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Sample records for biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

  1. Beta-arrestin biased agonism/antagonism at cardiovascular seven transmembrane-spanning receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    Heptahelical, G protein-coupled or seven transmembrane-spanning receptors, such as the β-adrenergic and the angiotensin II type 1 receptors, are the most diverse and therapeutically important family of receptors in the human genome, playing major roles in the physiology of various organs/tissues including the heart and blood vessels. Ligand binding activates heterotrimeric G proteins that transmit intracellular signals by regulating effector enzymes or ion channels. G protein signaling is terminated, in large part, by phosphorylation of the agonist-bound receptor by the G-protein coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), followed by βarrestin binding, which uncouples the phosphorylated receptor from the G protein and subsequently targets the receptor for internalization. As the receptor-βarrestin complex enters the cell, βarrestin-1 and -2, the two mammalian βarrestin isoforms, serve as ligand-regulated scaffolds that recruit a host of intracellular proteins and signal transducers, thus promoting their own wave of signal transduction independently of G-proteins. A constantly increasing number of studies over the past several years have begun to uncover specific roles played by these ubiquitously expressed receptor adapter proteins in signal transduction of several important heptahelical receptors regulating the physiology of various organs/ systems, including the cardiovascular (CV) system. Thus, βarrestin-dependent signaling has increasingly been implicated in CV physiology and pathology, presenting several exciting opportunities for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of CV disorders. Additionally, the discovery of this novel mode of heptahelical receptor signaling via βarrestins has prompted a revision of classical pharmacological concepts such as receptor agonism/antagonism, as well as introduction of new terms such as "biased signaling", which refers to ligand-specific activation of selective signal transduction pathways by the very same receptor. The

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of seven-transmembrane receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L; Kelstrup, Christian D; Lyngsø, Christina

    2010-01-01

    (q)-dependent and -independent AT(1)R signaling. This study provides substantial novel insight into angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity...

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of seven-transmembrane receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte L; Kelstrup, Christian D; Lyngsø, Christina;

    2010-01-01

    , we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis of the AT(1)R signaling network. We analyzed ligand-stimulated SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture) cells by high resolution (LTQ-Orbitrap) MS and compared the phosphoproteomes of the AT(1)R agonist angiotensin II......(q)-dependent and -independent AT(1)R signaling. This study provides substantial novel insight into angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity...

  4. Molecular pharmacology of promiscuous seven transmembrane receptors sensing organic nutrients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Johansen, Lars Dan; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    -sensing receptor, the G protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A), and the taste1 receptor T1R1/T1R3, which are sensing L-alpha-amino acids, the carbohydrate-sensing T1R2/T1R3 receptor, the proteolytic degradation product sensor GPR93 (also termed GPR92), and the free fatty acid (FFA) sensing......A number of highly promiscuous seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors have been cloned and characterized within the last few years. It is noteworthy that many of these receptors are activated broadly by amino acids, proteolytic degradation products, carbohydrates, or free fatty acids and are expressed...... in taste tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine glands, adipose tissue, and/or kidney. These receptors thus hold the potential to act as sensors of food intake, regulating, for example, release of incretin hormones from the gut, insulin/glucagon from the pancreas, and leptin from adipose tissue...

  5. Molecular pharmacological phenotyping of EBI2. An orphan seven-transmembrane receptor with constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Holst, Peter J

    2006-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is an orphan seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptor originally identified as the most up-regulated gene (>200-fold) in EBV-infected cells. Here we show that EBI2 signals with constitutive activity through Galpha(i) as determined by a receptor-mediate...

  6. Ligand Modulation of the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced Seven-transmembrane Receptor EBI2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Smethurst, Christopher; Holst, Peter Johannes;

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus-induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor, which was recently shown to orchestrate the positioning of B cells in the follicle. To date, no ligands, endogenously or synthetic, have been identified that modulate EBI2 activity. Here we...

  7. Promiscuous Seven Transmembrane Receptors Sensing L-α-amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2014-01-01

    A number of nutrient sensing seven trans-membrane (7TM) receptors have been identified and characterized over the past few years. While the sensing mechanisms to carbohydrates and free fatty acids are well understood, the molecular basis of amino acid sensing has recently come to the limelight. T....... The present review describes the current status of promiscuous L-α-amino acid sensors, the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR), the GPRC6A receptor, the T1R1/T1R3 receptor and also their molecular pharmacology, expression pattern and physiological significance....

  8. Metal ion site engineering indicates a global toggle switch model for seven-transmembrane receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Christian E; Frimurer, Thomas M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole;

    2006-01-01

    Much evidence indicates that, during activation of seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the intracellular segments of the transmembrane helices (TMs) move apart with large amplitude, rigid body movements of especially TM-VI and TM-VII. In this study, AspIII:08 (Asp113), the anchor point for monoa...... that the pivots for these vertical seesaw movements are the highly conserved proline bends of the involved helices....

  9. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  10. Molecular scaffolds regulate bidirectional crosstalk between Wnt and classical seven-transmembrane-domain receptor signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Thomas; Woulfe, Kathleen; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto

    2007-07-31

    Signaling downstream of classical seven-transmembrane domain receptors (7TMRs) had generally been thought to recruit factors that are in large part separate from those recruited by atypical 7TMRs, such as Frizzleds (Fzs), receptors for the Wnt family of glycoproteins. Classical 7TMRs are also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are mediated by signaling factors such as heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), GPCR kinases (GRKs), and beta-arrestins. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that classical and atypical 7TMRs share these factors, which are often associated with mediating classical 7TMR signaling, as well as the scaffolding proteins that were initially thought to be involved in transmitting atypical 7TMR signals. This sharing of signaling components by agonists that bind classical 7TMRs and those binding to atypical 7TMRs establishes the possibility of extensive crosstalk between these receptor classes. We discuss the evidence for, and against, crosstalk, and examine mechanisms by which this can occur.

  11. Yeast as a model system for mammalian seven-transmembrane segment receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeansonne, N.E. [East Carolina Univ. Medical School, Greenville, NC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Investigators have used the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to study the {beta}-adrenergic receptor, the T-cell receptor pathway, initiation of mammalian DNA replication, initiation of mammalian transcription, secretion, the CDC2 kinase system, cell cycle control, and aging, as well as the function of oncogenes. This list continues to growth with the discovery of an immunoglobulin heavy-chain binding homologue in yeast, an Rb binding protein homologue, and a possible yeast arrestin. Yeast is relatively easy to maintain, to grow, and to genetically manipulate. A single gene can be overexpressed, selectively mutated or deleted from its chromosomal location. In this way, the in vivo function of a gene can be studied. It has become reasonable to consider yeast as a model system for studying the seven transmembrane segments (7-TMS) receptor family. Currently, subtypes of the {beta}-adrenergic receptor are being studied in yeast. The receptor and its G{sub {alpha}}-G-protein, trigger the mating pheromone receptor pathway. This provides a powerful assay for determining receptor function. Studies expressing the muscarinic cholinergic receptor in yeast are underway. The yeast pheromone receptor belongs to this receptor family, sharing sequences and secondary structure homology. An effective strategy has been to identify a yeast pathway or process which is homologous to a mammalian system. The pathway is delineated in yeast, identifying other genetic components. Then yeast genes are used to screen for human homologues of these components. The putative human homologues are then expressed in yeast and in mammalian cells to determine function. When this type of {open_quotes}mixing and matching{close_quotes} works, yeast genetics can be a powerful tool. 115 refs.

  12. Cloning and characterization of two putative seven-transmembrane receptor genes from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Gao; Piming Zhao; Juan Wang; Haiyun Wang; Guiling Wang; Guixian Xia

    2008-01-01

    Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR,two full-length cDNAs encoding putative seven-transmembrane receptors (designated Gh7TMpR1 and Gh7TMpR2) were cloned from cotton plants.Southern blot and an ApaLl restriction site polymorphism analyses revealed that GhTTMpR1 was derived from the ancestral A diploid genome,while Gh7TMpR2 was from the D subgenome.Northern blot hybridization indicated that both Gh7TMpR1 and Gh7TMpR2 were expressed preferentially in the elongation phase of fiber development.Majority of the Gh7TMpR1 proteins were located within the membrane structure and displayed a punctuate pattern of distribution.Overexpression of Gh7TMpR1 in fission yeast disrupted the polar growth and caused the formation of rounded cells.These results suggest that GhT7MpRI may play a critical role in cotton fiber development,perhaps as a signaling receptor that is involved in controlling fiber elongation.

  13. EMR1, an unusual member in the family of hormone receptors with seven transmembrane segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, V; Chissoe, S L; Viegas-Péquignot, E; Diriong, S; N'Guyen, V C; Roe, B A; Lipinski, M

    1995-03-20

    Proteins with seven transmembrane segments (7TM) define a superfamily of receptors (7TM receptors) sharing the same topology: an extracellular N-terminus, three extramembranous loops on either side of the plasma membrane, and a cytoplasmic C-terminal tail. Upon ligand binding, cytoplasmic portions of the activated receptor interact with heterotrimeric G-coupled proteins to induce various second messengers. A small group, recently recognized on the basis of homologous primary amino acid sequences, comprises receptors to hormones of the secretin/vasoactive intestinal peptide/glucagon family, parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related peptides, growth hormone-releasing factor, corticotropin-releasing factor, and calcitonin. A cDNA, extracted from a neuroectodermal cDNA library, was predicted to encode a new 886-amino-acid protein with three distinct domains. The C-terminal third contains the seven hydrophobic segments and characteristic residues that allow the protein to be readily aligned with the various hormone receptors in the family. Six egf-like modules, at the N-terminus of the predicted mature protein, are separated from the transmembrane segments by a serine/threonine-rich domain, a feature reminiscent of mucin-like, single-span, integral membrane glycoproteins with adhesive properties. Because of its unique characteristics, this putative egf module-containing, mucin-like hormone receptor has been named EMR1. Southern analysis of a panel of somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization have assigned the EMR1 gene to human chromosome 19p13.3.

  14. Evolutionary and Comparative Genomics to Drive Rational Drug Design, with Particular Focus on Neuropeptide Seven-Transmembrane Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Furlong, Michael; Seong, Jae Young

    2017-01-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), also known as G protein-coupled receptors, are popular targets of drug development, particularly 7TMR systems that are activated by peptide ligands. Although many pharmaceutical drugs have been discovered via conventional bulk analysis techniques the increasing availability of structural and evolutionary data are facilitating change to rational, targeted drug design. This article discusses the appeal of neuropeptide-7TMR systems as drug targets and provi...

  15. High constitutive activity of a virus-encoded seven transmembrane receptor in the absence of the conserved DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) in transmembrane helix 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    The highly conserved Arg in the so-called DRY motif (Asp-Arg-Tyr) at the intracellular end of transmembrane helix 3 is in general considered as an essential residue for G protein coupling in rhodopsin-like seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors. In the open reading frame 74 (ORF74) receptor encoded ...

  16. Mathematical Models for Quantitative Assessment of Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET: Application to Seven Transmembrane Receptors (7TMRs Oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka eDrinovec

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The idea that seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also designated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs might form dimers or higher order oligomeric complexes was formulated more than 20 years ago and has been intensively studied since then. In the last decade, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET has been one of the most frequently used biophysical methods for studying 7TMRs oligomerization. This technique enables monitoring physical interactions between protein partners in living cells fused to donor and acceptor moieties. It relies on non-radiative transfer of energy between donor and acceptor, depending on their intermolecular distance (1–10 nm and relative orientation. Results derived from BRET-based techniques are very persuasive; however, they need appropriate controls and critical interpretation. To overcome concerns about the specificity of BRET-derived results, a set of experiments has been proposed, including negative control with a non-interacting receptor or protein, BRET dilution, saturation and competition assays. This article presents the theoretical background behind BRET assays, then outlines mathematical models for quantitative interpretation of BRET saturation and competition assay results, gives examples of their utilization and discusses the possibilities of quantitative analysis of data generated with other RET-based techniques.

  17. Seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor repertoire of gastric ghrelin cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja S; Park, Won-Mee; Sakata, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating secretion of the orexigenic-glucoregulatory hormone ghrelin remain unclear. Based on qPCR analysis of FACS-purified gastric ghrelin cells, highly expressed and enriched 7TM receptors were comprehensively identified and functionally characterized using in vitro,...

  18. PheVI:09 (Phe6.44) as a sliding microswitch in seven-transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Louise; Holst, Birgitte; Frimurer, Thomas M;

    2012-01-01

    In seven-transmembrane (7TM), G protein-coupled receptors, highly conserved residues function as microswitches, which alternate between different conformations and interaction partners in an extended allosteric interface between the transmembrane segments performing the large scale conformational...... changes upon receptor activation. Computational analysis using x-ray structures of the β(2)-adrenergic receptor demonstrated that PheVI:09 (6.44), which in the inactive state is locked between the backbone and two hydrophobic residues in transmembrane (TM)-III, upon activation slides ∼2 Å toward TM...

  19. Molecular cloning of the cDNA and chromosomal localization of the gene for a putative seven-transmembrane segment (7-TMS) receptor isolated from human spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federsppiel, B.; Melhado, I.G.; Delaney, A.; Clark-Lewis, I. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Duncan, A.M.V. (Queens Univ., Kinston, Ontario (Canada)); Jirik, F.R. (Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-06-01

    A family of proinflammatory cytokines sharing several structural features has been described and includes, for example, interleukin-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and melanocyte growth stimulatory activity. Recently, the receptors for interleukin-8 have been isolated and found to belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of G protein-coupled receptors. As other members of this cytokine family likely interact with similar receptors, the polymerase chain reaction was employed to isolate related receptors from human peripheral blood adherent cells. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on the rabbit interleukin-8 receptor sequence were used. The corresponding full-length cDNA was isolated from a human spleen cDNA library. The predicted protein sequence of this clone, designated pBE1.3, was 93% identical to that of a cDNA isolated from bovine locus coeruleus, which apparently encodes a neuropeptide Y receptor, and also shows similarity with the interleukin-8 receptor and the human cytomegalovirus US28 sequences. The gene, designated D2S201E, was localized to human chromosome 2q21. By Northern blotting, transcripts hybridizing to this cDNA were present in a variety of tissues and cells, including those of hemopoietic origin. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  20. A conserved aromatic lock for the tryptophan rotameric switch in TM-VI of seven-transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin;

    2010-01-01

    simulations in rhodopsin demonstrated that rotation around the chi1 torsion angle of Trp-VI:13 brings its side chain close to the equally highly conserved Phe-V:13 (Phe-5.47) in TM-V. In the ghrelin receptor, engineering of high affinity metal-ion sites between these positions confirmed their close spatial...

  1. Delineation of the endocytic pathway of substance P and its seven-transmembrane domain NK1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, E F; Garland, A M; Gamp, P D; Lovett, M; Payan, D G; Bunnett, N W

    1995-01-01

    Many of the actions of the neuropeptide substance P (SP) that are mediated by the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) desensitize and resensitize, which may be associated with NK1-R endocytosis and recycling. We delineated this endocytic pathway in transfected cells by confocal microscopy using cyanine 3-SP and NK1-R antibodies. SP and the NK1-R were internalized into the same clathrin immunoreactive vesicles, and then sorted into different compartments. The NK1-R was colocalized with a marker of early endosomes, but not with markers of late endosomes or lysosomes. We quantified the NK1-R at the cell surface by incubating cells with an antibody to an extracellular epitope. After exposure to SP, there was a loss and subsequent recovery of surface NK1-R. The loss was prevented by hypertonic sucrose and potassium depletion, inhibitors of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Recovery was independent of new protein synthesis because it was unaffected by cycloheximide. Recovery required endosomal acidification because it was prevented by an H(+)-ATPase inhibitor. The fate of internalized 125I-SP was examined by chromatography. SP was intact at the cell surface and in early endosomes, but slowly degraded in perinuclear vesicles. We conclude that SP induces clathrin-dependent internalization of the NK1-R. The SP/NK1-R complex dissociates in acidified endosomes. SP is degraded, whereas the NK1-R recycles to the cell surface. Images PMID:7545030

  2. Identification and functional comparison of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled BILF1 receptors in recently discovered nonhuman primate lymphocryptoviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Fares, Suzan; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    EBV and 12 previously uncharacterized nonhuman primate (NHP) lymphocryptoviruses (LCVs). Phylogenetic analysis defined 3 BILF1 clades, corresponding to LCVs of New World monkeys (clade A) or Old World monkeys and great apes (clades B and C). Common functional properties were suggested by a high degree...... activity. We identified BILF1 receptor orthologues in 12 previously uncharacterized LCVs from nonhuman primates (NHPs) of Old and New World origin. As 7TM receptors are excellent drug targets, our unique insight into the molecular mechanism of action of the BILF1 family and into the evolution of primate...

  3. Conformational constraining of inactive and active States of a seven transmembrane receptor by metal ion site engineering in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; David, Ralf; Oerlecke, Ilka;

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular part of transmembrane segment V (TM-V) is expected to be involved in the activation process of 7TM receptors, but its role is far from clear. Here, we study the highly constitutively active CXC-chemokine receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (ORF74-HHV8), in which a metal ion...... at concentrations >10 microM. The chemokine interaction with [R208H;R212H]-ORF74 was altered compared with wild-type ORF74-HHV8 with decreased agonist (CXCL1/GROalpha) potency (84-fold), affinity (5.8- and 136-fold in competition against agonist and inverse agonist, respectively), and binding capacity (B(max); 25....... The activating properties of Zn(II) were not due to a metal ion site between the ligand and the receptor because CXCL1/GROalpha analogs in which the putative metal-ion binding residues had been substituted-[H19A] and [H34A]-acted like wild-type CXCL1/GROalpha. Based on the complex action of Zn...

  4. Identification of common mechanisms by which human and mouse cytomegalovirus seven-transmembrane receptor homologues contribute to in vivo phenotypes in a mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2013-01-01

    The mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue (CKR) M33 is required for salivary gland tropism and efficient reactivation from latency, phenotypes partially rescued by the human cytomegalovirus CKR US28. Herein, we demonstrate that complementation of salivary gland tropism is mediated...... predominantly by G protein-dependent signaling conserved with that of M33; in contrast, both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways contribute to the latency phenotypes. A novel M33-dependent replication phenotype in cultured bone marrow macrophages is also described....

  5. MGC9753 gene, located within PPP1R1B-STARD3-ERBB2-GRB7 amplicon on human chromosome 17q12, encodes the seven-transmembrane receptor with extracellular six-cystein domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

    2003-06-01

    MYC, ERBB2, MET, FGFR2, CCNE1, MYCN, WNT2, CD44, MDM2, NCOA3, IQGAP1 and STK6 loci are amplified in human gastric cancer. It has been reported that the gene corresponding to EST H16094 is co-amplified with ERBB2 gene in human gastric cancer. Here, we identified and characterized the gene corresponding to EST H16094 by using bioinformatics. BLAST programs revealed that EST H16094 was derived from the uncharacterized MGC9753 gene. Two ORFs were predicted within human MGC9753 mRNA, and ORF1 (nucleotide position 18-980 of NM_033419.1) was predicted as the coding region of human MGC9753 mRNA based on comparative genomics. Nucleotide sequence of mouse Mgc9753 mRNA was next determined in silico by modification of AK052486 cDNA (deleting C at the nucleotide position 37). Human MGC9753 and mouse Mgc9753 proteins were 320-amino-acid seven-transmembrane receptors with the N-terminal six-cysteine domain and an N-glycosylation site (85.0% total-amino-acid identity). Human MGC9753 protein showed 90.6% total-amino-acid identity with human CAB2 aberrant protein, which lacked the third-transmembrane domain of MGC9753 due to frame shifts within ORF. Human MGC9753 gene, consisting of eight exons, were clustered with PPP1R1B, STARD3, TCAP, PNMT, ERBB2, MGC14832 and GRB7 genes within the 120-kb region. PPP1R1B, STARD3, MGC9753, ERBB2 and GRB7 genes are co-amplified in several cases of gastric cancer. This is the first report on comprehensive characterization of the amplicon around the PPP1R1B-STARD3-TCAP-PNMT-MGC9753-ERBB2-MGC14832-GRB7 locus on human chromosome 17q12.

  6. Agonists and inverse agonists for the herpesvirus 8-encoded constitutively active seven-transmembrane oncogene product, ORF-74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1999-01-01

    A number of CXC chemokines competed with similar, nanomolar affinity against 125I-interleukin-8 (IL-8) binding to ORF-74, a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor encoded by human herpesvirus 8. However, in competition against 125I-labeled growth-related oncogene (GRO)-alpha, the ORF-74...... receptor was highly selective for GRO peptides, with IL-8 being 10,000-fold less potent. The constitutive stimulating activity of ORF-74 on phosphatidylinositol turnover was not influenced by, for example, IL-8 binding. In contrast, GRO peptides acted as potent agonists in stimulating ORF-74 signaling......, whereas IP-10 and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha surprisingly acted as inverse agonists. These peptides had similar pharmacological properties with regard to enhancing or inhibiting, respectively, the stimulatory effect of ORF-74 on NIH-3T3 cell proliferation. Construction of a high affinity zinc...

  7. G Protein Coupled Receptors, the Magic Molecules with Seven Transmembrane Helices: A Brief Introduction to the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2012%G蛋白偶联受体:七次跨膜结构的超级分子——2012年诺贝尔化学奖简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路伟振; 吴蓓丽; 赵强

    2012-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors are the largest and the most important protein family in human genome, which involved in almost all of the living activities. The gene cloning, functional studies and structural determination of these receptors shed a new light on understanding the physiological regulation and the pathogenicity and treatment of almost all the human diseases. The Nobel Prize had issued to related research for 9 times, and in 2012, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was issued to two American scientists. Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka, for their extraordinary work on this area, especially on β2 adrenergic receptors. In this paper, we briefly reviewed the research progresses of G protein coupled receptors in the past, their unique 7 transmembrane architecture, activation mechanism and their future trends.%G蛋白偶联受体是人类基因组中最大也是最重要的一类蛋白质,它们几乎参与了生物体中所有的生命活动.这一类受体的发现、功能研究以及结构解析为我们了解生理调控以及疾病的发生与治疗等带来新的曙光.在此之前,G蛋白偶联受体的相关研究已经被九次授予诺贝尔奖,而2012年,诺贝尔化学奖再次授予Robert J.Lefkowitz和Brian K.Kobilka,以表彰他们在此领域,尤其是肾上腺素受体上的相关研究.文中简介了G蛋白偶联受体的研究历程,其独特的七次跨膜结构与激活机制,并对此领域的未来发展做了展望.

  8. Assessment of GPR30, a Seven Transmembrane-spanning Estrogen Receptor, as an Oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    by the whey acidic protein(WAP) promoter. These mice have recently been constructed and their genotypic and phenotypic analysis is underway. 15...transgenic m ice capable of overexpressing wild type or mutant GPR30 using the mammary gland specific promoter, whey acidic protein. Body. Work...mice have been generated and we are currently in the process of analyzing the phenotype. Key Research Elements. None. Reportable Outcomes

  9. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  10. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Hansen, Jonas Tind; Sanni, Samra Joke;

    2010-01-01

    molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit ß-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability......Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or ß-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given...... receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of ß-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying...

  11. Biased and G protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eSteen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biased signaling or functional selectivity occurs when a 7TM receptor preferentially activates one of several available pathways. It can be divided into three distinct forms: ligand bias, receptor bias, and tissue or cell bias, where it is mediated by different ligands (on the same receptor, different receptors (with the same ligand or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair. Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may not be absolute, i.e. full versus no activation. Here we discuss biased signaling in the chemokine system, including the structural basis for biased signaling in chemokine receptors, as well as in class A 7TM receptors in general. This includes overall helical movements and the contributions of micro-switches based on recently published 7TM crystals and molecular dynamics studies. All three forms of biased signaling are abundant in the chemokine system. This challenges our understanding of classic redundancy inevitably ascribed to this system, where multiple chemokines bind to the same receptor and where a single chemokine may bind to several receptors – in both cases with the same functional outcome. The ubiquitous biased signaling confer a hitherto unknown specificity to the chemokine system with a complex interaction pattern that is better described as promiscuous with context-defined roles and different functional outcomes in a ligand-, receptor- or cell/tissue-defined manner. As the low number of successful drug development plans implies, there are great difficulties in targeting chemokine receptors; in particular with regard to receptor antagonists as anti-inflammatory drugs. Un-defined and putative non-selective targeting of the complete cellular signaling system could be the underlying cause of lack of success. Therefore, biased ligands could be the

  12. Biased and g protein-independent signaling of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Larsen, Olav; Thiele, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    ), different receptors (with the same ligand), or different tissues or cells (for the same ligand-receptor pair). Most often biased signaling is differentiated into G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. Yet, it may also cover signaling differences within these groups. Moreover, it may...

  13. Unique interaction pattern for a functionally biased ghrelin receptor agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, Bjørn Behrens; Lang, Manja; Frimurer, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    /13) pathway. The recognition pattern of wFw-Isn-NH(2) with the ghrelin receptor also differed significantly from that of all previously characterized unbiased agonists. Most importantly, wFw-Isn-NH(2) was not dependent on GluIII:09 (Glu3.33), which otherwise is an obligatory TM III anchor point residue...... orientation as compared with, for example, the wFw peptide agonists. It is concluded that the novel peptide-mimetic ligand wFw-Isn-NH(2) is a biased ghrelin receptor agonist and that the selective signaling pattern presumably is due to its unique receptor recognition pattern lacking interaction with key...

  14. Biased signaling of G protein-coupled receptors - From a chemokine receptor CCR7 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Astrid Sissel; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hjortø, Gertrud M

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) and their associated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) work in a concerted manner to govern immune cell positioning in time and space. Promiscuity of both ligands and receptors, but also biased signaling within the chemokine system, adds to the complexity of how...

  15. Characterization of Novel Seven Transmembrane Helix, GS-Coupled Receptors and Pou Domain Proteins in Cancer of the Mammary Epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    and tested against CBP (amino acids, 2,058- 2,170) by a yeast two-hybrid assay. The major CBP interaction NATUREl VOL 387112 JUNE 1997 677...dependent transcription by evaluating its effects on stimulation by IFN-7 and retinoic acid. The simultaneous addition NATUREl VOL 387112 JUNE 1997...described44. Transient transfections and reporter assays. Transfection was done in either HeLa or CV-1 cells using the standard calcium phosphate procedure

  16. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  17. Biased agonism of the calcium-sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Hvidtfeldt, Maja; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of molecules modulating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are able to selectively affect one signaling pathway over others for a specific GPCR, thereby "biasing" the signaling, it has become obvious that the original model of GPCRs existing in either an "on" or "off...... of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), by looking at 12 well-known orthosteric CaSR agonists in 3 different CaSR signaling pathways: G(q/11) protein, G(i/o) protein, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Here we show that apart from G(q/11) and G(i/o) signaling, ERK1/2 is activated...

  18. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richard D. Ye; François Boulay; Ji Ming Wang; Claes Dahlgren; Craig Gerard; Marc Parmentier; Charles N. Serhan; Philip M. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation...

  19. Biased signaling of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor can be mediated through distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Mi Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs can adopt different active conformations facilitating a selective activation of either G protein or β-arrestin-dependent signaling pathways. This represents an opportunity for development of novel therapeutics targeting selective biological effects of a given receptor. Several studies on pathway separation have been performed, many of these on the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R. It has been shown that certain ligands or mutations facilitate internalization and/or recruitment of β-arrestins without activation of G proteins. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unresolved. For instance, it is unclear whether such selective G protein-uncoupling is caused by a lack of ability to interact with G proteins or rather by an increased ability of the receptor to recruit β-arrestins. Since uncoupling of G proteins by increased ability to recruit β-arrestins could lead to different cellular or in vivo outcomes than lack of ability to interact with G proteins, it is essential to distinguish between these two mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied five AT1R mutants previously published to display pathway separation: D74N, DRY/AAY, Y292F, N298A, and Y302F (Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering: 2.50, 3.49-3.51, 7.43, 7.49, and 7.53. We find that D74N, DRY/AAY, and N298A mutants are more prone to β-arrestin recruitment than WT. In contrast, receptor mutants Y292F and Y302F showed impaired ability to recruit β-arrestin in response to Sar1-Ile4-Ile8 (SII Ang II, a ligand solely activating the β-arrestin pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis reveals that the underlying conformations induced by these AT1R mutants most likely represent principally different mechanisms of uncoupling the G protein, which for some mutants may be due to their increased ability to recruit β-arrestin2. Hereby, these findings have important implications for drug discovery and 7TMR

  20. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes;

    2000-01-01

    expressing ORF74 under control of the CD2 promoter develop highly vascularized Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors. Through targeted mutagenesis we here create three distinct phenotypes of ORF74: a receptor with normal, high constitutive signaling through the phospholipase C pathway but deprived of binding...

  1. Diversity and bias through receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes. Focus on examples from dopamine D2 receptor heteromerization

    OpenAIRE

    Kjell eFuxe; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Wilber eRomero-Fernández; Luca eFerraro; Sergio eTanganelli; Małgorzata eFilip; Luigi Francesco Agnati; Pere eGarriga; Zaida eDiaz Cabiale; Dasiel Oscar Borroto-Escuela

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980ies and 1990ies it was shown that neurotensin through selective antagonistic NTR-D2likeR interactions incre...

  2. Update on Melatonin Receptors. IUPHAR Review. : Melatonin Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Jockers, Ralf; Delagrange, Philippe; Dubocovich, Margarita ,; Markus, Regina ,; Renault, Nicolas; Tosini, Gianluca; Cecon, Erika; Zlotos, Darius Paul

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Melatonin receptors are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor super-family. In mammals, two melatonin receptor subtypes exit MT1 and MT2 encoded by the MTNR1A and MTNR1B genes, respectively. The current review provides an update on melatonin receptors by the corresponding sub-committee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. We will highlight recent developments of melatonin receptor ligands, including ...

  3. Isoform-Specific Biased Agonism of Histamine H3 Receptor Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddy, Darren M; Cook, Anna E; Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Bosnyak, Sanja; Brady, Ryan; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Mocaer, Elisabeth; Summers, Roger J; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    The human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) is subject to extensive gene splicing that gives rise to a large number of functional and nonfunctional isoforms. Despite the general acceptance that G protein-coupled receptors can adopt different ligand-induced conformations that give rise to biased signaling, this has not been studied for the H3R; further, it is unknown whether splice variants of the same receptor engender the same or differential biased signaling. Herein, we profiled the pharmacology of histamine receptor agonists at the two most abundant hH3R splice variants (hH3R445 and hH3R365) across seven signaling endpoints. Both isoforms engender biased signaling, notably for 4-[3-(benzyloxy)propyl]-1H-imidazole (proxyfan) [e.g., strong bias toward phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) via the full-length receptor] and its congener 3-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)propyl-(4-iodophenyl)-methyl ether (iodoproxyfan), which are strongly consistent with the former's designation as a "protean" agonist. The 80 amino acid IL3 deleted isoform hH3R365 is more permissive in its signaling than hH3R445: 2-(1H-imidazol-5-yl)ethyl imidothiocarbamate (imetit), proxyfan, and iodoproxyfan were all markedly biased away from calcium signaling, and principal component analysis of the full data set revealed divergent profiles for all five agonists. However, most interesting was the identification of differential biased signaling between the two isoforms. Strikingly, hH3R365 was completely unable to stimulate GSK3β phosphorylation, an endpoint robustly activated by the full-length receptor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative example of differential biased signaling via isoforms of the same G protein-coupled receptor that are simultaneously expressed in vivo and gives rise to the possibility of selective pharmacological targeting of individual receptor splice variants.

  4. Heart Failure Therapeutics on the Basis of a Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin-2 Type 1 Receptor Rationale and Design of the BLAST-AHF Study (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felker, G. Michael; Butler, Javed; Collins, Sean P.; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth A.; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Soergel, David G.; Teerlink, John R.; Violin, Jonathan D.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pang, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The BLAST-AHF (Biased Ligand of the Angiotensin Receptor Study in Acute Heart Failure) study is designed to test the efficacy and safety of TRV027, a novel biased ligand of the angiotensin-2 type 1 receptor, in patients with acute heart failure (AHF). AHF remains a major public health problem, and n

  5. Diversity and bias through receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteroreceptor complexes. Focus on examples from dopamine D2 receptor heteromerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980ies and 1990ies it was shown that neurotensin through selective antagonistic NTR-D2likeR interactions increased the diversity of DA signalling by reducing D2R mediated dopamine signalling over D1R mediated dopamine signalling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site towards neuromedin N vs neurotensin in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signalling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favoured b-arrestin2 mediated signalling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms.

  6. Detergent-free incorporation of a seven-transmembrane receptor protein into nanosized bilayer Lipodisq particles for functional and biophysical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Lovett, Janet E; Graziadei, Andrea; Lindholm, Ljubica; Hicks, Matthew R; Watts, Anthony

    2012-09-12

    SMA-Lipodisq nanoparticles, with one bacteriorhodopsin (bR) per 12 nm particle on average (protein/lipid molar ratio, 1:172), were prepared without the use of detergents. Using pulsed and continuous wave nitroxide spin label electron paramagnetic resonance, the structural and dynamic integrity of bR was retained when compared with data for bR obtained in the native membrane and in detergents and then with crystal data. This indicates the potential of Lipodisq nanoparticles as a useful membrane mimetic.

  7. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug-tar...

  8. Oxytocin receptor gene and racial ingroup bias in empathy-related brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Siyang; Li, Bingfeng; Ma, Yina; Zhang, Wenxia; Rao, Yi; Han, Shihui

    2015-04-15

    The human brain responds more strongly to racial ingroup than outgroup individuals' pain. This racial ingroup bias varies across individuals and has been attributed to social experiences. What remains unknown is whether the racial ingroup bias in brain activity is associated with a genetic polymorphism. We investigated genetic associations of racial ingroup bias in the brain activity to racial ingroup and outgroup faces that received painful or non-painful stimulations by scanning A/A and G/G homozygous of the oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (OXTR rs53576) using functional MRI. We found that G/G compared to A/A individuals showed stronger activity in the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor area (ACC/SMA) in response to racial ingroup members' pain, whereas A/A relative to G/G individuals exhibited greater activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in response to racial outgroup members' pain. Moreover, the racial ingroup bias in ACC/SMA activity positively predicted participants' racial ingroup bias in implicit attitudes and NAcc activity to racial outgroup individuals' pain negatively predicted participants' motivations to reduce racial outgroup members' pain. Our results suggest that the two variants of OXTR rs53576 are associated with racial ingroup bias in brain activities that are linked to implicit attitude and altruistic motivation, respectively.

  9. Diversity and Bias through Receptor–Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization

    OpenAIRE

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F.; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor–receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR–D2 like receptor interac...

  10. Functionally biased signalling properties of 7TM receptors - opportunities for drug development for the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, B; Holliday, N; Madsen, A N

    2013-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The ghrelin receptor is a 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor involved in a variety of physiological functions including growth hormone secretion, increased food intake and fat accumulation as well as modulation of reward and cognitive functions. Because of its important role in metabolism...... and energy expenditure, the ghrelin receptor has become an important therapeutic target for drug design and the development of anti-obesity compounds. However, none of the compounds developed so far have been approved for commercial use. Interestingly, the ghrelin receptor is able to signal through several...

  11. Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors: the promise and the challenges--a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonberg, Jeremy; Lopez, Laura; Scammells, Peter J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Capuano, Ben; Lane, J Robert

    2014-11-01

    Historically, determination of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand efficacy has often been restricted to identifying the ligand as an agonist or antagonist at a given signaling pathway. This classification was deemed sufficient to predict compound efficacy at all signaling endpoints, including the therapeutically relevant one(s). However, it is now apparent that ligands acting at the same GPCR can stabilize multiple, distinct, receptor conformations linked to different functional outcomes. This phenomenon, known as biased agonism, stimulus bias, or functional selectivity offers the opportunity to separate on-target therapeutic effects from side effects through the design of drugs that show pathway selectivity. However, the medicinal chemist faces numerous challenges to develop biased ligands, including the detection and quantification of biased agonism. This review summarizes the current state of the field of research into biased agonism at GPCRs, with a particular focus on efforts to relate biased agonism to ligand structure.

  12. Collybolide is a novel biased agonist of κ-opioid receptors with potent antipruritic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N.; Fakira, Amanda K.; Massaro, Nicholas P.; Sharma, Indrajeet; Cavé, Adrien; Hamm, Heidi E.; Parello, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Among the opioid receptors, the κ-opioid receptor (κOR) has been gaining considerable attention as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of complex CNS disorders including depression, visceral pain, and cocaine addiction. With an interest in discovering novel ligands targeting κOR, we searched natural products for unusual scaffolds and identified collybolide (Colly), a nonnitrogenous sesquiterpene from the mushroom Collybia maculata. This compound has a furyl-δ-lactone core similar to that of Salvinorin A (Sal A), another natural product from the plant Salvia divinorum. Characterization of the molecular pharmacological properties reveals that Colly, like Sal A, is a highly potent and selective κOR agonist. However, the two compounds differ in certain signaling and behavioral properties. Colly exhibits 10- to 50-fold higher potency in activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway compared with Sal A. Taken with the fact that the two compounds are equipotent for inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity, these results suggest that Colly behaves as a biased agonist of κOR. Behavioral studies also support the biased agonistic activity of Colly in that it exhibits ∼10-fold higher potency in blocking non–histamine-mediated itch compared with Sal A, and this difference is not seen in pain attenuation by these two compounds. These results represent a rare example of functional selectivity by two natural products that act on the same receptor. The biased agonistic activity, along with an easily modifiable structure compared with Sal A, makes Colly an ideal candidate for the development of novel therapeutics targeting κOR with reduced side effects. PMID:27162327

  13. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2017-09-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  14. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders.

  15. Identification of transition bias in oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 gene in buffalo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shabir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Though transition bias has been previously demonstrated in cattle, however, there has not been any study that has explored transition bias in buffalo nuclear genome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nucleotide substitution pattern in the Intron I of Oxidised Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor 1 (OLR1 gene in four breeds of Indian buffalo using 24 different nucleotide substitution models and evaluate their association with DNA methylation. Materials and Methods: Transition/transversion bias (R was estimated by 24 different nucleotide substitution models available in MEGA 5.0. The transition/transversion bias (R was estimated under the Kimura 2-parameter model. Substitution patterns and the transitions/transversions rates (r were then estimated by Tamura-Nei-I and Tamura-Nei-II models. The CpG Island search was done by using CpG Plot Island online Software available at European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI website. Results: The frequency of transition was found to be 3.5 times higher than that of the transversion mutation frequency. Out of 9 nucleotide substitutions, 7 transitions and 2 transversions were found. Among all the nucleotide substitutions, thymine to cytosine substitutions was observed to be very high. CpG Island search tool revealed that IntronI of OLR1 genes is a CpG rich region, thus prone to methylation. Conclusions: Higher transition frequency was found in the intronI of OLR1 gene, however due to the richness of methylated CpGs in the evaluated stretch of genome, the higher T↔C transitions could likely be a result of frequent deaminations of the methylated cytosines into thymines during the evolution of four buffalo breeds.

  16. Regulation of membrane cholecystokinin-2 receptor by agonists enables classification of partial agonists as biased agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnan, Rémi; Masri, Bernard; Escrieut, Chantal; Foucaud, Magali; Cordelier, Pierre; Fourmy, Daniel

    2011-02-25

    Given the importance of G-protein-coupled receptors as pharmacological targets in medicine, efforts directed at understanding the molecular mechanism by which pharmacological compounds regulate their presence at the cell surface is of paramount importance. In this context, using confocal microscopy and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated internalization and intracellular trafficking of the cholecystokinin-2 receptor (CCK2R) in response to both natural and synthetic ligands with different pharmacological features. We found that CCK and gastrin, which are full agonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate production, rapidly and abundantly stimulate internalization. Internalized CCK2R did not rapidly recycle to plasma membrane but instead was directed to late endosomes/lysosomes. CCK2R endocytosis involves clathrin-coated pits and dynamin and high affinity and prolonged binding of β-arrestin1 or -2. Partial agonists and antagonists on CCK2R-induced inositol phosphate formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation did not stimulate CCK2R internalization or β-arrestin recruitment to the CCK2R but blocked full agonist-induced internalization and β-arrestin recruitment. The extreme C-terminal region of the CCK2R (and more precisely phosphorylatable residues Ser(437)-Xaa(438)-Thr(439)-Thr(440)-Xaa(441)-Ser(442)-Thr(443)) were critical for β-arrestin recruitment. However, this region and β-arrestins were dispensable for CCK2R internalization. In conclusion, this study allowed us to classify the human CCK2R as a member of class B G-protein-coupled receptors with regard to its endocytosis features and identified biased agonists of the CCK2R. These new important insights will allow us to investigate the role of internalized CCK2R·β-arrestin complexes in cancers expressing this receptor and to develop new diagnosis and therapeutic strategies targeting this receptor.

  17. G protein-coupled receptor 39 deficiency is associated with pancreatic islet dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Jin, Chunyu;

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-39 is a seven-transmembrane receptor expressed mainly in endocrine and metabolic tissues that acts as a Zn(++) sensor signaling mainly through the G(q) and G(12/13) pathways. The expression of GPR39 is regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1alpha and HNF-4...

  18. Ubiquitylation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 enables efficient receptor recycling and cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Schäuble, Karin; Hauser, Mark A.; Rippl, Alexandra; Bruderer, Roland; Otero, Carolina; Gröttrup, Marcus; Legler, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 is essential for lymphocyte and dendritic cell homing to secondary lymphoid organs. Owing to the ability to induce directional migration, CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 are pivotal for the regulation of the immune system. Here, we identify a novel function for receptor ubiquitylation in the regulation of the trafficking process of this G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. We discovered that CCR7 is ubiquitylated in a constitutive, ligand-independen...

