh5@mcmaster.ca; Webber, C. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); McMaster Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Fuentes, C.O. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Benson, R.; Beattie, K. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medical Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Jabbari, F. [Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Levy, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Sports Medicine, Dept. of Family Medicine and Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-06-15

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  9. Prevalence of knee abnormalities in patients with osteoarthritis and anterior cruciate ligament injury identified with peripheral magnetic resonance imaging: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.; Webber, C.; Fuentes, C.O.; Benson, R.; Beattie, K.; Adachi, J.D.; Xie, X.; Jabbari, F.; Levy, D.R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess, with a peripheral magnetic resonance imaging system (pMRI), the prevalence of bony and soft tissue abnormalities in the knee joints of normal subjects, osteoarthritis (OA) patients, and individuals who have suffered an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture; and 2) to compare the prevalence among groups. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 28 healthy, 32 OA, and 26 ACL damaged knees were acquired with a 1.0-T pMRI system. Two radiologists grade the presence and severity of 9 MR image features: cartilage degeneration, osteophytes, subchondral cyst, bone marrow edema, meniscal abnormality, ligament integrity, loose bodies, popliteal cysts, and joint effusion. Ten of 28 healthy (35.7%), 24 of 26 ACL (92.3%), and all OA knees (100%) showed prevalent cartilage defects; 5 healthy (17.9%), 20 ACL (76.9%), and all OA knees (100%) had osteophytes; and 9 normal (32.1%), 21 ACL (80.8%), and 29 OA knees (90.6%) had meniscal abnormalities. One-half of the knees in the OA group (16 of 32, 50%) had subchondral cysts, and almost one-half had bone marrow edema (15 of 32, 46.9%). These features were not common in the ACL group (7.7%, and 11.5%, respectively) and were not observed in healthy knees. The OA group had the most severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, bone marrow edema, subchondral cysts, and meniscal abnormalities; the ACL group showed more severe cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities than did normal subjects. The results suggest that knees that have sustained ACL damage have OA-like features, most subjects (19 of 26, 73.1%) could be identified as in the early stage of OA. The prominent abnormalities present in ACL-damaged knees are cartilage defects, osteophytes, and meniscal abnormalities. (author)

  10. MRI EVALUATION OF INTERNAL DERANGEMENT OF KNEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Srikar Chowdhary

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Internal derangement of knee means loss of normal knee function due to ligament or meniscal injuries. MRI is a routinely utilised noninvasive modality for evaluation of various knee disorders including internal derangement. MRI provides excellent soft tissue contrast and multiplanar images when compared to other musculoskeletal imaging modalities. The aim of the study is to study the demographic profile of patients presenting with internal derangement of knee, identify the various ligament and meniscal injuries causing internal derangement of knee and describe the MRI features of the ligament and meniscal injuries. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was undertaken from January 2016 to mid-December 2017 in the Department of Radiodiagnosis, MVJ Medical College and Research Hospital, Hoskote. The study population consisted of 108 patients with internal derangement of knee who underwent MRI of knee. All the MRI scans of the knee in this study were performed using Siemens Magnetom Essenza (A Tim+Dot system MR machine with a 1.5 tesla field strength magnet using a flex coil. RESULTS The study population consisted of 108 patients comprising of 90 males and 18 females. The age of the patients ranged from 16 to 67 years. Majority of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-30 years constituting about 41% of the total study population. Anterior cruciate ligament injury was the commonest followed by medial and lateral meniscus tears. Flap tear was the commonest type of meniscal tear. Posterior horn of the meniscus was the commonest tear site. CONCLUSION MRI is the investigation of choice in evaluating internal derangement of knee. MRI can accurately diagnose ligament and meniscal injuries and guide arthroscopy.

  11. Formation and maturation of the murine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Xiang, Lin; Rosen, Vicki

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal injuries are commonplace, but current surgical repair procedures do not prevent degenerative joint changes that occur after meniscal injury and often lead to osteoarthritis. Successful tissue regeneration in adults often recapitulates events that occur during embryogenesis, suggesting that understanding the regulatory pathways controlling these early processes may provide clues for developing strategies for tissue repair. While the mouse is now widely used to study joint diseases, detailed knowledge of the basic biology of murine meniscus is not readily available. Here, we examine meniscal morphogenesis in mice from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) to 6 months of age using histology, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. We find that the meniscus is a morphologically distinct structure at E16 when it begins to regionalize. At birth, the meniscus has a distinguishable inner, avascular, round chondrocyte cell region, an outer, vascularized, fibroblast cell region, and a surface superficial zone. Maturation begins at 2 weeks of age when the meniscus expresses type I collagen, type II collagen, type X collagen, and MMP-13 in specific patterns. By 4 weeks of age, small areas of ossification are detected in the anterior meniscal horn, a common feature seen in rodents. Maturation appears complete at 8 weeks of age, when the meniscus resembles the adult structure complete with ossifying tissue that contains bone marrow like areas. Our results provide, the first systematic study of mouse meniscal development and will be a valuable tool for analyzing murine models of knee joint formation and disease. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1683-1689, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Koo

    Full Text Available The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs. Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8 in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4 in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years and 30 years (range: 14-62 years in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001, and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001. A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001. LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001. Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001. Meniscal extrusion is

  13. Symptomatic knee disorders in floor layers and graphic designers. A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Lilli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing tibio-femoral osteoarthritis (TF OA, meniscal tears and bursitis among those with a trade as floor layers. The purpose of this study was to analyse symptomatic knee disorders among floor layers that were highly exposed to kneeling work tasks compared to graphic designers without knee-demanding work tasks. Methods Data on the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS were collected by questionnaires. In total 134 floor layers and 120 graphic designers had a bilateral radiographic knee examination to detect TF OA and patella-femoral (PF OA. A random sample of 92 floor layers and 49 graphic designers had Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of both knees to examine meniscal tears. Means of the subscales of KOOS were compared by analysis of variance. The risk ratio of symptomatic knee disorders defined as a combination of radiological detected knee OA or MRI-detected meniscal tears combined with a low KOOS score was estimated by logistic regression in floor layers with 95% confidence interval (CI and adjusted for age, body mass index, traumas, and knee-straining sports activities. Symptomatic knee OA or meniscal tears were defined as a combination of low KOOS-scores and radiographic or MRI pathology. Results Symptomatic TF and medial meniscal tears were found in floor layers compared to graphic designers with odds ratios 2.6 (95%CI 0.99-6.9 and 2.04 (95% CI 0.77-5.5, respectively. There were no differences in PF OA. Floor layers scored significantly lower on all KOOS subscales compared to graphic designers. Significantly lower scores on the KOOS subscales were also found for radiographic TF and PF OA regardless of trade but not for meniscal tears. Conclusions The study showed an overall increased risk of developing symptomatic TF OA in a group of floor layers with a substantial amount of kneeling work positions. Prevention would be appropriate to reduce the

  14. Anatomical region-dependent enhancement of 3-dimensional chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells by soluble meniscus extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Shimomura, Kazunori; Gottardi, Riccardo; Alexander, Peter G; Tuan, Rocky S

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from decellularized tissues has been found to promote tissue neogenesis, most likely mediated by specific biochemical and physical signaling motifs that promote tissue-specific differentiation of progenitor cells. Decellularized ECM has been suggested to be efficacious for the repair of tissue injuries. However, decellularized meniscus contains a dense collagenous structure, which impedes cell seeding and infiltration and is not readily applicable for meniscus repair. In addition, the meniscus consists of two distinct anatomical regions that differ in vascularity and cellular phenotype. The purpose of this study was to explore the region-specific bioactivity of solubilized ECM derived from the inner and outer meniscal regions as determined in 2D and 3D cultures of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When added as a medium supplement to 2D cultures of MSCs, urea-extracted fractions of the inner (imECM) and outer meniscal ECM (omECM) enhanced cell proliferation while imECM most strongly upregulated fibrochondrogenic differentiation on the basis of gene expression profiles. When added to 3D cultures of MSCs seeded in photocrosslinked methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels, both ECM fractions upregulated chondrogenic differentiation as determined by gene expression and protein analyses, as well as elevated sulfated glycosaminoglycan sGAG content, compared to ECM-free controls. The chondrogenic effect at day 21 was most pronounced with imECM supplementation, but equivalent between ECM groups by day 42. Despite increased cartilage matrix, imECM and omECM constructs possessed compressive moduli similar to controls. In conclusion, soluble meniscal ECM may be considered for use as a tissue-specific reagent to enhance chondrogenesis for MSC-based 3D cartilage tissue engineering. The inner region of the knee meniscus is frequently injured and possesses a poor intrinsic healing capacity. Solubilized extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from

  15. Relationship Between Preoperative Extrusion of the Medial Meniscus and Surgical Outcomes After Partial Meniscectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Choi, Chong Hyuk; Chun, Yong-Min; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Su-Keon; Jang, Jinyoung; Jeong, Howon; Jung, Min

    2017-07-01

    No previous study has examined arthritic change after meniscectomy with regard to extrusion of the medial meniscus. (1) To determine the factors related to preoperative meniscal extrusion; (2) to investigate the relationship between medial meniscal extrusion and postoperative outcomes of partial meniscectomy, and to identify a cutoff point of meniscal extrusion that contributes to arthritic change after partial meniscectomy in nonosteoarthritic knees. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 208 patients who underwent partial meniscectomy of the medial meniscus between January 2000 and September 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. The extent of extrusion and severity of degeneration of the medial meniscus as shown on preoperative MRI were evaluated. The minimum follow-up duration was 7 years. Clinical function was assessed with the Lysholm knee scoring scale, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) subjective knee evaluation form, and the Tapper and Hoover grading system. Radiological evaluation was conducted by use of the IKDC radiographic assessment scale. Regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting preoperative extrusion of the medial meniscus and factors influencing follow-up results after partial meniscectomy. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to identify a cutoff point for the extent of meniscal extrusion that was associated with arthritic change. The mean ± SD preoperative Lysholm knee score was 65.0 ± 6.3 and the mean IKDC subjective score was 60.1 ± 7.5. The mean follow-up functional scores were 93.2 ± 5.1 ( P meniscus showed a tendency to increase as the extent of intrameniscal degeneration increased, and the medial meniscus was extruded more in patients with horizontal, horizontal flap, and complex tears. The preoperative extent of meniscal extrusion had a statistically significant correlation with follow-up Lysholm knee score (coefficient = -0.10, P = .002), IKDC subjective score (coefficient

  16. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukic, S.; Melnikoff, S.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown to be useful in the area of pattern recognition for medical imaging. This paper investigates whether an ANN system can accurately classify meniscal tears on MR images of the knee. Thirty-five patients were selected for either definite meniscal tear (grade III) or normal meniscus (grade O) on MR images. The images were digitized using a high-resolution image scanner (Truvel) and then archived on disk. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform of the image was computed, and a 15-band wedge-ring filter was applied to the output. The results were used as input to a three-layer back-propagation network. After successfully training the ANN on a portion of the data base (16 cases) with an accuracy error of less than 1%, the remainder of the data was applied

  17. An optimized transversely isotropic, hyper-poro-viscoelastic finite element model of the meniscus to evaluate mechanical degradation following traumatic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Benjamin B.; Fischenich, Kristine M.; Button, Keith D.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse finite element (FE) analysis is an effective method to predict material behavior, evaluate mechanical properties, and study differences in biological tissue function. The meniscus plays a key role in load distribution within the knee joint and meniscal degradation is commonly associated with the onset of osteoarthritis. In the current study, a novel transversely isotropic hyper-poro-viscoelastic constitutive formulation was incorporated in a FE model to evaluate changes in meniscal material properties following tibiofemoral joint impact. A non-linear optimization scheme was used to fit the model output to indentation relaxation experimental data. This study is the first to investigate rate of relaxation in healthy versus impacted menisci. Stiffness was found to be decreased (p=0.003), while the rate of tissue relaxation increased (p=0.010) at twelve weeks post impact. Total amount of relaxation, however, did not change in the impacted tissue (p=0.513). PMID:25776872

  18. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Hospital; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-07-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  19. MR imaging of posterior cruciate ligament injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Niitsu, Mamoru; Itai, Yuji; Sato, Motohiro; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Ikeda, Kotaro; Kanamori, Akihiro

    2001-01-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are less frequent than anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, but are presumably more common than once thought. Thirty-nine patients with PCL injuries identified on MR images were studied. The criteria for PCL injury were complete tear, partial tear, and avulsion fracture. The approximate site of a partial tear was categorized as proximal, midsubstance, distal, or combination. Fourteen patients (35.9%) had complete tears of the PCL, 21 patients (53.8%) had partial tears, and four patients (10.3%) had avulsion fractures. A total of 12 patients (30.7%) had isolated PCL injuries, while the remaining 27 patients demonstrated evidence of other coexistent knee injuries, such as meniscal tears and ligamentous injuries. Of coexistent knee injuries, meniscal tears (18 patients, 46.2%) were most often seen. (author)

  20. Biomaterials in search of a meniscus substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongen, Jan J; van Tienen, Tony G; van Bochove, Bas; Grijpma, Dirk W; Buma, Pieter

    2014-04-01

    The menisci fulfill key biomechanical functions in the tibiofemoral (knee) joint. Unfortunately meniscal injuries are quite common and most often treated by (partial) meniscectomy. However, some patients experience enduring symptoms, and, more importantly, it leads to an increased risk for symptomatic osteoarthritis. Over the past decades, researchers have put effort in developing a meniscal substitute able to prevent osteoarthritis and treat enduring clinical symptoms. Grossly, two categories of substitutes are observed: First, a resorbable scaffold mimicking biomechanical function which slowly degrades while tissue regeneration and organization is promoted. Second, a non resorbable, permanent implant which mimics the biomechanical function of the native meniscus. Numerous biomaterials with different (material) properties have been used in order to provide such a substitute. Nevertheless, a clinically applicable cartilage protecting material is not yet emerged. In the current review we provide an overview, and discuss, these different materials and extract recommendations regarding material properties for future developmental research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cine MR imaging of internal derangements of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Anno, I.; Ishikawa, N.; Akisada, M.; Fukubayashi, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper assesses internal derangements of the knee joint by a new method of cine MR imaging. Cine MR imaging, involving cine acquisition of kinematic sagittal images during knee movement, was used to evaluate 51 symptomatic patients and 19 healthy subjects. Cine MR images of cruciate ligament fears showed disappearance of low-intensity bundles during knee movement, periodic appearance of joint fluid in the area of the ligament, and irregular tibial movement. Cine MR images of meniscal tears showed independent movement of meniscal fragments and periodic tear opening and closing. Twenty-seven of the 28 anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears confirmed arthroscopically were correctly identified with cine MR imaging, with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 92%

  2. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresi, L.M.; Davis, S.J.; Ziemba, M.R.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the two-tone meniscus, a sign of meniscal tear on MR imaging. MR images obtained at 0.3 and 1.5 T with 3-mm-thick sections were compared with arthroscopic findings for 86 patients studied over a 2-year period. Menisci described as two-tone menisci had two geographic regions of slightly different signal intensity: a region of subtle increased signal extending to at least one articular surface, which did not have linear or globular configuration, effacing a region of normal meniscal signal. The higher-signal-intensity region shows signal intensity greater than normal meniscus but less than grade 2 or 3 changes, hyalin cartilage, or joint fluid

  3. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  4. Knee extensor muscle strength in middle-aged and older individuals undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Michelle; Juhl, Carsten B; Lund, Hans

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: People with meniscal tears are at high risk to develop or progress knee osteoarthritis. Knee extensor weakness is considered a risk factor for osteoarthritis and is often reported in these individuals. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate knee...... for a meniscal tear and used either a healthy control group or the contralateral leg to compare knee extensor muscle strength were included. Methodological quality was assessed using guidelines from the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. RESULTS: Eleven studies, including predominately males were included (n...... and knee extensor muscle weakness are risk factors for osteoarthritis these results highlight the clinical importance of addressing muscle weakness in these individuals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. [Partial replacement of the knee joint with patient-specific instruments and implants (ConforMIS iUni, iDuo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, J; Steinert, A; Zilkens, C; Zeh, A; Schnurr, C; Schmitt-Sody, M; Gebauer, M

    2016-04-01

    Knee arthroplasty is a successful standard procedure in orthopedic surgery; however, approximately 20 % of patients are dissatisfied with the clinical results as they suffer pain and can no longer achieve the presurgery level of activity. According to the literature the reasons are inexact fitting of the prosthesis or too few anatomically formed implants resulting in less physiological kinematics of the knee joint. Reducing the number of dissatisfied patients and the corresponding number of revisions is an important goal considering the increasing need for artificial joints. In this context, patient-specific knee implants are an obvious alternative to conventional implants. For the first time implants are now matched to the individual bone and not vice versa to achieve the best possible individual situation and geometry and more structures (e.g. ligaments and bone) are preserved or only those structures are replaced which were actually destroyed by arthrosis. According to the authors view, this represents an optimal and pioneering addition to conventional implants. Patient-specific implants and the instruments needed for correct alignment and fitting can be manufactured by virtual 3D reconstruction and 3D printing based on computed tomography (CT) scans. The portfolio covers medial as well as lateral unicondylar implants, medial as well as lateral bicompartmental implants (femorotibial and patellofemoral compartments) and cruciate ligament-preserving as well as cruciate ligament-substituting total knee replacements; however, it must be explicitly emphasized that the literature is sparse and no long-term data are available.

