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Sample records for biased electrode experiment

  1. The first results of electrode biasing experiments in the IR-T1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A; Mohammadi, S; Arvin, R, E-mail: salari_phy@yahoo.co [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, PO Box 14665-678, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    We report here the first results of our movable electrode biasing experiments performed in the IR-T1 tokamak. For this study, a movable electrode biasing system was designed, constructed and installed on the IR-T1 tokamak. A positive voltage was applied to an electrode inserted in the tokamak limiter. The plasma current, poloidal and radial components of the magnetic fields, loop voltage and diamagnetic flux in the absence and presence of the biased electrode were measured. Results of the improvement done to plasma equilibrium behaviour are compared and discussed in this paper.

  2. A set-up for a biased electrode experiment in ADITYA Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, Pravesh; Ghosh, Joydeep; Sathyanarayana, K.; Praveenlal, V. E.; Gautam, Pramila; Shah, Minsha; Tanna, R. L.; Kumar, Pintu; Chavda, C.; Patel, N. C.; Panchal, V.; Gupta, C. N.; Jadeja, K. A.; Bhatt, S. B.; Kumar, S.; Raju, D.; Atrey, P. K.; Joisa, S.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental set-up to investigate the effect of a biased electrode introduced in the edge region on ADITYA tokamak discharges is presented. A specially designed double-bellow mechanical assembly is fabricated for controlling the electrode location as well as its exposed length inside the plasma. The cylindrical molybdenum electrode is powered by a capacitor-bank based pulsed power supply (PPS) using a semiconductor controlled rectifier (SCR) as a switch with forced commutation. A Langmuir probe array for radial profile measurements of plasma potential and density is fabricated and installed. Standard results of improvement of global confinement have been obtained using a biased electrode. In addition to that, in this paper we show for the first time that the same biasing system can be used to avoid disruptions through stabilisation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Real time disruption control experiments have also been carried out by triggering the bias-voltage on the electrode automatically when the Mirnov probe signal exceeds a preset threshold value using a uniquely designed electronic comparator circuit. Most of the results related to the improved confinement and disruption mitigation are obtained in case of the electrode tip being kept at ~3 cm inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS) with an exposed length of ~20 mm in typical discharges of ADITYA tokamak.

  3. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drentje, A G; Kitagawa, A; Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Biri, S

    2014-02-01

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses. One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions - i.e., radial directions - that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six "side" electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable, off-axis side electrode was applied in technically two versions. The measurements show indeed a decrease of ionic losses but different effectivities as compared to the biased disk.

  4. Experiments with biased side electrodes in electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Drentje, A G; Uchida, T; Rácz, R; Biri, S

    2015-01-01

    The output of highly charged ions from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) consists of ionic losses from a highly confined plasma. Therefore, an increase of the output of the ions of interest always is a compromise between an increase in the confinement and an increase of the losses.One route towards a solution consists of attacking the losses in directions (i.e., radial directions) that do not contribute to the required output. This was demonstrated in an experiment (using the Kei ECRIS at NIRS, Japan) where radial losses were electrostatically reduced by positively biasing one set of six side electrodes surrounding the plasma in side-ward directions attached (insulated) to the cylindrical wall of the plasma chamber. Recently new studies were performed in two laboratories using two essentially different ion sources. At the BioNano ECRIS (Toyo University, Japan) various sets of electrodes were used; each of the electrodes could be biased individually. At the Atomki ECRIS (Hungary), one movable,...

  5. Generation of Radial Electric Field with Electrode Biasing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; PAN Ge-Sheng; WEN Yi-Zhi; YU Chang-Xuan; WAN Shu-De; LIU Wan-Dong; WANG Zhi-Jiang; SUN Xuan

    2001-01-01

    Time and space resolved measurements of the radial electric field (Er) have been conducted during the electrode biasing experiments on the KT-5C tokamak. The suppression of the turbulent transport with the change of Er induced by the biased electrode is observed. It is found that the poloidal flow contributes to the main part of the Er, and the change of the poloidal flow has a lead of about 20μs to the formation of Er. These observations suggest that a radialcurrent, responding to an induced voltage on the electrode, drives a poloidal flow which in turn drives the radial electric field.

  6. Effect of electrode biasing on m/n  =  2/1 tearing modes in J-TEXT experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai; Hu, Qiming; Chen, Zhipeng; Yu, Q.; Zhu, Lizhi; Cheng, Zhifeng; Zhuang, Ge; Chen, Zhongyong

    2017-01-01

    The effects of electrode biasing (EB) on the m/n  =  2/1 tearing mode have been experimentally studied in J-TEXT tokamak discharges, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers. It is found that for a negative bias voltage, the mode amplitude is reduced, and the mode frequency is increased accompanied by the increased toroidal plasma rotation speed in the counter-I p direction. For a positive bias voltage, the mode frequency is decreased together with the change of the rotation velocity towards the co-I p direction, and the mode amplitude is increased. Statistic results show that the variations in the toroidal rotation speed, the 2/1 mode frequency and its amplitude linearly depend on the bias voltage. The threshold voltages for complete suppression and locking of the mode are found. The experimental results suggest that applied electrode biasing is a possible method for the avoidance of mode locking and disruption.

  7. Effects of electrode biasing in STOR-M Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Debjyoti; Nakajima, Masaru; Rohollahi, Akbar; McColl, David; Adegun, Joseph; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira

    2015-11-01

    STOR-M is an iron-core, limiter based tokamak with major and minor radii of 46cm and 12 cm, respectively. Recently, electrode biasing experiments have been carried to study the improved confinement. For this purpose we have developed a DC power supply which can be gated by a high power SCR. The rectangular SS electrode has a height of 10 cm, a width of 2 cm and a thickness of 0.2 cm. The radial position of the electrode throughout the experiments is kept around 4mm inside the limiter in the plasma edge region. After application of positive bias with voltages between +90 V to +110 V during the plasma discharge current flat top with slightly higher edge-qa (nearly 5 to 6), noticeable increment of average plasma density and soft x-ray intensity along the central chord have been observed. No distinguishable change in H α emission has been measured. These phenomena may be attributed to improved confinement formed at the inner region but not at the edge. In the upcoming experimental campaign, Ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to measure possible velocity shear inside the inner plasma region. Edge plasma pressure gradient will also be measured using Langmuir probes. Detailed experimental results will be presented.

  8. Ion flow and sheath structure near positively biased electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R.; Scheiner, B.; Baalrud, S. D.; Hopkins, M. M.; Barnat, E. V.; Yee, B. T.; Merlino, R. L.; Skiff, F.

    2016-11-01

    What effect does a dielectric material surrounding a small positively biased electrode have on the ion flow and sheath structure near the electrode? Measurements of the ion velocity distribution function and plasma potential near positively biased electrodes were made using laser-induced fluorescence and an emissive probe. The results were compared with 2D particle-in-cell simulations. Both measurements and simulations showed that when the positive electrode was surrounded by the dielectric material, ions were accelerated toward the electrode to approximately 0.5 times the ion sound speed before being deflected radially by the electron sheath potential barrier of the electrode. The axial potential profile in this case contained a virtual cathode. In comparison, when the dielectric material was removed from around the electrode, both the ion flow and virtual cathode depth near the electrode were dramatically reduced. These measurements suggest that the ion presheath from the dielectric material surrounding the electrode may enclose the electron sheath of the electrode, resulting in a virtual cathode that substantially influences the ion flow profile in the region.

  9. Tokamak edge plasma rotation in the presence of the biased electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohammadi, S. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Elahi, A. Salar, E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arvin, R. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Electrode biasing system was designed, constructed, and installed on the IR-T1 tokamak, and then biasing experiments were carried out. Also, using a Mach probes the effects of radial electric field (produced by biased electrode) on the poloidal and toroidal components of the edge plasma velocity were investigated. The results showed an increase in both toroidal and poloidal components of the edge plasma velocity during biasing regime. Results compared and discussed. During positive biasing, increased E{sub r} tends to slow the poloidal rotation in the electron diamagnetic drift direction, i.e., to speed up rotation in the ion diamagnetic drift direction. An increased toroidal rotation velocity has the opposite effect on the poloidal rotation.

  10. Low-bias negative differential conductance controlled by electrode separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiao-Hua; Liu, Ran; Bi, Jun-Jie; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Li, Zong-Liang

    2016-12-01

    The electronic transport properties of a single thiolated arylethynylene molecule with 9,10-dihydroanthracene core, denoted as TADHA, is studied by using non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with ab initio calculations. The numerical results show that the TADHA molecule exhibits excellent negative differential conductance (NDC) behavior at lower bias regime as probed experimentally. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecule originates from the Stark effect of the applied bias voltage, by which the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the HOMO-1 are pulled apart and become localized. The NDC behavior of TADHA molecular system is tunable by changing the electrode distance. Shortening the electrode separation can enhance the NDC effect which is attributed to the possible increase of coupling between the two branches of TADHA molecule. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374195 and 11405098) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2013FM006).

  11. Dynamics of Fluctuations, Flows and Global Stability Under Electrode Biasing in a Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tiffany

    2015-11-01

    Various bias electrodes have been inserted into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) device at the University of New Mexico, in order to affect intrinsic drift-wave turbulence and flows. The goal of the experiments was to suppress and effect the intrinsic turbulence and with detailed measurements, understand the changes that occur during biasing. The drift-mode in HelCat varies from coherent at low magnetic field (1kG). The first electrode consists of 6 concentric rings set in a ceramic substrate; these rings act as a boundary condition, sitting at the end of the plasma column 2-m away from the source. A negative bias has been found to have no effect on the fluctuations, but a positive bias (Vr>5Te) is required in order to suppress the drift-mode. Two molybdenum grids can also be inserted into the plasma and sit close to the source. Floating or grounding a grid results in suppressing the drift-mode of the system. A negative bias (>-5Te) is found to return the drift-mode, and it is possible to drive a once coherent mode into a broad-band turbulent one. From a bias voltage of -5Tenew mode, which is identified as a parallel-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At high positive bias, Vg>10Te, a new large-scale global mode is excited. This mode exhibits fluctuations in the ion saturation current, as well as in the potential, with a magnitude >50%. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability (PRI). In order to better understand the modes and changes observed in the plasma, a linear stability code, LSS, was employed. As well, a 1D3V-PIC code utilizing Braginskii's equations was also utilized to understand the high-bias instability.

  12. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...

  13. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    to be superior, i.e. a status quo effect. However, in the stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In the Choice Experiment literature, status quo bias...

  14. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    In stated preference literature, the tendency to choose the alternative representing the status quo situation seems to exceed real life status quo effects. Accordingly, status quo bias can be a problem. In Choice Experiments, status quo bias is found to be strongly correlated with protest attitudes...... toward the cost attribute. If economic values are to be elicited, this problem is difficult to remedy. In a split sample framework we test a novel ex-ante entreaty aimed specifically at the cost attribute and find that it effectively reduces status quo bias and improves the internal validity...

  15. The construction of an electrode biasing system for driving plasma rotation in J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T. Z.; Chen, Z. P.; Sun, Yue; Nan, J. Y.; Liu, H.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-05-01

    A newly designed electrode biasing system has been constructed for driving plasma rotation in J-TEXT tokamak. To reduce the influence to the plasma, the system contains a pneumatic driving system so that it can reciprocate in a single discharge, with a stroke of about 5 cm in 100 ms. The power supply of the system can provide stable and adjustable dc voltage in the range of 0-700 V, with adjustable duration of 10-200 ms; its instantaneous power output can reach up to more than 200 kW. In addition, the power supply can also provide a multi-cycle voltage waveform, with adjustable pulse width and voltage amplitude. When applying a positive bias to the plasma, both an improvement of plasma confinement and the speed-up of plasma-edge toroidal rotation in the same direction of plasma current are observed in the experiments.

  16. Effect of asymmetric molecule-electrode coupling and molecular bias on rectification in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rupan Preet; Sawhney, Ravinder Singh; Engles, Derick

    2016-12-01

    In this research work, we compare the rectification trends of two symmetrical and one asymmetrical molecular junction formed with gold and silver electrodes bridging benzenedithiol molecule. The origin of rectification is attributed to both molecular bias drop and asymmetric molecule-electrode coupling. The electronic transport properties are computed by using semi-empirical extended Huckel method combined with non-equilibrium Green's function framework. The results are fully rationalized by analysing the distribution of molecular orbitals with changing bias voltage, available density of states and area of transmission spectra spanned within bias window, transmission eigenstates and transmission pathways. We deduce through this work that the molecular rectification is not only the property of asymmetric molecule-metal coupling, but molecular bias also plays vital role in stemming asymmetric I- V characteristics. Our results suggest how to realize molecular rectification by using different electrode materials which act as Schottky barriers in molecular junctions that emulate p-n junction diode in semiconductor electronics.

  17. Electrochemical impedance analysis of nanoporous TiO2 electrode at low bias potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Jun Li; Yuan Lin; Zeng Chen; Jing Bo Zhang; Xiao Wen Zhou

    2010-01-01

    TiO2 colloid was prepared by the sol-gel method and was bladed on transparent conduction glass to made nanoporous electrode.The impedance performance of TiO2 electrode was studied at various bias potential.A simplified equivalent circuit was proposed to investigate the charge transport impedance of TiO2 film and good fitting results were obtained.

  18. The effect of biasing the plasma electrode on hydrogen ion formations in a multicusp ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ego, Hiroyasu; Iwashita, Yoshihisa (Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research); Takekoshi, Hidekuni

    1992-03-01

    The plasma electrode covered with magnetic cusp fields acting as a magnetic filter was installed in a multicusp ion source. The formation processes of the negative and positive hydrogen ions in this source have been investigated when an electrostatic positive bias is applied to the plasma electrode with respect to the anode chamber. The dominant H[sup -] volume-production process is the recombinational attachment rather than the dissociative attachment when the bias voltage is more than +3V. This recombinational attachment improves the H[sup +] ratio in the extracted positive beam, keeping its current value. (author) 52 refs.

  19. Cognitive bias and unusual experiences in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanali, Nedah; Ruffell, Tamatha; Browning, Sophie; Bracegirdle, Karen; Ames, Catherine; Corrigall, Richard; Laurens, Kristin R; Hirsch, Colette; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Maddox, Lucy; Jolley, Suzanne

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive therapy is recommended for children with psychotic-like, or unusual, experiences associated with distress or impairment (UEDs; UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, 2013 [1]). Accurate models of the psychological underpinnings of childhood UEDs are required to effectively target therapies. Cognitive biases, such as the jumping to conclusions data-gathering bias (JTC), are implicated in the development and maintenance of psychosis in adults. In this study, we aimed to establish the suitability for children of a task developed to assess JTC in adults. Eighty-six participants (aged 5-14 years) were recruited from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) and community (school) settings, and completed the probabilistic reasoning ('Beads') task, alongside measures of intellectual functioning, general psychopathology, and UEDs. Self-reported reasoning strategy was coded as 'probabilistic' or 'other'. Younger children (5-10 years) were more likely than older children (11-14 years) to JTC (OR = 2.7, 95 % CI = 1.1-6.5, p = 0.03); and to use non-probabilistic reasoning strategies (OR = 9.4, 95 % CI = 1.7-48.8, p = 0.008). Both UED presence (OR = 5.1, 95 % CI = 1.2-21.9, p = 0.03) and lower IQ (OR = 0.9, 95 % CI = 0.9-1.0, p = 0.02) were significantly and independently associated with JTC, irrespective of age and task comprehension. Findings replicate research in adults, indicating that the 'Beads' task can be reliably employed in children to assess cognitive biases. Psychological treatments for children with distressing unusual experiences might usefully incorporate reasoning interventions.

  20. Social influence bias: a randomized experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchnik, Lev; Aral, Sinan; Taylor, Sean J

    2013-08-09

    Our society is increasingly relying on the digitized, aggregated opinions of others to make decisions. We therefore designed and analyzed a large-scale randomized experiment on a social news aggregation Web site to investigate whether knowledge of such aggregates distorts decision-making. Prior ratings created significant bias in individual rating behavior, and positive and negative social influences created asymmetric herding effects. Whereas negative social influence inspired users to correct manipulated ratings, positive social influence increased the likelihood of positive ratings by 32% and created accumulating positive herding that increased final ratings by 25% on average. This positive herding was topic-dependent and affected by whether individuals were viewing the opinions of friends or enemies. A mixture of changing opinion and greater turnout under both manipulations together with a natural tendency to up-vote on the site combined to create the herding effects. Such findings will help interpret collective judgment accurately and avoid social influence bias in collective intelligence in the future.

  1. Behavioral experiments on biased voting in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Michael; Judd, Stephen; Tan, Jinsong; Wortman, Jennifer

    2009-02-03

    Many distributed collective decision-making processes must balance diverse individual preferences with a desire for collective unity. We report here on an extensive session of behavioral experiments on biased voting in networks of individuals. In each of 81 experiments, 36 human subjects arranged in a virtual network were financially motivated to reach global consensus to one of two opposing choices. No payments were made unless the entire population reached a unanimous decision within 1 min, but different subjects were paid more for consensus to one choice or the other, and subjects could view only the current choices of their network neighbors, thus creating tensions between private incentives and preferences, global unity, and network structure. Along with analyses of how collective and individual performance vary with network structure and incentives generally, we find that there are well-studied network topologies in which the minority preference consistently wins globally; that the presence of "extremist" individuals, or the awareness of opposing incentives, reliably improve collective performance; and that certain behavioral characteristics of individual subjects, such as "stubbornness," are strongly correlated with earnings.

  2. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    Hypothetical bias in stated preference studies is an essential problem which reduces the validity of the obtained welfare estimates for non-market goods. In the attempt to mitigate hypothetical bias, a type of reminder known as Cheap Talk, has been applied in previous studies and found to overall...... eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  3. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  4. Assignment procedure biases in randomized policy experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldashev, Gani; Kirchsteiger, Georg; Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2017-01-01

    ’s propensity to act reciprocally. When people are motivated by reciprocity, the choice of assignment procedure influences the RCTs’ findings. We show that even credible and explicit randomization procedures do not guarantee an unbiased prediction of the impact of policy interventions; however, they minimize...... any bias relative to other less transparent assignment procedures....

  5. "Virtual IED sensor" at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanova, M. A.; Lopaev, D. V.; Zyryanov, S. M.; Rakhimov, A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Energy distribution and the flux of the ions coming on a surface are considered as the key-parameters in anisotropic plasma etching. Since direct ion energy distribution (IED) measurements at the treated surface during plasma processing are often hardly possible, there is an opportunity for virtual ones. This work is devoted to the possibility of such indirect IED and ion flux measurements at an rf-biased electrode in low-pressure rf plasma by using a "virtual IED sensor" which represents "in-situ" IED calculations on the absolute scale in accordance with a plasma sheath model containing a set of measurable external parameters. The "virtual IED sensor" should also involve some external calibration procedure. Applicability and accuracy of the "virtual IED sensor" are validated for a dual-frequency reactive ion etching (RIE) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with a capacitively coupled rf-biased electrode. The validation is carried out for heavy (Ar) and light (H2) gases under different discharge conditions (different ICP powers, rf-bias frequencies, and voltages). An EQP mass-spectrometer and an rf-compensated Langmuir probe (LP) are used to characterize plasma, while an rf-compensated retarded field energy analyzer (RFEA) is applied to measure IED and ion flux at the rf-biased electrode. Besides, the pulsed selfbias method is used as an external calibration procedure for ion flux estimating at the rf-biased electrode. It is shown that pulsed selfbias method allows calibrating the IED absolute scale quite accurately. It is also shown that the "virtual IED sensor" based on the simplest collisionless sheath model allows reproducing well enough the experimental IEDs at the pressures when the sheath thickness s is less than the ion mean free path λi (s λi), the difference between calculated and experimental IEDs due to ion collisions in the sheath is observed in the low energy range. The effect of electron impact ionization in the sheath on the origin and

  6. Interdigitated ring electrodes: Theory and experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, Edward O; Pozo-Ayuso, Diego F; Castaño-Alvarez, Mario; Lewis, Grace E M; Dale, Sara E C; Marken, Frank; Compton, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of potassium ferrocyanide, K_4Fe(CN)_6, in aqueous solution under fully supported conditions is carried out at interdigitated band and ring electrode arrays, and compared to theoretical models developed to simulate the processes. Simulated data is found to fit well with experimental results using literature values of diffusion coefficients for Fe(CN)_6^(4-) and Fe(CN)_6^(3-). The theoretical models are used to compare responses from interdigitated band and ring arrays, and the size of ring array required to approximate the response to a linear band array is investigated. An equation is developed for the radius of ring required for a pair of electrodes in a ring array to give a result with 5% of a pair of electrodes in a band array. This equation is found to be independent of the scan rate used over six orders of magnitude.

  7. The effect of asymmetrical electrode form after negative bias illuminated stress in amorphous IGZO thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wan-Ching; Chang, Ting-Chang; Liao, Po-Yung; Chen, Yu-Jia; Chen, Bo-Wei; Hsieh, Tien-Yu; Yang, Chung-I.; Huang, Yen-Yu; Chang, Hsi-Ming; Chiang, Shin-Chuan; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Tsai, Tsung-Ming

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the degradation behavior of InGaZnO thin film transistors (TFTs) under negative bias illumination stress (NBIS). TFT devices with two different source and drain layouts were exanimated: one having a parallel format electrode and the other with UI format electrode. UI means that source/drain electrodes shapes is defined as a forked-shaped structure. The I-V curve of the parallel electrode exhibited a symmetric degradation under forward and reverse sweeping in the saturation region after 1000 s NBIS. In contrast, the I-V curve of the UI electrode structure under similar conditions was asymmetric. The UI electrode structure also shows a stretch-out phenomenon in its C-V measurement. Finally, this work utilizes the ISE-Technology Computer Aided Design (ISE-TCAD) system simulations, which simulate the electron field and IV curves, to analyze the mechanisms dominating the parallel and UI device degradation behaviors.

  8. An Electrochemical Experiment Using an Optically Transparent Thin Layer Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Thomas P.; Heineman, William R.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a unified experiment in which an optically transparent thin layer electrode is used to illustrate the techniques of thin layer electrochemistry, cyclic voltammetry, controlled potential coulometry, and spectroelectrochemistry. (MLH)

  9. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions.

  10. Can decision biases improve insurance outcomes? An experiment on status quo bias in health insurance choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Miriam; Felder, Stefan

    2013-06-19

    Rather than conforming to the assumption of perfect rationality in neoclassical economic theory, decision behavior has been shown to display a host of systematic biases. Properly understood, these patterns can be instrumentalized to improve outcomes in the public realm. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study whether decisions over health insurance policies are subject to status quo bias and, if so, whether experience mitigates this framing effect. Choices in two treatment groups with status quo defaults are compared to choices in a neutrally framed control group. A two-step design features sorting of subjects into the groups, allowing us to control for selection effects due to risk preferences. The results confirm the presence of a status quo bias in consumer choices over health insurance policies. However, this effect of the default framing does not persist as subjects repeat this decision in later periods of the experiment. Our results have implications for health care policy, for example suggesting that the use of non-binding defaults in health insurance can facilitate the spread of co-insurance policies and thereby help contain health care expenditure.

  11. Operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasma in front of a positively biased electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeong-Shin; Lee, Yuna; Dang, Jeong-Jeung [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoung-Jae, E-mail: jkjlsh1@snu.ac.kr [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y. S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Stability of an anode spot plasma, which is an additional high density plasma generated in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in ambient plasma, is a critical issue for its utilization to various types of ion sources. In this study, operating conditions for the generation of stable anode spot plasmas are experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of the bias current flowing into the positively biased electrode and the properties of ambient plasma reveal that unstable nature of the anode spot is deeply associated with the reduction of double layer potential between the anode spot plasma and the ambient plasma. It is found that stability of the anode spot plasma can be improved with increasing the ionization rate in ambient plasma so as to compensate the loss of electrons across the double layer or with enlarging the area of the biased electrode to prevent electron accumulation inside the anode spot. The results obtained from the present study give the guideline for operating conditions of anode spot plasmas as an ion source with high brightness.

  12. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB[sub 6] biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V[sub bias] [le] 50 V and I[sub inj] [ge] 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  13. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Tokamak Fusion Lab.

    1992-10-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB{sub 6} biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V{sub bias} {le} 50 V and I{sub inj} {ge} 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A.

  14. Effect of electrical properties of glass electrodes on the performance of RPC detectors for the INO-ICAL experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Raveendrababu, K; Satyanarayana, B

    2016-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration has chosen glass Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as the active detector elements for the Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) experiment. In the present work, we study the electrical properties such as bulk resistivity and relative permittivity of the glasses from two different manufacturers and compared the performances of RPCs built using these glasses. We conclude that the glass electrodes with larger bulk resistivy and permittivity are better suited for manufacturing RPCs for the ICAL experiment, as these detectors could be operated at lower bias currents and voltages, and produce better time resolutions compared to those built with glass electrodes of smaller bulk resistivity and permittivity.

  15. Multicultural experiences reduce intergroup bias through epistemic unfreezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Carmit T; Hong, Ying-Yi; Chao, Melody M; Wiruchnipawan, Fon; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    In 6 studies, we systematically explored for the 1st time the ameliorative effects of multicultural experience on intergroup bias and investigated the role of epistemic unfreezing as the motivational mechanism underlying these effects. We found that multicultural exposure led to a reduction in stereotype endorsement (Studies 1, 4, and 6), symbolic racism (Study 5), and discriminatory hiring decisions (Study 2). We further demonstrated that experimental exposure to multicultural experience caused a reduction in need for cognitive closure (NFCC; Studies 3 and 6) and that the ameliorative effects of multiculturalism experience on intergroup bias were fully mediated by lower levels of NFCC (Studies 4, 5, and 6). The beneficial effects of multiculturalism were found regardless of the targeted stereotype group (African Americans, Ethiopians, homosexuals, and native Israelis), regardless of whether multicultural experience was measured or manipulated, and regardless of the population sampled (Caucasian Americans or native Israelis), demonstrating the robustness of this phenomenon. Overall, these results demonstrate that multicultural experience plays a critical role in increasing social tolerance through its relationship to motivated cognitive processes.

  16. Observation of self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior during edge biasing experiment on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.H.; Jachmich, S.; Weynants, R.R. [Ecole Royale Militaire/Koninklijke Militaire School, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Euratom-Belgian State Association, Brussels, Belgium, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (Belgium)

    2004-07-01

    The self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior of the edge plasma transport has been investigated using the fluctuation data measured in the plasma edge and the scrape-off layer of TEXTOR tokamak before and during the edge electrode biasing experiments. In the 'non-shear' discharge phase before biasing, both the potential and density fluctuations clearly exhibit some of the characteristics associated with SOC: (1) existence of f{sup -1} power-law dependence in the frequency spectrum, (2) slowly decaying long tails in the autocorrelation function, (3) values of Hurst parameters larger than 0.5 at all the detected radial locations, (4) non-Gaussian probability density function of fluctuations and (5) radial propagation of avalanche-like events in the edge plasma area. During the biasing phase, with the generation of an edge radial electric field E{sub r} and hence a sheared E{sub r} x B flow, the local turbulence is found to be well de-correlated by the E{sub r} x B velocity shear, consistent with theoretical predictions. Nevertheless, it is concomitantly found that the Hurst parameters are substantially enhanced in the negative flow shear region and in the scrape-off layer as well, which is contrary to theoretical expectation. Implication of these observations to our understanding of plasma transport mechanisms is discussed. (authors)

  17. Profile Control by Biased Electrodes in Large Diameter RF Produced Pl asma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Yoshinaka, Toshiro

    1998-10-01

    Control of the plasma profile has been carried out, using the voltage biasing method in the large diameter (45 cm) RF (radio frequency) produced plasma in the presence of the uniform magnetic field (less than 1200 G). Under the low filling pressure condition of 0.16 mTorr, changing the biasing voltages to the three individual end plates with concentric circular ring shapes, the radial electron density (about 10^10 cm-3) profile could be changed from the hollow to the peaked one. On the contrary, the nearly flat electron temperature (several eV) profile did not change appreciably. The azimuthal rotation velocity measured by the Mach probe, i.e. directional probe, showed the different radial profiles (but nearly uniform along the axis) depending on the biasing voltage. This velocity became slower with the low magnetic field (less than 200 G) or in the higher pressure regime up to 20 mTorr with the higher electron density. The experimental results by other biasing methods will also be presented.