  19. G Protein - Coupled Receptors [Receptores Acoplados à Proteína G

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas V. B. Hoelz; Guilherme B. L. de Freitas; Pedro Henrique M. Torres; Tácio Vinício A. Fernandes; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Joaquim Fernando M. da Silva; Pedro G Pascutti; Ricardo B. de Alencastro

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest superfamily of proteins encoded by the human genome. These receptors are membrane proteins which share a common structure of seven transmembrane helices and are involved in the cellular signal transduction through activation of heterotrimeric protein (G protein) in intracellular environment. This activation signal, mediated by the agonist binding to the extracellular domain of the receptor, is transmitted into the cell and activat...

  20. PCR bias in amplification of androgen receptor alleles, a trinucleotide repeat marker used in clonality studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, G L; Boynton, K A

    1995-04-25

    Trinucleotide CAG repeats in the X-linked human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) have proved a useful means of determining X chromosome haplotypes, and when combined with methylation analysis of nearby cytosine residues permits identification of non-random X inactivation in tumors of women. Co-amplification of two alleles in a heterozygote generates PCR products which differ in the number of CAG units, and thus their melting and secondary structure characteristics. We have shown that under optimal conditions amplification efficiency of two HUMARA alleles is near-equivalent, generating PCR products in a ratio proportional to that of the genomic template. In contrast, reduction of template quantity, damage of template by ultraviolet irradiation or addition of monovalent salts (sodium chloride, sodium acetate or ammonium acetate) produces highly variable imbalances of allelic PCR products, with a strong tendency to preferentially amplify lower molecular weight alleles. Variability and biasing was diminished by substitution of 7-deaza-2'-dGTP for dGTP during amplification, an intervention which reduces stability of intramolecular and intermolecular GC base pairing. We conclude that DNA which is scanty, damaged or salt contaminated may display amplification bias of GC-rich PCR targets, potentially confounding accurate interpretation or reproducibility of assays which require co-amplification of alleles.

  1. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...

  2. Agonism, Antagonism, and Inverse Agonism Bias at the Ghrelin Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Kadmi, Céline; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Onfroy, Lauriane; Galés, Céline; Saulière, Aude; Gagne, Didier; Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; Denoyelle, Séverine; Verdié, Pascal; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Banères, Jean-Louis; Marie, Jacky

    2015-11-06

    The G protein-coupled receptor GHS-R1a mediates ghrelin-induced growth hormone secretion, food intake, and reward-seeking behaviors. GHS-R1a signals through Gq, Gi/o, G13, and arrestin. Biasing GHS-R1a signaling with specific ligands may lead to the development of more selective drugs to treat obesity or addiction with minimal side effects. To delineate ligand selectivity at GHS-R1a signaling, we analyzed in detail the efficacy of a panel of synthetic ligands activating the different pathways associated with GHS-R1a in HEK293T cells. Besides β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, we monitored activation of a large panel of G protein subtypes using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay with G protein-activation biosensors. We first found that unlike full agonists, Gq partial agonists were unable to trigger β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Using G protein-activation biosensors, we then demonstrated that ghrelin promoted activation of Gq, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, Goa, Gob, and G13 but not Gs and G12. Besides, we identified some GHS-R1a ligands that preferentially activated Gq and antagonized ghrelin-mediated Gi/Go activation. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrated that in addition to Gq, GHS-R1a also promoted constitutive activation of G13. Importantly, we identified some ligands that were selective inverse agonists toward Gq but not of G13. This demonstrates that bias at GHS-R1a signaling can occur not only with regard to agonism but also to inverse agonism. Our data, combined with other in vivo studies, may facilitate the design of drugs selectively targeting individual signaling pathways to treat only the therapeutically relevant function.

  3. Agonism, Antagonism, and Inverse Agonism Bias at the Ghrelin Receptor Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Kadmi, Céline; Leyris, Jean-Philippe; Onfroy, Lauriane; Galés, Céline; Saulière, Aude; Gagne, Didier; Damian, Marjorie; Mary, Sophie; Maingot, Mathieu; Denoyelle, Séverine; Verdié, Pascal; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Banères, Jean-Louis; Marie, Jacky

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GHS-R1a mediates ghrelin-induced growth hormone secretion, food intake, and reward-seeking behaviors. GHS-R1a signals through Gq, Gi/o, G13, and arrestin. Biasing GHS-R1a signaling with specific ligands may lead to the development of more selective drugs to treat obesity or addiction with minimal side effects. To delineate ligand selectivity at GHS-R1a signaling, we analyzed in detail the efficacy of a panel of synthetic ligands activating the different pathways associated with GHS-R1a in HEK293T cells. Besides β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, we monitored activation of a large panel of G protein subtypes using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay with G protein-activation biosensors. We first found that unlike full agonists, Gq partial agonists were unable to trigger β-arrestin2 recruitment and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Using G protein-activation biosensors, we then demonstrated that ghrelin promoted activation of Gq, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, Goa, Gob, and G13 but not Gs and G12. Besides, we identified some GHS-R1a ligands that preferentially activated Gq and antagonized ghrelin-mediated Gi/Go activation. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrated that in addition to Gq, GHS-R1a also promoted constitutive activation of G13. Importantly, we identified some ligands that were selective inverse agonists toward Gq but not of G13. This demonstrates that bias at GHS-R1a signaling can occur not only with regard to agonism but also to inverse agonism. Our data, combined with other in vivo studies, may facilitate the design of drugs selectively targeting individual signaling pathways to treat only the therapeutically relevant function. PMID:26363071

  4. The L-alpha-amino acid receptor GPRC6A is expressed in the islets of Langerhans but is not involved in L-arginine-induced insulin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Johansen, Lars Dan;

    2013-01-01

    GPRC6A is a seven-transmembrane receptor activated by a wide range of L: -a-amino acids, most potently by L: -arginine and other basic amino acids. The receptor is broadly expressed, but its exact physiological role remains to be elucidated. It is well established that L: -arginine stimulates ins...

  5. Quantification of mutation-derived bias for alternate mating functionalities of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p pheromone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pooja; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-01-01

    Although well documented for mammalian G-protein-coupled receptors, alternate functionalities and associated alternate signalling remain to be unequivocally established for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone Ste2p receptor. Here, evidence supporting alternate functionalities for Ste2p is re-evaluated, extended and quantified. In particular, strong mating and constitutive signalling mutations, focusing on residues S254, P258 and S259 in TM6 of Ste2p, are stacked and investigated in terms of their effects on classical G-protein-mediated signal transduction associated with cell cycle arrest, and alternatively, their impact on downstream mating projection and zygote formation events. In relative dose response experiments, accounting for systemic and observational bias, mutational-derived functional differences were observed, validating the S254L-derived bias for downstream mating responses and highlighting complex relationships between TM6-mutation derived constitutive signalling and ligand-induced functionalities. Mechanistically, localization studies suggest that alterations to receptor trafficking may contribute to mutational bias, in addition to expected receptor conformational stabilization effects. Overall, these results extend previous observations and quantify the contributions of Ste2p variants to mediating cell cycle arrest versus downstream mating functionalities.

  6. Estimation of the receptor-state affinity constants of ligands in functional studies using wild type and constitutively active mutant receptors: Implications for estimation of agonist bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Stein, Richard S L

    We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states. A means of confirming this assumption is provided. Global nonlinear regression analysis yields estimates of 1) the active (Kact) and inactive (Kinact) receptor-state affinity constants, 2) the isomerization constant of the unoccupied receptor (Kq-obs), and 3) the sensitivity constant of the signaling pathway (KE-obs). The latter two parameters define the output response of the receptor, and hence, their ratio (Kq-obs/KE) is a useful measure of system bias. If the cellular system is reasonably stable and the Kq-obs and KE-obs values of the signaling pathway are known, the Kact and Kinact values of additional agonists can be estimated in subsequent experiments on cells expressing the wild type receptor. We validated our method through computer simulation, an analytical proof, and analysis of previously published data. Our approach provides 1) a more meaningful analysis of structure-activity relationships, 2) a means of validating in silico docking experiments on active and inactive receptor structures and 3) an absolute, in contrast to relative, measure of agonist bias.

  7. New functions and signaling mechanisms for the class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebscher, Ines; Ackley, Brian; Araç, Demet

    2014-01-01

    The class of adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs), with 33 human homologs, is the second largest family of GPCRs. In addition to a seven-transmembrane α-helix-a structural feature of all GPCRs-the class of aGPCRs is characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular region...

  8. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud;

    2003-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large class of seven transmembrane proteins, which bind selectively agonists or antagonists with important consequences for cellular signaling and function. Comprehension of the molecular details of ligand binding is important for the understanding...

  9. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  10. Biased safety reporting in blinded randomized clinical trials: meta-analysis of angiotensin receptor blocker trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Takabayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cough is listed as an adverse drug reaction (ADR on the labels of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB. However, a causal association with cough has also been reported for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, which have frequently been used as comparator drugs in the registration clinical trials of ARBs. This prompted us to examine the possible influence of using comparator drugs with well-known ADRs on the safety reporting of investigational drugs in blinded randomized clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The double-blinded, randomized clinical trials with comparator drugs were identified in the Japanese dossiers for the new drug applications of ARBs. The risk ratios (RR of reporting cough and headache in ARB arms were calculated for each ARB by comparing trials using ACEIs and trials using non-ACEIs, were then combined with a meta-analysis. 23 trials with a total of 6643 patients were identified, consisting 6 trials using an ACEI comparator including 819 ARB patients and 17 trials using a non-ACEI comparator including 5824 ARB patients. The combined RR of cough reporting was significantly elevated (20.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.47 to 57.76, indicating more frequent reporting of cough in clinical trials using an ACEI comparator. In contrast, the combined RR of headache, a negative control, was insignificant (1.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 6.22. CONCLUSION: The use of comparators with well-known ADRs in blinded randomized trials produces potential bias in the reporting frequency of ADRs for investigational drugs. The selection of appropriate comparator drugs should be critical in unbiased safety assessment in double-blinded, randomized clinical trials and thus have relevance in reviewing the safety results from a regulatory point of view.

  11. Bitter substances from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine exert biased activation of human bitter taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Maik; Gu, Ming; Fan, Shengjie; Huang, Cheng; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2017-08-21

    The number and variety of bitter compounds originating from plants are vast. Whereas some bitter chemicals are toxic and should not be ingested, other compounds exhibit health beneficial effects, which is manifest in the cross-cultural believe that the bitterness of medicine is correlated with the desired medicinal activity. The bitter taste receptors in the oral cavity serve as sensors for bitter compounds and, as they are expressed in numerous extraoral tissues throughout the body, may also be responsible for some physiological effects exerted by bitter compounds. Chinese herbal medicine uses bitter herbs since ancient times for the treatment of various diseases; however, the routes by which these herbs modify physiology are frequently not well understood. We therefore screened 26 bitter substances extracted from medical herbs for the activation of the 25 human bitter taste receptors. We identified six receptors activated by in total 17 different bitter compounds. Interestingly, we observed a bias in bitter taste receptor activation with 10 newly identified agonists for the broadly tuned receptor TAS2R46, seven agonists activating the TAS2R14 and two compounds activating narrowly tuned receptors, suggesting that these receptors play dominant roles in the evaluation and perhaps physiological activities of Chinese herbal medicines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Molecular cloning of a functional allatostatin gut/brain receptor and an allatostatin preprohormone from the silkworm Bombyx mori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas; Lenz, C; Cazzamali, G

    2001-01-01

    The cockroach-type or A-type allatostatins are inhibitory insect neuropeptides with the C-terminal sequence Tyr/Phe-X-Phe-Gly-Leu-NH(2). Here, we have cloned an A-type allatostatin receptor from the silkworm Bombyx mori (BAR). BAR is 361 amino acid residues long, has seven transmembrane domains...

  13. Discovery and Characterization of Biased Allosteric Agonists of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milanos, Lampros; Brox, Regine; Frank, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report a design, synthesis, and detailed functional characterization of unique strongly biased allosteric agonists of CXCR3 that contain tetrahydroisoquinoline carboxamide cores. Compound 11 (FAUC1036) is the first strongly biased allosteric agonist of CXCR3 that selectively induc...

  14. Cannabinoid receptor interacting protein suppresses agonist-driven CB1 receptor internalization and regulates receptor replenishment in an agonist-biased manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Lawrence C; Leone-Kabler, Sandra; Luessen, Deborah J; Marrs, Glen S; Lyons, Erica; Bass, Caroline E; Chen, Rong; Selley, Dana E; Howlett, Allyn C

    2016-11-01

    Cannabinoid receptor interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) is a CB1 receptor (CB1 R) distal C-terminus-associated protein that modulates CB1 R signaling via G proteins, and CB1 R down-regulation but not desensitization (Blume et al. [2015] Cell Signal., 27, 716-726; Smith et al. [2015] Mol. Pharmacol., 87, 747-765). In this study, we determined the involvement of CRIP1a in CB1 R plasma membrane trafficking. To follow the effects of agonists and antagonists on cell surface CB1 Rs, we utilized the genetically homogeneous cloned neuronal cell line N18TG2, which endogenously expresses both CB1 R and CRIP1a, and exhibits a well-characterized endocannabinoid signaling system. We developed stable CRIP1a-over-expressing and CRIP1a-siRNA-silenced knockdown clones to investigate gene dose effects of CRIP1a on CB1 R plasma membrane expression. Results indicate that CP55940 or WIN55212-2 (10 nM, 5 min) reduced cell surface CB1 R by a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent process, and this was attenuated by CRIP1a over-expression. CP55940-mediated cell surface CB1 R loss was followed by a cycloheximide-sensitive recovery of surface receptors (30-120 min), suggesting the requirement for new protein synthesis. In contrast, WIN55212-2-mediated cell surface CB1 Rs recovered only in CRIP1a knockdown cells. Changes in CRIP1a expression levels did not affect a transient rimonabant (10 nM)-mediated increase in cell surface CB1 Rs, which is postulated to be as a result of rimonabant effects on 'non-agonist-driven' internalization. These studies demonstrate a novel role for CRIP1a in agonist-driven CB1 R cell surface regulation postulated to occur by two mechanisms: 1) attenuating internalization that is agonist-mediated, but not that in the absence of exogenous agonists, and 2) biased agonist-dependent trafficking of de novo synthesized receptor to the cell surface.

  15. Individual differences in positivity offset and negativity bias: Gender-specific associations with two serotonin receptor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashare, Rebecca L; Norris, Catherine J; Wileyto, E Paul; Cacioppo, John T; Strasser, Andrew A

    2013-09-01

    Individual differences in the evaluation of affective stimuli, such as the positivity offset and negativity bias may have a biological basis. We tested whether two SNPs (HTR2A; 102T>C and HTR1A; 1019C>G) related to serotonin receptor function, a biological pathway associated with affective regulation, were differentially related to positivity offset and negativity bias for males and females. Participants were 109 cigarette smokers who rated a series of affective stimuli to assess reactions to positive and negative pictures. Gender × genotype interactions were found for both SNPs. Males with the 102T allele showed a greater positivity offset than males with the 102C allele. For females, in contrast, the 1019C allele was associated with a greater positivity offset than the 1019G allele, whereas the 102T allele was associated with a greater negativity bias than the 102C allele. Identifying how gender differences may moderate the effect of serotonin receptor genes on affective information processing may provide insight into their role in guiding behavior and regulating affect.

  16. High throughput mutagenesis for identification of residues regulating human prostacyclin (hIP receptor expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Bill

    Full Text Available The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP receptor is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that plays a critical role in vascular smooth muscle relaxation and platelet aggregation. hIP receptor dysfunction has been implicated in numerous cardiovascular abnormalities, including myocardial infarction, hypertension, thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Genomic sequencing has discovered several genetic variations in the PTGIR gene coding for hIP receptor, however, its structure-function relationship has not been sufficiently explored. Here we set out to investigate the applicability of high throughput random mutagenesis to study the structure-function relationship of hIP receptor. While chemical mutagenesis was not suitable to generate a mutagenesis library with sufficient coverage, our data demonstrate error-prone PCR (epPCR mediated mutagenesis as a valuable method for the unbiased screening of residues regulating hIP receptor function and expression. Here we describe the generation and functional characterization of an epPCR derived mutagenesis library compromising >4000 mutants of the hIP receptor. We introduce next generation sequencing as a useful tool to validate the quality of mutagenesis libraries by providing information about the coverage, mutation rate and mutational bias. We identified 18 mutants of the hIP receptor that were expressed at the cell surface, but demonstrated impaired receptor function. A total of 38 non-synonymous mutations were identified within the coding region of the hIP receptor, mapping to 36 distinct residues, including several mutations previously reported to affect the signaling of the hIP receptor. Thus, our data demonstrates epPCR mediated random mutagenesis as a valuable and practical method to study the structure-function relationship of GPCRs.

  17. Biased Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor Signaling Influences Neuronal Viability in a Cell Culture Model of Huntington Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprairie, Robert B; Bagher, Amina M; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with limited treatment options. Prior to motor symptom onset or neuronal cell loss in HD, levels of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) decrease in the basal ganglia. Decreasing CB1 levels are strongly correlated with chorea and cognitive deficit. CB1 agonists are functionally selective (biased) for divergent signaling pathways. In this study, six cannabinoids were tested for signaling bias in in vitro models of medium spiny projection neurons expressing wild-type (STHdh(Q7/Q7)) or mutant huntingtin protein (STHdh(Q111/Q111)). Signaling bias was assessed using the Black and Leff operational model. Relative activity [ΔlogR (τ/KA)] and system bias (ΔΔlogR) were calculated relative to the reference compound WIN55,212-2 for Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gβγ, and β-arrestin1 signaling following treatment with 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), anandamide (AEA), CP55,940, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and THC+CBD (1:1), and compared between wild-type and HD cells. The Emax of Gαi/o-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was 50% lower in HD cells compared with wild-type cells. 2-AG and AEA displayed Gαi/o/Gβγ bias and normalized CB1 protein levels and improved cell viability, whereas CP55,940 and THC displayed β-arrestin1 bias and reduced CB1 protein levels and cell viability in HD cells. CBD was not a CB1 agonist but inhibited THC-dependent signaling (THC+CBD). Therefore, enhancing Gαi/o-biased endocannabinoid signaling may be therapeutically beneficial in HD. In contrast, cannabinoids that are β-arrestin-biased--such as THC found at high levels in modern varieties of marijuana--may be detrimental to CB1 signaling, particularly in HD where CB1 levels are already reduced.

  18. Agonist-biased signaling via proteinase activated receptor-2: differential activation of calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; Defea, Kathryn; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR(2)) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR(2) and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR(2)-Leu(37)Ser(38), rPAR(2)-Ala(37-38), and rPAR(2)-Ala(39-42) were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR(2) TL sequence, S(37)LIGRL(42)-. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR(2) and rPAR(2)-Ala(39-42) triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR(2)-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR(2)-Ala(37-38) nor rPAR(2)-Leu(37)Ser(38) constructs recruited beta-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both beta-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered beta-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Galpha(i) (pertussis toxin), Galpha(q) [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the

  19. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails - Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, A.; Sondergaard, B.P.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    -coupled receptor-associated sorting protein bound 23 of the 59 tail proteins. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding kinetics of selected hits from the glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, i.e. the tails of the virally encoded receptor US28 and the delta-opioid receptor, confirmed......Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor...... sequestration through interactions, mainly with the C-terminal intracellular tails of the receptors. A library of tails from 59 representative members of the super family of seven-transmembrane receptors was probed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins for interactions with four different adaptor...

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomics dissection of 7TM receptor signaling using full and biased agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Gitte Lund; Kelstrup, Christian; Lyngsø, Christina

    2010-01-01

    into Angiotensin II signal transduction and is the first study dissecting the differences between a full agonist and a biased agonist from a 7TMR on a systems-wide scale. Importantly, it reveals a previously unappreciated diversity and quantity of Gaq protein-independent signaling and uncovers novel signaling...

  1. Small-molecule-biased formyl peptide receptor agonist compound 17b protects against myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cheng Xue; May, Lauren T; Li, Renming; Cao, Nga; Rosli, Sarah; Deo, Minh; Alexander, Amy E; Horlock, Duncan; Bourke, Jane E; Yang, Yuan H; Stewart, Alastair G; Kaye, David M; Du, Xiao-Jun; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Ritchie, Rebecca H

    2017-02-07

    Effective treatment for managing myocardial infarction (MI) remains an urgent, unmet clinical need. Formyl peptide receptors (FPR) regulate inflammation, a major contributing mechanism to cardiac injury following MI. Here we demonstrate that FPR1/FPR2-biased agonism may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MI. The small-molecule FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound 17b (Cmpd17b), exhibits a distinct signalling fingerprint to the conventional FPR1/FPR2 agonist, Compound-43 (Cmpd43). In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably transfected with human FPR1 or FPR2, Compd17b is biased away from potentially detrimental FPR1/2-mediated calcium mobilization, but retains the pro-survival signalling, ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, relative to Compd43. The pathological importance of the biased agonism of Cmpd17b is demonstrable as superior cardioprotection in both in vitro (cardiomyocytes and cardiofibroblasts) and MI injury in mice in vivo. These findings reveal new insights for development of small molecule FPR agonists with an improved cardioprotective profile for treating MI.

  2. T cell Receptor Alpha Variable 12-2 bias in the immunodominant response to Yellow fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovay, Amandine; Zoete, Vincent; Dolton, Garry; Bulek, Anna M; Cole, David K; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Fuller, Anna; Beck, Konrad; Michielin, Olivier; Speiser, Daniel E; Sewell, Andrew K; Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A

    2017-10-03

    The repertoire of human αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) is generated via somatic recombination of germline gene segments. Despite this enormous variation, certain epitopes can be immunodominant, associated with high frequencies of antigen-specific T cells and/or exhibit bias towards a TCR gene segment. Here, we studied the TCR repertoire of the HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope LLWNGPMAV (hereafter, A2/LLW) from Yellow Fever virus, which generates an immunodominant CD8(+) T cell response to the highly effective YF-17D vaccine. We discover that these A2/LLW-specific CD8(+) T cells are highly biased for the TCR α chain TRAV12-2. This bias is already present in A2/LLW-specific naïve T cells before vaccination with YF-17D. Using CD8(+) T cell clones, we show that TRAV12-2 does not confer a functional advantage on a per cell basis. Molecular modeling indicated that the germline-encoded complementarity determining region (CDR) 1α loop of TRAV12-2 critically contributes to A2/LLW binding, in contrast to the conventional dominant dependence on somatically rearranged CDR3 loops. This germline component of antigen recognition may explain the unusually high precursor frequency, prevalence and immunodominance of T-cell responses specific for A2/LLW epitope. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L; von Zastrow, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and ...

  4. Structure and Function of CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 Homologues Derived from Representative Primate Species and Subspecies of the Taxonomic Suborders Prosimii and Anthropoidea

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    A chemokine receptor from the seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily is an essential coreceptor for the cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains. To investigate nonhuman primate CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) homologue structure and function, we amplified CCR5 DNA sequences from peripheral blood cells obtained from 24 representative species and subspecies of the primate suborders Prosimii (family L...

  5. Class II major histocompatibility complex mutant mice to study the germ-line bias of T-cell antigen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Daniel; Krovi, Sai Harsha; Tuttle, Kathryn D; Crooks, James; Reisdorph, Richard; White, Janice; Gross, James; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Gapin, Laurent; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of αβ T-cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with peptides bound to MHC molecules lies at the center of adaptive immunity. Whether TCRs have evolved to react with MHC or, instead, processes in the thymus involving coreceptors and other molecules select MHC-specific TCRs de novo from a random repertoire is a longstanding immunological question. Here, using nuclease-targeted mutagenesis, we address this question in vivo by generating three independent lines of knockin mice with single-amino acid mutations of conserved class II MHC amino acids that often are involved in interactions with the germ-line-encoded portions of TCRs. Although the TCR repertoire generated in these mutants is similar in size and diversity to that in WT mice, the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC is suggested by a shift and preferential use of some TCR subfamilies over others in mice expressing the mutant class II MHCs. Furthermore, T cells educated on these mutant MHC molecules are alloreactive to each other and to WT cells, and vice versa, suggesting strong functional differences among these repertoires. Taken together, these results highlight both the flexibility of thymic selection and the evolutionary bias of TCRs for MHC.

  6. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury.

  7. PCR bias in amplification of androgen receptor alleles, a trinucleotide repeat marker used in clonality studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Mutter, G L; Boynton, K A

    1995-01-01

    Trinucleotide CAG repeats in the X-linked human androgen receptor gene (HUMARA) have proved a useful means of determining X chromosome haplotypes, and when combined with methylation analysis of nearby cytosine residues permits identification of non-random X inactivation in tumors of women. Co-amplification of two alleles in a heterozygote generates PCR products which differ in the number of CAG units, and thus their melting and secondary structure characteristics. We have shown that under opt...

  8. Prolonged calcitonin receptor signaling by salmon, but not human calcitonin, reveals ligand bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Vietz Andreassen

    Full Text Available Salmon calcitonin (sCT and human calcitonin (hCT are pharmacologically distinct. However, the reason for the differences is unclear. Here we analyze the differences between sCT and hCT on the human calcitonin receptor (CT(aR with respect to activation of cAMP signaling, β-arrestin recruitment, ligand binding kinetics and internalization. The study was conducted using mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human CT(a receptor. CT(aR downstream signaling was investigated with dose response profiles for cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment for sCT and hCT during short term (<2 hours and prolonged (up to 72 hours stimulation. CT(aR kinetics and internalization was investigated with radio-labeled sCT and hCT ligands on cultured cells and isolated membrane preparations from the same cell line. We found that sCT and hCT are equipotent during short-term stimulations with differences manifesting themselves only during long-term stimulation with sCT inducing a prolonged activation up to 72 hours, while hCT loses activity markedly earlier. The prolonged sCT stimulation of both cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin recruitment was attenuated, but not abrogated by acid wash, suggesting a role for sCT activated internalized receptors. We have demonstrated a novel phenomenon, namely that two distinct CT(aR downstream signaling activation patterns are activated by two related ligands, thereby highlighting qualitatively different signaling responses in vitro that could have implications for sCT use in vivo.

  9. Prolonged calcitonin receptor signaling by salmon, but not human calcitonin, reveals ligand bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Furness, Sebastian G; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Nosjean, Olivier; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Salmon calcitonin (sCT) and human calcitonin (hCT) are pharmacologically distinct. However, the reason for the differences is unclear. Here we analyze the differences between sCT and hCT on the human calcitonin receptor (CT(a)R) with respect to activation of cAMP signaling, β-arrestin recruitment, ligand binding kinetics and internalization. The study was conducted using mammalian cell lines heterologously expressing the human CT(a) receptor. CT(a)R downstream signaling was investigated with dose response profiles for cAMP production and β-arrestin recruitment for sCT and hCT during short term (<2 hours) and prolonged (up to 72 hours) stimulation. CT(a)R kinetics and internalization was investigated with radio-labeled sCT and hCT ligands on cultured cells and isolated membrane preparations from the same cell line. We found that sCT and hCT are equipotent during short-term stimulations with differences manifesting themselves only during long-term stimulation with sCT inducing a prolonged activation up to 72 hours, while hCT loses activity markedly earlier. The prolonged sCT stimulation of both cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin recruitment was attenuated, but not abrogated by acid wash, suggesting a role for sCT activated internalized receptors. We have demonstrated a novel phenomenon, namely that two distinct CT(a)R downstream signaling activation patterns are activated by two related ligands, thereby highlighting qualitatively different signaling responses in vitro that could have implications for sCT use in vivo.

  10. The G Protein–Biased κ-Opioid Receptor Agonist RB-64 Is Analgesic with a Unique Spectrum of Activities In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate L.; Robinson, J. Elliott; Zhu, Hu; DiBerto, Jeffrey F.; Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Nichols, David E.; Malanga, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that functionally selective G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists may have enhanced therapeutic benefits has revitalized interest for many GPCR targets. In particular, although κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists are analgesic with a low risk of dependence and abuse, their use is limited by a propensity to induce sedation, motor incoordination, hallucinations, and dysphoria-like states. Several laboratories have produced a body of work suggesting that G protein–biased KOR agonists might be analgesic with fewer side effects. Although that has been an intriguing hypothesis, suitable KOR-selective and G protein–biased agonists have not been available to test this idea. Here we provide data using a G protein–biased agonist, RB-64 (22-thiocyanatosalvinorin A), which suggests that KOR-mediated G protein signaling induces analgesia and aversion, whereas β-arrestin-2 signaling may be associated with motor incoordination. Additionally, unlike unbiased KOR agonists, the G protein–biased ligand RB-64 does not induce sedation and does not have anhedonia-like actions, suggesting that a mechanism other than G protein signaling mediates these effects. Our findings provide the first evidence for a highly selective and G protein–biased tool compound for which many, but not all, of the negative side effects of KOR agonists can be minimized by creating G protein–biased KOR agonists. PMID:25320048

  11. Novel strategies in drug discovery of the calcium-sensing receptor based on biased signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Smajilovic, Sanela; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of chronic kidney disease is hyperphosphatemia due to renal phosphate retention. Prolonged parathyroid gland exposure to hyperphosphatemia leads to secondary hyperparathyroidism characterized by hyperplasia of the glands and excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which causes...... renal osteodystrophy. PTH secretion from the parathyroid glands is controlled by the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) that senses extracellular calcium. High extracellular calcium activates the CaSR causing inhibition of PTH secretion through multiple signaling pathways. Cinacalcet is the first drug...... targeting the CaSR and can be used to effectively control and reduce PTH secretion in PTH-related diseases. Cinacalcet is a positive allosteric modulator of the CaSR and affects PTH secretion from parathyroid glands by shifting the calcium-PTH concentration-response curve to the left. One major disadvantage...

  12. BIASED AGONISM OF THREE DIFFERENT CANNABINOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS IN MOUSE BRAIN CORTEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Diez-Alarcia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors are able to couple to different families of G-proteins when activated by an agonist drug. It has been suggested that different intracellular responses may be activated depending on the ligand. The goal of the present study was to characterize the pattern of G protein subunit stimulation triggered by three different cannabinoid ligands, THC, WIN55212-2 and ACEA in mouse brain cortex.Stimulation of the [35S]GTPS binding coupled to specific immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different subtypes of G proteins (Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, Gαo, Gαz, Gαs, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13, in the presence of Δ9-THC, WIN55212-2 and ACEA (submaximal concentration 10 µM was determined by Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA technique in mouse cortex of wild type, CB1 knock-out, CB2 knock-out and CB1/CB2 double knock-out mice. Results show that, in mouse brain cortex, cannabinoid agonists are able to significantly stimulate not only the classical inhibitory Gαi/o subunits but also other G subunits like Gαz, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13. Moreover, the specific pattern of G protein subunit activation is different depending on the ligand. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that, in mice brain native tissue, different exogenous cannabinoid ligands are able to selectively activate different inhibitory and non-inhibitory Gα protein subtypes, through the activation of CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. Results of the present study may help to understand the specific molecular pathways involved in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoid-derived drugs.

  13. Biased Agonism of Three Different Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists in Mouse Brain Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Alarcia, Rebeca; Ibarra-Lecue, Inés; Lopez-Cardona, Ángela P.; Meana, Javier; Gutierrez-Adán, Alfonso; Callado, Luis F.; Agirregoitia, Ekaitz; Urigüen, Leyre

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are able to couple to different families of G proteins when activated by an agonist drug. It has been suggested that different intracellular responses may be activated depending on the ligand. The goal of the present study was to characterize the pattern of G protein subunit stimulation triggered by three different cannabinoid ligands, Δ9-THC, WIN55212-2, and ACEA in mouse brain cortex. Stimulation of the [35S]GTPγS binding coupled to specific immunoprecipitation with antibodies against different subtypes of G proteins (Gαi1, Gαi2, Gαi3, Gαo, Gαz, Gαs, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13), in the presence of Δ9-THC, WIN55212-2 and ACEA (submaximal concentration 10 μM) was determined by scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technique in mouse cortex of wild type, CB1 knock-out, CB2 knock-out and CB1/CB2 double knock-out mice. Results show that, in mouse brain cortex, cannabinoid agonists are able to significantly stimulate not only the classical inhibitory Gαi/o subunits but also other G subunits like Gαz, Gαq/11, and Gα12/13. Moreover, the specific pattern of G protein subunit activation is different depending on the ligand. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that, in mice brain native tissue, different exogenous cannabinoid ligands are able to selectively activate different inhibitory and non-inhibitory Gα protein subtypes, through the activation of CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. Results of the present study may help to understand the specific molecular pathways involved in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoid-derived drugs. PMID:27867358

  14. Mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between interferons and estrogen receptor-alpha in mice: implications for sex bias in autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran Panchanathan

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, an autoimmune disease, predominantly affects women of childbearing age. Moreover, increased serum levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha are associated with the disease. Although, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2 is implicated in sex bias in SLE through up-regulation of IFN-gamma expression, the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that activation of IFN (alpha or gamma-signaling in immune cells up-regulates expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha; encoded by the Esr1 gene and stimulates expression of target genes.We found that treatment of mouse splenic cells and mouse cell lines with IFN (alpha or gamma increased steady-state levels of ERalpha mRNA and protein. The increase in the ERalpha mRNA levels was primarily due to the transcriptional mechanisms and it was dependent upon the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1 factor by IFN. Moreover, the IFN-treatment of cells also stimulated transcription of a reporter gene, expression of which was driven by the promoter region of the murine Esr1 gene. Notably, splenic cells from pre-autoimmune lupus-prone (NZB x NZWF(1 female mice had relatively higher steady-state levels of mRNAs encoded by the IFN and ERalpha-responsive genes as compared to the age-matched males.Our observations identify a novel mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between IFNs and ERalpha in immune cells in mice and support the idea that activation of this regulatory loop contributes to sex bias in SLE.

  15. Mutually Positive Regulatory Feedback Loop between Interferons and Estrogen Receptor-α in Mice: Implications for Sex Bias in Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Xiang; Ho, Shuk-mei; Choubey, Divaker

    2010-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), an autoimmune disease, predominantly affects women of childbearing age. Moreover, increased serum levels of interferon-α (IFN-α) are associated with the disease. Although, the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) is implicated in sex bias in SLE through up-regulation of IFN-γ expression, the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here we report that activation of IFN (α or γ)-signaling in immune cells up-regulates expression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα; encoded by the Esr1 gene) and stimulates expression of target genes. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that treatment of mouse splenic cells and mouse cell lines with IFN (α or γ) increased steady-state levels of ERα mRNA and protein. The increase in the ERα mRNA levels was primarily due to the transcriptional mechanisms and it was dependent upon the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1) factor by IFN. Moreover, the IFN-treatment of cells also stimulated transcription of a reporter gene, expression of which was driven by the promoter region of the murine Esr1 gene. Notably, splenic cells from pre-autoimmune lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 female mice had relatively higher steady-state levels of mRNAs encoded by the IFN and ERα-responsive genes as compared to the age-matched males. Conclusions/Significance Our observations identify a novel mutually positive regulatory feedback loop between IFNs and ERα in immune cells in mice and support the idea that activation of this regulatory loop contributes to sex bias in SLE. PMID:20526365

  16. Biased and constitutive signaling in the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 by manipulating the interface between transmembrane helices 6 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Anne; Thiele, Stefanie; Guo, Dong;

    2013-01-01

    protein active, but β-arrestin inactive and thus biased, CCR5 conformation. These results provide important information on the molecular interplay and impact of TM6 and TM7 for CCR5 activity, which may be extrapolated to other chemokine receptors and possibly to other 7TM receptors.......The equilibrium state of CCR5 is manipulated here toward either activation or inactivation by introduction of single amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane domains (TMs) 6 and 7. Insertion of a steric hindrance mutation in the center of TM7 (G286F in position VII:09/7.42) resulted in biased...... signaling. Thus, β-arrestin recruitment was eliminated, whereas constitutive activity was observed in Gαi-mediated signaling. Furthermore, the CCR5 antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a full agonist (a so-called efficacy switch). Computational modeling revealed that the position of the 7TM receptor...

  17. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule wit...

  18. Des-aspartate-angiotensin I causes specific release of PGE2 and PGI2 in HUVEC via the angiotensin AT1 receptor and biased agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qiang; Lee, Kok-Onn; Sim, Sai-Zhen; Xu, Xiao-Guang; Sim, Meng-Kwoon

    2015-12-05

    DAA-I (des-aspartate-angiotensin I), an endogenous angiotensin, had been shown earlier to ameliorate animal models of cardiovascular diseases via the angiotensin AT1 receptor and prostaglandins. The present study investigated further the action of DAA-I on the release of PGE2, PGI2, PGF2α and TXA2 in HUVEC. 10(-11)-10(-8)M DAA-I and 15min incubation specifically released PGE2 and PGI2. The release was inhibited by losartan and indomethacin but not by PD123319 and NS398 indicating that the angiotensin AT1 receptor and COX-1 mediate the release. At concentrations higher than 10(-7)M, DAA-I mimics the action of angiotensin II by releasing TXA2 but had no effect on the production of PGF2α. At similar concentrations and 4h incubation, DAA-I increased the release of the 4 prostaglandins via the angiotensin AT1 receptor and COX-2, again mimicking the action of angiotensin II. HUVEC that were preincubated with DAA-I or angiotensin II, released similar profiles of prostaglandins when incubated with arachidonic acid after the angiotensin had been washed off. We postulate that the internalized DAA-I/receptor complex remains active and mediates the conversion of arachidonic acid to the respective prostaglandins. The release of PGE2 and PGI2 via the angiotensin AT1 receptor and COX-1 is a novel specific action of DAA-I and is likely responsible for its beneficial effects seen in earlier studies. This specific action is definable as a biased agonism of the angiotensin AT1 receptor, which identifies DAA-I as a novel biased agonist and potential therapeutic that is able to produce specific prostaglandins at nanomolar concentrations.

  19. Ligand-induced modulation of the free-energy landscape of G protein-coupled receptors explored by adaptive biasing techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Provasi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental information supports the formation of ligand-specific conformations of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs as a possible molecular basis for their functional selectivity for signaling pathways. Taking advantage of the recently published inactive and active crystal structures of GPCRs, we have implemented an all-atom computational strategy that combines different adaptive biasing techniques to identify ligand-specific conformations along pre-determined activation pathways. Using the prototypic GPCR β2-adrenergic receptor as a suitable test case for validation, we show that ligands with different efficacies (either inverse agonists, neutral antagonists, or agonists modulate the free-energy landscape of the receptor by shifting the conformational equilibrium towards active or inactive conformations depending on their elicited physiological response. Notably, we provide for the first time a quantitative description of the thermodynamics of the receptor in an explicit atomistic environment, which accounts for the receptor basal activity and the stabilization of different active-like states by differently potent agonists. Structural inspection of these metastable states reveals unique conformations of the receptor that may have been difficult to retrieve experimentally.

  20. Biased and constitutive signaling in the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 by manipulating the interface between transmembrane helices 6 and 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Anne; Thiele, Stefanie; Guo, Dong; Hansen, Lærke S; Frimurer, Thomas M; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2013-05-03

    The equilibrium state of CCR5 is manipulated here toward either activation or inactivation by introduction of single amino acid substitutions in the transmembrane domains (TMs) 6 and 7. Insertion of a steric hindrance mutation in the center of TM7 (G286F in position VII:09/7.42) resulted in biased signaling. Thus, β-arrestin recruitment was eliminated, whereas constitutive activity was observed in Gαi-mediated signaling. Furthermore, the CCR5 antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a full agonist (a so-called efficacy switch). Computational modeling revealed that the position of the 7TM receptor-conserved Trp in TM6 (Trp-248 in position VI:13/6.48, part of the CWXP motif) was influenced by the G286F mutation, causing Trp-248 to change orientation away from TM7. The essential role of Trp-248 in CCR5 activation was supported by complete inactivity of W248A-CCR5 despite maintaining chemokine binding. Furthermore, replacing Trp-248 with a smaller aromatic amino acid (Tyr/Phe) impaired the β-arrestin recruitment, yet with maintained G protein activity (biased signaling); also, here aplaviroc switched to a full agonist. Thus, the altered positioning of Trp-248, induced by G286F, led to a constraint of G protein active, but β-arrestin inactive and thus biased, CCR5 conformation. These results provide important information on the molecular interplay and impact of TM6 and TM7 for CCR5 activity, which may be extrapolated to other chemokine receptors and possibly to other 7TM receptors.