  6. Intravoxel incoherent motion perfusion imaging in acute stroke: initial clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federau, C.; Becce, F.; Maeder, P.; Meuli, R.; Sumer, S.; Wintermark, M.; O'Brien, K.

    2014-01-01

    Intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) imaging is an MRI perfusion technique that uses a diffusion-weighted sequence with multiple b values and a bi-compartmental signal model to measure the so-called pseudo-diffusion of blood caused by its passage through the microvascular network. The goal of the current study was to assess the feasibility of IVIM perfusion fraction imaging in patients with acute stroke. Images were collected in 17 patients with acute stroke. Exclusion criteria were onset of symptoms to imaging >5 days, hemorrhagic transformation, infratentorial lesions, small lesions 2 . Image quality was assessed by two radiologists, and quantitative analysis was performed in regions of interest placed in the stroke area, defined by thresholding the apparent diffusion coefficient maps, as well as in the contralateral region. IVIM perfusion fraction maps showed an area of decreased perfusion fraction f in the region of decreased apparent diffusion coefficient. Quantitative analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in both IVIM perfusion fraction f (0.026 ± 0.019 vs. 0.056 ± 0.025, p = 2.2 . 10 -6 ) and diffusion coefficient D compared with the contralateral side (3.9 ± 0.79 . 10 -4 vs. 7.5 ± 0.86 . 10 -4 mm 2 /s, p = 1.3 . 10 -20 ). IVIM perfusion fraction imaging is feasible in acute stroke. IVIM perfusion fraction is significantly reduced in the visible infarct. Further studies should evaluate the potential for IVIM to predict clinical outcome and treatment response. (orig.)

  7. Patellofemoral Arthralgia, Overuse Syndromes of the Knee, and Chondromalacia Patella

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, R. Peter

    1985-01-01

    Patellofemoral arthralgia is a very common syndrome affecting athletes. Most often, examination fails to define true pathology. Conservative treatment, an active exercise program, and sports may be undertaken without harm to the knee. The patellofemoral arthralgia syndrome must be differentiated from true chondromalacia patella, where there is actual degeneration of the patella's articular cartilage, and from other sources of internal derangement such as meniscal disease or osteochondral lesi...

  8. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  9. Changes in Contact Area in Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears Subjected to Repair and Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Brandon S; Walley, Kempland C; Okajima, Stephen; Manoukian, Ohan S; Perez-Viloria, Miguel; DeAngelis, Joseph P; Ramappa, Arun J; Nazarian, Ara

    2017-03-01

    To assess the changes in tibiofemoral contact pressure and contact area in human knees with a horizontal cleavage tear before and after treatment. Ten human cadaveric knees were tested. Pressure sensors were placed under the medial meniscus and the knees were loaded at twice the body weight for 20 cycles at 0°, 10°, and 20° of flexion. Contact area and pressure were recorded for the intact meniscus, the meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear, after meniscal repair, after partial meniscectomy (single leaflet), and after subtotal meniscectomy (double leaflet). The presence of a horizontal cleavage tear significantly increased average peak contact pressure and reduced effective average tibiofemoral contact area at all flexion angles tested compared with the intact state (P contact pressure after creation of the horizontal cleavage tear. Repairing the horizontal cleavage tear restored peak contact pressures and areas to within 15% of baseline, statistically similar to the intact state at all angles tested (P contact pressure and reduced average contact area at all degrees of flexion compared with the intact state (P contact area and a significant elevation in contact pressure. These changes may accelerate joint degeneration. A suture-based repair of these horizontal cleavage tears returns the contact area and contact pressure to nearly normal, whereas both partial and subtotal meniscectomy lead to significant reductions in contact area and significant elevations in contact pressure within the knee. Repairing horizontal cleavage tears may lead to improved clinical outcomes by preserving meniscal tissue and the meniscal function. Understanding contact area and peak contact pressure resulting from differing strategies for treating horizontal cleavage tears will allow the surgeon to evaluate the best strategy for treating his or her patients who present with this meniscal pathology. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier

  10. A rare case of localised pigmented villonodular synovitis in the knee of a 24-year-old female soccer player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Casper; Stockmann Poulsen, Simon; Joergensen, Uffe

    2017-01-01

    Localised pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee is a rare diagnosis, with clinical signs and symptoms mimicking meniscal damage or other common knee injuries. We report the case of a 24-year-old female soccer player, seeking treatment after 7 months of persisting knee pain...... analyses confirmed the diagnosis of localised PVNS. The patient was subsequently free of symptoms with no signs of recurrence on MRI and had resumed soccer practice at the 1-year follow-up appointment....

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on biochemical and physical properties of human menisci (preliminary data)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, I.; Kaminski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The menisci, composed mostly of water (-70%) and collagen (-20%, predominantly type I), are integral structural components of human knee, aiding in shock absorption, joint stability, lubrication, and nutrition. Total or partial meniscectomies are associated with altered load bearing across the knee, frequently resulting in degenerative osteoarthritis. Therefore meniscal replacement has been advocated in case of extensive meniscus damage or after its removal. Among different natural and artificial materials, the use of meniscal allografts is the most promising method. However, the application of non-sterilised menisci is connected with the risk of infection disease transmission. The aim of the initial part of our study was to assess the effect of ionising radiation on biochemical properties of human menisci preserved with various methods and then irradiated with a dose 35 kGy. Twenty eight menisci from cadaveric donors were procured using standard operating procedures and then divided into the following groups: 1) fresh menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 2) fresh menisci irradiated at room temperature (RT); 3) lyophilised menisci irradiated at -70 degree C; 4) lyophilised menisci irradiated at RT. Samples from each experimental group were irradiated with a dose of 35 kGy with 10 MeV electron accelerator. Non-irradiated menisci served as controls. Meniscal allografts were pulverised in the liquid nitrogen mill and quantitatively extracted to measure neutral soluble collagen (NSC) and acid soluble collagen (ASC) by colorimetric assay of hydroxyproline, released under extraction from tissue samples. The amount of released hydroxyproline reflects the level of collagen degradation caused by ionising radiation. As in our previous studies concerning other connective tissue allografts (bones, tendons), collagen fragmentation in menisci was also affected by preservation and sterilisation conditions. The choice of proper conditions allows one to diminish the

  12. Intra-Articular Lubricin Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    with ligamentous /meniscal injuries. Up to 60% of patients who undergo anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement surgery develop symptomatic knee...testing device. The skills he has gained in the process enhance his career prospects as a biomedical engineer . How were the results disseminated to...BS (Co-Investigator), 0.12 Calendar months (no salary support) Fully negotiated during Year 2: Engineering Endogenous Cartilage Repair Sponsor

  13. A conceptual framework for a sports knee injury performance profile (SKIPP) and return to activity criteria (RTAC)

    OpenAIRE

    Logerstedt, David; Arundale, Amelia; Lynch, Andrew; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTInjuries to the knee, including intra-articular fractures, ligamentous ruptures, and meniscal and articular cartilage lesions, are commonplace within sports. Despite advancements in surgical techniques and enhanced rehabilitation, athletes returning to cutting, pivoting, and jumping sports after a knee injury are at greater risk of sustaining a second injury. The clinical utility of objective criteria presents a decision-making challenge to ensure athletes are fully rehabilitated and ...

  14. Intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringler, Michael D.; Collins, Mark S.; Howe, B.M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shotts, Ezekiel E. [NEA Baptist Clinic, Jonesboro, AR (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Unlike with anterior cruciate ligament injury, little is known about the prevalence of intra-articular pathology associated with isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury in the knee. The objectives of this study were to characterize and identify the frequency of meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries in these patients, and to see if management might be affected. Altogether, 48 knee MRI exams with isolated PCL tears were evaluated for the presence of: grade and location of PCL tear, meniscal tear, articular chondral lesion, bone bruise, and fracture. Comparisons between PCL tear grade and location, as well as mechanism of injury when known, with the presence of various intra-articular pathologies, were made using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. In all, 69 % of isolated PCL tears occur in the midsubstance, 27 % proximally. Meniscal tears were seen in 25 % of knees, involving all segments of both menisci, except for the anterior horn medial meniscus. Altogether, 23 % had focal cartilage lesions, usually affecting the central third medial femoral condyle and medial trochlea, while 12.5 % of knees had fractures, and 48 % demonstrated bone bruises, usually involving the central to anterior tibiofemoral joint. The presence of a fracture (p = 0.0123) and proximal location of PCL tear (p = 0.0016) were both associated with the hyperextension mechanism of injury. There were no statistically significant associations between PCL tear grade and presence of intra-articular abnormality. Potentially treatable meniscal tears and osteochondral injuries are relatively prevalent, and demonstrable on MRI in patients with isolated acute PCL injury of the knee. (orig.)

  15. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.M.Z.; Fallon, M.; Breidahl, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Traditional plain film arthrography can achieve reasonable accuracy and is an accepted method of investigation of patients with knee pain and possible meniscal tear. Multi-detector CT can potentially provide a more detailed and accurate examination due to its high-resolution crosssectional and multi-planar capabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of our technique. All patients who underwent a multi-detector CT knee arthrogram in an initial 8 month period were identified. Initially the referring clinician was contacted. If the patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon the outcome of orthopaedic review was recorded using clinical, arthroscopic and / or MRI follow-up of the patient population. One hundred and twelve patients had a Multi-detector CT knee arthrogram performed within and 8 month period. Follow-up information was received in 69.7% of patients. Of these 68.9% had orthopaedic assessment - of which 69.2% underwent a knee arthroscopy.There was total agreement of findings in 67%, agreement of meniscal findings in 67% and chondral findings in 100%. Overall, orthopaedic opinion agreed with CT findings in 76.9%. At this stage, all meniscal tears not described in the initial CT arthrogram report have in retrospect been visible. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography is an accurate and elegant technique for investigation of knee pain, providing information in a format familiar to those reporting knee MRI. There is an initial learning curve. The technique is particularly useful in chondral assessment. It is accurate for meniscal pathology, although caution and recognition of potential pitfalls is required. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Meniscotibial (coronary) ligament tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khoury, G.Y.; Usta, H.Y.; Berger, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Preservation of the meniscus whenever possible is essential in maintaining knee stability and preventing premature osteoarthritis. Peripheral meniscal tears are the most amenable to surgical repair. This study evaluates the peripheral attachments of the medial meniscus and focuses on a specific tear limited to the meniscotibial ligament (coronary ligament). The diagnosis is made arthrographically when the medial meniscus floats above the tibial plateau without separating completely from the capsule. The lateral meniscus is rarely involved in this type of injury. (orig.)

  17. MRI EVALUATION OF PAINFUL KNEE JOINT- THE CORRELATION OF MULTIPLE COEXISTING PATHOLOGIES, AGE AND SEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukheswar Pame

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND 1. To evaluate the incidence and coexistence of multiple knee joint pathologies causing painful knee and their correlation to age and sex. 2. To evaluate the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI features in various knee pathologies and to identify the common lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed using the clinical data of patients presenting with painful knee joint which were evaluated with MRI. Data from 200 patients examined between September 2015 and August 2016 were included into this study. The data was analysed statistically to evaluate the correlation between the MR pathological findings to age and sex of the patients. RESULTS The patient’s age ranged between 8 and 75 years (mean: 36 years. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear was the commonest finding (60% followed by bursitis (55%, meniscal degeneration (54.6% and meniscal tear (52%. Primary signs of ACL tear were hyperintensity, discontinuity and nonvisualisation. Secondary signs like Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL buckling, PCL index of greater than 0.5, uncovered Lateral meniscus (LM and bone contusion assisted in diagnosis in indeterminate cases. Mid substance was the commonest site of ACL tear (64%. PCL tear accounted for only a small percentage (7%. Medial Meniscus (MM tear (35% was commoner than LM tear (17%. The posterior horn of meniscus was the commonest site of injury (86.5%. Age was significantly correlated with meniscal degeneration and tear, Medial collateral ligament (MCL degeneration, parameniscal cyst, and chondromalacia patellae. A significant correlation between male gender and ACL injury was noted. Meniscal injury was significantly correlated with bursitis, as well with MCL injury. Bone bruise was significantly correlated with ACL injury, MCL injury and Lateral collateral ligament (LCL injury. CONCLUSIONS MRI findings of certain pathologies in a painful knee can coexist and significantly correlate with each other, age and sex of

  18. Traces and burrowing behaviors of the Cicada nymph Cicadetta calliope: Neoichnology and paleoecological significance of extant soil-dwelling insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.J.; Hasiotis, S.T.

    2008-01-01

    This study documents the traces and burrowing behaviors of nymphs of the prairie cicada Cicadetta calliope (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), as observed in neoichnological experiments. Cicada nymphs were collected from the C horizons of sandy Fluvents along the Kansas River east of Lawrence, Kansas. The nymphs appeared to be fifth instars, 13-17 mm long and 6-7 mm wide. Nymphs were placed in plastic enclosures containing layers of colored, moist, very fine-grained sand. They burrowed immediately, excavating air-filled, sediment-enclosed cells between 20 mm and 40 mm long and averaging 9 mm wide. Burrowing was completed in three stages: (1) sediment in the forward portion of the cell was excavated and rolled into a ball with the forelimbs; (2) the nymph turned 180?? using a forward roll, and moved to the back of the cell; and (3) the sediment ball was pushed up against the back wall of the cell and kneaded with the forelimbs into a thin layer. Resulting burrow traces are sinuous and distinctly meniscate and demonstrate that insect larvae construct meniscate, backfilled burrows in well-drained terrestrial settings. Cicadetta calliope nymphs and their traces are excellent analogs for meniscate trace fossils commonly found in late Paleozoic-Cenozoic alluvial deposits and paleosols. Such meniscate trace fossils are useful for interpreting the paleoenvironment and paleohydrogeology of the units in which they are found. In addition, such backfilled burrows can be used to supplement the fossil record of cicada-like hemipterans, currently known only from the latest Permian to the Early Triassic. Copyright ?? 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  19. CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Korolev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate long-term results of meniscal repair during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction.Materials and methods: 45 patients who underwent meniscal repair during arthroscopic ACL reconstruction between 2007 and 2013 by the same surgeon were included in the study. In total, fifty meniscus were repaired (26 medial and 24 lateral. Procedures included use of one up to four Fast-Fix implants (Smith & Nephew. In five cases both medial and lateral meniscus were repaired. Cincinnati, IKDC and Lysholm scales were used for long-term outcome analysis.Results: 19 male and 26 female patients were included in the study aging from 15 to 59 years (mean age 33,2±1,5. Median time from injury to surgical procedure was zero months (ranging zero to one. Mean time from surgery to scale analysis was 55,9±3 months (ranged 20-102. Median Cincinnati score was 97 (ranged 90-100, with excellent results in 93% of cases (43 patients and good results in 7% (3 patients. Median IKDC score was 90,8 (ranged 86,2-95,4, with excellent outcomes in 51% of cases (23 patients, good in 33% (15 patients and satisfactory in 16% (7 patients. Median Lysholm score was 95 (ranged 90-100, with excellent outcomes in 76% of cases (34 patients and good in 24% (11 patients. Authors identified no statistical differences when comparing survey results in age, sex and time from trauma to surgery.Conclusions: Results of the present study match the data from orthopedic literature that prove meniscal repair as a safe and efficient procedure with good and excellent outcomes. All-inside meniscal repair can be used irrespectively of patients' age and is efficient even in case of delayed procedures.

  20. Tribosupplementation with Lubricin in Prevention of Post-Traumatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cells. This level of expression is commercially scalable and will thus enable production of a GMP protein for clinical use . A purification bioprocess...utilizing anion exchange, hydroxyapatite and a hydrophobic exchange media resins achieves a high level of purity. Explants of bovine articular...performed another study in porcine following meniscal injury, which was funded by a Phase 2 STTR (1R42AR057276 PI: Jay) using the same rhPRG4 also

  1. Femoral condyle insufficiency fractures: associated clinical and morphological findings and impact on outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plett, Sara K.; Hackney, Lauren A.; Heilmeier, Ursula; Nardo, Lorenzo; Zhang, Chiyuan A.; Link, Thomas M. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Yu, Aihong [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2015-12-15

    To determine the characteristics of femoral condyle insufficiency fracture (FCIF) lesions and their relative associations with the risk of clinical progression. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Seventy-three patients (age range, 19-95) were included after excluding patients with post-traumatic fractures, bone marrow infarct, osteochondritis dissecans, or underlying tumor. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists classified morphologic findings including lesion diameter, associated bone marrow edema pattern, and associated cartilage/meniscus damage. Electronic medical charts were evaluated for symptoms, risk factors, and longitudinal outcomes, including total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Imaging characteristics were correlated with clinical findings, and comparison of outcome groups was performed using a regression model adjusted for age. The majority of patients with FCIF were women (64.4 %, 47/73), on average 10 years older than men (66.28 ± 15.86 years vs. 56.54 ± 10.39 years, p = 0.005). The most common location for FCIF was the central weight-bearing surface of the medial femoral condyle; overlying full thickness cartilage loss (75.7 %, 53/70) and ipsilateral meniscal injury (94.1 %, 64/68) were frequently associated. Clinical outcomes were variable, with 23.9 % (11/46) requiring TKA. Cartilage WORMS score, adjacent cartilage loss, and contralateral meniscal injury, in addition to decreased knee range of motion at presentation, were significantly associated with progression to TKA (p < 0.05). FCIF are frequently associated with overlying cartilage loss and ipsilateral meniscal injury. The extent of cartilage loss and meniscal damage, in addition to loss of knee range of motion at the time of presentation, are significantly associated with clinical progression. (orig.)