  18. Negative Interpretation Bias and the Experience of Pain in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heathcote, L.C. (Lauren C); Koopmans, M. (Merel); Eccleston, C. (Christopher); Fox, E. (Elaine); Jacobs, K. (Konrad); Wilkinson, N. (Nick); Lau, J.Y.F. (Jennifer Y.F)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNegative interpretation bias, the tendency to appraise ambiguous situations in a negative or threatening way, has been suggested to be important for the development of adult chronic pain. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the role of a negative interpretation bias in a

  19. Maturation experiments reveal bias in the fossil record of feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Maria; Field, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolutionary history of birds and feathers is a major focus in palaeobiology and evolutionary biology. Diverse exceptionally preserved birds and feathered dinosaurs from Jurassic and Cretaceous biotas in China have provided pivotal evidence of early feathers and feather-like integumentary features, but the true nature of many of these fossil soft tissues is still debated. Interpretations of feathers at intermediate developmental stages (i.e. Stages II, III and IV) and of simple quill-like (Stage I) feathers are particularly controversial. This reflects key uncertainties relating to the preservation potential of feathers at different evolutionary-developmental stages, and to the relative preservation potential of diagnostic features of Stage I feathers and hair. To resolve these issues, we used high pressure-high temperature autoclave experiments to simulate the effects of burial on modern feathers from the Black Coucal (Centropus grilii) and Common Starling (Sturnus vulgaris), and on human hair. Our results reveal profound differences in the recalcitrance of feathers of different types during maturation: Stage I and Stage V feathers retain diagnostic morphological and ultrastructural details following maturation, whereas other feather types do not. Further, the morphology and arrangement of certain ultrastructural features diagnostic of Stages III and IV, e.g. barbules, are preferentially lost during maturation. These results indicate a pervasive bias in the fossil record of feathers, whereby preservation of feathers at Stages I and V is favored. Critical stages in the evolution of feathers, i.e. Stages II, III and IV, are less likely to be preserved and more likely to be misinterpreted as feathers at earlier developmental stages. Our discovery has major implications for our understanding of the fidelity of the fossil record of feathers and provides a framework for testing the significance of putative examples of fossil feathers at different developmental

  20. EXPERIMENT WITH A BIASED DISK AT THE KVI ECRIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GAMMINO, S; SIJBRING, J; DRENTJE, AG

    1992-01-01

    Some measurements have been done on the source ECRIS 1 at K.V.I., showing the beneficial effect to the output currents when a biased disk is positioned in the first stage, as reported by the Grenoble ECRIS group. The increase is in the order of 40% and it can be explained by the enrichment of the el

  1. An economical and convenient experiment setup for electrode investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Naser Pour; Rieger, Viola; Brendler, Christian; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Electrodes are among the critical components of neural stimulation devices. Investigating electrode properties like electrode impedance, charge injection capacity, and electrode corrosion limits plays an important role in electrode development. There are many commercial devices available for this purpose. Although useful, these devices are usually expensive and often offer more functions than required. We propose a versatile setup, composed of a LabVIEW program, a National Instruments multifunctional board, and a circuit built of discrete commercial elements. The system offers basic functions used in electrochemical investigation like current and voltage injection, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy. It offers the functionalities of both a potentiostat and an arbitrary waveform generator. It has already been applied elsewhere.

  2. Differential effects of weight bias experiences and internalization on exercise among women with overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Rebecca L; Puhl, Rebecca M; Dovidio, John F

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of experiences with weight stigma and weight bias internalization on exercise. An online sample of 177 women with overweight and obesity (M(age) = 35.48 years, M(BMI) = 32.81) completed questionnaires assessing exercise behavior, self-efficacy, and motivation; experiences of weight stigmatization; weight bias internalization; and weight-stigmatizing attitudes toward others. Weight stigma experiences positively correlated with exercise behavior, but weight bias internalization was negatively associated with all exercise variables. Weight bias internalization was a partial mediator between weight stigma experiences and exercise behavior. The distinct effects of experiencing versus internalizing weight bias carry implications for clinical practice and public health. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Advanced Biasing Experiments on the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew; Korepanov, Sergey; Garate, Eusebio; Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Douglass, Jon; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Uchizono, Nolan; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    The C-2 experiment seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral beam injection on field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas. Recently, substantial improvements in plasma performance were achieved through the application of edge biasing with coaxial plasma guns located in the divertors. Edge biasing provides rotation control that reduces instabilities and E × B shear that improves confinement. Typically, the plasma gun arcs are run at ~ 10 MW for the entire shot duration (~ 5 ms), which will become unsustainable as the plasma duration increases. We have conducted several advanced biasing experiments with reduced-average-power plasma gun operating modes and alternative biasing cathodes in an effort to develop an effective biasing scenario applicable to steady state FRC plasmas. Early results show that several techniques can potentially provide effective, long-duration edge biasing.

  4. Comparison of non-polarising electrode designs for measuring electrical properties in biogeophysics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Hubbard, C. G.; Morris, K.; Shaw, S.

    2009-12-01

    An increasing number of laboratory studies are investigating the link between microbial biogeochemical processes, such as the bioreduction of Fe(III) and sulfate, and geophysical responses. Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP) studies both use non-polarisable electrodes to measure these responses. Commonly used electrodes include Ag with AgCl coating, in direct contact with the solution chemistry of the experiment being performed. However, this arrangement can lead to alteration and degradation of the AgCl coating, for example by formation of AgS, resulting in signals from a galvanic response. In this contribution, we directly compare the performance of two alternative electrode arrangements for monitoring SP and IP in laboratory column experiments. The first arrangement uses inexpensive, plastic-bodied, commercially available Ag/AgCl reference electrodes in a KCl gel, offering ease of use. The second arrangement uses miniaturized, laboratory-constructed Pb/PbCl2 “Petiau” electrodes. Petiau electrodes are commonly used in field SP investigations and their dimensions can be tailored for specific laboratory experiment requirements. The performance of these electrodes in aqueous solutions of known conductivity was compared. The measured SP between electrode pairs in the same conductive solution, which should theoretically be zero, was < 2 mV for Petiau electrodes and < 1.2 mV for Ag/AgCl electrodes. However, Petiau electrodes showed greater accuracy and reproducibility when used for conductivity (IP) measurements. The results from the use of both types of electrodes in column experiments with biologically active sediments will be reported.

  5. Mechanisms of electrode induced injury. Part 2: Clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Terry; Stecker, Mark M; Netherton, Brett L

    2007-06-01

    In the previous paper in this series, basic mechanisms of electrode related injuries were discussed. In this paper, the discussion begins with some of the clinical aspects of burns. This is followed by a summary of the clinical literature on injuries produced by surface and subdermal electrodes. This clinical literature demonstrates that most electrode burns are related to the presence of high frequency electric fields (RF) created either by an electrosurgical unit or a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A smaller number of lesions are produced by low current, long duration direct current (DC) stimulation and during high current stimulation such as defibrillation. A discussion of the clinical complications from indwelling intracranial electrodes centers on electrodes placed for deep brain stimulation (DBS) that are currently used therapeutically in a wide array of neurologic disorders. The probability of considering a post-implant MRI scan is high and the safety of such scans is the focus of discussion. A very small number of adverse incidents have indicated a downward revision in the specific absorption rate recommendations for MRI examination with those patients who present with indwelling DBS leads and internal pulse generators. Continued vigilance when any type of electrode is used is important.

  6. The role of experience on techno-entrepreneurs’ decision making biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Nouri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurs are the driving force behind the prospect and growth of the societies. Sound and wise decisions pave the way for them to carry out these highly important functions. Entrepreneurs are to discover and exploit opportunities. Therefore, they must gather sufficient and pertinent information. Entrepreneurs, like most human beings face complex and ambiguous decision-making situations, not to mention their lack of time and source to gather and process the data. Under these circumstances, entrepreneurs are prone making biases decisions. There are many reasons identified for this entrepreneurial decision making biases, such as the high cost of rational decision making, limitations in information processing, differences in their styles and procedures, or information overload, environmental complexity, environmental uncertainty. These biases are neither totally harmful nor completely useful and have to be seen as natural human characteristics. What makes entrepreneurial decision-making biases important is their effects on the decisions and thus the outcome of the enterprises. Entrepreneurial decision-making biases, deliberate or unintentional can seal the fate of the enterprises, therefore studying them meticulously is crucial. Literature has shown that experience could be an effective factor in decision-making biases. In this paper, we try to find out the impact of experience in Iranian high tech entrepreneurs’ major decision-making biases by a qualitative approach. Finally, it was concluded that experience is influential in shaping overconfidence bias.

  7. Weight bias as a function of person variables and contact experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jay W; James, Audrey; Poulsen, Joan Rose; Dumford, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We tested a mediation model of weight bias that considers person attributes and contact experiences with overweight individuals. In Study 1, we administered a survey to assess Openness, Agreeableness, Attributional Complexity, contact experiences with overweight individuals, and weight bias. Mediation analyses found that Agreeableness predicted less weight bias through contact experiences. In Study 2, we asked participants to interact with a peer whose weight and attributions regarding the weight were experimentally manipulated. We then measured acceptance of the peer. Agreeableness was found to indirectly predict more acceptance of an overweight peer through Empathy and contact experiences. These results show that contact theory is applicable to the domain of weight bias, and support person-situation approaches to prejudice.

  8. Discrimination of Inner- and Outer-Sphere Electrode Reactions by Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Sachiko; Ichimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate students who are studying homogeneous and heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions is described. Heterogeneous or electrode reaction kinetics can be examined by using the electrochemical reduction of three Fe[superscript III]/Fe[superscript II] redox couples at platinum and glassy carbon disk electrodes.…

  9. Determination of Penicillin Using an Immobilized Enzyme Electrode: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifflin, Theodore E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment in which students: (1) construct an immobilized penicillinase electrode; (2) evaluate electron response as a function of penicillin concentration; and (3) study effects of solvent compositions, ionic strength, and equilibrium time upon electrode response. (JN)

  10. Discrimination of Inner- and Outer-Sphere Electrode Reactions by Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Sachiko; Ichimura, Akio

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for undergraduate students who are studying homogeneous and heterogeneous electron-transfer reactions is described. Heterogeneous or electrode reaction kinetics can be examined by using the electrochemical reduction of three Fe[superscript III]/Fe[superscript II] redox couples at platinum and glassy carbon disk electrodes.…

  11. Plasma Flows within the Context of Biasing Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Tendler

    2004-01-01

    The understanding and reduction of turbulent transport in magnetic confinement devices is not only an academic task, but also the matter of practical interest, since high confinement is chosen as the regime for ITER and possible future reactors it reduces both the size and the cost. Since the pioneering work on CCT a lot of work has been devoted to the effect of electric field biasing carried out on many tokamaks, which in general leads to a strongly varying radial electric fields as a function of radius and a resulting sheared E ×B flow, giving rise to improved confinement properties.The issue of plasma flows is utterly fundamental for understanding of tokamaks aimed at the achievement of fusion energy. This appears in the well known neoclassical theory as the most accomplished and self-consistent basis for understanding of fusion plasmas. It pertains to the novel concept of "zonal flows" emerging from the recent development of gyro-kinetic transport codes. The poloidal and toroidal flows are also crucial for the concept of the electric field shear suppression of plasma turbulence in tokamaks. Yet, this timely and topical issue has remained largely unaddressed experimentally because of great difficulties of measuring flows in plasmas.Recently, the team of scientists from all over the world developed innovative configuration of probes yielding the flow velocity locally. This timely and topical diagnostics has been successfully applied on many tokamaks ranging from the huge JET through medium TEXTOR to a small CASTOR due to the excellent collaboration and coordination between research teams. Results caused large interest of fusion community born out by numerous invited talks delivered at the major international meetings.

  12. Sources of Bias in Performance Evaluation: Two Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Jack M.; Hilterman, Robert J.

    1977-01-01

    Reports two experiments designed to determine if (1) low-performing blacks would be evaluated lower than comparable whites while high-performing blacks would be rated higher than white counterparts, and (2) perceived social class, not race, would be the relevant variable in the operation of the stereotype confirmation - contrast process. Available…

  13. [The National Danish Survey of Patient Experiences has a small positive bias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstjerne Andersen, Angelo; Fuglsang, Marie; Kyed, Daisy

    2012-10-01

    The response rate in The National Danish Survey of Patient Experiences in 2009 was 54%. In order to evaluate bias due to non-responders, The Unit of Patient-perceived Quality merged survey data and data on patient background from Statistics Denmark. The relationships between the responding patients' background and their answers to six questions in the survey questionnaire are estimated with logistic regression analysis and subsequently used for predicting the answers of the non-responders. Results indicate a small positive bias in four of the questions and no bias in the remaining two.

  14. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The Role of Teaching Experience and Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2?×?2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as…

  15. Perceptual expertise: can sensorimotor experience change holistic processing and left-side bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Ricky Van-yip; Au, Terry Kit-fong; Hsiao, Janet Hui-wen

    2014-09-01

    Holistic processing and left-side bias are both behavioral markers of expert face recognition. By contrast, expert recognition of characters in Chinese orthography involves left-side bias but reduced holistic processing, although faces and Chinese characters share many visual properties. Here, we examined whether this reduction in holistic processing of Chinese characters can be better explained by writing experience than by reading experience. Compared with Chinese nonreaders, Chinese readers who had limited writing experience showed increased holistic processing, whereas Chinese readers who could write characters fluently showed reduced holistic processing. This result suggests that writing and sensorimotor experience can modulate holistic-processing effects and that the reduced holistic processing observed in expert Chinese readers may depend mostly on writing experience. However, both expert writers and writers with limited experience showed similarly stronger left-side bias than novices did in processing mirror-symmetric Chinese characters; left-side bias may therefore be a robust expertise marker for object recognition that is uninfluenced by sensorimotor experience.

  16. Laboratory experiments on current flow between stationary and moving electrodes in magnetoplasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Reiner L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed in order to investigate the basic physics of current flow between tethered electrodes in magnetoplasmas. The major findings are summarized. The experiments are performed in an effectively very large laboratory plasma in which not only the nonlinear current collection is addressed but also the propagation and spread of currents, the formation of current wings by moving electrodes, the current closure, and radiation from transmission lines. The laboratory plasma consists of a pulsed dc discharge whose Maxwellian afterglow provides a quiescent, current-free uniform background plasma. Electrodes consisting of collectors and electron emitters are inserted into the plasma and a pulsed voltage is applied between two floating electrodes via insulated transmission lines. Besides the applied current in the wire, the total current density in the plasma is obtained from space and time resolved magnetic probe measurements via Maxwell's law. Langmuir probes yield the plasma parameters.

  17. Screening for psychotic experiences: social desirability biases in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVylder, Jordan E; Hilimire, Matthew R

    2015-08-01

    Subthreshold psychotic experiences are common in the population and may be clinically significant. Reporting of psychotic experiences through self-report screens may be subject to threats to validity, including social desirability biases. This study examines the influence of social desirability on the reporting of psychotic experiences. College students (n = 686) completed a psychosis screen and the Marlowe-Crowne social desirability scale as part of a self-report survey battery. Associations between psychosis and social desirability were tested using logistic regression models. With the exception of auditory hallucinations, all other measures of psychotic experiences were subject to social desirability biases. Respondents who gave more socially desirable answers were less likely to report psychotic experiences. Respondent's tendency to underreport psychotic experiences should be accounted for when screening for these symptoms clinically. Findings also suggest that population figures based on self-report may underestimate the prevalence of subthreshold delusions but not hallucinations. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Intracochlear Pressure Changes due to 2 Electrode Types: An Artificial Model Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Philipp; Mittmann, Marlene; Ernst, Arneborg; Todt, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Objective To preserve residual hearing in cochlear implant surgery, the electrode design has been refined, and an atraumatic insertion has become one aspect of cochlear implant research. Previous studies have described the effect of insertion speed and opening of the round window membrane on intracochlear pressure changes. The aim of our current study was to observe intracochlear pressure changes due to different cochlear implant electrodes in an artificial cochlear model with stable surrounding factors. Study Design Prospective controlled study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlear model with a pressure sensor in the apical area. With straight and perimodiolar electrode arrays, 5 insertions with the same insertion speed and 5 insertions over the same time were performed. Results With the perimodiolar high-volume electrode, significantly greater intracochlear fluid pressure changes were observed than with the straight electrode. Compared with the straight electrode, the perimodiolar electrode induces significantly higher pressure peaks (1.12 ± 0.15 vs 0.86 ± 0.05 mm Hg, P = .006) and significantly higher amplitudes (0.38 ± 0.07 vs 0.09 ± 0.07 mm Hg, P pressure changes during cochlear implantation.

  19. Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Mohammed Hussen; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Recent papers have suggested that use of a so-called Repeated Opt-Out Reminder (ROOR) might mitigate hypothetical bias in stated Discrete Choice Experiments (DCE), but evidence so far has only been circumstantial. We provide the first comprehensive test of whether a ROOR can actually mitigate...

  20. Innovative Liner Concepts: Experiments and Impedance Modeling of Liners Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jeff; Betts, Juan Fernando; Fuller, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The study of normal impedance of perforated plate acoustic liners including the effect of bias flow was studied. Two impedance models were developed by modeling the internal flows of perforate orifices as infinite tubes with the inclusion of end corrections to handle finite length effects. These models assumed incompressible and compressible flows, respectively, between the far field and the perforate orifice. The incompressible model was used to predict impedance results for perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 5% to 15%. The predicted resistance results showed better agreement with experiments for the higher percent open area samples. The agreement also tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. For perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 1% to 5%, the compressible model was used to predict impedance results. The model predictions were closer to the experimental resistance results for the 2% to 3% open area samples. The predictions tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. The reactance results were well predicted by the models for the higher percent open area, but deteriorated as the percent open area was lowered (5%) and bias flow was increased. A fit was done on the incompressible model to the experimental database. The fit was performed using an optimization routine that found the optimal set of multiplication coefficients to the non-dimensional groups that minimized the least squares slope error between predictions and experiments. The result of the fit indicated that terms not associated with bias flow required a greater degree of correction than the terms associated with the bias flow. This model improved agreement with experiments by nearly 15% for the low percent open area (5%) samples when compared to the unfitted model. The fitted model and the unfitted model performed equally well for the higher percent open area (10% and 15%).

  1. Studying Gender Bias in Physics Grading: The role of teaching experience and country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Sarah I.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of gender-STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) stereotypes has been repeatedly documented. This article examines physics teachers' gender bias in grading and the influence of teaching experience in Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. In a 2 × 2 between-subjects design, with years of teaching experience included as moderating variable, physics teachers (N = 780) from Switzerland, Austria, and Germany graded a fictive student's answer to a physics test question. While the answer was exactly the same for each teacher, only the student's gender and specialization in languages vs. science were manipulated. Specialization was included to gauge the relative strength of potential gender bias effects. Multiple group regression analyses, with the grade that was awarded as the dependent variable, revealed only partial cross-border generalizability of the effect pattern. While the overall results in fact indicated the existence of a consistent and clear gender bias against girls in the first part of physics teachers' careers that disappeared with increasing teaching experience for Swiss teachers, Austrian teachers, and German female teachers, German male teachers showed no gender bias effects at all. The results are discussed regarding their relevance for educational practice and research.

  2. Cold starting of fluorescent lamps - part II: experiments on glow times and electrode damaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Reinhard; Paul, Irina; Hilscher, Achim; Horn, Siegfried; Tidecks, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we present experiments on cold start and the resulting electrode damaging (reducing lamp life) of AC driven fluorescent lamps. The crucial parameter is the glow time, determined from time resolved measurements of lamp voltage and current. The relation between the energy consumed during glow phase and the glow time is studied. It turns out that there is no common threshold of energy until the glow-to-arc transition takes place, but strong energy input into the lamp yields short glow times. The transient behaviour from the glow to the arc regime is investigated and the stable operation points of the arc discharge are determined, yielding an arc discharge voltage-current characteristics of the lamp type investigated. The electrode damage is investigated as a function of the open source voltage and the ballast resistance. Subsequent cold starts lead to an increase of the glow time due to electrode damaging, i.e., the electrode damage accumulates. Different regeneration procedures and their effectiveness are compared. Regeneration burning turns out to be more effective than heating up the electrode. A criterion for avoiding high electrode damage is obtained, indicating that the average power during glow time should exceed 20 W.

  3. The BIAS-Treatment Scale (BIAS-TS): a measure of the subjective experience of active and passive harm and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Chris G

    2011-05-01

    This article describes the Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes-Treatment Scale (BIAS-TS), a self-report measure of experiences of active harm, passive harm, active facilitation, and passive facilitation. The BIAS-TS was derived from the Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes (BIAS) Map, and provided reliable, replicable, and stable indexes of different harmful and facilitatory behaviors that people encounter in their day-to-day lives from multiple sources (Studies 1 and 2). The BIAS-TS subscales were uniquely associated with concurrent subjective well-being, and were distinct from the HEXACO dimensions of personality, Social Dominance Orientation, and Right-Wing Authoritarianism (Study 3). The BIAS-TS also provided novel support for the subordinate-male target hypothesis proposed by social dominance theory (Study 4). The BIAS-TS instruction set can be easily reworded to assess perceived discrimination and intergroup rejection from specific or multiple general sources and is applicable in numerous contexts. A copy of the BIAS-TS is included.

  4. Correspondence between Experiment and Theory of Bulk Electrocrystallisation at Solid Electrodes in Aqueous Electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2009-01-01

    A model of electrodeposition and electrodissolution at electrode surfaces in aqueous solution is presented. The description is based on the assumption that redox reaction of water is the more important process controlling the electrode kinetics. Chronoamperometric measurements and experiments...... of cyclic voltammetry indicate that the current fundamentally is proportional to inverse time. It was proposed that redox-active species different from water never touch the surface but they predominantly interact with surface-active hydrogen or oxygen formed at the surface by redox processes of water...

  5. Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments implies risk of observer bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bello, Segun; Krogsbøll, Lasse T; Gruber, Jan

    2014-01-01

    and caused by three pesticides experiments with very large observer bias, pooled ROR was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.07, 0.59) in contrast to the pooled ROR in the other seven experiments, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.57, 1.17). CONCLUSION: Lack of blinding of outcome assessors in animal model experiments with subjective outcomes......OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of not blinding outcome assessors on estimates of intervention effects in animal experiments modeling human clinical conditions. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We searched PubMed, Biosis, Google Scholar, and HighWire Press and included animal model experiments with both...... blinded and nonblinded outcome assessors. For each experiment, we calculated the ratio of odds ratios (ROR), that is, the odds ratio (OR) from nonblinded assessments relative to the corresponding OR from blinded assessments. We standardized the ORs according to the experimental hypothesis...

  6. Theory and experiment on the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, J. W.; Smith, B. B.; Walbran, S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Rigney, R. O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N. C.; Yonco, R. M.; Nagy, Z.; Univ. of Minnesota; NREL

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous-cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous-ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous-ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric-ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here.

  7. Theory and experiment on the cuprous{endash}cupric electron transfer rate at a copper electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halley, J.W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Smith, B.B. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado (United States); Walbran, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Curtiss, L.A.; Rigney, R.O.; Sutjianto, A.; Hung, N.C.; Yonco, R.M.; Nagy, Z. [Argonne National Laboratory, Divisions of Materials Science, Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4837 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    We describe results of experiment and theory of the cuprous{endash}cupric electron transfer rate in an aqueous solution at a copper electrode. The methods are similar to those we reported earlier for the ferrous{endash}ferric rate. The comparison strongly suggests that, in marked distinction to the ferrous{endash}ferric case, the electron transfer reaction is adiabatic. The model shows that the activation barrier is dominated by the energy required for the ion to approach the electrode, rather than by the energy required for rearrangement of the solvation shell, also in sharp distinction to the case of the ferric{endash}ferrous electron transfer at a gold electrode. Calculated activation barriers based on this image agree with the experimental results reported here. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Gender bias in hospital leadership: a qualitative study on the experiences of women CEOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soklaridis, Sophie; Kuper, Ayelet; Whitehead, Cynthia R; Ferguson, Genevieve; Taylor, Valerie H; Zahn, Catherine

    2017-04-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of gender bias among women hospital CEOs and explore to what these female leaders attribute their success within a male-dominated hospital executive leadership milieu. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study involved 12 women hospital CEOs from across Ontario, Canada. Purposeful sampling techniques and in-depth qualitative interview methods were used to facilitate discussion around experiences of gender and leadership. Findings Responses fell into two groups: the first group represented the statement "Gender inequality is alive and well". The second group reflected the statement "Gender inequity is not significant, did not happen to me, and things are better now". This group contained a sub-group with no consciousness of systemic discrimination and that claimed having no gendered experiences in their leadership journey. The first group described gender issues in various contexts, from the individual to the systemic. The second group was ambivalent about gender as a factor impacting leadership trajectories. Originality/value Representations of women's leadership have become detached from feminism, with major consequences for women. This study reveals how difficult it is for some women CEOs to identify gender bias. The subtle everyday norms and practices within the workplace make it difficult to name and explain gender bias explicitly and may explain the challenges in understanding how it might affect a woman's career path.

  9. Bias to pollen odors is affected by early exposure and foraging experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, A; Farina, W M

    2014-07-01

    In many pollinating insects, foraging preferences are adjusted on the basis of floral cues learned at the foraging site. In addition, olfactory experiences gained at early adult stages might also help them to initially choose food sources. To understand pollen search behavior of honeybees, we studied how responses elicited by pollen-based odors are biased in foraging-age workers according to (i) their genetic predisposition to collect pollen, (ii) pollen related information gained during foraging and (iii) different experiences with pollen gained at early adult ages. Bees returning to the hive carrying pollen loads, were strongly biased to unfamiliar pollen bouquets when tested in a food choice device against pure odors. Moreover, pollen foragers' orientation response was specific to the odors emitted by the pollen type they were carrying on their baskets, which suggests that foragers retrieve pollen odor information to recognize rewarding flowers outside the hive. We observed that attraction to pollen odor was mediated by the exposure to a pollen diet during the first week of life. We did not observe the same attraction in foraging-age bees early exposed to an artificial diet that did not contain pollen. Contrary to the specific response observed to cues acquired during foraging, early exposure to single-pollen diets did not bias orientation response towards a specific pollen odor in foraging-age bees (i.e. bees chose equally between the exposed and the novel monofloral pollen odors). Our results show that pollen exposure at early ages together with olfactory experiences gained in a foraging context are both relevant to bias honeybees' pollen search behavior.

  10. No Own-Age Bias in 3-Year-Old Children: More Evidence for the Role of Early Experience in Building Face-Processing Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassia, Viola Macchi; Pisacane, Antonella; Gava, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of an own-age bias in young children who accumulated different amounts of early experience with child faces. Discrimination abilities for upright and inverted adult and child faces were tested using a delayed two-alternative, forced-choice matching-to-sample task in two groups of 3-year-old children,…

  11. An important impact of the molecule-electrode couplings asymmetry on the efficiency of bias-driven redox processes in molecular junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Baldea, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Two recent experimental (Li, J.~\\emphj{et al}, \\emph{Proc.\\ Natl.\\ Acad.\\ Sci.\\ U.~S.~A.} {\\bf 2014}, 111, 1282-1287) and theoretical studies (B\\^aldea, I, \\emph{Phys.\\ Chem.\\ Chem.\\ Phys.}\\ {\\bf 2014}, 16, 25942-25949) have addressed the problem of tuning molecular charge and vibrational properties of single molecules embedded in nanojunctions. These are molecular characteristics escaping so far to an efficient experimental control in broad ranges. Here, we present a general argument demonstrating why, out of various experimental platforms possible, those wherein active molecules are asymmetrically coupled to electrodes are to be preferred to those symmetrically coupled for achieving a(n almost) complete redox process, and why electrochemical environment has advantages over "dry" setups. This study aims at helping to nanofabricate molecular junctions using the most appropriate platforms enabling the broadest possible bias-driven control of the redox state and vibrational modes of single molecules linked to e...

  12. Design and analysis of experiments in networks: Reducing bias from interference

    CERN Document Server

    Eckles, Dean; Ugander, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the effects of interventions in networks is complicated when the units are interacting, such that the outcomes for one unit may depend on the treatment assignment and behavior of many or all other units (i.e., there is interference). When most or all units are in a single connected component, it is impossible to directly experimentally compare outcomes under two or more global treatment assignments since the network can only be observed under a single assignment. Familiar formalism, experimental designs, and analysis methods assume the absence of these interactions, and result in biased estimators of causal effects of interest. While some assumptions can lead to unbiased estimators, these assumptions are generally unrealistic, and we focus this work on realistic assumptions. Thus, in this work, we evaluate methods for designing and analyzing randomized experiments that aim to reduce this bias and thereby reduce overall error. In design, we consider the ability to perform random assignment to treatm...