  1. Comparative analyses of downstream signal transduction targets modulated after activation of the AT1 receptor by two β-arrestin-biased agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Geisa A; Duarte, Diego A; Parreiras-E-Silva, Lucas T; Teixeira, Felipe R; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Oliveira, Eduardo B; Bouvier, Michel; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in essentially all physiological processes in mammals. The classical GPCR signal transduction mechanism occurs by coupling to G protein, but it has recently been demonstrated that interaction with β-arrestins leads to activation of pathways that are independent of the G protein pathway. Also, it has been reported that some ligands can preferentially activate one of these signaling pathways; being therefore called biased agonists for G protein or β-arrestin pathways. The angiotensin II (AngII) AT1 receptor is a prototype GPCR in the study of biased agonism due to the existence of well-known β-arrestin-biased agonists, such as [Sar(1), Ile(4), Ile(8)]-AngII (SII), and [Sar(1), D-Ala(8)]-AngII (TRV027). The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the two above mentioned β-arrestin-biased agonists on downstream phosphorylation events and gene expression profiles. Our data reveal that activation of AT1 receptor by each ligand led to a diversity of activation profiles that is far broader than that expected from a simple dichotomy between "G protein-dependent" and "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling. We observed clusters of activation profiles common to AngII, SII, and TRV027, as well as downstream effector activation that are unique to AngII, SII, or TRV027. Analyses of β-arrestin conformational changes after AT1 receptor stimulation with SII or TRV027 suggests that the observed differences could account, at least partially, for the diversity of modulated targets observed. Our data reveal that, although the categorization "G protein-dependent" vs. "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling can be of pharmacological relevance, broader analyses of signaling pathways and downstream targets are necessary to generate an accurate activation profile for a given ligand. This may bring relevant information for drug development, as it may allow more refined comparison of drugs with similar mechanism of action and effects, but with

  2. Comparative analyses of downstream signal transduction targets modulated after activation of the AT1 receptor by two β-arrestin biased agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisa A Santos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are involved in essentially all physiological processes in mammals. The classical GPCR signal transduction mechanism occurs by coupling to G protein, but it has recently been demonstrated that interaction with β-arrestins leads to activation of pathways that are independent of the G protein pathway. Also, it has been reported that some ligands can preferentially activate one of these signaling pathways; being therefore called biased agonists for G protein or β-arrestin pathways. The angiotensin II (AngII AT1 receptor is a prototype GPCR in the study of biased agonism due to the existence of well-known β-arrestin biased agonists, such as [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]-AngII (SII, and [Sar1,D-Ala8]-AngII (TRV027. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the two above mentioned β-arrestin biased agonists on downstream phosphorylation events and gene expression profiles. Our data reveal that activation of AT1 receptor by each ligand led to a diversity of activation profiles that is far broader than that expected from a simple dichotomy between G protein-dependent and β-arrestin-dependent signaling. We observed clusters of activation profiles common to AngII, SII and TRV027, as well as downstream effector activation that are unique to AngII, SII, or TRV027. Analyses of β-arrestin conformational changes after AT1 receptor stimulation with SII or TRV027 suggests that the observed differences could account, at least partially, for the diversity of modulated targets observed. Our data reveal that, although the categorization G protein-dependent vs. β-arrestin-dependent signaling can be of pharmacological relevance, broader analyses of signaling pathways and downstream targets are necessary to generate an accurate activation profile for a given ligand. This may bring relevant information for drug development, as it may allow more refined comparison of drugs with similar mechanism of action and effects, but with

  3. Dopamine receptor blockade attenuates the general incentive motivational effects of noncontingently delivered rewards and reward-paired cues without affecting their ability to bias action selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlund, Sean B; Maidment, Nigel T

    2012-01-01

    Environmental cues affect our behavior in a variety of ways. Despite playing an invaluable role in guiding our daily activities, such cues also appear to trigger the harmful, compulsive behaviors that characterize addiction and other disorders of behavioral control. In instrumental conditioning, rewards and reward-paired cues bias action selection and invigorate reward-seeking behaviors, and appear to do so through distinct neurobehavioral processes. Although reward-paired cues are known to invigorate performance through a dopamine-dependent incentive motivational process, it is not known if dopamine also mediates the influence of rewards and reward-paired cues over action selection. The current study contrasted the effects of systemic administration of the nonspecific dopamine receptor antagonist flupentixol on response invigoration and action bias in Pavlovian-instrumental transfer, a test of cue-elicited responding, and in instrumental reinstatement, a test of noncontingent reward-elicited responding. Hungry rats were trained on two different stimulus-outcome relationships (eg, tone-grain pellets and noise-sucrose solution) and two different action-outcome relationships (eg, left press-grain and right press-sucrose). At test, we found that flupentixol pretreatment blocked the response invigoration generated by the cues but spared their ability to bias action selection to favor the action whose outcome was signaled by the cue being presented. The response-biasing influence of noncontingent reward deliveries was also unaffected by flupentixol. Interestingly, although flupentixol had a modest effect on the immediate response invigoration produced by those rewards, it was particularly potent in countering the lingering enhancement of responding produced by multiple reward deliveries. These findings indicate that dopamine mediates the general incentive motivational effects of noncontingent rewards and reward-paired cues but does not support their ability to bias

  4. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug......-targets today. It is well established that family C 7TM receptors form homo- or hetero-dimers on the cell surface of living cells. The large extra-cellular domains (ECD) have been crystallized as a dimer in the presence and absence of agonist. Upon agonist binding, the dimeric ECD undergoes large conformational...... to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors....

  5. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly......The human chemokine system comprises 19 seven-transmembrane helix (7TM) receptors and 45 endogenous chemokines that often interact with each other in a promiscuous manner. Due to the chemokine system's primary function in leukocyte migration, it has a central role in immune homeostasis...... and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity...

  6. Strontium is a biased agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor in rat medullary thyroid carcinoma 6-23 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Alex Rojas Bie; Worm, Jesper; Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard

    2012-01-01

    of CaSR is poorly understood, the objective of the present study was to investigate biased signaling of CaSR by using rat medullary thyroid carcinoma 6-23 cells as a model of thyroid parafollicular C-cells. By doing concentration-response experiments we focused on the ability of two well known Ca...

  7. Cloning of Encoding Sequences for Chemokine Receptors CXCR4 and CCR5 from a Chinese Lymphocyte cDNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    @@ It has been known recently that cofactors, which belong to the family of seven-transmembrane GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors, are necessary for the entry of HIV-1 into CD4+cells. The CXC chemokine receptor 4(CXCR4) was first found to act as the coreceptor for the infection of T cell line-tropic HIV-1 strains to T helper cells in 1996. Keeping in step with this find the CC chemokine receptor 5(CCR5)was also identified as a coreceptor for macrophage-tropic virus. Both of the coreceptors could be used in basic research and application design for AIDS.

  8. Role of protease-activated receptor-2 in inflammation, and its possible implications as a putative mediator of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Holzhausen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 belongs to a novel subfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors with seven-transmembrane domains. This receptor is widely distributed throughout the body and seems to be importantly involved in inflammatory processes. PAR2 can be activated by serine proteases such as trypsin, mast cell tryptase, and bacterial proteases, such as gingipain produced by Porphyromonas gingivalis. This review describes the current stage of knowledge of the possible mechanisms that link PAR2 activation with periodontal disease, and proposes future therapeutic strategies to modulate the host response in the treatment of periodontitis.

  9. Common and biased signaling pathways of the chemokine receptor CCR7 elicited by its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 in leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mark A; Legler, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Chemokines are pivotal regulators of cell migration during continuous immune surveillance, inflammation, homeostasis, and development. Chemokine binding to their 7-transmembrane domain, G-protein-coupled receptors causes conformational changes that elicit intracellular signaling pathways to acquire and maintain an asymmetric architectural organization and a polarized distribution of signaling molecules necessary for directional cell migration. Leukocytes rely on the interplay of chemokine-triggered migration modules to promote amoeboid-like locomotion. One of the most important chemokine receptors for adaptive immune cell migration is the CC-chemokine receptor CCR7. CCR7 and its ligands CCL19 and CCL21 control homing of T cells and dendritic cells to areas of the lymph nodes where T cell priming and the initiation of the adaptive immune response occur. Moreover, CCR7 signaling also contributes to T cell development in the thymus and to lymphorganogenesis. Although the CCR7-CCL19/CCL21 axis evolved to benefit the host, inappropriate regulation or use of these proteins can contribute or cause pathobiology of chronic inflammation, tumorigenesis, and metastasis, as well as autoimmune diseases. Therefore, it appears as the CCR7-CCL19/CCL21 axis is tightly regulated at numerous intersections. Here, we discuss the multiple regulatory mechanism of CCR7 signaling and its influence on CCR7 function. In particular, we focus on the functional diversity of the 2 CCR7 ligands, CCL19 and CCL21, as well as on their impact on biased signaling. The understanding of the molecular determinants of biased signaling and the multiple layers of CCR7 regulation holds the promise for potential future therapeutic intervention.

  10. A Pharmacological Primer of Biased Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    Biased agonism is one of the fastest growing topics in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology; moreover, biased agonists are used in the clinic today: carvedilol (Coreg®) is a biased agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, there is a general lack of understanding of biased agonism when compared to traditional pharmacological terminology. Therefore, this review is designed to provide a basic introduction to classical pharmacology as well as G protein-coupled receptor signal transductio...

  11. Identification of pathway-biased and deleterious melatonin receptor mutants in autism spectrum disorders and in the general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Chaste

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a powerful antioxidant and a synchronizer of many physiological processes. Alteration of the melatonin pathway has been reported in circadian disorders, diabetes and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. However, very little is known about the genetic variability of melatonin receptors in humans. Here, we sequenced the melatonin receptor MTNR1A and MTNR1B, genes coding for MT1 and MT2 receptors, respectively, in a large panel of 941 individuals including 295 patients with ASD, 362 controls and 284 individuals from different ethnic backgrounds. We also sequenced GPR50, coding for the orphan melatonin-related receptor GPR50 in patients and controls. We identified six non-synonymous mutations for MTNR1A and ten for MTNR1B. The majority of these variations altered receptor function. Particularly interesting mutants are MT1-I49N, which is devoid of any melatonin binding and cell surface expression, and MT1-G166E and MT1-I212T, which showed severely impaired cell surface expression. Of note, several mutants possessed pathway-selective signaling properties, some preferentially inhibiting the adenylyl cyclase pathway, others preferentially activating the MAPK pathway. The prevalence of these deleterious mutations in cases and controls indicates that they do not represent major risk factor for ASD (MTNR1A case 3.6% vs controls 4.4%; MTNR1B case 4.7% vs 3% controls. Concerning GPR50, we detected a significant association between ASD and two variations, Delta502-505 and T532A, in affected males, but it did not hold up after Bonferonni correction for multiple testing. Our results represent the first functional ascertainment of melatonin receptors in humans and constitute a basis for future structure-function studies and for interpreting genetic data on the melatonin pathway in patients.

  12. Modulation of constitutive activity and signaling bias of the ghrelin receptor by conformational constraint in the second extracellular loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokrosinski, Jacek; Frimurer, Thomas M; Sivertsen, Bjoern

    2012-01-01

    phenotypes as the negatively charged Glu residue. Computational chemistry analysis indicated that the propensity for the C-terminal segment of ECL2b to form an extended a-helix was increased from 15% in the wild type to 89% and 82% by introduction in position 204(C+6) of a Glu or a Lys residue, respectively....... Moreover, the constitutive activity of the receptor was inhibited by Zn(2+) binding in an engineered metal-ion site stabilizing an a-helical conformation of this loop segment. It is concluded that the high constitutive activity of the ghrelin receptor is dependent upon flexibility in the C-terminal segment...

  13. Molecular piracy of mammalian interleukin-8 receptor type B by herpesvirus saimiri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, S K; Murphy, P M

    1993-10-05

    Viruses are known to acquire and modify the genes of their hosts to attain a survival advantage in the host environment. Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a T-lymphotropic virus that causes fatal lymphoproliferative diseases in several non-human primates. The gene ECRF3 of HVS was most likely acquired from a primate host. ECRF3 encodes a putative seven-transmembrane-domain receptor that is remotely related (approximately 30% amino acid identity) to the known mammalian alpha and beta chemokine receptors, namely interleukin-8 receptor (IL8R) types A and B and the MIP-1 alpha/RANTES receptor, respectively. Chemokines regulate the trafficking, activation, and, in some cases, proliferation of myeloid and lymphoid cell types. We now show that ECRF3 encodes a functional receptor for the alpha chemokines IL-8, GRO/melanoma growth stimulatory activity (MGSA), and NAP-2 but not for beta chemokines, a specificity identical to that of IL8RB. Paradoxically, IL8RA shares 77% amino acid identity with IL8RB but is not a receptor for GRO/MGSA or NAP-2. This is the first functional characterization of a viral seven-transmembrane-domain receptor. It suggests a novel role for alpha chemokines in the pathogenesis of HVS infection by transmembrane signaling via the product of ECRF3.

  14. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  15. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  16. Intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  17. Functional Consequences of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor Cross-talk and Trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Noerklit; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Wismann, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    The signaling capacity of seven-transmembrane/G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) can be regulated through ligand-mediated receptor trafficking. Classically, the recycling of internalized receptors is associated with resensitization, whereas receptor degradation terminates signaling. We have......) and glucagon (GCGR) receptors. The interaction and cross-talk between coexpressed receptors is a wide phenomenon of the 7TM/GPCR superfamily. Numerous reports show functional consequences for signaling and trafficking of the involved receptors. On the basis of the high structural similarity and tissue...... coexpression, we here investigated the potential cross-talk between GLP-1R and GIPR or GCGR in both trafficking and signaling pathways. Using a real-time time-resolved FRET-based internalization assay, we show that GLP-1R, GIPR, and GCGR internalize with differential properties. Remarkably, upon coexpression...

  18. Association between the melatonin receptor 1B gene polymorphism on the risk of type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose regulation: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Melatonin receptor 1B (MTNR1B belongs to the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor superfamily involved in insulin secretion, which has attracted considerable attention as a candidate gene for type 2 diabetes (T2D since it was first identified as a loci associated with fasting plasma glucose level through genome wide association approach. The relationship between MTNR1B and T2D has been reported in various ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to consolidate and summarize published data on the potential of MTNR1B polymorphisms in T2D risk prediction. METHODS: PubMed, EMBASE, ISI web of science and the CNKI databases were systematically searched to identify relevant studies. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also tested. RESULTS: A total of 23 studies involving 172,963 subjects for two common polymorphisms (rs10830963, rs1387153 on MTNR1B were included. An overall random effects per-allele OR of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.08; P<10(-4 and 1.04 (95% CI: 0.98-1.10; P = 0.20 were found for the two variants respectively. Similar results were also observed using dominant or recessive genetic model. There was strong evidence of heterogeneity, which largely disappeared after stratification by ethnicity. Significant results were found in Caucasians when stratified by ethnicity; while no significant associations were observed in East Asians and South Asians. Besides, we found that the rs10830963 polymorphism is a risk factor associated with increased impaired glucose regulation susceptibility. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis demonstrated that the rs10830963 polymorphism is a risk factor for developing impaired glucose regulation and T2D.

  19. Multiple switches in G protein-coupled receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Shivani; Smith, Steven O

    2009-09-01

    The activation mechanism of G protein-coupled receptors has presented a puzzle that finally may be close to solution. These receptors have a relatively simple architecture consisting of seven transmembrane helices that contain just a handful of highly conserved amino acids, yet they respond to light and a range of chemically diverse ligands. Recent NMR structural studies on the active metarhodopsin II intermediate of the visual receptor rhodopsin, along with the recent crystal structure of the apoprotein opsin, have revealed multiple structural elements or 'switches' that must be simultaneously triggered to achieve full activation. The confluence of several required structural changes is an example of "coincidence counting", which is often used by nature to regulate biological processes. In ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors, the presence of multiple switches may provide an explanation for the differences between full, partial and inverse agonists.

  20. Anti-analgesic effect of the mu/delta opioid receptor heteromer revealed by ligand-biased antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Milan-Lobo

    Full Text Available Delta (DOR and mu opioid receptors (MOR can complex as heteromers, conferring functional properties in agonist binding, signaling and trafficking that can differ markedly from their homomeric counterparts. Because of these differences, DOR/MOR heteromers may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of pain. However, there are currently no ligands selective for DOR/MOR heteromers, and, consequently, their role in nociception remains unknown. In this study, we used a pharmacological opioid cocktail that selectively activates and stabilizes the DOR/MOR heteromer at the cell surface by blocking its endocytosis to assess its role in antinociception. We found that mice treated chronically with this drug cocktail showed a significant right shift in the ED50 for opioid-mediated analgesia, while mice treated with a drug that promotes degradation of the heteromer did not. Furthermore, promoting degradation of the DOR/MOR heteromer after the right shift in the ED50 had occurred, or blocking signal transduction from the stabilized DOR/MOR heteromer, shifted the ED50 for analgesia back to the left. Taken together, these data suggest an anti-analgesic role for the DOR/MOR heteromer in pain. In conclusion, antagonists selective for DOR/MOR heteromer could provide an avenue for alleviating reduced analgesic response during chronic pain treatment.

  1. Molecular cloning, genomic organization, developmental regulation, and a knock-out mutant of a novel leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (DLGR-2) from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kathrine Krageskov; Hauser, Frank; Schiøtt, Morten

    2000-01-01

    After screening the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project database with sequences from a recently characterized Leu-rich repeats-containing G protein-coupled receptor (LGR) fromDrosophila (DLGR-1), we identified a second gene for a different LGR (DLGR-2) and cloned its cDNA. DLGR-2 is 1360 amino acid...... LGRs (LGR-4 and LGR-5). This homology includes the seven transmembrane region (e.g., 49% amino acid identity with the human TSH receptor) and the very large extracellular amino terminus. This amino terminus contains 18 Leu-rich repeats-in contrast with the 3 mammalian glycoprotein hormone receptors...

  2. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud

    2003-01-01

    of receptor function and in turn for the design and development of novel therapeutic compound. Here we show how ligand-receptor interaction can be investigated in situ with high sensitivity on sensor surfaces by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) measurements. A generally applicable method...... for the surface immobilization of membrane proteins was developed using the prototypic seven transmembrane neurokinin-1 receptor. The receptor was expressed as a biotinylated protein in mammalian cells. Membranes from cell homogenates were selectively immobilized on glass surfaces covered with streptavidin. TIRF...... measurements showed that a fluorescent agonist binds to the receptor on the sensor surface with similar affinity as to the receptor in live cells. This approach offers the possibility to investigate minute amounts of membrane protein in an active form and in its native environment without purification....

  3. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  4. The agonist-binding domain of the calcium-sensing receptor is located at the amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, H; Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O

    1999-01-01

    has been shown to bind the endogenous agonist. To investigate whether the agonist-binding domain of the CaR also is located in the ATD, we constructed a chimeric receptor named Ca/1a consisting of the ATD of CaR and the seven transmembrane region and C terminus of mGlu1a. The Ca/1a receptor stimulated......The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that displays 19-25% sequence identity to the gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. All three groups of receptors have a large amino-terminal domain (ATD), which for the mGlu receptors...

  5. T cell receptor Vβ gene bias in rheumatoid arthritis%类风湿关节炎T细胞受体Vβ基因的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卓莉; 董怡; 张国柱

    2002-01-01

    目的通过对T细胞受体(TCR)的表达进行研究,探讨类风湿关节炎的发病机制.方法应用半定量的逆转录多聚酶链反应(RT-PCR)分析类风湿关节炎、骨关节炎、截肢病人滑膜和外周血中T细胞受体Vβ基因(TCR Vβ1-TCR Vβ24)的使用情况,经基因扫描分析确定其表达水平.结果类风湿关节炎、骨关节炎及截肢病人的滑膜组织与外周血表达绝大多数的Vβ基因;类风湿关节炎病人滑膜组织中Vβ基因的使用呈现更明显的不均衡状态;Vβ6、 Vβ17与Vβ22为优势亚群.其中以Vβ17增高最为显著.结论类风湿关节炎病人滑膜组织中Vβ基因的表达无限制性,但是存在明显的不均衡性.某些特定Vβ基因的选择性扩增支持类风湿关节炎为抗原或超抗原驱动的免疫过程.%Objectives To explore the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by studying the expression of T cell receptors (TCRs).Methods T cell receptor Vβ (TCR Vβ) gene usage and expression were analyzed from synovial membrane and peripheral blood of 8 RA patients, 2 osteoarthritis patients and 2 accident amputees. The complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of 25 TCR Vβ subfamily genes in unselected T cell populations were amplified semi-quantitatively by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The products were further studied by genescan for frequency of Vβ usage.Results The numbers of Vβ subfamilies expressed by T cells from RA peripheral blood and synovial membrane were not significantly restricted. More importantly, biased Vβ gene expression in RA synovium was observed and Vβ6, Vβ17, and Vβ22 genes were the predominant subfamilies. It was noteworthy that the expression of Vβ17 in RA synovium was significantly increased. Conclusion Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that several antigen or superantigen-driven processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of RA.

  6. Female Bias in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is Associated with the Differential Expression of X-Linked Toll-Like Receptor 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gabrielle; Cabal, Nicholas; Vannier, Augustin; Umiker, Benjamin; Yin, Raymund H; Orjalo, Arturo V; Johansson, Hans E; Han, Jin-Hwan; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of anti-nuclear antibodies. SLE is one of many autoimmune disorders that have a strong gender bias, with 70-90% of SLE patients being female. Several explanations have been postulated to account for the severity of autoimmune diseases in females, including hormonal, microbiota, and gene dosage differences. X-linked toll-like receptors (TLRs) have recently been implicated in disease progression in females. Our previous studies using the 564Igi mouse model of SLE on a Tlr7 and Tlr9 double knockout background showed that the presence of Tlr8 on both X chromosomes was required for the production of IgG autoantibodies, Ifn-I expression and granulopoiesis in females. Here, we show the results of our investigation into the role of Tlr8 expression in SLE pathogenesis in 564Igi females. Female mice have an increase in serum pathogenic anti-RNA IgG2a and IgG2b autoantibodies. 564Igi mice have also been shown to have an increase in neutrophils in vivo, which are major contributors to Ifn-α expression. Here, we show that neutrophils from C57BL/6 mice express Ifn-α in response to 564 immune complexes and TLR8 activation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from 564Igi females have a significant increase in Tlr8 expression compared to male-derived cells, and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization data suggest that Tlr8 may escape X-inactivation in female-derived macrophages. These results propose a model by which females may be more susceptible to SLE pathogenesis due to inefficient inactivation of Tlr8.

  7. NK1 receptor fused to beta-arrestin displays a single-component, high-affinity molecular phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martini, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Holst, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    with low affinity against antagonists. In contrast, in the NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion protein, all ligands bound with similar affinity independent of the choice of radioligand and with Hill coefficients near unity. We conclude that the NK1 receptor in complex with arrestin is in a high-affinity, stable......Arrestins are cytosolic proteins that, upon stimulation of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors, terminate signaling by binding to the receptor, displacing the G protein and targeting the receptor to clathrin-coated pits. Fusion of beta-arrestin1 to the C-terminal end of the neurokinin NK1 receptor...... Gq/G11 and Gs pathways. The NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion construct bound nonpeptide antagonists with increased affinity but surprisingly also bound two types of agonists, substance P and neurokinin A, with high, normal affinity. In the wild-type NK1 receptor, neurokinin A (NKA) competes for binding...

  8. Extraoral bitter taste receptors in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhang, Cheng-Hai; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2017-02-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs or T2Rs) belong to the superfamily of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, which are the targets of >50% of drugs currently on the market. Canonically, T2Rs are located in taste buds of the tongue, where they initiate bitter taste perception. However, accumulating evidence indicates that T2Rs are widely expressed throughout the body and mediate diverse nontasting roles through various specialized mechanisms. It has also become apparent that T2Rs and their polymorphisms are associated with human disorders. In this review, we summarize the physiological and pathophysiological roles that extraoral T2Rs play in processes as diverse as innate immunity and reproduction, and the major challenges in this emerging field. © 2017 Lu et al.

  9. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne; Holst, Birgitte; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Haft, Carol Renfrew; Whistler, Jennifer; Schwartz, Thue W

    2004-12-24

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequestration through interactions, mainly with the C-terminal intracellular tails of the receptors. A library of tails from 59 representative members of the super family of seven-transmembrane receptors was probed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins for interactions with four different adaptor proteins previously proposed to be involved in post-endocytotic sorting of receptors. Of the two proteins suggested to target receptors for recycling to the cell membrane, which is the route believed to be taken by a majority of receptors, ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) bound only a single receptor tail, i.e. the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor, whereas N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor bound 11 of the tail-fusion proteins. Of the two proteins proposed to target receptors for lysosomal degradation, sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) bound 10 and the C-terminal domain of G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein bound 23 of the 59 tail proteins. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding kinetics of selected hits from the glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, i.e. the tails of the virally encoded receptor US28 and the delta-opioid receptor, confirmed the expected nanomolar affinities for interaction with SNX1. Truncations of the NK(1) receptor revealed that an extended binding epitope is responsible for the interaction with both SNX1 and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein as well as with N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. It is concluded that the tail library provides useful information on the general importance of certain adaptor proteins, for example, in this case, ruling out EBP50 as being a broad spectrum

  10. Conversion of agonist site to metal-ion chelator site in the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, C E; Thirstrup, K; Holst, Birgitte

    1999-01-01

    in the mutant receptors not by normal catecholamine ligands but instead either by free zinc ions or by zinc or copper ions in complex with small hydrophobic metal-ion chelators. Chelation of the metal ions by small hydrophobic chelators such as phenanthroline or bipyridine protected the cells from the toxic......Previously metal-ion sites have been used as structural and functional probes in seven transmembrane receptors (7TM), but as yet all the engineered sites have been inactivating. Based on presumed agonist interaction points in transmembrane III (TM-III) and -VII of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor......, in this paper we construct an activating metal-ion site between the amine-binding Asp-113 in TM-III-or a His residue introduced at this position-and a Cys residue substituted for Asn-312 in TM-VII. No increase in constitutive activity was observed in the mutant receptors. Signal transduction was activated...

  11. Construction of a high affinity zinc binding site in the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O; Jensen, L B

    2001-01-01

    and the loops connecting these. The findings offer valuable insight into the mechanism of ATD closure and family C receptor activation. Furthermore, the findings demonstrate that ATD regions other than those participating in agonist binding could be potential targets for new generations of ligands......The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The receptors are characterized by having unusually long amino-terminal domains (ATDs), to which agonist binding has been shown to take place. Previously, we have constructed...... of a "closed" conformation, and thus stabilizing a more or less inactive "open" form of the ATD. This study presents the first metal ion site constructed in a family C GPCR. Furthermore, it is the first time a metal ion site has been created in a region outside of the seven transmembrane regions of a GPCR...

  12. Regulation of mTOR by Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Biol. 14:1540–49 52. Blenis J, Kuo CJ, Erikson RL. 1987. Identification of a ribosomal protein S6 kinase regulated by trans- formation and growth...153 Molecular Mechanism of β-Arrestin-Biased Agonism at Seven-Transmembrane Receptors Eric Reiter, Seungkirl Ahn, Arun K. Shukla, and Robert J

  13. Molecular mechanisms of somatostatin receptor trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, Zsolt; Peineau, Stéphane; Dournaud, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    The neuropeptide somatostatin (SRIF) is an important modulator of neurotransmission in the central nervous system and acts as a potent inhibitor of hormone and exocrine secretion. In addition, SRIF regulates cell proliferation in normal and tumorous tissues. The six somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst1, sst2A, sst2B, sst3, sst4, and sst5), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, share a common molecular topology: a hydrophobic core of seven transmembrane-spanning α-helices, three intracellular loops, three extracellular loops, an amino-terminus outside the cell, and a carboxyl-terminus inside the cell. For most of the GPCRs, intracytosolic sequences, and more particularly the C-terminus, are believed to interact with proteins that are mandatory for either exporting neosynthesized receptor, anchoring receptor at the plasma membrane, internalization, recycling, or degradation after ligand binding. Accordingly, most of the SRIF receptors can traffic not only in vitro within different cell types but also in vivo. A picture of the pathways and proteins involved in these processes is beginning to emerge.

  14. Regulatory Features for Odorant Receptor Genes in the Mouse Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; D'Errico, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The odorant receptor genes, seven transmembrane receptor genes constituting the vastest mammalian gene multifamily, are expressed monogenically and monoallelicaly in each sensory neuron in the olfactory epithelium. This characteristic, often referred to as the one neuron-one receptor rule, is driven by mostly uncharacterized molecular dynamics, generally named odorant receptor gene choice. Much attention has been paid by the scientific community to the identification of sequences regulating the expression of odorant receptor genes within their loci, where related genes are usually arranged in genomic clusters. A number of studies identified transcription factor binding sites on odorant receptor promoter sequences. Similar binding sites were also found on a number of enhancers that regulate in cis their transcription, but have been proposed to form interchromosomal networks. Odorant receptor gene choice seems to occur via the local removal of strongly repressive epigenetic markings, put in place during the maturation of the sensory neuron on each odorant receptor locus. Here we review the fast-changing state of art for the study of regulatory features for odorant receptor genes.

  15. Pharmacogenomics of Prostaglandin and Leukotriene Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-García, José A.; Perkins, James R.; Jurado-Escobar, Raquel; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A.; Viguera, Enrique; Pérez-Sánchez, Natalia; Blanca-López, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Individual genetic background together with environmental effects are thought to be behind many human complex diseases. A number of genetic variants, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), have been shown to be associated with various pathological and inflammatory conditions, representing potential therapeutic targets. Prostaglandins (PTGs) and leukotrienes (LTs) are eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and related polyunsaturated fatty acids that participate in both normal homeostasis and inflammatory conditions. These bioactive lipid mediators are synthesized through two major multistep enzymatic pathways: PTGs by cyclooxygenase and LTs by 5-lipoxygenase. The main physiological effects of PTGs include vasodilation and vascular leakage (PTGE2); mast cell maturation, eosinophil recruitment, and allergic responses (PTGD2); vascular and respiratory smooth muscle contraction (PTGF2), and inhibition of platelet aggregation (PTGI2). LTB4 is mainly involved in neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and epithelial barrier function, whereas cysteinyl LTs (CysLTs) (LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4) induce bronchoconstriction and neutrophil extravasation, and also participate in vascular leakage. PTGs and LTs exert their biological functions by binding to cognate receptors, which belong to the seven transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. SNPs in genes encoding these receptors may influence their functionality and have a role in disease susceptibility and drug treatment response. In this review we summarize SNPs in PTGs and LTs receptors and their relevance in human diseases. We also provide information on gene expression. Finally, we speculate on future directions for this topic. PMID:27708579

  16. PHARMACOGENOMICS OF PROSTAGLANDIN AND LEUKOTRIENE RECEPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Cornejo-García

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Individual genetic background together with environmental effects are thought to be behind many human complex diseases. A number of genetic variants, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, have been shown to be associated with various pathological and inflammatory conditions, representing potential therapeutic targets. Prostaglandins (PTGs and leukotrienes (LTs are eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid and related polyunsaturated fatty acids that participate in both normal homeostasis and inflammatory conditions. These bioactive lipid mediators are synthesised through two major multistep enzymatic pathways: PTGs by cyclooxygenase and LTs by 5-lipoxygenase. The main physiological effects of PTGs include vasodilation and vascular leakage (PTGE2; mast cell maturation, eosinophil recruitment and allergic responses (PTGD2; vascular and respiratory smooth muscle contraction (PTGF2, and inhibition of platelet aggregation (PTGI2. LTB4 is mainly involved in neutrophil recruitment, vascular leakage, and epithelial barrier function, whereas cysteinyl LTs (CysLTs (LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4 induce bronchoconstriction and neutrophil extravasation, and also participate in vascular leakage. PTGs and LTs exert their biological functions by binding to cognate receptors, which belong to the seven transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. SNPs in genes encoding these receptors may influence their functionality and have a role in disease susceptibility and drug treatment response. In this review we summarize SNPs in PTGs and LTs receptors and their relevance in human diseases. We also provide information on gene expression. Finally, we speculate on future directions for this topic.

  17. Genomic organization and sequence analysis of the vomeronasal receptor V2R genes in mouse genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hui; Zhang YaPing

    2007-01-01

    Two multigene superfamilies, named V1R and V2R, encoding seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified as pheromone receptors in mammals. Three V2R gene families have been described in mouse and rat. Here we screened the updated mouse genome sequence database and finally retrieved 63 putative functional V2R genes including three newly identified genes which formed a new additional family. We described the genomic organization of these genes and also characterized the conservation of mouse V2R protein sequences. These genomic and sequence information we described are useful as part of the evidence to speculate the functional domain of V2Rs and should give aid to the functionality study in the future.

  18. G-protein-coupled receptors and their (Bio) chemical significance win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio) chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  19. G-protein-Coupled Receptors and Their (Bio Chemical Significance Win 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Hsien Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane cell surface proteins specialized in cellular communication. These receptors represent a major gateway through which cells convert external cues into intracellular signals and respond with appropriate actions. While the effects of hormones, neurotransmitters, and drugs on cells, tissues, organs, and even whole organisms are well described, the molecular identity of the direct targets and the diverse signaling mechanisms of these biological ligands have been slow and hard to define. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2012 acknowledges the importance of GPCRs in these processes, especially for the contribution of Profs Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka to the studies of GPCRs. In this brief review, the seminal works accomplished by the two GPCR pioneers are summarized and the (bio chemical significance of GPCRs in health and disease is discussed.

  20. Predicting Kinase Activity in Angiotensin Receptor Phosphoproteomes Based on Sequence-Motifs and Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgebo, Rikke; Horn, Heiko; Olsen, Jesper V;

    2014-01-01

    -arrestin dependent signalling. Two complimentary global phosphoproteomics studies have analyzed the complex signalling induced by the AT1aR. Here we integrate the data sets from these studies and perform a joint analysis using a novel method for prediction of differential kinase activity from phosphoproteomics data......Recent progress in the understanding of seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR) signalling has promoted the development of a new generation of pathway selective ligands. The angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1aR) is one of the most studied 7TMRs with respect to selective activation of the β...... likely activated kinases. This suggested that AT1aR-dependent signalling activates 48 of the 285 kinases detected in HEK293 cells. Of these, Aurora B, CLK3 and PKG1 have not previously been described in the pathway whereas others, such as PKA, PKB and PKC, are well known. In summary, we have developed...

  1. Functional, molecular and pharmacological advances in 5-HT7 receptor research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Peter B; Sutcliffe, J Gregor

    2004-09-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor was among a group of 5-HT receptors that were discovered using targeted cloning strategies 12 years ago. This receptor is a seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein-coupled receptor that is positively linked to adenylyl cyclase. The distributions of 5-HT7 receptor mRNA, immunolabeling and radioligand binding exhibit strong similarities, with the highest receptor densities present in the thalamus and hypothalamus and significant densities present in the hippocampus and cortex. The recent availability of selective antagonists and knockout mice strains has dramatically increased our knowledge about this receptor. Together with unselective agonists, these new tools have helped to reveal the 5-HT7 receptor distribution in more detail. Important functional roles for the 5-HT7 receptor in thermoregulation, circadian rhythm, learning and memory, hippocampal signaling and sleep have also been established. Hypotheses driving current research indicate that this receptor might be involved in mood regulation, suggesting that the 5-HT7 receptor is a putative target in the treatment of depression.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0546 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0546 dbj|BAC05731.1| seven transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAC05837.1| seven... transmembrane helix receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAG73953.1| seven transmembrane helix protein [synthetic construct] BAC05731.1 3e-68 72% ...

  3. Topological and functional characterization of an insect gustatory receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Insect gustatory receptors are predicted to have a seven-transmembrane structure and are distantly related to insect olfactory receptors, which have an inverted topology compared with G-protein coupled receptors, including mammalian olfactory receptors. In contrast, the topology of insect gustatory receptors remains unknown. Except for a few examples from Drosophila, the specificity of individual insect gustatory receptors is also unknown. In this study, the total number of identified gustatory receptors in Bombyx mori was expanded from 65 to 69. BmGr8, a silkmoth gustatory receptor from the sugar receptor subfamily, was expressed in insect cells. Membrane topology studies on BmGr8 indicate that, like insect olfactory receptors, it has an inverted topology relative to G protein-coupled receptors. An orphan GR from the bitter receptor family, BmGr53, yielded similar results. We infer, from the finding that two distantly related BmGrs have an intracellular N-terminus and an odd number of transmembrane spans, that this is likely to be a general topology for all insect gustatory receptors. We also show that BmGr8 functions independently in Sf9 cells and responds in a concentration-dependent manner to the polyalcohols myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to a range of mono- and di-saccharides. BmGr8 is the first chemoreceptor shown to respond specifically to inositol, an important or essential nutrient for some Lepidoptera. The selectivity of BmGr8 responses is consistent with the known responses of one of the gustatory receptor neurons in the lateral styloconic sensilla of B. mori, which responds to myo-inositol and epi-inositol but not to allo-inositol.

  4. Multiple Sex Pheromones and Receptors of a Mushroom-producing Fungus Elicit Mating in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Thomas J.; DeSimone, Susan M.; Mitton, Michael F.; Kurjan, Janet; Raper, Carlene A.

    1999-01-01

    The mushroom-producing fungus Schizophyllum commune has thousands of mating types defined, in part, by numerous lipopeptide pheromones and their G protein-linked receptors. Compatible combinations of pheromones and receptors encoded by different mating types regulate a pathway of sexual development leading to mushroom formation and meiosis. A complex set of pheromone–receptor interactions maximizes the likelihood of outbreeding; for example, a single pheromone can activate more than one receptor and a single receptor can be activated by more than one pheromone. The current study demonstrates that the sex pheromones and receptors of Schizophyllum, when expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can substitute for endogenous pheromone and receptor and induce the yeast pheromone response pathway through the yeast G protein. Secretion of active Schizophyllum pheromone requires some, but not all, of the biosynthetic machinery used by the yeast lipopeptide pheromone a-factor. The specificity of interaction among pheromone–receptor pairs in Schizophyllum was reproduced in yeast, thus providing a powerful system for exploring molecular aspects of pheromone–receptor interactions for a class of seven-transmembrane-domain receptors common to a wide range of organisms. PMID:10436012

  5. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A.; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.—Terrazas, C. A., Alcántara-Hernández, M., Bonifaz, L., Terrazas, L. I., Satoskar, A. R. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway. PMID:23907435

  6. Adenosine A2A receptor regulation of microglia morphological remodeling-gender bias in physiology and in a model of chronic anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, L; Pinheiro, H; Patrício, P; Mateus-Pinheiro, A; Alves, N D; Coimbra, B; Baptista, F I; Henriques, S N; Cunha, C; Santos, A R; Ferreira, S G; Sardinha, V M; Oliveira, J F; Ambrósio, A F; Sousa, N; Cunha, R A; Rodrigues, A J; Pinto, L; Gomes, C A

    2016-10-11

    Developmental risk factors, such as the exposure to stress or high levels of glucocorticoids (GCs), may contribute to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. The immunomodulatory role of GCs and the immunological fingerprint found in animals prenatally exposed to GCs point towards an interplay between the immune and the nervous systems in the etiology of these disorders. Microglia are immune cells of the brain, responsive to GCs and morphologically altered in stress-related disorders. These cells are regulated by adenosine A2A receptors, which are also involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety. We now compare animal behavior and microglia morphology in males and females prenatally exposed to the GC dexamethasone. We report that prenatal exposure to dexamethasone is associated with a gender-specific remodeling of microglial cell processes in the prefrontal cortex: males show a hyper-ramification and increased length whereas females exhibit a decrease in the number and in the length of microglia processes. Microglial cells re-organization responded in a gender-specific manner to the chronic treatment with a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, which was able to ameliorate microglial processes alterations and anxiety behavior in males, but not in females.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.173.

  7. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  8. The E92K melanocortin 1 receptor mutant induces cAMP production and arrestin recruitment but not ERK activity indicating biased constitutive signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2011-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) constitutes a key regulator of melanism. Consequently, many naturally-occurring MC1R mutations are associated with a change in color. An example is the Glu-to-Lys substitution found at position II:20/2.60 in the top of transmembrane helix II which has been...... identified in melanic mice and several other species. This mutation induces a pronounced increase in MC1R constitutive activity suggesting a link between constitutive activity and melanism which is corroborated by the attenuation of a-melanocyte stimulating hormone (aMSH) induced activation. However......, the mechanism by which the mutation induces constitutive activity is currently not known....

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Thyrotropin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Ando

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The thyrotropin receptor (TSHR is a seven transmembrane G-protein linked glycoprotein expressed on the thyroid cell surface and which, under the regulation of TSH, controls the production and secretion of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland. This membrane protein is also a major target antigen in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. In Graves' disease, autoantibodies to the TSHR (TSHR-Abs stimulate the TSHR to produce thyroid hormone excessively. In autoimmune thyroid failure, some patients exhibit TSHR-Abs which block TSH action on the receptor. There have been many attempts to generate human stimulating TSHR-mAbs, but to date, only one pathologically relevant human stimulating TSHR-mAb has been isolated. Most mAbs to the TSHR have been derived from rodents immunized with TSHR antigen from bacteria or insect cells. These antigens lacked the native conformation of the TSHR and the resulting mAbs were exclusively blocking or neutral TSHR-mAbs. However, mAbs raised against intact native TSHR antigen have included stimulating mAbs. One such stimulating mAb has demonstrated a number of differences in its regulation of TSHR post-translational processing. These differences are likely to be reflective of TSHR-Abs seen in Graves' disease.

  10. Molecular cloning and expression of rat prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sando, T; Usui, T; Tanaka, I; Mori, K; Sasaki, Y; Fukuda, Y; Namba, T; Sugimoto, Y; Ichikawa, A; Narumiya, S

    1994-05-16

    A cDNA clone encoding the rat prostaglandin (PG) E receptor EP2 subtype was cloned from a rat lung cDNA library. It encodes 488 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. Specific binding of [3H]PGE2 was found in COS-7 cells transfected with the cDNA and was displaced with unlabeled prostaglandins in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the significant expression being observed in the thymus, lung, spleen, heart stomach, and pancreas.

  11. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors

  12. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  13. Differential extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation by the angiotensin type 1 receptor supports distinct phenotypes of cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael;

    2007-01-01

    The angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is a seven-transmembrane receptor well established to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) by discrete G protein-dependent and beta-arrestin2-dependent pathways. The biological importance of this, however, remains...... that phosphorylates p90 Ribosomal S6 Kinase, a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK1/2 signal transduction. Moreover, the beta-arrestin2-dependent ERK1/2 signal supports intact proliferation of cardiac myocytes. In contrast to G(q)-activated ERK1/2, and in keeping with its failure to translocate to the nucleus......, the beta-arrestin2-scaffolded pool of ERK1/2 does not phosphorylate the transcription factor Elk-1, induces no increased transcription of the immediate-early gene c-Fos, and does not entail myocyte hypertrophy. These results clearly demonstrate the biological significance of differential signalling...