  2. Correlation between ?CT imaging, histology and functional capacity of the osteoarthritic knee in the rat model of osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Bagi, Cedo M.; Zakur, David E.; Berryman, Edwin; Andresen, Catharine J.; Wilkie, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Background To acquire the most meaningful understanding of human arthritis, it is essential to select the disease model and methodology translatable to human conditions. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a number of analytic techniques and biomarkers for their ability to accurately gauge bone and cartilage morphology and metabolism in the medial meniscal tear (MMT) model of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods MMT surgery was performed in rats to induce OA. A dynamic weight bearing ...

  3. Matrix forming characteristics of inner and outer human meniscus cells on 3D collagen scaffolds under normal and low oxygen tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croutze, Roger; Jomha, Nadr; Uludag, Hasan; Adesida, Adetola

    2013-12-13

    Limited intrinsic healing potential of the meniscus and a strong correlation between meniscal injury and osteoarthritis have prompted investigation of surgical repair options, including the implantation of functional bioengineered constructs. Cell-based constructs appear promising, however the generation of meniscal constructs is complicated by the presence of diverse cell populations within this heterogeneous tissue and gaps in the information concerning their response to manipulation of oxygen tension during cell culture. Four human lateral menisci were harvested from patients undergoing total knee replacement. Inner and outer meniscal fibrochondrocytes (MFCs) were expanded to passage 3 in growth medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), then embedded in porous collagen type I scaffolds and chondrogenically stimulated with transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3) under 21% (normal or normoxic) or 3% (hypoxic) oxygen tension for 21 days. Following scaffold culture, constructs were analyzed biochemically for glycosaminoglycan production, histologically for deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as at the molecular level for expression of characteristic mRNA transcripts. Constructs cultured under normal oxygen tension expressed higher levels of collagen type II (p = 0.05), aggrecan (p oxygen tension. There was no significant difference in expression of these genes between scaffolds seeded with MFCs isolated from inner or outer regions of the tissue following 21 days chondrogenic stimulation (p > 0.05). Cells isolated from inner and outer regions of the human meniscus demonstrated equivalent differentiation potential toward chondrogenic phenotype and ECM production. Oxygen tension played a key role in modulating the redifferentiation of meniscal fibrochondrocytes on a 3D collagen scaffold in vitro.

  4. Quantitative MRI T2 relaxation time evaluation of knee cartilage: comparison of meniscus-intact and -injured knees after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Shuang; Tao, Hongyue; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-04-01

    Associated meniscal injury is well recognized at anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and it is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis. To evaluate and characterize the postoperative appearance of articular cartilage after different meniscal treatment in ACL-reconstructed knees using T2 relaxation time evaluation on MRI. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 62 consecutive patients who under ACL reconstruction were recruited in this study, including 23 patients undergoing partial meniscectomy (MS group), 21 patients undergoing meniscal repair (MR group), and 18 patients with intact menisci (MI group) at time of surgery. Clinical evaluation, including subjective functional scores and physical examination, was performed on the same day as the MRI examination and at follow-up times ranging from 2 to 4.2 years. The MRI multiecho sagittal images were segmented to determine the T2 relaxation time value of each meniscus and articular cartilage plate. Differences in each measurement were compared among groups. No patient had joint-line tenderness or reported pain or clicking on McMurray test or instability. There were also no statistically significant differences in functional scores or medial or lateral meniscus T2 values among the 3 groups (P > .05 for both). There was a significantly higher articular cartilage T2 value in the medial femorotibial articular cartilage for the MS group (P T2 value between the MS and MR groups (P > .05) in each articular cartilage plate. The medial tibial articular cartilage T2 value had a significant positive correlation with medial meniscus T2 value (r = 0.287; P = .024) CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that knees with meniscectomy or meniscal repair had articular cartilage degeneration at 2 to 4 years postoperatively, with higher articular cartilage T2 relaxation time values compared with the knees with an intact meniscus. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Familial Discoid Medial Meniscus Tear in Three Members of a Family: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Ali, Raheel; McKay, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background. A discoid meniscus is a thickened variant of the normal C-shaped meniscus prone to injury. Discoid medial meniscal tears have rarely been reported within families and may suggest familial or developmental origins. Methods. We report the cases of two Caucasian brothers with symptomatic discoid medial meniscus tears. A literature review was conducted addressing discoid medial meniscus and cases of familial meniscus tears. Case Presentation. Physically active brothers presented with ...

  6. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF CLINICAL AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IN KNEE MENISCI AND LIGAMENTOUS INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of clinical diagnosis compared to MRI findings in ligamentous and meniscal injuries with respect to arthroscopic confirmation as a gold standard. METHODS 485 patients with knee injuries were prospectively assessed by clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging and correlated after therapeutic arthroscopy. The overall accuracy, clinically productive values of sensitivity and specificity was derived. The actual value of the test with respect to positive predictive and negative predictive value was also derived, taking arthroscopic findings as confirmatory. The overall partial and total agreement among the clinical, MRI and arthroscopy was documented. RESULTS The overall accuracy for clinical examination was 85, 92, 100 and 100 and accuracy for MRI was 90, 97, 97 and 97 for detecting medial meniscus, lateral meniscus, ACL and PCL tears respectively. Clinically lateral meniscus tears are difficult to diagnose clinically with negative predictive value (90 whereas ACL injuries do not need MRI for diagnosis as evident by a high negative predictive value (100 of clinical examination. Total agreement with the clinical findings confirmed by arthroscopy was 64.40% which was relatively high as compared to total agreement of MRI findings which was only 31.50%. We found similar total agreement versus total disagreement of both clinical and MRI to be only 2.74% indicating very high accuracy in clinical diagnosis of meniscal and ligamentous injuries combined. CONCLUSION The clinical evaluation alone is sufficient to diagnose meniscal and ACL/PCL pathologies and MRI should be considered only as a powerful negative diagnostic tool. The arthroscopy decision should not be heavily dependent on MRI for ligamentous injuries but reverse is true for meniscal lesions. MR evaluation functions as a powerful negative diagnostic tool to rule out doubtful and complex knee injuries.

  7. Identification and characterization of adult mouse meniscus stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Shi, Rui Rui; Gendelman, Ashira; Mathewson, Dylan; Gamer, Jackson; Rosen, Vicki

    Meniscal damage is a common problem that accelerates the onset of knee osteoarthritis. Stem cell-based tissue engineering treatment approaches have shown promise in preserving meniscal tissue and restoring meniscal function. The purpose of our study was to identify meniscus-derived stem/progenitor cells (MSPCs) from mouse, a model system that allows for in vivo analysis of the mechanisms underlying meniscal injury and healing. MSPCs were isolated from murine menisci grown in explant culture and characterized for stem cell properties. Flow cytometry was used to detect the presence of surface antigens related to stem cells, and qRT-PCR was used to examine the gene expression profile of MSPCs. Major proteins associated with MSPCs were localized in the adult mouse knee using immunohistochemistry. Our data show that MSPCs have universal stem cell-like properties including clonogenicity and multi-potentiality. MSPCs expressed the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, Sca-1, CD90, and CD73 and when cultured had elevated levels of biglycan and collagen type I, important extracellular matrix components of adult meniscus. MSPC also expressed significant levels of Lox and Igf-1, genes associated with the embryonic meniscus. Localization studies showed staining for these same proteins in the superficial and outer zones of the adult mouse meniscus, regions thought to harbor endogenous repair cells. MSPCs represent a novel resident stem cell population in the murine meniscus. Analysis of MSPCs in mice will allow for a greater understanding of the cell biology of the meniscus, essential information for enhancing therapeutic strategies for treating knee joint injury and disease.

  8. A new arthroscopic classification of degenerative medial meniscus root tear that correlates with meniscus extrusion on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Seong-Il; Jeong, Tae-Wan; Kim, Su-Jin; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2016-03-01

    To determine a new classification system for medial meniscus root tears (MMRT) based on arthroscopic findings. 24 knees (55%) belonged to the nondisplaced or overlapped group, and 20 knees (45%) to the widely displaced group. Absolute meniscal extrusion was defined as distance between outer edge of the articular cartilage of tibial plateau and meniscal outer edge. Relative extrusion was defined as extruded meniscus width divided by entire meniscal width, multiplied by 100. The proportion of knees with major (>3 mm) extrusion were compared in two groups, as were the severity of chondral wear and osteoarthritic change. Absolute (4.6 mm vs. 3.7 mm, P=0.006) and relative (46% vs. 39%, P=0.042) extrusion of the medial meniscus were greater in widely displaced than in nondisplaced or overlapped group. Medial joint space width was significantly narrower in the widely displaced than in the nondisplaced or overlapped group (3.0 mm vs. 4.0 mm, P=0.007). The widely displaced group had a 4° greater varus deformity, and higher rates of major extrusion (>3 mm), grade III or IV chondral wear in the medial femoral condyle (60% vs. 29%, P=0.039) and medial compartment osteoarthritis (75% vs. 21%, P=0.001) than did the nondisplaced or overlapped group. Widely displaced MMRT had greater meniscal extrusion and more severe chondral wear and osteoarthritis than did nondisplaced or overlapped MMRT. In this novel classification system, the stage of MMRT severity was associated with tear site displacement. Case series (level IV). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between the MRI features of mild osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral compartments of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Watt, Iain; Bloem, Johan L.; Riyazi, Naghmeh; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between osteoarthritic changes seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral (PF) or tibiofemoral (TF) compartments in patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. MR images of the knee were obtained in 105 sib pairs (210 patients) who had been diagnosed with OA at multiple joints. Entry criteria included that the degree of OA in the knee examined should be between a Kellgren and Lawrence score of 2 or 3. MR images were analyzed for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, bone marrow edema (BME) and meniscal tears. The relationship between findings in the medial and lateral aspects of the PF and TF compartments was examined. The number of cartilaginous defects on either side of the PF compartment correlated positively with number of cartilaginous defects in the ipsilateral TF compartment (odds ratio, OR, 55, confidence interval, CI, 7.8-382). The number of cartilaginous defects in the PF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 3.7, CI 1.0-14) and ipsilateral PF BME (OR 17, CI 3.8-72). Cartilaginous defects in the TF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 9.8, CI 2.5-38) and ipsilateral TF BME (OR 120, CI 6.5-2,221). Osteoarthritic defects lateralize or medialize in the PF and TF compartments of the knee in patients with mild OA. (orig.)

  10. EFFICACY of P188 ON LAPINE MENISCUS PRESERVATION FOLLOWING BLUNT TRAUMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coatney, Garrett A.; Abraham, Adam C.; Fischenich, Kristine M.; Button, Keith D.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the knee leads to the development of posttraumatic osteoarthritis. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of a single intra-articular injection of a non-ionic surfactant, Poloxamer 188 (P188), in preservation of meniscal tissue following trauma through maintenance of meniscal glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and mechanical properties. Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a closed knee joint, traumatic compressive impact with the joint constrained to prevent anterior tibial translation. The contralateral limb served as an un-impacted control. Six animals (treated) received an injection of P188 in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) post trauma, and another six animals (sham) received a single injection of PBS to the impacted limb. Histological analyses for GAG was determined 6 weeks post trauma, and functional outcomes were assessed using stress relaxation micro-indentation. The impacted limbs of the sham group demonstrated a significant decrease in meniscal GAG coverage compared to non-impacted limbs (p < 0.05). GAG coverage of the impacted P188 treated limbs was not significantly different than contralateral non-impacted limbs in all regions except the medial anterior (p < 0.05). No significant changes were documented in mechanics for either the sham or treated groups compared to their respective control limbs. This suggests that a single intra-articular injection of P188 shows promise in prevention of trauma induced GAG loss. PMID:25846264

  11. The relationship between the MRI features of mild osteoarthritis in the patellofemoral and tibiofemoral compartments of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Watt, Iain; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Riyazi, Naghmeh; Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the relationship between osteoarthritic changes seen on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the patellofemoral (PF) or tibiofemoral (TF) compartments in patients with mild osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. MR images of the knee were obtained in 105 sib pairs (210 patients) who had been diagnosed with OA at multiple joints. Entry criteria included that the degree of OA in the knee examined should be between a Kellgren and Lawrence score of 2 or 3. MR images were analyzed for the presence of cartilaginous lesions, bone marrow edema (BME) and meniscal tears. The relationship between findings in the medial and lateral aspects of the PF and TF compartments was examined. The number of cartilaginous defects on either side of the PF compartment correlated positively with number of cartilaginous defects in the ipsilateral TF compartment (odds ratio, OR, 55, confidence interval, CI, 7.8-382). The number of cartilaginous defects in the PF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 3.7, CI 1.0-14) and ipsilateral PF BME (OR 17, CI 3.8-72). Cartilaginous defects in the TF compartment correlated positively with ipsilateral meniscal tears (OR 9.8, CI 2.5-38) and ipsilateral TF BME (OR 120, CI 6.5-2,221). Osteoarthritic defects lateralize or medialize in the PF and TF compartments of the knee in patients with mild OA. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  13. New understanding of the complex structure of knee menisci: implications for injury risk and repair potential for athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, J B; Matyas, J R; Barclay, L; Holowaychuk, S; Sciore, P; Lo, I K Y; Shrive, N G; Frank, C B; Achari, Y; Hart, D A

    2011-08-01

    Menisci help maintain the structural integrity of the knee. However, the poor healing potential of the meniscus following a knee injury can not only end a career in sports but lead to osteoarthritis later in life. Complete understanding of meniscal structure is essential for evaluating its risk for injury and subsequent successful repair. This study used novel approaches to elucidate meniscal architecture. The radial and circumferential collagen fibrils in the meniscus were investigated using novel tissue-preparative techniques for light and electron microscopic studies. The results demonstrate a unique architecture based on differences in the packaging of the fundamental collagen fibrils. For radial arrays, the collagen fibrils are arranged in parallel into ∼10 μm bundles, which associate laterally to form flat sheets of varying dimensions that bifurcate and come together to form a honeycomb network within the body of the meniscus. In contrast, the circumferential arrays display a complex network of collagen fibrils arranged into ∼5 μm bundles. Interestingly, both types of architectural organization of collagen fibrils in meniscus are conserved across mammalian species and are age and sex independent. These findings imply that disruptions in meniscal architecture following an injury contribute to poor prognosis for functional repair. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. MRI STUDY OF TYPES AND INCIDENCE OF INTERNAL DERANGEMENTS OF TRAUMATIC KNEE JOINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomidi Sudha Rani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND MRI has been accepted as the best imaging modality for noninvasive evaluation of knee injuries and it has proved reliable, safe and offers advantages over diagnostic arthroscopy, which is currently regarded as the reference standard for the diagnosis of internal derangements of the knee. 1 METHODS AND MATERIALS A prospective study of fifty patients who underwent MRI for the diagnosis of internal derangement of knee was conducted between the period of January 2015 to January 2016 in Government General Hospital, Kakinada. All the patients with history of knee joint pain following trauma and clinically suspected to have meniscal and ligament tears are included in the study. Patients were evaluated using GE 1.5 T MRI machine with pulsar gradient system using a sensor extremity coil. RESULTS Commonest lesion detected in our study was ACL tear followed by medial meniscal tear and medial collateral ligament injury. The most common sign of cruciate ligament injury was hyperintensity in the ligament. Grade 3 was the most common grade of meniscal tear. CONCLUSION MRI is an excellent, noninvasive, radiation free imaging modality and is unique in its ability to evaluate the internal structure as well as soft tissue delineation. Many anatomical variants can mimic a tear on MRI. MRI is an excellent noninvasive modality for imaging the knee and helps in arriving at a correct anatomical diagnosis there by guiding further management of the patient.

  15. UTE-T2* mapping detects sub-clinical meniscus injury after anterior cruciate ligament tear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, A.; Qian, Y.; Golla, S.; Chu, C.R.