  13. Thermophysical Property Estimation by Transient Experiments: The Effect of a Biased Initial Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Scarpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of thermophysical properties of materials in dynamic experiments can be conveniently performed by the inverse solution of the associated heat conduction problem (IHCP. The inverse technique demands the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution within the material. As only a limited number of temperature sensors (or no sensor at all are arranged inside the test specimen, the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution is affected by some uncertainty. This uncertainty, together with other possible sources of bias in the experimental procedure, will propagate in the estimation process and the accuracy of the reconstructed thermophysical property values could deteriorate. In this work the effect on the estimated thermophysical properties due to errors in the initial temperature distribution is investigated along with a practical method to quantify this effect. Furthermore, a technique for compensating this kind of bias is proposed. The method consists in including the initial temperature distribution among the unknown functions to be estimated. In this way the effect of the initial bias is removed and the accuracy of the identified thermophysical property values is highly improved.

  14. Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

  15. Initial Operative Experience and Short-term Hearing Preservation Results With a Mid-scala Cochlear Implant Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrakic, Maja; Roland, J Thomas; McMenomey, Sean O; Svirsky, Mario A

    2016-12-01

    To describe our initial operative experience and hearing preservation results with the Advanced Bionics (AB) Mid Scala Electrode (MSE). Retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. Sixty-three MSE implants in pediatric and adult patients were compared with age- and sex-matched 1j electrode implants from the same manufacturer. All patients were severe to profoundly deaf. Cochlear implantation with either the AB 1j electrode or the AB MSE. The MSE and 1j electrodes were compared in their angular depth of insertion and pre to postoperative change in hearing thresholds. Hearing preservation was analyzed as a function of angular depth of insertion. Secondary outcome measures included operative time, incidence of abnormal intraoperative impedance and telemetry values, and incidence of postsurgical complications. Depth of insertion was similar for both electrodes, but was more consistent for the MSE array and more variable for the 1j array. Patients with MSE electrodes had better hearing preservation. Thresholds shifts at four audiometric frequencies ranging from 250 to 2000 Hz were 10, 7, 2, and 6 dB smaller for the MSE electrode than for the 1j (p Hearing preservation at low frequencies was worse with deeper insertion, regardless of array. Secondary outcome measures were similar for both electrodes. The MSE electrode resulted in more consistent insertion depth and somewhat better hearing preservation than the 1j electrode. Differences in other surgical outcome measures were small or unlikely to have a meaningful effect.

  16. Experience of automation failures in training: effects on trust, automation bias, complacency and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Chavaillaz, Alain; Wastell, David

    2016-06-01

    This work examined the effects of operators' exposure to various types of automation failures in training. Forty-five participants were trained for 3.5 h on a simulated process control environment. During training, participants either experienced a fully reliable, automatic fault repair facility (i.e. faults detected and correctly diagnosed), a misdiagnosis-prone one (i.e. faults detected but not correctly diagnosed) or a miss-prone one (i.e. faults not detected). One week after training, participants were tested for 3 h, experiencing two types of automation failures (misdiagnosis, miss). The results showed that automation bias was very high when operators trained on miss-prone automation encountered a failure of the diagnostic system. Operator errors resulting from automation bias were much higher when automation misdiagnosed a fault than when it missed one. Differences in trust levels that were instilled by the different training experiences disappeared during the testing session. Practitioner Summary: The experience of automation failures during training has some consequences. A greater potential for operator errors may be expected when an automatic system failed to diagnose a fault than when it failed to detect one.

  17. Age biases in face processing: the effects of experience across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, I review studies investigating discrimination and recognition abilities for faces of different ages in children and adults. Contrary to the earlier assertion that own-age faces are better recognized than other-age faces (own-age bias; OAB), I discuss recent evidence for a processing advantage for adult versus non-adult faces. This evidence is interpreted as suggesting that the precocious and continuous exposure to adult faces may shape the individual's face representation across development. Moreover, by testing how experience with faces of various ages acquired at different times in development modulates face-processing skills, this evidence shows that plasticity of face recognition abilities decreases with age, but early-acquired experience has enduring effects that impact our ability to learn from encounters with new types of faces in adulthood.

  18. Clinical experience in the application of the tissue pH electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, W; Burghardt, E

    1978-09-01

    Only after placing the pH electrode through an incision could its point enter deep enough into the tissue. The storage of the pH electrode in a reference buffer considerably improved the stability of the electrode. The ECG electrode is at present the weakest link in the realization of continuous pH measurements. Improvements should be effected mainly with the ECG electrode, the electrode cable and the application instruments.

  19. The effect of electrode heating on the discharge parameters in complex plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Victor; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Creel, James; Schmoke, Jimmy; Cook, Mike; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell, E-mail: victor_land@baylor.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics, and Engineering Research, Baylor University, Waco, TX, 76798-7316 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Thermophoresis is a tool often applied in complex plasma experiments. One of the usual stated benefits over other experimental tools is that electrode temperature changes required to induce thermophoresis do not directly influence the plasma parameters. From electronic data, plasma emission profiles in the sheath, and Langmuir probe data in the plasma bulk, we conclude that this assumption does not hold. An important effect on the levitation of dust particles in argon plasma is observed as well. The reason behind the changes in plasma parameters seems to be the change in neutral atom density accompanying the increased gas temperature while running at constant pressure.

  20. Characterization of 3 mm Glass Electrodes and Development of RPC Detectors for $INO-ICAL$ Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Daljeet; Gaur, Ankit; Kumar, Purnendu; Hasbuddin, Md; Mishra, Swati; Kumar, Praveen; Naimuddin, Md

    2014-01-01

    India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a multi-institutional facility, planned to be built up in South India. The INO facility will host a 51 kton magnetized Iron CALorimeter (ICAL) detector to study atmospheric muon neutrinos. Iron plates have been chosen as the target material whereas Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) have been chosen as the active detector element for the ICAL experiment. Due to the large number of RPCs needed ($\\sim$ 28,000 of $2~m \\times 2~m$ in size) for ICAL experiment and for the long lifetime of the experiment, it is necessary to perform a detailed $R\\&D$ such that each and every parameter of the detector performance can be optimized to improve the physics output. In this paper, we report on the detailed material and electrical properties studies for various types of glass electrodes available locally. We also report on the performance studies carried out on the RPCs made with these electrodes as well as the effect of gas composition and environmental temperature on the detector...

  1. A new class of electrodes of 'intermediate invasiveness': preliminary experience with epidural pegs and foramen ovale electrodes in the mapping of seizure foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, I A; Assirati, J A; Burgess, R; Barnett, G H; Luders, H

    1991-09-01

    Non-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) recording with scalp and sphenoidal leads is often insensitive to precise localization of ictal onset, and can be distorted by skull defects and underlying lesions or deformities of the brain. We present preliminary experience with epidural pegs and foramen ovale electrodes used in 30 cases of intractable partial epilepsy where non-invasive EEG did not define a zone of epileptogenesis with sufficient precision to recommend resection, or to dictate precise placement of depth electrodes or subdural girds. Custom designed mushroom shaped peg electrodes were implanted via 4.5 mm twist-drill skull holes for epidural recording from cortical areas of suspected epileptogenesis. Foramen ovale electrodes (flexible 3-contact leads) were introduced via percutaneous puncture of Meckel's cave cistern for recording from mesiotemporal regions. Chronic recording was performed for 4 to 26 days (mean 9.2 days). There were no serious complications and signal quality was excellent in every electrode. Based on interictal and ictal records, resective surgery was performed in 8 cases, more focused further invasive recording was recommended in 15 cases (with subsequent resective surgery), and surgical options were excluded in 7 cases. It is concluded that these electrodes of 'intermediate invasiveness' represent a safe and effective tool in the armamentarium for mapping complicated or elusive epileptic foci. They can be used in lieu of, in addition to, or prior to more invasive measures. Their greatest advantage lies in their relative safety and ability to survey extensive zones of suspected epileptogenesis so as to guide and focus further mapping and surgical intervention.

  2. Analysis of caries experience taking inter-observer bias and variability into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesaffre, E; Mwalili, S M; Declerck, D

    2004-12-01

    In larger oral health surveys, clinical measurements are often obtained using several examiners. This raises the issue of inter-observer variability in measurement. Often, the problem is dealt with by reporting kappa values obtained in a calibration exercise. In the present study, the limitations of this statistic are presented, and an alternative, based on a Bayesian approach, is proposed. When the alternative approach was applied to caries experience data obtained in an oral health screening survey in seven-year-old Flemish children (Signal Tandmobiel study), it could be ruled out that the observed geographic East-West gradient was due to bias induced by variability in scoring of the different dental examiners involved. The proposed method offers an opportunity to refine existing analytical approaches and is relevant to any health outcome study.

  3. Adult fruit fly attraction to larvae biases experience and mediates social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisko, Zachary; Anderson, Blake; Dukas, Reuven

    2014-04-01

    We investigated whether adult fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) use cues of larvae as social information in their food patch choice decisions. Adult male and female fruit flies showed attraction to odours emanating from foraging larvae, and females preferred to lay eggs on food patches occupied by larvae over similar unoccupied patches. Females learned and subsequently preferred to lay eggs at patches with novel flavours previously associated with feeding larvae over patches with novel flavours previously associated with no larvae. However, when we controlled for the duration of exposure to each flavoured patch, females no longer preferred the flavour previously associated with feeding larvae. This suggests that social learning in this context is indirect, as a result of strong social attraction biasing experience.

  4. Forty years of experiments on aquatic invasive species: are study biases limiting our understanding of impacts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads Thomsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasions by non-native species are a threat to biodiversity because invaders can impact native populations, communities and entire ecosystems. To manage this threat, it is necessary to have a strong mechanistic understanding of how non-native species affect local species and communities. We reviewed 259 published papers (1972–2012 that described field experiments quantifying the impact of aquatic non-native species, to examine whether various types of study biases are limiting this understanding. Our review revealed that invasion impacts had been experimentally quantified for 101 aquatic non-native species, in all major freshwater and marine habitats, on all continents except Antarctica and for most higher taxonomic groupings. Over one-quarter (26% of studies included tests for impacts on local biodiversity. However, despite this extensive research effort, certain taxa, habitats and regions remain poorly studied. For example, of the over one hundred species examined in previous studies, only one was a marine fish and only six were herbivores. Furthermore, over half (53% the studies were from the USA and two-thirds (66% were from experiments conducted in temperate latitudes. By contrast, only 3% of studies were from Africa and <2% from high latitudes. We also found that one-fifth (20% of studies were conducted in estuaries, but only 1% from coral reefs. Finally, we note that the standard procedure of pooling or not reporting non-significant treatments and responses is likely to limit future synthetic advancement by biasing meta-analysis and severely limiting our ability to identify non-native species with none or negligible ecological impacts. In conclusion, a future focus on poorly-studied taxa, habitats and regions, and enhanced reporting of results, should improve our understanding and management of impacts associated with aquatic non-native species.

  5. First priciples simulations of a bias-dependent electrochemical cell

    CERN Document Server

    Pedroza, Luana S; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; Fernández-Serra, Marivi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the local structure of liquid water at the interfaces of metallic electrodes is a key problem in aqueous-based electrochemistry. Notably the system is under an external potential bias, which makes the task of simulating this setup difficult. To correctly compute the effect of an external bias potential applied to electrodes, we combine density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods. Our method now allows to explicitly consider an external applied bias, in direct correspondence to the experiments. In this work, we apply this methodology to study the electronic properties and atomic forces of one water molecule at the interface of gold electrodes. We find that, as expected, the water molecule is sensitive to the sign and magnitude of the applied bias.

  6. A LabVIEW based experiment system for the efficient collection and analysis of cyclic voltametry and electrode charge capacity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlefsen, D; Hu, Z; Troyk, P R

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic voltametry and recording of stimulation electrode voltage excursions are two critical methods of measurement for understanding the performance of implantable electrodes. Because implanted electrodes cannot easily be replaced, it is necessary to have an a-priori understanding of an electrode's implanted performance and capabilities. In-vitro exhaustive tests are often needed to quantify an electrodes performance. Using commonly available equipment, the human labor cost to conduct this work is immense. Presented is an automated experiment system that is highly configurable that can efficiently conduct a battery of repeatable CV and stimulation recording measurements. Results of preparing 96 electrodes prior to an animal implantation are also discussed.

  7. Probing the Human Brain with Stimulating Electrodes: The Story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) Experiment on Mary Rafferty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren Julius; Almerigi, Jason B.

    2009-01-01

    Roberts Bartholow's 1874 experiment on Mary Rafferty is widely cited as the first demonstration, by direct application of stimulating electrodes, of the motor excitability of the human cerebral cortex. The many accounts of the experiment, however, leave certain questions and details unexamined or unresolved, especially about Bartholow's goals, the…

  8. Accessibility experiences and the hindsight bias: I knew it all along versus it could never have happened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Lawrence J; Schwarz, Norbert; Small, Eulena M

    2002-12-01

    In two experiments, we tested accessibility experiences versus accessible content in influencing the hindsight bias when participants generated either thoughts about alternative outcomes or thoughts about known outcomes. Participants who had listed many thoughts (Experiment 1) and those who had contracted their brow muscles (Experiment 2) when considering alternate outcomes rated the known outcome as more likely than did than those who had listed two thoughts or who had not contracted their brows--a "backfire" effect. In contrast, but no less ironically, participants who had listed many thoughts and those who contracted their brows when considering known outcomes rated those outcomes as less likely--an "it could never have happened" effect. Both effects are due to subjective accessibility experiences, and their role in influencing and debiasing the hindsight bias is discussed.

  9. Efficient Terahertz Photoconductive Emitters with Improved Electrode Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xin Wang; Yi-Jie Niu; Wei Cheng; Zhi-Qiang Li; Zi-Ran Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of two new types of terahertz photoconductive emitters. One has an asymmetric four-contact electrode structure and the other has an arc-shaped electrode structure, which are all modified from a traditional strip line antenna. Numerical simulations and real experiments confirm the good performance of the proposed antennas. An amplitude increase of about 40% is experimentally observed for the terahertz signals generated from the new structures. The special electrode structure and its induced local bias field enhancement are responsible for this radiation efficiency improvement. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of developing highly efficient terahertz photoconductive emitters by optimizing the electrode structure.

  10. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) Experiment: Research Biases in the Development of the CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    and teens can compare, and ultimately be transposed through the CSF, to developing resiliency of deployed Soldiers in combat zones. These studies...added pressure of a shortened development time may contribute to unintended biases or unmitigated biases. This study will look at all of their...units. They recommended that the units designate proponents to manage the suicide prevention program, maintain vigilance by leaders and Soldier peers

  11. The impact of sea surface temperature bias on equatorial Atlantic interannual variability in partially coupled model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Greatbatch, Richard J.; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-07-01

    We examine the impact of sea surface temperature (SST) bias on interannual variability during boreal summer over the equatorial Atlantic using two suites of partially coupled model (PCM) experiments with and without surface heat flux correction. In the experiments, surface wind stress anomalies are specified from observations while the thermodynamic coupling between the atmospheric and oceanic components is still active as in the fully coupled model. The results show that the PCM can capture around 50% of the observed variability associated with the Atlantic Niño from 1958 to 2013, but only when the bias is substantially reduced using heat flux correction, with no skill otherwise. We further show that ocean dynamics explain a large part of the SST variability in the eastern equatorial Atlantic in both observations (50-60%) and the PCM experiments (50-70%) with heat flux correction, implying that the seasonal predictability potential may be higher than currently thought.

  12. Fair Play: A Study of Scientific Workforce Trainers’ Experience Playing an Educational Video Game about Racial Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Molly; Gutierrez, Belinda; Savoy, Julia; Samuel, Clem; Filut, Amarette; Pribbenow, Christine Maidl

    2017-01-01

    Explicit racial bias has decreased in the United States, but racial stereotypes still exist and conspire in multiple ways to perpetuate the underparticipation of Blacks in science careers. Capitalizing on the potential effectiveness of role-playing video games to promote the type of active learning required to increase awareness of and reduce subtle racial bias, we developed the video game Fair Play, in which players take on the role of Jamal, a Black male graduate student in science, who experiences discrimination in his PhD program. We describe a mixed-methods evaluation of the experience of scientific workforce trainers who played Fair Play at the National Institutes of Health Division of Training Workforce Development and Diversity program directors’ meeting in 2013 (n = 47; 76% female, n = 34; 53% nonwhite, n = 26). The evaluation findings suggest that Fair Play can promote perspective taking and increase bias literacy, which are steps toward reducing racial bias and affording Blacks equal opportunities to excel in science. PMID:28450447

  13. Fair Play: A Study of Scientific Workforce Trainers' Experience Playing an Educational Video Game about Racial Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatz, Anna; Carnes, Molly; Gutierrez, Belinda; Savoy, Julia; Samuel, Clem; Filut, Amarette; Pribbenow, Christine Maidl

    2017-01-01

    Explicit racial bias has decreased in the United States, but racial stereotypes still exist and conspire in multiple ways to perpetuate the underparticipation of Blacks in science careers. Capitalizing on the potential effectiveness of role-playing video games to promote the type of active learning required to increase awareness of and reduce subtle racial bias, we developed the video game Fair Play, in which players take on the role of Jamal, a Black male graduate student in science, who experiences discrimination in his PhD program. We describe a mixed-methods evaluation of the experience of scientific workforce trainers who played Fair Play at the National Institutes of Health Division of Training Workforce Development and Diversity program directors' meeting in 2013 (n = 47; 76% female, n = 34; 53% nonwhite, n = 26). The evaluation findings suggest that Fair Play can promote perspective taking and increase bias literacy, which are steps toward reducing racial bias and affording Blacks equal opportunities to excel in science. © 2017 A. Kaatz et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Attentional bias for smoking-related information in pregnant women: relationships with smoking experience, smoking attitudes and perceived harm to foetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenaway, Rebecca; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P

    2012-09-01

    According to recent models of drug dependence, attentional bias for drug cues provides an index of vulnerability to drug-taking and relapse. The present study examined attentional bias for smoking-related information in pregnant women and its relationship with smoking experience and attitudes. Participants were 71 pregnant women (35 without smoking experience; 36 with experience of smoking, of whom 16 reported currently smoking). Attentional bias was assessed from the interference index of smoking-related words on a modified Stroop task. The attentional bias for smoking cues was positively associated with smoking experience, and with more favourable general attitudes to smoking (i.e. incentive-related bias). The bias was also greater in women who perceived greater harm of passive smoking to their foetus (i.e. threat-related bias), which was independent of smoking experience. Results indicate that attentional bias for smoking-related cues is independently associated with both incentive-related (reward) and threat-related (aversive) evaluations of cigarette smoking in pregnant women. This work highlights the need for longitudinal research to investigate whether the attentional bias provides a cognitive index of vulnerability for persistent smoking behaviour both during and after pregnancy.

  15. Dismissing Children's Perceptions of Their Emotional Experience and Parental Care: Preliminary Evidence of Positive Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, Jessica L.; David, Daryn H.; Crowley, Michael J.; Snavely, Jonathan E.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    The tendency to perceive caregivers in highly positive terms and to perceive the self as strong and problem-free are two facets of the positive bias characteristic of a dismissing attachment classification in adulthood. However, this link has not yet been examined in children. We evaluated the association between dismissing attachment and positive…

  16. Monopolar Radiofrequency Ablation for Medium-sized Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Preliminary Experience with Single-Electrode Overlapping Ablation and Multiple-Electrode Switching System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Yung Wang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Medium-sized hepatocellular carcinoma can be effectively ablated with monopolar radiofrequency ablation by either single-electrode overlapping ablation or a multiple-electrode switching system. Regarding mid-term treatment responses, both RFA approaches can achieve similar treatment effectiveness, local tumor progression rate, and survival probabilities. Multiple-electrode switching RFA can treat larger medium-sized HCC with comparable mid-term efficacy as smaller medium-sized HCC treated with single-electrode overlapping RFA.

  17. Enhancing emotional experiences to dance through music: the role of valence and arousal in the cross-modal bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F. Christensen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that emotional responses to stimuli presented to one perceptive modality (e.g. visual are modulated by the concurrent presentation of affective information to another modality (e.g. auditory – an effect known as the cross-modal bias. However, the affective mechanisms mediating this effect are still not fully understood. It remains unclear what role different dimensions of stimulus valence and arousal play in mediating the effect, and to what extent cross-modal influences impact not only our perception and conscious affective experiences, but also our psychophysiological emotional response. We addressed these issues by measuring participants’ subjective emotion ratings and their Galvanic Skin Responses in a cross-modal affect perception paradigm employing videos of ballet dance movements and instrumental classical music as the stimuli. We chose these stimuli to explore the cross-modal bias in a context of stimuli (ballet dance movements that most participants would have relatively little prior experience with. Results showed (i that the cross-modal bias was more pronounced for sad than for happy movements, whereas it was equivalent when contrasting high vs. low arousal movements, and (ii that movement valence did not modulate participants’ GSR, while movement arousal did such that GSR was potentiated in the case of low arousal movements with sad music and when high arousal movements were paired with happy music. Results are discussed in the context of the cross-modal affect perception literature and with regards to implications for the art community.

  18. Enhancing emotional experiences to dance through music: the role of valence and arousal in the cross-modal bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julia F; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Gomila, Antoni; Oke, Peter; Calvo-Merino, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that emotional responses to stimuli presented to one perceptive modality (e.g., visual) are modulated by the concurrent presentation of affective information to another modality (e.g., auditory)-an effect known as the cross-modal bias. However, the affective mechanisms mediating this effect are still not fully understood. It remains unclear what role different dimensions of stimulus valence and arousal play in mediating the effect, and to what extent cross-modal influences impact not only our perception and conscious affective experiences, but also our psychophysiological emotional response. We addressed these issues by measuring participants' subjective emotion ratings and their Galvanic Skin Responses (GSR) in a cross-modal affect perception paradigm employing videos of ballet dance movements and instrumental classical music as the stimuli. We chose these stimuli to explore the cross-modal bias in a context of stimuli (ballet dance movements) that most participants would have relatively little prior experience with. Results showed (i) that the cross-modal bias was more pronounced for sad than for happy movements, whereas it was equivalent when contrasting high vs. low arousal movements; and (ii) that movement valence did not modulate participants' GSR, while movement arousal did, such that GSR was potentiated in the case of low arousal movements with sad music and when high arousal movements were paired with happy music. Results are discussed in the context of the affective dimension of neuroentrainment and with regards to implications for the art community.

  19. A priori expectancy bias and its relation to shock experience and anxiety: a naturalistic study in patients with an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, P; Wiedemann, G; Dengler, W; Kühlkamp, V

    2001-09-01

    Patients with an automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD) may offer an unique naturalistic opportunity to study whether expectancy biases develop because of precipitating aversive or traumatic experiences and/or because of elevated anxiety. An expectancy bias and its associations with AICD discharge and anxiety was examined in 24 AICD patients with a thought experiment. While patients without AICD discharge exhibited no expectancy bias, patients with discharge experiences were found to expect that stimuli depicting medical emergency situations will be followed by an aversive consequence. The magnitude of their expectancy bias was positively correlated with their anxiety level. In the group with AICD discharge, patients with low anxiety levels exhibited no bias, while patients with high anxiety levels exhibited a rather strong bias. It seems that the experience of an aversive or traumatic event, here an AICD discharge, is a necessary (but not sufficient) precipitating event for the development of an expectancy bias. If such an event happens, trait anxiety level presumably determines if and how strong the expectancy bias will be.

  20. Comparative Experiments on Disambiguating Word Senses An Illustration of the Role of Bias in Machine Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Mooney, R J

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental comparison of seven different learning algorithms on the problem of learning to disambiguate the meaning of a word from context. The algorithms tested include statistical, neural-network, decision-tree, rule-based, and case-based classification techniques. The specific problem tested involves disambiguating six senses of the word ``line'' using the words in the current and proceeding sentence as context. The statistical and neural-network methods perform the best on this particular problem and we discuss a potential reason for this observed difference. We also discuss the role of bias in machine learning and its importance in explaining performance differences observed on specific problems.

  1. Action modulated cognition: the influence of sensori-motor experience on the global processing bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihey, Tracey A; Black, Sandra E; Ferber, Susanne

    2013-08-01

    Whether we are aware of it or not, cognition is inherently biased. Researchers have attempted to modulate these biases using prism adaptation in both healthy and patient populations. Recent research suggests that prisms themselves might not be necessary; simply interacting with one side of space can produce similar effects (Dupierrix, Alleysson, Ohlmann and Chokron (2008). Brain Research, 1214, 127-135). Here we tested whether sensori-motor interaction with the environment affects aspects of cognition that should at first glance appear to be unrelated. While previous research involved tasks that were largely directional in nature (e.g., line bisection), we chose a task without a directional component, the hierarchical figures task (Navon, (1977). Cognitive Psychology, 9, 353-383). In a sample of healthy young adults, we found that after 5min of lateralized pointing (pointing solely to the left or right side of space), performance on the hierarchical figures task varied significantly as a function of pointing direction: interference from irrelevant global information increased after interacting with the left side of space and decreased after interacting with the right side of space. We discuss the results in relation to a "hemispheric imbalance" hypothesis. Our findings demonstrate that cognition can be readily influenced by interactions with the environment even without artificially distorting normal perceptuo-motor relationships.

  2. How experience shapes memory for faces: an event-related potential study on the own-age bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Holger; Wolff, Nicole; Steffens, Melanie C; Schweinberger, Stefan R

    2013-10-01

    Young adults more accurately remember own-age than older faces. We tested whether this own-age bias (OAB) is reduced by increased experience. Young experts (geriatric nurses) and controls performed a recognition experiment with young and old faces. Critically, while control participants demonstrated better memory for young faces, no OAB was observed in the experts. Event-related potentials revealed larger N170 and P2 amplitudes for young than old faces in both groups, suggesting no group differences during early perceptual processing. At test, N250 repetition effects were more anteriorily distributed for own- than other-age faces in control participants, whereas experts showed no corresponding effects. A larger late positive component (LPC) for old than young faces was observed in controls, but not in experts. Larger LPCs may reflect prolonged stimulus processing compromising memory retrieval. In sum, experience with other-age faces does not affect early perceptual processing, but modulates later stages related to memory retrieval.

  3. Intercomparsion of regional biases and doubled CO{sub 2}-sensitivity of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, T.G.F. [Nat. Center for Atmos. Res., Boulder, CO (United States). Climate and Global Dynamics Div.]|[Climate System Modeling Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Giorgi, F.; Meehl, G.A. [Nat. Center for Atmos. Res., Boulder, CO (United States). Climate and Global Dynamics Div.

    1998-01-01

    We compared regional biases and transient doubled CO{sub 2} sensitivities of nine coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (GCMs) from six international climate modeling groups. We evaluated biases and responses in winter and summer surface air temperatures and precipitation for seven subcontinental regions, including those in the 1990 intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC) scientific assessment. Regional biases were large and exceeded the variance among four climatological datasets, indicating that model biases were not primarily due to uncertainty in observations. Model responses to altered greenhouse forcing were substantial (average temperature change=2.7{+-}0.9 C, range of precipitation change =-35 to +120% of control). While coupled models include more climate system feedbacks than earlier GCMs implemented with mixed-layer ocean models, inclusion of a dynamic ocean alone did not improve simulation of long-term mean climatology nor increase convergence among model responses to altered greenhouse gas forcing. On the other hand, features of some of the coupled models including flux adjustment (which may have simply masked simulation errors), high horizontal resolution, and estimation of screen height temperature contributed to improved simulation of long-term surface climate. The large range of model responses was partly accounted for by inconsistencies in forcing scenarios and transient-simulation averaging periods. Nonetheless, the models generally had greater agreement in their sensitivities than their controls did with observations. This suggests that consistent, large-scale response features from an ensemble of model sensitivity experiments may not depend on details of their representation of present-day climate. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 65 refs.