  14. A strategy using NMR peptide structures of thromboxane A2 receptor as templates to construct ligand-recognition pocket of prostacyclin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Ke-He

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Prostacyclin receptor (IP and thromboxane A2 receptor (TP belong to rhodopsin-type G protein-coupling receptors and respectively bind to prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 derived from arachidonic acid. Recently, we have determined the extracellular loop (eLP structures of the human TP receptor by 2-D 1H NMR spectroscopy using constrained peptides mimicking the individual eLP segments. The studies have identified the segment along with several residues in the eLP domains important to ligand recognition, as well as proposed a ligand recognition pocket for the TP receptor. Results: The IP receptor shares a similar primary structure in the eLPs with those of the TP receptor. Forty percent residues in the second eLPs of the receptors are identical, which is the major region involved in forming the ligand recognition pocket in the TP receptor. Based on the high homology score, the eLP domains of the IP receptor were constructed by the homology modeling approach using the NMR structures of the TP eLPs as templates, and then configured to the seven transmembrane (TM domains model constructed using the crystal structure of the bovine rhodopsin as a template. A NMR structure of iloprost was docked into the modeled IP ligand recognition pocket. After dynamic studies, the segments and residues involved in the IP ligand recognition were proposed. A key residue, Arg173 involved in the ligand recognition for the IP receptor, as predicted from the modeling, was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Conclusion: A 3-D model of the human IP receptor was constructed by homology modeling using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin TM domains and the NMR structures of the synthetic constrained peptides of the eLP domains of the TP receptor as templates. This strategy can be applied to molecular modeling and the prediction of ligand recognition pockets for other prostanoid receptors.

  15. Two seven-transmembrane domain MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O proteins cofunction in Arabidopsis root thigmomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongying; Noir, Sandra; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Hartmann, H Andreas; Wu, Ming-Jing; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Sukumar, Poornima; Muday, Gloria; Panstruga, Ralph; Jones, Alan M

    2009-07-01

    Directional root expansion is governed by nutrient gradients, positive gravitropism and hydrotropism, negative phototropism and thigmotropism, as well as endogenous oscillations in the growth trajectory (circumnutation). Null mutations in phylogenetically related Arabidopsis thaliana genes MILDEW RESISTANCE LOCUS O 4 (MLO4) and MLO11, encoding heptahelical, plasma membrane-localized proteins predominantly expressed in the root tip, result in aberrant root thigmomorphogenesis. mlo4 and mlo11 mutant plants show anisotropic, chiral root expansion manifesting as tightly curled root patterns upon contact with solid surfaces. The defect in mlo4 and mlo11 mutants is nonadditive and dependent on light and nutrients. Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that the mutant phenotype is independently modulated by the Gbeta subunit of the heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Analysis of expressed chimeric MLO4/MLO2 proteins revealed that the C-terminal domain of MLO4 is necessary but not sufficient for MLO4 action in root thigmomorphogenesis. The expression of the auxin efflux carrier fusion, PIN1-green fluorescent protein, the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression, and acropetal as well as basipetal auxin transport are altered at the root tip of mlo4 mutant seedlings. Moreover, addition of auxin transport inhibitors or the loss of EIR1/AGR1/PIN2 function abolishes root curling of mlo4, mlo11, and wild-type seedlings. These results demonstrate that the exaggerated root curling phenotypes of the mlo4 and mlo11 mutants depend on auxin gradients and suggest that MLO4 and MLO11 cofunction as modulators of touch-induced root tropism.

  16. Insect olfactory receptors: contributions of molecular biology to chemical ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Merlin, Christine

    2004-12-01

    Our understanding of the molecular basis of chemical signal recognition in insects has been greatly expanded by the recent discovery of olfactory receptors (Ors). Since the discovery of the complete repertoire of Drosophila melanogaster Ors, candidate Ors have been identified from at least 12 insect species from four orders (Coleoptera, Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Hymenoptera), including species of economic or medical importance. Although all Ors share the same G-protein coupled receptor structure with seven transmembrane domains, they present poor sequence homologies within and between species, and have been identified mainly through genomic data analyses. To date, D. melanogaster remains the only insect species where Ors have been extensively studied, from expression pattern establishment to functional investigations. These studies have confirmed several observations made in vertebrates: one Or type is selectively expressed in a subtype of olfactory receptor neurons, and one olfactory neuron expresses only one type of Or. In addition, all olfactory neurons expressing one Or type converge to the same glomerulus in the antennal lobe. The olfactory mechanism, thus, appears to be conserved between insects and vertebrates. Although Or functional studies are in their initial stages in insects (mainly Drosophila), insects appear to be good models to establish fundamental concepts of olfaction with the development of powerful genetic, imaging, and behavioral tools. This new field of study will greatly contribute to the understanding of insect chemical communication mechanisms, particularly with agricultural pests and disease vectors, and could result in future strategies to reduce their negative effects.

  17. Conformational states of the full-length glucagon receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Yang, Dehua; de Graaf, Chris; Moeller, Arne; West, Graham M.; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Wang, Chong; Siu, Fai Y.; Song, Gaojie; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen; Pascal, Bruce D.; Wu, Beili; Potter, Clinton S.; Zhou, Hu; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carragher, Bridget; Yang, Huaiyu; Wang, Ming-Wei; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-07-01

    Class B G protein-coupled receptors are composed of an extracellular domain (ECD) and a seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain, and their signalling is regulated by peptide hormones. Using a hybrid structural biology approach together with the ECD and 7TM domain crystal structures of the glucagon receptor (GCGR), we examine the relationship between full-length receptor conformation and peptide ligand binding. Molecular dynamics (MD) and disulfide crosslinking studies suggest that apo-GCGR can adopt both an open and closed conformation associated with extensive contacts between the ECD and 7TM domain. The electron microscopy (EM) map of the full-length GCGR shows how a monoclonal antibody stabilizes the ECD and 7TM domain in an elongated conformation. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) studies and MD simulations indicate that an open conformation is also stabilized by peptide ligand binding. The combined studies reveal the open/closed states of GCGR and suggest that glucagon binds to GCGR by a conformational selection mechanism.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterisation of a novel GABAB-related G-protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Michalovich, D; Testa, T T; Robbins, M J; Jaillard, C; Hill, J; Szekeres, P G; Charles, K J; Jourdain, S; Holbrook, J D; Boyfield, I; Patel, N; Medhurst, A D; Pangalos, M N

    2003-02-20

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have analysed human genomic sequence and identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) was a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. The C-terminal sequence of GABA(BL) contained a putative coiled-coil domain, di-leucine and several RXR(R) ER retention motifs, all of which have been shown to be critical in GABA(B) receptor subunit function. In addition, the distribution of GABA(BL) in the central nervous system was reminiscent of that of the other known GABA(B) subunits. However, we were unable to detect receptor function in response to any GABA(B) ligands when GABA(BL) was expressed in isolation or in the presence of either GABA(B1) or GABA(B2). Therefore, if GABA(BL) is indeed a GABA(B) receptor subunit, its partner is a potentially novel receptor subunit or chaperone protein which has yet to be identified.

  19. Cloning and expression of a cDNA for mouse prostaglandin E receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, A; Sugimoto, Y; Namba, T; Watabe, A; Irie, A; Negishi, M; Narumiya, S; Ichikawa, A

    1993-04-15

    A functional cDNA clone encoding mouse EP2 subtype of prostaglandin (PG) E receptor was isolated from a mouse cDNA library by cross-hybridization with the mouse EP3 subtype PGE receptor cDNA. The mouse EP2 receptor consists of 513 amino acid residues with putative seven-transmembrane domains. In contrast to EP3 receptor, this receptor possesses long third intracellular loop and carboxyl-terminal tail. [3H] PGE2 specifically bound to the membrane of mammalian COS cells transfected with the cDNA. The binding to the membrane was displaced with unlabeled PG in the order of PGE2 = PGE1 > iloprost > or = PGF2 alpha > or = PGD2. The binding was also inhibited by misoprostol, an EP2 and EP3 agonist, but not by sulprostone, an EP1 and EP3 agonist, and SC-19220, an EP1 antagonist. PGE2 markedly increased cAMP level in COS cells transfected with the cDNA. These results suggest that this receptor is EP2 subtype. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the EP2 mRNA is widely expressed in various tissues, the abundant expression being observed in ileum, thymus, and mastocytoma P-815 cells.

  20. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Formyl Peptide Receptor Polymorphisms: 27 Most Possible Ways for Phagocyte Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skvortsov, S S; Gabdoulkhakova, A G

    2017-04-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) expressed by mammalian myeloid cells are the important part of innate immunity. They belong to the seven-transmembrane domain class of receptors coupled to heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins. Binding of the receptor with a wide spectrum of exogenous and endogenous ligands triggers such defensive phagocyte reactions as chemotaxis, secretory degranulation, and respiratory burst, keeping a balance of inflammatory and antiinflammatory processes in the organism. The association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene of FPR1 receptor resulting in disruption of the receptor structure and the development of certain pathologies accompanied with inflammation, such as aggressive periodontitis, macular degeneration, and even gastric cancer (Maney, P., and Walters, J. D. (2009) J. Periodontol., 80, 1498-1505; Liang, X. Y., et al. (2014) Eye, 28, 1502-1510; Otani, T., et al. (2011) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 405, 356-361) has been shown. In this review, we matched the missense mutation of formyl-peptide receptors with their known functional domains and classified them according to their potential significance in pathology.

  2. METHODS FOR RECOMBINANT EXPRESSION AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMAN CANNABINOID RECEPTOR CB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A. Yeliseev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptor CB2 is a seven transmembrane-domain integral membrane protein that belongs to a large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. CB2 is a part of the endocannabinoid system that plays vital role in regulation of immune response, inflammation, pain sensitivity, obesity and other physiological responses. Information about the structure and mechanisms of functioning of this receptor in cell membranes is essential for the rational development of specific pharmaceuticals. Here we review the methodology for recombinant expression, purification, stabilization and biochemical characterization of CB2 suitable for preparation of multi-milligram quantities of functionally active receptor. The biotechnological protocols include expression of the recombinant CB2 in E. coli cells as a fusion with the maltose binding protein, stabilization with a high affinity ligand and a derivative of cholesterol in detergent micelles, efficient purification by tandem affinity chromatography, and reconstitution of the receptor into lipid bilayers. The purified recombinant CB2 receptor is amenable to functional and structural studies including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a wide range of biochemical and biophysical techniques.

  3. Isolation and characterisation of the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) gene in a teleost fish, Fugu rubripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, João C; Power, Deborah M; Elgar, Greg; Clark, Melody S

    2003-06-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor receptor (CRF) is a member of the secretin family of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. These are characterised by the presence of seven transmembrane domains and six conserved cysteines that are important for receptor conformation and ligand binding. IN vertebrates two CRF receptors (CRF1 and CRF2) have been isolated and characterised. In this study the complete structure of the CRF1 receptor was isolated and partially characterised for the first time in a vertebrate using the compact genome of the Japanese pufferfish, Fugu rubripes as a model. The Fugu CRF1 receptor gene is composed of 14 exons is approximately 27 kb in length. A tissue distribution of this receptor in Fugu reveals that it is expressed mainly in liver, gonads, heart and brain, however, expression in the kidney, gut and gills was also detected. In vertebrates this receptor appears to have a different tissue distribution and its presence in the gills may indicate a new role in osmoregulatory processes.

  4. Search for a platelet-activating factor receptor in the Trypanosoma cruzi proteome: a potential target for Chagas disease chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fábio Kawano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD causes the highest burden of parasitic diseases in the Western Hemisphere and is therefore a priority for drug research and development. Platelet-activating factor (PAF causes the CD parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to differentiate, which suggests that the parasite may express PAF receptors. Here, we explored the T. cruzi proteome for PAF receptor-like proteins. From a total of 23,000 protein sequences, we identified 29 hypothetical proteins that are predicted to have seven transmembrane domains (TMDs, which is the main characteristic of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, including the PAF receptor. The TMDs of these sequences were independently aligned with domains from 25 animal PAF receptors and the sequences were analysed for conserved residues. The conservation score mean values for the TMDs of the hypothetical proteins ranged from 31.7-44.1%, which suggests that if the putative T. cruzi PAF receptor is among the sequences identified, the TMDs are not highly conserved. These results suggest that T. cruzi contains several GPCR-like proteins and that one of these GPCRs may be a PAF receptor. Future studies may further validate the PAF receptor as a target for CD chemotherapy.

  5. Interaction of G protein coupled receptors and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpl, Gerald

    2016-09-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest receptor superfamily in eukaryotic cells. Owing to their seven transmembrane helices, large parts of these proteins are embedded in the cholesterol-rich plasma membrane bilayer. Thus, GPCRs are always in proximity to cholesterol. Some of them are functionally dependent on the specific presence of cholesterol. Over the last years, enormous progress on receptor structures has been achieved. While lipophilic ligands other than cholesterol have been shown to bind either inside the helix bundle or at the receptor-lipid interface, the binding site of cholesterol was either a single transmembrane helix or a groove between two or more transmembrane helices. A clear preference for one of the two membrane leaflets has not been observed. Not surprisingly, many hydrophobic residues (primarily leucine and isoleucine) were found to be involved in cholesterol binding. In most cases, the rough β-face of cholesterol contacted the transmembrane helix bundle rather than the surrounding lipid matrix. The polar hydroxy group of cholesterol was localized near the water-membrane interface with potential hydrogen bonding to residues in receptor loop regions. Although a canonical motif, designated as CCM site, was detected as a specific cholesterol binding site in case of the β2AR, this site was not found to be occupied by cholesterol in other GPCRs possessing the same motif. Cholesterol-receptor interactions can increase the compactness of the receptor structure and are able to enhance the conformational stability towards active or inactive receptor states. Overall, all current data suggest a high plasticity of cholesterol interaction sites in GPCRs.

  6. CPI Bias in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Chung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the CPI bias in Korea by employing the approach of Engel’s Law as suggested by Hamilton (2001. This paper is the first attempt to estimate the bias using Korean panel data, Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS. Following Hamilton’s model with non­linear specification correction, our estimation result shows that the cumulative CPI bias over the sample period (2000-2005 was 0.7 percent annually. This CPI bias implies that about 21 percent of the inflation rate during the period can be attributed to the bias. In light of purchasing power parity, we provide an interpretation of the estimated bias.

  7. Bias in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  8. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  9. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  10. Dual modulation of inward rectifier potassium currents in olfactory neuronal cells by promiscuous G protein coupling of the oxytocin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravati, Marta; Busnelli, Marta; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Reversi, Alessandra; Spaiardi, Paolo; Parenti, Marco; Toselli, Mauro; Chini, Bice

    2010-09-01

    Oxytocin receptor is a seven transmembrane receptor widely expressed in the CNS that triggers G(i) or G(q) protein-mediated signaling cascades leading to the regulation of a variety of neuroendocrine and cognitive functions. We decided to investigate whether and how the promiscuous receptor/G protein coupling affects neuronal excitability. As an experimental model, we used the immortalized gonadotropin-releasing hormone-positive GN11 cell line displaying the features of immature, migrating olfactory neurons. Using RT-PCR analysis, we detected the presence of oxytocin receptors whose stimulation by oxytocin led to the accumulation of inositol phosphates and to the inhibition of cell proliferation, and the expression of several inward rectifier (IR) K+ channel subtypes. Moreover, electrophysiological and pharmacological inspections using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings evidenced that in GN11 cells, IR channel subtypes are responsive to oxytocin. In particular, we found that: (i) peptide activation of receptor either inhibited or stimulated IR conductances, and (ii) IR current inhibition was mediated by a pertussis toxin-resistant G protein presumably of the G(q/11) subtype, and by phospholipase C, whereas IR current activation was achieved via receptor coupling to a pertussis toxin-sensitive G(i/o) protein. The findings suggest that neuronal excitability might be tuned by a single peptide receptor that mediates opposing effects on distinct K+ channels through the promiscuous coupling to different G proteins.

  11. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-06-26

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT(1A)R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT(1A)R, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs.

  12. Structure and mechanism for recognition of peptidehormones by Class B G-protein-coupled receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kuntal PAL; Karsten MELCHER; H Eric XU

    2012-01-01

    Class B G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are receptors for peptide hormones that include glucagon,parathyroid hormone,and calcitonin.These receptors are involved in a wide spectrum of physiological activities,from metabolic regulation and stress control to development and maintenance of the skeletal system.As such,they are important drug targets for the treatment of diabetes,osteo-porosis,and stress related disorders.Class B GPCRs are organized into two modular domains:an extracellular domain (ECD) and ahelical bundle that contains seven transmembrane helices (TM domain).The ECD is responsible for the high affinity and specificity of hormone binding,and the TM domain is required for receptor activation and signal coupling to downstream G-proteins.Although the structure of the full-length receptor remains unknown,the ECD structures have been well characterized for a number of Class BGPCRs,revealing a common fold for ligand recognition.This review summarizes the general structural principles that guide hormone binding by Class B ECDs and their implications in the design of peptide hormone analogs for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Stallion spermatozoa: putative target of estrogens; presence of the estrogen receptors ESR1, ESR2 and identification of the estrogen-membrane receptor GPER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkoun, Brahim; Gautier, Camille; Delalande, Christelle; Barrier-Battut, Isabelle; Guénon, Isabelle; Goux, Didier; Bouraïma-Lelong, Hélène

    2014-05-01

    Among mammals, the stallion produces the largest amount of testicular estrogens. These steroid hormones are produced mainly by Leydig and Sertoli cells in the testis and also in the epididymis. Their role in horse testicular physiology and their ability to act on spermatozoa are still unknown. In order to determine if spermatozoa are targets for estrogens, the presence of estrogen receptors in mature ejaculated spermatozoa has been investigated. The presence of a single isoform of ESR1 (66kDa) and ESR2 (61kDa) was found by Western-blot analysis in samples from seven stallions. Confocal analysis mainly showed a flagellar localization for both receptors. Immuno-TEM experiments revealed that they are mostly located near the membranes, which are classically associated with rapid, non-genomic, effects. Moreover, we evidenced the expression of the seven transmembrane estradiol binding receptor GPER in colt testis. The protein was also localized at the connecting piece in mature spermatozoa. In conclusion, our results suggest that horse spermatozoa are a target for estrogens, which could act on several receptors either during the epididymal transit and/or in the female genital tract.

  14. The Role of Chemoattractant Receptors in Shaping the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiamin Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractant receptors are a family of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs initially found to mediate the chemotaxis and activation of immune cells. During the past decades, the functions of these GPCRs have been discovered to not only regulate leukocyte trafficking and promote immune responses, but also play important roles in homeostasis, development, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. Accumulating evidence indicates that chemoattractant GPCRs and their ligands promote the progression of malignant tumors based on their capacity to orchestrate the infiltration of the tumor microenvironment by immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal cells. This facilitates the interaction of tumor cells with host cells, tumor cells with tumor cells, and host cells with host cells to provide a basis for the expansion of established tumors and development of distant metastasis. In addition, many malignant tumors of the nonhematopoietic origin express multiple chemoattractant GPCRs that increase the invasiveness and metastasis of tumor cells. Therefore, GPCRs and their ligands constitute targets for the development of novel antitumor therapeutics.

  15. Political bias is tenacious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Peter H; Wojcik, Sean P; Chen, Eric Evan; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Ringel, Megan M

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. are right to worry about political bias in social psychology but they underestimate the ease of correcting it. Both liberals and conservatives show partisan bias that often worsens with cognitive sophistication. More non-liberals in social psychology is unlikely to speed our convergence upon the truth, although it may broaden the questions we ask and the data we collect.

  16. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  17. 嗅觉受体基因和蛋白的研究进展%Research progress on olfactory receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭鹤; 赵鲁杭

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory perception is the process that the olfactory receptor is activated by odorous molecules, which induce the transduction of signal in the cell and the chemical information is transduced into electrical impulses. After the changed signal is transmitted to the brain,the whole perception process completes. OR gene belongs to the multigene family. The coded olfactory receptor proteins belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor ( GPCR) superfamily and therefore are invariably seven-transmembrane domain(7TM) protein. Olfactory receptor protein plays an important role in olfactory perception and signal transduction process.%嗅觉感知的起始是由嗅觉受体( olfactory receptor,OR)被气味分子激活,引起细胞内的信号转导,将气味的化学信号转变成电信号,传到更高的脑部结构,完成气味感知.OR基因属于多基因家族,编码的嗅觉受体蛋白(olfactory receptor protein)属于G-蛋白偶联受体超家族,有7个跨膜区域.嗅觉受体蛋白在嗅觉识别气味及信号传导过程中起着重要的作用.

  18. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and combining quantitative mass spectrometry with cell biological analysis to investigate morphine's reduced efficacy for promoting receptor endocytosis when compared to a peptide full agonist. We show that these chemically distinct ligands produce a complex, and qualitatively similar mixture of phosphorylated opioid receptor forms in intact cells. Quantitatively, however, the agonists promote markedly disproportional production of multi-site phosphorylation involving a specific Ser/Thr motif, whose modification at more than one residue is essential for efficient recruitment of the adaptor protein β-arrestin to clathrin-coated pits that mediate subsequent endocytosis of MORs. These results reveal quantitative encoding of agonist-selective endocytosis at the level of individual opioid receptors, based on the conserved biochemical principles of multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection. PMID:21868358

  19. Media Bias and Reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Gentzkow; Jesse M. Shapiro

    2005-01-01

    A Bayesian consumer who is uncertain about the quality of an information source will infer that the source is of higher quality when its reports conform to the consumer's prior expectations. We use this fact to build a model of media bias in which firms slant their reports toward the prior beliefs of their customers in order to build a reputation for quality. Bias emerges in our model even though it can make all market participants worse off. The model predicts that bias will be less severe w...

  20. Biased predecision processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories.

  1. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  2. Role and therapeutic potential of G-protein coupled receptors in breast cancer progression and metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anukriti; Nunes, Jessica J; Ateeq, Bushra

    2015-09-15

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large family of cell-surface receptors, which have recently emerged as key players in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and metastasis. In this review, we discussed our current understanding of the many roles played by GPCRs in general, and particularly Angiotensin II type I receptor (AGTR1), a member of the seven-transmembrane-spanning G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and its significance in breast cancer progression and metastasis. We have also discussed different strategies for targeting AGTR1, and its ligand Angiotension II (Ang II), which might unravel unique opportunities for breast cancer prevention and treatment. For example, AGTR1 blockers (ARBs) which are already in clinical use for treating hypertension, merit further investigation as a therapeutic strategy for AGTR1-positive cancer patients and may have the potential to prevent Ang II-AGTR1 signalling mediated cancer pathogenesis and metastases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Berkson’s bias, selection bias, and missing data

    OpenAIRE

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While Berkson’s bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2×2 tables illustrate how Berkson’s bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random is less i...

  4. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  5. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  6. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1067 ref|XP_001255730.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_001255807.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos t...aurus] ref|XP_001252728.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255730.1 1e-179 100% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0423 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0423 ref|XP_001255730.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_001255807.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos t...aurus] ref|XP_001252728.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255730.1 1e-129 74% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0026 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-177 100% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1959 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1959 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-115 79% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-21-0063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-21-0063 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-160 89% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0617 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0617 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-158 89% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1044 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1044 ref|XP_001255840.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_001252868.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos t...aurus] ref|XP_001253817.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255840.1 0.0 100% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1228 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-1228 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-140 79% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0812 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0812 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-177 100% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1762 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1762 ref|XP_001255673.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_602082.3| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taur...us] ref|XP_001255654.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255673.1 1e-94 84% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-12-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-12-0039 ref|XP_001255730.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_001255807.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos t...aurus] ref|XP_001252728.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255730.1 1e-137 79% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0020 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0020 ref|XP_001255730.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane hel...ix receptor [Bos taurus] ref|XP_001255807.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos t...aurus] ref|XP_001252728.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Bos taurus] XP_001255730.1 1e-133 80% ...

  19. Selective Orthosteric Free Fatty Acid Receptor 2 (FFA2) Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Johannes; Smith, Nicola J.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Grundmann, Manuel; Hudson, Brian D.; Ward, Richard J.; Drewke, Christel; Milligan, Graeme; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond

    2011-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2; GPR43) is a G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptor for short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) that is implicated in inflammatory and metabolic disorders. The SCFA propionate has close to optimal ligand efficiency for FFA2 and can hence be considered as highly potent given its size. Propionate, however, does not discriminate between FFA2 and the closely related receptor FFA3 (GPR41). To identify FFA2-selective ligands and understand the molecular basis for FFA2 selectivity, a targeted library of small carboxylic acids was examined using holistic, label-free dynamic mass redistribution technology for primary screening and the receptor-proximal G protein [35S]guanosine 5′-(3-O-thio)triphosphate activation, inositol phosphate, and cAMP accumulation assays for hit confirmation. Structure-activity relationship analysis allowed formulation of a general rule to predict selectivity for small carboxylic acids at the orthosteric binding site where ligands with substituted sp3-hybridized α-carbons preferentially activate FFA3, whereas ligands with sp2- or sp-hybridized α-carbons prefer FFA2. The orthosteric binding mode was verified by site-directed mutagenesis: replacement of orthosteric site arginine residues by alanine in FFA2 prevented ligand binding, and molecular modeling predicted the detailed mode of binding. Based on this, selective mutation of three residues to their non-conserved counterparts in FFA3 was sufficient to transfer FFA3 selectivity to FFA2. Thus, selective activation of FFA2 via the orthosteric site is achievable with rather small ligands, a finding with significant implications for the rational design of therapeutic compounds selectively targeting the SCFA receptors. PMID:21220428

  20. Gene : CBRC-GGOR-01-1244 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 97% ref|XP_521992.2| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Pan troglodytes] 3e-70 98% MV...ECFLLAVMAYDRYVAIRNPLLYTVAERNGTERNGTERNSMEWNGMEWNSMEWNGIQWNGMEWNGTVRNGTERNGMEFHGMEWNGMEFHGMEFNAMQRXXXXXXALLAQARTIELEIFLIT ...

  1. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  2. Distribution of a GABAB-like receptor protein in the rat central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Calver, A R; Jourdain, S; Pangalos, M N

    2003-11-07

    Using a homology-based bioinformatics approach we have identified the human and rodent orthologues of a novel putative seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, termed GABA(BL). The amino acid sequence homology of these cDNAs compared to GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) led us to postulate that GABA(BL) may be a putative novel GABA(B) receptor subunit. We have developed a rabbit polyclonal antisera specific to the GABA(BL) protein and assessed the distribution of GABA(BL) in the rat CNS by immunohistochemistry. Protein expression was particularly dense in regions previously shown to contain known GABA(B) receptor subunits. Dense immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex, major subfields of the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus. GABA(BL) labelling was very conspicuous in the cerebellum, both in the granule cell layer and in Purkinje cells, and was also observed in the substantia gelatinosa and ventral horn motor neurons of the spinal cord. GABA(BL) immunoreactivity was also noted in a subset of parvalbumin positive hippocampal interneurons. Our data suggest a widespread distribution of GABA(BL) throughout the rat CNS.

  3. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  4. Turn-on switch in parathyroid hormone receptor by a two-step parathyroid hormone binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marián; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Palm, Dieter; Lohse, Martin J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2005-11-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and its related receptor (PTHR) are essential regulators of calcium homeostasis and bone physiology. PTH activates PTHR by interacting with a ligand-binding site localized within the N-terminal extracellular domain (the N-domain) and the domain comprising the seven transmembrane helices and the connecting extracellular loops (the J-domain). PTH binding triggers a conformational switch in the receptor, leading to receptor activation and subsequent cellular responses. The process of receptor activation occurs rapidly, within approximately 1 s, but the binding event preceding receptor activation is not understood. By recording FRET between tetramethyl-rhodamine in PTH(1-34) and GFP in the N-domain of the receptor, we measured the binding event in real time in living cells. We show that the association time course between PTH(1-34) and PTHR involves a two-step binding process where the agonist initially binds the receptor with a fast time constant (tau approximately 140 ms) and then with slower kinetics (tau approximately 1 s). The fast and slow phases were assigned to hormone association to the receptor N- and J domains, respectively. Our data indicate that the slow binding step to the J-domain coincides with a conformational switch in the receptor, also monitored by FRET between the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein in the PTHR sensor, PTHR enhanced cyan fluorescent protein/enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (PTHR(CFP/YFP)). These data suggest that the conformational change that switches the receptor into its active state proceeds in a sequential manner, with the first rapid binding step event preceding receptor activation by PTH(1-34).

  5. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    . For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  6. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate that the agricul......Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  7. Characterization of a β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor from the rice stem borer (Chilo suppressalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun-Fan; Yao, Yao; Huang, Jia; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2012-08-01

    Octopamine, the invertebrate counterpart of adrenaline and noradrenaline, plays a key role in regulation of many physiological and behavioral processes in insects. It modulates these functions through binding to specific octopamine receptors, which are typical rhodopsin-like G-protein coupled receptors. A cDNA encoding a seven-transmembrane receptor was cloned from the nerve cord of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, viz. CsOA2B2, which shares high sequence similarity to CG6989, a Drosophila β-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor (DmOctβ2R). We generated an HEK-293 cell line that stably expresses CsOA2B2 in order to examine the functional and pharmacological properties of this receptor. Activation of CsOA2B2 by octopamine increased the production of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50)=2.33 nmol l(-1)), with a maximum response at 100 nmol l(-1). Tyramine also activated the receptor but with much less potency than octopamine. Dopamine and serotonin had marginal effects on cAMP production. Using a series of known agonists and antagonists for octopamine receptors, we observed a rather unique pharmacological profile for CsOA2B2 through measurements of cAMP. The rank order of potency of the agonists was naphazoline > clonidine. The activated effect of octopamine is abolished by co-incubation with phentolamine, mianserin or chlorpromazine. Using in vivo pharmacology, CsOA2B2 antagonists mianserin and phentolamine impaired the motor ability of individual rice stem borers. The results of the present study are important for a better functional understanding of this receptor as well as for practical applications in the development of environmentally sustainable pesticides.

  8. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  9. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  10. Simulating currency substitution bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boon (Martin); C.J.M. Kool (Clemens); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sign and size of estimates of the elasticity of currency substitution critically depend on the definition of the oppurtunity costs of holding money. We investigate possible biases by means of Monte Carlo experiments, as sufficient real data are not available.

  11. Sex Bias in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalk, Sue Rosenberg; And Others

    This study investigated children's sex biased attitudes as a function of the sex, age, and race of the child as well as a geographical-SES factor. Two attitudes were measured on a 55-item questionnaire: Sex Pride (attributing positive characteristics to a child of the same sex) and Sex Prejudice (attributing negative characteristics to a child of…

  12. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    the receptors currently assigned to family C. However, our results strongly indicate that RAIG1 and GPRC5B form a new subgroup of family C characterized by short ATDs. GPRC5B mRNA is widely expressed in peripheral and central tissues with highest abundance in kidney, pancreas, and testis. This mRNA expression...... from an expressed sequence tag clone that contained the entire open reading frame of the transcript encoding a protein of 395 amino acids. Analysis of the protein sequence reveal that GPRC5B contains a signal peptide and seven transmembrane alpha-helices, which is a hallmark of G......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  13. GPCR biased ligands as novel heart failure therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violin, Jonathan D; Soergel, David G; Boerrigter, Guido; Burnett, John C; Lark, Michael W

    2013-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors have been successfully targeted by numerous therapeutics including drugs that have transformed the management of cardiovascular disease. However, many GPCRs, when activated or blocked by drugs, elicit both beneficial and adverse pharmacology. Recent work has demonstrated that in some cases, the salutary and deleterious signals linked to a specific GPCR can be selectively targeted by "biased ligands" that entrain subsets of a receptor's normal pharmacology. This review briefly summarizes the advances and current state of the biased ligand field, focusing on an example: biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. These compounds exhibit unique pharmacology, distinct from classic agonists or antagonists, and one such molecule is now in clinical development for the treatment of acute heart failure.

  14. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field.

  15. The Caenorhabditis elegans D2-like dopamine receptor DOP-2 physically interacts with GPA-14, a Gαi subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pratima; Harbinder, Singh

    2012-01-26

    Dopaminergic inputs are sensed on the cell surface by the seven-transmembrane dopamine receptors that belong to a superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Dopamine receptors are classified as D1-like or D2-like receptors based on their homology and pharmacological profiles. In addition to well established G-protein coupled mechanism of dopamine receptors in mammalian system they can also interact with other signaling pathways. In C. elegans four dopamine receptors (dop-1, dop-2, dop-3 and dop-4) have been reported and they have been implicated in a wide array of behavioral and physiological processes. We performed this study to assign the signaling pathway for DOP-2, a D2-like dopamine receptor using a split-ubiquitin based yeast two-hybrid screening of a C. elegans cDNA library with a novel dop-2 variant (DOP-2XL) as bait. Our yeast two-hybrid screening resulted in identification of gpa-14, as one of the positively interacting partners. gpa-14 is a Gα coding sequence and shows expression overlap with dop-2 in C. elegans ADE deirid neurons. In-vitro pull down assays demonstrated physical coupling between dopamine receptor DOP-2XL and GPA-14. Further, we sought to determine the DOP-2 region necessary for GPA-14 coupling. We generated truncated DOP-2XL constructs and performed pair-wise yeast two-hybrid assay with GPA-14 followed by in-vitro interaction studies and here we report that the third intracellular loop is the key domain responsible for DOP-2 and GPA-14 coupling. Our results show that the extra-long C. elegans D2-like receptor is coupled to gpa-14 that has no mammalian homolog but shows close similarity to inhibitory G-proteins. Supplementing earlier investigations, our results demonstrate the importance of an invertebrate D2-like receptor's third intracellular loop in its G-protein interaction.

  16. Human choriogonadotropin binds to a lutropin receptor with essentially no N-terminal extension and stimulates cAMP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, I H; Ji, T H

    1991-07-15

    The lutropin (LH) receptor, which belongs to the family of G-protein coupled receptors, consists of an extracellular hydrophilic N-terminal extension of 341 amino acids and a membrane-embedded C-terminal region of 333 amino acids. This C-terminal region comprises a short N terminus, seven transmembrane domains, three cytoplasmic loops, three exoplasmic loops, and a C terminus. Recently, it was reported that the N-terminal extension of the LH receptor alone or a naturally occurring variant LH receptor similar to the N-terminal extension is capable of binding the hormone with an affinity slightly higher than that of the native receptor. This finding raises a question as to whether the N-terminal extension represents the entire hormone binding site and, if so, how is hormone binding transduced to the activation of a G-protein? In an attempt to answer this important question, we have prepared truncated receptors containing an N-terminal extension as short as 10 amino acids. Surprisingly, the truncated receptors were not only capable of binding the hormone, albeit with low affinities, but also capable of stimulating cAMP synthesis. These results suggest a possibility that the hormone, at least in part, interacts with the membrane-embedded C-terminal region and modulates it to activate adenylate cyclase. The low hormone binding affinities of the truncated receptors taken together with high affinity hormone binding to the N-terminal extension of the LH receptor indicate the existence of two or more contact points between the receptor and the hormone.

  17. Anandamide mediates cognitive judgement bias in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregiel, J; Malek, N; Popik, P; Starowicz, K; Rygula, R

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of acute pharmacological manipulation of the endocannabinoid (EC) system on the valence of cognitive judgement bias of rats in the ambiguous-cue interpretation (ACI) paradigm. To accomplish this goal, after initial behavioural training, different groups of rats received single, systemic injections of the irreversible anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis inhibitor URB597, the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) inverse agonist AM251, the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) inverse agonist AM630, the combination of URB597 and AM251, and a combination of URB597 and AM630 and were subsequently tested with the ACI paradigm. We report that URB597 at a dose of 1 mg/kg significantly biased animals towards positive interpretation of the ambiguous cue and that this effect was abolished by pre-treatment with AM251 (1 mg/kg) or AM630 (1 mg/kg). The CB1 and CB2 inverse agonists administered alone (1 mg/kg) had no statistically significant effects on the interpretation of the ambiguous cue by rats. Our findings suggest involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the mediation of optimistic judgement bias.

  18. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  19. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  20. Temperature trend biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  1. Role of Prokineticin Receptor-1 in Epicardial Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan G. Nebigil

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs form a large class of seven transmembrane (TM domain receptors. The use of endogenous GPCR ligands to activate the stem cell maintenance or to direct cell differentiation would overcome many of the problems currently encountered in the use of stem cells, such as rapid in vitro differentiation and expansion or rejection in clinical applications. This review focuses on the definition of a new GPCR signaling pathway activated by peptide hormones, called “prokineticins”, in epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs. Signaling via prokineticin-2 and its receptor, PKR1, is required for cardiomyocyte survival during hypoxic stress. The binding of prokineticin-2 to PKR1 induces proliferation, migration and angiogenesis in endothelial cells. The expression of prokineticin and PKR1 increases during cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Gain of function of PKR1 in the adult mouse heart revealed that cardiomyocyte-PKR1 signaling activates EPDCs in a paracrine fashion, thereby promoting de novo vasculogenesis. Transient PKR1 gene therapy after myocardial infarction in mice decreases mortality and improves heart function by promoting neovascularization, protecting cardiomyocytes and mobilizing WT1+ cells. Furthermore, PKR1 signaling promotes adult EPDC proliferation and differentiation to adopt endothelial and smooth muscle cell fate, for the induction of de novo vasculogenesis. PKR1 is expressed in the proepicardium and epicardial cells derived from mice kidneys. Loss of PKR1 causes deficits in EPDCs in the neonatal mice hearts and kidneys and impairs vascularization and heart and kidney function. Taken together, these data indicate a novel role for PKR1 in heart-kidney complex via EPDCs.

  2. Bias in collegiate courts

    OpenAIRE

    Olowofoyeku, AA

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is ...

  3. Construction, purification, and immunogenicity of recombinant cystein-cystein type chemokine receptor 5 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kongtian; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Zenglu; Yan, Zhen; Shi, Jihong; Han, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2006-09-01

    Cystein-Cystein type chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a seven-transmembrane, G-protein coupled receptor. It is a major coreceptor with CD4 glycoprotein mediating cellular entry of CCR5 strains of HIV-1. A lack of cell-surface expression of CCR5 found in the homozygous Delta32 CCR5 mutation, upregulation of CC chemokines and antibodies to CCR5 are associated with resistance to HIV infection. In addition, CCR5 can be blocked by three CC chemokines and antibodies to three extracellular domains of CCR5. Consequently, CCR5 is considered an attractive therapeutic target against HIV infection. In the current study, we constructed a recombinant vaccine by coupling a T helper epitope AKFVAAWTLKAA (PADRE) to the N terminus of CCR5 extracellular domains (PADRE-CCR5) and expressed this protein in Escherichia coli. We have developed an inexpensive and scalable purification process for the fusion protein from inclusion bodies and the final yields of 6mg purified fusion protein per gram of cell paste was obtained. The immunogenicity of the recombinant vaccine generated was examined in BALB/c mice. Sera from the vaccinated mice demonstrated high-titer specific antibodies to the recombinant vaccine, suggesting that PADRE-rCCR5 may be used as a candidate of active CCR5 vaccine.

  4. GPR55 regulates cannabinoid 2 receptor-mediated responses in human neutrophils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nariman A B Balenga; Maria Waldhoer; Elma Aflaki; Julia Kargl; Wolfgang Platzer; Ralf Schr(o)der; Stefanie Bl(a)ttermann; Evi Kostenis; Andrew J Brown; Akos Heinemann

    2011-01-01

    The directional migration of neutrophils towards inflammatory mediators,such as chemokines and cannabinoids,occurs via the activation of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) and is a highly organized process.A crucial role for controlling neutrophil migration has been ascribed to the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R),but additional modulatory sites distinct from CB2R have recently been suggested to impact CB2R-mediated effector functions in neutrophils.Here,we provide evidence that the recently de-orphanized 7TM/GPCR GPR55potently modulates CB2R-mediated responses.We show that GPR55 is expressed in human blood neutrophils and its activation augments the migratory response towards the CB2R agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG),while inhibiting neutrophil degranulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.Using HEK293 and HL60 cell lines,along with primary neutrophils,we show that GPR55 and CB2R interfere with each other's signaling pathways at the level of small GTPases,such as Rac2 and Cdc42.This ultimately leads to cellular polarization and efficient migration as well as abrogation of degranulation and ROS formation in neutrophils.Therefore,GPR55 limits the tissueinjuring inflammatory responses mediated by CB2R,while it synergizes with CB2R in recruiting neutrophils to sites of inflammation.

  5. Cloning and expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 (ep 1 ) in Bostrichthys sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao Jian; Hong, Wan Shu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yu Ting; Chen, Shi Xi

    2014-08-01

    Our previous studies suggested that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a putative sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. We found immunoreactivities of PGE2 receptor subtypes (Ep1-3) expressed in the olfactory sac, but only Ep1 presented higher density of immunoreactivity in mature fish than that in immature fish in both sexes. To gain a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism for the detection of PGE2 in the olfactory system, we cloned an ep 1 cDNA from the adult olfactory sac. The open-reading frame of the ep 1 consisted of 1,134-bp nucleotides that encoded a 378-amino acid-long protein with a seven-transmembrane domain, typical for the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily. Expression of ep 1 mRNA was observed in all tissues examined, with higher levels obtained in the olfactory sacs and testes. The expression of ep 1 mRNA in the olfactory sacs and gonads was significantly higher in both sexes of mature fish than in those of immature ones. Taken together, our results suggested that Ep1, which is highly expressed in the olfactory sacs and gonads of mature fish, is important for the control of reproduction and may be involved in PGE2-initiated spawning behavior in B. sinensis.