    2018-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Meniscus tear is a known risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative assessment of meniscus degeneration, prior to surface break-down, is important to identification of early disease potentially amenable to therapeutic interventions. This work examines the diagnostic potential of ultrashort echo time-enhanced T2* (UTE-T2*) mapping to detect human meniscus degeneration in vitro and in vivo in subjects at risk of developing OA. Design UTE-T2* maps of 16 human cadaver menisci were compared to histological evaluations of meniscal structural integrity and clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment by a musculoskeletal radiologist. In vivo UTE-T2* maps were compared in 10 asymptomatic subjects and 25 ACL-injured patients with and without concomitant meniscal tear. Results In vitro, UTE-T2* values tended to be lower in histologically and clinically normal meniscus tissue and higher in torn or degenerate tissue. UTE-T2* map heterogeneity reflected collagen disorganization. In vivo, asymptomatic meniscus UTE-T2* values were repeatable within 9% (root-mean-square average coefficient of variation). Posteromedial meniscus UTE-T2* values in ACL-injured subjects with clinically diagnosed medial meniscus tear (n = 10) were 87% higher than asymptomatics (n = 10, P meniscus degeneration. Further study is needed to determine whether elevated subsurface meniscus UTE-T2* values predict progression of meniscal degeneration and development of OA. PMID:22306000

  16. Comparison of the biomechanical tensile and compressive properties of decellularised and natural porcine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgaied, A; Stanley, M; Galfe, M; Berry, H; Ingham, E; Fisher, J

    2015-06-01

    Meniscal repair is widely used as a treatment for meniscus injury. However, where meniscal damage has progressed such that repair is not possible, approaches for partial meniscus replacement are now being developed which have the potential to restore the functional role of the meniscus, in stabilising the knee joint, absorbing and distributing stress during loading, and prevent early degenerative joint disease. One attractive potential solution to the current lack of meniscal replacements is the use of decellularised natural biological scaffolds, derived from xenogeneic tissues, which are produced by treating the native tissue to remove the immunogenic cells. The current study investigated the effect of decellularisation on the biomechanical tensile and compressive (indentation and unconfined) properties of the porcine medial meniscus through an experimental-computational approach. The results showed that decellularised medial porcine meniscus maintained the tensile biomechanical properties of the native meniscus, but had lower tensile initial elastic modulus. In compression, decellularised medial porcine meniscus generally showed lower elastic modulus and higher permeability compared to that of the native meniscus. These changes in the biomechanical properties, which ranged from less than 1% to 40%, may be due to the reduction of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) content during the decellularisation process. The predicted biomechanical properties for the decellularised medial porcine meniscus were within the reported range for the human meniscus, making it an appropriate biological scaffold for consideration as a partial meniscus replacement. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Meniscus tear surgery and meniscus replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Javier; Forriol, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective the menisci are easily injured and difficult to repair. The aim of this study was to analyze the current state of meniscal surgery aimed at preserving morphology and conserving the biomechanics of the knee to prevent joint degeneration. Methodology a search of the electronic medical literature database Medline was conducted, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. The search was not limited by language. Candidate articles were identified by searching for those that included the keywords meniscus, surgery, suture, implant, allograft. The limits were included for clinical research and clinical trials. Basic research was not included. The studies selected were evaluated and classified in three different categories: basic science, reconstruction (suture and meniscectomy) and implants (scaffolds and allograft). Results the consequences of meniscectomy performed at a young age can lead to a joint cartilage degeneration twenty years later. There are few surgical options for the repair of meniscal injuries in order both to preserve the meniscus and to ensure the long term survival of the knee joint, meniscectomy, repair, suturing the tear, or reconstruction, when a meniscal allograft or synthetic substitute is used to replace the meniscus, but the biomechanical properties of the native meniscus are not reproduced entirely by the scaffolds that exist today. Conclusion therapies that successfully repair or replace the meniscus are therefore likely to prevent or delay osteoarthritis progression. PMID:27331034

  18. Prevalence of abnormal findings in magnetic resonance images of asymptomatic knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuta, Shoji; Masaki, Kunihiro; Korai, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    One hundred fifteen asymptomatic Japanese volunteers aged from 13 to 76 years were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate age-related meniscal degeneration and to determine the prevalence of discoid menisci. Each meniscus was graded in the anterior and posterior portions according to intrameniscal MRI signals. Discoid meniscus was diagnosed if a bow-tie configuration was noted on three or more contiguous sagittal sections. Meniscal abnormalities on MRI became more prevalent with age in both men and women. The posterior horn of the medial meniscus showed a significantly higher prevalence of degeneration than other parts of the meniscus. Discoid menisci were noted in 15 subjects (13% prevalence), always representing the lateral meniscus. Subchondral changes were observed in 13 subjects more than 40 years old, mostly women, and were located in the medial compartment. These abnormalities were not correlated with severity of degeneration in the posterior portion of the medial meniscus. This study demonstrates considerable prevalence of meniscal abnormalities in asymptomatic Japanese subjects. (author)

  19. Hydrogels for precision meniscus tissue engineering: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Cucchiarini, Magali; Madry, Henning

    The meniscus plays a pivotal role to preserve the knee joint homeostasis. Lesions to the meniscus are frequent, have a reduced ability to heal, and may induce tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. Current reconstructive therapeutic options mainly focus on the treatment of lesions in the peripheral vascularized region. In contrast, few approaches are capable of stimulating repair of damaged meniscal tissue in the central, avascular portion. Tissue engineering approaches are of high interest to repair or replace damaged meniscus tissue in this area. Hydrogel-based biomaterials are of special interest for meniscus repair as its inner part contains relatively high proportions of proteoglycans which are responsible for the viscoelastic compressive properties and hydration grade. Hydrogels exhibiting high water content and providing a specific three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment may be engineered to precisely resemble this topographical composition of the meniscal tissue. Different polymers of both natural and synthetic origins have been manipulated to produce hydrogels hosting relevant cell populations for meniscus regeneration and provide platforms for meniscus tissue replacement. So far, these compounds have been employed to design controlled delivery systems of bioactive molecules involved in meniscal reparative processes or to host genetically modified cells as a means to enhance meniscus repair. This review describes the most recent advances on the use of hydrogels as platforms for precision meniscus tissue engineering.

  20. In Vivo Tibial Cartilage Strains in Regions of Cartilage-to-Cartilage Contact and Cartilage-to-Meniscus Contact in Response to Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty; Lad, Nimit K; Collins, Amber T; Ganapathy, Pramodh K; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; McNulty, Amy L; Spritzer, Charles E; Moorman, Claude T; Sutter, E Grant; Garrett, William E; DeFrate, Louis E

    2017-10-01

    There are currently limited human in vivo data characterizing the role of the meniscus in load distribution within the tibiofemoral joint. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to compare the strains experienced in regions of articular cartilage covered by the meniscus to regions of cartilage not covered by the meniscus. It was hypothesized that in response to walking, tibial cartilage covered by the meniscus would experience lower strains than uncovered tibial cartilage. Descriptive laboratory study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knees of 8 healthy volunteers was performed before and after walking on a treadmill. Using MRI-generated 3-dimensional models of the tibia, cartilage, and menisci, cartilage thickness was measured in 4 different regions based on meniscal coverage and compartment: covered medial, uncovered medial, covered lateral, and uncovered lateral. Strain was defined as the normalized change in cartilage thickness before and after activity. Within each compartment, covered cartilage before activity was significantly thinner than uncovered cartilage before activity ( P meniscus experiences lower strains than uncovered cartilage in the medial compartment. These findings provide important baseline information on the relationship between in vivo tibial compressive strain responses and meniscal coverage, which is critical to understanding normal meniscal function.

  1. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of meniscus surgery and future targets for biologic intervention: A review of data from the MOON Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Robert W; Jones, Morgan; Wasserstein, David; Spindler, Kurt P

    Meniscus injury and treatment occurred with the majority of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions (ACLR) in the multicenter orthopedic outcomes (MOON) cohort. We describe the patient-reported outcomes, radiographic outcomes, and predictors of pain from meniscus injuries and treatment in the setting of ACLR. Patient-reported outcomes improve significantly following meniscus repair with ACLR, but differences exist based on the meniscus injury laterally (medial or lateral). Patients undergoing medial meniscus repair have worse patient-reported outcomes and more pain compared to those with uninjured menisci. However, lateral meniscal tears can be repaired with similar outcomes as uninjured menisci. Medial meniscal treatment (meniscectomy or repair) results in a significant loss of joint space at 2 years compared to uninjured menisci. Menisci treated with excision had a greater degree of joint space loss compared to those treated with repair. Clinically significant knee pain is more common following injuries to the medial meniscus and increased in patients who undergo early re-operation after initial ACLR. Future research efforts aimed at improving outcomes after combined ACLR and meniscus treatment should focus on optimizing biologic and mechanical environments that promote healing of medial meniscal tears sustained during ACL injury.

  2. Mechanobiology of the Meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Amy L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus plays a critical biomechanical role in the knee, providing load support, joint stability, and congruity. Importantly, growing evidence indicates that the mechanobiologic response of meniscal cells plays a critical role in the physiologic, pathologic, and repair responses of the meniscus. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies that have begun to directly measure the biomechanical effects of joint loading on the meniscus under physiologic and pathologic conditions, showing that the menisci are exposed to high contact stresses, resulting in a complex and nonuniform stress-strain environment within the tissue. By combining microscale measurements of the mechanical properties of meniscal cells and their pericellular and extracellular matrix regions, theoretical and experimental models indicate that the cells in the meniscus are exposed to a complex and inhomogeneous environment of stress, strain, fluid pressure, fluid flow, and a variety of physicochemical factors. Studies across a range of culture systems from isolated cells to tissues have revealed that the biological response of meniscal cells is directly influenced by physical factors, such as tension, compression, and hydrostatic pressure. In addition, these studies have provided new insights into the mechanotransduction mechanisms by which physical signals are converted into metabolic or pro/anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, these in vivo and in vitro studies show that mechanical factors play an important role in the health, degeneration, and regeneration of the meniscus. A more thorough understanding of the mechanobiologic responses of the meniscus will hopefully lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent degeneration and enhance repair of the meniscus. PMID:25731738

  3. Atlas of Bone Scintigraphy in the Developing Paediatric Skeleton: The Normal Skeleton, Variants and Pitfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of 99m technetium polyphosphate in 1972 by Dr. M. Subramanian, bone scintigraphy has become an integral part of the evaluation of paediatric musculoskeletal disorders. Using the current high resolution gamma cameras and 99m technetium-methylene diphosphonate ( 99m Tc-MDP) or 99m Tc 2,3-dicarboxypropane-1,1-diphosphonate ( 99m Tc-DPD), the quality of images available for interpretation is high. From the very earliest days, there has been a certain confusion over normal bone physiology, as depicted by the bone scintigram in paediatric patients. This has resulted in a number of difficulties in detecting subtle abnormalities, especially near the dynamically changing scintigraphic presentation of the physes (growth zones). Examples of abnormalities that might be confused with normal bone activity are osteomyelitis, bucket handle fractures of the long bones, as well as neuroblastoma and leukaemic metastases. The aim of this publication is to provide structured information about the maturation and normal appearance of the skeleton from infancy to adulthood. As such, it reflects the current status of bone scintigraphy. It is hoped that this work will contribute to an enhanced understanding of the dynamic process of naturally occurring metabolic bone changes, which will, in turn, improve the quality of reporting of paediatric bone scans. As the majority of paediatric bone scintigrams are interpreted by non-paediatric nuclear physicians, the availability of this reference atlas should improve the care of children. This atlas is intended to address the needs of nuclear medicine physicians, both residents and specialists. It is intended to serve as an illustrative reference to those not having sufficient exposure to paediatric bone scan investigations, to enable them to maintain adequate competency in this particular application. Experts in paediatric nuclear medicine are often consulted for their opinion on bone scans obtained in their respective

  4. In vivo kinematics of a robot-assisted uni- and multi-compartmental knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshifumi; Abbasi, Ali Z; Conditt, Michael A; Christopher, Jennifer; Kreuzer, Stefan; Otto, Jason K; Banks, Scott A

    2014-07-01

    There is great interest in providing reliable and durable treatments for one- and two-compartment arthritic degeneration of the cruciate-ligament intact knee. One approach is to resurface only the diseased compartments with discrete unicompartmental components, retaining the undamaged compartment(s). However, placing multiple small implants into the knee presents a greater surgical challenge than total knee arthroplasty, so it is not certain that the natural knee mechanics can be maintained or restored. The goal of this study was to determine whether near-normal knee kinematics can be obtained with a robot-assisted multi-compartmental knee arthroplasty. Thirteen patients with 15 multi-compartmental knee arthroplasties using haptic robotic-assisted bone preparation were involved in this study. Nine subjects received a medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), three subjects received a medial UKA and patellofemoral (PF) arthroplasty, and three subjects received medial and lateral bi-unicondylar arthroplasty. Knee motions were recorded using video-fluoroscopy an average of 13 months (6-29 months) after surgery during stair and kneeling activities. The three-dimensional position and orientation of the implant components were determined using model-image registration techniques. Knee kinematics during maximum flexion kneeling showed femoral external rotation and posterior lateral condylar translation. All knees showed femoral external rotation and posterior condylar translation with flexion during the step activity. Knees with medial UKA and PF arthroplasty showed the most femoral external rotation and posterior translation, and knees with bicondylar UKA showed the least. Knees with accurately placed uni- or bi-compartmental arthroplasty exhibited stable knee kinematics consistent with intact and functioning cruciate ligaments. The patterns of tibiofemoral motion were more similar to natural knees than commonly has been observed in knees with total knee

  5. ACL status in arthroplasty patients, why not to preserve?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbadie Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Only 70–85% of patients that had total knee arthroplasty (TKA are satisfied with their knees. The need for a near to normal knee kinematics is crucial and maybe the solution to their needs. Addressing the cruciate ligaments during surgery along with the extent of arthrosis may give a solution to this problem. Material and methods: One hundred consecutive patients in whom a total knee arthroplasty was indicated and performed were prospectively documented. During the knee replacement surgery, the condition of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments and the degree of osteoarthritis (OA in the medial and lateral compartments as well as in the patello-femoral joint were documented using the Outerbridge classification. The patients’ average age was 72.3 years, with the majority being female. In all patients, a total bi-compartmental knee replacement was indicated. Results: Our results showed that in 78% of all patients the anterior, and in 98% the posterior cruciate ligament was still intact. Seventy-one percent of cases suffered from grade 4 medial osteoarthritis, 19% from grade 3 and 10% from grade 2. Thirty-six of patients suffered from grade 4 lateral osteoarthritis, 36% from grade 3, 24% from grade 2 and 4% from grade 1. Grade 4 patello-femoral osteoarthritis was present in 32% of all patients, grade 3 in 60% and grade 2 in 8% of all patients. Discussion: The goal of arthroplasty is to approximate the function of a normal knee. The retention of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL allows for better knee, kinematics, improved proprioception, increased flexion and an overall improvement in knee function. The decreased constraint that is possible with retention of both cruciates may decrease implant stresses and improve the implant survivorship. The distribution of OA shows that the medial and patello-femoral compartments of the joint are primarily affected. This could also allow for a more conservative and patient

  6. Regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) measurements by SPECT analysis of Xenon-133 transit: Validation of technique and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezai, K.; Kirchner, P.; Armstrong, C.; Ehrhardt, J.; Damasio, H.; Adams, H.; Damasio, A.

    1984-01-01

    The SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) developed by a previous study for rCBF measurements with Xe-133 was validated with phantom simulations and clinical studies. A bi-compartmental flow phantom was developed consisting of a Xenon-133 pump connected in series to head and lung compartments. Flow rates between 0.2 and 1.4 brain volumes/min (20-140 cc/100ml/min) were tested against Tomomatic measurements by linear regression. Correlation was excellent (r=1.0) in the range of 0.2-1.2 (20-120 cc/100ml/min), representing flow rates which are most likely to be encountered in clinical studies. Flow rates above 1.2 (120 cc/100 ml/min) were significantly underestimated. 32 studies on 20 volunteers gave a mean normal flow of 72 (SD=12) cc/ 100g/min. Mean regional flow ranged from 62 in frontal lobes to 75 in central gray matter. Right-to-left variation was less than 5%. The lowest regional flow in a normal subject was 45 cc/100g/min. 68 studies were performed on 30 stroke patients. In 27 rCBF was less than 45 in affected brain areas for a sensitivity of 90% which improved to 97% when comparisons with contralateral brain were included. Initial CT scans were normal or non-diagnostic in 10, but showed CVA's in regions of reduced rCBF in 17 patients. rCBF abnormalities involved greater portions of brain than CT changes, often (8/17) including distant regions, unpredicted by CT or clinical studies but known to be strongly interconnected to the area of structural damage. SPECT estimates of rCBF appear to be a sensitive research and diagnostic tool and complement the structural information provided by CT

  7. Comparison of 3 estimation methods of mycophenolic acid AUC based on a limited sampling strategy in renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, Anne; Blanchet, Benoît; Audard, Vincent; Barau, Caroline; Furlan, Valérie; Durrbach, Antoine; Taïeb, Fabrice; Lang, Philippe; Grimbert, Philippe; Tod, Michel

    2009-04-01

    A significant relationship between mycophenolic acid (MPA) area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the risk for rejection has been reported. Based on 3 concentration measurements, 3 approaches have been proposed for the estimation of MPA AUC, involving either a multilinear regression approach model (MLRA) or a Bayesian estimation using either gamma absorption or zero-order absorption population models. The aim of the study was to compare the 3 approaches for the estimation of MPA AUC in 150 renal transplant patients treated with mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. The population parameters were determined in 77 patients (learning study). The AUC estimation methods were compared in the learning population and in 73 patients from another center (validation study). In the latter study, the reference AUCs were estimated by the trapezoidal rule on 8 measurements. MPA concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography. The gamma absorption model gave the best fit. In the learning study, the AUCs estimated by both Bayesian methods were very similar, whereas the multilinear approach was highly correlated but yielded estimates about 20% lower than Bayesian methods. This resulted in dosing recommendations differing by 250 mg/12 h or more in 27% of cases. In the validation study, AUC estimates based on the Bayesian method with gamma absorption model and multilinear regression approach model were, respectively, 12% higher and 7% lower than the reference values. To conclude, the bicompartmental model with gamma absorption rate gave the best fit. The 3 AUC estimation methods are highly correlated but not concordant. For a given patient, the same estimation method should always be used.