  4. Computer modeling and ex vivo experiments with a (saline-linked) irrigated electrode for RF-assisted heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Javier; Perez, Juan J; Trujillo, Macarena; Berjano, Enrique

    2014-12-12

    Externally irrigated radiofrequency (RF) electrodes have been widely used to thermally ablate tumors in surface tissue and to thermally coagulate the transection plane during a surgical resection. As far as we know, no mathematical model has yet been developed to study the electrical and thermal performance of these electrodes, especially the role of the saline layer that forms around the electrode. Numerical models of a TissueLink device model DS3.0 (Salient Surgical Technologies, Portsmouth, NH, USA) were developed. Irrigation was modeled including a saline layer and a heat convection term in the governing equation. Ex vivo experiments based on fragments of bovine hepatic tissue were conducted to obtain information which was used in building the numerical model. We compared the 60°C isotherm of the computer results with the whitening contour in the heated samples. Computer and experimental results were in fine agreement in terms of lesion depth (2.4 mm in the simulations and 2.4 ± 0.6 mm in the experiments). In contrast, the lesion width was greater in the simulation (9.6 mm vs. 7.8 ± 1.8 mm). The computer simulations allowed us to explain the role of the saline layer in creating the thermal lesion. Impedance gradually decreased as heating proceeded. The saline was not observed to boil. In the proximity of the electrode (around 1 mm) the thermal lesion was mainly created by the RF power in this zone, while at a further distance the thermal lesion was created by the hot saline on the tissue surface by simple thermal conduction. Including the heat convection term associated with the saline velocity in the governing equation was crucial to verifying that the saline layer had not reached boiling temperature. The model reproduced thermal performance during heating in terms of lesion depth, and provided an explanation for: 1) the relationship between impedance, electrode insertion depth, and saline layer, and 2) the process of creating thermal lesions in the

  5. Nucleation and aggregative growth of palladium nanoparticles on carbon electrodes: Experiment and kinetic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yang-Rae; Lai, Stanley C.S.; McKelvey, Kim; Zhang, Guohui; Perry, David; Miller, Thomas S.; Unwin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of the electrochemical nucleation and growth of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) on carbon electrodes have been investigated using a microscale meniscus cell on both highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and a carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid

  6. Correspondence between Experiment and Theory of Bulk Electrocrystallisation at Solid Electrodes in Aqueous Electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    A theory of bulk-metal electrocrystallisation at solid-metal surfaces in aqueous electrolytes is presented. The electrochemical processes in the vicinity of the electrode surface are dynamic interactions between charged and uncharged species. Redox processes in the classical sense constitute only...

  7. A potential gender bias in assessing quality of life - a standard gamble experiment among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidi, Leath Al; Mahlich, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    There are several methodologies that can be used for evaluating patients' perception of their quality of life. Most commonly, utilities are directly elicited by means of either the time-trade-off or the standard-gamble method. In both methods, risk attitudes determine the quality of life values. Quality of life values among 31 Austrian undergraduate students were elicited by means of the standard gamble approach. The impact of several variables such as gender, side job, length of study, and living arrangements on the quality of life were identified using different types of regression techniques (ordinary least squares, generalized linear model, Betafit). Significant evidence was found that females are associated with a higher quality of life in all specifications of our estimations. The observed gender differences in quality of life can be attributed to a higher degree of risk aversion of women. A higher risk aversion leads to a higher valuation of given health states and a potential gender bias in health economic evaluations. This result could have implications for health policy planners when it comes to budget allocation decisions.

  8. Electrochemical behavior of a typical redox mediator on a modified electrode surface: Experiment and computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán Arriazu, E. M.; Paz Zanini, Verónica I.; Gulotta, Florencia A.; Araujo, Virginia M.; Pinto, O. A.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the study of a redox species electrosorption on a modified electrode by experimental measurements and computer simulation. The propose model is based on the fact that charges are transferred to the electrode when an electroactive species is adsorbed on its surface. The electrode surface is modified by the irreversible adsorption of a non-electroactive species, which blocks a percentage of the adsorption sites. Hence, the electroactive species can only be adsorbed on the surface vacancies, and, when this phenomenon occurs, interact laterally with the non-electroactive one. Lattice-gas models and Monte Carlo simulations in the Gran Canonical Ensemble are used. The analysis conducted is based on the study of adsorption isotherms and voltammograms, for several values of energies and adsorption degrees of the non-electroactive species. In the case of experimental measurements, an artificial clay (Laponite®) represents the non-electroactive species while the redox probe Fe(CN)64- is the electroactive one. The results obtained by the proposed model are compared with experimental voltammograms.

  9. Understanding Biases in Ribosome Profiling Experiments Reveals Signatures of Translation Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Hussmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome profiling produces snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes on messenger RNAs. These snapshots can be used to make inferences about translation dynamics. Recent ribosome profiling studies in yeast, however, have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the average translation rate of each codon. Some experiments have used cycloheximide (CHX to stabilize ribosomes before measuring their positions, and these studies all counterintuitively report a weak negative correlation between the translation rate of a codon and the abundance of its cognate tRNA. In contrast, some experiments performed without CHX report strong positive correlations. To explain this contradiction, we identify unexpected patterns in ribosome density downstream of each type of codon in experiments that use CHX. These patterns are evidence that elongation continues to occur in the presence of CHX but with dramatically altered codon-specific elongation rates. The measured positions of ribosomes in these experiments therefore do not reflect the amounts of time ribosomes spend at each position in vivo. These results suggest that conclusions from experiments in yeast using CHX may need reexamination. In particular, we show that in all such experiments, codons decoded by less abundant tRNAs were in fact being translated more slowly before the addition of CHX disrupted these dynamics.

  10. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  11. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  12. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-01

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  13. Development of novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor on for Si drift detectors and detector arrays for X-ray and nuclear physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng, E-mail: lizheng@xtu.edu.cn [School of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Chen, Wei [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-11-21

    A novel on-chip, customer-design spiral biasing adaptor (SBA) has been developed. A single SBA is used for biasing a Si drift detector (SDD) and SDD array. The use of an SBA reduces the biasing current. This paper shows the calculation of the geometry of an SBA and an SDD to get the best drift field in the SDD and SDD array. Prototype SBAs have been fabricated to verify the concept. Electrical measurements on these SBAs are in agreement with the expectations. The new SDD array with an SBA can be used for X-ray detection and in nuclear physics experiments.

  14. Correspondence between Experiment and Theory of Bulk Electrocrystallisation at Solid Electrodes in Aqueous Electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    overpotentials in cyclic voltammetry (dc). The lack of complete reversibility in nernstian systems is a key topic of the present model, and the description also involves a prediction of the properties observed in non-reversible systems. These considerations lead to a novel concept for reversibility that is based...... position relative to the electrode, the rate of reduction and oxidation may increase thus leading to current densities that exceed the magnitude of conventional diffusion current densities observed in cyclic voltammetry. This result was accomplished by including in the description a depletion layer devoid...

  15. Comprehensive ecosystem model-experiment synthesis using multiple datasets at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment experiments: model performance and compensating biases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Anthony P [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; DeKauwe, Martin G [Macquarie University; Medlyn, Belinda [Macquarie University; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Asao, Shinichi [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hickler, Thomas [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Huntinford, Chris [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lomas, Mark [University of Sheffield; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Prentice, I. Collin [Macquarie University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Shusen [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS); Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Warlind, David [Lund University, Sweden; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Woodward, F. Ian [University of Sheffield; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a remarkable wealth of data to test the sensitivities of terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs). In this study, a broad set of 11 TEMs were compared to 22 years of data from two contrasting FACE experiments in temperate forests of the south eastern US the evergreen Duke Forest and the deciduous Oak Ridge forest. We evaluated the models' ability to reproduce observed net primary productivity (NPP), transpiration and Leaf Area index (LAI) in ambient CO2 treatments. Encouragingly, many models simulated annual NPP and transpiration within observed uncertainty. Daily transpiration model errors were often related to errors in leaf area phenology and peak LAI. Our analysis demonstrates that the simulation of LAI often drives the simulation of transpiration and hence there is a need to adopt the most appropriate of hypothesis driven methods to simulate and predict LAI. Of the three competing hypotheses determining peak LAI (1) optimisation to maximise carbon export, (2) increasing SLA with canopy depth and (3) the pipe model the pipe model produced LAI closest to the observations. Modelled phenology was either prescribed or based on broader empirical calibrations to climate. In some cases, simulation accuracy was achieved through compensating biases in component variables. For example, NPP accuracy was sometimes achieved with counter-balancing biases in nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen uptake. Combined analysis of parallel measurements aides the identification of offsetting biases; without which over-confidence in model abilities to predict ecosystem function may emerge, potentially leading to erroneous predictions of change under future climates.

  16. Emil Rupp, Albert Einstein and the canal ray experiments on wave-particle duality: Scientific fraud and theoretical bias

    CERN Document Server

    van Dongen, Jeroen

    2007-01-01

    In 1926 Emil Rupp published a number of papers on the interference properties of light emitted by canal ray sources. These articles, particularly one paper that came into being in collaboration with Albert Einstein, drew quite some attention as they probed the wave versus particle nature of light. They also significantly propelled Rupp's career, even though that from the outset they were highly controversial. This article will review this episode, and in particular Rupp's collaboration with Einstein. Evidence that Rupp forged his results is presented and their critical reception in the socially and politically divided German physics community is discussed. These divisions fail to explain the full dynamic; the latter is attempted by turning to the role that theoretical bias on occasion has in assessing experiment. Einstein's responses in particular are analyzed in this context.

  17. Probing the human brain with stimulating electrodes: the story of Roberts Bartholow's (1874) experiment on Mary Rafferty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lauren Julius; Almerigi, Jason B

    2009-06-01

    Roberts Bartholow's 1874 experiment on Mary Rafferty is widely cited as the first demonstration, by direct application of stimulating electrodes, of the motor excitability of the human cerebral cortex. The many accounts of the experiment, however, leave certain questions and details unexamined or unresolved, especially about Bartholow's goals, the nature and quality of the evidence, and the experiment's role in the history of theory and research on localisation of function. In this article, we try to fill these gaps and to tell the full story. We describe Bartholow's career up to 1874, review the theoretical and empirical background for the experiment, and present Bartholow's own account of the experiment as well as those of his supporters and critics. We then present our own analysis, assess the experiment's influence on contemporaneous scientific opinion about cortical excitability, and trace its citation record into our own time. We also review and assess ethical criticisms of Bartholow and their effects on his career, and we close by discussing the role we think the experiment deserves to play in the history of theory and research on cortical excitability.

  18. SPEAR-1: An experiment to measure current collection in the ionosphere by high voltage biased conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitt, W. John; Myers, Neil B.; Roberts, Jon A.; Thompson, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment is described in which a high electrical potential difference, up to 45 kV, was applied between deployed conducting spheres and a sounding rocket in the ionosphere. Measurements were made of the applied voltage and the resulting currents for each of 24 applications of different high potentials. In addition, diagnostic measurements of optical emissions in the vicinity of the spheres, energetic particle flow to the sounding rocket, dc electric field and wave data were made. The ambient plasma and neutral environments were measured by a Langmuir probe and a cold cathode neutral ionization gauge, respectively. The payload is described and examples of the measured current and voltage characteristics are presented. The characteristics of the measured currents are discussed in terms of the diagnostic measurements and the in-situ measurements of the vehicle environment. In general, it was found that the currents observed were at a level typical of magnetically limited currents from the ionospheric plasma for potentials less than 12 kV, and slightly higher for larger potentials. However, due to the failure to expose the plasma contactor, the vehicle sheath modified the sphere sheaths and made comparisons with the analytic models of Langmuir-Blodgett and Parker-Murphy less meaningful. Examples of localized enhancements of ambient gas density resulting from the operation of the attitude control system thrusters (cold nitrogen) were obtained. Current measurements and optical data indicated localized discharges due to enhanced gas density that reduced the vehicle-ionosphere impedance.

  19. Patient stories about their dialysis experience biases others' choices regardless of doctor's advice: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Anna E; Bekker, Hilary L; Conner, Mark; Mooney, Andrew F

    2012-01-01

    Renal services provide resources to support patients in making informed choices about their dialysis modality. Many encourage new patients to talk with those already experiencing dialysis. It is unclear if these stories help or hinder patients' decisions, and few studies have been conducted into their effects. We present two studies comparing the impact of patient and doctor stories on hypothetical dialysis modality choices among an experimental population. In total, 1694 participants viewed online information about haemodialysis and continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis and completed a questionnaire. In Study 1, using actors, treatment information was varied by presenter (Doctor, Patient), order of presenter (Patient first, Doctor first) and mode of delivery (written, video). Information in Study 2 was varied (using actors) by presenter (Doctor, Patient), order of presenter (Patient first, Doctor first), inclusion of a decision table (no table, before story, after story) and sex of the 'patient' (male, female) and 'Doctor' (male, female). Information was controlled to ensure comparable content and comprehensibility. In both studies, participants were more likely to choose the dialysis modality presented by the patient rather than that presented by the doctor. There was no effect for mode of delivery (video versus written) or inclusion of a decision table. As 'new' patients were making choices based on past patient experience of those already on dialysis, we recommend caution to services using patient stories about dialysis to support those new to the dialysis in delivering support to those who are new to the decision making process for dialysis modality.

  20. Experiment on 550 kV Transformer under DC Bias%550kV变压器直流偏磁试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓玲; 李有春

    2011-01-01

    Taking Jinping I hydropower station for an example, experiment on main transformer under DC bias is performed and the data is analyzed. And the influence rule of DC bias on main transformer is obtained. Then, the measures of suppression transformer DC bias and perfect design are put forward. Thus it provides basis for operation maintenance of hydropower station and study of DC bias.%以锦屏一级水电站为例,介绍了主变压器直流偏磁试验并进行了分析,获得了直流偏磁对水电站主变压器影响的规律,提出了抑制直流偏磁措施和完善设计的建议,为电站的运行维护及直流偏磁的研究提供了依据.

  1. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Johnson, Theresa; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10-16 g to 10-11 g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space weather

  2. Phonon excitation and instabilities in biased graphene nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegård, Per;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how a high current density perturbs the phonons in a biased graphene nanoconstriction coupled to semi-infinite electrodes. The coupling to electrode phonons, electrode electrons under bias, Joule heating, and current-induced forces is evaluated using first principles density...

  3. INTERPRETATION OF POTENTIAL INTERMITTENCE TITRATION TECHNIQUE EXPERIMENTS FOR VARIOUS Li-INTERCALATION ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D.Levi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we compare two different approaches for the calculation of the enhancement factor Wi, based on its definition as the ratio of the chemical and the component diffusion coefficients for species in mixed-conduction electrodes, originated from the "dilute solution" or "lattice gas" models for the ion system. The former approach is only applicable for small changes of the ion concentration while the latter allows one to consider a broad range of intercalation levels. The component diffusion coefficient of lithium ions has been determined for a series of lithium intercalation anodes and cathodes. A new "enhancement factor" for the ion transport has been defined and its relations to the intercalation capacitance and the intercalation isotherm have been established. A correlation between the dependences of the differential capacitance and the partial ion conductivity on the potential has been observed. It is considered as a prove that the intercalation process is controlled by the availability of sites for Li-ion insertion rather than by the concurrent insertion of the counter-balancing electronic species.

  4. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  5. Development and deployment of an inner detector minimum bias trigger and analysis of minimum bias data of the ATLAS experiment at the large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwee, Regina Esther

    2012-01-13

    Soft inelastic QCD processes are the dominant proton-proton interaction type at the LHC. More than 20 of such collisions pile up within a single bunch-crossing at ATLAS, when the LHC is operated at design luminosity of L=10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} colliding proton bunches with an energy of {radical}(s)=14 TeV. Inelastic interactions are characterised by a small transverse momentum transfer and can only be approximated by phenomenological models that need experimental data as input. The initial phase of LHC beam operation in 2009, with luminosities ranging from L=10{sup 27} to 10{sup 31} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, offered an ideal period to select single proton-proton interactions and study general aspects of their properties. As first part of this thesis, a Minimum Bias trigger was developed and used for data-taking in ATLAS. This trigger, mbSpTrk, processes signals of the silicon tracking detectors of ATLAS and was designed to fulfill efficiently reject empty events, while possible biases in the selection of proton-proton collisions is reduced to a minimum. The trigger is flexible enough to cope also with changing background conditions allowing to retain low-p{sub T} events while machine background is highly suppressed. As second part, measurements of inelastic charged particles were performed in two phase-space regions. Centrally produced charged particles were considered with a pseudorapidity smaller than 0.8 and a transverse momentum of at least 0.5 or 1 GeV. Four characteristic distributions were measured at two centre-of-mass energies of {radical}(s)=0.9 and 7 TeV. The results are presented with minimal model dependency to compare them to predictions of different Monte Carlo models for soft particle production. This analysis represents also the ATLAS contribution for the first common LHC analysis to which the ATLAS, CMS and ALICE collaborations agreed. The pseudorapidity distributions for both energies and phase-space regions are compared to the respective

  6. On a problematic procedure to manipulate response biases in recognition experiments: the case of "implied" base rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröder, Arndt; Malejka, Simone

    2017-07-01

    The experimental manipulation of response biases in recognition-memory tests is an important means for testing recognition models and for estimating their parameters. The textbook manipulations for binary-response formats either vary the payoff scheme or the base rate of targets in the recognition test, with the latter being the more frequently applied procedure. However, some published studies reverted to implying different base rates by instruction rather than actually changing them. Aside from unnecessarily deceiving participants, this procedure may lead to cognitive conflicts that prompt response strategies unknown to the experimenter. To test our objection, implied base rates were compared to actual base rates in a recognition experiment followed by a post-experimental interview to assess participants' response strategies. The behavioural data show that recognition-memory performance was estimated to be lower in the implied base-rate condition. The interview data demonstrate that participants used various second-order response strategies that jeopardise the interpretability of the recognition data. We thus advice researchers against substituting actual base rates with implied base rates.

  7. Photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline TiO II electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Haroldo G.; Nery, Daiane C.; Paschoalino, Matheus P.; Jardim, Wilson F.; Longo, Claudia

    2007-09-01

    The electrochemical and photocatalytic properties of a TiO II film deposited on transparent electrodes were investigated. Its electrochemical behavior was typical of an n-type semiconductor electrode. Its photocatalytic activity, investigated for phenol degradation on an optical bench (area of 1 cm2, 5 mL of solution), revealed small currents (3 μA) and poor total organic carbon (TOC) removal (5 %) when the electrode was biased at + 1.1 V in the dark for 3 h. Under polychromatic irradiation, the electrode presented 25 μA of current and 12 % of phenol degradation. A better performance was achieved for photoelectrocatalytic configuration, when the electrode was irradiated and biased with + 0.6 V. Experiments done under irradiation with a metallic vapor lamp using 9 cm2 electrodes and 10 mL of solution revealed that heterogeneous photocatalysis configuration (HPC) resulted in 50 % of TOC removal, while 85 % was achieved by the electro-assisted process (EHPC). Both the configurations exhibited pseudo-first order kinetics for phenol degradation, but the rate constant was two times that of EHPC. The application of a potential bias to the TiO II porous electrode must enhance the photogenerated electron/hole separation, which minimize the charge recombination and increases its photocatalytic activity towards organic pollutant degradation.

  8. Intergroup bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  9. Large amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetry at a rotating disc electrode: a versatile technique for covering Levich and flow rate insensitive regimes in a single experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Kiran; Kennedy, Gareth F; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M

    2012-04-14

    The theory for large amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetry at a rotating disc electrode is described. Resolution of time domain data into dc and ac harmonic components reveals that the mass transport for the dc component is controlled by convective-diffusion, while the background free higher order harmonic components are flow rate insensitive and mainly governed by linear diffusion. Thus, remarkable versatility is available; Levich behaviour of the dc component limiting current provides diffusion coefficient values and access to higher harmonics allows fast electrode kinetics to be probed. Two series of experiments (dc and ac voltammetry) have been required to extract these parameters; here large amplitude ac voltammetry with RDE methodology is used to demonstrate that kinetics and diffusion coefficient information can be extracted from a single experiment. To demonstrate the power of this approach, theoretical and experimental comparisons of data obtained for the reversible [Ru(NH(3))(6)](3+/2+) and quasi-reversible [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) electron transfer processes are presented over a wide range of electrode rotation rates and with different concentrations and electrode materials. Excellent agreement of experimental and simulated data is achieved, which allows parameters such as electron transfer rate, diffusion coefficient, uncompensated resistance and others to be determined using a strategically applied approach that takes into account the different levels of sensitivity of each parameter to the dc or the ac harmonic.

  10. What was I thinking? Eye-tracking experiments underscore the bias that architecture exerts on nuclear grading in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Bombari

    Full Text Available We previously reported that nuclear grade assignment of prostate carcinomas is subject to a cognitive bias induced by the tumor architecture. Here, we asked whether this bias is mediated by the non-conscious selection of nuclei that "match the expectation" induced by the inadvertent glance at the tumor architecture. 20 pathologists were asked to grade nuclei in high power fields of 20 prostate carcinomas displayed on a computer screen. Unknown to the pathologists, each carcinoma was shown twice, once before a background of a low grade, tubule-rich carcinoma and once before the background of a high grade, solid carcinoma. Eye tracking allowed to identify which nuclei the pathologists fixated during the 8 second projection period. For all 20 pathologists, nuclear grade assignment was significantly biased by tumor architecture. Pathologists tended to fixate on bigger, darker, and more irregular nuclei when those were projected before kigh grade, solid carcinomas than before low grade, tubule-rich carcinomas (and vice versa. However, the morphometric differences of the selected nuclei accounted for only 11% of the architecture-induced bias, suggesting that it can only to a small part be explained by the unconscious fixation on nuclei that "match the expectation". In conclusion, selection of « matching nuclei » represents an unconscious effort to vindicate the gravitation of nuclear grades towards the tumor architecture.

  11. Nonresponse bias in randomized controlled experiments in criminology: Putting the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET) under a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Emma; Elffers, Henk; White, Gentry; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine whether or not the results of the Queensland Community Engagement Trial (QCET)-a randomized controlled trial that tested the impact of procedural justice policing on citizen attitudes toward police-were affected by different types of nonresponse bias. We use two methods (Cochrane and Elffers methods) to explore nonresponse bias: First, we assess the impact of the low response rate by examining the effects of nonresponse group differences between the experimental and control conditions and pooled variance under different scenarios. Second, we assess the degree to which item response rates are influenced by the control and experimental conditions. Our analysis of the QCET data suggests that our substantive findings are not influenced by the low response rate in the trial. The results are robust even under extreme conditions, and statistical significance of the results would only be compromised in cases where the pooled variance was much larger for the nonresponse group and the difference between experimental and control conditions was greatly diminished. We also find that there were no biases in the item response rates across the experimental and control conditions. RCTs that involve field survey responses-like QCET-are potentially compromised by low response rates and how item response rates might be influenced by the control or experimental conditions. Our results show that the QCET results were not sensitive to the overall low response rate across the experimental and control conditions and the item response rates were not significantly different across the experimental and control groups. Overall, our analysis suggests that the results of QCET are robust and any biases in the survey responses do not significantly influence the main experimental findings.

  12. An apparatus for studying electrical breakdown in liquid helium at 0.4 K and testing electrode materials for the SNS nEDM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, T M; Yao, W; Beck, D H; Cianciolo, V; Clayton, S M; Crawford, C; Currie, S A; Filippone, B W; Griffith, W C; Makela, M; Schmid, R; Seidel, G M; Tang, Z; Wagner, D; Wei, W; Williamson, S E

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed an apparatus to study DC electrical breakdown in liquid helium at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and at pressures between the saturated vapor pressure and $\\sim$600 torr. The apparatus can house a set of electrodes that are 12 cm in diameter with a gap of $1-2$ cm between them, and a potential up to $\\pm 50$ kV can be applied to each electrode. Initial results demonstrated that it is possible to apply fields exceeding 100 kV/cm in a 1 cm gap between two electropolished stainless steel electrodes 12 cm in diameter for a wide range of pressures at 0.4 K. We also measured the current between two electrodes. Our initial results, $I 5\\times10^{18}$ $\\Omega\\cdot$cm. This lower bound is 5 times larger than the bound previously measured. We report the design, construction, and operational experience of the apparatus, as well as initial results.

  13. Safety of atrial fibrillation ablation with novel multi-electrode array catheters on uninterrupted anticoagulation-a single-center experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Christopher Ruslan

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: A recent single-center report indicated that the performance of atrial fibrillation ablation in patients on uninterrupted warfarin using a conventional deflectable tip electrode ablation catheter may be as safe as periprocedural discontinuation of warfarin and bridging with heparin. Novel multi-electrode array catheters for atrial fibrillation ablation are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. While offering the possibility of more rapid atrial fibrillation ablation, they are stiffer and necessitate the deployment of larger deflectable transseptal sheaths, and it remains to be determined if they increase the risk of cardiac perforation and vascular injury. Such potential risks would have implications for a strategy of uninterrupted periprocedural anticoagulation. METHOD AND RESULTS: We audited the safety outcomes of our atrial fibrillation ablation procedures using multi-electrode array ablation catheters in patients on uninterrupted warfarin (CHADS2 score>or=2) and in patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). Two bleeding complications occurred in 49 patients on uninterrupted warfarin, both of which were managed successfully without longterm sequelae, and no bleeding complication occurred in 32 patients not on warfarin (uninterrupted aspirin). There were no thromboembolic events or other complication with either anticoagulant regimen. CONCLUSION: Despite the larger diameter and increased stiffness of multi-electrode array catheters and their deflectable transseptal sheaths, their use for catheter ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation on uninterrupted warfarin in this single-center experience does not appear to be unsafe, and thus, an adequately powered multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial should be considered.

  14. Bias and Uncertainty of Critical Experiment Models with CSAS25 from SCALE4.4a for Criticality Safety Analyses On the HP J-5600 (CMODB) Workstation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.H.; Keener, H.J.; DeClue, J.F.; Krass, A.W.; Cain, V.R.

    2001-02-01

    This report documents establishment of bias, bias trends and uncertainty for validation of the CSAS25 control module from the SCALE 4.4a computer code system for use in evaluating criticality safety of uranium systems. The 27-group ENDF/B-IV, 44-group ENDF/B-V, and 238-group ENDF/B-V cross-section libraries were used. The criticality validation calculations were performed using over 500 benchmark cases from Volumes II and IV of the ''International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments,'' published by the Nuclear Energy Agency Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (NEA/OECD). Based on statistical analysis of the calculation results, the bias, bias trends and uncertainty of the benchmark calculations have been established for these benchmark experiments. Numerical methods for applying margins are briefly described, but the determination of appropriate correlating parameter and values for additional margin, applicable to a particular analysis, must be determined as part of process analysis. As such, this document does not specify upper subcritical limits as has been done in the past. A follow-on report will be written to assess the methods for determination of an upper safety limit in more detail, provide comparisons, and recommend a preferred method. Analysts using these results are responsible for exercising sound engineering judgment using strong technical arguments to develop a margin in k{sub eff} or other correlating parameter that is sufficiently large to ensure that conditions (calculated by this method to be subcritical by this margin) will actually be subcritical. Documentation of determination and justification of the appropriate margin in the analyst's evaluation, in conjunction with this report, will constitute the complete Validation Report in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1998, Section 4.3.6(4).

  15. Study of Interdigitated Electrode Arrays Using Experiments and Finite Element Models for the Evaluation of Sterilization Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oberländer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a sensor to evaluate sterilization processes with hydrogen peroxide vapor has been characterized. Experimental, analytical and numerical methods were applied to evaluate and study the sensor behavior. The sensor set-up is based on planar interdigitated electrodes. The interdigitated electrode structure consists of 614 electrode fingers spanning over a total sensing area of 20 mm2. Sensor measurements were conducted with and without microbiological spores as well as after an industrial sterilization protocol. The measurements were verified using an analytical expression based on a first-order elliptical integral. A model based on the finite element method with periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions was developed and utilized to validate the experimental findings.

  16. Study of interdigitated electrode arrays using experiments and finite element models for the evaluation of sterilization processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberländer, Jan; Jildeh, Zaid B; Kirchner, Patrick; Wendeler, Luisa; Bromm, Alexander; Iken, Heiko; Wagner, Patrick; Keusgen, Michael; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-10-14

    In this work, a sensor to evaluate sterilization processes with hydrogen peroxide vapor has been characterized. Experimental, analytical and numerical methods were applied to evaluate and study the sensor behavior. The sensor set-up is based on planar interdigitated electrodes. The interdigitated electrode structure consists of 614 electrode fingers spanning over a total sensing area of 20 mm². Sensor measurements were conducted with and without microbiological spores as well as after an industrial sterilization protocol. The measurements were verified using an analytical expression based on a first-order elliptical integral. A model based on the finite element method with periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions was developed and utilized to validate the experimental findings.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquist, Carl W.; Marchant, David D.