  6. Endothelin receptor B polymorphism associated with lethal white foal syndrome in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santschi, E M; Purdy, A K; Valberg, S J; Vrotsos, P D; Kaese, H; Mickelson, J R

    1998-04-01

    Overo lethal white syndrome (OLWS) is an inherited syndrome of foals born to American Paint Horse parents of the overo coat-pattern lineage. Affected foals are totally or almost totally white and die within days from complications due to intestinal aganglionosis. Related conditions occur in humans and rodents in which mutations in the endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) gene are responsible. EDNRB is known to be involved in the developmental regulation of neural crest cells that become enteric ganglia and melanocytes. In this report we identify a polymorphism in the equine EDNRB gene closely associated with OLWS. This Ile to Lys substitution at codon 118 is located within the first transmembrane domain of this seven-transmembrane domain G-protein-coupled receptor protein. All 22 OLWS-affected foals examined were homozygous for the Lys118 EDNRB allele, while all available parents of affected foals were heterozygous. All but one of the parents also had an overo white body-spot phenotype. Solid-colored control horses of other breeds were homozygous for the Ile118 EDNRB allele. Molecular definition of the basis for OLWS in Paint Horses provides a genetic test for the presence of the Lys118 EDNRB allele and adds to our understanding of the basis for coat color patterns in the horse.

  7. Dynamic Nigrostriatal Dopamine Biases Action Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher D; Li, Hao; Geddes, Claire E; Jin, Xin

    2017-03-22

    Dopamine is thought to play a critical role in reinforcement learning and goal-directed behavior, but its function in action selection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that nigrostriatal dopamine biases ongoing action selection. When mice were trained to dynamically switch the action selected at different time points, changes in firing rate of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, as well as dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum, were found to be associated with action selection. This dopamine profile is specific to behavioral choice, scalable with interval duration, and doesn't reflect reward prediction error, timing, or value as single factors alone. Genetic deletion of NMDA receptors on dopamine or striatal neurons or optogenetic manipulation of dopamine concentration alters dopamine signaling and biases action selection. These results unveil a crucial role of nigrostriatal dopamine in integrating diverse information for regulating upcoming actions, and they have important implications for neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease and substance dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Behavioral Biases in Interpersonal Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Liu (Ning)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis presents evidence suggesting that the same types of biases in individual decision making under uncertainty pertain in interpersonal contexts. The chapters above demonstrate in specific contexts how specific interpersonal factors attenuate, amplify, or replicate these bias

  9. The nociceptin receptor (NOPR) and its interaction with clinically important agonist molecules: a membrane molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothandan, Gugan; Gadhe, Changdev G; Balupuri, Anand; Ganapathy, Jagadeesan; Cho, Seung Joo

    2014-12-01

    The nociceptin receptor (NOPR) is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that contains seven transmembrane helices. NOPR has a distinct mechanism of activation, though it shares a significant homology with other opioid receptors. Previously there have been reports on homology modeling of NOPR and also molecular dynamics simulation studies for a short period. Recently the crystal structure of NOPR was reported. In this study, we analyzed the time dependent behavior of NOPR docked with clinically important agonist molecules such as NOP (natural agonist) peptide and compound 10 (SCH-221510 derivative) using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) for 100 ns. Molecular dynamics simulations of NOPR-agonist complexes allowed us to refine the system and to also identify stable structures with better binding modes. Structure activity relationships (SAR) for SCH221510 derivatives were investigated and reasons for the activities of these derivatives were determined. Our molecular dynamics trajectory analysis of NOPR-peptide and NOPR-compound 10 complexes found residues to be crucial for binding. Mutagenesis studies on the residues identified from our analysis could prove useful. Our results could also provide useful information in the structure-based drug design of novel and potent agonists targeting NOPR.

  10. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  11. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    . The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Insights into the interaction of negative allosteric modulators with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5: discovery and computational modeling of a new series of ligands with nanomolar affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anighoro, Andrew; Graziani, Davide; Bettinelli, Ilaria; Cilia, Antonio; De Toma, Carlo; Longhi, Matteo; Mangiarotti, Fabio; Menegon, Sergio; Pirona, Lorenza; Poggesi, Elena; Riva, Carlo; Rastelli, Giulio

    2015-07-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a biological target implicated in major neurological and psychiatric disorders. In the present study, we have investigated structural determinants of the interaction of negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) with the seven-transmembrane (7TM) domain of mGlu5. A homology model of the 7TM receptor domain built on the crystal structure of the mGlu1 template was obtained, and the binding modes of known NAMs, namely MPEP and fenobam, were investigated by docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The results were validated by comparison with mutagenesis data available in the literature for these two ligands, and subsequently corroborated by the recently described mGlu5 crystal structure. Moreover, a new series of NAMs was synthesized and tested, providing compounds with nanomolar affinity. Several structural modifications were sequentially introduced with the aim of identifying structural features important for receptor binding. The synthesized NAMs were docked in the validated homology model and binding modes were used to interpret and discuss structure-activity relationships within this new series of compounds. Finally, the models of the interaction of NAMs with mGlu5 were extended to include important non-aryl alkyne mGlu5 NAMs taken from the literature. Overall, the results provide useful insights into the molecular interaction of negative allosteric modulators with mGlu5 and may facilitate the design of new modulators for this class of receptors.

  13. The G-protein coupled receptor associated sorting protein GASP-1 regulates the signalling and trafficking of the viral chemokine receptor US28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschische, Pia; Moser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dawn; Vischer, Henry F; Parzmair, Gerald P; Pommer, Veronika; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Schaider, Helmut; Smit, Martine J; Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L; Waldhoer, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes the seven transmembrane(7TM)/G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) US28, which signals and endocytoses in a constitutive, ligand-independent manner. Here we show that, following endocytosis, US28 is targeted to the lysosomes for degradation as a consequence of its interaction with the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We find that GASP-1 binds to US28 in vitro and that disruption of the GASP-1/US28 interaction by either (i) overexpression of dominant negative cGASP-1 or by (ii) shRNA knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 is sufficient to inhibit the lysosomal targeting of US28 and slow its post-endocytic degradation. Furthermore, we found that GASP-1 affects US28-mediated signalling. The knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 impairs the US28-mediated Galphaq/PLC/inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation as well as the activation of the transcription factors Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Overexpression of GASP-1 enhances both IP accumulation and transcription factor activity. Thus, GASP-1 is an important cellular determinant that not only regulates the post-endocytic trafficking of US28, but also regulates the signalling capacities of US28.

  14. Editorial bias in scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Many authors believe that there are biases in scientific publications. Editorial biases include publication bias; which refers to those situations where the results influence the editor's decision, and editorial bias refers to those situations where factors related with authors or their environment influence the decision. This paper includes an analysis of the situation of editorial biases. One bias is where mainly articles with positive results are accepted, as opposed to those with negative results. Another is latent bias, where positive results are published before those with negative results. In order to examine editorial bias, this paper analyses the influence of where the article originated; the country or continent, academic centre of origin, belonging to cooperative groups, and the maternal language of the authors. The article analyses biases in the editorial process in the publication of funded clinical trials. Editorial biases exists. Authors, when submitting their manuscript, should analyse different journals and decide where their article will receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of a tyramine receptor type 2 from hemocytes of rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun-Fan; Xu, Gang; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2015-04-01

    Calcium acts as a second messenger in many cell types, including insect hemocytes. Intracellular calcium level has a definite role in innate and adaptive immune signaling. Biogenic amines such as octopamine (OA), tyramine (TA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) play various important physiological roles in insects by activating distinct G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that share a putative seven transmembrane domain structure. OA and 5-HT have been shown that can mediate insect hemocytic immune reactions to infections and invasions. Here, we showed that TA increase hemocyte spreading in the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. Furthermore, we cloned a cDNA encoding a tyramine receptor type 2 from the hemocytes in the C. suppressalis, viz., CsTA2, which shares high sequence similarity to members of the invertebrate tyramine receptor family. The CsTA2 receptor was stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, and its ligand response has been examined. Receptor activation with TA induced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cells, with an EC50 value of 18.7±5.3 nM, whereas OA, DA, 5-HT and other potential agonists did not have this response. The mRNA is present in various tissues including nerve cord, hemocytes, fat body, midgut, Malpighian tubules, and epidermis in the larval stage. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry assay displayed that CsTA2 was detected and presented on hemocytes. We also showed that TA induced Ca(2+) release from the hemocytes of C. suppressalis.

  16. Outcome predictability biases learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Mitchell, Chris J; Bethmont, Anna; Lovibond, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Much of contemporary associative learning research is focused on understanding how and when the associative history of cues affects later learning about those cues. Very little work has investigated the effects of the associative history of outcomes on human learning. Three experiments extended the "learned irrelevance" paradigm from the animal conditioning literature to examine the influence of an outcome's prior predictability on subsequent learning of relationships between cues and that outcome. All 3 experiments found evidence for the idea that learning is biased by the prior predictability of the outcome. Previously predictable outcomes were readily associated with novel predictive cues, whereas previously unpredictable outcomes were more readily associated with novel nonpredictive cues. This finding highlights the importance of considering the associative history of outcomes, as well as cues, when interpreting multistage designs. Associative and cognitive explanations of this certainty matching effect are discussed.

  17. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Degl'Innocenti

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice.Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice.Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J, and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections.In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12, Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a whole, our findings

  18. Theoretical investigation of exchange bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhi-Jie; Wang Huai-Yu; Ding Ze-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The exchange bias of bilayer magnetic films consisting of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in an uncompensated case is studied by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory.The effects of the layer thickness and temperature and the interfacial coupling strength on the exchange bias HE are investigated. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM layer thickness and temperature is qualitatively in agreement with experimental results. When temperature varies, both the coercivity HC and HE decrease with the temperature increasing. For each FM thickness, there exists a least AFM thickness in which the exchange bias occurs,which is called pinning thickness.

  19. Characterization of two patched receptors for the vertebrate hedgehog protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D; Stone, D M; Brush, J; Ryan, A; Armanini, M; Frantz, G; Rosenthal, A; de Sauvage, F J

    1998-11-10

    The multitransmembrane protein Patched (PTCH) is the receptor for Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a secreted molecule implicated in the formation of embryonic structures and in tumorigenesis. Current models suggest that binding of Shh to PTCH prevents the normal inhibition of the seven-transmembrane-protein Smoothened (SMO) by PTCH. According to this model, the inhibition of SMO signaling is relieved after mutational inactivation of PTCH in the basal cell nevus syndrome. Recently, PTCH2, a molecule with sequence homology to PTCH, has been identified. To characterize both PTCH molecules with respect to the various Hedgehog proteins, we have isolated the human PTCH2 gene. Biochemical analysis of PTCH and PTCH2 shows that they both bind to all hedgehog family members with similar affinity and that they can form a complex with SMO. However, the expression patterns of PTCH and PTCH2 do not fully overlap. While PTCH is expressed throughout the mouse embryo, PTCH2 is found at high levels in the skin and in spermatocytes. Because Desert Hedgehog (Dhh) is expressed specifically in the testis and is required for germ cell development, it is likely that PTCH2 mediates its activity in vivo. Chromosomal localization of PTCH2 places it on chromosome 1p33-34, a region deleted in some germ cell tumors, raising the possibility that PTCH2 may be a tumor suppressor in Dhh target cells.

  20. Advances in G-protein coupled receptor research and related bioinformatics study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) is one of the most important protein families for drug target. GPCR agonists and antagonists occupy approximately one third of the world small molecule drug market. Much effort has been invested in GPCR study by both academic institutions and pharmaceutical industries. With seven-transmembrane domains, GPCR plays significant roles in intercellular signal transduction and is involved in a variety of biological pathways. With the availability of sequence data of human and other mammalian genomes, as well as their expressed sequence tag (EST) data, the bioinformatics and genomics approaches can be applied to identifying novel GPCR in the post genomic era. Deorphanizing GPCR or matching ligands with GPCR greatly facilitates target validation process and automatically provides a possible compound screening assay. Similarly, bioinformatics data mining approach could also be applied to the identification of GPCR peptide or protein ligands. Here we give a general review of recent advances in the study of GPCR structure, function, as well as GPCR and ligand identification with the emphasis on the bioinformatics database mining of GPCR and their peptide or protein ligands.

  1. [Regulation of G protein-coupled receptor function by its binding proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, Norimichi; Saito, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane receptors with an N-terminus in the extracellular region and C-terminus in the intracellular region. When an agonist binds to a GPCR, a signal is transduced into a cell through the activation of trimeric G proteins. Recently, it has been shown that the activities of GPCRs are regulated by multiple mechanisms. One of the mechanisms is regulation through the binding proteins to the carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. In the present study, the binding partners for the C-terminus of the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) and thromboxane A(2) receptor (TP) were searched for using yeast two-hybrid screening, and the functions of these proteins were investigated. We identified t-complex testis expressed-1 (Tctex-1) and 4.1G as associated proteins for the PTHR. Tctex-1 is one of the light chains of cytoplasmic dynein, which is a motor protein across microtubles. We found that Tctex-1 was involved in agonist-induced internalization of the PTHR. 4.1G, a cytoskeletal protein, facilitated the cell surface localization of the PTHR and augmented PHTR-mediated signal transduction. TPs consists of two splicing variants, TPalpha and TPbeta. As a result of yeast two-hybrid screening, two proteasomal proteins, proteasome activator PA28gamma and proteasome subunit alpha7, were identified as direct interacting proteins for TPbeta. TPbeta has a tendency to be retained in the intracellular compartment, probably due to its binding to proteasomes. We also demonstrated that TPalpha and TPbeta formed heterodimers, and the signal transduction through TPalpha was reduced by the formation of heterodimers. In conclusion, the proteins bound to GPCRs may regulate the intracellular traffic of GPCRs.

  2. Adiponectin Receptors Form Homomers and Heteromers Exhibiting Distinct Ligand Binding and Intracellular Signaling Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almabouada, Farid; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Rabanal-Ruiz, Yoana; Peinado, Juan R.; Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael; Malagon, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin binds to two widely expressed receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) that contain seven transmembrane domains but, unlike G-protein coupled receptors, present an extracellular C terminus and a cytosolic N terminus. Recently, AdipoR1 was found to associate in high order complexes. However, it is still unknown whether AdipoR2 may also form homomers or heteromers with AdipoR1 or if such interactions may be functionally relevant. Herein, we have analyzed the oligomerization pattern of AdipoRs by FRET and immunoprecipitation and evaluated both the internalization of AdipoRs in response to various adiponectin isoforms and the effect of adiponectin binding to different AdipoR combinations on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α activation. Transfection of HEK293AD cells with AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 showed that both receptors colocalize at both the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. Co-transfection with the different AdipoR pairs yielded high FRET efficiencies in non-stimulated cells, which indicates that AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 form homo- and heteromeric complexes under resting conditions. Live FRET imaging suggested that both homo- and heteromeric AdipoR complexes dissociate in response to adiponectin, but heteromers separate faster than homomers. Finally, phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to adiponectin was delayed in cells wherein heteromer formation was favored. In sum, our findings indicate that AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 form homo- and heteromers that present unique interaction behaviors and signaling properties. This raises the possibility that the pleiotropic, tissue-dependent functions of adiponectin depend on the expression levels of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 and, therefore, on the steady-state proportion of homo- and heteromeric complexes. PMID:23255609

  3. Adiponectin receptors form homomers and heteromers exhibiting distinct ligand binding and intracellular signaling properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almabouada, Farid; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Rabanal-Ruiz, Yoana; Peinado, Juan R; Vazquez-Martinez, Rafael; Malagon, Maria M

    2013-02-01

    Adiponectin binds to two widely expressed receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) that contain seven transmembrane domains but, unlike G-protein coupled receptors, present an extracellular C terminus and a cytosolic N terminus. Recently, AdipoR1 was found to associate in high order complexes. However, it is still unknown whether AdipoR2 may also form homomers or heteromers with AdipoR1 or if such interactions may be functionally relevant. Herein, we have analyzed the oligomerization pattern of AdipoRs by FRET and immunoprecipitation and evaluated both the internalization of AdipoRs in response to various adiponectin isoforms and the effect of adiponectin binding to different AdipoR combinations on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α activation. Transfection of HEK293AD cells with AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 showed that both receptors colocalize at both the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum. Co-transfection with the different AdipoR pairs yielded high FRET efficiencies in non-stimulated cells, which indicates that AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 form homo- and heteromeric complexes under resting conditions. Live FRET imaging suggested that both homo- and heteromeric AdipoR complexes dissociate in response to adiponectin, but heteromers separate faster than homomers. Finally, phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase in response to adiponectin was delayed in cells wherein heteromer formation was favored. In sum, our findings indicate that AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 form homo- and heteromers that present unique interaction behaviors and signaling properties. This raises the possibility that the pleiotropic, tissue-dependent functions of adiponectin depend on the expression levels of AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 and, therefore, on the steady-state proportion of homo- and heteromeric complexes.

  4. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  5. Bias in the Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Robert

    Non-language elements of bias in mass media--such as images, sounds, tones of voices, inflection, and facial expressions--are invariably integrated with the choice of language. Further, they have an emotional impact that is often greater than that of language. It is essential that the teacher of English deal with this non-language bias since it is…

  6. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  7. Obesity, the endocannabinoid system, and bias arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M McPartland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that academic physicians conflicted by funding from the pharmaceutical industry have corrupted evidence based medicine and helped enlarge the market for drugs. Physicians made pharmaceutical-friendly statements, engaged in disease mongering, and signed biased review articles ghost-authored by corporate employees. This paper tested the hypothesis that bias affects review articles regarding rimonabant, an anti-obesity drug that blocks the central cannabinoid receptor. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A MEDLINE search was performed for rimonabant review articles, limited to articles authored by USA physicians who served as consultants for the company that manufactures rimonabant. Extracted articles were examined for industry-friendly bias, identified by three methods: analysis with a validated instrument for monitoring bias in continuing medical education (CME; analysis for bias defined as statements that ran contrary to external evidence; and a tally of misrepresentations about the endocannabinoid system. Eight review articles were identified, but only three disclosed authors' financial conflicts of interest, despite easily accessible information to the contrary. The Takhar CME bias instrument demonstrated statistically significant bias in all the review articles. Biased statements that were nearly identical reappeared in the articles, including disease mongering, exaggerating rimonabant's efficacy and safety, lack of criticisms regarding rimonabant clinical trials, and speculations about surrogate markers stated as facts. Distinctive and identical misrepresentations regarding the endocannabinoid system also reappeared in articles by different authors. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are characteristic of bias that arises from financial conflicts of interest, and suggestive of ghostwriting by a common author. Resolutions for this scenario are proposed.

  8. Large-Scale Galaxy Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a pedagogical proof of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which includes the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in i...

  9. Publication bias in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Nazish

    2011-06-01

    Communication of research findings is the utmost responsibility of all scientists. Publication bias occurs if scientific studies with negative or null results fail to get published. This can happen due to bias in submitting, reviewing, accepting, publishing or aggregating scientific literature that fails to show positive results on a particular topic. Publication bias can make scientific literature unrepresentative of the actual research studies. This can give the reader a false impression about the beneficial effects of a particular treatment or intervention and can influence clinical decision making. Publication bias is more common than it is actually considered to be, but there are ways to detect and prevent it. This paper comments on the occurrence, types and consequences of publication bias and the strategies employed to detect and control it.

  10. A C-terminal segment of the V{sub 1}R vasopressin receptor is unstructured in the crystal structure of its chimera with the maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adikesavan, Nallini Vijayarangan; Mahmood, Syed Saad; Stanley, Nithianantham; Xu, Zhen; Wu, Nan [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Thibonnier, Marc [Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States); Shoham, Menachem, E-mail: mxs10@case.edu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-4935 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The 1.8 Å crystal structure of an MBP-fusion protein with the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment of the V1 vasopressin receptor reveals that the receptor segment is unstructured. The V{sub 1} vascular vasopressin receptor (V{sub 1}R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of body-fluid osmolality, blood volume and blood pressure. Signal transduction is mediated by the third intracellular loop of this seven-transmembrane protein as well as by the C-terminal cytoplasmic segment. A chimera of the maltose-binding protein (MBP) and the C-terminal segment of V{sub 1}R has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.10, b = 66.56, c = 115.72 Å, β = 95.99°. The 1.8 Å crystal structure reveals the conformation of MBP and part of the linker region of this chimera, with the C-terminal segment being unstructured. This may reflect a conformational plasticity in the C-terminal segment that may be necessary for proper function of V{sub 1}R.

  11. A facile synthesis of new 2-carboxamido-3-carboxythiophene and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-2-carboxamido-3-carboxythieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives as potential endothelin receptors ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittalà, Valeria; Modica, Maria; Romeo, Giuseppe; Materia, Luisa; Salerno, Loredana; Siracusa, Mariangela; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mereghetti, Ilario; Russo, Filippo

    2005-09-01

    Endothelins (ETs) are the most ubiquitous, highly potent and unusually long-lasting peptidic constrictors of human vessels known. Elevated levels of the plasma concentration of ETs were observed in several diseases such as hypertension, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, renal failure, pulmonary hypertension, and atherosclerosis. ETs exert their activities via specific seven-transmembrane, G protein-coupled receptors. To date two receptor subtypes, endothelin A (ET(A)) and endothelin B (ET(B)), have been identified and cloned. A literature survey revealed that a number of compounds that bind ET receptors with affinity and selectivity are known, nevertheless these compounds belong only to few chemical classes. The aim of this work is the identification of an "hit compound" with novel chemical structure endowed with reasonable ET affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, new variously substituted 2-carboxamido-3-carboxythiophene derivatives (29-52) were synthesized. These compounds were tested for their ability to inhibit ETs binding in radioligand binding assay using CHO cells stably expressing human ET(A) and ET(B) receptors.

  12. Helminth-excreted/secreted products are recognized by multiple receptors on DCs to block the TLR response and bias Th2 polarization in a cRAF dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, César A; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Bonifaz, Laura; Terrazas, Luis I; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2013-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) recognize pathogens and initiate the T-cell response. The DC-helminth interaction induces an immature phenotype in DCs; as a result, these DCs display impaired responses to TLR stimulation and prime Th2-type responses. However, the DC receptors and intracellular pathways targeted by helminth molecules and their importance in the initiation of the Th2 response are poorly understood. In this report, we found that products excreted/secreted by Taenia crassiceps (TcES) triggered cRAF phosphorylation through MGL, MR, and TLR2. TcES interfered with the LPS-induced NFκB p65 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. In addition, TcES-induced cRAF signaling pathway was critical for down-regulation of the TLR-mediated DC maturation and secretion of IL-12 and TNF-α. Finally, we show for the first time that blocking cRAF in DCs abolishes their ability to induce Th2 polarization in vitro after TcES exposure. Our data demonstrate a new mechanism by which helminths target intracellular pathways to block DC maturation and efficiently program Th2 polarization.

  13. Dimerisation of the Drosophila odorant co-receptor Orco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha eMukunda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Odorant receptors (ORs detect volatile molecules and transform this external information into an intracellular signal. Insect ORs are heteromers composed of two seven transmembrane proteins, an odor-specific OrX and a coreceptor (Orco protein. These ORs form ligand gated cation channels that conduct also calcium. The sensitivity of the ORs is regulated by intracellular signaling cascades. Heterologously expressed Orco proteins form also non-selective cation channels that cannot be activated by odors but by synthetic agonists such as VUAA1. The stoichiometry of OR or Orco channels is unknown. In this study we engineered the simplest oligomeric construct, the Orco dimer (Orco di and investigated its functional properties. Two Orco proteins were coupled via a 1-transmembrane protein to grant for proper orientation of both parts. The Orco di construct and Orco wild type proteins were stably expressed in CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Their functional properties were investigated and compared by performing calcium imaging and patch clamp experiments. With calcium imaging experiments using allosteric agonist VUAA1 we demonstrate that the Orco di construct - similar to Orco wt - forms functional calcium conducting ion channel. This was supported by patch clamp experiments. The function of Orco di was seen to be modulated by CaM in a similar manner as the function of Orco wt. In addition, Orco di interacts with the OrX protein, Or22a. The properties of this complex are comparable to Or22a/Orco wt couples. Taken together, the properties of the Orco di construct are similar to those of channels formed by Orco wt proteins. Our results are thus compatible with the view that Orco wt channels are dimeric assemblies.

  14. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  15. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  16. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  17. Biases from neutrino bias: to worry or not to worry?

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Verde, Licia; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The relation between the halo field and the matter fluctuations (halo bias), in the presence of massive neutrinos depends on the total neutrino mass, massive neutrinos introduce an additional scale-dependence of the bias which is usually neglected in cosmological analyses. We investigate the magnitude of the systematic effect on interesting cosmological parameters induced by neglecting this scale dependence, finding that while it is not a problem for current surveys, it is non-negligible for ...

  18. Magnetic bearings with zero bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic bearing operating without a bias field has supported a shaft rotating at speeds up to 12,000 rpm with the usual four power supplies and with only two. A magnetic bearing is commonly operated with a bias current equal to half of the maximum current allowable in its coils. This linearizes the relation between net force and control current and improves the force slewing rate and hence the band width. The steady bias current dissipates power, even when no force is required from the bearing. The power wasted is equal to two-thirds of the power at maximum force output. Examined here is the zero bias idea. The advantages and disadvantages are noted.

  19. MLE's bias pathology motivates MCMLE

    OpenAIRE

    Yatracos, Yannis G.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimates are often biased. It is shown that this pathology is inherent to the traditional ML estimation method for two or more parameters, thus motivating from a different angle the use of MCMLE.

  20. Cognitive biases and language universals

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  1. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  2. Computing highly correlated positions using mutual information and graph theory for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarosh N Fatakia

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are a superfamily of seven transmembrane-spanning proteins involved in a wide array of physiological functions and are the most common targets of pharmaceuticals. This study aims to identify a cohort or clique of positions that share high mutual information. Using a multiple sequence alignment of the transmembrane (TM domains, we calculated the mutual information between all inter-TM pairs of aligned positions and ranked the pairs by mutual information. A mutual information graph was constructed with vertices that corresponded to TM positions and edges between vertices were drawn if the mutual information exceeded a threshold of statistical significance. Positions with high degree (i.e. had significant mutual information with a large number of other positions were found to line a well defined inter-TM ligand binding cavity for class A as well as class C GPCRs. Although the natural ligands of class C receptors bind to their extracellular N-terminal domains, the possibility of modulating their activity through ligands that bind to their helical bundle has been reported. Such positions were not found for class B GPCRs, in agreement with the observation that there are not known ligands that bind within their TM helical bundle. All identified key positions formed a clique within the MI graph of interest. For a subset of class A receptors we also considered the alignment of a portion of the second extracellular loop, and found that the two positions adjacent to the conserved Cys that bridges the loop with the TM3 qualified as key positions. Our algorithm may be useful for localizing topologically conserved regions in other protein families.

  3. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  4. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  5. The North Atlantic Cold Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbatch, Richard; Drews, Annika; Ding, Hui; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic cold bias, associated with a too zonal path of the North Atlantic Current and a missing "northwest corner", is a common problem in coupled climate and forecast models. The bias affects the North Atlantic and European climate mean state, variability and predictability. We investigate the use of a flow field correction to adjust the path of the North Atlantic Current as well as additional corrections to the surface heat and freshwater fluxes. Results using the Kiel Climate Model show that the flow field correction allows a northward flow into the northwest corner, largely eliminating the bias below the surface layer. A surface cold bias remains but can be eliminated by additionally correcting the surface freshwater flux, without adjusting the surface heat flux seen by the ocean model. A model version in which only the surface fluxes of heat and freshwater are corrected continues to exhibit the incorrect path of the North Atlantic Current and a strong subsurface bias. Removing the bias impacts the multi-decadal time scale variability in the model and leads to a better representation of the SST pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability than the uncorrected model.

  6. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinstry, William J.; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, Thomas J.; Parker, Michael W.; (SVIMR-A); (Chugai); (Melbourne)

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 {angstrom}, and diffracted to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  7. Crystallization of the receptor-binding domain of parathyroid hormone-related protein in complex with a neutralizing monoclonal antibody Fab fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinstry, William J; Polekhina, Galina; Diefenbach-Jagger, Hannelore; Sato, Koh; Onuma, Etsuro; Gillespie, Matthew T; Martin, Thomas J; Parker, Michael W

    2009-04-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) plays an important role in regulating embryonic skeletal development and is abnormally regulated in the pathogenesis of skeletal complications observed with many cancers and osteoporosis. It exerts its action through binding to a G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane cell-surface receptor (GPCR). Structurally, GPCRs are very difficult to study by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment which recognizes the same region of PTHrP as its receptor, PTH1R, was used to aid in the crystallization of PTHrP. The resultant protein complex was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.6, b = 96.3, c = 88.5 A, and diffracted to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure will shed light on the nature of the key residues of PTHrP that interact with the antibody and will provide insights into how the antibody is able to discriminate between PTHrP and the related molecule parathyroid homone.

  8. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  9. Cloning, Tissue Distribution, and Transmembrane Orientation of the Olfactory Co-Receptor Orco from Two Important Lepidopteran Rice Pests, the Leaffolder (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis) and the Striped Stem Borer (Chilo suppressalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Su; HUANG Yuan-jie; QIAO Fei; ZHOU Wen-wu; GONG Zhong-jun; CHENG Jia-an; ZHU Zeng-rong

    2013-01-01

    In insects, the sense of smell is mainly mediated by olfactory receptors (Ors). Olfactory co-receptor (Orco), which is co-expressed with the Ors in almost all olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), is demonstrated to be an essential component in the insect olfactory system. It can be potential target for developing novel olfactory-disruption strategy to control insect pests. In this study, two full-length cDNA sequences encoding Orcos (CmedOrco and ChsupOrco) were cloned from two Lepidopteran rice pests, the rice leaffolder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis and the rice striped stem borer, Chilo suppressalis. The amino acid sequences of CmedOrco and ChsupOrco showed high similarity to the previously identiifed Orcos from other insect species. Bioinformatic prediction and cellular immunofluorescence indicated that CmedOrco and ChsupOrco were both seven-transmembrane proteins with intracellular N-termini and extracellular C-termini. mRNA expression levels of the two Orcos were much higher in male and female antennae than those in non-olfactory tissues, and the ChsupOrco transcripts reached a peak level in adults compared to other life stages. Our results provide a foundation from which it will be possible to elucidate the roles of Orco in moth olfaction and for the development of environment-friendly management strategies of these two rice insect pests.

  10. The Advances in Chemokine Receptors CXCR1/2 and Cancer%趋化因子受体CXCR1、CXCR2与肿瘤研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡婉明; 王俊普; 李景和

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine Receptors, a group of seven-transmembrane proteins related to G-protein-coupled receptors, are expressed in tumor cells of various tissue origin. They play an important role in tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis. Recently, a lot of studies suggest that chemokine receptors CXCR1/2 have close correlation with tumor and may become a potential new target of tumor treatment. The aim of this article is to review recent development of the relationship between tumor and CXCR1/2.%趋化因子受体是由7个跨膜区组成的G蛋白偶联受体,多个系统的肿瘤细胞均表达趋化因子受体,其在肿瘤的发生、发展和转移等各个阶段都发挥重要作用.近年来有不少研究发现趋化因子受体中的CXCR1和CXCR2与肿瘤关系密切,认为其可能成为肿瘤治疗的一个潜在新靶点.本文就CXCR1和CXCR2这两种趋化因子受体与肿瘤的关系做一综述.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a new chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXCR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q J; Lu, S; Ye, R D; Martins-Green, M

    2000-10-31

    This study delineates the isolation and characterization of a novel chemokine receptor gene, the putative chicken CXC receptor 1 (cCXCR1). Using a human CXCR1 probe, we isolated several positive clones from a chicken genomic library. One of the clones contained a fragment of approximately 5000bp that hybridized strongly with the hCXCR1 probe. This fragment was sequenced and subjected to a variety of computer analyses. The open reading frame for this gene predicts a seven transmembrane domain protein with all the characteristics of a chemokine receptor and with 67% sequence homology to hCXCR1, 65% to hCXCR2 and also with considerable sequence homology to other human chemokine receptors such as hCXCR4 (50%), hCCR2 (49%) and hCCR1 (49%). However, the homology to a previously isolated potential G-protein-coupled receptor for chickens (AvCRL1) is only 47%. Using 5' RACE, two transcription initiation sites were identified suggesting the potential for the expression of two protein isoforms (I and II) in vivo. The promoter for the putative cCXCR1 contains a variety of consensus transcription factor binding elements that can potentially be involved in the expression of this chicken receptor upon stimulation by stress-inducing agents. RT-PCR analysis was used to determine the pattern of expression of the larger isoform (I) of this receptor in a variety of tissues. This form of the receptor is expressed primarily in the organs of the gastrointestinal tract, tissues that are frequently exposed to stress-inducing agents, but not in the central nervous system, tissues that are protected from insult by the blood barrier. Using the same RT-PCR approach we show that stress-inducing agents, such as 'first-hand' and 'second-hand' cigarette smoke components, tumor promoters and thrombin, differentially stimulate the expression of the isoform I in primary fibroblasts. Thrombin is an enzyme that plays many important roles in thrombosis, angiogenesis and wound healing and exposure to

  12. Characterization and ligand identification of a membrane progesterone receptor in fungi: existence of a novel PAQR in Sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Velazquez Waleska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptive responses in fungi result from the interaction of membrane receptors and extracellular ligands. Many different classes of receptors have been described in eukaryotic cells. Recently a new family of receptors classified as belonging to the progesterone-adiponectin receptor (PAQR family has been identified. These receptors have the seven transmembrane domains characteristic of G-protein coupled receptors, but their activity has not been associated directly to G proteins. They share sequence similarity to the eubacterial hemolysin III proteins. Results A new receptor, SsPAQR1 (Sporothrixschenckiiprogesterone-adiponectinQ receptor1, was identified as interacting with Sporothrix schenckii G protein alpha subunit SSG-2 in a yeast two-hybrid assay. The receptor was identified as a member of the PAQR family. The cDNA sequence revealed a predicted ORF of 1542 bp encoding a 514 amino acids protein with a calculated molecular weight of 57.8 kDa. Protein domain analysis of SsPAQR1 showed the 7 transmembrane domains (TM characteristic of G protein coupled receptors and the presence of the distinctive motifs that characterize PAQRs. A yeast-based assay specific for PAQRs identified progesterone as the agonist. S. schenckii yeast cells exposed to progesterone (0.50 mM showed an increase in intracellular levels of 3′, 5′ cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP within the first min of incubation with the hormone. Different progesterone concentrations were tested for their effect on the growth of the fungus. Cultures incubated at 35°C did not grow at concentrations of progesterone of 0.05 mM or higher. Cultures incubated at 25°C grew at all concentrations tested (0.01 mM-0.50 mM with growth decreasing gradually with the increase in progesterone concentration. Conclusion This work describes a receptor associated with a G protein alpha subunit in S. schenckii belonging to the PAQR family. Progesterone was identified as the ligand

  13. Comparative analysis of the repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors of three species of the fungal genus Trichoderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic organisms employ cell surface receptors such as the seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) as sensors to connect to the environment. GPCRs react to a variety of extracellular cues and are considered to play central roles in the signal transduction in fungi. Several species of the filamentous ascomycete Trichoderma are potent mycoparasites, i.e. can attack and parasitize other fungi, which turns them into successful bio-fungicides for the protection of plants against fungal phytopathogens. The identification and characterization of GPCRs will provide insights into how Trichoderma communicates with its environment and senses the presence of host fungi. Results We mined the recently published genomes of the two mycoparasitic biocontrol agents Trichoderma atroviride and Trichoderma virens and compared the identified GPCR-like proteins to those of the saprophyte Trichoderma reesei. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in 14 classes and revealed differences not only among the three Trichoderma species but also between Trichoderma and other fungi. The class comprising proteins of the PAQR family was significantly expanded both in Trichoderma compared to other fungi as well as in the two mycoparasites compared to T. reesei. Expression analysis of the PAQR-encoding genes of the three Trichoderma species revealed that all except one were actually transcribed. Furthermore, the class of receptors with a DUF300 domain was expanded in T. atroviride, and T. virens showed an expansion of PTH11-like receptors compared to T. atroviride and T. reesei. Conclusions Comparative genome analyses of three Trichoderma species revealed a great diversity of putative GPCRs with genus- and species- specific differences. The expansion of certain classes in the mycoparasites T. atroviride and T. virens is likely to reflect the capability of these fungi to establish various ecological niches and interactions with other organisms such as fungi and plants. These

  14. Gender bias in academic recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that women are underrepresented in the academic systems of many countries. Gender discrimination is one of the factors that could contribute to this phenomenon. This study considers a recent national academic recruitment campaign in Italy, examining whether women are subject...... to more or less bias than men. The findings show that no gender-related differences occur among the candidates who benefit from positive bias, while among those candidates affected by negative bias, the incidence of women is lower than that of men. Among the factors that determine success in a competition...... for an academic position, the number of the applicant’s career years in the same university as the committee members assumes greater weight for male candidates than for females. Being of the same gender as the committee president is also a factor that assumes greater weight for male applicants. On the other hand...

  15. Anchoring Bias in Online Voting

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather, as well as other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called \\emph{anchoring bias} is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with interval voting number in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgements, auctions, and so on.

  16. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  17. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  18. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  19. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  20. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  1. Codon Pair Bias Is a Direct Consequence of Dinucleotide Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kunec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Codon pair bias is a remarkably stable characteristic of a species. Although functionally uncharacterized, robust virus attenuation was achieved by recoding of viral proteins using underrepresented codon pairs. Because viruses replicate exclusively inside living cells, we posited that their codon pair preferences reflect those of their host(s. Analysis of many human viruses showed, however, that the encoding of viruses is influenced only marginally by host codon pair preferences. Furthermore, examination of codon pair preferences of vertebrate, insect, and arthropod-borne viruses revealed that the latter do not utilize codon pairs overrepresented in arthropods more frequently than other viruses. We found, however, that codon pair bias is a direct consequence of dinucleotide bias. We conclude that codon pair bias does not play a major role in the encoding of viral proteins and that virus attenuation by codon pair deoptimization has the same molecular underpinnings as attenuation based on an increase in CpG/TpA dinucleotides.

  2. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  3. Molecular characterization of an adiponectin receptor homolog in the white leg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Ran Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin (AdipoQ and its receptors (AdipoRs are strongly related to growth and development of skeletal muscle, as well as glucose and lipid metabolism in vertebrates. Herein we report the identification of the first full-length cDNA encoding an AdipoR homolog (Liv-AdipoR from the decapod crustacean Litopenaeus vannamei using a combination of next generation sequencing (NGS technology and bioinformatics analysis. The full-length Liv-AdipoR (1,245 bp encoded a protein that exhibited the canonical seven transmembrane domains (7TMs and the inversed topology that characterize members of the progestin and adipoQ receptor (PAQR family. Based on the obtained sequence information, only a single orthologous AdipoR gene appears to exist in arthropods, whereas two paralogs, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, have evolved in vertebrates. Transcriptional analysis suggested that the single Liv-AdipoR gene appears to serve the functions of two mammalian AdipoRs. At 72 h after injection of 50 pmol Liv-AdipoR dsRNA (340 bp into L. vannamei thoracic muscle and deep abdominal muscle, transcription levels of Liv-AdipoR decreased by 93% and 97%, respectively. This confirmed optimal conditions for RNAi of Liv-AdipoR. Knockdown of Liv-AdipoR resulted in significant changes in the plasma levels of ammonia, 3-methylhistine, and ornithine, but not plasma glucose, suggesting that that Liv-AdipoR is important for maintaining muscle fibers. The chronic effect of Liv-AdipoR dsRNA injection was increased mortality. Transcriptomic analysis showed that 804 contigs were upregulated and 212 contigs were downregulated by the knockdown of Liv-AdipoR in deep abdominal muscle. The significantly upregulated genes were categorized as four main functional groups: RNA-editing and transcriptional regulators, molecular chaperones, metabolic regulators, and channel proteins.