  8. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  9. MR imaging of anterior cruciate ligament tears: is there a gender gap?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Parellada, J.Antoni; Parker, Laurence; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinically, females receive anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears more commonly than males. We explored whether gender differences exist in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears. At 1.5T, two observers evaluated MR examinations of 84 consecutive age-matched patients (42 males, 42 females, aged 16-39) with ACL tears, for mechanism of injury, extent and type of tear, the presence of secondary signs and associated osseous, meniscal and ligamentous injuries. The most common mechanism of injury for both females and males was the pivot shift mechanism (67 and 60%, respectively). Females were more commonly imaged in the acute stage of tear than males (98 and 67%, respectively, p=0.001) and more commonly possessed the typical posterolateral tibial bone contusion pattern (88 and 62%, respectively, p=0.0131). Males exhibited a deeper femoral notch sign (2.7 and 2.0 mm, p=0.007) and medial meniscal, lateral collateral ligament and posterior cruciate ligament injuries more commonly than females (48 and 24%, p=0.009, 30 and 7%, p=0.035, 17 and 0%, p=0.035). There was no significant difference between genders for the presence of other secondary signs and contusion patterns, associated lateral meniscal tears, presence of O'Donoghue's triad or associated medial collateral ligament injuries. Gender differences in MR imaging patterns of ACL tears exist: females are more commonly imaged in the acute stage and more commonly possess posterolateral tibial bone contusions; males have a more severe presentation than females, associated with more severe lateral femoral condyle and soft tissue injuries. (orig.)

  10. Arthroscopic Treatment of Discoid Lateral Meniscus Tears in Children With Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanda, Alfred; Wallace, Maegen; Bober, Michael B; Mackenzie, William

    2016-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia that presents to the pediatric orthopaedist. More than half of achondroplasia patients are affected with knee pain. It is thought that the majority of this pain may be due to spinal stenosis, hip pathology, or knee malalignment. Discoid menisci can be a source of lateral knee joint pain in skeletally immature patients in general. We present the first case series of patients with achondroplasia who had symptomatic discoid lateral menisci treated with arthroscopic knee surgery. The charts of 6 patients (8 knees) with achondroplasia who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery for symptomatic discoid lateral menisci were collected. History and physical examination data, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and operative reports were reviewed. Meniscal tear configuration and treatment type (meniscectomy vs. repair) were noted. Each patient was found to have a tear of the discoid meniscus. All menisci were treated with saucerization. In addition, meniscal repair was performed in 2 cases, partial meniscectomy in 3 cases, and subtotal meniscectomy in 3 cases. Two patients had bilateral discoid meniscal tears which were treated. Average follow-up was 2.4 years (range, 1 to 4.5 y) and the average pediatric International Knee Documentation Committee (pedi-IKDC) score was 85.3% (range, 75% to 95.4%). At final follow-up, all patients were pain free and able to return to full activities. Discoid meniscus tears may be a source of lateral joint line pain in patients with achondroplasia. These injuries can be successfully treated with arthroscopic surgery in this patient population. Future studies need to be done to determine the exact incidence of discoid menisci in achondroplasia patients and also to determine whether there is a genetic relationship between the 2 conditions. Level IV-case series.

  11. When should the external approach be resorted to in the arthroscopic treatment of perimeniscal cyst?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombaci Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meniscal cysts very often cause meniscal tears and especially when it is peripheral, some of the healthy parts of meniscus might be needlessly sacrificed. In particular conditions, extraarticular approaches might save some menisci. In the present study, we evaluated the conditions which required using the extraarticular approach in addition to the arthroscopic procedure, to maximally preserve the meniscus. Methods: Eight patients with perimeniscal cysts were evaluated retrospectively. One cyst was localized within the medial meniscus and seven in the lateral meniscus. The mean age was 36.13 (range; 19–63 years, mean follow-up time, 27.3 (range; 12–47 months. Patients were evaluated by using a Visual Analogue Score (VAS to measure pain relief and “Lysholm score” to measure functional improvement. In all patients except one, in which the cystic cavity was connected with the joint at the periphery of the meniscus, the cyst was drained from the intraarticular opening. When the cyst was too large (three cases and in one case where a large amount of meniscus was preserved for reasons mentioned above, additional extraarticular drainage was carried out. Results: The mean preoperative and postoperative VAS were 6 (range; 2–8 and 1.55 (range; 0–3 (p = 0.00058 and Lysholm scores were 64.75 (range; 48–86 and 93.11 (range; 80–100 (p = 0.0014, respectively. Discussion: In cysts, which have very limited or no connection with the joint on the most peripheral region of the meniscus and/or are larger than the meniscus height, extraarticular drainage of the cyst might produce unnecessary meniscal loss and function. In the extraarticular drainage, scrapping the walls of the cyst, while inspecting with an arthroscope, reduces recurrence of the cyst.

  12. Associations between MRI-defined structural pathology and generalized and localized knee pain - the Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, P; Podlipská, J; Guermazi, A; Niinimäki, J; Lehenkari, P; Roemer, F W; Nieminen, M T; Koski, J M; Arokoski, J P A; Saarakkala, S

    2016-09-01

    To determine the associations between multi-feature structural pathology assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the presence of knee pain, and to determine the associations between the locations of structural changes and different knee pain patterns. Eighty symptomatic subjects with knee pain and suspicion or diagnosis of knee OA and 63 asymptomatic subjects underwent knee MRI. Severity of structural changes was graded by MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) in separate knee locations. The associations between cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), osteophytes, Hoffa's synovitis, effusion-synovitis, meniscal damage and structural pathologies in ligaments, tendons and bursas and both the presence of pain and the knee pain patterns were assessed. The presence of Hoffa's synovitis (adjusted RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-1.3) and osteophytes in any region (2.07, 1.19-3.60) was significantly associated with the presence of pain. Any Hoffa's synovitis was associated with patellar pain (adjusted RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.19-3.60) and moderate-to-severe Hoffa's synovitis with diffuse pain (2.25, 1.13-4.50). Medial knee pain was associated with cartilage loss in the medial tibia (adjusted RR 2.66, 95% CI 1.22-5.80), osteophytes in the medial tibia (2.66, 1.17-6.07) and medial femur (2.55, 1.07-6.09), medial meniscal maceration (2.20, 1.01-4.79) and anterior meniscal extrusions (2.78, 1.14-6.75). Hoffa's synovitis and osteophytes were strongly associated with the presence of knee pain. Medial pain was associated most often with medially located structural pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of the Knee Quality of Life (KQoL-26 26-item questionnaire: data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atwell Chris

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article describes the development and validation of a self-reported questionnaire, the KQoL-26, that is based on the views of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury of the knee that assesses the impact of their knee problem on the quality of their lives. Methods Patient interviews and focus groups were used to derive questionnaire content. The instrument was assessed for data quality, reliability, validity, and responsiveness using data from a randomised trial and patient survey about general practitioners' use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury. Results Interview and focus group data produced a 40-item questionnaire designed for self-completion. 559 trial patients and 323 survey patients responded to the questionnaire. Following principal components analysis and Rasch analysis, 26 items were found to contribute to three scales of knee-related quality of life: physical functioning, activity limitations, and emotional functioning. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.60–0.82. Cronbach's alpha and test retest reliability estimates were 0.91–0.94 and 0.80–0.93 respectively. Hypothesised correlations with the Lysholm Knee Scale, EQ-5D, SF-36 and knee symptom questions were evidence for construct validity. The instrument produced highly significant change scores for 65 trial patients indicating that their knee was a little or somewhat better at six months. The new instrument had higher effect sizes (range 0.86–1.13 and responsiveness statistics (range 1.50–2.13 than the EQ-5D and SF-36. Conclusion The KQoL-26 has good evidence for internal reliability, test-retest reliability, validity and responsiveness, and is recommended for use in randomised trials and other evaluative studies of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury.

  14. An immunohistochemical study of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: regional variations in cartilage phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, S; Sicking, B; Sprecher, C M; Putz, R; Benjamin, M

    2007-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) transmits load from the wrist to the ulna and stabilizes the distal radioulnar joint. Damage to it is a major cause of wrist pain. Although its basic structure is well established, little is known of its molecular composition. We have analysed the immunohistochemical labelling pattern of the extracellular matrix of the articular disc and the meniscal homologue of the TFCC in nine elderly individuals (age range 69–96 years), using a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against collagens, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Although many of the molecules (types I, III and VI collagen, chondroitin 4 sulphate, dermatan sulphate and keratan sulphate, the oversulphated epitope of chondroitin 6 sulphate, versican and COMP) were found in all parts of the TFCC, aggrecan, link protein and type II collagen were restricted to the articular disc and to entheses. They were thus not a feature of the meniscal homologue. The shift in tissue phenotype within the TFCC, from a fibrocartilaginous articular disc to a more fibrous meniscal homologue, correlates with biomechanical data suggesting that the radial region is stiff and subject to considerable stress concentration. The presence of aggrecan, link protein and type II collagen in the articular disc could explain why the TFCC is destroyed in rheumatoid arthritis, given that it has been suggested that autoimmunity to these antigens results in the destruction of articular cartilage. The differential distribution of aggrecan within the TFCC is likely to be reflected by regional differences in water content and mobility on the radial and ulnar side. This needs to be taken into account in the design of improved MRI protocols for visualizing this ulnocarpal complex of the wrist. PMID:17532798

  15. Development of the knee quality of life (KQoL-26) 26-item questionnaire: data quality, reliability, validity and responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Andrew M; Brealey, Stephen; Robling, Michael; Atwell, Chris; Russell, Ian; Gillespie, William; King, David

    2008-07-10

    This article describes the development and validation of a self-reported questionnaire, the KQoL-26, that is based on the views of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury of the knee that assesses the impact of their knee problem on the quality of their lives. Patient interviews and focus groups were used to derive questionnaire content. The instrument was assessed for data quality, reliability, validity, and responsiveness using data from a randomised trial and patient survey about general practitioners' use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury. Interview and focus group data produced a 40-item questionnaire designed for self-completion. 559 trial patients and 323 survey patients responded to the questionnaire. Following principal components analysis and Rasch analysis, 26 items were found to contribute to three scales of knee-related quality of life: physical functioning, activity limitations, and emotional functioning. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.60-0.82. Cronbach's alpha and test retest reliability estimates were 0.91-0.94 and 0.80-0.93 respectively. Hypothesised correlations with the Lysholm Knee Scale, EQ-5D, SF-36 and knee symptom questions were evidence for construct validity. The instrument produced highly significant change scores for 65 trial patients indicating that their knee was a little or somewhat better at six months. The new instrument had higher effect sizes (range 0.86-1.13) and responsiveness statistics (range 1.50-2.13) than the EQ-5D and SF-36. The KQoL-26 has good evidence for internal reliability, test-retest reliability, validity and responsiveness, and is recommended for use in randomised trials and other evaluative studies of patients with a suspected ligamentous or meniscal injury.

  16. Postero-anterior radiogram of the knee in weight-bearing and semiflexion. Comparison with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegaard, T.; Rudling, O.; Sanfridsson, J.; Jonsson, K.; Saxne, T.; Svensson, B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was four-fold: to assess the reproducibility of p.a. weight-bearing radiograms of the knee and the minimal joint-space (MJS) width measurements in these radiograms; to compare the MJS with MR-detected cartilage defects; to evaluate the location of these cartilage defects; and to estimate the relation between meniscal abnormalities and joint-space narrowing. Material and Methods: Fifty-nine individuals, aged 41-58 years (mean 50), with chronic knee pain were examined by means of p.a. weight-bearing radiograms in semiflexion with fluoroscopic guidance of the knee joint. The MJS was measured with a standard ruler. On the same day MR imaging was performed with proton-density- and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo on a 1.0 T imager. Meniscal abnormalities and cartilage defects in the tibiofemoral joint (TFJ) were noted. Results and Conclusion: The p.a. view of the knee and the MJS measurements were reproducible. MJS of 3 mm is a limit in diagnosing joint-space narrowing in knees with MR-detected cartilage defects. There was a high proportion (p<0.001) of meniscal abnormality within the narrowed compartments in comparison with those that were not narrowed. A larger number of the cartilage defects (p<0.05) was found in the medial femoral condyle than in any of the other condyles of the TFJ. The defects had a dorsal location (p<0.001) as shown in the weight-bearing radiograms of the knee in semiflexion. (orig.)

  17. Visibility of Anterolateral Ligament Tears in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knees With Standard 1.5-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, David E; Carroll, Kevin W; Kosarek, Frank J; Piasecki, Dana P; Fleischli, James F; D'Alessandro, Donald F

    2016-10-01

    To attempt to visualize the ligament with standard 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-torn knee, and if it is visible, attempt to characterize it as torn or intact at its femoral, meniscal, and tibial attachment sites. This was a retrospective MRI study based on arthroscopic findings of a known ACL tear in 72 patients between the years 2006 and 2010. Patients all had hamstring ACL reconstructions, no concomitant lateral collateral ligament, or posterolateral corner injury based on imaging and physical examination, and had a preoperative 1.5-tesla MRI scan with standard sequences performed within 3 weeks of the injury. Two fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative MRI for visualization of the anterolateral ligament (ALL) for concomitant tears. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was calculated. Learning effect was analyzed to determine if radiologists' agreement improved as reads progressed. Both radiologists were able to visualize the ALL in 100% of the scans. Overall, ALL tears were noted in 26% by radiologist 1 and in 62% by radiologist 2. The agreement between the ligament being torn or not had a kappa of 0.54 between radiologists. The agreements in torn or not torn between radiologists in the femoral, meniscal, and tibial sites were 0.14, 0.15, and 0.31. The intraobserver reliability by radiologist 1 for femoral, meniscal, and tibial tears was 0.04, 0.57, and 0.54 respectively. For radiologist 2, they were 0.75, 0.61, and 0.55. There was no learning effect noted. ALL tears are currently unable to be reliably identified as torn or intact on standard 1.5-tesla MRI sequences. Proper imaging sequences are of crucial importance to reliably follow these tears to determine their clinical significance. Level IV, therapeutic case series study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of novel biodegradable three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives in a meniscus explant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochyńska, A I; Hannink, G; Verhoeven, R; Grijpma, D W; Buma, P

    2017-05-01

    Current treatment methods to repair meniscal tears do not bring fully satisfactory results. Tissue adhesives are considered promising alternatives, since they are easy to apply and cause minimal tissue trauma. The first aim of this study was to analyze the adhesive properties of and tissue response to two recently developed biodegradable block copolymeric three-armed- and hyper-branched tissue adhesives. The second aim was to investigate if tissue surface modification with collagenase improves the attachment of the adhesives and increases the healing potential of the tissue. Cylindrical explants were harvested from bovine menisci. The central core of the explants was removed and glued back into the defect, with or without incubation in collagenase solution prior to gluing, using one of the novel glues, Dermabond® or fibrin glue. The repair constructs were cultured in vitro for 1 and 28 days. Adhesion tests and histology were performed to analyze the effects of the glue in combination with the additional treatment. The adhesive strength of the novel glues was 40-50 kPa, which was significantly higher than that of fibrin glue (15 kPa). Cells were present in direct contact with the glues, and the tissue remained vital during the whole culture period. Increased cellularity around the tear in the collagenase treated explants was observed after 1 day. The two newly developed tissue adhesives are attractive materials to be used for repair of meniscal tears. The beneficial influence of collagenase treatment in treating meniscal tears with glues still needs to be confirmed in more clinical relevant studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1405-1411, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of Human Serum and 2 Different Types of Platelet Concentrates on Human Meniscus Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymann, Undine; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Krüger, Jan-Philipp; Hirsh, Glen; Endres, Michaela; Petersen, Wolf; Kaps, Christian

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of 10% human serum (HS), 5% platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and 5% autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) on migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis of human meniscus cells. Cell migration and proliferation on stimulation with HS, PRP, and ACP were assessed by chemotaxis assays and measurement of genomic DNA content. Meniscus cells were cultivated in pellets stimulated with 10% HS, 5% PRP, or 5% ACP. Meniscal ECM formation was evaluated by histochemical staining of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans and by analysis of fibrochondrocyte marker gene expression. Human meniscus cells were significantly attracted by all 3 blood-derived products (10% HS and 5% ACP: P = .0001, 5% PRP: P = .0002). Cell proliferation at day 9 was significantly increased on stimulation with 10% HS (P = .0001) and 5% PRP (P = .0002) compared with 5% ACP and controls. Meniscus cell pellet cultures showed the formation of a well-structured meniscal ECM with deposition of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans on stimulation with 10% HS, whereas 5% PRP or 5% ACP resulted in the formation of an inhomogeneous and more fibrous ECM. Stimulation with 10% HS and 5% ACP showed a significant induction of fibrochondrocyte marker genes such as aggrecan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0147), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0005), and biglycan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0003), whereas PRP showed no inducing effect. Among all tested blood-derived products, only stimulation with HS showed the formation of a meniscal ECM as well as positive cell proliferating and migrating effects in vitro. Regarding a potential biological repair of nonvascular meniscus lesions, our results may point toward the use of HS as a beneficial augment in regenerative meniscus repair approaches. Our findings may suggest that HS might be a beneficial augment for meniscus repair. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  20. Characterization of the anatomy of the anterolateral ligament of the knee using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosy, Jonathan D.; Mandalia, Vipul I.; Anaspure, Rahul [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, Princess Elizabeth Orthopaedic Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    The anterolateral ligament (ALL) may limit tibial internal rotation and pivot-shift following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Previous studies, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify this structure, have been inconsistent. We aimed to further characterize the anatomy of this ligament with reference to previous work. Institutional Review Board approval was gained and a retrospective study of 154 consecutive 1.5-T MRI studies was performed by a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. Cases with a lateral compartment or cruciate injury and patients under 16 years were excluded. A total of 100 MRIs (98 patients; 63 males: 35 females; mean age, 45.3 years, range, 16-85 years) were included in the study. The ALL was visualized partially in 94 (94.0 %) of the cases and fully with distinct femoral and tibial fibers in 57 (57.0 %) of the cases. Although the femoral origin was discreet in only 57 (57.0 %) of cases, the tibial insertion (7.64 ± 1.26 mm below the joint-line) and meniscal attachment were demonstrated in all cases where the ligament was seen. Where the femoral origin was not seen, a broad expansion of the ligament was noted. We identified four types of meniscal attachment (complete, central, bipolar, and inferior-only). The thickness of the ALL, at the level of the joint-line, was 1.75 ± 0.57 mm. The ALL is a consistent structure with meniscal and tibial portions identifiable in the majority of MRI studies of the uninjured knee. There is an attachment to the lateral meniscus with anatomical variation described by our subclassification. (orig.)