    1978-01-01

    A ceramic-metal composite suitable for use in a high-temperature environment consists of a refractory ceramic matrix containing 10 to 50 volume percent of a continuous high-temperature metal reinforcement. In a specific application of the composite, as an electrode in a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the one surface of the electrode which contacts the MHD fluid may have a layer of varying thickness of nonreinforced refractory ceramic for electrode temperature control. The side walls of the electrode may be coated with a refractory ceramic insulator. Also described is an electrode-insulator system for a MHD channel.

  18. Quality, bias and service user experience in healthcare: 10 years of mental health guidelines at the UK National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Tim; Glover, Naomi; Taylor, Clare; Pilling, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    The guideline programme developed by the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health (NCCMH) for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is probably the most comprehensive and methodologically advanced mental health guideline programme in the world, covering most adults and children with mental health problems and addressing a broad range of pharmacological and psychological/psychosocial interventions. As the success of the NICE programme gains momentum, its influence in the National Health Service (NHS) grows. If guidelines contain systematic bias the effects will be widespread. Over the last 10 years the NCCMH has recognized imperfections and patterns of bias in the way that evidence is generated and included in guidelines, including psychological/psychosocial interventions and drug treatments. The pharmaceutical industry remains a major source of bias through selective reporting and publishing, and represents a threat to ensuring the evidence underpinning guidelines and clinical decision-making is as complete and reliable as possible. The inclusion of service users into guideline development at the NCCMH has developed in parallel to the identification and understanding of evidential bias, and is now becoming an important focus for high-quality guidelines which are becoming increasingly person-centred. For mental health this is as radical as the integration of psychological/psychosocial treatments into what has, for many years, been a largely medical domain. The future role of service users in monitoring their own experience of care and ensuring that trusts are accountable to them is now a real possibility and is likely to have an impact upon the traditional power relations in mental health and the stigma usually associated with psychiatric problems.

  19. On-chip metal/polypyrrole quasi-reference electrodes for robust ISFET operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Guevara, Carlos; Swaminathan, Vikhram V; Burgess, Mark; Reddy, Bobby; Salm, Eric; Liu, Yi-Shao; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-05-21

    To operate an ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFETs) it is necessary to set the electrolyte potential using a reference electrode. Conventional reference electrodes are bulky, fragile, and too big for applications where the electrolyte volume is small. Several researchers have proposed tackling this issue using a solid-state planar micro-reference electrode or a reference field-effect transistor. However, these approaches are limited by poor robustness, high cost, or complex integration with other microfabrication processes. Here we report a simple method to create robust on-chip quasi-reference electrodes by electrodepositing polypyrrole on micro-patterned metal leads. The electrodes were fabricated through the polymerization of pyrrole on patterned metals with a cyclic voltammetry process. Open circuit potential measurements were performed to characterize the polypyrrole electrode performance, demonstrating good stability (±1 mV), low drift (∼1 mV h(-1)), and reduced pH response (5 mV per pH). In addition, the polypyrrole deposition was repeated in microelectrodes made of different metals to test compatibility with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Our results suggest that nickel, a metal commonly used in semiconductor foundries for silicide formation, is a good candidate to form the polypyrrole quasi-reference electrodes. Finally, the polypyrrole microelectrodes were used to operate foundry fabricated ISFETs. These experiments demonstrated that transistors biased with polypyrrole electrodes have pH sensitivity and resolution comparable to ones that are biased with standard reference electrodes. Therefore, the simple fabrication, high compatibility, and robust electrical performance make polypyrrole an ideal choice for the fabrication of outstanding microreference electrodes that enable robust and sensitive operation of multiple ISFET sensors on a chip.

  20. Inappropriate Use of the Quasi-Reversible Electrode Kinetic Model in Simulation-Experiment Comparisons of Voltammetric Processes That Approach the Reversible Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Simonov, Alexandr N.

    2014-08-19

    Many electrode processes that approach the "reversible" (infinitely fast) limit under voltammetric conditions have been inappropriately analyzed by comparison of experimental data and theory derived from the "quasi-reversible" model. Simulations based on "reversible" and "quasi-reversible" models have been fitted to an extensive series of a.c. voltammetric experiments undertaken at macrodisk glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for oxidation of ferrocene (Fc0/+) in CH3CN (0.10 M (n-Bu)4NPF6) and reduction of [Ru(NH 3)6]3+ and [Fe(CN)6]3- in 1 M KCl aqueous electrolyte. The confidence with which parameters such as standard formal potential (E0), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E0 (k0), charge transfer coefficient (α), uncompensated resistance (Ru), and double layer capacitance (CDL) can be reported using the "quasi- reversible" model has been assessed using bootstrapping and parameter sweep (contour plot) techniques. Underparameterization, such as that which occurs when modeling CDL with a potential independent value, results in a less than optimal level of experiment-theory agreement. Overparameterization may improve the agreement but easily results in generation of physically meaningful but incorrect values of the recovered parameters, as is the case with the very fast Fc0/+ and [Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+ processes. In summary, for fast electrode kinetics approaching the "reversible" limit, it is recommended that the "reversible" model be used for theory-experiment comparisons with only E0, R u, and CDL being quantified and a lower limit of k 0 being reported; e.g., k0 ≥ 9 cm s-1 for the Fc0/+ process. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  1. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Knauff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. METHODS: We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. RESULTS: The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  2. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauff, Markus; Budeck, Claudia; Wolf, Ann G; Hamburger, Kai

    2010-10-18

    Explanations for the current worldwide financial crisis are primarily provided by economists and politicians. However, in the present work we focus on the psychological-cognitive factors that most likely affect the thinking of people on the economic stage and thus might also have had an effect on the progression of the crises. One of these factors might be the effect of prior beliefs on reasoning and decision-making. So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market. The premises of reasoning problems concerned stock trading and the experiments varied whether or not their conclusions--a proposition which is reached after considering the premises--agreed with the brokers' prior beliefs. Half of the problems had a conclusion that was highly plausible for stock-brokers while the other half had a highly implausible conclusion. The data show a strong belief bias. Stock-brokers were strongly biased by their prior knowledge. Lowest performance was found for inferences in which the problems caused a conflict between logical validity and the experts' belief. In these cases, the stock-brokers tended to make logically invalid inferences rather than give up their existing beliefs. Our findings support the thesis that cognitive factors have an effect on the decision-making on the financial market. In the present study, stock-brokers were guided more by past experience and existing beliefs than by logical thinking and rational decision-making. They had difficulties to disengage themselves from vastly anchored thinking patterns. However, we believe, that it is wrong to accuse the brokers for their "malfunctions", because such hard-wired cognitive principles are difficult to suppress even if the person is aware of them.

  3. Test of item-response bias in the CES-D scale. experience from the New Haven EPESE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, S R; Kawachi, I; Maller, S J; Berkman, L F

    2000-03-01

    We present results of item-response bias analyses of the exogenous variables age, gender, and race for all items from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale using data (N = 2340) from the New Haven component of the Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (EPESE). The proportional odds of blacks responding higher on the CES-D items "people are unfriendly" and "people dislike me" were 2.29 (95% confidence interval: 1.74, 3.02) and 2.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.15, 4.07) times that of whites matched on overall depressive symptoms, respectively. In addition, the proportional odds of women responding higher on the CES-D item "crying spells" were 2.14 (95% confidence interval: 1.60, 2.82) times that of men matched on overall depressive symptoms. Our data indicate the CES-D would have greater validity among this diverse group of older men and women after removal of the crying item and two interpersonal items.

  4. A potential gender bias in assessing quality of life – a standard gamble experiment among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Obaidi L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leath Al Obaidi,1 Jörg Mahlich2,3 1University of Nottingham, School of Economics, Nottingham, UK; 2Health Economics, Janssen KK, Tokyo, Japan; 3Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany Background: There are several methodologies that can be used for evaluating patients' perception of their quality of life. Most commonly, utilities are directly elicited by means of either the time-trade-off or the standard-gamble method. In both methods, risk attitudes determine the quality of life values. Methods: Quality of life values among 31 Austrian undergraduate students were elicited by means of the standard gamble approach. The impact of several variables such as gender, side job, length of study, and living arrangements on the quality of life were identified using different types of regression techniques (ordinary least squares, generalized linear model, Betafit. Results: Significant evidence was found that females are associated with a higher quality of life in all specifications of our estimations. Discussion: The observed gender differences in quality of life can be attributed to a higher degree of risk aversion of women. A higher risk aversion leads to a higher valuation of given health states and a potential gender bias in health economic evaluations. This result could have implications for health policy planners when it comes to budget allocation decisions. Keywords: quality of life, gender, risk aversion, standard gamble, students 

  5. Simulating currency substitution bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boon (Martin); C.J.M. Kool (Clemens); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sign and size of estimates of the elasticity of currency substitution critically depend on the definition of the oppurtunity costs of holding money. We investigate possible biases by means of Monte Carlo experiments, as sufficient real data are not available.

  6. Avoiding bias effects in NMR experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations: principles and application to organic semiconductor materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Ricardo; Cobo, Marcio Fernando; de Azevedo, Eduardo Ribeiro; Sommer, Michael; Wicklein, André; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Hempel, Günter; Saalwächter, Kay

    2013-09-16

    Carbon-proton dipole-dipole couplings between bonded atoms represent a popular probe of molecular dynamics in soft materials or biomolecules. Their site-resolved determination, for example, by using the popular DIPSHIFT experiment, can be challenged by spectral overlap with nonbonded carbon atoms. The problem can be solved by using very short cross-polarization (CP) contact times, however, the measured modulation curves then deviate strongly from the theoretically predicted shape, which is caused by the dependence of the CP efficiency on the orientation of the CH vector, leading to an anisotropic magnetization distribution even for isotropic samples. Herein, we present a detailed demonstration and explanation of this problem, as well as providing a solution. We combine DIPSHIFT experiments with the rotor-directed exchange of orientations (RODEO) method, and modifications of it, to redistribute the magnetization and obtain undistorted modulation curves. Our strategy is general in that it can also be applied to other types of experiments for heteronuclear dipole-dipole coupling determinations that rely on dipolar polarization transfer. It is demonstrated with perylene-bisimide-based organic semiconductor materials, as an example, in which measurements of dynamic order parameters reveal correlations of the molecular dynamics with the phase structure and functional properties.

  7. Testing for bias between the Kjeldahl and Dumas methods for the determination of nitrogen in meat mixtures, by using data from a designed interlaboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; Owen, Linda; Wilkinson, Kate; Wood, Roger; Damant, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    Bias between the Dumas and the Kjeldahl methods for the determination of protein nitrogen in food was studied by conducting an interlaboratory study involving 40 laboratories and 20 different test materials. Biases were found to be small and statistically significant only for the chicken test materials, where a bias of 0.020±0.004% m/m was detected.

  8. Recent Experimental and Numerical Results on Turbulence, Flows and Global Stability Under Biasing in a Magnetized Linear Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Desjardins, T. R.; Fisher, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing experiments and numerical modeling on the effects of flow shear on electrostatic turbulence in the presence of electrode biasing are being conducted in helicon plasmas in the linear HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device. It is found that changes in flow shear, affected by electrode biasing through Er x Bz rotation, can strongly affect fluctuation dynamics, including fully suppressing the fluctuations or inducing chaos. The fundamental underlying instability, at least in the case of low magnetic field, is identified as a hybrid resistive drift-Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At higher magnetic fields, multiple modes (resistive drift, rotation-driven interchange and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz) are present, and interact nonlinearly. At high positive electrode bias (V >10Te), a large amplitude, global instability, identified as the potential relaxation instability is observed. Numerical modeling is also being conducted, using a 3 fluid global Braginskii solver for no or moderate bias cases, and a 1D PIC code for high bias cases. Recent experimental and numerical results will be presented. Supported by U.S. National Science Foundation Award 1500423.

  9. Relationship Between Childhood Maltreatment Experience, Cognitive Bias and Depression%童年虐待经历及认知偏差与抑郁的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴韦玮; 陆邵佳; 位照国; 彭红军; 李凌江

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨童年期受虐待经历及认知偏差与抑郁的关系.方法:利用童年创伤问卷将入组的重症抑郁症患者及健康成人分为童年虐待组和无童年虐待组,所有被试均完成功能失调性态度量表及认知偏差问卷.结果:在功能失调性态度得分、抑郁-歪曲得分上,诊断有显著主效应,仅认知哲学评分中,童年创伤无主效应.完美化因子评分中,童年创伤与诊断有显著交互作用,伴童年虐待的抑郁症患者显著升高.多元回归分析显示,功能失调性态度总分与抑郁-歪曲得分是抑郁程度的显著预测因子.结论:抑郁症患者及伴童年虐待者均比健康人有更严重的认知偏差,伴童年虐待的抑郁症对完美化的追求更明显.负性认知偏差是抑郁症的有力预测因子.%Objective:To explore the relationship between childhood maltreatment experience,cognitive bias and depression.Methods:Patients of major depression and healthy adults were assessed by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ).And then the patients were divided into the depression group with childhood maltreatment and the one without childhood maltreatment; and the healthy adults were divided into the control group with childhood maltreatment and the one without childhood maltreatment.All subjects were assessed cogntive biases with Dysfunctional Attitudes Scales(DAS)and The Cognitive Bias Questionnaire (CBQ).Results:The main effect of depression diagnosis existed in the total score of DAS and all structure factors,as well as the score of depression-distortion.The main effects of childhood maltreatment were found in the score of depression-distortion,as well as the total score of DAS and 7 structure factors,except "Cognitive-philosophy" factor.Multiple regression analysis showed that the total score of DAS and the score of depression-distortion were powerful predictors of depression.Conclusion:Both depressive patients and the people with childhood maltreatment have

  10. Study of Mn dissolution from LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel electrodes using rotating ring-disk collection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li-Fang; Ou, Chin-Ching; Striebel, Kathryn A.; Chen, Jenn-Shing

    2003-07-01

    The goal of this research was to measure Mn dissolution from a thin porous spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode by rotating ring-disk collection experiments. The amount of Mn dissolution from the spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrode under various conditions was detected by potential step chronoamperometry. The concentration of dissolved Mn was found to increase with increasing cycle numbers and elevated temperature. The dissolved Mn was not dependent on disk rotation speed, which indicated that the Mn dissolution from the disk was under reaction control. The in situ monitoring of Mn dissolution from the spinel was carried out under various conditions. The ring currents exhibited maxima corresponding to the end-of-charge (EOC) and end-of-discharge (EOD), with the largest peak at EOC. The results suggest that the dissolution of Mn from spinel LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} occurs during charge/discharge cycling, especially in a charged state (at >4.1 V) and in a discharged state (at <3.1 V). The largest peak at EOC demonstrated that Mn dissolution took place mainly at the top of charge. At elevated temperatures, the ring cathodic currents were larger due to the increase of Mn dissolution rate.

  11. An apparatus for studying electrical breakdown in liquid helium at 0.4 K and testing electrode materials for the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T. M.; Ramsey, J. C.; Yao, W.; Beck, D. H.; Cianciolo, V.; Clayton, S. M.; Crawford, C.; Currie, S. A.; Filippone, B. W.; Griffith, W. C.; Makela, M.; Schmid, R.; Seidel, G. M.; Tang, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wei, W.; Williamson, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    We have constructed an apparatus to study DC electrical breakdown in liquid helium at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and at pressures between the saturated vapor pressure and ˜600 Torr. The apparatus can house a set of electrodes that are 12 cm in diameter with a gap of 1-2 cm between them, and a potential up to ±50 kV can be applied to each electrode. Initial results demonstrated that it is possible to apply fields exceeding 100 kV/cm in a 1 cm gap between two electropolished stainless steel electrodes 12 cm in diameter for a wide range of pressures at 0.4 K. We also measured the current between two electrodes. Our initial results, I 5 × 1018 Ω cm. This lower bound is 5 times larger than the bound previously measured. We report the design, construction, and operational experience of the apparatus, as well as initial results.

  12. Ion-selective electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Mikhelson, Konstantin N

    2013-01-01

    Ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) have a wide range of applications in clinical, environmental, food and pharmaceutical analysis as well as further uses in chemistry and life sciences. Based on his profound experience as a researcher in ISEs and a course instructor, the author summarizes current knowledge for advanced teaching and training purposes with a particular focus on ionophore-based ISEs. Coverage includes the basics of measuring with ISEs, essential membrane potential theory and a comprehensive overview of the various classes of ion-selective electrodes. The principles of constructing I

  13. Microvoltammetric Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-25

    Microvoltammetric Electrodes, J. 0. Howell, R. M. Wightman, Anal. Chem., 56, 524-529 (1984). 2. Flow Rate Independent Amperometric Cell , W. L. Caudill...Electroanal. Chem., 182, 113-122 (1985). C. List of all publications 1. Flow Rate Independent Amperometric Cell , W. L. Caudill, J. 0. Howell, R. M

  14. Intrinsic thermodynamic and kinetic properties of Sb electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries: Experiment and Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Ganesh, Panchapakesan [ORNL; Sun, Che Nan [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    energy barrier for near-neighbor vacancy motion, predominant in these close-packed phases is about twice for Na than for Li. Our analysis tries to relate the lower intrinsic diffusivity of Na compared to Li with the long-range strain propagation induced by the former, thereby leading to an intrinsic origin of differences in rates, mechanical properties and amorphization. Finally, the surface chemistry of Sb electrodes cycled in NaClO4 dissolved in pure PC with(out) the addition of 5wt% EC or FEC shows presence of ethers and NaF for the EC- and FEC-based electrolytes, respectively, and SEI films rich in Na-based carbonates.

  15. Effect of biasing on plasma rotation in the edge of IR-T1 Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Arvin, R.; Gheydi, M.; Nikmohammadi, A. [Plasma physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O.Box: 14665-768 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorshid, P.; Bolourian, H. [Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Electrode biasing experiments were carried out on the IR-T1 Tokamak. The effects of radial electric field (Er) on plasma fluid velocity and magnetic island rotation investigated by a Mach/Langmuir electric probe and an array of 12 Mirnov coils. The Results have shown a change in the fluid velocity during biasing regime. References: [1] Van Oost G. et al. 2001 Czech. J. of Phys. 51 957; [2] Effect of Plasma Biasing on Suppression of Electrostatic Fluctuation in the Edge Region of STP-3(M) Reversed Field Pinch J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 74 (2005) pp.605-612; [3] Weynants R. R. and Van Oost G. 1993 Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 35 B177. (authors)

  16. Light addressable gold electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Waqas

    2011-07-01

    The main objective carried out in this dissertation was to fabricate Light Amplified Potentiometric sensors (LAPS) based upon the semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) instead of its bulk form. Quantum dots (QDs) were opted for this device fabrication because of their superior fluorescent, electric and catalytic properties. Also in comparison to their bulk counterparts they will make device small, light weighted and power consumption is much lower. QDs were immobilized on a Au substrate via 1,4 benzene dithiol (BDT) molecule. Initially a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of BDT was established on Au substrate. Because of SAM, the conductivity of Au substrate decreased dramatically. Furthermore QDs were anchored with the help of BDT molecule on Au substrate. When QDs immobilized on Au substrate (QD/Au) via BDT molecule were irradiated with UV-visible light, electron-hole pairs were generated in QDs. The surface defect states in QDs trapped the excited electrons and long lived electron-hole pairs were formed. By the application of an appropriate bias potential on Au substrate the electrons could be supplied or extracted from the QDs via tunneling through BDT. Thus a cathodic or anodic current could be observed depending upon bias potential under illumination. However without light illumination the QD/Au electrode remained an insulator. To improve the device different modifications were made, including different substrates (Au evaporated on glass, Au evaporated on mica sheets and Au sputtered on SiO{sub 2}/Si) and different dithiol molecules (capped and uncapped biphenyl 4,4' dithiol and capped and uncapped 4,4' dimercaptostilbenes) were tried. Also different QD immobilization techniques (normal incubation, spin coating, layer by layer assembly (LbL) of polyelectrolytes and heat immobilization) were employed. This device was able to detect electrochemically different analytes depending upon the QDs incorporated. For example CdS QDs were able to detect 4

  17. Elements of a pragmatic approach for dealing with bias and uncertainty in experiments through predictions : experiment design and data conditioning; %22real space%22 model validation and conditioning; hierarchical modeling and extrapolative prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Vicente Jose

    2011-11-01

    This report explores some important considerations in devising a practical and consistent framework and methodology for utilizing experiments and experimental data to support modeling and prediction. A pragmatic and versatile 'Real Space' approach is outlined for confronting experimental and modeling bias and uncertainty to mitigate risk in modeling and prediction. The elements of experiment design and data analysis, data conditioning, model conditioning, model validation, hierarchical modeling, and extrapolative prediction under uncertainty are examined. An appreciation can be gained for the constraints and difficulties at play in devising a viable end-to-end methodology. Rationale is given for the various choices underlying the Real Space end-to-end approach. The approach adopts and refines some elements and constructs from the literature and adds pivotal new elements and constructs. Crucially, the approach reflects a pragmatism and versatility derived from working many industrial-scale problems involving complex physics and constitutive models, steady-state and time-varying nonlinear behavior and boundary conditions, and various types of uncertainty in experiments and models. The framework benefits from a broad exposure to integrated experimental and modeling activities in the areas of heat transfer, solid and structural mechanics, irradiated electronics, and combustion in fluids and solids.

  18. Electrical breakdown experiments with application to alkali metal thermal-to-electric converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momozaki, Y.; El-Genk, M.S. [The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    2003-04-01

    Electrical breakdown in alkali metal thermal-to-electric converters (AMTECs) limits the number of solid electrolytes that could be connected in series and, hence, the output voltage. Experiments are conducted to measure the DC electrical breakdown voltage in cesium vapor between two planar molybdenum electrodes, 1.6 cm in diameter, separated by a 0.5 mm gap, and relate the results to potential electrical breakdown on the cathode side of AMTECs. Two sets of experiments are conducted. In the first set, in which the electrodes are kept at 560 and 650 K and the cesium pressure varied from 0.71 to 29 Pa, when the cooler electrode is positively biased, breakdown occurs at {approx}500 V. When the cooler electrode is negatively biased, breakdown occurs at 700 V. In the second set of experiments, in which the electrodes are held at 625 and 1100 K and the cesium pressure varied from 1.7 to 235 Pa, when the cooler electrode is positively biased, the breakdown voltage is <4 V but in excess of 400 V when the cooler electrode is negatively biased. Because the first ionization potential (3.89 V) and the ionization rate constant of cesium are lower and higher, respectively, than for sodium (5.14 V) and potassium (4.34 V) vapors, the DC electrical breakdown voltage in AMTECs with either a potassium or a sodium working fluid is expected to be higher than measured in this work for cesium vapor. In such converters, the wall should be negatively biased relative to the highest voltage cathode in order to avoid electrical breakdown up to 400 V, or even higher. (author)

  19. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan M.

    2015-12-15

    A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium molecules on an electrode array followed by post-assembly electro-addressable conversion of the unreactive group to a chemical or biological recognition group. Electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays enables the multi-target electrochemical sensing of biological and chemical analytes.

  20. Marcus-Hush-Chidsey theory of electron transfer to and from species bound at a non-uniform electrode surface: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henstridge, Martin C.; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Gusmão, Rui; Compton, Richard G.

    2011-11-01

    Two simple models of electrode surface inhomogeneity based on Marcus-Hush theory are considered; a distribution in formal potentials and a distribution in electron tunnelling distances. Cyclic voltammetry simulated using these models is compared with that simulated using Marcus-Hush theory for a flat, uniform and homogeneous electrode surface, with the two models of surface inhomogeneity yielding broadened peaks with decreased peak-currents. An edge-plane pyrolytic graphite electrode is covalently modified with ferrocene via 'click' chemistry and the resulting voltammetry compared with each of the three previously considered models. The distribution of formal potentials is seen to fit the experimental data most closely.

  1. An electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tinghu; Sabic, Darko

    2013-06-01

    This note describes an electrode polarization impedance based flow sensor for low water flow measurement. It consists of two pairs of stainless steel electrodes set apart and inserted into a non-conductive flow tube with each pair of electrodes placed diametrically at the opposite sides. The flow sensor is modeled as a typical four-electrode system of which two electrodes are current-carrying and the other two serve as output pick ups. The polarization impedances of the two current carrying electrodes are affected by water flows resulting in changes of differential potential between the two pick-up electrodes which are separated by the same fluid. The interrogation of the two excitation electrodes with dc biased ac signals offers significantly higher sensor sensitivities to flow. The prototype flow sensor constructed for a 20 mm diameter pipeline was able to measure water flow rate as low as tested at 1.06 l h-1 and remained sensitive at a flow rate of 25.18 l h-1 when it was driven with a sinusoidal voltage at 1000 Hz with a peak ac amplitude of 2 V and a dc offset of +8 V. The nonlinear characteristics of the sensor response indicate that the sensor is more sensitive at low flows and will not be able to measure at very high flows. Additional experiments are needed to evaluate the influences of impurities, chemical species, ions constituents, conductivity and temperature over a practical range of residential water conditions, the effects of fluctuating ground signals, measurement uncertainty, power consumption, compensation of effects and practical operations. The flow sensor (principle) presented may be used as (in) a secondary sensor in combination with an existing electronic water meter to extend the low end of measurement range in residential water metering.

  2. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  3. Outcome predictability biases learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Mitchell, Chris J; Bethmont, Anna; Lovibond, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Much of contemporary associative learning research is focused on understanding how and when the associative history of cues affects later learning about those cues. Very little work has investigated the effects of the associative history of outcomes on human learning. Three experiments extended the "learned irrelevance" paradigm from the animal conditioning literature to examine the influence of an outcome's prior predictability on subsequent learning of relationships between cues and that outcome. All 3 experiments found evidence for the idea that learning is biased by the prior predictability of the outcome. Previously predictable outcomes were readily associated with novel predictive cues, whereas previously unpredictable outcomes were more readily associated with novel nonpredictive cues. This finding highlights the importance of considering the associative history of outcomes, as well as cues, when interpreting multistage designs. Associative and cognitive explanations of this certainty matching effect are discussed.

  4. Stereotype Formation : Biased by Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences ill the extent its which social groups have previously been predictive elf behavioral or physical properties Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness o

  5. On the relative independence of thinking biases and cognitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanovich, Keith E; West, Richard F

    2008-04-01

    In 7 different studies, the authors observed that a large number of thinking biases are uncorrelated with cognitive ability. These thinking biases include some of the most classic and well-studied biases in the heuristics and biases literature, including the conjunction effect, framing effects, anchoring effects, outcome bias, base-rate neglect, "less is more" effects, affect biases, omission bias, myside bias, sunk-cost effect, and certainty effects that violate the axioms of expected utility theory. In a further experiment, the authors nonetheless showed that cognitive ability does correlate with the tendency to avoid some rational thinking biases, specifically the tendency to display denominator neglect, probability matching rather than maximizing, belief bias, and matching bias on the 4-card selection task. The authors present a framework for predicting when cognitive ability will and will not correlate with a rational thinking tendency.

  6. 光纤陀螺光功率对最佳偏置点影响的实验研究%Experiment and study of effects of optic power on best bias position in FOG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贺; 吕英进; 朱奎宝; 邓年茂

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the random walk coefficient (RWC)of FOG in the bias working region [π/2,π],by analyzing the mathe-matic model of the relationship between RWC and bias working position,the influence of optical source power on the best bias position in FOG was simulated and experimented.Experimental results indicate that with the increase of optical source power, the best bias position becomes closer toπand the corresponding RWC is smaller.But in the situation of fixed bias working posi-tion,if optical source power is overabundant,the detector will work in the saturated region which can decrease the performance of FOG.Results of simulation and experiment provide a reference for the proper choice of optical source power and bias working position in the process of designing FOG.%为降低光纤陀螺在偏置工作区间[π/2,π]内的随机游走系数,通过分析光纤陀螺随机游走系数与偏置工作点关系的数学模型,对光源光功率影响光纤陀螺最佳偏置工作点的规律进行仿真和实验研究。实验结果表明,光源光功率越大,光纤陀螺的最佳偏置工作点越靠近π,对应的随机游走系数越小;在偏置工作点不变的情况下,光源光功率增大过多,会使探测器工作在饱和区,降低光纤陀螺的性能。仿真和实验结果为光纤陀螺在设计过程中选择合适的光源光功率和偏置工作点提供了参考。

  7. Aurora Borealis Experiment (ABX): A Planeterrella for Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Michael; Carpe, Andy; Zwicker, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The Planeterrella is an experiment invented by Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble in France designed to simulate aurorae of various planets. It is done by placing two differently sized aluminum spheres in a bell jar with a pressure of approximately 75 mTorr. Each sphere has magnets inside and is electrically biased. An electrode with the opposite electrical bias is inserted into the bell jar so that the voltage between them is on the order of 300 V. A plasma is then created and an aurora is formed around the magnetic poles of the spheres or near the edge of the electrode. We have made a modified version of the planeterrella, called the Aurora Borealis Experiment (ABX), based upon Lilensten's plans. We will present the technical details of the experiment and preliminary results of its use with a variety of different audiences.