  4. Structure modeling of all identified G protein-coupled receptors in the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, encoded by about 5% of human genes, comprise the largest family of integral membrane proteins and act as cell surface receptors responsible for the transduction of endogenous signal into a cellular response. Although tertiary structural information is crucial for function annotation and drug design, there are few experimentally determined GPCR structures. To address this issue, we employ the recently developed threading assembly refinement (TASSER method to generate structure predictions for all 907 putative GPCRs in the human genome. Unlike traditional homology modeling approaches, TASSER modeling does not require solved homologous template structures; moreover, it often refines the structures closer to native. These features are essential for the comprehensive modeling of all human GPCRs when close homologous templates are absent. Based on a benchmarked confidence score, approximately 820 predicted models should have the correct folds. The majority of GPCR models share the characteristic seven-transmembrane helix topology, but 45 ORFs are predicted to have different structures. This is due to GPCR fragments that are predominantly from extracellular or intracellular domains as well as database annotation errors. Our preliminary validation includes the automated modeling of bovine rhodopsin, the only solved GPCR in the Protein Data Bank. With homologous templates excluded, the final model built by TASSER has a global C(alpha root-mean-squared deviation from native of 4.6 angstroms, with a root-mean-squared deviation in the transmembrane helix region of 2.1 angstroms. Models of several representative GPCRs are compared with mutagenesis and affinity labeling data, and consistent agreement is demonstrated. Structure clustering of the predicted models shows that GPCRs with similar structures tend to belong to a similar functional class even when their sequences are diverse. These results demonstrate the usefulness

  5. Molecular characterization of an adiponectin receptor homolog in the white leg shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah Ran; Alam, Md Jobaidul; Yoon, Tae-ho; Lee, Soo Rin; Park, Hyun; Kim, Doo-Nam; An, Doo-Hae; Lee, Jae-Bong; Lee, Chung Il

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin (AdipoQ) and its receptors (AdipoRs) are strongly related to growth and development of skeletal muscle, as well as glucose and lipid metabolism in vertebrates. Herein we report the identification of the first full-length cDNA encoding an AdipoR homolog (Liv-AdipoR) from the decapod crustacean Litopenaeus vannamei using a combination of next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and bioinformatics analysis. The full-length Liv-AdipoR (1,245 bp) encoded a protein that exhibited the canonical seven transmembrane domains (7TMs) and the inversed topology that characterize members of the progestin and adipoQ receptor (PAQR) family. Based on the obtained sequence information, only a single orthologous AdipoR gene appears to exist in arthropods, whereas two paralogs, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, have evolved in vertebrates. Transcriptional analysis suggested that the single Liv-AdipoR gene appears to serve the functions of two mammalian AdipoRs. At 72 h after injection of 50 pmol Liv-AdipoR dsRNA (340 bp) into L. vannamei thoracic muscle and deep abdominal muscle, transcription levels of Liv-AdipoR decreased by 93% and 97%, respectively. This confirmed optimal conditions for RNAi of Liv-AdipoR. Knockdown of Liv-AdipoR resulted in significant changes in the plasma levels of ammonia, 3-methylhistine, and ornithine, but not plasma glucose, suggesting that that Liv-AdipoR is important for maintaining muscle fibers. The chronic effect of Liv-AdipoR dsRNA injection was increased mortality. Transcriptomic analysis showed that 804 contigs were upregulated and 212 contigs were downregulated by the knockdown of Liv-AdipoR in deep abdominal muscle. The significantly upregulated genes were categorized as four main functional groups: RNA-editing and transcriptional regulators, molecular chaperones, metabolic regulators, and channel proteins. PMID:27478708

  6. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  7. Smelling Sulfur: Copper and Silver Regulate the Response of Human Odorant Receptor OR2T11 to Low-Molecular-Weight Thiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengju; Ahmed, Lucky; Zhang, Ruina; Pan, Yi; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Burger, Jessica L; Block, Eric; Batista, Victor S; Zhuang, Hanyi

    2016-10-03

    Mammalian survival depends on ultrasensitive olfactory detection of volatile sulfur compounds, since these compounds can signal the presence of rancid food, O2 depleted atmospheres, and predators (through carnivore excretions). Skunks exploit this sensitivity with their noxious spray. In commerce, natural and liquefied gases are odorized with t-BuSH and EtSH, respectively, as warnings. The 100-million-fold difference in olfactory perception between structurally similar EtSH and EtOH has long puzzled those studying olfaction. Mammals detect thiols and other odorants using odorant receptors (ORs), members of the family of seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Understanding the regulator cofactors and response of ORs is particularly challenging due to the lack of X-ray structural models. Here, we combine computational modeling and site-directed mutagenesis with saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy and measurements of the receptor response profiles. We find that human thiol receptor OR2T11 responds specifically to gas odorants t-BuSH and EtSH requiring ionic copper for its robust activation and that this role of copper is mimicked by ionic and nanoparticulate silver. While copper is both an essential nutrient for life and, in excess, a hallmark of various pathologies and neurodegenerative diseases, its involvement in human olfaction has not been previously demonstrated. When screened against a series of alcohols, thiols, sulfides, and metal-coordinating ligands, OR2T11 responds with enhancement by copper to the mouse semiochemical CH3SCH2SH and derivatives, to four-membered cyclic sulfide thietane and to one- to four-carbon straight- and branched-chain and five-carbon branched-chain thiols but not to longer chain thiols, suggesting compact receptor dimensions. Alcohols are unreactive.

  8. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which is ...

  9. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  10. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  11. Attentional bias in math anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms. PMID:26528208

  12. Attentional Bias in Math Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eRubinsten

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math. Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of math anxiety and 13 with low levels of math anxiety were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of 6 types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, were presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks. Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in math anxiety. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words. These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense math anxiety symptoms.

  13. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  14. Sex Bias in Counseling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harway, Michele

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews findings of bias in counseling materials and presents results of three original studies. Indications are that textbooks used by practitioners present the sexes in stereotypical fashion, and a greater proportion of college catalog context is devoted to men than to women. (Author)

  15. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  16. Measurement Bias in Multilevel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  17. Measurement bias in multilevel data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.; Dolan, C.V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  18. Attentional bias in math anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms.

  19. Bias Adjusted Precipitation Threat Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesinger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide variety of performance measures available for the assessment of skill of deterministic precipitation forecasts, the equitable threat score (ETS might well be the one used most frequently. It is typically used in conjunction with the bias score. However, apart from its mathematical definition the meaning of the ETS is not clear. It has been pointed out (Mason, 1989; Hamill, 1999 that forecasts with a larger bias tend to have a higher ETS. Even so, the present author has not seen this having been accounted for in any of numerous papers that in recent years have used the ETS along with bias "as a measure of forecast accuracy".

    A method to adjust the threat score (TS or the ETS so as to arrive at their values that correspond to unit bias in order to show the model's or forecaster's accuracy in extit{placing} precipitation has been proposed earlier by the present author (Mesinger and Brill, the so-called dH/dF method. A serious deficiency however has since been noted with the dH/dF method in that the hypothetical function that it arrives at to interpolate or extrapolate the observed value of hits to unit bias can have values of hits greater than forecast when the forecast area tends to zero. Another method is proposed here based on the assumption that the increase in hits per unit increase in false alarms is proportional to the yet unhit area. This new method removes the deficiency of the dH/dF method. Examples of its performance for 12 months of forecasts by three NCEP operational models are given.

  20. Evidence of positive selection at codon sites localized in extracellular domains of mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Kelsey J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CC chemokine receptor proteins (CCR1 through CCR10 are seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors whose signaling pathways are known for their important roles coordinating immune system responses through targeted trafficking of white blood cells. In addition, some of these receptors have been identified as fusion proteins for viral pathogens: for example, HIV-1 strains utilize CCR5, CCR2 and CCR3 proteins to obtain cellular entry in humans. The extracellular domains of these receptor proteins are involved in ligand-binding specificity as well as pathogen recognition interactions. In mammals, the majority of chemokine receptor genes are clustered together; in humans, seven of the ten genes are clustered in the 3p21-24 chromosome region. Gene conversion events, or exchange of DNA sequence between genes, have been reported in chemokine receptor paralogs in various mammalian lineages, especially between the cytogenetically closely located pairs CCR2/5 and CCR1/3. Datasets of mammalian orthologs for each gene were analyzed separately to minimize the potential confounding impact of analyzing highly similar sequences resulting from gene conversion events. Molecular evolution approaches and the software package Phylogenetic Analyses by Maximum Likelihood (PAML were utilized to investigate the signature of selection that has acted on the mammalian CC chemokine receptor (CCR gene family. The results of neutral vs. adaptive evolution (positive selection hypothesis testing using Site Models are reported. In general, positive selection is defined by a ratio of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide changes (dN/dS, or ω >1. Results Of the ten mammalian CC motif chemokine receptor sequence datasets analyzed, only CCR2 and CCR3 contain amino acid codon sites that exhibit evidence of positive selection using site based hypothesis testing in PAML. Nineteen of the twenty codon sites putatively indentified as likely to be under positive

  1. Identification of a novel pituitary-specific chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and its splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2006-11-01

    In all vertebrates, GnRH regulates gonadotropin secretion through binding to a specific receptor on the surface of pituitary gonadotropes. At least two forms of GnRH exist within a single species, and several corresponding GnRH receptors (GNRHRs) have been isolated with one form being pituitary specific. In chickens, only one type of widely expressed GNRHR has previously been identified. The objectives of this study were to isolate a chicken pituitary-specific GNRHR and to determine its expression pattern during a reproductive cycle. Using a combined strategy of PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), a new GNRHR (chicken GNRHR2) and two splice variants were isolated in domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus). Full-length GNRHR2 and one of its splice variant mRNAs were expressed exclusively in the pituitary, whereas mRNA of the other splice variant was expressed in most brain tissues examined. The deduced amino acid sequence of full-length chicken GNRHR2 reveals a seven transmembrane domain protein with 57%-65% homology to nonmammalian GNRHRs. Semiquantitative real-time PCR revealed that mRNA levels of full-length chicken GNRHR2 in the pituitary correlate with the reproductive status of birds, with maximum levels observed during the peak of lay and 4 wk postphotostimulation in females and males, respectively. Furthermore, GnRH stimulation of GH3 cells that were transiently transfected with cDNA that encodes chicken GNRHR2 resulted in a significant increase in inositol phosphate accumulation. In conclusion, we isolated a novel GNRHR and its splice variants in chickens, and spatial and temporal gene expression patterns suggest that this receptor plays an important role in the regulation of reproduction.

  2. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    ’ recommendations. Using a large data of analysts’ recommendations from Asian emerging markets, we show that local analysts issue more optimistic recommendations than their foreign counterparts. However, optimism difference between the two groups is greater for firms with poor information environment. Our results......Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts...... show that optimism difference between the two groups is more than twice as much in firms with poor information environment than in firms with better information environment. We argue that poor information environment pose greater information asymmetries to foreign analysts regarding local firms...

  3. Complex pharmacology of free fatty acid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond; Hudson, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond simple competitive agonism or antagonism by ligands interacting with the orthosteric binding site of the receptor to incorporate concepts of allosteric agonism, allosteric modulation, signaling bias, c...

  4. Down-regulation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 by somatostatin receptor subtype 5: a novel mechanism for inhibition of cellular proliferation and insulin secretion by somatostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eBrunicardi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin is a regulatory peptide and acts as an endogenous inhibitory regulator of the secretory and proliferative responses of target cells. Somatostatin’s actions are mediated by a family of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors that comprise five distinct subtypes (SSTR1-5. SSTR5 is one of the major SSTRs in the islets of Langerhans. Homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1 is essential for pancreatic development, β cell differentiation, maintenance of normal β cell functions in adults and tumorigenesis. Recent studies show that SSTR5 acts as a negative regulator for PDX-1 expression and that SSTR5 mediates somatostatin’s inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and insulin expression/excretion through down-regulating PDX-1 expression. SSTR5 exerts its inhibitory effect on PDX-1 expression at both the transcriptional level by down-regulating PDX-1 mRNA and the post-translational level by enhancing PDX-1 ubiquitination. Identification of PDX-1 as a transcriptional target for SSTR5 may help in guiding the choice of therapeutic cancer treatments.

  5. WNT/Frizzled signalling: receptor-ligand selectivity with focus on FZD-G protein signalling and its physiological relevance: IUPHAR Review 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, J P; Petersen, J; Schulte, G

    2014-03-01

    The wingless/int1 (WNT)/Frizzled (FZD) signalling pathway controls numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, cell-fate decisions, migration and plays a crucial role during embryonic development. Nineteen mammalian WNTs can bind to 10 FZDs thereby activating different downstream pathways such as WNT/β-catenin, WNT/planar cell polarity and WNT/Ca(2+) . However, the mechanisms of signalling specification and the involvement of heterotrimeric G proteins are still unclear. Disturbances in the pathways can lead to various diseases ranging from cancer, inflammatory diseases to metabolic and neurological disorders. Due to the presence of seven-transmembrane segments, evidence for coupling between FZDs and G proteins and substantial structural differences in class A, B or C GPCRs, FZDs were grouped separately in the IUPHAR GPCR database as the class FZD within the superfamily of GPCRs. Recently, important progress has been made pointing to a direct activation of G proteins after WNT stimulation. WNT/FZD and G protein coupling remain to be fully explored, although the basic observation supporting the nature of FZDs as GPCRs is compelling. Because the involvement of different (i) WNTs; (ii) FZDs; and (iii) intracellular binding partners could selectively affect signalling specification, in this review we present the current understanding of receptor/ligand selectivity of FZDs and WNTs. We pinpoint what is known about signalling specification and the physiological relevance of these interactions with special emphasis on FZD-G protein interactions.

  6. The G Protein-Coupled Receptor RAI3 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Pancreatic Cancer Survival and Regulates Proliferation via STAT3 Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahny, Elisabeth; Yang, Hai; Liu, Bin; Jahnke, Beatrix; Lademann, Franziska; Knösel, Thomas; Rümmele, Petra; Grützmann, Robert; Aust, Daniela E.; Denz, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest tumors worldwide. Understanding the function of gene expression alterations is a prerequisite for developing new strategies in diagnostic and therapy. GPRC5A (RAI3), coding for a seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor is known to be overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and might be an interesting candidate for therapeutic intervention. Expression levels of RAI3 were compared using a tissue microarray of 435 resected patients with pancreatic cancer as well as 209 samples from chronic pancreatitis (CP), intra-ductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and normal pancreatic tissue. To elucidate the function of RAI3 overexpression, siRNA based knock-down was used and transfected cells were analyzed using proliferation and migration assays. Pancreatic cancer patients showed a statistically significant overexpression of RAI3 in comparison to normal and chronic pancreatitis tissue. Especially the loss of apical RAI3 expression represents an independent prognostic parameter for overall survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. Suppression of GPRC5a results in decreased cell growth, proliferation and migration in pancreatic cancer cell lines via a STAT3 modulated pathway, independent from ERK activation. PMID:28114355

  7. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases). Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Probability biases as Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre; C. R. Martins

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will show how several observed biases in human probabilistic reasoning can be partially explained as good heuristics for making inferences in an environment where probabilities have uncertainties associated to them. Previous results show that the weight functions and the observed violations of coalescing and stochastic dominance can be understood from a Bayesian point of view. We will review those results and see that Bayesian methods should also be used as part of the explanation behind other known biases. That means that, although the observed errors are still errors under the be understood as adaptations to the solution of real life problems. Heuristics that allow fast evaluations and mimic a Bayesian inference would be an evolutionary advantage, since they would give us an efficient way of making decisions. %XX In that sense, it should be no surprise that humans reason with % probability as it has been observed.

  9. Belief bias and relational reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Maxwell J; Sykes, Elizabeth D A

    2003-01-01

    When people evaluate categorical syllogisms, they tend to reject unbelievable conclusions and accept believable ones irrespective of their validity. Typically, this effect is particularly marked for invalid conclusions that are possible, but do not necessarily follow, given the premises. However, smaller believability effects can also be detected for other types of conclusion. Three experiments are reported here, in which an attempt was made to determine whether belief bias effects can manifest themselves on the relational inference task. Subjects evaluated the validity of conclusions such as William the Conqueror was king after the Pyramids were built (temporal task) or Manchester is north of Bournemouth (spatial task) with respect to their premises. All of the major findings for equivalent categorical syllogism tasks were replicated. However, the overall size of the main effect of believability appears to be related to task presentation, a phenomenon not previously identified for categorical syllogisms and which current theories of belief bias have difficulty explaining.

  10. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  11. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  12. Are temperature reconstructions regionally biased?

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, O

    2012-01-01

    Are temperature reconstructions possibly biased due to regionally differing density of utilized proxy-networks? This question is assessed utilizing a simple process-based forward model of tree growth in the virtual reality of two simulations of the climate of the last millennium with different amplitude of solar forcing variations. The pseudo-tree ring series cluster in high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and east Asia. Only weak biases are found for the full network. However, for a strong solar forcing amplitude the high latitudes indicate a warmer first half of the last millennium while mid-latitudes and Asia were slightly colder than the extratropical hemispheric average. Reconstruction skill is weak or non-existent for two simple reconstruction schemes, and comparison of virtual reality target and reconstructions reveals strong deficiencies. The temporal resolution of the proxies has an influence on the reconstruction task and results are sensitive to the construction of the proxy-network. Existing ...

  13. Competition and Commercial Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    A. Blasco; F. Sobbrio

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on commercial media bias (i.e., advertisers influence over media accuracy) and then introduces a simple model to summarize the main elements of the theoretical literature. The analysis provides three main policy insights for media regulators: i) Media regulators should target their monitoring efforts towards news contents upon which advertisers are likely to share similar preferences; ii) In advertising industries characterized by high correlation in ...

  14. BEHAVIORAL BIASES IN TRADING SECURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcan Ciprian Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main thesis of this paper represents the importance and the effects that human behavior has over capital markets. It is important to see the link between the asset valuation and investor sentiment that motivate to pay for an asset a certain prices over/below the intrinsic value. The main behavioral aspects discussed are emotional factors such as: fear of regret, overconfidence, perseverance, loss aversion ,heuristic biases, misinformation and thinking errors, herding and their consequences.

  15. Measuring bias from unbiased observable

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-01-01

    Since Kaiser introduced galaxies as a biased tracer of the underlying total mass field, the linear galaxies bias, b(z) appears ubiquitously both in theoretical calculations and in observational measurements related to galaxy surveys. However, the generic approaches to the galaxy density is a non-local and stochastic function of the underlying dark matter density and it becomes difficult to make the analytic form of b(z). Due to this fact, b(z) is known as a nuisance parameter and the effort has been made to measure bias free observable quantities. We provide the exact and analytic function of b(z) which also can be measured from galaxy surveys using the redshift space distortions parameters, more accurately unbiased observable \\beta \\sigma_{\\rm{gal}} = f \\sigma_8. We also introduce approximate solutions for b(z) for different gravity theories. One can generalize these approximate solutions to be exact when one solves the exact evolutions for the dark matter density fluctuation of given gravity theories. These...

  16. Response bias in plaintiffs' histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W; Zasler, N D; Marguilies, S; English, L T; Stevens, K B

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated response bias in self-reported history of factors relevant to the assessment of traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury and related emotional distress. Response bias refers to systematic error in self-report data. A total of 446 subjects (comprising 131 litigating and 315 non-litigating adults from five locations in the United States) completed a symptom questionnaire. Data were obtained from university faculty and students, from patients in clinics specializing in physiatry neurology, and family medicine, and from plaintiffs undergoing forensic neuropsychological evaluations. Comparisons were made for litigant and non litigant ratings of their past and current cognitive and emotional functioning, including life in general, ability to concentrate, memory, depression, anxiety, alcohol, drugs, ability to work or attend school, irritability, headaches, confusion, self-esteem, and fatigue. Although there is no basis for hypothesizing plaintiffs to be healthier than the general population, plaintiffs rated their pre-injury functioning superior to non-plaintiffs. These findings suggest that response biases need to be taken into account by forensic examiners when relying on litigants' self-reports of pre-injury status.

  17. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  18. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen E Allahverdyan

    Full Text Available Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science.We formulate a (non-Bayesian model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency or the first opinion (primacy -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties.The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  19. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W Hildebrand

    Full Text Available The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7, and B (between TM5 and 6, respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all

  20. Matrilateral Bias in Human Grandmothering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daly

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Children receive more care and resources from their maternal grandmothers than from their paternal grandmothers. This asymmetry is the “matrilateral bias” in grandmaternal investment. Here, we synopsize the evolutionary theories that predict such a bias, and review evidence of its cross-cultural generality and magnitude. Evolutionists have long maintained that investing in a daughter’s child yields greater fitness returns, on average, than investing in a son’s child because of paternity uncertainty: the son’s putative progeny may have been sired by someone else. Recent theoretical work has identified an additional natural selective basis for the matrilateral bias that may be no less important: supporting grandchildren lightens the load on their mother, increasing her capacity to pursue her fitness in other ways, and if she invests those gains either in her natal relatives or in children of a former or future partner, fitness returns accrue to the maternal, but not the paternal, grandmother. In modern democracies, where kinship is reckoned bilaterally and no postmarital residence norms restrict grandmaternal access to grandchildren, many studies have found large matrilateral biases in contact, childcare, and emotional closeness. In other societies, patrilineal ideology and postmarital residence with the husband’s kin (virilocality might be expected to have produced a patrilateral bias instead, but the available evidence refutes this hypothesis. In hunter-gatherers, regardless of professed norms concerning kinship and residence, mothers get needed help at and after childbirth from their mothers, not their mothers-in-law. In traditional agricultural and pastoral societies, patrilineal and virilocal norms are common, but young mothers still turn to their natal families for crucial help, and several studies have documented benefits, including reduced child mortality, associated with access to maternal, but not paternal, grandmothers. Even

  1. Bias-correction in vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the properties of various methods for bias-correcting parameter estimates in both stationary and non-stationary vector autoregressive models. First, we show that two analytical bias formulas from the existing literature are in fact identical. Next, based on a detailed simulation study......, we show that when the model is stationary this simple bias formula compares very favorably to bootstrap bias-correction, both in terms of bias and mean squared error. In non-stationary models, the analytical bias formula performs noticeably worse than bootstrapping. Both methods yield a notable...... improvement over ordinary least squares. We pay special attention to the risk of pushing an otherwise stationary model into the non-stationary region of the parameter space when correcting for bias. Finally, we consider a recently proposed reduced-bias weighted least squares estimator, and we find...

  2. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  3. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  4. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. Marissen; I.H.A. Franken; A.J. Waters; P. Blanken; W. van den Brink; V.M. Hendriks

    2006-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have shown that abstinent heroin addicts exhibit an attentional bias to heroin-related stimuli. It has been suggested that attentional bias may represent a vulnerability to relapse into drug use. In the present study, the predictive value of pre-treatment attentional bias on re

  5. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  6. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  7. Targeting central melanocortin receptors: a promising novel approach for treating alcohol abuse disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey eOlney

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The melanocortin (MC peptides are produced centrally by propiomelanocortin (POMC neurons within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and act through five seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled melanocortin receptor (MCR subtypes. The MC3R and MC4R subtypes, the most abundant central MCRs, are widely expressed in brain regions known to modulate neurobiological responses to ethanol, including regions of the hypothalamus and extended amygdala. Agouti-related protein (AgRP, also produced in the arcuate nucleus, is secreted in terminals expressing MCRs and functions as an endogenous MCR antagonist. This review highlights recent genetic and pharmacological findings that have implicated roles for the MC and AgRP systems in modulating ethanol consumption. Ethanol consumption is associated with significant alterations in the expression levels of various MC peptides/protein, which suggests that ethanol-induced perturbations of MC/AgRP signaling may modulate excessive ethanol intake. Consistently, MCR agonists decrease, and AgRP increases, ethanol consumption in mice. MCR agonists fail to blunt ethanol intake in mutant mice lacking the MC4R, suggesting that the protective effects of MCR agonists are modulated by the MC4R. Interestingly, recent evidence reveals that MCR agonists are more effective at blunting binge-like ethanol intake in mutant mice lacking the MC3R, suggesting that the MC3R has opposing effects on the MC4R. Finally, mutant mice lacking AgRP exhibit blunted voluntary and binge-like ethanol drinking, consistent with pharmacological studies. Collectively, these preclinical observations provide compelling evidence that compounds that target the MC system may provide therapeutic value for treating alcohol abuse disorders and that the utilization of currently available MC-targeting compounds- such as those being used to treat eating disorders- may be used as effective treatments to this end.

  8. Re: Chemokines in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fehmi Narter

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines that regulate the trafficking and positioning of cells by activating the seven-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled chemokine receptors (GPCR) or non G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane spanning receptors called atypical chemokine receptors (ACKR). Chemokines are basic proteins that also bind to glycosaminoglycans which play important roles in their biology. Chemokines are divided into four subfamilies based on the position of the first two N-termina...

  9. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays.Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias,especially the media bias.They studied the media bias from different perspectives,such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX,the bias on the venerable group,the bias on women and so on.The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  10. A Review of Studies on Media Bias at Home

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛一丹

    2015-01-01

    Bias is widely existed nowadays. Domestic scholars have done a lot of research on the bias, especially the media bias. They studied the media bias from different perspectives, such as the bias on China image,the bias of a certain media FOX, the bias on the venerable group, the bias on women and so on. The author plans to give a review of the studies on media bias at home in this paper.

  11. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  12. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...... sizes has been conducted. METHODS: Here, we performed a comprehensive review of meta-analyses of peripheral nongenetic biomarkers that could discriminate individuals with MDD from nondepressed controls. PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched through April 10, 2015. RESULTS: From 15...

  13. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which...... is a general tendency to focus on numerators and pay insufficient attention to denominators in ratios. Using a population-based survey experiment, I demonstrate how differently framed but logically equivalent representations of the exact same numerical value can have large effects on citizens’ preferences...

  14. Magnetoelectric switching of exchange bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Pavel; Hochstrat, Andreas; Chen, Xi; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Binek, Christian

    2005-03-25

    The perpendicular exchange bias field, H(EB), of the magnetoelectric heterostructure Cr2O3(111)/(Co/Pt)(3) changes sign after field cooling to below the Néel temperature of Cr2O3 in either parallel or antiparallel axial magnetic and electric freezing fields. The switching of H(EB) is explained by magnetoelectrically induced antiferromagnetic single domains which extend to the interface, where the direction of their end spins controls the sign of H(EB). Novel applications in magnetoelectronic devices seem possible.

  15. A Simulation Platform for Quantifying Survival Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayeda, Elizabeth Rose; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Power, Melinda C

    2016-01-01

    Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality i......-mortality situations. This simulation platform provides a flexible tool for evaluating biases in studies with high mortality, as is common in cognitive aging research.......Bias due to selective mortality is a potential concern in many studies and is especially relevant in cognitive aging research because cognitive impairment strongly predicts subsequent mortality. Biased estimation of the effect of an exposure on rate of cognitive decline can occur when mortality...... platform with which to quantify the expected bias in longitudinal studies of determinants of cognitive decline. We evaluated potential survival bias in naive analyses under several selective survival scenarios, assuming that exposure had no effect on cognitive decline for anyone in the population. Compared...

  16. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (Pframing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, Pframing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  17. Systematic errors in detecting biased agonism: Analysis of current methods and development of a new model-free approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaran, H. Ongun; Ambrosio, Caterina; Uğur, Özlem; Madaras Koncz, Erzsebet; Grò, Maria Cristina; Vezzi, Vanessa; Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Costa, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Discovering biased agonists requires a method that can reliably distinguish the bias in signalling due to unbalanced activation of diverse transduction proteins from that of differential amplification inherent to the system being studied, which invariably results from the non-linear nature of biological signalling networks and their measurement. We have systematically compared the performance of seven methods of bias diagnostics, all of which are based on the analysis of concentration-response curves of ligands according to classical receptor theory. We computed bias factors for a number of β-adrenergic agonists by comparing BRET assays of receptor-transducer interactions with Gs, Gi and arrestin. Using the same ligands, we also compared responses at signalling steps originated from the same receptor-transducer interaction, among which no biased efficacy is theoretically possible. In either case, we found a high level of false positive results and a general lack of correlation among methods. Altogether this analysis shows that all tested methods, including some of the most widely used in the literature, fail to distinguish true ligand bias from “system bias” with confidence. We also propose two novel semi quantitative methods of bias diagnostics that appear to be more robust and reliable than currently available strategies. PMID:28290478

  18. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  19. Gene : CBRC-ETEL-01-0666 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _HUMAN 1e-113 63% ref|XP_001377735.1| PREDICTED: similar to seven transmembrane helix receptor [Monodelphis domestica] 1e-111 59% MPN...STIVTEFLLSGFSDVWEVQSLYTMLFLLMYLATLTGNLLIVTVITLDQRLHTPMYFFILNLSVWDMCYISVTVPKACVIFLLN

  20. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...... projects appear to be systematically underestimated, while demand for rail projects appears to be systematically overestimated. We compare the findings in the present study with those of previous studies and discuss the implications for the validity of project appraisal in the form of CBA...

  1. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Del Vicario, Michela; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM...

  2. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us.

  3. Forecasts: uncertain, inaccurate and biased?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Ambrasaite, Inga; Salling, Kim Bang

    2012-01-01

    Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) is the dominating methodology for appraisal of transport infrastructure projects across the globe. In order to adequately assess the costs and benefits of such projects two types of forecasts are crucial to the validity of the appraisal. First are the forecasts...... of construction costs, which account for the majority of total project costs. Second are the forecasts of travel time savings, which account for the majority of total project benefits. The latter of these is, inter alia, determined by forecasts of travel demand, which we shall use as a proxy for the forecasting...... accuracy of project benefits. This paper presents results from an on-going research project on uncertainties in transport project evaluation (UNITE) that find forecasts of demand to be not only uncertain, but at times also highly inaccurate and often displaying a concerning degree of bias. Demand for road...

  4. Female-biased anorexia and anxiety in the Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, John L; Fong, Li An; Clossen, Bryan L; Hairgrove, Ross E; York, Daniel C; Walker, Benjamin B; Hercules, Gregory W; Mertesdorf, Lauren M; Patel, Margi; Morgan, Caurnel

    2014-06-22

    Anorexia and anxiety cause significant mortality and disability with female biases and frequent comorbidity after puberty, but the scarcity of suitable animal models impedes understanding of their biological underpinnings. It is reported here that in adult or weanling Syrian hamsters, relative to social housing (SH), social separation (SS) induced anorexia characterized as hypophagia, weight loss, reduced adiposity, and hypermetabolism. Following anorexia, SS increased reluctance to feed, and thigmotaxis, in anxiogenic environments. Importantly, anorexia and anxiety were induced post-puberty with female biases. SS also reduced hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor mRNA and serum corticosteroid levels assessed by RT-PCR and RIA, respectively. Consistent with the view that sex differences in adrenal suppression contributed to female biases in anorexia and anxiety by disinhibiting neuroimmune activity, SS elevated hypothalamic interleukin-6 and toll-like receptor 4 mRNA levels. Although corticosteroids were highest during SH, they were within the physiological range and associated with juvenile-like growth of white adipose, bone, and skeletal muscle. These results suggest that hamsters exhibit plasticity in bioenergetic and emotional phenotypes across puberty without an increase in stress responsiveness. Thus, social separation of hamsters provides a model of sex differences in anorexia and anxiety during adulthood and their pathogeneses during adolescence.

  5. Biased random walks on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battiston, Federico; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Biased random walks on complex networks are a particular type of walks whose motion is biased on properties of the destination node, such as its degree. In recent years they have been exploited to design efficient strategies to explore a network, for instance by constructing maximally mixing trajectories or by sampling homogeneously the nodes. In multiplex networks, the nodes are related through different types of links (layers or communication channels), and the presence of connections at different layers multiplies the number of possible paths in the graph. In this work we introduce biased random walks on multiplex networks and provide analytical solutions for their long-term properties such as the stationary distribution and the entropy rate. We focus on degree-biased walks and distinguish between two subclasses of random walks: extensive biased walks consider the properties of each node separately at each layer, intensive biased walks deal instead with intrinsically multiplex variables. We study the effec...

  6. Professional Culture and Climate: Addressing Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    Unconscious bias reflects expectations or stereotypes that influence our judgments of others (regardless of our own group). Everyone has unconscious biases. The end result of unconscious bias can be an accumulation of advantage or disadvantage that impacts the long term career success of individuals, depending on which biases they are subject to. In order to foster a professional culture and climate, being aware of these unconscious biases and mitigating against them is a first step. This is particularly important when judgements are needed, such as in cases for recruitment, choice of speakers for conferences, and even reviewing papers submitted for publication. This presentation will cover how unconscious bias manifests itself, what evidence exists to demonstrate it exists, and ways it can be addressed.

  7. Symmetry as Bias: Rediscovering Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a rational reconstruction of Einstein's discovery of special relativity, validated through an implementation: the Erlanger program. Einstein's discovery of special relativity revolutionized both the content of physics and the research strategy used by theoretical physicists. This research strategy entails a mutual bootstrapping process between a hypothesis space for biases, defined through different postulated symmetries of the universe, and a hypothesis space for physical theories. The invariance principle mutually constrains these two spaces. The invariance principle enables detecting when an evolving physical theory becomes inconsistent with its bias, and also when the biases for theories describing different phenomena are inconsistent. Structural properties of the invariance principle facilitate generating a new bias when an inconsistency is detected. After a new bias is generated. this principle facilitates reformulating the old, inconsistent theory by treating the latter as a limiting approximation. The structural properties of the invariance principle can be suitably generalized to other types of biases to enable primal-dual learning.

  8. Dopamine system genes are associated with orienting bias among healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozulinsky, Polina; Greenbaum, Lior; Brande-Eilat, Noa; Braun, Yair; Shalev, Idan; Tomer, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Healthy individuals display subtle orienting bias, manifested as a tendency to direct greater attention toward one hemispace, and evidence suggests that this bias reflects an individual trait, which may be modulated by asymmetric dopamine signaling in striatal and frontal regions. The current study examined the hypothesis that functional genetic variants within dopaminergic genes (DAT1 3' VNTR, dopamine D2 receptor Taq1A (rs1800497) and COMT Val158Met (rs4680)) contribute to individual differences in orienting bias, as measured by the greyscales paradigm, in a sample of 197 young healthy Israeli Jewish participants. For the Taq1A variant, homozygous carriers of the A2 allele displayed significantly increased leftward orienting bias compared to the carriers of the A1 allele. Additionally, and as previously reported by others, we found that bias towards leftward orienting of attention was significantly greater among carriers of the 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 3' VNTR as compared to the individuals who were homozygous for the 10-repeat allele. No significant effect of the COMT Val158Met on orienting bias was found. Taken together, our findings support the potential influence of genetic variants on inter-individual differences in orienting bias, a phenotype relevant to both normal and impaired cognitive processes.

  9. Political Accountability, Electoral Control, and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Takanori; Hizen, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Are anti-establishment mass media really useful in preventing politicians from behaving dishonestly? This paper proposes a voting model for analyzing how differences in the direction of media bias affect politicians' behavior. In particular, the probability of corruption by an incumbent is higher (than that in the case of no media bias) if and only if the mass media have some degree of "anti-incumbent" bias (i.e., information favorable to the incumbent is converted into unfavorable news about...

  10. Electric control of exchange bias training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, W; Binek, Ch

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3), and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  11. Electric Control of Exchange Bias Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtenkamp, W.; Binek, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr2O3, and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  12. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  13. Guidelines for reducing bias in nursing examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klisch, M L

    1994-01-01

    As our nation becomes more diversified, many schools of nursing strive to improve the recruitment and retention of English as a Second Language (ESL) and minority nursing students. An important aspect of this commitment to diversity is the reduction of biased items in nursing examinations, with the goal of making the evaluation process fair for all students. The author defines test and item bias, provides examples of biased items, and presents specific guidelines for decreasing item bias in teacher-made nursing examinations. A discussion of the related topic of whether ESL students should be given extended testing time is included.

  14. Bayesian long branch attraction bias and corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Previous work on the star-tree paradox has shown that Bayesian methods suffer from a long branch attraction bias. That work is extended to settings involving more taxa and partially resolved trees. The long branch attraction bias is confirmed to arise more broadly and an additional source of bias is found. A by-product of the analysis is methods that correct for biases toward particular topologies. The corrections can be easily calculated using existing Bayesian software. Posterior support for a set of two or more trees can thus be supplemented with corrected versions to cross-check or replace results. Simulations show the corrections to be highly effective.

  15. Attribution bias and social anxiety in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M. Achim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia have produced mixed results, whereas such biases have been more consistently reported in people with anxiety disorders. Anxiety comorbidities are frequent in schizophrenia, in particular social anxiety disorder, which could influence their patterns of attribution biases. The objective of the present study was thus to determine if individuals with schizophrenia and a comorbid social anxiety disorder (SZ+ show distinct attribution biases as compared with individuals with schizophrenia without social anxiety (SZ− and healthy controls. Attribution biases were assessed with the Internal, Personal, and Situational Attributions Questionnaire in 41 individual with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls. Results revealed the lack of the normal externalizing bias in SZ+, whereas SZ− did not significantly differ from healthy controls on this dimension. The personalizing bias was not influenced by social anxiety but was in contrast linked with delusions, with a greater personalizing bias in individuals with current delusions. Future studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia should carefully document symptom presentation, including social anxiety.

  16. Neuropeptides and neuropeptide receptors: drug targets, and peptide and non-peptide ligands: a tribute to Prof. Dieter Seebach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Daniel; Bartfai, Tamas

    2012-11-01

    The number of neuropeptides and their corresponding receptors has increased steadily over the last fourty years: initially, peptides were isolated from gut or brain (e.g., Substance P, somatostatin), then by targeted mining in specific regions (e.g., cortistatin, orexin in the brain), or by deorphanization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; orexin, ghrelin receptors) and through the completion the Human Genome Project. Neuropeptides (and their receptors) have regionally restricted distributions in the central and peripheral nervous system. The neuropeptide signaling is somewhat more distinct spatially than signaling with classical, low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters that are more widely expressed, and, therefore, one assumes that drugs acting at neuropeptide receptors may have more selective pharmacological actions with possibly fewer side effects than drugs acting on glutamatergic, GABAergic, monoaminergic, or cholinergic systems. Neuropeptide receptors, which may have a few or multiple subtypes and splice variants, belong almost exclusively to the GPCR family also known as seven-transmembrane receptors (7TM), a favorite class of drug targets in the pharmaceutical industry. Most neuropeptides are co-stored and co-released with classic neurotransmitters, albeit often only at higher frequencies of stimulation or at bursting activity, thus restricting the neuropeptide signaling to specific circumstances, another reason to assume that neuropeptide drug mimics may have less side effects. Neuropeptides possess a wide spectrum of functions from neurohormone, neurotransmitter to growth factor, but also as key inflammatory mediators. Neuropeptides become 'active' when the nervous system is challenged, e.g., by stress, injury, drug abuse, or neuropsychiatric disorders with genetic, epigenetic, and/or environmental components. The unsuspected number of true neuropeptides and their cognate receptors provides opportunities to identify novel targets for the treatment of

  17. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  18. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models. PMID:28074874

  19. Zero-bias spin separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganichev, Sergey D.; Bel'Kov, Vasily V.; Tarasenko, Sergey A.; Danilov, Sergey N.; Giglberger, Stephan; Hoffmann, Christoph; Ivchenko, Eougenious L.; Weiss, Dieter; Wegscheider, Werner; Gerl, Christian; Schuh, Dieter; Stahl, Joachim; de Boeck, Jo; Borghs, Gustaaf; Prettl, Wilhelm

    2006-09-01

    The generation, manipulation and detection of spin-polarized electrons in low-dimensional semiconductors are at the heart of spintronics. Pure spin currents, that is, fluxes of magnetization without charge current, are quite attractive in this respect. A paradigmatic example is the spin Hall effect, where an electrical current drives a transverse spin current and causes a non-equilibrium spin accumulation observed near the sample boundary. Here we provide evidence for an another effect causing spin currents which is fundamentally different from the spin Hall effect. In contrast to the spin Hall effect, it does not require an electric current to flow: without bias the spin separation is achieved by spin-dependent scattering of electrons in media with suitable symmetry. We show, by free-carrier absorption of terahertz (THz) radiation, that spin currents flow in a wide range of temperatures. Moreover, the experimental results provide evidence that simple electron gas heating by any means is already sufficient to yield spin separation due to spin-dependent energy-relaxation processes.

  20. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models.

  1. Media bias under direct and indirect government control: when is the bias smaller?

    OpenAIRE

    Abhra Roy

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical framework to compare media bias under direct and indirect government control. In this context, we show that direct control can lead to a smaller bias and higher welfare than indirect control. We further show that the size of the advertising market affects media bias only under direct control. Media bias, under indirect control, is not affected by the size of the advertising market.

  2. Understanding Unconscious Bias and Unintentional Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moule, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Unconscious biases affect one's relationships, whether they are fleeting relationships in airports or longer term relationships between teachers and students, teachers and parents, teachers and other educators. In this article, the author argues that understanding one's possible biases is essential for developing community in schools.…

  3. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  4. COVARIATION BIAS AND THE RETURN OF FEAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Peter; VANDENHOUT, MA; MERCKELBACH, H

    1995-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that phobic fear is accompanied by a covariation bias, i.e. that phobic Ss tend to overassociate fear relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes. Such a covariation bias seems to be a fairly direct and powerful way to confirm danger expectations and enhance fear. Therefore

  5. Bounding the bias of contrastive divergence learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Anja; Igel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Optimization based on k-step contrastive divergence (CD) has become a common way to train restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs). The k-step CD is a biased estimator of the log-likelihood gradient relying on Gibbs sampling. We derive a new upper bound for this bias. Its magnitude depends on k...

  6. Length-biased Weighted Maxwell Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanak Modi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of length-biased distribution can be employed in development of proper models for life-time data. In this paper, we develop the length-biased form of Weighted Maxwell distribution (WMD. We study the statistical properties of the derived distribution including moments, moment generating function, hazard rate, reverse hazard rate, Shannon entropy and estimation of parameters

  7. Developmental Changes in the Whole Number Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many students' knowledge of fractions is adversely affected by whole number bias, the tendency to focus on the separate whole number components (numerator and denominator) of a fraction rather than on the fraction's integrated magnitude (ratio of numerator to denominator). Although whole number bias appears early in the fraction learning process…

  8. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...

  9. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    to be superior, i.e. a status quo effect. However, in the stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In the Choice Experiment literature, status quo bias...

  10. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  11. On Measurement Bias in Causal Inference

    CERN Document Server

    Pearl, Judea

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of measurement errors in causal inference and highlights several algebraic and graphical methods for eliminating systematic bias induced by such errors. In particulars, the paper discusses the control of partially observable confounders in parametric and non parametric models and the computational problem of obtaining bias-free effect estimates in such models.