  1. MR imaging of chondramalacia patella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulish, B.S.; Montanez, J.; Mulopulos, G.P.; Goodfellow, D.; Dollinger, B.; Bryan, P.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1986-01-01

    Because of its inherent soft-tissue contrast, MR imaging can distinguish hyaline articular cartilage, fibrocartilage, and cortical and medullary bone, and thus seems a method ideally suited to examine the posterior patellar hyaline articular cartilage. The authors studied the knees of people with suspected chondromalacia patella using MR imagine and compared our findings to normal knees and, where available, results of surgery. They find that we can distinguish swollen cartilage, irregular cartilage, absent cartilage, and bony patellar defects. Joint fluid and meniscal injuries could also be identified. MR imaging is a useful method for evaluation of chondromalacia patella and may reduce the need for arthroscopy and arthrography for diagnosis

  2. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gans, Itai; Ganley, Theodore J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Orthopaedics, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bedoya, Maria A.; Ho-Fung, Victor [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-08-31

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre

  3. Weight-training injuries. Common injuries and preventative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, L J; Yetman, R J; Risser, W L

    1993-07-01

    The use of weights is an increasingly popular conditioning technique, competitive sport and recreational activity among children, adolescents and young adults. Weight-training can cause significant musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, dislocations, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, intervertebral disk herniation, and meniscal injuries of the knee. Although injuries can occur during the use of weight machines, most apparently happen during the aggressive use of free weights. Prepubescent and older athletes who are well trained and supervised appear to have low injury rates in strength training programmes. Good coaching and proper weightlifting techniques and other injury prevention methods are likely to minimise the number of musculoskeletal problems caused by weight-training.

  4. Associations of anatomical measures from MRI with radiographically defined knee osteoarthritis score, pain, and physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Maryfran; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie A; Jacobson, Jon A; Jiang, Yebin; Yosef, Matheos

    2011-02-02

    The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is traditionally based on radiographic findings, but magnetic resonance imaging is now being used to provide better visualization of bone, cartilage, and soft tissues as well as the patellar compartment. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalences of knee features defined on magnetic resonance imaging in a population and to relate these abnormalities to knee osteoarthritis severity scores based on radiographic findings, physical functioning, and reported knee pain in middle-aged women. Magnetic resonance images of the knee were evaluated for the location and severity of cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, meniscal and/or ligamentous tears, effusion, and synovitis among 363 middle-aged women (724 knees) from the Michigan Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. These findings were related to Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis severity scores from radiographs, self-reported knee pain, self-reported knee injury, perception of physical functioning, and physical performance measures to assess mobility. Radiographs, physical performance assessment, and interviews were undertaken at the 1996 study baseline and again (with the addition of magnetic resonance imaging assessment) at the follow-up visit during 2007 to 2008. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis changed from 3.7% at the baseline assessment to 26.7% at the follow-up visit eleven years later. Full-thickness cartilage defects of the medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments were present in 14.5% (105 knees), 4.6% (thirty-three knees), and 26.2% (190 knees), respectively. Synovitis was identified in 24.7% (179) of the knees, and joint effusions were observed in 70% (507 knees); 21.7% (157) of the knees had complex or macerated meniscal tears. Large osteophytes, marked synovitis, macerated meniscal tears, and full-thickness tibial cartilage defects were associated with increased odds of knee pain and with

  5. Evolution of Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Prohorov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of juvenile ankylosing spondylitis tend to follow a more frequent involvement in the pathological process of elbow and ankle joints, development of enthesiopathies, changes of intraarticular meniscal horns, forming of Baker’s cysts, cartilage flaps and systemic osteoporosis, and total value of all these signs 13 times exceeds thereof in patients with with the debut of disease in adulthood, but for juvenile ankylosing spondylitis vertebral lesion is less common. Age dimorphism of the use of certain groups of drugs and physiotherapy facilities is observed.

  6. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging and pre-surgical evaluation in the assessment of traumatic intra-articular knee disorders in children and adolescents: what conditions still pose diagnostic challenges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, Itai; Ganley, Theodore J.; Bedoya, Maria A.; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of intra-articular lesions in children based on clinical examination and MRI is particularly challenging. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation of the knee in pediatric patients relative to arthroscopic evaluation as the gold standard. We report diagnoses frequently missed or inaccurately diagnosed pre-operatively. We conducted a retrospective review of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation in children and adolescents ages 1-17 years who were treated by knee arthroscopy during a 21/2-year period. All MRIs were reviewed by a pediatric radiologist blinded to clinical findings. Pediatric orthopedic clinic notes were reviewed for pre-surgical evaluation (based on physical exam, radiograph, MR images and radiologist's MRI report). Arthroscopic findings were used as the gold standard. We calculated the percentages of diagnoses at arthroscopy missed on both MRI and pre-surgical evaluation. Diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents and in patients with one pathological lesion vs. those with >1 lesion was analyzed. We performed a second review of MR images of the missed or over-called MRI diagnoses with knowledge of arthroscopic findings. We included 178 children and adolescents. The most common diagnoses missed on MRI or pre-surgical evaluation but found at arthroscopy were: discoid meniscus (8/30, or 26.7% of cases); lateral meniscal tears (15/80, or 18.8% of cases); intra-articular loose bodies (5/36, or 13.9% of cases), and osteochondral injuries (9/73, or 12.3% of cases). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre-surgical evaluation was 92.7% and 95.3%, respectively. No significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between children and adolescents was observed. When multiple intra-articular lesions were present, lateral meniscal tears were more likely to be inaccurately diagnosed (missed or over-called) on both MRI (P = 0.009) and pre-surgical evaluation (P < 0.001). Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and pre

  7. Fast three-dimensional MR imaging of the knee: A comparison with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrrell, R.; Gluckert, K.; Yulish, B.; Pathria, M.N.; Goodfellow, D.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty patients with suspected knee pathology were evaluated with fast volume imaging and compared to arthroscopy as a gold standard. The knee was imaged with FISP (repetition time 28 msec/echo time, 14 msec/flip angle, 40 degrees) in a sagittal plane generating 64 continguous slices in about 8 minutes. A numerical grading system that could be used for both MR and arthroscopy was devised. Results showed that there was a 95% agreement between MR and arthroscopy in meniscal tears; 100% correlation between MR and severely degenerated menisci; 100% agreement of partial cruciate tears; and high correlation for high-grade cartilage lesions

  8. MR imaging of appendicular musculoskeletal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathol, M.H.; Montgomery, W.J.; Yuh, W.T.C.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty cases of musculoskeletal trauma to the extremities examined by MR imaging have been reviewed retrospectively. Examples of various injuries will be shown, including disruption of ligament and tendon, muscular tear and edema, hemorrhage (local or diffuse), vascular injury, bone marrow contusion, osteocartilaginous fracture, meniscal tear, and joint fluid. Many of these patients were collegiate athletes, and MR was valuable in establishing a rapid, accurate diagnosis influencing not only treatment but also return to competition. Negative examinations allowed resumption of competition with a high degree of confidence. The advantages and disadvantages of MR in musculo-skeletal trauma are discussed

  9. Proximity of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex to Key Surrounding Structures and Safety Assessment of an Arthroscopic Repair Technique: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuremsky, Marshall A; Habet, Nahir; Peindl, Richard D; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-12-01

    To quantify the distance of the dorsal ulnar sensory branch, floor of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, and ulnar neurovascular bundles from the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and secondarily to assess the safety of an all-inside arthroscopic repair of the TFCC with a commonly used meniscal repair device with respect to the aforementioned structures. A custom K-wire with 1-mm gradation was used to determine the distance of at-risk structures from the periphery of the TFCC in 13 above-elbow human cadaver specimens. An all-inside repair of the TFCC at the location of a Palmer 1B tear was then performed using a commonly employed meniscal repair device. The distance from the deployed devices to the structure in closest proximity was then measured using digital calipers. The mean distance from the deployed device to the nearest structure of concern for iatrogenic injury was 9.4 mm (range, 5-15 mm). The closest structure to iatrogenic injury was usually, but not always, the dorsal ulnar sensory nerve in 9 of 13 wrists (69.2%) at 9.3 mm (range, 5-15 mm); on 3 occasions it was instead the ulnar nerve (23.1%) at 9.5 mm (range, 9-10 mm), and on 1 occasion 6 mm from the flexor digitorum profundus to the little finger (7.7%). Forearm rotation had no significant effect on measured distances (ulnar nerve: P = .98; dorsal sensory: P = .89; ECU: P = .90). The largest influence of forearm rotation was a 0.4-mm difference between pronation and supination with respect to the distance of the TFCC periphery on the ECU subsheath. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly used meniscal repair device appears safe with respect to nearby neurovascular structures and tendons under typical arthroscopic conditions. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly employed meniscal repair device appears safe in terms of proximity to important structures although further clinical investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  10. MRI of radial displacement of the meniscus in the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jian; Lv Houshan; Lao Shan; Guan Zhenpeng; Hong Nan; Liang Hao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus of the knees in the study population with MR imaging, and to establish MRI diagnostic criteria for radial displacement of the meniscus and displacement index. Methods: MR signs of radial displacement of the meniscus were evaluated retrospectively in 398 patients with knee symptoms who were examined with non- weight bearing MR images from Jan. 2000 to Feb. 2004. The patients younger than 18 years old, with joint effusion or serious arthropathy were excluded and 312 patients were eligible to be enrolled in this study. The criterion for radial displacement of the meniscus was defined as the location of the edge of meniscal body beyond the femoral and tibial outer border line. A displacement index, defined as the ratio of meniscal overhang to meniscal width, was used to quantify meniscal displacement. Results: The prevalence of radial displacement of the meniscus was 16.7% (52/312) and 13.9% (21/151) in right knee and 19.3% (31/161 )in left knee, respectively. There was no significant difference between left and right knee (χ 2 =1.60, P>0.05) and the ratio between medial and lateral meniscus was 7.8:1. The average displacement index was 0.54±0.24. The displacement indices were significant higher in older group (F=3.63, P<0.05). The incidence and indices of radial displacement of the meniscus for patients under or above 50 year older were 12.0%(17/142), 0.46±0.22 and 20.6% (35/170), 0.64±0.20, respectively. Difference was highly significant (t=0.84, P<0.01). Conclusion: It was concluded that radial displacement of the meniscus in knees was not a rare finding with MR imaging in patients with knee symptoms. The incidence increased in older age group. Further investigations were recommended to understand the etiology and clinical significance of the phenomenon of radial displacement of the meniscus. (authors)

  11. A Novel Repair Method for Radial Tears of the Medial Meniscus: Biomechanical Comparison of Transtibial 2-Tunnel and Double Horizontal Mattress Suture Techniques Under Cyclic Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sanjeev; Civitarese, David M; Turnbull, Travis Lee; LaPrade, Christopher M; Nitri, Marco; Wijdicks, Coen A; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-03-01

    Complete radial tears of the medial meniscus have been reported to be functionally similar to a total meniscectomy. At present, there is no consensus on an ideal technique for repair of radial midbody tears of the medial meniscus. Prior attempts at repair with double horizontal mattress suture techniques have led to a reportedly high rate of incomplete healing or healing in a nonanatomic (gapped) position, which compromises the ability of the meniscus to withstand hoop stresses. A newly proposed 2-tunnel radial meniscal repair method will result in decreased gapping and increased ultimate failure loads compared with the double horizontal mattress suture repair technique under cyclic loading. Controlled laboratory study. Ten matched pairs of male human cadaveric knees (average age, 58.6 years; range, 48-66 years) were used. A complete radial medial meniscal tear was made at the junction of the posterior one-third and middle third of the meniscus. One knee underwent a horizontal mattress inside-out repair, while the contralateral knee underwent a radial meniscal repair entailing the same technique with a concurrent novel 2-tunnel repair. Specimens were potted and mounted on a universal testing machine. Each specimen was cyclically loaded 1000 times with loads between 5 and 20 N before experiencing a load to failure. Gap distances at the tear site and failure load were measured. The 2-tunnel repairs exhibited a significantly stronger ultimate failure load (median, 196 N; range, 163-212 N) than did the double horizontal mattress suture repairs (median, 106 N; range, 63-229 N) (P = .004). In addition, the 2-tunnel repairs demonstrated decreased gapping at all testing states (P meniscus significantly decrease the ability of the meniscus to dissipate tibiofemoral loads, predisposing patients to early osteoarthritis. Improving the ability to repair medial meniscal radial tears in a way that withstands cyclic loads and heals in an anatomic position could significantly

  12. The knee meniscus: structure-function, pathophysiology, current repair techniques, and prospects for regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Eleftherios A.; Hadidi, Pasha; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive scientific investigations in recent decades have established the anatomical, biomechanical, and functional importance that the meniscus holds within the knee joint. As a vital part of the joint, it acts to prevent the deterioration and degeneration of articular cartilage, and the onset and development of osteoarthritis. For this reason, research into meniscus repair has been the recipient of particular interest from the orthopedic and bioengineering communities. Current repair techniques are only effective in treating lesions located in the peripheral vascularized region of the meniscus. Healing lesions found in the inner avascular region, which functions under a highly demanding mechanical environment, is considered to be a significant challenge. An adequate treatment approach has yet to be established, though many attempts have been undertaken. The current primary method for treatment is partial meniscectomy, which commonly results in the progressive development of osteoarthritis. This drawback has shifted research interest towards the fields of biomaterials and bioengineering, where it is hoped that meniscal deterioration can be tackled with the help of tissue engineering. So far, different approaches and strategies have contributed to the in vitro generation of meniscus constructs, which are capable of restoring meniscal lesions to some extent, both functionally as well as anatomically. The selection of the appropriate cell source (autologous, allogeneic, or xenogeneic cells, or stem cells) is undoubtedly regarded as key to successful meniscal tissue engineering. Furthermore, a large variation of scaffolds for tissue engineering have been proposed and produced in experimental and clinical studies, although a few problems with these (e.g., byproducts of degradation, stress shielding) have shifted research interest towards new strategies (e.g., scaffoldless approaches, self-assembly). A large number of different chemical (e.g., TGF-β1, C-ABC) and

  13. Magnetic resonance analysis of loaded meniscus deformation: a novel technique comparing participants with and without radiographic knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, Toran D. [California State University, Department of Physical Therapy, Sacramento, CA (United States); Subburaj, Karupppasamy; Wu, Samuel; Kumar, Deepak; Wyatt, Cory; Souza, Richard B. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research Group, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    To establish a novel method of quantifying meniscal deformation using loaded MRI. More specifically, the goals were to evaluate the (1) accuracy, (2) inter-rater reliability, (3) intra-rater reliability, and (4) scan-rescan reliability. The secondary purpose of this experiment was to evaluate group differences in meniscal deformation in participants with and without radiographic knee OA. Weight-bearing 3-T MRIs of the knee in full extension and 30 of flexion were processed to create 3D models of meniscal deformation. Accuracy was assessed using a custom-designed phantom. Twenty-one participants either with or without signs of OA were evaluated, and another six participants (14 knees, one subject was scanned twice) underwent repeated imaging to assess scan-rescan reproducibility. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), root-mean squared error (RMSE), and root-mean-square percent coefficient-of-variation (RMS%CV) analyses were performed. Exploratory comparisons were made between those with and without OA to evaluate potential group differences. All variables were found to be accurate with RMSE ranging from 0.08 to 0.35 mm and 5.99 to 14.63 mm{sup 2}. Reproducibility of peak anterior-posterior meniscal deformation was excellent (ICC > 0.821; p < 0.013) with RMS%CV for intra-rater ranging from 0.06 to 1.53 % and 0.17 to 1.97 %, inter-rater ranging from 0.10 to 7.20 % and 3.95 to 18.53 %, and scan-rescan reliability ranging from 1.531 to 7.890 % and 4.894 to 9.142 %, for distance and area metric, respectively. Participants with OA were found to have significantly greater anterior horn movement of both the medial (p = 0.039) and lateral meniscus (p = 0.015), and smaller flexed medial meniscus outer area (p = 0.048) when compared to controls. MRI-based variables of meniscus deformation were found to be valid in participants with and without OA. Significant differences were found between those with and without radiographic OA; further study is warranted. (orig.)