  8. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Su Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  9. Thinking in Black and White: Conscious thought increases racially biased judgments through biased face memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strick, M.A.; Stoeckart, P.F.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    It is a common research finding that conscious thought helps people to avoid racial discrimination. These three experiments, however, illustrate that conscious thought may increase biased face memory, which leads to increased judgment bias (i.e., preferring White to Black individuals). In Experiment

  10. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation relieves the unilateral bias of a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiyan; Tian, Xulong; Qian, Long; Yu, Xuehong; Jiang, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    The unilaterally lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease which fails to orient to the food stimuli presented on the contralateral side of its preferential side of body could be induced by the injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). We employed transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, current intensity: 80 μA, and 40 μA; anodal electrode area: 3.14 mm(2); stimulation time: 30 minutes) over the M1 area to relieve the ipsilateral bias in the rat model. A corridor test was set to count the ipsilateral bias of the rats. In this experiment, 30 Sprague-Dawley rats (80 μA: n = 8, 40 μA: n = 8, sham: n = 7, healthy control: n = 7) were chosen for the corridor test and the tDCS session. The lesioned rats exhibited increased ipsilateral bias 4 weeks after the lesion surgery (P < 0.01), and the anodal tDCS with the active electrode on the lesioned side relieved the ipsilateral bias significantly (P < 0.01) immediately after the surgery and the improvement lasted for nearly 1 day. The rats in the group of 80 μA exhibited more significant changes than the 40 μA group after one day. After all the experiments, the histological process showed no neurotrauma led by the tDCS. In conclusion, the modulatory function of the cortical excitability of the tDCS may awaken the compensatory mechanisms and the response mechanisms which modulate the loss of the brain function. Further studies should be done to provide more evidence about the assumption.

  11. Secondary Ionization Coefficient of Dielectric Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuhide; Suzuki, Susumu; Itoh, Haruo

    Experiments for observations and stabilization of discharge paths in several electrode systems are carried out aiming at precise measurement of the secondary ionization coefficient γ of MgO film electrode. The discharge chamber is filled with Ar gas. The waveforms of the applied voltage between the electrodes and the discharge current are measured with visual observation of the discharge light. Two MgO coated electrodes are placed so that they are facing each other. For these MgO electrodes, the discharge paths take a detour, not the shortest distance. Smaller prebreakdown current pulses are observed before the breakdown. After breakdown, discontinuous discharge current is observed. Therefore, it is prepared a glass tube surrounding the discharge area. As the result, the discharge paths take a straight perpendicular for the electrode surface, and the discharge is stabilized.

  12. Bias modulated scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Kim; Perry, David; Byers, Joshua C; Colburn, Alex W; Unwin, Patrick R

    2014-04-01

    Nanopipets are versatile tools for nanoscience, particularly when used in scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to determine, in a noncontact manner, the topography of a sample. We present a new method, applying an oscillating bias between a quasi-reference counter electrode (QRCE) in the SICM nanopipet probe and a second QRCE in the bulk solution, to generate a feedback signal to control the distance between the end of a nanopipet and a surface. Both the amplitude and phase of the oscillating ion current, induced by the oscillating bias and extracted using a phase-sensitive detector, are shown to be sensitive to the probe-surface distance and are used to provide stable feedback signals. The phase signal is particularly sensitive at high frequencies of the oscillating bias (up to 30 kHz herein). This development eliminates the need to physically oscillate the probe to generate an oscillating ion current feedback signal, as needed for conventional SICM modes. Moreover, bias modulation allows a feedback signal to be generated without any net ion current flow, ensuring that any polarization of the quasi reference counter electrodes, electro-osmotic effects, and perturbations of the supporting electrolyte composition are minimized. Both feedback signals, magnitude and phase, are analyzed through approach curve measurements to different surfaces at a range of distinct frequencies and via impedance measurements at different distances from a surface. The bias modulated response is readily understood via a simple equivalent circuit model. Bias modulated (BM)-SICM is compared to conventional SICM imaging through measurements of substrates with distinct topographical features and yields equivalent results. Finally, BM-SICM with both amplitude and phase feedback is used for topographical imaging of subtle etch features in a calcite crystal surface. The 2 modes yield similar results, but phase-detection opens up the prospect of faster imaging.

  13. The illogicality of stock-brokers: psychological experiments on the effects of prior knowledge and belief biases on logical reasoning in stock trading

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knauff, Markus; Budeck, Claudia; Wolf, Ann G; Hamburger, Kai

    2010-01-01

    .... So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market...

  14. The Illogicality of Stock-Brokers: Psychological Experiments on the Effects of Prior Knowledge and Belief Biases on Logical Reasoning in Stock Trading: e13483

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markus Knauff; Claudia Budeck; Ann G Wolf; Kai Hamburger

    2010-01-01

    .... So far, this question has been explored only to a limited extent. Methods We report two experiments on logical reasoning competences of nineteen stock-brokers with long-lasting vocational experiences at the stock market...

  15. Electrostatic atomization: Effect of electrode materials on electrostatic atomizer performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Abhilash; Staszel, Christopher; Kashir, Babak; Perri, Anthony; Mashayek, Farzad; Yarin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Electrostatic atomization was studied experimentally with a pointed electrode in a converging nozzle. Experiments were carried out on poorly conductive canola oil where it was observed that electrode material may affect charge transfer. This points at the possible faradaic reactions that can occur at the surfaces of the electrodes. The supply voltage is applied to the sharp electrode and the grounded nozzle body constitutes the counter-electrode. The charge transfer is controlled by the electrochemical reactions on both the electrodes. The electrical performance study of the atomizer issuing a charged oil jet was conducted using three different nozzle body materials - brass, copper and stainless steel. Also, two sharp electrode materials - brass and stainless steel - were tested. The experimental results revealed that both the nozzle body material, as well as the sharp electrode material affected the spray and leak currents. Moreover, the effect of the sharp electrode material is quite significant. This research is supported by NSF Grant 1505276.

  16. Cobalt Phthalocyanine Modified Electrodes Utilised in Electroanalysis: Nano-Structured Modified Electrodes vs. Bulk Modified Screen-Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Foster

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC compounds have been reported to provide electrocatalytic performances towards a substantial number of analytes. In these configurations, electrodes are typically constructed via drop casting the CoPC onto a supporting electrode substrate, while in other cases the CoPC complex is incorporated within the ink of a screen-printed sensor, providing a one-shot economical and disposable electrode configuration. In this paper we critically compare CoPC modified electrodes prepared by drop casting CoPC nanoparticles (nano-CoPC onto a range of carbon based electrode substrates with that of CoPC bulk modified screen-printed electrodes in the sensing of the model analytes L-ascorbic acid, oxygen and hydrazine. It is found that no “electrocatalysis” is observed towards L-ascorbic acid using either of these CoPC modified electrode configurations and that the bare underlying carbon electrode is the origin of the obtained voltammetric signal, which gives rise to useful electroanalytical signatures, providing new insights into literature reports where “electrocatalysis” has been reported with no clear control experiments undertaken. On the other hand true electrocatalysis is observed towards hydrazine, where no such voltammetric features are witnessed on the bare underlying electrode substrate.

  17. Cobalt phthalocyanine modified electrodes utilised in electroanalysis: nano-structured modified electrodes vs. bulk modified screen-printed electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Christopher W; Pillay, Jeseelan; Metters, Jonathan P; Banks, Craig E

    2014-11-19

    Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC) compounds have been reported to provide electrocatalytic performances towards a substantial number of analytes. In these configurations, electrodes are typically constructed via drop casting the CoPC onto a supporting electrode substrate, while in other cases the CoPC complex is incorporated within the ink of a screen-printed sensor, providing a one-shot economical and disposable electrode configuration. In this paper we critically compare CoPC modified electrodes prepared by drop casting CoPC nanoparticles (nano-CoPC) onto a range of carbon based electrode substrates with that of CoPC bulk modified screen-printed electrodes in the sensing of the model analytes L-ascorbic acid, oxygen and hydrazine. It is found that no "electrocatalysis" is observed towards L-ascorbic acid using either of these CoPC modified electrode configurations and that the bare underlying carbon electrode is the origin of the obtained voltammetric signal, which gives rise to useful electroanalytical signatures, providing new insights into literature reports where "electrocatalysis" has been reported with no clear control experiments undertaken. On the other hand true electrocatalysis is observed towards hydrazine, where no such voltammetric features are witnessed on the bare underlying electrode substrate.

  18. RETGEM with polyvinylchloride (PVC) electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Razin, V I; Reshetin, A I; Filippov, S N

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new design of the RETGEM (Resistive Electrode Thick GEM) based on electrodes made of a polyvinylchloride material (PVC). Our device can operate with gains of 10E5 as a conventional TGEM at low counting rates and as RPC in the case of high counting rates without of the transit to the violent sparks. The distinct feature of present RETGEM is the absent of the metal coating and lithographic technology for manufacturing of the protective dielectric rms. The electrodes from PVC permit to do the holes by a simple drilling machine. Detectors on a RETGEM basis could be useful in many fields of an application requiring a more cheap manufacturing and safe operation, for example, in a large neutrino experiments, in TPC, RICH systems.

  19. Motion Control of Disc Electrode by Electrorheological Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kazutoshi; Hirose, Yuji; Ogura, Hironao; Otsubo, Yasufumi

    2008-07-01

    The electrorheological(ER) suspensions are sandwiched between two flat disc electrodes with the radial line patterns. The pattern electrodes are fixed on the parallel plate geometry on a stress-controlled rheometer which was modified for the ER experiments. The motion of disk electrodes analyzed as a function of electrification modes to obtain the basic data for ER actuators.

  20. CPI Bias in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Chung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the CPI bias in Korea by employing the approach of Engel’s Law as suggested by Hamilton (2001. This paper is the first attempt to estimate the bias using Korean panel data, Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS. Following Hamilton’s model with non­linear specification correction, our estimation result shows that the cumulative CPI bias over the sample period (2000-2005 was 0.7 percent annually. This CPI bias implies that about 21 percent of the inflation rate during the period can be attributed to the bias. In light of purchasing power parity, we provide an interpretation of the estimated bias.

  1. Bias in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  2. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  3. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  4. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  5. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Cells: Fiber Substrates Nickel Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Howard H.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of nickel fiber mat electrodes were investigated over a wide range of fiber diameters, electrode thickness, porosity and active material loading levels. Thickness' were 0.040, 0.060 and 0.080 inches for the plaque: fiber diameters were primarily 2, 4, and 8 micron and porosity was 85, 90, and 95%. Capacities of 3.5 in. diameter electrodes were determined in the flooded condition with both 26 and 31% potassium hydroxide solution. These capacity tests indicated that the highest capacities per unit weight were obtained at the 90% porosity level with a 4 micron diameter fiber plaque. It appeared that the thinner electrodes had somewhat better performance, consistent with sintered electrode history. Limited testing with two-positive-electrode boiler plate cells was also carried out. Considerable difficulty with constructing the cells was encountered with short circuits the major problem. Nevertheless, four cells were tested. The cell with 95% porosity electrodes failed during conditioning cycling due to high voltage during charge. Discharge showed that this cell had lost nearly all of its capacity. The other three cells after 20 conditioning cycles showed capacities consistent with the flooded capacities of the electrodes. Positive electrodes made from fiber substrates may well show a weight advantage of standard sintered electrodes, but need considerably more work to prove this statement. A major problem to be investigated is the lower strength of the substrate compared to standard sintered electrodes. Problems with welding of leads were significant and implications that the electrodes would expand more than sintered electrodes need to be investigated. Loading levels were lower than had been expected based on sintered electrode experiences and the lower loading led to lower capacity values. However, lower loading causes less expansion and contraction during cycling so that stress on the substrate is reduced.

  6. Microresonator electrode design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Branch, Darren W.

    2016-05-10

    A microresonator with an input electrode and an output electrode patterned thereon is described. The input electrode includes a series of stubs that are configured to isolate acoustic waves, such that the waves are not reflected into the microresonator. Such design results in reduction of spurious modes corresponding to the microresonator.

  7. The Composite Insertion Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlung, Sven; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; West, Keld

    1984-01-01

    The specific energy obtainable by discharge of porous insertion electrodes is limited by electrolyte depletion in thepores. This can be overcome using a solid ion conductor as electrolyte. The term "composite" is used to distinguishthese electrodes from porous electrodes with liquid electrolyte...

  8. Insulated ECG electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  9. Organic electrodes based on grafted oligothiophene units in ultrathin, large-area molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Pascal; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Anthore, Anne; Lafarge, Philippe; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-11

    Molecular junctions were fabricated with the combined use of electrochemistry and conventional CMOS tools. They consist of a 5-10 nm thick layer of oligo(1-(2-bisthienyl)benzene) between two gold electrodes. The layer was grafted onto the bottom electrode using diazonium electroreduction, which yields a stable and robust gold-oligomer interface. The top contact was obtained by direct electron-beam evaporation on the molecular layers through masks defined by electron-beam lithography. Transport mechanisms across such easily p-dopable layers were investigated by analysis of current density-voltage (J-V) curves. Application of a tunneling model led to a transport parameter (thickness of ~2.4 nm) that was not consistent with the molecular thickness measured using AFM (~7 nm). Furthermore, for these layers with thicknesses of 5-10 nm, asymmetric J-V curves were observed, with current flowing more easily when the grafted electrode was positively polarized. In addition, J-V experiments at two temperatures (4 and 300 K) showed that thermal activation occurs for such polarization but is not observed when the bias is reversed. These results indicate that simple tunneling cannot describe the charge transport in these junctions. Finally, analysis of the experimental results in term of "organic electrode" and redox chemistry in the material is discussed.

  10. Microtitrimetry by differential electrolytic potentiometry using metallic electrodes and nanomaterials modified metallic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amro, Abdulaziz Nabil

    For the first time silver wire electrodes have been coated with carbon nanotubes using floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The production of CNTs has been conducted in a horizontal tubular reactor. Acetylene gas was used as a carbon source. Ferrocene has been used as a catalyst precursor for the growth of CNT. Different parameters have been optimized to get a high yield of CNTs and ensure their growth on the silver electrodes using univariate method. The parameters studied include the hydrogen flow rate, acetylene flow rate, temperature of the furnace, time of the reaction and the location of the electrodes in the reactor tube. The optimum conditions for those parameters were: for hydrogen and acetylene, the flow rates were 25 mL /min and 75 mL / min respectively. The furnace temperature was found to be 700 °C and the reaction time was 15 minutes. Regarding the location of the silver wires it should be located in the first 10 cm of the front side of the tube. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transition electron microscopy (TEM) have been used to characterize carbon on silver electrodes. According to the experimental results, TEM figures show that CNT produced on Silver wire is multiwall carbon nanotubes MWCNT. Silver electrodes either pure or coated with CNT were used as indicating systems in micro titration using both dc differential electrolytic potentiometry (DEP) and mark-space bias DEP techniques. All types of titrimetric reactions were investigated using different types of electrodes like Pt and gold for oxidation reduction titrations, antimony electrodes for acid base titrations, silver electrodes for precipitation titrations in addition to Ag-CNT electrodes. End points at volumes of 1 microL were determined. Different parameters were optimized like the current density, the percentage bias, the volume of the sample and the concentrations of the reactants. Microtitrimetry has been applied on several types of analytes; Ferrous

  11. Cross-situational consistency in recognition memory response bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Justin; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Individuals taking an old-new recognition memory test differ widely in their bias to respond "old," ranging from strongly conservative to strongly liberal, even without any manipulation intended to affect bias. Kantner and Lindsay (2012) found stability of bias across study-test cycles, suggesting that bias is a cognitive trait. That consistency, however, could have arisen because participants perceived the two tests as being part of the same experiment in the same context. In the present study, we tested for stability across two recognition study-test procedures embedded in markedly different experiments, held weeks apart, that participants did not know were connected. Bias showed substantial cross-situational stability. Moreover, bias weakly predicted identifications on an eyewitness memory task and accuracy on a go-no-go task. Although we found little in the way of relationships between bias and five personality measures, these findings suggest that response bias is a stable and broadly influential characteristic of recognizers.

  12. Political bias is tenacious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditto, Peter H; Wojcik, Sean P; Chen, Eric Evan; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Ringel, Megan M

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. are right to worry about political bias in social psychology but they underestimate the ease of correcting it. Both liberals and conservatives show partisan bias that often worsens with cognitive sophistication. More non-liberals in social psychology is unlikely to speed our convergence upon the truth, although it may broaden the questions we ask and the data we collect.

  13. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  14. Belief bias and relational reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Maxwell J; Sykes, Elizabeth D A

    2003-01-01

    When people evaluate categorical syllogisms, they tend to reject unbelievable conclusions and accept believable ones irrespective of their validity. Typically, this effect is particularly marked for invalid conclusions that are possible, but do not necessarily follow, given the premises. However, smaller believability effects can also be detected for other types of conclusion. Three experiments are reported here, in which an attempt was made to determine whether belief bias effects can manifest themselves on the relational inference task. Subjects evaluated the validity of conclusions such as William the Conqueror was king after the Pyramids were built (temporal task) or Manchester is north of Bournemouth (spatial task) with respect to their premises. All of the major findings for equivalent categorical syllogism tasks were replicated. However, the overall size of the main effect of believability appears to be related to task presentation, a phenomenon not previously identified for categorical syllogisms and which current theories of belief bias have difficulty explaining.

  15. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  16. Quantum Statistical Calculation of Exchange Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huai-Yu; DAI Zhen-Hong

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of exchange bias of ferromagnetic (FM) films, which are coupled with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) film, is studied by Heisenberg model by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory for the uncompensated case. Exchange bias HE and coercivity Hc are calculated as functions of the FM film thickness L, temperature, the strength of the exchange interaction across the interface between FM and AFM and the anisotropy of the FM. Hc decreases with increasing L when the FM film is beyond some thickness. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM film thickness and on temperature is also qualitatively in agreement with experiments.

  17. Forecast Bias Correction: A Second Order Method

    CERN Document Server

    Crowell, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The difference between a model forecast and actual observations is called forecast bias. This bias is due to either incomplete model assumptions and/or poorly known parameter values and initial/boundary conditions. In this paper we discuss a method for estimating corrections to parameters and initial conditions that would account for the forecast bias. A set of simple experiments with the logistic ordinary differential equation is performed using an iterative version of a first order version of our method to compare with the second order version of the method.

  18. Publication bias and the failure of replication in experimental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2012-12-01

    Replication of empirical findings plays a fundamental role in science. Among experimental psychologists, successful replication enhances belief in a finding, while a failure to replicate is often interpreted to mean that one of the experiments is flawed. This view is wrong. Because experimental psychology uses statistics, empirical findings should appear with predictable probabilities. In a misguided effort to demonstrate successful replication of empirical findings and avoid failures to replicate, experimental psychologists sometimes report too many positive results. Rather than strengthen confidence in an effect, too much successful replication actually indicates publication bias, which invalidates entire sets of experimental findings. Researchers cannot judge the validity of a set of biased experiments because the experiment set may consist entirely of type I errors. This article shows how an investigation of the effect sizes from reported experiments can test for publication bias by looking for too much successful replication. Simulated experiments demonstrate that the publication bias test is able to discriminate biased experiment sets from unbiased experiment sets, but it is conservative about reporting bias. The test is then applied to several studies of prominent phenomena that highlight how publication bias contaminates some findings in experimental psychology. Additional simulated experiments demonstrate that using Bayesian methods of data analysis can reduce (and in some cases, eliminate) the occurrence of publication bias. Such methods should be part of a systematic process to remove publication bias from experimental psychology and reinstate the important role of replication as a final arbiter of scientific findings.

  19. Media Bias and Reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Gentzkow; Jesse M. Shapiro

    2005-01-01

    A Bayesian consumer who is uncertain about the quality of an information source will infer that the source is of higher quality when its reports conform to the consumer's prior expectations. We use this fact to build a model of media bias in which firms slant their reports toward the prior beliefs of their customers in order to build a reputation for quality. Bias emerges in our model even though it can make all market participants worse off. The model predicts that bias will be less severe w...

  20. Biased predecision processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories.

  1. Tapping to a slow tempo in the presence of simple and complex meters reveals experience-specific biases for processing music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Ullal-Gupta

    Full Text Available Musical meters vary considerably across cultures, yet relatively little is known about how culture-specific experience influences metrical processing. In Experiment 1, we compared American and Indian listeners' synchronous tapping to slow sequences. Inter-tone intervals contained silence or to-be-ignored rhythms that were designed to induce a simple meter (familiar to Americans and Indians or a complex meter (familiar only to Indians. A subset of trials contained an abrupt switch from one rhythm to another to assess the disruptive effects of contradicting the initially implied meter. In the unfilled condition, both groups tapped earlier than the target and showed large tap-tone asynchronies (measured in relative phase. When inter-tone intervals were filled with simple-meter rhythms, American listeners tapped later than targets, but their asynchronies were smaller and declined more rapidly. Likewise, asynchronies rose sharply following a switch away from simple-meter but not from complex-meter rhythm. By contrast, Indian listeners performed similarly across all rhythm types, with asynchronies rapidly declining over the course of complex- and simple-meter trials. For these listeners, a switch from either simple or complex meter increased asynchronies. Experiment 2 tested American listeners but doubled the duration of the synchronization phase prior to (and after the switch. Here, compared with simple meters, complex-meter rhythms elicited larger asynchronies that declined at a slower rate, however, asynchronies increased after the switch for all conditions. Our results provide evidence that ease of meter processing depends to a great extent on the amount of experience with specific meters.

  2. Coplanar interdigitated grid detector with single electrode readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Paul N.

    2001-01-01

    The coplanar interdigitated grid technique with single electrode readout provides substantial spectral performance improvement over that of conventional full-area planar electrode detectors and over coplanar interdigitated grid detectors which measure the difference between the induced charge signals from two interdigitated coplanar grid electrodes. The signal from only one interdigitated grid electrode is read out. The signal response is optimized by changing the relative areas of the two grid electrodes and the bias applied across the detector. Only one preamplifier is needed and signal subtraction is not necessary. This eliminates the electronic noise contribution from the additional preamplifier used in the normal coplanar grid implementation, and conventional single-amplifier detector electronics can be used.

  3. Superior long-term stability of a glucose biosensor based on inserted barrel plating gold electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Teng; Hsiao, Hung-Chan; Fang, Mei-Yen; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-10-15

    Disposable one shot usage blood glucose strips are routinely used in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus and their performance can vary greatly. In this paper we critically evaluated the long-term stability of glucose strips made of barrel plating gold electrodes. Compared to other glucose biosensing platforms of vapor deposited palladium and screen printed carbon electrodes, the proposed glucose biosensor was found to show the best stability among the three biosensing platforms in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C for 6 months with an average bias of 3.4% at glucose concentrations of 5-20 mM. The precision test of this barrel plating gold glucose biosensor also showed the best performance (coefficients of variation in the range of 1.4-2.4%) in thermal acceleration experiments at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C and 70 degrees C for 27 days. Error grid analysis revealed that all measurements fell in zone A and zone B. Regression analysis showed no significant difference between the proposed biosensor and the reference method at 99% confidence level. The amperometric glucose biosensor fabricated by inserting two barrel plating gold electrodes onto an injection-molding plastic base followed by immobilizing with a bio-reagent layer and membrane was very impressive with a long-term stability up to 2.5 years at 25 degrees C. Overall, these results indicated that the glucose oxidase/barrel plating gold biosensing platform is ideal for long-term accurate glycemic control.

  4. Berkson’s bias, selection bias, and missing data

    OpenAIRE

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    While Berkson’s bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2×2 tables illustrate how Berkson’s bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random is less i...

  5. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  6. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  7. Tool electrode wear in electrical discharge of small diameter holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slătineanu Laurenţiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the problem of obtaining small diameter holes in workpieces made of high speed steel by electrical discharge machining was formulated. A fulfil factorial experiment was designed and materialized, taking into consideration the tool electrode diameter, pulse on time and pulse off time as independent variables. The tool electrode wear was evaluated by means of the decrease of tool electrode mass and length. On the base of experimental results, power type empirical mathematical models were determined. One noticed the higher influence exerted by the too electrode diameter, whose increase determine the decrease of the tool electrode.

  8. Research on flaky and vertical gas diffusion electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱梅; 徐献芝; 苏润; 杨基明

    2004-01-01

    Flaky and vertical gas diffusion electrode was propos, ed to improve the efficiency of fuel cells. The discharge experiments were done to compare the discharge capability of the electrode with different PTFE ingredient and different basal body uniformity. The results showed the electrode with 10% PTFE and high uniformity was favorable to discharge. This single electrode could discharge about 100 h at 150 mA(no noble metal catalyst). The electrode made of the punched screens was superior to that made of the foam Ni.

  9. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  10. 三维电极反应器对甲基叔丁基醚降解性能的试验研究%Experiment on degradation of methyl tert-butylether by using 3D electrode reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐苏云; 何传秋; 罗丽雯; 董亚楠; 王水寒

    2014-01-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether ( MTBE) is a potential carcinogen pollutant.This article investigated the electrochemical degradation of MTBE in wastewater by using a novel three-dimensional electrode re-actor with granular activated carbon as particle electrode.The effects of electrolyte, voltage intensity and pH level on the degradation of MTBE were tested.Experiment results show that under the conditions of 25℃, electrolyte (Na2SO4) concentration of 0.2 mol, potential=10 V and pH=7.0, total organic car-bon ( TOC) of MTBE solution with initial concentration of 50 mmol is removed by 78% after 150 min. Compared to activated carbon adsorption and bipolar electrolysis, the three-dimensional electrode reac-tor can greatly improve the efficiency of MTBE degradation and carbonization.Therefor, the three-di-mensional electrode reactor is an effective technology to remove MTBE contamination in wastewater and has better application prospect.%甲基叔丁基醚( MTBE)是一种潜在的致癌污染物质,本文考察了以活性炭为粒子电极的三维电极反应器对水体中MTBE的降解性能。实验分别研究了电解质、电压强度和pH值对MTBE降解效果的影响。结果表明:当温度为25℃、电解质Na2 SO4浓度为0.2 mol、电压为10V、pH为7.0的条件下,初始浓度为50 mmol的MTBE溶液,在反应进行150 min后其总有机碳的去除率可达78%。与单纯活性炭吸附、两极电解对比,三维电极能大幅度提高MTBE的降解和碳化效率。因此三维电极反应器是一种能够有效去除废水中MTBE污染的技术方法,具备较好的应用前景。

  11. Pocket ECG electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Gordon F. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low-noise electrode suited for sensing electrocardiograms when chronically and subcutaneously implanted in a free-ranging subject. The electrode comprises a pocket-shaped electrically conductive member with a single entrance adapted to receive body fluids. The exterior of the member and the entrance region is coated with electrical insulation so that the only electrolyte/electrode interface is within the member remote from artifact-generating tissue. Cloth straps are bonded to the member to permit the electrode to be sutured to tissue and to provide electrical lead flexure relief.