  12. Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The desire to ensure the best for children is precisely why educators should become aware of the concept of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Operating outside of our conscious awareness, implicit biases are pervasive, and they can challenge even the most…

  13. Racially Biased Policing: Determinants of Citizen Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzer, Ronald; Tuch, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    The current controversy surrounding racial profiling in America has focused renewed attention on the larger issue of racial bias by the police. Yet little is known about the extent of police racial bias and even less about public perceptions of the problem. This article analyzes recent national survey data on citizens' views of and reported…

  14. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  15. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation independently of beta-arrestin- and dynamin-mediated FSH receptor internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crepieux Pascale

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R is a seven transmembrane spanning receptor (7TMR which plays a crucial role in male and female reproduction. Upon FSH stimulation, the FSH-R activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK. However, the mechanisms whereby the agonist-stimulated FSH-R activates ERK are poorly understood. In order to activate ERK, some 7 TMRs require beta-arrestin-and dynamin-dependent internalization to occur, whereas some others do not. In the present study, we examined the ability of the FSH-activated FSH-R to induce ERK phosphorylation, in conditions where its beta-arrestin- and dynamin-mediated internalization was impaired. Methods Human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells were transiently transfected with the rat FSH-R. Internalization of the FSH-R was manipulated by co-expression of either a beta-arrestin (319–418 dominant negative peptide, either an inactive dynamin K44A mutant or of wild-type beta-arrestin 1 or 2. The outcomes on the FSH-R internalization were assayed by measuring 125I-FSH binding at the cell surface when compared to internalized 125I-FSH binding. The resulting ERK phosphorylation level was visualized by Western blot analysis. Results In HEK 293 cells, FSH stimulated ERK phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Co-transfection of the beta- arrestin (319–418 construct, or of the dynamin K44A mutant reduced FSH-R internalization in response to FSH, without affecting ERK phosphorylation. Likewise, overexpression of wild-type beta-arrestin 1 or 2 significantly increased the FSH-R internalization level in response to FSH, without altering FSH-induced ERK phosphorylation. Conclusion From these results, we conclude that the FSH-R does not require beta-arrestin- nor dynamin-mediated internalization to initiate ERK phosphorylation in response to FSH.

  16. Blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus flytrap domain (VFTD) inhibits amygdala plasticity, stress, and anxiety-related behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Christine E; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J

    2014-04-18

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design.

  17. Implicit Social Biases in People With Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Elina; Stanley, Damian; Nair, Remya; Adolphs, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    Implicit social biases are ubiquitous and are known to influence social behavior. A core diagnostic criterion of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is abnormal social behavior. We investigated the extent to which individuals with ASD might show a specific attenuation of implicit social biases, using Implicit Association Tests (IATs) involving social (gender, race) and nonsocial (nature, shoes) categories. High-functioning adults with ASD showed intact but reduced IAT effects relative to healthy control participants. We observed no selective attenuation of implicit social (vs. nonsocial) biases in our ASD population. To extend these results, we supplemented our healthy control data with data collected from a large online sample from the general population and explored correlations between autistic traits and IAT effects. We observed no systematic relationship between autistic traits and implicit social biases in our online and control samples. Taken together, these results suggest that implicit social biases, as measured by the IAT, are largely intact in ASD.

  18. Adaptive Variable Bias Magnetic Bearing Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. With the existence of the bias current, even in no load conditions, there is always some power consumption. In aerospace applications, power consumption becomes an important concern. In response to this concern, an alternative magnetic bearing control method, called Adaptive Variable Bias Control (AVBC), has been developed and its performance examined. The AVBC operates primarily as a proportional-derivative controller with a relatively slow, bias current dependent, time-varying gain. The AVBC is shown to reduce electrical power loss, be nominally stable, and provide control performance similar to conventional bias control. Analytical, computer simulation, and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  19. Are all biases missing data problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Chanelle J; Cain, Lauren E; Hogan, Joseph W

    2015-09-01

    Estimating causal effects is a frequent goal of epidemiologic studies. Traditionally, there have been three established systematic threats to consistent estimation of causal effects. These three threats are bias due to confounders, selection, and measurement error. Confounding, selection, and measurement bias have typically been characterized as distinct types of biases. However, each of these biases can also be characterized as missing data problems that can be addressed with missing data solutions. Here we describe how the aforementioned systematic threats arise from missing data as well as review methods and their related assumptions for reducing each bias type. We also link the assumptions made by the reviewed methods to the missing completely at random (MCAR) and missing at random (MAR) assumptions made in the missing data framework that allow for valid inferences to be made based on the observed, incomplete data.

  20. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  1. A catalog of biases in questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pak, Anita W P

    2005-01-01

    Bias in questionnaires is an important issue in public health research. To collect the most accurate data from respondents, investigators must understand and be able to prevent or at least minimize bias in the design of their questionnaires. This paper identifies and categorizes 48 types of bias in questionnaires based on a review of the literature and offers an example of each type. The types are categorized according to three main sources of bias: the way a question is designed, the way the questionnaire as a whole is designed, and how the questionnaire is administered. This paper is intended to help investigators in public health understand the mechanism and dynamics of problems in questionnaire design and to provide a checklist for identifying potential bias in a questionnaire before it is administered.

  2. Eulerian bias and the galaxy density field

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, B M; Heavens, A F; Mann, Bob; Peacock, John; Heavens, Alan

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the effects on cosmological clustering statistics of empirical biasing, where the galaxy distribution is a local transformation of the present-day Eulerian density field. The effects of the suppression of galaxy numbers in voids, and their enhancement in regions of high density, are considered, independently and in combination. We compare results from numerical simulations with the predictions of simple analytic models. We find that the bias is generally scale-dependent, so that the shape of the galaxy power spectrum differs from that of the underlying mass distribution. The degree of bias is always a monotonic function of scale, tending to an asymptotic value on scales where the density fluctuations are linear. The scale dependence is often rather weak, with many reasonable prescriptions giving a bias which is nearly independent of scale. We have investigated whether such an Eulerian bias can reconcile a range of theoretical power spectra with the twin requirements of fitting the galaxy power ...

  3. Sampling Bias on Cup Anemometer Mean Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L.; Hansen, O. F.; Højstrup, J.

    2003-10-01

    The cup anemometer signal can be sampled in several ways to obtain the mean wind speed. Here we discuss the sampling of series of mean wind speeds from consecutive rotor rotations, followed by unweighted and weighted averaging. It is shown that the unweighted averaging creates a positive bias on the long-term mean wind speed, which is at least one order of magnitude larger than the positive bias from the weighted averaging, also known as the sample-and-hold method. For a homogeneous, neutrally stratified flow the first biases are 1%-2%. For comparison the biases due to fluctuations of the three wind velocity components and due to calibration non-linearity are determined under the same conditions. The largest of these is the v-bias from direction fluctuations. The calculations pertain to the Risø P2546A model cup anemometer.

  4. Medical journal peer review: process and bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Scientific peer review is pivotal in health care research in that it facilitates the evaluation of findings for competence, significance, and originality by qualified experts. While the origins of peer review can be traced to the societies of the eighteenth century, it became an institutionalized part of the scholarly process in the latter half of the twentieth century. This was a response to the growth of research and greater subject specialization. With the current increase in the number of specialty journals, the peer review process continues to evolve to meet the needs of patients, clinicians, and policy makers. The peer review process itself faces challenges. Unblinded peer review might suffer from positive or negative bias towards certain authors, specialties, and institutions. Peer review can also suffer when editors and/or reviewers might be unable to understand the contents of the submitted manuscript. This can result in an inability to detect major flaws, or revelations of major flaws after acceptance of publication by the editors. Other concerns include potentially long delays in publication and challenges uncovering plagiarism, duplication, corruption and scientific misconduct. Conversely, a multitude of these challenges have led to claims of scientific misconduct and an erosion of faith. These challenges have invited criticism of the peer review process itself. However, despite its imperfections, the peer review process enjoys widespread support in the scientific community. Peer review bias is one of the major focuses of today's scientific assessment of the literature. Various types of peer review bias include content-based bias, confirmation bias, bias due to conservatism, bias against interdisciplinary research, publication bias, and the bias of conflicts of interest. Consequently, peer review would benefit from various changes and improvements with appropriate training of reviewers to provide quality reviews to maintain the quality and integrity of

  5. Functional coupling of Cys-226 and Cys-296 in the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor indicates a disulfide bond that is close to the activation pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rosalind J; Al-Sabah, Suleiman; de Maturana, Rakel López; Sinfield, John K; Donnelly, Dan

    2010-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane α-helical (7TM) integral membrane proteins that play a central role in both cell signaling and in the action of many pharmaceuticals. The crystal structures of several Family A GPCRs have shown the presence of a disulfide bond linking transmembrane helix 3 (TM3) to the second extracellular loop (ECL2), enabling ECL2 to stabilize and contribute to the ligand binding pocket. Family B GPCRs share no significant sequence identity with those in Family A but nevertheless share two conserved cysteines in topologically equivalent positions. Since there are no available crystal structures for the 7TM domain of any Family B GPCR, we used mutagenesis alongside pharmacological analysis to investigate the role of ECL2 and the conserved cysteine residues. We mutated Cys-226, at the extracellular end of TM3 of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, to alanine and observed a 38-fold reduction in GLP-1 potency. Interestingly, this potency loss was restored by the additional substitution of Cys-296 in ECL2 to alanine. Alongside the complete conservation of these cysteine residues in Family B GPCRs, this functional coupling suggested the presence of a disulfide bond. Further mutagenesis demonstrated that the low potency observed at the C226A mutant, compared with the C226A-C296A double mutant, was the result of the bulky nature of the released Cys-296 side chain. Since this suggested that ECL2 was in close proximity to the agonist activation pocket, an alanine scan of ECL2 was carried out which confirmed the important role of this loop in agonist-induced receptor activation.

  6. On the power of the test for cluster bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cluster bias refers to measurement bias with respect to the clustering variable in multilevel data. The absence of cluster bias implies absence of bias with respect to any cluster-level (level 2) variable. The variables that possibly cause the bias do not have to be measured to test for cluster

  7. Exchange bias effect in alloys and compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, S; Patra, M; Majumdar, S

    2011-02-23

    The phenomenology of exchange bias effects observed in structurally single-phase alloys and compounds but composed of a variety of coexisting magnetic phases such as ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, spin-glass, cluster-glass and disordered magnetic states are reviewed. The investigations on exchange bias effects are discussed in diverse types of alloys and compounds where qualitative and quantitative aspects of magnetism are focused based on macroscopic experimental tools such as magnetization and magnetoresistance measurements. Here, we focus on improvement of fundamental issues of the exchange bias effects rather than on their technological importance.

  8. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...... toward the cost attribute. If economic values are to be elicited, this problem is difficult to remedy. In a split sample framework we test a novel ex-ante entreaty aimed specifically at the cost attribute and find that it effectively reduces status quo bias and improves the internal validity...

  9. Quantum Statistical Calculation of Exchange Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huai-Yu; DAI Zhen-Hong

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of exchange bias of ferromagnetic (FM) films, which are coupled with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) film, is studied by Heisenberg model by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory for the uncompensated case. Exchange bias HE and coercivity Hc are calculated as functions of the FM film thickness L, temperature, the strength of the exchange interaction across the interface between FM and AFM and the anisotropy of the FM. Hc decreases with increasing L when the FM film is beyond some thickness. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM film thickness and on temperature is also qualitatively in agreement with experiments.

  10. Removing Malmquist bias from linear regressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verter, Frances

    1993-01-01

    Malmquist bias is present in all astronomical surveys where sources are observed above an apparent brightness threshold. Those sources which can be detected at progressively larger distances are progressively more limited to the intrinsically luminous portion of the true distribution. This bias does not distort any of the measurements, but distorts the sample composition. We have developed the first treatment to correct for Malmquist bias in linear regressions of astronomical data. A demonstration of the corrected linear regression that is computed in four steps is presented.

  11. Forecast Bias Correction: A Second Order Method

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The difference between a model forecast and actual observations is called forecast bias. This bias is due to either incomplete model assumptions and/or poorly known parameter values and initial/boundary conditions. In this paper we discuss a method for estimating corrections to parameters and initial conditions that would account for the forecast bias. A set of simple experiments with the logistic ordinary differential equation is performed using an iterative version of a first order version of our method to compare with the second order version of the method.

  12. A study on investors’ personality characteristics and behavioral biases: Conservatism bias and availability bias in the Tehran Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Moradi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most economic and finance theories are based on the assumption that during economic decision making, people would act totally rational and consider all available information. Nevertheless, behavioral finance focuses on studying of the role of psychological factors on economic participants’ behavior. The study shows that in real-world environment, people are influenced by emotional and cognitive errors and may make irrational financial decisions. In many cases, the participants of financial markets are not aware of their talents for error in decision making, so they are dissatisfied with their investments by considering some behavioral biases decisions. These decisions may often yield undesirable outcomes, which could influence economy, significantly. This paper presents a survey on the relationship between personality dimensions with behavioral biases and availability bias among investment managers in the Tehran Stock Exchange using SPSS software, descriptive and inferential statistics. The necessary data are collected through questionnaire and they are analyzed using some statistical tests. The preliminary results indicate that there is a relationship between personality dimensions and behavioral biases like conservatism bias and availability bias among the investors in the Tehran Stock Exchange.

  13. Opioid receptors: toward separation of analgesic from undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ping-Yee; Reggio, Patricia H; Loh, Horace H

    2013-06-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor hetero-oligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics.

  14. Opioid Receptors: Toward Separation of Analgesic from Undesirable Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, P.Y.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Loh, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor heterooligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics PMID:23598157

  15. Popularity, similarity, and the network extraversion bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiler, Daniel C; Kleinbaum, Adam M

    2015-05-01

    Using the emergent friendship network of an incoming cohort of students in an M.B.A. program, we examined the role of extraversion in shaping social networks. Extraversion has two important implications for the emergence of network ties: a popularity effect, in which extraverts accumulate more friends than introverts do, and a homophily effect, in which the more similar are two people's levels of extraversion, the more likely they are to become friends. These effects result in a systematic network extraversion bias, in which people's social networks will tend to be overpopulated with extraverts and underpopulated with introverts. Moreover, the most extraverted people have the greatest network extraversion bias, and the most introverted people have the least network extraversion bias. Our finding that social networks were systematically misrepresentative of the broader social environment raises questions about whether there is a societal bias toward believing other people are more extraverted than they actually are and whether introverts are better socially calibrated than extraverts.

  16. Neurocognition and cognitive biases in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Cristina P; Sacks, Stephanie A; Weisman de Mamani, Amy G

    2012-08-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have been found to exhibit a number of information processing biases that may play a role in the development and exacerbation of symptoms and may impair overall functioning. However, little is known about the factors that are associated with these cognitive biases. Recently, researchers have begun to consider whether neurocognitive deficits, common in schizophrenia, may be risk factors for the development of cognitive biases. In the present study, we assessed neurocognition (verbal learning, delayed verbal recall memory, and verbal recognition memory) and cognitive biases (knowledge corruption and impaired cognitive insight) in 72 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. As hypothesized, poorer delayed verbal recall memory was associated with increased knowledge corruption. Contrary to expectations, verbal learning and verbal memory were not associated with cognitive insight. These findings suggest that an inadequate recall memory system may put patients with schizophrenia at greater risk for cognitive distortions.

  17. Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias Wh...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias When Using Medicare Prescription Drug Data Unobservable exposure time is common among Medicare Part D beneficiaries,...

  18. Fixed points of occasionally weakly biased mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Mahendra Singh, M. R. Singh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weak reciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Commonfixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provideillustrative examples to justify the improvements. Abstract. Common fixed point results due to Pant et al. [Pant et al., Weakreciprocal continuity and fixed point theorems, Ann Univ Ferrara, 57(1, 181-190 (2011] are extended to a class of non commuting operators called occasionally weakly biased pair[ N. Hussain, M. A. Khamsi A. Latif, Common fixed points for JH-operators and occasionally weakly biased pairs under relaxed conditions, Nonlinear Analysis, 74, 2133-2140 (2011]. We also provide illustrative examples to justify the improvements.

  19. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  20. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    Hypothetical bias in stated preference studies is an essential problem which reduces the validity of the obtained welfare estimates for non-market goods. In the attempt to mitigate hypothetical bias, a type of reminder known as Cheap Talk, has been applied in previous studies and found to overall...... eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  1. Autobiographical memory bias in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Julie; de Bree, June; Bryant, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    In social anxiety the psychological self is closely related to the feared stimulus. Socially anxious individuals are, by definition, concerned about how the self is perceived and evaluated by others. As autobiographical memory is strongly related to views of the self it follows that biases in autobiographical memory play an important role in social anxiety. In the present study high (n = 19) and low (n = 29) socially anxious individuals were compared on autobiographical memory bias, current goals, and self-discrepancy. Individuals high in social anxiety showed a bias towards recalling more negative and more social anxiety-related autobiographical memories, reported more current goals related to overcoming social anxiety, and showed larger self-discrepancies. The pattern of results is largely in line with earlier research in individuals with PTSD and complicated grief. This suggests that the relation between autobiographical memory bias and the self is a potentially valuable trans-diagnostic factor.

  2. Statistical framework for estimating GNSS bias

    CERN Document Server

    Vierinen, Juha; Rideout, William C; Erickson, Philip J; Norberg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) non-ionospheric differential time delay bias. The biases are estimated by examining differences of measured line integrated electron densities (TEC) that are scaled to equivalent vertical integrated densities. The spatio-temporal variability, instrumentation dependent errors, and errors due to inaccurate ionospheric altitude profile assumptions are modeled as structure functions. These structure functions determine how the TEC differences are weighted in the linear least-squares minimization procedure, which is used to produce the bias estimates. A method for automatic detection and removal of outlier measurements that do not fit into a model of receiver bias is also described. The same statistical framework can be used for a single receiver station, but it also scales to a large global network of receivers. In addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the method is also applicable to other dual frequency GNSS s...

  3. Pseudo exchange bias due to rotational anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, A., E-mail: andrea.ehrmann@fh-bielefeld.de [Faculty of Engineering and Mathematics, Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences, 33619 Bielefeld (Germany); Komraus, S.; Blachowicz, T.; Domino, K. [Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nees, M.K.; Jakobs, P.J.; Leiste, H. [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mathes, M.; Schaarschmidt, M. [ACCESS e. V., 57072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Ferromagnetic nanostructure arrays with particle dimensions between 160 nm and 400 nm were created by electron-beam lithography. The permalloy structures consist of rectangular-shaped walls around a square open space. While measuring their magnetic properties using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), in some angular regions an exchange bias (EB) seemed to appear. This paper gives an overview of possible reasons for this “pseudo exchange bias” and shows experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulations that this effect can be attributed to unintentionally measuring minor loops. - Highlights: • Pseudo exchange bias can be found in square Py nanorings of different dimensions. • Pseudo exchange bias stems from unintentionally measuring minor loops. • New approach in explaining “real” exchange bias effect in coupled FM/AFM systems. • Theoretical base to explain other measurements of a rotational anisotropy.

  4. Affective forecasting bias in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Shalini; Bulley, Adam; von Hippel, William; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Adults are capable of predicting their emotional reactions to possible future events. Nevertheless, they systematically overestimate the intensity of their future emotional reactions relative to how they feel when these events actually occur. The developmental origin of this "intensity bias" has not yet been examined. Two studies were conducted to test the intensity bias in preschool children. In the first study, 5-year-olds (N=30) predicted how they would feel if they won or lost various games. Comparisons with subsequent self-reported feelings indicated that participants overestimated how sad they would feel to lose the games but did not overestimate their happiness from winning. The second study replicated this effect in another sample of 5-year-olds (n=34) and also found evidence of an intensity bias in 4-year-olds (n=30). These findings provide the first evidence of a negative intensity bias in affective forecasting among young children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Implicit Social Biases in People With Autism

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Implicit social biases are ubiquitous and are known to influence social behavior. A core diagnostic criterion of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is abnormal social behavior. We investigated the extent to which individuals with ASD might show a specific attenuation of implicit social biases, using Implicit Association Tests (IATs) involving social (gender, race) and nonsocial (nature, shoes) categories. High-functioning adults with ASD showed intact but reduced IAT effects relative to healthy ...

  6. Biased liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2008-01-01

    We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure.......We simulate the director structure of all capillaries in a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with liquid crystals. Various mode simulations for different capillaries show the necessity to consider the entire structure....

  7. Sex-Biased Parent-Offspring Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Redondo, T.; Gomendio, Montserrat; Medina, Rosario

    1992-01-01

    In species showing sexual dimorphism, parents may obtain different fitness returns per unit of parental expenditure from sons and daughters. Under these circumstances, parents are expected to invest extra resources in offspring of the most profitable sex. However, it is unclear whether sex-biased expenditure is the result of selection acting on parents, their offspring, or both. Current parent-offspring conflict theory is used to investigate whether sex biases in parental expenditure should b...

  8. SUBJECTIVE AGE BIASES AMONG ADOLESCENT GIRLS

    OpenAIRE

    Guiot, Denis

    2000-01-01

    International audience; Until now, the concept of subjective age has only been used to segment the mature market. Research on consumer behavior has shown the effects of a youthful bias, the tendency to see oneself as younger. Using a conceptual framework based on self-concept, social comparison, and symbolic consumption, this research proposes to characterize the antecedents and the effects of an analogous but opposed tendency: an older bias among adolescent girls. An empirical study carried ...

  9. Measuring the bias of technological change

    OpenAIRE

    Doraszelski, Ulrich; Jaumandreu, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Technological change can increase the productivity of the various factors of production in equal terms or it can be biased towards a specific factor. We develop an estimator for production functions when productivity is multi-dimensional. We directly assess the bias of technological change by measuring, at the level of the individual firm, how much of it is factor neutral and how much is labor augmenting. Applying our estimator to panel data from Spain, we find that technological change is in...

  10. Perceptual and performance biases in action selection

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    When we see an object in the world, there may be a large number of different ways to interact with that object. This large 'visuomotor space' can be constrained through affordances (perceptually available object properties defining potential uses), task demands and the actor's intentions. The effects of perceptual biases can be modified by performance factors, such as a limb's end-state-comfort (ESC; Rosenbaum et al. 1990). We investigated how two other potential performance biases affected i...

  11. Constraints on Assembly Bias from Galaxy Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, Andrew R; Bosch, Frank C van den; Lange, Johannes U; Villarreal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We constrain the newly-introduced decorated Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) model using SDSS DR7 measurements of projected galaxy clustering or r-band luminosity threshold samples. The decorated HOD is a model for the galaxy-halo connection that augments the HOD by allowing for the possibility of galaxy assembly bias: galaxy luminosity may be correlated with dark matter halo properties besides mass, Mvir. We demonstrate that it is not possible to rule out galaxy assembly bias using DR7 measurements of galaxy clustering alone. Moreover, galaxy samples with Mr < -20 and Mr < -20.5 favor strong central galaxy assembly bias. These samples prefer scenarios in which high-concentration are more likely to host a central galaxy relative to low-concentration halos of the same mass. We exclude zero assembly bias with high significance for these samples. Satellite galaxy assembly bias is significant for the faintest sample, Mr < -19. We find no evidence for assembly bias in the Mr < -21 sample. Assembly bi...

  12. Neural correlates of attentional bias in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Robert; Luijten, Maartje

    2014-06-01

    A small but growing neuroimaging literature has begun to examine the neural mechanisms underlying the difficulty that substance-use dependent (SUD) groups have with ignoring salient, drug-related stimuli. Drug-related attentional bias appears to implicate the countermanding forces of cognitive control and reward salience. Basic cognitive neuroscience research suggests that ignoring emotionally evocative stimuli in our environment requires both up-regulation of control networks and down-regulation of processing in emotion and reward regions. Research to date suggests that attentional biases for drug-related stimuli emerge from a failure to sufficiently increase control of attention over salient, but task-irrelevant stimuli. While SUD samples have typically shown increased activity in the cognitive control regions (ie, lateral prefrontal and dorsal anterior cingulate), during attentional bias such increases appear to have been insufficient for the concomitant increases in processing by the emotion/reward regions (ie, amygdala, insula, and striatum). Given the potential contribution of attentional biases to perpetuating drug use and the development of interventions (both pharmaceutical and cognitive-behavioral) to treat biases, understanding the neural basis of successfully reducing bias remains an important, but as yet unanswered, question for our field.

  13. Placebo effect studies are susceptible to response bias and to other types of biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin G

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo.......Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo....

  14. A biased ligand for OXE-R uncouples Gα and Gβγ signaling within a heterotrimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blättermann, Stefanie; Peters, Lucas; Ottersbach, Philipp Aaron;

    2012-01-01

    Differential targeting of heterotrimeric G protein versus β-arrestin signaling are emerging concepts in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) research and drug discovery, and biased engagement by GPCR ligands of either β-arrestin or G protein pathways has been disclosed. Herein we report on a new mec...

  15. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  16. Characterization of Structurally Novel G Protein Biased CB1 Agonists: Implications for Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Benjamin M; Franks, Lirit N; Tai, Sherrica; Fantegrossi, William E; Stahl, Edward L; Berquist, Michael D; Cabanlong, Christian V; Wilson, Catheryn D; Penthala, Narsimha R; Crooks, Peter A; Prather, Paul L

    2017-08-21

    The human cannabinoid subtype 1 receptor (hCB1R) is highly expressed in the CNS and serves as a therapeutic target for endogenous ligands as well as plant-derived and synthetic cannabinoids. Unfortunately, acute use of hCB1R agonists produces unwanted psychotropic effects and chronic administration results in development of tolerance and dependence, limiting the potential clinical use of these ligands. Studies in β-arrestin knockout mice suggest that interaction of certain GPCRs, including μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and hCB1Rs, with β-arrestins might be responsible for several adverse effects produced by agonists acting at these receptors. Indeed, agonists that bias opioid receptor activation toward G-protein, relative to β-arrestin signaling, produce less severe adverse effects. These observations indicate that therapeutic utility of agonists acting at hCB1Rs might be improved by development of G-protein biased hCB1R agonists. Our laboratory recently reported a novel class of indole quinulidinone (IQD) compounds that bind cannabinoid receptors with relatively high affinity and act with varying efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether agonists in this novel cannabinoid class exhibit ligand bias at hCB1 receptors. Our studies found that a novel IQD-derived hCB1 receptor agonist PNR-4-20 elicits robust G protein-dependent signaling, with transduction ratios similar to the non-biased hCB1R agonist CP-55,940. In marked contrast to CP-55,940, PNR-4-20 produces little to no β-arrestin 2 recruitment. Quantitative calculation of bias factors indicates that PNR-4-20 exhibits from 5.4-fold to 29.5-fold bias for G protein, relative to β-arrestin 2 signaling (when compared to G protein activation or inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, respectively). Importantly, as expected due to reduced β-arrestin 2 recruitment, chronic exposure of cells to PNR-4-20 results in significantly less desensitization and down-regulation of hCB1Rs compared to

  17. On the relative independence of thinking biases and cognitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanovich, Keith E; West, Richard F

    2008-04-01

    In 7 different studies, the authors observed that a large number of thinking biases are uncorrelated with cognitive ability. These thinking biases include some of the most classic and well-studied biases in the heuristics and biases literature, including the conjunction effect, framing effects, anchoring effects, outcome bias, base-rate neglect, "less is more" effects, affect biases, omission bias, myside bias, sunk-cost effect, and certainty effects that violate the axioms of expected utility theory. In a further experiment, the authors nonetheless showed that cognitive ability does correlate with the tendency to avoid some rational thinking biases, specifically the tendency to display denominator neglect, probability matching rather than maximizing, belief bias, and matching bias on the 4-card selection task. The authors present a framework for predicting when cognitive ability will and will not correlate with a rational thinking tendency.

  18. Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Rose Skaksen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally l...... information aboutfuture labour requirements, as the relative importance of these industries must be expectedto grow, thereby reinforcing the shift in demand for skilled labour.JEL Classification: J24, J31, L6Keywords: skill-biased technological change, Danish industries......Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally...... large Danish industries have experiencedrelatively less SBTC. This may partly explain why wage inequality between skilled and lessskilled has risen less in Denmark than in other countries. We also find that SBTC has beenconcentrated in already skill-intensive industries. This contains important...

  19. Velocity bias in a LCDM model

    CERN Document Server

    Colin, Pierre; Kravtsov, A V; Colin, Pedro; Klypin, Anatoly; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2000-01-01

    We use N-body simulations to study the velocity bias of dark matter halos, the difference in the velocity fields of dark matter and halos, in a flat low- density LCDM model. The high force, 2kpc/h, and mass, 10^9Msun/h, resolution allows dark matter halos to survive in very dense environments of groups and clusters making it possible to use halos as galaxy tracers. We find that the velocity bias pvb measured as a ratio of pairwise velocities of the halos to that of the dark matter evolves with time and depends on scale. At high redshifts (z ~5) halos move generally faster than the dark matter almost on all scales: pvb(r)~1.2, r>0.5Mpc/h. At later moments the bias decreases and gets below unity on scales less than r=5Mpc/h: pvb(r)~(0.6-0.8) at z=0. We find that the evolution of the pairwise velocity bias follows and probably is defined by the spatial antibias of the dark matter halos at small scales. One-point velocity bias b_v, defined as the ratio of the rms velocities of halos and dark matter, provides a mo...

  20. Graphene nanoribbon devices at high bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Melinda Y.; Kim, Philip

    2014-02-01

    We present the electron transport in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) at high electric bias conduction. When graphene is patterned into a few tens of nanometer width of a ribbon shape, the carriers are confined to a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) system. Combining with the disorders in the system, this quantum confinement can lead into a transport gap in the energy spectrum of the GNRs. Similar to CNTs, this gap depends on the width of the GNR. In this review, we examine the electronic properties of lithographically fabricated GNRs, focusing on the high bias transport characteristics of GNRs as a function of density tuned by a gate voltage. We investigate the transport behavior of devices biased up to a few volts, a regime more relevant for electronics applications. We find that the high bias transport behavior in this limit can be described by hot electron scattered by the surface phonon emission, leading to a carrier velocity saturation. We also showed an enhanced current saturation effect in the GNRs with an efficient gate coupling. This effect results from the introduction of the charge neutrality point into the channel, and is similar to pinch-off in MOSFET devices. We also observe that heating effects in graphene at high bias are significant.

  1. Confounding and bias in the attributable fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Lyndsey A; Steenland, N Kyle

    2011-01-01

    Inappropriate methods are frequently used to calculate the population attributable fraction (AF) for a given exposure of interest. This commonly occurs when authors use adjusted relative risks (RRs) reported in the literature (the "source" data), without access to the original data. In this analysis, we examine the relationship between the direction and magnitude of confounding in the source data and resulting bias in the attributable fraction when incorrect methods are used. We assess confounding by the confounding risk ratio, which is the ratio of the crude RR to the adjusted RR. We assess bias in the AF by the ratio of the incorrectly calculated AF to the correctly calculated AF. Using generated data, we examine the relationship between confounding and AF bias under various scenarios of population prevalence of exposure and strength of the exposure-disease association. For confounding risk ratios greater than 1.0 (ie, crude RR >adjusted RR), the AF is underestimated; for confounding risk ratios less than 1.0 (ie, crude RR confounding increases, and is dependent on the prevalence of exposure in the total population, with bias greatest at the lowest prevalence of exposure. Bias in the AF is also higher when the exposure-disease association is weaker. Results of these analyses can assist interpretation of incorrectly calculated attributable fraction estimates commonly reported in the epidemiologic literature.

  2. CD bias control on hole pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kyohei; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shohei; Yamato, Masatoshi; Oyama, Kenichi; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2016-03-01

    Gridded design rules[1] is major process in configuring logic circuit used 193-immersion lithography. In the scaling of grid patterning, we can make 10nm order line and space pattern by using multiple patterning techniques such as self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) and litho-etch- litho-etch (LELE)[2][3][5] . On the other hand, Line cut process has some error parameters such as pattern defect, placement error, roughness and X-Y CD bias with the decreasing scale. Especially roughness and X-Y CD bias are paid attention because it cause cut error and pattern defect. In this case, we applied some smoothing process to care hole roughness[4]. Each smoothing process showed different effect on X-Y CD bias. In this paper, we will report the pattern controllability comparison of trench and block + inverse. It include X-Y CD bias, roughness and process usability. Furthermore we will discuss optimum method focused on X-Y CD bias when we use additional process such as smoothing and shrink etching .

  3. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  4. A Comparison of attentional biases and memory biases in social phobia and major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinck, M.; Becker, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive processes play an important role in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety and depression. Current theories differ, however, in their predictions regarding the occurrence of attentional biases and memory biases in depression and anxiety. To allow for a systematic comparison of disorders a

  5. Hindsight bias and outcome bias in the social construction of medical negligence: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh, Thomas B; Dekker, Sidney W A

    2009-05-01

    Medical negligence has been the subject of much public debate in recent decades. Although the steep increase in the frequency and size of claims against doctors at the end of the last century appears to have plateaued, in Australia at least, medical indemnity costs and consequences are still a matter of concern for doctors, medical defence organisations and governments in most developed countries. Imprecision in the legal definition of negligence opens the possibility that judgments of this issue at several levels may be subject to hindsight and outcome bias. Hindsight bias relates to the probability of an adverse event perceived by a retrospective observer ("I would have known it was going to happen"), while outcome bias is a largely subconscious cognitive distortion produced by the observer's knowledge of the adverse outcome. This review examines the relevant legal, medical, psychological and sociological literature on the operation of these pervasive and universal biases in the retrospective evaluation of adverse events. A finding of medical negligence is essentially an after-the-event social construction and is invariably affected by hindsight bias and knowledge of the adverse outcome. Such biases obviously pose a threat to the fairness of judgments. A number of debiasing strategies have been suggested but are relatively ineffective because of the universality and strength of these biases and the inherent difficulty of concealing from expert witnesses knowledge of the outcome. Education about the effect of the biases is therefore important for lawyers, medical expert witnesses and the judiciary.

  6. Placebo effect studies are susceptible to response bias and to other types of biases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin G

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo....

  7. Expectancy biases in fear and anxiety and their link to biases in attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, Tatjana; Okon-Singer, Hadas

    2015-12-01

    Healthy individuals often exhibit prioritized processing of aversive information, as manifested in enhanced orientation of attention to threatening stimuli compared with neutral items. In contrast to this adaptive behavior, anxious, fearful, and phobic individuals show exaggerated attention biases to threat. In addition, they overestimate the likelihood of encountering their feared stimulus and the severity of the consequences; both are examples of expectancy biases. The co-occurrence of attention and expectancy biases in fear and anxiety raises the question about causal influences. Herein, we summarize findings related to expectancy biases in fear and anxiety, and their association with attention biases. We suggest that evidence calls for more comprehensive research strategies in the investigation of mutual influences between expectancy and attention biases, as well as their combined effects on fear and anxiety. Moreover, both types of bias need to be related to other types of distorted information processing commonly observed in fear and anxiety (e.g., memory and interpretation biases). Finally, we propose new research directions that may be worth considering in developing more effective treatments for anxiety disorders.

  8. Piezoelectric tuning of exchange bias from negative to positive bias fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian; Sahoo, Sarbeswar

    2010-03-01

    Tuning of the exchange bias has been attempted using magnetoelectric and multiferroic systems. Alternatively, we propose tuning of the exchange bias via the piezoelectric property of ferroelectric material. A ferromagnetic Co thin film is deposited on top of a ferroelectric tetragonal BaTiO3 (001) by using MBE at a base pressure of 1.5x10^10 m bar. An ex-situ antiferromagnetic CoO film is naturally formed on top of the Co Hereby, the piezoelectric BaTiO3 induced electrically tunable stress in the adjacent Co film. The stress induced strain alters the magnetic anisotropy of the Co film and by that the magnetization at the Co/CoO-interface modifying the exchange bias field. This includes sign change of the exchange bias from negative to positive bias fields by increasing electric field applied on BaTiO3. The observed complex electric field dependence of the exchange bias is interpreted through competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange at the rough Co/CoO interface. The competition involves weakening of negative exchange bias through deviations from collineraity of the Co and CoO interface magnetization and simultaneous activation of antiferromagnetic exchange giving rise to a crossover into positive exchange bias.

  9. Cognitive Bias Modification Training in Adolescents: Effects on Interpretation Biases and Mood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lothmann, Claudia; Holmes, Emily A.; Chan, Stella W. Y.; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Negative biases in the interpretation of ambiguous material have been linked to anxiety and mood problems. Accumulating data from adults show that positive and negative interpretation styles can be induced through cognitive bias modification (CBM) paradigms with accompanying changes in mood. Despite the therapeutic potential of…

  10. Thinking in Black and White: Conscious thought increases racially biased judgments through biased face memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strick, M.A.; Stoeckart, P.F.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common research finding that conscious thought helps people to avoid racial discrimination. These three experiments, however, illustrate that conscious thought may increase biased face memory, which leads to increased judgment bias (i.e., preferring White to Black individuals). In Experiment

  11. Optimism Bias in Fans and Sports Reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley C Love

    Full Text Available People are optimistic about their prospects relative to others. However, existing studies can be difficult to interpret because outcomes are not zero-sum. For example, one person avoiding cancer does not necessitate that another person develops cancer. Ideally, optimism bias would be evaluated within a closed formal system to establish with certainty the extent of the bias and the associated environmental factors, such that optimism bias is demonstrated when a population is internally inconsistent. Accordingly, we asked NFL fans to predict how many games teams they liked and disliked would win in the 2015 season. Fans, like ESPN reporters assigned to cover a team, were overly optimistic about their team's prospects. The opposite pattern was found for teams that fans disliked. Optimism may flourish because year-to-year team results are marked by auto-correlation and regression to the group mean (i.e., good teams stay good, but bad teams improve.

  12. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eFields

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a social brain. Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model is correct, overriding the bias toward agency to construct mechanistic explanations of observed events requires structure-mapping inferences, implemented by the pre-motor action planning system, that replace agents with mechanisms as causes of unobserved changes in contextual or featural properties of objects. Experiments that would test this model are discussed.

  13. Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional smoothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzner-lober, Eric [UHB, FRANCE; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA

    2008-01-01

    In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoothers. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in detail the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting. We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

  14. Uncovering racial bias in nursing fundamentals textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes research that sought to identify and critique selected content areas from three nursing fundamentals textbooks for the presence or absence of racial bias embedded in the portrayal of African Americans. The analyzed content areas were the history of nursing, cultural content, and physical assessment/hygiene parameters. A researcher-developed guide was used for data collection and analysis of textual language, illustrations, linguistics, and references. A thematic analysis resulted in I I themes reflecting the portrayal of African Americans in these sampled textbooks. An interpretive analysis with a lens of Sadker and Sadker's categories of bias, along with other literary and theoretical contexts, were used to explore for the presence or absence of racial bias. Recommendations for nursing education are provided.

  15. Sex-biased dispersal of human ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yukimaru

    2017-07-01

    Some anthropologists and primatologists have argued that, judging by extant chimpanzees and humans, which are female-biased dispersers, the common ancestors of humans and chimpanzees were also female-biased dispersers. It has been thought that sex-biased dispersal patterns have been genetically transmitted for millions of years. However, this character has changed many times with changes in environment and life-form during human evolution and historical times. I examined life-form and social organization of nonhuman primates, among them gatherers (foragers), hunter-gatherers, agriculturalists, industrialists, and modern and extant humans. I conclude that dispersal patterns changed in response to environmental conditions during primate and human evolution. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reference List About Implicit and Unconscious Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Villeseche, Florence; Weidemann, Cecilie Dam

    The compilation of this reference list is one of the initiatives of the action plan developed by the Council for Diversity and Inclusion at Copenhagen Business School (CBS). This reference list is the first in a series of efforts initiated by this Council to develop an academic resource pool...... and knowledge base on diversity- and inclusion-related topics. An implicit and/or unconscious bias is a bias that we are unaware of and is therefore expressed unwillingly and unknowingly. As recent studies on implicit bias indicate “we now know that the operation of prejudice and stereotyping in social judgment...... and behavior does not require personal animus, hostility, or even awareness. In fact, prejudice is often ‘unconscious’ or ‘implicit’ – that is, unwitting, unintentional, and uncontrollable even among the most well-intentioned people. […] Prejudice also lives and thrives in the banal workings of normal...

  17. Recognition bias and the physical attractiveness stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Jean-Christophe; Rasmussen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have found a recognition bias for information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype (PAS), in which participants believe that they remember that attractive individuals have positive qualities and that unattractive individuals have negative qualities, regardless of what information actually occurred. The purpose of this research was to examine whether recognition bias for PAS congruent information is replicable and invariant across a variety of conditions (i.e. generalizable). The effects of nine different moderator variables were examined in two experiments. With a few exceptions, the effect of PAS congruence on recognition bias was independent of the moderator variables. The results suggest that the tendency to believe that one remembers information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype is a robust phenomenon.

  18. Addressing PCR Biases in Environmental Microbiology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Rita; Székely, Anna; Révész, Sára; Márialigeti, Károly

    Each step of a molecular environmental microbiology study is prone to errors, though the qualitative and quantitative biases of PCR amplification could result in the most serious biases. One has to be aware of this fact, and well-characterized PCR biases have to be avoided by using target-optimized PCR protocols. The most important tasks are primer and thermal profile optimization. We have shown that primer mismatches, even in the case of universal primers, can cause almost complete missing of common taxa from clone libraries, for example. Similarly high annealing temperatures can drastically distort community composition of the sample in the PCR product. Strategies of primer selection and PCR thermal profile design are discussed in detail.

  19. Reciprocity-induced bias in digital reputation

    CERN Document Server

    Livan, Giacomo; Aste, Tomaso

    2016-01-01

    The peer-to-peer (P2P) economy relies on establishing trust in distributed networked systems, where the reliability of a user is assessed through digital peer-review processes that aggregate ratings into reputation scores. Here we present evidence of a network effect which biases the digital reputations of the users of P2P networks, showing that P2P networks display exceedingly high levels of reciprocity. In fact, these are so large that they are close to the highest levels structurally compatible with the networks' reputation landscape. This shows that the crowdsourcing process underpinning digital reputation is significantly distorted by the attempt of users to mutually boost reputation, or to retaliate, through the exchange of ratings. We show that the least active users are predominantly responsible for such reciprocity-induced bias, and that this fact can be exploited to suppress the bias itself.