  14. Arthroscopic debridement for grade III and IV chondromalacia of the knee in patients older than 60 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Patt, Thomas W; Rutten, Sjoerd; Raven, Eric E J; van de Vis, Harm M V; Albers, G H Rob

    2007-10-01

    Arthroscopic debridement has been used to treat patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis, although there is sometimes conflicting evidence documenting its efficacy. This study evaluates the success of arthroscopic debridement in elderly patients with grade III and IV chondromalacia of the knee as measured by patient satisfaction and the need for additional surgery. From December 1998 to August 2001, a total of 102 consecutive cases of knee arthroscopy in 99 patients > 60 years were performed. Average follow-up was 34 months (range: 7-104 months). Patients were asked about their satisfaction using a visual analog scale, and the presence of meniscal lesions during arthroscopy and the treatment for these lesions were evaluated. Knees also were assessed for articular surface degeneration using Outerbridge's classification for chondromalacia. The need for and type of additional surgery was evaluated. During arthroscopy, meniscal lesions requiring a partial meniscectomy were found in 95 knees. Chondromalacia was found in 92 knees; 53 knees had grade I or II chondromalacia and 39 knees had grade III or IV chondromalacia. Additional surgery was performed in 17 knees. Mean patient satisfaction score was 73 (range: 50-100) in the 39 knees with grade III or IV chondromalacia after arthroscopic debridement was performed. These findings suggest arthroscopic debridement in elderly patients has a place in the treatment algorithm for grade III or IV chondromalacia of the knee.

  15. The valuable use of Microsoft Kinect™ sensor 3D kinematic in the rehabilitation process in basketball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidot, Ariel; Favaretto, Guillermo; Frisoli, Melisa; Gemignani, Diego; Gumpel, Gustavo; Massuh, Roberto; Rayan, Josefina; Turin, Matías

    2016-04-01

    Subjects who practice sports either as professionals or amateurs, have a high incidence of knee injuries. There are a few publications that show studies from a kinematic point of view of lateral-structure-knee injuries, including meniscal (meniscal tears or chondral injury), without anterior cruciate ligament rupture. The use of standard motion capture systems for measuring outdoors sport is hard to implement due to many operative reasons. Recently released, the Microsoft Kinect™ is a sensor that was developed to track movements for gaming purposes and has seen an increased use in clinical applications. The fact that this device is a simple and portable tool allows the acquisition of data of sport common movements in the field. The development and testing of a set of protocols for 3D kinematic measurement using the Microsoft Kinect™ system is presented in this paper. The 3D kinematic evaluation algorithms were developed from information available and with the use of Microsoft’s Software Development Kit 1.8 (SDK). Along with this, an algorithm for calculating the lower limb joints angles was implemented. Thirty healthy adult volunteers were measured, using five different recording protocols for sport characteristic gestures which involve high knee injury risk in athletes.

  16. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  17. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, J P

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved.

  18. MRI in diagnostic of soft tissue damages by fractures of lateral tibial plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrova, D.; Proichev, V.; Popov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: The knee is one of the most often injured joint. Fractures of tibial condyles are the most common articular damages. Koton and Berg call them „bumper“ fractures the tibia plateau is vulnerable to both high- and low-energy injury mechanisms due to its vulnerable position in the lower extremity. It must bear significant weight and sustain significant impact and deceleration forces with little skeletal constraint, and has scant surrounding soft tissue and a tethered medial and lateral integument. Furthermore, the tibial plateau has relatively forgiving ligamentous attachments that must allow for a large range of motion in a single plane. Not surprisingly, given the diversity of injury, management of these fractures has come to include a wide variety of treatment strategies. traditionally, ligament injury associated with plateau fractures has been diagnosed indirectly with stress radiographs and physical examination. With increasing use of more sensitive MRI and arthroscopy, associated ligament and meniscus injuries have been found in significant percentages of plateau fractures. these soft tissue injuries consist primarily of MCL lesions, meniscal injuries, and ACL disruptions. However, studies addressing associated soft tissue injuries all agree that neither the type of plateau fracture nor the presence or absence of ligament injury correlates with the incidence of meniscal tears

  19. Vertical tears of the cranial horn of the meniscus and its cranial ligament in the equine femorotibial joint: 7 cases and their treatment by arthroscopic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walmsley, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Five horses with a vertical tear in the cranial horn and cranial ligament of the medial meniscus and 2 horses with a similar injury in the lateral meniscus were diagnosed from a series of 126 horses which were examined arthroscopically for stifle lameness. All the lesions had similar characteristics. The tear was about 1 cm from the axial border of the meniscus and its ligament and, in all but one case in which it was incomplete, much of the torn tissue was loosely attached in the axial part of the joint from where it was removed. The remaining meniscus, abaxial to the tear, was displaced cranially and abaxially and its torn edges were debrided. Radiographically, 6 cases had proliferative new bone on the cranial aspect of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia and 3 had calcified soft tissue densities in the cranial, medial or lateral femorotibial joint. Following surgery and a 6 month period of rest and controlled exercise, 3 horses returned to full competition work, one was usable for hacking, 2 are convalescing and one is lame after one year. It is postulated that this could be a characteristic meniscal injury in horses which can benefit from arthroscopic surgery. Better techniques for accessing the body and caudal pole of the menisci are needed if a more complete diagnosis and treatment of meniscal injuries are to be achieved

  20. Cysts of the semilunar cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruessermann, M.

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of the studies listed in the bibliography, this dissertation reports on the pathology, clinical symptoms and radiology of cysts of the semilunar cartilage. The author analyses 118 cases of his own, with special regard to the results of pneumo-arthrographic investigations carried through according to a special technique by Schaefer. In the course of this work, measurements of the meniscal base are for the first time used as radiological criteria indicating the presence of a cyst of the semilunar cartilage. Furthermore the well-known radiological signs of cysts, such as bone defects according to Albert and Keller, light central spot in the meniscal body, as well as Rauber's sign and horizontal rupture, are investigated as to the frequency of their incidence. For that purpose all the X-ray pictures were subjected to a further dose scrutiny. A list of all the 118 cases with their clinical and radiological data is found in the annex, together with the results of the operations and patho-anatomical investigations. (orig.) [de

  1. Magnetic resonance tomography of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, Stefan; Kuruvilla, Yojena Chittazhathu Kurian; Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital, University of Berne, Department of Interventional, Pediatric and Diagnostic Radiology Inselspital, Berne (Switzerland); Endel, Gottfried [Main Association of Austrian Social Insurance Institutions, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in terms of sensitivity and specificity using a field strength of <1.0 T (T) versus ≥1.5 T for diagnosing or ruling out knee injuries or knee pathologies. The systematic literature research revealed more than 10,000 references, of which 1598 abstracts were reviewed and 87 full-text articles were retrieved. The further selection process resulted in the inclusion of four systematic reviews and six primary studies. No differences could be identified in the diagnostic performance of low- versus high-field MRI for the detection or exclusion of meniscal or cruciate ligament tears. Regarding the detection or grading of cartilage defects and osteoarthritis of the knee, the existing evidence suggests that high-field MRI is tolerably specific but not very sensitive, while there is literally no evidence for low-field MRI because only a few studies with small sample sizes and equivocal findings have been performed. We can recommend the use of low-field strength MRI systems in suspected meniscal or cruciate ligament injuries. This does, however, not apply to the diagnosis and grading of knee cartilage defects and osteoarthritis because of insufficient evidence. (orig.)

  2. Linear signal hyperintensity adjacent to the subchondral bone plate at the knee on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences: imaging aspects and association with structural lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Balaj, Clemence [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, IADI, UMR S 947, Nancy (France); Marie, Beatrice [CHU Hopital Central, Service d' Anatomo-Pathologie, Nancy (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain [CHU Hopital Central, Service D' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Braun, Marc [CHU Hopital Central, Service de Neuroradiologie, Nancy (France)

    2014-11-15

    To describe the association between linear T2 signal abnormalities in the subchondral bone and structural knee lesions. MR studies of patients referred for the evaluation of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated and 133 of these patients presented bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) (study group) and while 61 did not (control group). The presence of linear anomalies of the subchondral bone on T2-weighted fat-saturated sequences was evaluated. The findings were correlated to the presence of structural knee lesions and to the duration of the patient's symptoms. Histologic analysis of a cadaveric specimen was used for anatomic correlation. Linear T2 hyperintensities at the subchondral bone were present in 41 % of patients with BMEP. None of the patients in the control group presented this sign. When a subchondral linear hyperintensity was present, the prevalence of radial or root tears was high and that of horizontal tears was low (71.4 and 4.8 %, respectively). Sixty-nine percent of the patients with a subchondral insufficiency fracture presented a subchondral linear hyperintensity. It was significantly more prevalent in patients with acute or sub-acute symptoms (p < 0.0001). The studied linear T2 hyperintensity is located at the subchondral spongiosa and can be secondary to local or distant joint injuries. Its presence should evoke acute and sub-acute knee injuries. This sign is closely related to subchondral insufficiency fractures and meniscal tears with a compromise in meniscal function. (orig.)

  3. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: fuldemyildirim@yahoo.com; Basaran, Ceyla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylab@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: emkayahanulu@yahoo.com; Uyusur, Arzu [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuuyusur@yahoo.com; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: caglat@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Muhtesem Agildere, A. [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Caddesi 10. sokak no: 45, Bahcelievler 06490, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: amuhtesem@superonline.com

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  4. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Sung Suk; Eun, Choong Kie; Park, Dong Woo

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee

  5. Radiologic findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee : Focusing on MR imaging and plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jin; Choi, Jae Young; Cha, Sung Suk; Eun, Choong Kie [Inje Univ., College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong Woo [Hanyang Univ., College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. Seven keens in six patients with hemophilia (five hemophilia A and one hemophilia B) were retrospectively studied with MR images and plain radiographs. Patients were aged between 2 and 20 years (mean, 11) and all had a clinical history of repeated hemarthrosis. MR images of the knee were analyzed with respect to intra- and extra-articular hemorrhage, the state of synovial tissue, articular cartilage, bone, menisci, and ligaments. Synovial hypertrophy and articular cartilage destruction were revealed in all seven knees ; pannus was found in four, and was seen as low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. All five instances of synovial hypertrophy and pannus were enhanced. Joint effusion, presented in five of seven knees, demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and was associated with peripheral low signal intensity of hemosiderin. Subchondral and marginal erosion was seen in six cases, patellar deformity in three, meniscal damage in four and cruciate ligament damage in one case. MR is superior to radiography in demonstrating chronic repeated hemarthrosis (manifested as thick intra-articular effusion), hemosidering, synovial hypertrophy, erosion or destruction of articular cartilage and bone, and meniscal or cruciate ligament injury of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee. MR is therefore thought to be a useful imaging study for accurate evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy of the knee.

  6. Weightbearing Versus Nonweightbearing After Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderHave, Kelly L; Perkins, Crystal; Le, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Optimal rehabilitation after meniscal repair remains controversial. To review the current literature on weightbearing status after meniscal repairs and to provide evidence-based recommendations for postoperative rehabilitation. MEDLINE (January 1, 1993 to July 1, 2014) and Embase (January 1, 1993 to July 1, 2014) were queried with use of the terms meniscus OR/AND repair AND rehabilitation. Included studies were those with levels of evidence 1 through 4, with minimum 2 years follow-up and in an English publication. Systematic review. Level 4. Demographics and clinical and radiographic outcomes of meniscus repair at a minimum of 2 years follow-up were extracted. Successful clinical outcomes ranged from 70% to 94% with conservative rehabilitation. More recent studies using an accelerated rehabilitation protocol with full weightbearing and early range of motion reported 64% to 96% good results. Outcomes after both conservative (restricted weightbearing) protocols and accelerated rehabilitation (immediate weightbearing) yielded similar good to excellent results; however, lack of similar objective criteria and consistency among surgical techniques and existing studies makes direct comparison difficult. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Subchondral Bone and the Osteochondral Unit: Basic Science and Clinical Implications in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Riboh, Jonathan C

    2018-06-01

    Articular cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis are among the most common conditions seen by sports medicine physicians. Nonetheless, treatment options for articular degeneration are limited once the osteoarthritic cascade has started. Intense research is focused on the use of biologics, cartilage regeneration, and transplantation to help maintain and improve cartilage health. An underappreciated component of joint health is the subchondral bone. A comprehensive, nonsystematic review of the published literature was completed via a PubMed/MEDLINE search of the keywords "subchondral" AND "bone" from database inception through December 1, 2016. Clinical review. Level 4. Articles collected via the database search were assessed for the association of bone marrow lesions and osteoarthritis, cartilage regeneration, and ligamentous and meniscal injury; the clinical disorder known as painful bone marrow edema syndrome; and the subchondral bone as a target for medical and surgical intervention. A complex interplay exists between the articular cartilage of the knee and its underlying subchondral bone. The role of subchondral bone in the knee is intimately related to the outcomes from cartilage restoration procedures, ligamentous injury, meniscal pathology, and osteoarthritis. However, subchondral bone is often neglected when it should be viewed as a critical element of the osteochondral unit and a key player in joint health. Continued explorations into the intricacies of subchondral bone marrow abnormalities and implications for the advent of procedures such as subchondroplasty will inform further research efforts on how interventions aimed at the subchondral bone may provide durable options for knee joint preservation.

  8. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  9. Collagene order of articular cartilage by clinical magnetic resonance images and its age dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, P.; Gruender, W. [Inst. of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The present papers describes a novel method to obtain information on the degree of order of the collagen network of the knee meniscal cartilage by means of a single clinical MRI. Images were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers aged between 6 and 76 years as well as from one patient with clinically-diagnosed arthrosis at the age of 32 and 37 years. A siemens vision (1.5 T) MRT with TR = 750 ms, TE = 50 ms, FoV = 160 mm, and Matrix 512 x 512 was used for this purpose. The MR signal intensities of the cartilage were read out along slices with constant height above the subchondral bone and plotted versus the actual angle to the external magnetic field. The obtained intensity curves were fitted by a model distribution, and the degree of order of the collagen fibers was calculated. For the knee meniscal cartilage, there was an age-dependency of the degree of order and a significant deviation of the volunteer with arthrosis from the normal curve. The results are discussed in view of the arcade model and of a possible use of non-invasive clinical MRT for the detection of early arthrotic changes of cartilage. (orig.)

  10. MR imaging before arthroscopy in knee joint disorders?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappeport, E.D.; Mehta, S.; Wieslander, S.B.; Schwarz Lausten, G.; Thomsen, H.S.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To review the current literature examining the relative merits of arthroscopy and MR imaging of the knee. Material and Methods: All papers comparing MR imaging with arthroscopy published within the last 10 years according to Medline were collected and read. Results: Technology has improved considerably during recent years allowing detailed non-invasive visualization of the knee. In particular, the development of cheaper whole-body and dedicated low-field MR units has opened up for non-invasive inspection of the knee at reasonable cost. Meniscal tears can be detected with accuracy rates of around 90% and rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament with accuracy rates of around 93% compared to arthroscopy. However, arthroscopy is not the ideal gold standard, since it has weak points, e.g. peripheral meniscal tears or osteochondritis without apparent damage to the cartilage. Conclusion: Based on the overwhelming literature it seems safe to conclude that MR examinations of the knee should be performed before arthroscopy is undertaken. (orig.)

  11. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  12. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical management of the acutely locked knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, Eugene G.; Nasser, Khalid N.; Dawson, Stewart; Goh, Leslie A.

    2002-01-01

    To explore prospectively the hypothesis that MRI of the acutely locked knee can alter surgical decision-making.Design and patients. The study group comprised patients with a clinical diagnosis of knee locking requiring arthroscopy. The decision to carry out arthroscopy was made by an experienced consultant orthopaedic surgeon specialising in trauma and recorded in the patient's notes prior to MRI. Preoperative MRI was carried out using a 1.5 T system. The management was altered from surgical to conservative treatment in 20 (48%) patients on the basis of the MR findings. Arthroscopy was limited to patients with an MR diagnosis of a mechanical block, usually a displaced meniscal tear or loose body. Both patient groups were followed clinically until symptoms resolved.Results. Forty-two patients were entered into the study. MRI identified a mechanical cause for locking in 22 patients (21 avulsion meniscal tears and 1 loose body). All were confirmed at arthroscopy. Twenty patients were changed from operative to non-operative treatment on the basis of the MRI findings. One patient in this group required a delayed arthroscopy for an impinging anterior cruciate ligament stump. The sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of MRI in identifying patients who require arthroscopy was therefore 96%/100%/98% respectively.Conclusion. MRI can successfully segregate patients with a clinical diagnosis of mechanical locking into those who have a true mechanical block and those who can be treated conservatively. MRI should precede arthroscopy in this clinical setting. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The appearances of knee injuries on MR imaging are less well documented in children than adults. Some patterns of injury are shared by both groups of patients, e. g. meniscal damage. The frequency of specific injuries may differ, e. g. anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. Congenital abnormality, coexistent pathology and previous treatment of the knee appear to be associated with meniscal problems. Discoid menisci are seen most frequently in children and have unique features on MR scans. Cruciate ligament tears are difficult to diagnose in the smallest children. The ACL may not be identified due to its small size. Normal bone marrow signal may be confused with marrow infiltration or bone microfracture. Radiographically occult fractures around the knee appear to be strongly associated with ligamentous injury as in adult patients. Osteochondral fractures, osteochondral lesions and articular cartilage damage are revealed on MR scans, but their long-term effects are uncertain. It is possible to diagnose a range of knee injuries on MR scans in children. The biggest diagnostic challenge is in pre-school children. (orig.). With 9 figs., 1 tab

  14. O'Donoghue's triad: magnetic resonance imaging evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staron, R.B.; Haramati, N.; Feldman, F.; Kiernan, H.A.; Pfaff, H.C.; Rubin, S.J.; Zwass, A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to search for magnetic resonance imaging evidence of medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury in knees with proven tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial meniscus; the three abnormalities that make up O'Donoghue's triad. Although the MCL injury can be unapparent clinically, knee joint stability may be compromised. The superficial portion of the MCL was evaluated on 19 MR studies of 16 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL and medial meniscal tears. MCL thicknesses were compared to those on MR images of 19 normal knees. The injured knees were of 13 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 19 to 56 years; the normal knees were of 10 men and 9 women, ranging in age from 19 to 55 years. The medial collateral ligaments of all injured knees were abnormal, and, as a group, they had greater thicknesses and more intraligamentous thickness variability than normal knees. The MR appearance of both ACL and medial meniscal tears served as indirect evidence of MCL injury, with irregular MCL thickening indicative of prior injury. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Firsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2012-2014 total 67 unicompartmental arthroplasty surgeries with use of Oxford knee meniscal bearing were performed. The surgeries were performed by a single surgeon. Minimally invasive approach was used. All patients were evaluated clinically, radiographically and with Oxford Knee score scale, Knee Society score scale and functional scale. Obtained data was processed with nonparametric Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results were processed using the statistical analysis application package SPSS, version 10.07. Analysis of of mid-term results showed that the average for Oxford Knee score increased from 16.4 (95% CI 9-23 to 41.3 (95% CI 29-47. Average for Knee Society score scale increased from 42.7 (95% CI 31-55 to 88.6 (95% CI 73-100. No occurrence of early postoperative complications have been reported. Statistically significant improvements of knee function in patients after unicompartmental arthroplasty have been observed. Unicompartmental arthroplasty currently can be considered as an advanced treatment option for medial knee joint pathology. Meniscal bearing cemented prostheses such as Oxford III are preferable.