  12. Handbook of reference electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Inzelt, György; Scholz, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    Reference Electrodes are a crucial part of any electrochemical system, yet an up-to-date and comprehensive handbook is long overdue. Here, an experienced team of electrochemists provides an in-depth source of information and data for the proper choice and construction of reference electrodes. This includes all kinds of applications such as aqueous and non-aqueous solutions, ionic liquids, glass melts, solid electrolyte systems, and membrane electrodes. Advanced technologies such as miniaturized, conducting-polymer-based, screen-printed or disposable reference electrodes are also covered. Essen

  13. The source of the truth bias: Heuristic processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Chris N H; Masip, Jaume

    2015-06-01

    People believe others are telling the truth more often than they actually are; this is called the truth bias. Surprisingly, when a speaker is judged at multiple points across their statement the truth bias declines. Previous claims argue this is evidence of a shift from (biased) heuristic processing to (reasoned) analytical processing. In four experiments we contrast the heuristic-analytic model (HAM) with alternative accounts. In Experiment 1, the decrease in truth responding was not the result of speakers appearing more deceptive, but was instead attributable to the rater's processing style. Yet contrary to HAMs, across three experiments we found the decline in bias was not related to the amount of processing time available (Experiments 1-3) or the communication channel (Experiment 2). In Experiment 4 we found support for a new account: that the bias reflects whether raters perceive the statement to be internally consistent. © 2015 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Multi-Electrode Resistivity Probe for Investigation of Local Temperature Inside Metal Shell Battery Cells via Resistivity: Experiments and Evaluation of Electrical Resistance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct Current (DC electrical resistivity is a material property that is sensitive to temperature changes. In this paper, the relationship between resistivity and local temperature inside steel shell battery cells (two commercial 10 Ah and 4.5 Ah lithium-ion cells is innovatively studied by Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT. The Schlumberger configuration in ERT is applied to divide the cell body into several blocks distributed in different levels, where the apparent resistivities are measured by multi-electrode surface probes. The investigated temperature ranges from −20 to 80 °C. Experimental results have shown that the resistivities mainly depend on temperature changes in each block of the two cells used and the function of the resistivity and temperature can be fitted to the ERT-measurement results in the logistical-plot. Subsequently, the dependence of resistivity on the state of charge (SOC is investigated, and the SOC range of 70%–100% has a remarkable impact on the resistivity at low temperatures. The proposed approach under a thermal cool down regime is demonstrated to monitor the local transient temperature.

  15. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which...... is a general tendency to focus on numerators and pay insufficient attention to denominators in ratios. Using a population-based survey experiment, I demonstrate how differently framed but logically equivalent representations of the exact same numerical value can have large effects on citizens’ preferences...

  16. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  17. Intergroup relationships do not reduce racial bias in empathic neural responses to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Huerta, Luis Sebastian; Hielscher, Emily; Sherwell, Chase S; Rens, Natalie; Cunnington, Ross

    2014-11-01

    Perceiving the pain of others activates similar neural structures to those involved in the direct experience of pain, including sensory and affective-motivational areas. Empathic responses can be modulated by race, such that stronger neural activation is elicited by the perception of pain in people of the same race compared with another race. In the present study, we aimed to identify when racial bias occurs in the time course of neural empathic responses to pain. We also investigated whether group affiliation could modulate the race effect. Using the minimal group paradigm, we assigned participants to one of two mixed-race teams. We examined event-related potentials from participants when viewing members of their own and the other team receiving painful or non-painful touch. We identified a significant racial bias in early ERP components at N1 over frontal electrodes, where Painful stimuli elicited a greater negative shift relative to Non-Painful stimuli in response to own race faces only. A long latency empathic response was also found at P3, where there was significant differentiation between Painful and Non-Painful stimuli regardless of Race or Group. There was no evidence that empathy-related brain activity was modulated by minimal group manipulation. These results support a model of empathy for pain that consists of early, automatic bias towards own-race empathic responses and a later top-down cognitive evaluation that does not differentiate between races and may ultimately lead to unbiased behaviour.

  18. Durable fuel electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    the composite. The invention also relates to the use of the composite as a fuel electrode, solid oxide fuel cell, and/or solid oxide electrolyser. The invention discloses a composite for an electrode, comprising a three-dimensional network of dispersed metal particles, stabilised zirconia particles and pores...

  19. Membrane Bioprobe Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the design of ion selective electrodes coupled with immobilized enzymes which operate either continuously or on drop-sized samples. Cites techniques for urea, L-phenylalanine and amygdalin. Micro size electrodes for use in single cells are discussed. (GH)

  20. Membrane Bioprobe Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the design of ion selective electrodes coupled with immobilized enzymes which operate either continuously or on drop-sized samples. Cites techniques for urea, L-phenylalanine and amygdalin. Micro size electrodes for use in single cells are discussed. (GH)

  1. Developing the Bias Blind Spot: Increasing Skepticism towards Others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadwa B Elashi

    Full Text Available Two experiments with eighty-eight 7- to 10-year-olds examined the bias blind spot in children. Both younger and older children rated themselves as less likely than a specific other (Experiment 1 or an average child (Experiment 2 to commit various biases. These self-other differences were also more extreme for biased behaviors than for other behaviors. At times, older children demonstrated stronger self-other differences than younger children, which seemed primarily driven by older children's judgments about bias in others. These findings suggest that, although the bias blind spot exists as soon as children recognize other-committed biases, what changes over development is how skeptical children are towards others.

  2. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  3. A semiconductor based electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khamatani, A.; Kobayasi, K.

    1983-03-30

    The semiconductor electrode is submerged into an electrolyte which is held in the illuminated chamber. The other electrode is placed in a dark chamber connected with the channel to be illuminated, which has a partition in the form of a membrane. An electric current flows in the external circuit of the element with illumination of the first electrode. The illuminated electrode is covered with a thin film of a substance which is stable with the action of the electrolyte. The film is made of Si02, A1203, GaN or A1N. The protective coating makes it possible to use materials less stable than Ti02 in a rutile modification, but which have higher characteristics than the GaP, GaAs, CdS and InP, for making the electrode.

  4. Regular arrays of microdisc electrodes: simulation quantifies the fraction of 'dead' electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordeig, Olga; Banks, Craig E; Davies, Trevor J; Del Campo, Javier; Mas, Roser; Muñoz, Francesc Xavier; Compton, Richard G

    2006-03-01

    Arrays of microdisc electrodes have found widespread use in electroanalysis. These are commonly produced lithographically and practical arrays may contain up to hundreds of individual disc electrodes (e.g. of gold, platinum, indium,...) to maximise sensitivity and minimise limits of detection. Typically, however, the lithographic fabrication process is imperfect resulting in a significant fraction (often tens of percent) of electrochemically inactive electrodes. We demonstrate that a 2-dimensional simulation based on the diffusion domain approximation in conjugation with simple experiments on the ferrocyanide redox couple in aqueous solutions can be used to rigorously 'count' the number of active electrodes in a non-destructive fashion. The agreement with an independent count in which active electrodes are identified via electro-plating with copper followed by ex situ microscopic examination is quantitatively excellent.

  5. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, D.J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  6. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  7. Current-induced forces and hot spots in biased nanojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Jing-Tao; Christensen, Rasmus B; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Hedegård, Per; Brandbyge, Mads

    2015-03-06

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect.

  8. Current-Induced Forces and Hot Spots in Biased Nanojunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Wang, Jian-Sheng;

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the interplay of current-induced forces (CIFs), Joule heating, and heat transport inside a current-carrying nanoconductor. We find that the CIFs, due to the electron-phonon coherence, can control the spatial heat dissipation in the conductor. This yields a significant...... asymmetric concentration of excess heating (hot spot) even for a symmetric conductor. When coupled to the electrode phonons, CIFs drive different phonon heat flux into the two electrodes. First-principles calculations on realistic biased nanojunctions illustrate the importance of the effect....

  9. A multi-electrode biomimetic electrolocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayekar, K.; Damalla, D.; Gottwald, M.; Bousack, H.; von der Emde, G.

    2012-04-01

    We present the concept of an active multi-electrode catheter inspired by the electroreceptive system of the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus petersii. The skin of this fish exhibits numerous electroreceptor organs which are capable of sensing a self induced electrical field. Our sensor is composed of a sending electrode and sixteen receiving electrodes. The electrical field produced by the sending electrode was measured by the receiving electrodes and objects were detected by the perturbation of the electrical field they induce. The intended application of such a sensor is in coronary diagnostics, in particular in distinguishing various types of plaques, which are major causes of heart attack. For calibration of the sensor system, finite element modeling (FEM) was performed. To validate the model, experimental measurements were carried out with two different systems. The physical system was glass tubing with metal and plastic wall insertions as targets. For the control of the experiment and for data acquisition, the software LabView designed for 17 electrodes was used. Different parameters of the electric images were analyzed for the prediction of the electrical properties and size of the inserted targets in the tube. Comparisons of the voltage modulations predicted from the FEM model and the experiments showed a good correspondence. It can be concluded that this novel biomimetic method can be further developed for detailed investigations of atherosclerotic lesions. Finally, we discuss various design strategies to optimize the output of the sensor using different simulated models to enhance target recognition.

  10. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    . For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  11. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate that the agricul......Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  12. Sex Bias in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalk, Sue Rosenberg; And Others

    This study investigated children's sex biased attitudes as a function of the sex, age, and race of the child as well as a geographical-SES factor. Two attitudes were measured on a 55-item questionnaire: Sex Pride (attributing positive characteristics to a child of the same sex) and Sex Prejudice (attributing negative characteristics to a child of…

  13. Structural tuning of nanogaps using electromigration induced by field emission current with bipolar biasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Mamiko; Ito, Mitsuki; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi, E-mail: shrakash@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2015-07-07

    We report a new method for fabrication of Ni nanogaps based on electromigration induced by a field emission current. This method is called “activation” and is demonstrated here using a current source with alternately reversing polarities. The activation procedure with alternating current bias, in which the current source polarity alternates between positive and negative bias conditions, is performed with planar Ni nanogaps defined on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at room temperature. During negative biasing, a Fowler-Nordheim field emission current flows from the source (cathode) to the drain (anode) electrode. The Ni atoms at the tip of the drain electrode are thus activated and then migrate across the gap from the drain to the source electrode. In contrast, in the positive bias case, the field emission current moves the activated atoms from the source to the drain electrode. These two procedures are repeated until the tunnel resistance of the nanogaps is successively reduced from 100 TΩ to 48 kΩ. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies showed that the gap separation narrowed from approximately 95 nm to less than 10 nm because of the Ni atoms that accumulated at the tips of both the source and drain electrodes. These results show that the alternately biased activation process, which is a newly proposed atom transfer technique, can successfully control the tunnel resistance of the Ni nanogaps and is a suitable method for formation of ultrasmall nanogap structures.

  14. Racial bias in perceptions of others' pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Trawalter

    Full Text Available The present work provides evidence that people assume a priori that Blacks feel less pain than do Whites. It also demonstrates that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status and the privilege (or hardship status confers, not race per se. Archival data from the National Football League injury reports reveal that, relative to injured White players, injured Black players are deemed more likely to play in a subsequent game, possibly because people assume they feel less pain. Experiments 1-4 show that White and Black Americans-including registered nurses and nursing students-assume that Black people feel less pain than do White people. Finally, Experiments 5 and 6 provide evidence that this bias is rooted in perceptions of status, not race per se. Taken together, these data have important implications for understanding race-related biases and healthcare disparities.

  15. Decoupling Action Potential Bias from Cortical Local Field Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V. David

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurophysiologists have recently become interested in studying neuronal population activity through local field potential (LFP recordings during experiments that also record the activity of single neurons. This experimental approach differs from early LFP studies because it uses high impendence electrodes that can also isolate single neuron activity. A possible complication for such studies is that the synaptic potentials and action potentials of the small subset of isolated neurons may contribute disproportionately to the LFP signal, biasing activity in the larger nearby neuronal population to appear synchronous and cotuned with these neurons. To address this problem, we used linear filtering techniques to remove features correlated with spike events from LFP recordings. This filtering procedure can be applied for well-isolated single units or multiunit activity. We illustrate the effects of this correction in simulation and on spike data recorded from primary auditory cortex. We find that local spiking activity can explain a significant portion of LFP power at most recording sites and demonstrate that removing the spike-correlated component can affect measurements of auditory tuning of the LFP.

  16. Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    gathered close to a microsecond after the stress is interrupted. 1. Experimental Setup This method uses an operational amplifier ( OPAMP ) as shown in...Figure 18. The OPAMP is used in a fashion such that when the test is switched from the stress position to that of the measure position, it will attempt... OPAMP . As a result, it is possible for this test to be run on shorter time periods of stress. Furthermore, this approach allows a direct

  17. Reducing status quo bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole; Ladenburg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    To secure the validity and applicability of stated preference measures in economic analysis, hypothetical preferences must mimic real life preferences. For instance, people have a propensity to prefer what they already have when presented with alternatives that, all things being equal, seem...

  18. Note: electrode polarization of Galinstan electrodes for liquid impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Brett L; Kellis, Nathan A; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2011-04-01

    Electrode polarization is a significant obstacle in the impedance measurements of ionic liquids. An atomically smooth electrode surface could potentially reduce unwanted impedance contributions from electrode polarization. Liquid metal electrodes were formed by adhering Galinstan to acrylic plates in a parallel-plate capacitor arrangement. Electrode polarization was compared to a similar cell with stainless steel electrodes. The impedance of salt and protein solutions (β-lactoglobulin) was measured from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. Because of oxide layer formation, the performance of the Galinstan electrode is significantly different than the theoretical ideal.

  19. Porous Electrode Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    representation and analysis for their observed current distributions. Simonsson won the young author’s award of the Electrochemical Society for his paper...and T. Katan, Proc. Symp. Energy Storage and Conversion, the Electrochemical Society 77-6, 770 (1977) The optimum thickness of porous electrodes is...Chloride Electrodes; Surface Morphology on Charging and Dis- charging," T. Katan, S. Szpak, and D. N. Bennion, The Electrochemical Society , 143rd National

  20. Techniques of Electrode Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Li, Xinyong; Chen, Guohua

    Electrochemical applications using many kinds of electrode materials as an advanced oxidation/reduction technique have been a focus of research by a number of groups during the last two decades. The electrochemical approach has been adopted successfully to develop various environmental applications, mainly including water and wastewater treatment, aqueous system monitoring, and solid surface analysis. In this chapter, a number of methods for the fabrication of film-structured electrode materials were selectively reviewed. Firstly, the thermal decomposition method is briefly described, followed by introducing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) strategy. Especially, much attention was focused on introducing the methods to produce diamond novel film electrode owing to its unique physical and chemical properties. The principle and influence factors of hot filament CVD and plasma enhanced CVD preparation were interpreted by refereeing recent reports. Finally, recent developments that address electro-oxidation/reduction issues and novel electrodes such as nano-electrode and boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) are presented in the overview.

  1. A hybrid model of radio frequency biased inductively coupled plasma discharges: description of model and experimental validation in argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, De-Qi; Liu, Wei; Gao, Fei; Lieberman, M. A.; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid model, i.e. a global model coupled bidirectionally with a parallel Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) sheath model, is developed to investigate an inductively coupled discharge with a bias source. This hybrid model can self-consistently reveal the interaction between the bulk plasma and the radio frequency (rf) bias sheath. More specifically, the plasma parameters affecting characteristics of rf bias sheath (sheath length and self-bias) are calculated by a global model and the effect of the rf bias sheath on the bulk plasma is determined by the voltage drop of the rf bias sheath. Moreover, specific numbers of ions are tracked in the rf bias sheath and ultimately the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) incident on the bias electrode is obtained. To validate this model, both bulk plasma density and IEDF on the bias electrode in an argon discharge are compared with experimental measurements, and a good agreement is obtained. The advantage of this model is that it can quickly calculate the bulk plasma density and IEDF on the bias electrode, which are of practical interest in industrial plasma processing, and the model could be easily extended to serve for industrial gases.

  2. Sensor employing internal reference electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention concerns a novel internal reference electrode as well as a novel sensing electrode for an improved internal reference oxygen sensor and the sensor employing same.......The present invention concerns a novel internal reference electrode as well as a novel sensing electrode for an improved internal reference oxygen sensor and the sensor employing same....

  3. Temperature trend biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  4. Bias in collegiate courts

    OpenAIRE

    Olowofoyeku, AA

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the issues attending common law collegiate courts’ engagements with allegations of bias within their own ranks. It will be argued that, in such cases, it would be inappropriate to involve the collegiate panel or any member thereof in the decision, since such involvement inevitably encounters difficulties. The common law’s dilemmas require drastic solutions, but the common law arguably is illequipped to implement the required change. The answer, it will be argued, is ...

  5. Mood-congruent free recall bias in anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Riccardo; Fox, Elaine; Lynn, Bellinger; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Dominic P.

    2001-01-01

    The present study evaluated the status of mood-congruent free recall bias in anxious individuals following incidental encoding of target words. In the first experiment, high trait anxiety individuals showed increased recall of threat-related information after an orienting task promoting lexical processing of target words. In a second experiment, both lexical and semantic orienting tasks were performed at study. In this experiment, anxious individuals displayed a mood-congruent recall bias onl...

  6. Behavioral Biases in Interpersonal Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Liu (Ning)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis presents evidence suggesting that the same types of biases in individual decision making under uncertainty pertain in interpersonal contexts. The chapters above demonstrate in specific contexts how specific interpersonal factors attenuate, amplify, or replicate these bias

  7. Bias polarity-sensitive electrical failure characteristics of ZnSe nanowire in metal–semiconductor–metal nanostructure

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bias polarity on the electrical breakdown behavior of the single ZnSe nanowire (NW) in the metal–semiconductor–metal (M–S–M) nanostructure under high current density and high bias conditions has been studied in the present paper. The experimental results show that the failure of the ZnSe NW in M–S–M nanostructure was sensitive to bias polarity since the NW commonly collapsed at the negatively biased Au metal electrode due to high Joule heat produced in NW at the reversely biased...

  8. Individual finger classification from surface EMG: Influence of electrode set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celadon, Nicolo; Dosen, Strahinja; Paleari, Marco; Farina, Dario; Ariano, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to minimize the number of channels, determining acceptable electrode locations and optimizing electrode-recording configurations to decode isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers. Nine healthy subjects performed cyclical isometric contractions activating individual fingers. During the experiment they tracked a moving visual marker indicating the contraction type (flexion/extension), desired activation level and the finger that should be employed. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals were detected from the forearm muscles using a matrix of 192 channels (24 longitudinal columns and 8 transversal rows, 10 mm inter-electrode distance). The classification was evaluated in the context of a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with different sets of EMG electrodes: A) one linear array of 8 electrodes, B) two arrays of 8 electrodes each, C) a set with one electrode on the barycenter of each sEMG activity area, D) all the recorded channels. The results showed that the classification accuracy depended on the electrode set (F=14.67, p 82% of average success rate). Considering the computation time and electrode positioning, it is concluded that two arrays of 8 electrodes provide an optimal configuration to classify the isometric flexion and extension of individual fingers.

  9. The Role of Biased Scanning in Counterattitudinal Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, John D.; Collins, Barry E.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments tested biased-scanning hypothesis that high financial inducement leads to greater cognitive contact with counterattitudinal arguments and thus to greater attitude change. No differences in biased scanning or attitude change were observed as a function of financial inducement. Results were interpreted in framework of reactance and…

  10. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  11. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eFields

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a social brain. Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model is correct, overriding the bias toward agency to construct mechanistic explanations of observed events requires structure-mapping inferences, implemented by the pre-motor action planning system, that replace agents with mechanisms as causes of unobserved changes in contextual or featural properties of objects. Experiments that would test this model are discussed.

  12. Recognition bias and the physical attractiveness stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Jean-Christophe; Rasmussen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have found a recognition bias for information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype (PAS), in which participants believe that they remember that attractive individuals have positive qualities and that unattractive individuals have negative qualities, regardless of what information actually occurred. The purpose of this research was to examine whether recognition bias for PAS congruent information is replicable and invariant across a variety of conditions (i.e. generalizable). The effects of nine different moderator variables were examined in two experiments. With a few exceptions, the effect of PAS congruence on recognition bias was independent of the moderator variables. The results suggest that the tendency to believe that one remembers information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype is a robust phenomenon.

  13. Discrete angle biasing in Monte Carlo radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-05-01

    An angular biasing procedure is presented for use in Monte Carlo radiation transport with discretized scattering angle data. As in more general studies, the method is shown to reduce statistical weight fluctuations when it is combined with the exponential transformation. This discrete data application has a simple analytic form which is problem independent. The results from a sample problem illustrate the variance reduction and efficiency characteristics of the combined biasing procedures, and a large neutron and gamma ray integral experiment is also calculated. A proposal is given for the possible code generation of the biasing parameter p and the preferential direction /ovr/Omega///sub 0/ used in the combined biasing schemes.

  14. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    . The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  16. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  17. Evaluation of Niobium as Candidate Electrode Material for DC High Voltage Photoelectron Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    BastaniNejad, M.; Mohamed, Abdullah; Elmustafa, A. A.; Adderley, P.; Clark, J.; Covert, S.; Hansknecht, J.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Mammei, R.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The field emission characteristics of niobium electrodes were compared to those of stainless steel electrodes using a DC high voltage field emission test apparatus. A total of eight electrodes were evaluated: two 304 stainless steel electrodes polished to mirror-like finish with diamond grit and six niobium electrodes (two single-crystal, two large-grain, and two fine-grain) that were chemically polished using a buffered-chemical acid solution. Upon the first application of high voltage, the best large-grain and single-crystal niobium electrodes performed better than the best stainless steel electrodes, exhibiting less field emission at comparable voltage and field strength. In all cases, field emission from electrodes (stainless steel and/or niobium) could be significantly reduced and sometimes completely eliminated, by introducing krypton gas into the vacuum chamber while the electrode was biased at high voltage. Of all the electrodes tested, a large-grain niobium electrode performed the best, exhibiting no measurable field emission (< 10 pA) at 225 kV with 20 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to a field strength of 18:7 MV/m.

  18. Evaluation of levels of defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes using capacitive and faradaic current components derived simultaneously from large-amplitude Fourier transformed ac voltammetric experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chong-Yong; Bond, Alan M

    2009-01-15

    The level of edge plane defect sites present in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes has been evaluated via analysis of dc, ac fundamental, and higher-order ac harmonics available from a single large-amplitude Fourier transformed (FT) ac voltammetric experiment. Deliberate introduction of a low level of edge plane defect was achieved by polishing, with a higher level being introduced via electrochemical pretreatment. Kinetics regimes associated with fast electron transfer on the edge plane defect sites and slow electron transfer on the basal plane surface are resolved under ac conditions when using the surface-sensitive [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) redox probe. However, because of their insensitivity to slow electron transfer, higher-order ac faradaic harmonics almost exclusively detect only the much faster processes that emanate from edge plane defect sites. Thus, detection of fourth- and higher-order ac Faradaic harmonic components that are devoid of background capacitive current is possible at freshly cleaved HOPG in the region near the reversible potential for the [Fe(CN)(6)](3-/4-) process. Under these circumstances, dc cyclic voltammograms exhibit only reduction and oxidation peaks separated by more than 1 V. The fundamental ac harmonic provides detailed information on the capacitive current, which increases with the level of edge plane defect sites. Apparent charge transfer rate constants also can be derived from peak-to-peak separations obtained from the dc aperiodic component. Estimates of the percentage of edge plane defect sites based on ac higher harmonics, capacitance, and dc aperiodic component that are available from a single experiment have been compared. The edge plane defect levels deduced from capacitance (fundamental harmonic ac component) and higher harmonic Faradaic currents are considered to be more reliable than estimations based on apparent rate constants derived from the dc aperiodic component or conventional dc cyclic voltammogram.

  19. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    SP, of theelectrode reaction. eta is the overvoltage at the electrode. This equation is appliedto a high temperature carbonate fuel cell. It is shown that the Peltier entropyterm by far exceeds the heat production due to the irreversible losses, and thatthe main part of heat evolved at the cathode is reabsorbed......The heat evolution at a single irreversibly working electrode is treated onthe basis of the Brønsted heat principle. The resulting equation is analogous to the expression for the total heat evolution in a galvanic cellwith the exception that –DeltaS is substituted by the Peltier entropy, Delta...

  20. Study on the Characteristics of the Gas Switch Electrode Erosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hu; CHANG Jia-sen; TONG Xin; ZHANG Qiao-gen

    2011-01-01

    Gas spark switch is one of the key parts in pulsed power technology.Electrode erosion has great influence on the switch performance and lifetime.In this paper,a field distortion gas switch is selected for the experiment and a great deal of discharging experiments have been conducted in different test conditions.The forming process of etch pit as well as its influencing factors is discussed briefly and surface roughness coefficient (SRC) of the electrode is put forward to evaluate the state of electrode erosion.Experimental results show that current peak plays an important role in electrode erosion when waveforms of discharge current are the same,and electric charge and oscillation frequency of discharge current also have great effect on the electrode erosion when waveforms of discharge current are different.With the increase of discharge times,SRC decreases slowly at first and then decreases quickly after three thousand of discharge times.

  1. Reference Electrodes in Metal Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Szabó

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With especial regard to hydrogen electrode, the theoretical fundamentals of electrode potential, the most important reference electrodes and the electrode potential measurement have been discussed. In the case of the hydrogen electrode, it have been emphasised that there is no equilibrium between the hydrogen molecule (H2 and the hydrogen (H+, hydronium (H3O+ ion in the absence of a suitable catalyst. Taking into account the practical aspects as well, the theorectical basis of working of hydrogen, copper-copper sulphate, mercury-mercurous halide, silver-silver halide, metal-metal oxide, metal-metal sulphate and “Thalamid” electrodes, has been discussed.

  2. Current rectification in nickelocenylferrocene sandwiched between two gold electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2013-01-07

    I present a theoretical study of the electronic transport properties of nickelocenylferrocene sandwiched between gold electrodes. Compared with the biferrocene system, the nickelocenylferrocene system had high electrical conduction and rectification in the bias range -1 to 1 V. Furthermore, the spin-down states of the nickelocenylferrocene system exhibited perfect spin-filtering properties. From the electronic states of the nickelocenylferrocene, it was found that the rectification was caused by a difference in the bias-dependent behaviors between the Fe 3d and Ni 3d orbitals.

  3. Virtual electrodes for high-density electrode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cela, Carlos Jose; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2017-05-23

    The present embodiments are directed to implantable electrode arrays having virtual electrodes. The virtual electrodes may improve the resolution of the implantable electrode array without the burden of corresponding complexity of electronic circuitry and wiring. In a particular embodiment, a virtual electrode may include one or more passive elements to help steer current to a specific location between the active electrodes. For example, a passive element may be a metalized layer on a substrate that is adjacent to, but not directly connected to an active electrode. In certain embodiments, an active electrode may be directly coupled to a power source via a conductive connection. Beneficially, the passive elements may help to increase the overall resolution of the implantable array by providing additional stimulation points without requiring additional wiring or driver circuitry for the passive elements.

  4. Design architecture of double spiral interdigitated electrode with back gate electrode for biosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Hashim, U.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Ayub, R. M.; Adzhri, R.; Zaki, M.; Azman, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the preparation method of photolithography chrome mask design used in fabrication process of double spiral interdigitated electrode with back gate biasing based biosensor. By learning the fabrication process flow of the biosensor, the chrome masks are designed through drawing using the AutoCAD software. The overall width and length of the device is optimized at 7.0 mm and 10.0 mm, respectively. Fabrication processes of the biosensor required three chrome masks, which included back gate opening, spiral IDE formation, and passivation area formation. The complete chrome masks design will be sent for chrome mask fabrication and for future use in biosensor fabrication.

  5. Submicron electrode gaps fabricated by gold electrodeposition at interdigitated electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Megen, M.J.J; Olthuis, W.; Berg, van den A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrodes with submicron gaps are desired for achieving high amplification redox cycling sensors. In this contribution we report the use of electrodeposition of gold in order to decrease the inter-electrode spacing at interdigitated electrodes. Using this method submicron spacings can be obtained w

  6. Editorial bias in scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, J; García-Ramos, R

    2011-01-01

    Many authors believe that there are biases in scientific publications. Editorial biases include publication bias; which refers to those situations where the results influence the editor's decision, and editorial bias refers to those situations where factors related with authors or their environment influence the decision. This paper includes an analysis of the situation of editorial biases. One bias is where mainly articles with positive results are accepted, as opposed to those with negative results. Another is latent bias, where positive results are published before those with negative results. In order to examine editorial bias, this paper analyses the influence of where the article originated; the country or continent, academic centre of origin, belonging to cooperative groups, and the maternal language of the authors. The article analyses biases in the editorial process in the publication of funded clinical trials. Editorial biases exists. Authors, when submitting their manuscript, should analyse different journals and decide where their article will receive adequate treatment. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Single Electrode Heat Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Broers, G. H. J.

    1977-01-01

    for the oxygen electrode reaction is estimatedfrom thermodynamic data and reasonable agreement with the experimentalresults is found. It is concluded that the main contribution to the Peltierentropy arises from the transition from gaseous to liquid state, whereas thetransfer entropies of the ionic species...

  8. Dry EEG Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lopez-Gordo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications.