  20. Optimism Bias in Fans and Sports Reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Bradley C; Kopeć, Łukasz; Guest, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    People are optimistic about their prospects relative to others. However, existing studies can be difficult to interpret because outcomes are not zero-sum. For example, one person avoiding cancer does not necessitate that another person develops cancer. Ideally, optimism bias would be evaluated within a closed formal system to establish with certainty the extent of the bias and the associated environmental factors, such that optimism bias is demonstrated when a population is internally inconsistent. Accordingly, we asked NFL fans to predict how many games teams they liked and disliked would win in the 2015 season. Fans, like ESPN reporters assigned to cover a team, were overly optimistic about their team's prospects. The opposite pattern was found for teams that fans disliked. Optimism may flourish because year-to-year team results are marked by auto-correlation and regression to the group mean (i.e., good teams stay good, but bad teams improve).

  1. Cosmology of biased discrete symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gleiser, Marcelo; Kolb, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    The cosmological consequences of spontaneous breaking of an approximate discrete symmetry are studied. The breaking leads to formation of proto-domains of false and true vacuum separated by domain walls of thickness determined by the mass scale of the model. The cosmological evolution of the walls is extremely sensitive to the magnitude of the biasing; several scenarios are possible, depending on the interplay between the surface tension on the walls and the volume pressure from the biasing. Walls may disappear almost immediately after they form, or may live long enough to dominate the energy density of the Universe and cause power-law inflation. Limits are obtained on the biasing that characterizes each possible scenario.

  2. Racial bias in perceptions of others' pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Trawalter

    Full Text Available The present work provides evidence that people assume a priori that Blacks feel less pain than do Whites. It also demonstrates that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status and the privilege (or hardship status confers, not race per se. Archival data from the National Football League injury reports reveal that, relative to injured White players, injured Black players are deemed more likely to play in a subsequent game, possibly because people assume they feel less pain. Experiments 1-4 show that White and Black Americans-including registered nurses and nursing students-assume that Black people feel less pain than do White people. Finally, Experiments 5 and 6 provide evidence that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status, not race per se. Taken together, these data have important implications for understanding race-related biases and healthcare disparities.

  3. Linearity Limits of Biased 1337 Trap Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Balling, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The upper power limit of linear response of light trap detectors was recently measured [2,3]. We have completed this measurement with test of traps with bias voltage at several visible wavelengths using silicon photodiodes Hamamatsu S1337 1010 and made a brief test of S5227 1010. Bias extends the linearity limit by factor of more than 10 for very narrow beams and more than 30 for wide beams [5]. No irreversible changes were detected even for the highest irradiance of 33 W/cm2 at 406nm. Here we present measurement of minimal bias voltage necessary for 99%, 99.8% and 99.95% linearity for several beam sizes.

  4. Bias modulated scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Perry, David; Byers, Joshua C; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    Nanopipets are versatile tools for nanoscience, particularly when used in scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to determine, in a noncontact manner, the topography of a sample. We present a new method, applying an oscillating bias between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in the SICM nanopipet probe and a second QRCE in the bulk solution, to generate a feedback signal to control the distance between the end of a nanopipet and a surface. Both the amplitude and phase of the oscillating ion current, induced by the oscillating bias and extracted using a phase-sensitive detector, are shown to be sensitive to the probe-surface distance and are used to provide stable feedback signals. The phase signal is particularly sensitive at high frequencies of the oscillating bias (up to 30 kHz herein). This development eliminates the need to physically oscillate the probe to generate an oscillating ion current feedback signal, as needed for conventional SICM modes. Moreover, bias modulation allows a feedback signal to be generated without any net ion current flow, ensuring that any polarization of the quasi reference counter electrodes, electro-osmotic effects, and perturbations of the supporting electrolyte composition are minimized. Both feedback signals, magnitude and phase, are analyzed through approach curve measurements to different surfaces at a range of distinct frequencies and via impedance measurements at different distances from a surface. The bias modulated response is readily understood via a simple equivalent circuit model. Bias modulated (BM)-SICM is compared to conventional SICM imaging through measurements of substrates with distinct topographical features and yields equivalent results. Finally, BM-SICM with both amplitude and phase feedback is used for topographical imaging of subtle etch features in a calcite crystal surface. The 2 modes yield similar results, but phase-detection opens up the prospect of faster imaging.

  5. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  6. Pseudo exchange bias due to rotational anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, A.; Komraus, S.; Blachowicz, T.; Domino, K.; Nees, M. K.; Jakobs, P. J.; Leiste, H.; Mathes, M.; Schaarschmidt, M.

    2016-08-01

    Ferromagnetic nanostructure arrays with particle dimensions between 160 nm and 400 nm were created by electron-beam lithography. The permalloy structures consist of rectangular-shaped walls around a square open space. While measuring their magnetic properties using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), in some angular regions an exchange bias (EB) seemed to appear. This paper gives an overview of possible reasons for this "pseudo exchange bias" and shows experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulations that this effect can be attributed to unintentionally measuring minor loops.

  7. Optimal design of APD biasing circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chun-sheng; QIN Shi-qiao; WANG Xing-shu; ZHU Dong-hua

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a control method for avalanche photodiode (APD) reverse bias with temperature compensation and load resistance compensation. The influence of background light and load resistance on APD detection circuit is analyzed in detail. A theoretical model of temperature compensation and load resistance compensation is established, which is used for APD biasing circuit designing. It is predicted that this control method is especially suitable for LD laser range finder used on vehicles. Experimental results confirm thatthe design proposed in this paper can considerablely improve the performance of range finder.

  8. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  9. Intergroup Bias in Parliamentary Rule Enforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Parliament chairmen drawn from parliamentary parties enforce speaking time. Analyzing 5,756 speeches scraped from online transcripts, I provide evidence that speech lengths are biased in favor of the presiding chairman’s party. On average, speakers of the same party as the presiding chairman give 5 percent...... longer speeches and are 5 percent more likely to exceed the speaking time limit. The paper contributes to the extant literature by demonstrating political intergroup bias in a natural setting, suggesting that group loyalties can supersede institutional obligations even in a “least likely” context...

  10. Extrinsic control of the exchange bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochstrat, A.; Binek, Ch. E-mail: binek@kleemann.uni-duisburg.de; Chen Xi; Kleemann, W

    2004-05-01

    A new control mechanism for the exchange bias effect in magnetic heterostructures is proposed. It takes advantage of the magnetoelectric effect which takes place in the antiferromagnetic pinning layer. In contrast with the pioneering AC measurements of the magnetoelectric effect, we investigate the magnetic response of the prototypical magnetoelectric compound Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on static electric fields. The linear dependence of the magnetic moment on the applied axial electric field and the temperature dependence of the corresponding slopes {alpha}{sub parallel} are measured by DC SQUID magnetometry. The contribution of the field-induced surface magnetization and its impact on the exchange bias effect is estimated.

  11. Terahertz Bloch oscillator with a modulated bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyart, Timo; Alexeeva, Natalia V; Mattas, Jussi; Alekseev, Kirill N

    2009-04-10

    Electrons performing Bloch oscillations in an energy band of a dc-biased superlattice in the presence of weak dissipation can potentially generate THz fields at room temperature. The realization of such a Bloch oscillator is a long-standing problem due to the instability of a homogeneous electric field in conditions of negative differential conductivity. We establish the theoretical feasibility of stable THz gain in a long superlattice device in which the bias is quasistatically modulated by microwave fields. The modulation waveforms must have at least two harmonics in their spectra.

  12. Recursive bias estimation and L2 boosting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA, FRANCE; Matzner - Lober, Eric [RENNE, FRANCE

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general iterative bias correction procedure for regression smoothers. This bias reduction schema is shown to correspond operationally to the L{sub 2} Boosting algorithm and provides a new statistical interpretation for L{sub 2} Boosting. We analyze the behavior of the Boosting algorithm applied to common smoothers S which we show depend on the spectrum of I - S. We present examples of common smoother for which Boosting generates a divergent sequence. The statistical interpretation suggest combining algorithm with an appropriate stopping rule for the iterative procedure. Finally we illustrate the practical finite sample performances of the iterative smoother via a simulation study.

  13. The N-terminally truncated µ3 and µ3-like opioid receptors are transcribed from a novel promoter upstream of exon 2 in the human OPRM1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Andersen

    Full Text Available The human µ opioid receptor gene, OPRM1, produces a multitude of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding full-length or truncated receptor variants with distinct pharmacological properties. The majority of these transcripts are transcribed from the main promoter upstream of exon 1, or from alternate promoters associated with exons 11 and 13. Two distinct transcripts encoding six transmembrane domain (6TM hMOR receptors, µ3 and µ3-like, have been reported, both starting with the first nucleotide in exon 2. However, no mechanism explaining their initiation at exon 2 has been presented. Here we have used RT-PCR with RNA from human brain tissues to demonstrate that the µ3 and µ3-like transcripts contain nucleotide sequences from the intron 1-exon 2 boundary and are transcribed from a novel promoter located upstream of exon 2. Reporter gene assays confirmed the ability of the novel promoter to drive transcription in human cells, albeit at low levels. We also report the identification of a "full-length" seven transmembrane domain (7TM version of µ3, hMOR-1A2, which also contains exon 1, and a novel transcript, hMOR-1Y2, with the potential to encode the previously reported hMOR-1Y receptor, but with exon Y spliced to exon 4 instead of exon 5 as in hMOR-1Y. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged hMOR variants in HEK 293 cells showed that both 6TM receptors were retained in the intracellular compartment and were unresponsive to exogenous opioid exposure as assessed by their ability to redistribute or affect cellular cAMP production, or to promote intracellular Ca(2+ release. Co-staining with an antibody specific for endoplasmic reticulum (ER indicated that the µ3-like receptor was retained at the ER after synthesis. 7TM receptors hMOR-1A2 and hMOR-1Y2 resided in the plasma membrane, and were responsive to opioids. Notably, hMOR-1A2 exhibits novel functional properties in that it did not internalize in response to the opioid peptide [D-Ala2, N

  14. Emerging Concepts and Approaches for Chemokine-Receptor Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hayre, Morgan; Salanga, Catherina L.; Handel, Tracy M.; Hamel, Damon J.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemokine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) most noted for their role in cell migration. However, inappropriate utilization or regulation of these receptors is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, cancer and HIV, making them important drug targets. Areas covered in this review Allostery, oligomerization, and ligand bias are presented as they pertain to chemokine receptors and their associated pathologies. Specific examples of each are described from the recent literature and their implications are discussed in terms of drug discovery efforts targeting chemokine receptors. What the reader will gain Insight into the expanding view of the multitude of pharmacological variables that need to be considered or that may be exploited in chemokine receptor drug discovery. Take home message Since 2007, two drugs targeting chemokine receptors have been approved by the FDA, Maraviroc for preventing HIV infection and Mozobil™ for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. While these successes permit optimism for chemokine receptors as drug targets, only recently has the complexity of this system begun to be appreciated. The concepts of allosteric inhibitors, biased ligands and functional selectivity raise the possibility that drugs with precisely-defined properties can be developed. Other complexities such as receptor oligomerization and tissue-specific functional states of receptors also offer opportunities for increased target and response specificity, although it will be more challenging to translate these ideas into approved therapeutics compared to traditional approaches. PMID:21132095

  15. Lipoxin Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Romano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoxins (LXs represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL. In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1. This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed.

  16. Correction of biased climate simulated by biased physics through parameter estimation in an intermediate coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shaoqing; Liu, Zhengyu; Wu, Xinrong; Han, Guijun

    2016-09-01

    Imperfect physical parameterization schemes are an important source of model bias in a coupled model and adversely impact the performance of model simulation. With a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model of intermediate complexity, the impact of imperfect parameter estimation on model simulation with biased physics has been studied. Here, the biased physics is induced by using different outgoing longwave radiation schemes in the assimilation and "truth" models. To mitigate model bias, the parameters employed in the biased longwave radiation scheme are optimized using three different methods: least-squares parameter fitting (LSPF), single-valued parameter estimation and geography-dependent parameter optimization (GPO), the last two of which belong to the coupled model parameter estimation (CMPE) method. While the traditional LSPF method is able to improve the performance of coupled model simulations, the optimized parameter values from the CMPE, which uses the coupled model dynamics to project observational information onto the parameters, further reduce the bias of the simulated climate arising from biased physics. Further, parameters estimated by the GPO method can properly capture the climate-scale signal to improve the simulation of climate variability. These results suggest that the physical parameter estimation via the CMPE scheme is an effective approach to restrain the model climate drift during decadal climate predictions using coupled general circulation models.

  17. Cognitive bias measurement and social anxiety disorder: Correlating self-report data and attentional bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Miloff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social anxiety disorder (SAD and attentional bias are theoretically connected in cognitive behavioral therapeutic models. In fact, there is an emerging field focusing on modifying attentional bias as a stand-alone treatment. However, it is unclear to what degree these attentional biases are present before commencing treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure pre-treatment attentional bias in 153 participants diagnosed with SAD using a home-based Internet version of the dot-probe paradigm. Results showed no significant correlation for attentional bias (towards or away from negative words or faces and the self-rated version of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR. However, two positive correlations were found for the secondary measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9. These indicated that those with elevated levels of anxiety and depression had a higher bias towards negative faces in neutral–negative and positive–negative valence combinations, respectively. The unreliability of the dot-probe paradigm and home-based Internet delivery are discussed to explain the lack of correlations between LSAS-SR and attentional bias. Changes to the dot-probe task are suggested that could improve reliability.

  18. Assignment procedure biases in randomized policy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldashev, Gani; Kirchsteiger, Georg; Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2017-01-01

    ’s propensity to act reciprocally. When people are motivated by reciprocity, the choice of assignment procedure influences the RCTs’ findings. We show that even credible and explicit randomization procedures do not guarantee an unbiased prediction of the impact of policy interventions; however, they minimize...... any bias relative to other less transparent assignment procedures....

  19. Interpretation bias and social anxiety in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miers, Anne C; Blöte, Anke W; Bögels, Susan M; Westenberg, P Michiel

    2008-12-01

    Interpretation bias, described as the tendency to interpret social situations in a negative or threatening manner, has been widely linked to social anxiety in adult populations. This study aimed to extend research on interpretation bias to an adolescent population. Thirty-seven high socially anxious and a control group of 36 non-socially anxious adolescents rated the likelihood of different interpretations of ambiguous social and non-social situations coming to mind and which interpretation they most believed. Results showed that negative interpretations of social situations were more common in the high anxious than control group. Such negative bias could not be accounted for by high levels of negative affect. The groups did not differ as to their positive interpretations. Furthermore, there was evidence for content specificity of interpretation bias; high anxious adolescents were not more negative than control participants in their interpretations of non-social situations. Findings are discussed in relation to the adult literature and their clinical relevance is considered.

  20. Size bias for one and all

    OpenAIRE

    Arratia, Richard; Goldstein, Larry; Kochman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Size bias occurs famously in waiting-time paradoxes, undesirably in sampling schemes, and unexpectedly in connection with Stein's method, tightness, analysis of the lognormal distribution, Skorohod embedding, infinite divisibility, and number theory. In this paper we review the basics and survey some of these unexpected connections.

  1. Biased allocation of faces to social categories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dotsch, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Knippenberg, A.F.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Three studies show that social categorization is biased at the level of category allocation. In all studies, participants categorized faces. In Studies 1 and 2, participants overallocated faces with criminal features-a stereotypical negative trait-to the stigmatized Moroccan category, especially if

  2. Avoiding bias in safety testing design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    All scientists are biased, no matter what their backgrounds or affiliations, so what is it about the scientific method that overcomes this and which makes science so successful? Key features are transparency and critical peer scrutiny. These general issues will be will be considered in terms...

  3. Examining Gender Bias in Studies of Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Crowden, N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the presence of a gender bias in studies of innovation. Using the Innovation Systems Research Network (ISRN) and its interview guide as a case study, this research project examines how accurately and completely such innovation studies present gender differences in the innovation process.

  4. Accounting for discovery bias in genomic prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to evaluate an approach to mitigating discovery bias in genomic prediction. Accuracy may be improved by placing greater emphasis on regions of the genome expected to be more influential on a trait. Methods emphasizing regions result in a phenomenon known as “discovery bias” if info...

  5. The Psychological Price of Media Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babad, Elisha

    2005-01-01

    Media bias was investigated through the effects of a TV interviewer's preferential behavior on the image of the interviewee in the eyes of the viewers. Judges viewed a political interview with either a friendly or a hostile interviewer then rated their impressions of the interviewed politician, whose behavior was identical in all conditions. The…

  6. Countering Gender Bias in the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Discusses gender bias created by media favoring males in science, mathematics, and technology and how female academic achievement and attitudes are effected negatively. Introduces an inquiry-based activity using media clippings in which students analyze the images in mass media and discuss their ideas on those images. (YDS)

  7. Minimum Bias and Underlying Event at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Fano, Livio

    2006-01-01

    The prospects of measuring minimum bias collisions (MB) and studying the underlying event (UE) at CMS are discussed. Two methods are described. The first is based on the measurement of charged tracks in the transverse region with respect to a charge-particle jet. The second technique relies on the selection of muon-pair events from Drell-Yan process.

  8. Assessing Projection Bias in Consumers' Food Preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana de-Magistris

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test whether projection bias exists in consumers' purchasing decisions for food products. To achieve our aim, we used a non-hypothetical experiment (i.e., experimental auction, where hungry and non-hungry participants were incentivized to reveal their willingness to pay (WTP. The results confirm the existence of projection bias when consumers made their decisions on food products. In particular, projection bias existed because currently hungry participants were willing to pay a higher price premium for cheeses than satiated ones, both in hungry and satiated future states. Moreover, participants overvalued the food product more when they were delivered in the future hungry condition than in the satiated one. Our study provides clear, quantitative and meaningful evidence of projection bias because our findings are based on economic valuation of food preferences. Indeed, the strength of this study is that findings are expressed in terms of willingness to pay which is an interpretable amount of money.

  9. Biased Language: The Urge to Purge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maculaitis, Jean D'Arcy

    Issues of social discrimination of all kinds and in all forms in teaching are discussed. Sexism, racism, ageism, bias by commission versus omission, other objectionable stereotypes, and the difference between accurate portrayal and the ideal are defined. Sixteen suggestions are given for choosing or developing language arts instructional materials…

  10. Bias in emerging biomarkers for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, A F; Köhler, C A; Fernandes, B S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date no comprehensive evaluation has appraised the likelihood of bias or the strength of the evidence of peripheral biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD). Here we performed an umbrella review of meta-analyses of peripheral non-genetic biomarkers for BD. METHOD: The Pubmed/Medline, E...

  11. Attentional bias modification encourages healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoschke, Naomi; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2014-01-01

    The continual exposure to unhealthy food cues in the environment encourages poor dietary habits, in particular consuming too much fat and sugar, and not enough fruit and vegetables. According to Berridge's (2009) model of food reward, unhealthy eating is a behavioural response to biased attentional processing. The present study used an established attentional bias modification paradigm to discourage the consumption of unhealthy food and instead promote healthy eating. Participants were 146 undergraduate women who were randomly assigned to two groups: one was trained to direct their attention toward pictures of healthy food ('attend healthy' group) and the other toward unhealthy food ('attend unhealthy' group). It was found that participants trained to attend to healthy food cues demonstrated an increased attentional bias for such cues and ate relatively more of the healthy than unhealthy snacks compared to the 'attend unhealthy' group. Theoretically, the results support the postulated link between biased attentional processing and consumption (Berridge, 2009). At a practical level, they offer potential scope for interventions that focus on eating well. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Very Massive Tracers and Higher Derivative Biases

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Senatore, Leonardo; Vlah, Zvonimir; Angulo, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Most of the upcoming cosmological information will come from analyzing the clustering of the Large Scale Structures (LSS) of the universe through LSS or CMB observations. It is therefore essential to be able to understand their behavior with exquisite precision. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS) provides a consistent framework to make predictions for LSS observables in the mildly non-linear regime. In this paper we focus on biased tracers. We argue that in calculations at a given order in the dark matter perturbations, highly biased tracers will underperform because of their larger higher derivative biases. A natural prediction of the EFTofLSS is therefore that by simply adding higher derivative biases, all tracers should perform comparably well. We implement this prediction for the halo-halo and the halo-matter power spectra at one loop, and the halo-halo-halo, halo-halo-matter, and halo-matter-matter bispectra at tree-level, and compare with simulations. We find good agreement ...

  13. Exchange bias mediated by interfacial nanoparticles (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, A. E., E-mail: aberk@ucsd.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, California 92093 (United States); Sinha, S. K. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Fullerton, E. E. [Center for Magnetic Recording Research, University of California, California 92093 (United States); Smith, D. J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The objective of this study on the iconic exchange-bias bilayer Permalloy/CoO has been to identify those elements of the interfacial microstructure and accompanying magnetic properties that are responsible for the exchange-bias and hysteretic properties of this bilayer. Both epitaxial and polycrystalline samples were examined. X-ray and neutron reflectometry established that there existed an interfacial region, of width ∼1 nm, whose magnetic properties differed from those of Py or CoO. A model was developed for the interfacial microstructure that predicts all the relevant properties of this system; namely; the temperature and Permalloy thickness dependence of the exchange-bias, H{sub EX}, and coercivity, H{sub C}; the much smaller measured values of H{sub EX} from what was nominally expected; the different behavior of H{sub EX} and H{sub C} in epitaxial and polycrystalline bilayers. A surprising result is that the exchange-bias does not involve direct exchange-coupling between Permalloy and CoO, but rather is mediated by CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in the interfacial region.

  14. Knowledge of Social Affiliations Biases Economic Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Joel E; Mack, Michael L; Gelman, Bernard D; Preston, Alison R

    2016-01-01

    An individual's reputation and group membership can produce automatic judgments and behaviors toward that individual. Whether an individual's social reputation impacts interactions with affiliates has yet to be demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that during initial encounters with others, existing knowledge of their social network guides behavior toward them. Participants learned reputations (cooperate, defect, or equal mix) for virtual players through an iterated economic game (EG). Then, participants learned one novel friend for each player. The critical question was how participants treated the friends in a single-shot EG after the friend-learning phase. Participants tended to cooperate with friends of cooperators and defect on friends of defectors, indicative of a decision making bias based on memory for social affiliations. Interestingly, participants' explicit predictions of the friends' future behavior showed no such bias. Moreover, the bias to defect on friends of defectors was enhanced when affiliations were learned in a social context; participants who learned to associate novel faces with player faces during reinforcement learning did not show reputation-based bias for associates of defectors during single-shot EG. These data indicate that when faced with risky social decisions, memories of social connections influence behavior implicitly.

  15. Uncovering Racial Bias in Nursing Fundamentals Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michelle M.

    2001-01-01

    The portrayal of African Americans in nursing fundamentals textbooks was analyzed, resulting in 11 themes in the areas of history, culture, and physical assessment. Few African American leaders were included, and racial bias and stereotyping were apparent. Differences were often discussed using Eurocentric norms, and language tended to minimize…

  16. Racial bias shapes social reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Björn; Selbing, Ida; Molapour, Tanaz; Olsson, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Both emotional facial expressions and markers of racial-group belonging are ubiquitous signals in social interaction, but little is known about how these signals together affect future behavior through learning. To address this issue, we investigated how emotional (threatening or friendly) in-group and out-group faces reinforced behavior in a reinforcement-learning task. We asked whether reinforcement learning would be modulated by intergroup attitudes (i.e., racial bias). The results showed that individual differences in racial bias critically modulated reinforcement learning. As predicted, racial bias was associated with more efficiently learned avoidance of threatening out-group individuals. We used computational modeling analysis to quantitatively delimit the underlying processes affected by social reinforcement. These analyses showed that racial bias modulates the rate at which exposure to threatening out-group individuals is transformed into future avoidance behavior. In concert, these results shed new light on the learning processes underlying social interaction with racial-in-group and out-group individuals.

  17. Economic Costs of Bias-Based Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baams, Laura; Talmage, Craig A.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Because many school districts receive funding based on student attendance, absenteeism results in a high cost for the public education system. This study shows the direct links between bias-based bullying, school absenteeism because of feeling unsafe at school, and loss of funds for school districts in California. Data from the 2011-2013…

  18. Vowel bias in Danish word-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anders; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The present study explored whether the phonological bias favoring consonants found in French-learning infants and children when learning new words (Havy & Nazzi, 2009; Nazzi, 2005) is language-general, as proposed by Nespor, Peña and Mehler (2003), or varies across languages, perhaps as a functio...

  19. Present-bias in different income groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Can, B.; Erdem, O.

    2013-01-01

    The excessive use of credit cards and increasing consumer borrowing has been a major problem. Laibson (1997) suggests the present-bias problem as one of the driving forces of excessive borrowing. Shefrin and Thaler (1988) suggest that self-control underlies national borrowing/savings rate. We conduc

  20. Jackknife bias reduction for polychotomous logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, S B; Greenwood, C M; Hauck, W W

    1997-03-15

    Despite theoretical and empirical evidence that the usual MLEs can be misleading in finite samples and some evidence that bias reduced estimates are less biased and more efficient, they have not seen a wide application in practice. One can obtain bias reduced estimates by jackknife methods, with or without full iteration, or by use of higher order terms in a Taylor series expansion of the log-likelihood to approximate asymptotic bias. We provide details of these methods for polychotomous logistic regression with a nominal categorical response. We conducted a Monte Carlo comparison of the jackknife and Taylor series estimates in moderate sample sizes in a general logistic regression setting, to investigate dichotomous and trichotomous responses and a mixture of correlated and uncorrelated binary and normal covariates. We found an approximate two-step jackknife and the Taylor series methods useful when the ratio of the number of observations to the number of parameters is greater than 15, but we cannot recommend the two-step and the fully iterated jackknife estimates when this ratio is less than 20, especially when there are large effects, binary covariates, or multicollinearity in the covariates.

  1. Quantifying Heuristic Bias: Anchoring, Availability, and Representativeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Megan; Josephson, S Andrew

    2017-07-28

    Construct: Authors examined whether a new vignette-based instrument could isolate and quantify heuristic bias. Heuristics are cognitive shortcuts that may introduce bias and contribute to error. There is no standardized instrument available to quantify heuristic bias in clinical decision making, limiting future study of educational interventions designed to improve calibration of medical decisions. This study presents validity data to support a vignette-based instrument quantifying bias due to the anchoring, availability, and representativeness heuristics. Participants completed questionnaires requiring assignment of probabilities to potential outcomes of medical and nonmedical scenarios. The instrument randomly presented scenarios in one of two versions: Version A, encouraging heuristic bias, and Version B, worded neutrally. The primary outcome was the difference in probability judgments for Version A versus Version B scenario options. Of 167 participants recruited, 139 enrolled. Participants assigned significantly higher mean probability values to Version A scenario options (M = 9.56, SD = 3.75) than Version B (M = 8.98, SD = 3.76), t(1801) = 3.27, p = .001. This result remained significant analyzing medical scenarios alone (Version A, M = 9.41, SD = 3.92; Version B, M = 8.86, SD = 4.09), t(1204) = 2.36, p = .02. Analyzing medical scenarios by heuristic revealed a significant difference between Version A and B for availability (Version A, M = 6.52, SD = 3.32; Version B, M = 5.52, SD = 3.05), t(404) = 3.04, p = .003, and representativeness (Version A, M = 11.45, SD = 3.12; Version B, M = 10.67, SD = 3.71), t(396) = 2.28, p = .02, but not anchoring. Stratifying by training level, students maintained a significant difference between Version A and B medical scenarios (Version A, M = 9.83, SD = 3.75; Version B, M = 9.00, SD = 3.98), t(465) = 2.29, p = .02, but not residents or attendings. Stratifying by heuristic and training level, availability maintained

  2. Magnetic flux biasing of magnetostrictive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2017-05-01

    The performance of magnetostrictive materials, especially those with high initial magnetic permeability and associated low magnetic reluctance, is sensitive to not just the amount of magnetic bias but also how the bias is applied. Terfenol-D and Galfenol have been characterized under constant magnetic field and constant magnetomotive force, which require active control. The application of a magnetic flux bias utilizing permanent magnets allows for robust magnetostrictive systems that require no active control. However, this biasing configuration has not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents flux density versus stress major loops of Terfenol-D and Galfenol at various magnetic flux biases. A new piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is defined as the locally-averaged slope of flux density versus stress. Considering the materials alone, the maximum {d}33φ is 18.42 T GPa-1 and 19.53 T GPa-1 for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. Compared with the peak piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33* measured under controlled magnetic fields, the piezomagnetic coefficient {d}33φ is 26% and 74% smaller for Terfenol-D and Galfenol, respectively. This study shows that adding parallel magnetic flux paths to low-reluctance magnetostrictive components can partially compensate for the performance loss. With a low carbon steel flux path in parallel to the Galfenol specimen, the maximum {d}33φ increased to 28.33 T GPa-1 corresponding to a 45% improvement compared with the case without a flux path. Due to its low magnetic permeability, Terfenol-D does not benefit from the addition of a parallel flux path.

  3. Attentional Bias, Memory Bias, and Symptom Attribution in Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance and Classical Somatoform Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Witthöft, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Idiopathic Environmental Intolerance (IEI) refers to a polysymptomatic condition of unknown etiology, poorly understood pathogeneses, and somatoform-like phenomenology. Two studies were designed to assess cognitive biases in people with IEI (n

  4. Are most samples of animals systematically biased? Consistent individual trait differences bias samples despite random sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Peter A

    2013-02-01

    Sampling animals from the wild for study is something nearly every biologist has done, but despite our best efforts to obtain random samples of animals, 'hidden' trait biases may still exist. For example, consistent behavioral traits can affect trappability/catchability, independent of obvious factors such as size and gender, and these traits are often correlated with other repeatable physiological and/or life history traits. If so, systematic sampling bias may exist for any of these traits. The extent to which this is a problem, of course, depends on the magnitude of bias, which is presently unknown because the underlying trait distributions in populations are usually unknown, or unknowable. Indeed, our present knowledge about sampling bias comes from samples (not complete population censuses), which can possess bias to begin with. I had the unique opportunity to create naturalized populations of fish by seeding each of four small fishless lakes with equal densities of slow-, intermediate-, and fast-growing fish. Using sampling methods that are not size-selective, I observed that fast-growing fish were up to two-times more likely to be sampled than slower-growing fish. This indicates substantial and systematic bias with respect to an important life history trait (growth rate). If correlations between behavioral, physiological and life-history traits are as widespread as the literature suggests, then many animal samples may be systematically biased with respect to these traits (e.g., when collecting animals for laboratory use), and affect our inferences about population structure and abundance. I conclude with a discussion on ways to minimize sampling bias for particular physiological/behavioral/life-history types within animal populations.

  5. Mood-congruent free recall bias in anxious individuals is not a consequence of response bias

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Riccardo; Whittuck, Dora; Roberson, Debi; Dutton, Kevin; Georgiou, George; Fox, Elaine

    2006-01-01

    The status of mood-congruent free recall bias in anxious individuals was evaluated following incidental encoding of target words. Individuals with high and low levels of trait anxiety completed a modified Stroop task, which revealed an attentional bias for threat-related stimuli in anxious individuals. This group was significantly slower in naming the colour in which threat-related words were displayed compared to neutral words. In a subsequent free recall test for the words used in the modif...

  6. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  7. Is racial bias malleable? Whites' lay theories of racial bias predict divergent strategies for interracial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Rebecca; Shapiro, Jenessa R

    2012-07-01

    How do Whites approach interracial interactions? We argue that a previously unexamined factor-beliefs about the malleability of racial bias-guides Whites' strategies for difficult interracial interactions. We predicted and found that those who believe racial bias is malleable favor learning-oriented strategies such as taking the other person's perspective and trying to learn why an interaction is challenging, whereas those who believe racial bias is fixed favor performance-oriented strategies such as overcompensating in the interaction and trying to end the interaction as quickly as possible. Four studies support these predictions. Whether measured (Studies 1, 3, and 4) or manipulated (Study 2), beliefs that racial bias is fixed versus malleable yielded these divergent strategies for difficult interracial interactions. Furthermore, beliefs about the malleability of racial bias are distinct from related constructs (e.g., prejudice and motivations to respond without prejudice; Studies 1, 3, and 4) and influence self-reported (Studies 1-3) and actual (Study 4) strategies in imagined (Studies 1-2) and real (Studies 3-4) interracial interactions. Together, these findings demonstrate that beliefs about the malleability of racial bias influence Whites' approaches to and strategies within interracial interactions.

  8. When bias binds: Effect of implicit outgroup bias on ingroup affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby-Senghor, Drew S; Sinclair, Stacey; Smith, Colin Tucker

    2015-09-01

    We tested a novel process we term implicit homophily in which perceivers' implicit outgroup bias shapes their affiliative responses toward ingroup targets with outgroup friends as a function of perceived similarity. Across 4 studies, we tested implicit homophily in the context of racial groups. We found that White participants with higher implicit anti-Black bias reported less affiliative responses toward White targets with Black friends compared with White targets with White friends, and this effect persisted above and beyond the effects of implicit pro-White bias and explicit racial bias (Studies 1-3). We further found evidence that this relationship between implicit anti-Black bias and affiliation exists because participants infer how comfortable targets are around outgroup members (Preliminary Study) and use this information to infer similarity on this dimension (Studies 1-3). Our findings also suggested that stigma transference and expectancy violation were not viable alternative mediators (Preliminary Study and Study 1). Finally, women's implicit anti-Black bias predicted their likelihood of having Facebook friends with Black friends, providing ecological and behavioral evidence of implicit homophily (Study 4). Implications for research on stigma by association, extended contact, affiliation, and network formation are discussed.

  9. Exchange bias in nano-ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, D. A.; Krasikov, A. A.; Dubrovskiy, A. A.; Popkov, S. I.; Stolyar, S. V.; Iskhakov, R. S.; Ladygina, V. P.; Yaroslavtsev, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    We report the results of investigations of the effect of cooling in an external magnetic field starting from the temperature over superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB on the shift of magnetic hysteresis loops in systems of ferrihydrite nanoparticles from ˜2.5 to ˜5 nm in size with different TB values. In virtue of high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite nanoparticles and open hysteresis loops in the range of experimentally attainable magnetic fields, the shape of hysteresis loops of such objects in the field-cooling mode is influenced by the minor hysteresis loop effect. A technique is proposed for distinguishing the exchange bias effect among the effects related to the minor hysteresis loops caused by high anisotropy fields of ferrihydrite particles. The exchange bias in ferrihydrite is stably observed for particles not less than 3 nm in size or with TB over 40 K, and its characteristic value increases with the particle size.

  10. Biased trapping issue on weighted hierarchical networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meifeng Dai; Jie Liu; Feng Zhu

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present trapping issues of weight-dependent walks on weighted hierarchical networks which are based on the classic scale-free hierarchical networks. Assuming that edge’s weight is used as local information by a random walker, we introduce a biased walk. The biased walk is that a walker, at each step, chooses one of its neighbours with a probability proportional to the weight of the edge. We focus on a particular case with the immobile trap positioned at the hub node which has the largest degree in the weighted hierarchical networks. Using a method based on generating functions, we determine explicitly the mean first-passage time (MFPT) for the trapping issue. Let parameter (0 < < 1) be the weight factor. We show that the efficiency of the trapping process depends on the parameter a; the smaller the value of a, the more efficient is the trapping process.

  11. Biased liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Scolari, Lara

    2009-01-01

    A simulation scheme for the transmission spectrum of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal and subject to an external bias is presented. The alignment of the biased liquid crystal is simulated using the finite element method to solve the relevant system of coupled...... partial differential equations. From the liquid crystal alignment the full tensorial dielectric permittivity in the capillaries is derived. The transmission spectrum for the photonic crystal fiber is obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue problem deriving from Maxwell’s equations using a vector...... element based finite element method. We demonstrate results for a splay aligned liquid crystal infiltrated into the capillaries of a four-ring photonic crystal fiber and compare them to corresponding experiments....

  12. Sex bias in psychoactive drug advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E

    1980-05-01

    A recent concern has been the possible effect of sex-role stereotypes upon physicians' prescription patterns. In an attempt to examine the part played by drug advertisements, this paper will present a content analysis of psychoactive (mood-modifying) drug ads appearing in the American Journal of Psychiatry over a 17-year period; and a study of subjects' perceptions of the patients depicted in these drug ads across eight dimensions emerging from the content analysis. An initial perusal of psychoactive drug ads in professional medical journals suggested the existence of a sex bias: Females appeared to be presented as patients more often than males, and in a much more demeaning manner. The present analyses were done in an attempt to discover if a sex bias does exist in drug advertisements, which may influence the physician's perception of his or her patients, and subsequently, his or her prescription patterns.

  13. Model selection bias and Freedman's paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacs, P.M.; Burnham, K.P.; Anderson, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    In situations where limited knowledge of a system exists and the ratio of data points to variables is small, variable selection methods can often be misleading. Freedman (Am Stat 37:152-155, 1983) demonstrated how common it is to select completely unrelated variables as highly "significant" when the number of data points is similar in magnitude to the number of variables. A new type of model averaging estimator based on model selection with Akaike's AIC is used with linear regression to investigate the problems of likely inclusion of spurious effects and model selection bias, the bias introduced while using the data to select a single seemingly "best" model from a (often large) set of models employing many predictor variables. The new model averaging estimator helps reduce these problems and provides confidence interval coverage at the nominal level while traditional stepwise selection has poor inferential properties. ?? The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo 2009.

  14. Leveraging Pileup as a Zero Bias Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, each event recorded by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations contains many nearly simultaneous pp collisions occurring at nearly the same time as the primary interaction of interest. These pileup collisions are usually a nuisance, degrading the energy resolution of jets and the missing transverse momentum, as well as affecting other reconstructed physics objects. However, interesting processes can also occur in the pileup interactions, and by construction they are recorded without selection bias since the triggering signal originates from the primary interaction in the event. These zero bias events have a large effective prescale, but can be useful for searches and measurements of processes that are difficult or not possible to record with an online trigger. As one example, we show a significant improvement in the sensitivity to low mass dijet resonances using pileup interactions.

  15. Gender bias in scholarly peer review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, Markus; Schottdorf, Manuel; Neef, Andreas; Battaglia, Demian

    2017-01-01

    Peer review is the cornerstone of scholarly publishing and it is essential that peer reviewers are appointed on the basis of their expertise alone. However, it is difficult to check for any bias in the peer-review process because the identity of peer reviewers generally remains confidential. Here, using public information about the identities of 9000 editors and 43000 reviewers from the Frontiers series of journals, we show that women are underrepresented in the peer-review process, that editors of both genders operate with substantial same-gender preference (homophily), and that the mechanisms of this homophily are gender-dependent. We also show that homophily will persist even if numerical parity between genders is reached, highlighting the need for increased efforts to combat subtler forms of gender bias in scholarly publishing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21718.001

  16. Investigating bias in psychotherapy with BDSM clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Keely; Stock, Wendy; Moser, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a concern among consensual BDSM participants that they will receive biased care from mental health professionals. Results are presented of an anonymous Internet-based survey administered to both BDSM-identified individuals who have received psychological care and to mental health professionals. The survey included socio-demographic data and invited participants to write narrative accounts of biased or culturally sensitive care, from which common themes were identified. Mental health providers (N=17) responded in fewer numbers than those who identified as BDSM-identified participants (N=175). Descriptive characteristics of the sample will be discussed. Themes from the qualitative data may be useful in informing the future development of guidelines for practitioners to work more responsibly with clients who identify as members of this sexual minority group.

  17. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are distinguished in their cognitive processing. Results suggests that monotonous compound propositions are prone to underconfi dence. An heuristic approach to this phenomenon is proposed. The activation of a monotony heuristic would produce an illusion of simplicity that generates the calibration bias. These evidence is analysed in the context of the metacognitive modeling of calibration phenomena.

  18. Two success-biased social learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Ryan

    2013-06-01

    I compare the evolutionary dynamics of two success-biased social learning strategies, which, by definition, use the success of others to inform one's social learning decisions. The first, "Compare Means", causes a learner to adopt cultural variants with highest mean payoff in her sample. The second, "Imitate the Best", causes a learner to imitate the single most successful individual in her sample. I summarize conditions under which each strategy performs well or poorly, and investigate their evolution via a gene-culture coevolutionary model. Despite the adaptive appeal of these strategies, both encounter conditions under which they systematically perform worse than simply imitating at random. Compare Means performs worst when the optimal cultural variant is usually at high frequency, while Imitate the Best performs worst when suboptimal variants sometimes produce high payoffs. The extent to which it is optimal to use success-biased social learning depends strongly on the payoff distributions and environmental conditions that human social learners face.

  19. Aging and attentional biases for emotional faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Carstensen, Laura L

    2003-09-01

    We examined age differences in attention to and memory for faces expressing sadness, anger, and happiness. Participants saw a pair of faces, one emotional and one neutral, and then a dot probe that appeared in the location of one of the faces. In two experiments, older adults responded faster to the dot if it was presented on the same side as a neutral face than if it was presented on the same side as a negative face. Younger adults did not exhibit this attentional bias. Interactions of age and valence were also found for memory for the faces, with older adults remembering positive better than negative faces. These findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information. This attentional bias is consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.

  20. Human language reveals a universal positivity bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Clark, Eric M; Desu, Suma; Frank, Morgan R; Reagan, Andrew J; Williams, Jake Ryland; Mitchell, Lewis; Harris, Kameron Decker; Kloumann, Isabel M; Bagrow, James P; Megerdoomian, Karine; McMahon, Matthew T; Tivnan, Brian F; Danforth, Christopher M

    2015-02-24

    Using human evaluation of 100,000 words spread across 24 corpora in 10 languages diverse in origin and culture, we present evidence of a deep imprint of human sociality in language, observing that (i) the words of natural human language possess a universal positivity bias, (ii) the estimated emotional content of words is consistent between languages under translation, and (iii) this positivity bias is strongly independent of frequency of word use. Alongside these general regularities, we describe interlanguage variations in the emotional spectrum of languages that allow us to rank corpora. We also show how our word evaluations can be used to construct physical-like instruments for both real-time and offline measurement of the emotional content of large-scale texts.