  16. MR imaging of the combined anterior and posterior cruciate ligament tears: focussing on the ratterns of injuries and associated findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seon Young; Choi, Chang Lak; Park, Dal Soo; Park, Eun Hee; Lee, Sang Ho; Song, Mun Kab; Lee, Kwang Won; Kwon, Soon Tae

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of injuries and frequency of associated findings on MR imaging in patients with both anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)tears;to compare the associated findings, as seen on MR imaging, in cases with both ACL and PCL tears with those with ACL or PCL tears. Ten patients with compbined ACL and PCL tears, 16 with ACL tears and 18 with PCL tears, all confirmed by arthroscopy or open surgery, were involved in this study. To identify the associated knee injuries, MR images were retrospectively evaluated. In ten patients with combined ACL and PCL tears, open surgery led to the identification of six complete ACL tears (60%), four partial ACL tears (40%), eitht complete PCL tears (80%) and two partial PCL tears (20%). Injuries associated with these combined tears, and revealed by MR imaging, comprised six medial collateral ligament injuries (60%), six lateral collateral ligament jnjuries (60%), five medial meniscal injuries (50%), three lateral meniscal injuries (30%), nine bony injuries (90%), two posterior capsular injuries (20%), and three popliteus muscle injuries (30%). The frequency of popliteus muscle injury was significantly different (p<0.05, Fisher's exact test) between the group with both ACL and PCL tears and that with ACL or PCL tears. Associated findings in patients with combined ACL and PCL tears are more frequent than in those with ACL or PCL tears. In cases involving combined ACL and PCL tears, associated findings-as seen on MR images-should thus be carefully examined

  17. Meniscus repair and regeneration: review on current methods and research potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Scotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Meniscus regeneration is an unsolved clinical challenge. Despite the wide acceptance of the degenerative consequences of meniscectomy, no surgical procedure has succeeded to date in regenerating a functional and long-lasting meniscal fibrocartilage. Research proposed a number of experimental approaches encompassing all the typical strategies of regenerative medicine: cell-free scaffolds, gene therapy, intra-articular delivery of progenitor cells, biological glues for enhanced bonding of reparable tears, partial and total tissue engineered meniscus replacement. None of these approaches has been completely successful and can be considered suitable for all patients, as meniscal tears require specific and patient-related treatments depending on the size and type of lesion. Recent advances in cell biology, biomaterial science and bioengineering (e.g., bioreactors have now the potential to drive meniscus regeneration into a series of clinically relevant strategies. In this tutorial paper, the clinical need for meniscus regeneration strategies will be explained, and past and current experimental studies on meniscus regeneration will be reported.

  18. Assessment of apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in tibial hyaline cartilage after viable medial meniscus transplantation in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Tomasz J; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Danilewicz, Marian; Fabiś, Jarosław

    2012-12-20

    The porpuse of this animal study was to assess chondrocyte apoptosis and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression in rabbit tibial cartilage 6 months after viable medial meniscal autografts and allografts. Twenty white male New Zealand rabbits were chosen for the study. The medial meniscus was excised from 14 animals and stored under tissue culture conditions for 2 weeks, following which t of them were implantated as autografts and 7 as allografts. The control group consisted of 6 animals which underwent arthtrotomy. When the animals were eutanized, the tibial cartilage was used for immunohisochemical examination. Apoptosis (TUNEL method) and MMP-1, MMP-3 and TIMP-2 expression were estimated semiquantatively. An increased level of chodrocyte apoptosis in the tibail cartilage was observed after both kinds of transplants (p hyaline cartilage against excessive apoptosis. The results of experimantal studies on humans indicate the need to device a method of apoptosis inhibition in the hyaline cartilage to improve long-term results of meniscal transplantation.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the menisci of the knee. Normal images. Pitfalls. Meniscus degeneration. Anatomical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helenon, O.; Laval-Jeantet, M.; Bastian, D.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study on 5 knees of fresh corpses explored with magnetic resonance imaging are reported, including 1 examined before and after intraarticular contrast injection, and on 15 asymptomatic subjects examined with the same procedure. A very thorough study of the menisci and of their attachment, ie. The tibial insertion of the menisceal horns, the transverse ligament, and the meniscofemoral ligament, is possible with T1-weighted MR sequences. The T2-weighted sequences, either following intraarticular contrast injection or in cases of articular effusion, allow analyzing the capsular attachments of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus and its relationships with the tendon of the popliteal muscle. Five misleading images must be known for the exploration of the menisci, in order to avoid a number of interpretation problems. Images of type I and II initial meniscus degeneration are observed in 47% of all cases (control group). One case of menisceal cyst developing in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus, with anatomical correlation, is also reported [fr

  20. A prospective study on time to recovery in 254 injured novice runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Oestergaard Nielsen

    Full Text Available Describe the diagnoses and the time to recovery of running-related injuries in novice runners.Prospective cohort study on injured runners.This paper is a secondary data analysis of a 933-person cohort study (DANO-RUN aimed at characterizing risk factors for injury in novice runners. Among those sustaining running-related injuries, the types of injuries and time to recovery is described in the present paper. All injured runners were diagnosed after a thorough clinical examination and then followed prospectively during their recovery. If they recovered completely from injury, time to recovery of each injury was registered.A total of 254 runners were injured. The proportion of runners diagnosed with medial tibial stress syndrome was 15%, 10% for patellofemoral pain, 9% for medial meniscal injury, 7% for Achilles tendinopathy and 5% for plantar fasciitis. Among the 220 runners (87% recovering from their injury, the median time to recovery was 71 days (minimum  = 9 days, maximum  = 617 days.Medial tibial stress syndrome was the most common injury followed by patellofemoral pain, medial meniscal injury and Achilles tendinopathy. Half of the injured runners were unable to run 2×500 meters without pain after 10 weeks. Almost 5% of the injured runners received surgical treatment.

  1. MRI findings in renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim; Basaran, Ceyla; Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan; Uyusur, Arzu; Tarhan, Nefise Cagla; Muhtesem Agildere, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and demonstrate the MRI findings of renal transplant recipients with hip and knee pain and to investigate the most common etiology of pain. Materials and methods: 69 hip MRIs of 57 patients with hip pain and 30 knee MRIs of 24 patients with knee pain with no history of trauma were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. Results: In the evaluation of hip MRIs, 24 patients had avascular necrosis and effusion, 2 patients had bone marrow edema consistent with early stage of avascular necrosis. 18 patients had only intraarticular effusion, 6 patients had tendinitis, 6 patients had bursitis and 1 patient had soft tissue abscess. Five patients had muscle edema and five patients had muscle atrophy as additional findings to the primary pathologies. Among patients with knee pain, nine patients had degenerative joint disease. Seven patients had chondromalacia, five had bone marrow edema, six had meniscal tear, six had ligament rupture and two had bone infarct. Three of the patients had muscle edema accompanying to other pathologies. Conclusion: The most common etiology of hip pain in renal transplant recipients is avascular necrosis as expected, intraarticular effusion is found to be Second reason for pain. However, knee pain is explained by ligament pathology, meniscal tear, chondromalacia or degenerative joint disease rather than osteonecrosis.

  2. Microstructural characterization of CPPD and hydroxyapatite crystal depositions on human menisci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsamenis, Orestis L. [Bioengineering Research Group, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Karoutsos, Vagelis [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Kontostanos, Konstantinos; Panagiotopoulos, Elias C. [Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Rio, Patras (Greece); Papadaki, Helen [Department of Anatomy-Histology-Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, 26500 Rio, Patras (Greece); Bouropoulos, Nikolaos [Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, 26504 Rio, Patras (Greece); Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas-Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes - FORTH/ICE-HT, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2012-11-15

    Meniscus is a fibrocartilaginous tissue composed mainly of water and a dense elaborate collagen network with a predominantly circumferential alignment. Crystal formation and accumulation on meniscal tissue is frequently observed especially in elderly. In this study, we used X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and FT-Raman for the structural identification of the depositions and Optical microscopy, Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM/EDX) and Atomic Force microscopy (AFM), in order to investigate the structural relationship between the crystal deposits and the collagen fibers of human meniscal tissues. We are reporting on the formation of intercalary ''colonies'' of Calcium Pyrophosphate Dihydrate (CPPD) crystals with two distinct morphologies corresponding to the monoclinic and the triclinic phase, as well as the formation of micro-aggregations composed of nano-crystalline HAP aggregations which are developed along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers without extensively disturbing the collagens arrangement. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. The Pathobiology of the Meniscus: A Comparison Between the Human and Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Krupkova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Serious knee pain and related disability have an annual prevalence of approximately 25% on those over the age of 55 years. As curative treatments for the common knee problems are not available to date, knee pathologies typically progress and often lead to osteoarthritis (OA. While the roles that the meniscus plays in knee biomechanics are well characterized, biological mechanisms underlying meniscus pathophysiology and roles in knee pain and OA progression are not fully clear. Experimental treatments for knee disorders that are successful in animal models often produce unsatisfactory results in humans due to species differences or the inability to fully replicate disease progression in experimental animals. The use of animals with spontaneous knee pathologies, such as dogs, can significantly help addressing this issue. As microscopic and macroscopic anatomy of the canine and human menisci are similar, spontaneous meniscal pathologies in canine patients are thought to be highly relevant for translational medicine. However, it is not clear whether the biomolecular mechanisms of pain, degradation of extracellular matrix, and inflammatory responses are species dependent. The aims of this review are (1 to provide an overview of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the human and canine meniscus, (2 to compare the known signaling pathways involved in spontaneous meniscus pathology between both species, and (3 to assess the relevance of dogs with spontaneous meniscal pathology as a translational model. Understanding these mechanisms in human and canine meniscus can help to advance diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for painful knee disorders and improve clinical decision making.

  4. MR imaging of the anatomy of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Tineke; Vanrietvelde, Frederik; Seynaeve, Patrick; Verdonk, Peter; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-04-01

    Background In cadaveric and arthroscopic studies different insertion locations of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus (AHMM) have been described. Purpose To investigate if the different insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, can be determined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods MR images of 100 patients without meniscal tears on MRI were retrospectively evaluated. Two observers classified the AHMM insertion based on its position relative to the anterior tibial edge and the medial tibial spine. The association between AHMM insertion and tibial plateau slope, meniscal radial displacement, and anterior intermeniscal ligament (AIL) presence was investigated. Results The AHMM inserted posterior to the anterior tibial edge in 93 knees and anterior to the tibial edge in seven knees (= type III). Of the 93 knees with AHMM insertion posterior to the anterior tibial edge, 63 inserted lateral to the medial tibial spine (= type I) and 30 medial (= type II). The AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge had a significantly ( P  0.05). A strong inter- and intra-observer agreement was observed. Conclusion Three different bony insertion locations of the AHMM, as described in cadaveric studies, could be identified on MRI. All AHMMs inserting anterior to the tibial edge displayed an AIL. Whether there is a clinical correlation with these insertion patterns remains unclear.

  5. A Special Tear Pattern of Anterior Horn of the Lateral Meniscus: Macerated Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiapeng; Zhai, Wenliang; Li, Qiang; Jia, Qianxin; Lin, Dasheng

    2017-01-01

    We describe a special, interesting phenomenon found in the anterior horn of the lateral meniscus (AHLM): most tear patterns in the AHLM are distinctive, with loose fibers in injured region and circumferential fiber bundles were separated. We name it as macerated tear. The goal of this study was to bring forward a new type of meniscal tear in the AHLM and investigate its clinical value. AHLM tears underwent arthroscopic surgery from January 2012 to December 2014 were included. Data regarding the integrity of AHLM were prospectively recorded in a data registry. Tear morphology and treatment received were subsequently extracted by 2 independent reviewers from operative notes and arthroscopic surgical photos. A total of 60 AHLM tears in 60 patients (mean age 27.1 years) were grouped into horizontal tears (n = 15, 25%), vertical tears (n = 14, 23%), complex tears (n = 6, 10%), and macerated tears (n = 25, 42%). There were 6 patients with AHLM cysts in macerated tear group and one patient in vertical tear group. 60 patients were performed arthroscopic meniscus repairs and were followed-up with averaged 18.7 months. Each group had significant postoperative improvement in Lysholm and IKDC scores (p 0.05). This study demonstrated that the macerated tear is common in the tear pattern of AHLM. However, feasibility of the treatment of this type of meniscal tear, especially the meniscus repairs still requires further study.

  6. Discoid meniscus of the knee: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Ahn, Joong Mo; Seong, Sang Cheol

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of the discoid meniscus, the authors reviewed 31 cases of discoid menisci diagnosed by MR imaging among which 16 cases received arthroscopy. Using knee surface coil, sagittal T1, T2 and proton density images and coronal T1 weighted images were obtained with 18 cm FOV and 4 mm/ 1 mm thickness/gap. A discoid meniscus was considered if three or more contiguous sagittal images demonstrated continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns or the diameter of the mid-portion of the meniscus exceeded 15 mm on the coronal image. The authors also observed the associated abnormalities including tears of meniscus and ligament, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects. All discoid menisci were lateral menisci and torn discoid lateral menisci were present in 26 cases (83%). In two cases, tears of the contralateral medial meniscus were present. The tears of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects were present in 4, 2, 4, and 5 cases respectively. All collateral ligaments were intact. In conclusion MR imaging was useful for the detection of discoid meniscus and associated abnormalities

  7. Tissue-Derived Extracellular Matrix Bioscaffolds: Emerging Applications in Cartilage and Meniscus Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monibi, Farrah A; Cook, James L

    2017-08-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common problem in orthopedic practice. Given the long-term consequences of unaddressed cartilage and meniscal pathology, a number of treatments have been attempted to stimulate repair or to replace the injured tissue. Despite advances in orthopedic surgery, effective treatments for cartilage and meniscus injuries remain a significant clinical challenge. Tissue engineering is a developing field that aims to regenerate injured tissues with a combination of cells, scaffolds, and signals. Many natural and synthetic scaffold materials have been developed and tested for the repair and restoration of a number of musculoskeletal tissues. Among these, biological scaffolds derived from cell and tissue-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) have shown great promise in tissue engineering given the critical role of the ECM for maintaining the biological and biomechanical properties, structure, and function of native tissues. This review article presents emerging applications for tissue-derived ECM scaffolds in cartilage and meniscus repair. We examine normal ECM composition and the current and future methods for potential treatment of articular cartilage and meniscal defects with decellularized scaffolds.

  8. MRI diagnosis of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Zhou Chengtao; Mu Renqi; Zhang Guanghui; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscal articular capsule. Methods: MR imaging of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule confirmed by surgery and arthroscope were analyzed retrospectively in 8 cases. Results: The 'Butterfly knot sign' disappeared and was replaced with fluid signal on the sagittal slice of meniscal body in 8 cases. Part of back angle remained in 3 cases. 'Double anterior cruciate ligament sign' was showed on one side of middle sagittal slice in 7 cases. 'Reverse meniscus sign' was revealed in intercondylar fossa on the coronary view in 8 cases. Abnormal high signal was showed in the injured meniscus in 6 cases. Abnormal high signal was detected in the opposite meniscus in 5 cases. Conclusion: The MR findings of reverse and separation of meniscus articular capsule include disappearance of 'butterfly knot sign', appearance of 'reverse meniscus sign' and 'double anterior cruciate ligament sign'. The diagnosis would be established if the former 2 signs were present or all the 3 signs were present simultaneously. (authors)

  9. Cell-Based Strategies for Meniscus Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wei; Guo, Weimin; Han, Shufeng; Zhu, Yun; Liu, Shuyun; Guo, Quanyi

    2016-01-01

    Meniscus injuries remain a significant challenge due to the poor healing potential