  9. Inkjet printed multiwall carbon nanotube electrodes for dielectric elastomer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, Curdin; Gardin, Samuele; Abuhimd, Hatem; Kovacs, Gabor

    2016-05-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DE’s) offer promising applications as soft and light-weight electromechanical actuators. It is known that beside the dielectric material, the electrode properties are of particular importance regarding the DE performance. Therefore, in recent years various studies have focused on the optimization of the electrode in terms of conductivity, stretchability and reliability. However, less attention was given to efficient electrode processing and deposition methods. In the present study, digital inkjet printing was used to deposit highly conductive and stretchable electrodes on silicone. Inkjet printing is a versatile and cost effective deposition method, which allows depositing complex-shaped electrode patterns with high precision. The electrodes were printed using an ink based on industrial low-cost MWCNT. Experiments have shown that the strain-conductivity properties of the printed electrode are strongly depended on the deposition parameters like drop-spacing and substrate temperature. After the optimization of the printing parameters, thin film electrodes could be deposited showing conductivities of up to 30 S cm-1 without the need of any post-treatment. In addition, electromechanical tests with fabricated DE actuators have revealed that the inkjet printed MWCNT electrodes are capable to self-clear in case of a dielectric breakdown.

  10. Transparent electrodes in the terahertz regime – a new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Song, Z.; Zalkovskij, Maksim

    We suggest a new possibility for obtaining a transparent metallic film, thus allowing for completely transparent electrodes. By placing a complementary composite layer on top of the electrode, we can cancel the back-scattering of the latter thus obtaining a perfectly transparent structure. For ea...... of fabrication, we performed the first experiments in the THz regime, but the concept is applicable to the entire electromagnetic waves spectrum. We show that the experiments and theory match each other perfectly....

  11. Liberal bias and the five-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al. draw attention to the "embedding of liberal values and methods" in social psychological research. They note how these biases are often invisible to the researchers themselves. The authors themselves fall prey to these "invisible biases" by utilizing the five-factor model of personality and the trait of openness to experience as one possible explanation for the under-representation of political conservatives in social psychology. I show that the manner in which the trait of openness to experience is conceptualized and measured is a particularly blatant example of the very liberal bias the authors decry.

  12. FEM numerical model study of electrosurgical dispersive electrode design parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John A

    2015-01-01

    Electrosurgical dispersive electrodes must safely carry the surgical current in monopolar procedures, such as those used in cutting, coagulation and radio frequency ablation (RFA). Of these, RFA represents the most stringent design constraint since ablation currents are often more than 1 to 2 Arms (continuous) for several minutes depending on the size of the lesion desired and local heat transfer conditions at the applicator electrode. This stands in contrast to standard surgical activations, which are intermittent, and usually less than 1 Arms, but for several seconds at a time. Dispersive electrode temperature rise is also critically determined by the sub-surface skin anatomy, thicknesses of the subcutaneous and supra-muscular fat, etc. Currently, we lack fundamental engineering design criteria that provide an estimating framework for preliminary designs of these electrodes. The lack of a fundamental design framework means that a large number of experiments must be conducted in order to establish a reasonable design. Previously, an attempt to correlate maximum temperatures in experimental work with the average current density-time product failed to yield a good match. This paper develops and applies a new measure of an electrode stress parameter that correlates well with both the previous experimental data and with numerical models of other electrode shapes. The finite element method (FEM) model work was calibrated against experimental RF lesions in porcine skin to establish the fundamental principle underlying dispersive electrode performance. The results can be used in preliminary electrode design calculations, experiment series design and performance evaluation.

  13. Feasibility of tracked electrodes for use in epilepsy surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, David; Brinkmann, Benjamin; Hanson, Dennis; Worrell, Gregory; Robb, Richard; Holton, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    Subdural electrode recording is commonly used to evaluate intractable epilepsy. In order to accurately record electrical activity responsible for seizure, electrodes must be positioned precisely near targets of interest, often indicated preoperatively through imaging studies. To achieve accurate placement, a large craniotomy is used to expose the brain surface. With the intent of limiting the size and improving the location of craniotomy for electrode placement, we examined magnetic tracking for localization of electrode strips. Commercially available electrode strips were attached to specialized magnetic tracking sensors developed by Medtronic plc. In a rigid phantom we evaluated the strips to determine the accuracy of electrode placement on targets. We further conducted an animal study to evaluate the impact of magnetic field interference during data collection. The measured distance between the physical fiducial and lead coil of the electrode strip was 1.32 +/- 1.03mm in the phantom experiments. The tracking system induces a very strong signal in the electrodes in the Very Low Frequency, an International Telecommunication Union (ITU) designated frequency band, from 3 kHz to 30 kHz. The results of the animal experiment demonstrated both tracking feasibility and data collection.

  14. Electroanalysis with carbon paste electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Svancara, Ivan; Walcarius, Alain; Vytras, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Electrochemistry and Electroanalysis with Carbon Paste-Based ElectrodesHistorical Survey and GlossaryField in Publication Activities and LiteratureCarbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesCarbon Paste as the Binary MixtureClassification of Carbon Pastes and Carbon Paste ElectrodesConstruction of Carbon Paste HoldersCarbon Paste as the Electrode MaterialPhysicochemical Properties of Carbon PastesElectrochemical Characteristics of Carbon PastesTesting of Unmodified CPEsIntera

  15. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1985-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that covers the applications of electrochemical sensors, along with the versatility of ion-selective electrodes. The coverage of the text includes solid contact in membrane ion-selective electrodes; immobilized enzyme probes for determining inhibitors; potentiometric titrations based on ion-pair formation; and application of ion-selective electrodes in soil science, kinetics, and kinetic analysis. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  16. DC breakdown experiments with cobalt electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Descoeudres, Antoine; Nordlund, Kai

    2009-01-01

    RF accelerating structures of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) require a material capable of sustaining high electric field with a low breakdown rate and low induced damage. Because of the similarity of many aspects of DC and RF breakdown, a DC breakdown study is underway at CERN in order to test candidate materials and surface preparations, and have a better understanding of the breakdown mechanism under ultra-high vacuum in a simple setup. The conditioning speed, breakdown field and field enhancement factor of cobalt have been measured. The average breakdown field after conditioning reaches 615 MV/m, which places cobalt amongst the best materials tested so far. By comparison with results and properties of other metals, the high breakdown field of Co could be due to its high work function and maybe also to its hexagonal crystal structure. Geneva, Switzerland (June 2009) CLIC – Note – 875

  17. Attributional biases, paranoia, and depression in early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Robyn; Still, Megan; Connors, Michael H; Ward, Philip B; Catts, Stanley V

    2013-11-01

    Attributional biases to externalize blame for negative events (externalizing bias) and to target other people for blame (personalizing bias) may constitute a vulnerability to psychosis. However, most research to date has only examined attributional biases in chronic patients. We examined attributional style, paranoia, and depression in early psychosis patients to assess the primacy of attributional biases in psychosis. A quasi-experimental design was adopted to compare the attributional style of patients and controls. Correlates of attributional style were also examined. Early psychosis patients and age- and gender-matched healthy controls completed the 'Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire'. Paranoid tendencies, suspiciousness, and depression were also assessed in both groups, while severity of current symptoms was assessed in patients. A high proportion of patients had persecutory delusions. These patients, however, did not differ from controls in externalizing or personalizing bias. Whereas suspiciousness and persecutory delusions in patients associated with externalizing bias, no bias measures associated with paranoid tendencies in either patients or controls. Counter to the pattern seen for endogenous depression, depression in patients was associated with an increased tendency to attribute events to self and a decreased tendency to attribute events to circumstances. These preliminary findings raise doubts about the primacy of attributional biases in psychosis. The novel findings with regard to depression warrant further investigation and suggest that young people, who develop depression after the onset of psychosis, may experience a need to re-establish a sense of personal control over life events that appear unpredictable. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  18. 3 keys to defeating unconscious bias watch, think, act

    CERN Document Server

    Thiederman, Sondra

    2015-01-01

    Have you ever had a biased thought? If the answer is “yes,” join the club. Everybody has biases and, although that doesn’t make us bad people, it does mean we compromise our ability to get along with people who are different from us. The good news is, there’s a lot we can do to defeat bias. Calling on Dr. Sondra Thiederman’s twenty-five years of experience in the diversity/inclusion field, the book lays out an innovative WATCH, THINK, ACT strategy that each of us can immediately apply to the task. Easy-to-read and filled with anecdotes and activities, 3 Keys shows the reader: • How to WATCH their thoughts, experiences, and actions to identify unconscious biases and target them for extinction. • How to THINK in such a way as to weaken and control our biases. • How to ACT to defeat our biases and cultivate the kind of common ground that we know to be inhospitable to the survival of bias. Designed to motivate real change, the answer to defeating our biases is in these pages. The rest is up to you...

  19. Electroformed Electrodes for Electrical-Discharge Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, A.; Cassidenti, M.

    1984-01-01

    Copper electrodes replace graphite electrodes in many instances of electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of complex shapes. Copper electrodes wear longer and cause less contamination of EDM dielectric fluid than do graphite electrodes.

  20. Theoretical investigation of exchange bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhi-Jie; Wang Huai-Yu; Ding Ze-Jun

    2007-01-01

    The exchange bias of bilayer magnetic films consisting of ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) layers in an uncompensated case is studied by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory.The effects of the layer thickness and temperature and the interfacial coupling strength on the exchange bias HE are investigated. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM layer thickness and temperature is qualitatively in agreement with experimental results. When temperature varies, both the coercivity HC and HE decrease with the temperature increasing. For each FM thickness, there exists a least AFM thickness in which the exchange bias occurs,which is called pinning thickness.

  1. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Macbeth; Alfredo López Alonso; Eugenia Razumiejczyk; Rodrigo Sosa; Carolina Pereyra; Humberto Fernández

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are...

  2. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Knight

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Animal experimentation evokes strong emotional responses in people on both sides of the debate surrounding its ethical status. However, the true level of its usefulness to society may only be discerned by careful examination of reliable scientific evidence. My recent book, The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments, reviewed more than 500 relevant scientific publications. Recently in this journal, however, a reviewer essentially accused me of bias. Yet the conclusions of my b...

  3. Control of secondary electrons from ion beam impact using a positive potential electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J.

    2016-11-01

    Secondary electrons emitted when an ion beam impacts a detector can amplify the ion beam signal, but also introduce errors if electrons from one detector propagate to another. A potassium ion beam and a detector comprised of ten impact wires, four split-plates, and a pair of biased electrodes were used to demonstrate that a low-voltage, positive electrode can be used to maintain the beneficial amplification effect while greatly reducing the error introduced from the electrons traveling between detector elements.

  4. Electrode models in electrical impedance tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents different views on electrode modelling, which include electrode electrochemistry models for modelling the effects of electrode-electrolyte interface, electric field electrode models for modelling electrode geometry, and electrode models for modelling the effects of electrode common mode voltage and double layer capacitance. Taking the full electrode models into consideration .in electrical impedance tomography (EIT) will greatly help the optimised approach to a good solution and further understanding of the measurement principle.

  5. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1983-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 5 is a collection of articles that covers ion-speciation. The book aims to present the advancements of the range and capabilities of selective ion-sensors. The topics covered in the selection are neutral carrier based ion-selective electrodes; reference electrodes and liquid junction effects in ion-selective electrode potentiometry; ion transfer across water/organic phase boundaries and analytical; and carbon substrate ion-selective electrodes. The text will be of great use to chemists and chemical engineers.

  6. Assessing Projection Bias in Consumers' Food Preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana de-Magistris

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to test whether projection bias exists in consumers' purchasing decisions for food products. To achieve our aim, we used a non-hypothetical experiment (i.e., experimental auction, where hungry and non-hungry participants were incentivized to reveal their willingness to pay (WTP. The results confirm the existence of projection bias when consumers made their decisions on food products. In particular, projection bias existed because currently hungry participants were willing to pay a higher price premium for cheeses than satiated ones, both in hungry and satiated future states. Moreover, participants overvalued the food product more when they were delivered in the future hungry condition than in the satiated one. Our study provides clear, quantitative and meaningful evidence of projection bias because our findings are based on economic valuation of food preferences. Indeed, the strength of this study is that findings are expressed in terms of willingness to pay which is an interpretable amount of money.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic generator electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.; Herman, Harold; Kuczen, Kenneth D.

    1979-01-01

    An improved electrode for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamid (MHD) generator utilizes an elongated monolithic cap of dense refractory material compliantly mounted to the MHD channel frame for collecting the current. The cap has a central longitudinal channel which contains a first layer of porous refractory ceramic as a high-temperature current leadout from the cap and a second layer of resilient wire mesh in contact with the first layer as a low-temperature current leadout between the first layer and the frame. Also described is a monolithic ceramic insulator compliantly mounted to the frame parallel to the electrode by a plurality of flexible metal strips.

  8. Carbon nanotube electrodes for hot-wire electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründler, Peter; Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2009-02-23

    The use and preparation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) at thin metallic wire electrodes for hot-wire electrochemical studies is described. The nanotubes were deposited on metal substrates such as gold by electrophoresis from a dispersion containing sodium dodecyl sulphate as an anionic surfactant. The formation of a layer of pure SWCNTs is achieved by thermal treatment at 350 degrees C. When heated in situ by a strong ac current, the electrodes can be used for electrochemical studies of nanotubes at increased temperatures. The state and functionality of the electrodes were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and cyclic voltammetry with both anionic and cationic redox systems (dopamine, ferrocene carboxylic acid). First time experiments at the heated SWCNT electrodes demonstrated an excellent suitability of these as-prepared electrodes for thermoelectrochemical studies.

  9. Surprise, Memory, and Retrospective Judgment Making: Testing Cognitive Reconstruction Theories of the Hindsight Bias Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Ivan K.

    2009-01-01

    Hindsight bias has been shown to be a pervasive and potentially harmful decision-making bias. A review of 4 competing cognitive reconstruction theories of hindsight bias revealed conflicting predictions about the role and effect of expectation or surprise in retrospective judgment formation. Two experiments tested these predictions examining the…

  10. The SDT Model of Belief Bias: Complexity, Time, and Cognitive Ability Mediate the Effects of Believability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippas, Dries; Handley, Simon J.; Verde, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    When people evaluate conclusions, they are often influenced by prior beliefs. Prevalent theories claim that "belief bias" affects the quality of syllogistic reasoning. However, recent work by Dube, Rotello, and Heit (2010) has suggested that belief bias may be a simple response bias. In Experiment 1, receiver operating characteristic…

  11. Electrocatalysts for oxygen electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeager, E.B. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The objectives of the research were: to develop further understanding of the factors controlling O{sub 2} reduction and generation on various electrocatalysts, including transition metal macrocycles and oxides: to use this understanding to identify and develop much higher activity catalysts, both monofunction and bifunction; and to establish how catalytic activity for a given O{sub 2} electrocatalyst depends on catalyst-support interactions and to identify stable catalyst supports for bifunctional electrodes.

  12. Composite electrodes for lithium batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, S. A.; Johnson, C. S.; Kahaian, A. J.; Kepler, K. D.; Shao-Horn, Y.; Thackeray, M. M.; Vaughey, J. T.

    1999-02-03

    The stability of composite positive and negative electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries is discussed. Positive electrodes with spinel-type structures that are derived from orthorhombic-LiMnO{sub 2} and layered-MnO{sub 2} are significantly more stable than standard spinel Li[Mn{sub 2}]O{sub 4} electrodes when cycled electrochemically over both the 4-V and 3-V plateaus in lithium cells. Transmission electron microscope data of cycled electrodes have indicated that a composite domain structure accounts for this greater electrochemical stability. The performance of composite Cu{sub x}Sn materials as alternative negative electrodes to amorphous SnO{sub x} electrodes for lithium-ion batteries is discussed in terms of the importance of the concentration of the electrochemically inactive copper component in the electrode.

  13. Self-bias Dependence on Process Parameters in Asymmetric Cylindrical Coaxial Capacitively Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2015-01-01

    An rf coaxial capacitively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasma is applied to processing the inner wall of superconducting radio frequency cavities. A dc self-bias potential is established across the inner electrode sheath due to the surface area difference between inner and outer electrodes of the coaxial plasma. The self-bias potential measurement is used as an indication of the plasma sheath voltage asymmetry. The understanding of the asymmetry in sheath voltage distribution in coaxial plasma is important for the modification of the inner surfaces of three dimensional objects. The plasma sheath voltages were tailored to process the outer wall by providing an additional dc current to the inner electrode with the help of an external dc power supply. The dc self-bias potential is measured for different diameter electrodes and its variation on process parameters such as gas pressure, rf power and percentage of chlorine in the Ar/Cl2 gas mixture is studied. The dc current needed to overcome the self-bias potential to make it ...

  14. Bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molinari, A.; Gutiérrez, I.; Hulea, I.N.; Russo, S.; Morpurgo, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a systematic study of the bias-dependent contact resistance in rubrene single-crystal field-effect transistors with Ni, Co, Cu, Au, and Pt electrodes. They show that the reproducibility in the values of contact resistance strongly depends on the metal, ranging from a factor of 2 f

  15. Performance enhancement of ITO/oxide/semiconductor MOS-structure silicon solar cells with voltage biasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Min-Chun; Lee, Yi-Yu; Hou, Zhong-Fu; Liao, Changn-Jyun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the photovoltaic performance enhancement of a p-n junction silicon solar cell using a transparent-antireflective ITO/oxide film deposited on the spacing of the front-side finger electrodes and with a DC voltage applied on the ITO-electrode. The depletion width of the p-n junction under the ITO-electrode was induced and extended while the absorbed volume and built-in electric field were also increased when the biasing voltage was increased. The photocurrent and conversion efficiency were increased because more photo-carriers are generated in a larger absorbed volume and because the carriers transported and collected more effectively due to higher biasing voltage effects. Compared to a reference solar cell (which was biased at 0 V), a conversion efficiency enhancement of 26.57% (from 12.42% to 15.72%) and short-circuit current density enhancement of 42.43% (from 29.51 to 42.03 mA/cm(2)) were obtained as the proposed MOS-structure solar cell biased at 2.5 V. In addition, the capacitance-volt (C-V) measurement was also used to examine the mechanism of photovoltaic performance enhancement due to the depletion width being enlarged by applying a DC voltage on an ITO-electrode.

  16. Exchange bias training effect in coupled all ferromagnetic bilayer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Ch; Polisetty, S; He, Xi; Berger, A

    2006-02-17

    Exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic thin films show remarkable analogies to conventional antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic exchange bias heterostructures. Not only do all these ferromagnetic bilayers exhibit a tunable exchange bias effect, they also show a distinct training behavior upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. In contrast with conventional exchange bias systems, such all ferromagnetic bilayer structures allow the observation of training induced changes in the bias-setting hardmagnetic layer by means of simple magnetometry. Our experiments show unambiguously that the exchange bias training effect is driven by deviations from equilibrium in the pinning layer. A comparison of our experimental data with predictions from a theory based upon triggered relaxation phenomena shows excellent agreement.

  17. Search Engine Bias and the Demise of Search Engine Utopianism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, E.

    Due to search engines' automated operations, people often assume that search engines display search results neutrally and without bias. However, this perception is mistaken. Like any other media company, search engines affirmatively control their users' experiences, which has the consequence of skewing search results (a phenomenon called "search engine bias"). Some commentators believe that search engine bias is a defect requiring legislative correction. Instead, this chapter argues that search engine bias is the beneficial consequence of search engines optimizing content for their users. The chapter further argues that the most problematic aspect of search engine bias, the "winner-take-all" effect caused by top placement in search results, will be mooted by emerging personalized search technology.

  18. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  19. Bias in the Mass Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Robert

    Non-language elements of bias in mass media--such as images, sounds, tones of voices, inflection, and facial expressions--are invariably integrated with the choice of language. Further, they have an emotional impact that is often greater than that of language. It is essential that the teacher of English deal with this non-language bias since it is…

  20. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  1. Large-Scale Galaxy Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a pedagogical proof of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which includes the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in i...

  2. Publication bias in epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Nazish

    2011-06-01

    Communication of research findings is the utmost responsibility of all scientists. Publication bias occurs if scientific studies with negative or null results fail to get published. This can happen due to bias in submitting, reviewing, accepting, publishing or aggregating scientific literature that fails to show positive results on a particular topic. Publication bias can make scientific literature unrepresentative of the actual research studies. This can give the reader a false impression about the beneficial effects of a particular treatment or intervention and can influence clinical decision making. Publication bias is more common than it is actually considered to be, but there are ways to detect and prevent it. This paper comments on the occurrence, types and consequences of publication bias and the strategies employed to detect and control it.

  3. Experimental Study of Electrodes Parameters Effects on Small Diffusion Combustion Flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiting Zhang

    2015-01-01

    To study the configuration and conductivity effects on micro⁃scale methane⁃air flames by electric field and iron wind, different electric field forces and iron winds are generated by needle, circle and plate electrodes respectively in different electrodes heights under both AC and DC fields though experiments. Experimental results showed that the flame characteristics are affected by needle electrodes mainly through the action of ion wind, by plate type electrodes mainly through the action of electric field force and by annular electrodes through both the electric field force and ion wind at the same time. Under DC field ’ s effects of all electrodes types, the flame will consequently go down while the voltage reached to a limit value, and it will breakdown under the strong effect of the ion wind by needle electrodes. The results also showed the influence by different electrodes types to the current characteristics, resistance properties and configuration of themicro⁃scale flames.

  4. A kinetic study of the photoelectrocatalytic decolorization of methylene blue using a TiO{sub 2} thin film electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, K.H.; Lin, C.L. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ho, K.C. [Inst. of Chemistry, Taipei, Taiwan (China). Academia Sinica]|[National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    This study investigated the photoelectrocatalytic decolorization of methylene blue (MB) with a TiO{sub 2} film electrode under external bias. The TiO{sub 2} thin films were prepared using a sol-gel method with hydrolysis. The films were dip-coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) conducting glass. Results of the experiment showed that the decolorization rate was a function of the MB concentration; the applied potential bias; the pH value; the thickness of the TiO{sub 2} thin film; and the incident light intensity. The photocurrent density increased with the number of dip-coatings. The decolorization rate decreased due to the increase of the electrical resistance when the film was dip-coated more than 5 times. It was suggested that the photoelectrocatalytic rate was further enhanced when the applying potential bias was greater than 0.6 V. A kinetic model depicting the decolorization rate and the reaction time was proposed. Parameters of the model included the adsorption equilibrium constant of MB and the photophysical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge with Liquid Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas in contact with liquid are widely studied aiming variety of plasma applications. DC glow discharge with liquid electrode is an easy method to obtain simple and stable plasma-liquid interface. When we focus attention on liquid-phase reaction, the discharge system is considered as electrolysis with plasma electrode. The plasma electrode will supply electrons and positive ions to the liquid surface in a different way from the conventional metal electrode. However, the phenomena at plasma-liquid interface have not been understood well. In this work, we studied physical and chemical effect in liquid induced by dc atmospheric pressure glow discharge with liquid electrode. The experiment was carried out using H-shaped Hoffman electrolysis apparatus filled with electrolyte, to separate the anodic and cathodic reactions. Two nozzle electrodes made of stainless steel are set about 2 mm above the liquid surface. By applying a dc voltage between the nozzle electrodes, dc glow discharges as plasma electrodes are generated in contact with liquid. As electrolyte, we used aqueous solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, AgNO3 and HAuCl4. AgNO3 and HAuCl4 are to discuss the reduction process of metal ions for synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs). OH radical generation yield in liquid was measured by chemical probe method using terephthalic acid. Discharge-induced liquid flow was visualized by Schlieren method. Electron irradiation to liquid surface (plasma cathode) generated OH- and OH radical in liquid while positive ion irradiation (plasma anode) generated H+ and OH radical. The generation efficiency of OH radical was better with plasma anode. Both Ag NPs in AgNO3 and Au NPs in HAuCl4 were synthesized with plasma cathode while only Au NPs were generated with plasma anode. Possible reaction process is qualitatively discussed. The discharge-induced liquid flow such as convection pattern was strongly influenced by the gas flow on the liquid surface. This work

  6. Attentional bias for nondrug reward is magnified in addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A; Faulkner, Monica L; Rilee, Jessica J; Yantis, Steven; Marvel, Cherie L

    2013-12-01

    Attentional biases for drug-related stimuli play a prominent role in addiction, predicting treatment outcomes. Attentional biases also develop for stimuli that have been paired with nondrug rewards in adults without a history of addiction, the magnitude of which is predicted by visual working-memory capacity and impulsiveness. We tested the hypothesis that addiction is associated with an increased attentional bias for nondrug (monetary) reward relative to that of healthy controls, and that this bias is related to working-memory impairments and increased impulsiveness. Seventeen patients receiving methadone-maintenance treatment for opioid dependence and 17 healthy controls participated. Impulsiveness was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11; Patton, Stanford, & Barratt, 1995), visual working-memory capacity was measured as the ability to recognize briefly presented color stimuli, and attentional bias was measured as the magnitude of response time slowing caused by irrelevant but previously reward-associated distractors in a visual-search task. The results showed that attention was biased toward the distractors across all participants, replicating previous findings. It is important to note, this bias was significantly greater in the patients than in the controls and was negatively correlated with visual working-memory capacity. Patients were also significantly more impulsive than controls as a group. Our findings demonstrate that patients in treatment for addiction experience greater difficulty ignoring stimuli associated with nondrug reward. This nonspecific reward-related bias could mediate the distracting quality of drug-related stimuli previously observed in addiction.

  7. Improved performance of a barrier-discharge plasma jet biased by a direct-current voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Li, Yaru; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying; Dong, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges that plasma research encounters is how to generate a large-scale plasma plume at atmospheric pressure. Through utilizing a third electrode biased by a direct-current voltage, a longer plasma plume is generated by a plasma jet in dielectric barrier discharge configurations. Results indicate that the plume length increases until it reaches the third electrode with increasing the bias voltage. By fast photography, it is found that the plume consists of two types of streamers under the influence of the bias voltage, which develops from a guided streamer to a branching one with leaving the tube opening. The transition from the guided streamer to the branching one can be attributed to the electric field and the air/argon fraction. PMID:27759080

  8. Improved performance of a barrier-discharge plasma jet biased by a direct-current voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuechen; Li, Yaru; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying; Dong, Lifang

    2016-10-01

    One of the challenges that plasma research encounters is how to generate a large-scale plasma plume at atmospheric pressure. Through utilizing a third electrode biased by a direct-current voltage, a longer plasma plume is generated by a plasma jet in dielectric barrier discharge configurations. Results indicate that the plume length increases until it reaches the third electrode with increasing the bias voltage. By fast photography, it is found that the plume consists of two types of streamers under the influence of the bias voltage, which develops from a guided streamer to a branching one with leaving the tube opening. The transition from the guided streamer to the branching one can be attributed to the electric field and the air/argon fraction.

  9. Enhanced Photocatalytic Efficiency of TiO2 by Combining the Modification of Ag Nanoparticles with the Application of Anodic Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Ag-TiO2/ITO film electrode was used as photoanode to investigate the feasibility of a hybrid technology of Ag nanoparticles combined with the application of anodic bias.The results showed that the deposited Ag and applied anodic bias have an apparent additive effect.

  10. Extraction of network topology from multi-electrode recordings: Is there a small-world effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eGerhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous recording of the activity of many neurons poses challenges for multivariate data analysis. Here, we propose a general scheme of reconstruction of the functional network from spike train recordings. Effective, causal interactions are estimated by fitting Generalized Linear Models (GLMs on the neural responses, incorporating effects of the neurons' self-history, of input from other neurons in the recorded network and of modulation by an external stimulus. The coupling terms arising from synaptic input can be transformed by thresholding into a binary connectivity matrix which is directed. Each link between two neurons represents a causal influence from one neuron to the other, given the observation of all other neurons from the population. The resulting graph is analyzed with respect to small-world and scale-free properties using quantitative measures for directed networks. Such graph-theoretic analyses have been performed on many complex dynamic networks, including the connectivity structure between different brain areas. Only few studies have attempted to look at the structure of cortical neural networks on the level of individual neurons. Here, using multi-electrode recordings from the visual system of the awake monkey, we find that cortical networks lack scale-free behavior, but show a small, but significant small-world structure. Assuming a simple distance-dependent probabilistic wiring between neurons, we find that this connectivity structure can account for all of the networks' observed small-world-ness. Moreover, for multi-electrode recordings the sampling of neurons is not uniform across the population. We show that the small-world-ness obtained by such a localized sub-sampling overestimates the strength of the true small-world-structure of the network. This bias is likely to be present in all previous experiments based on multi-electrode recordings.

  11. Gas sensor with multiple internal reference electrodes and sensing electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a potentiometric gas sensor, or potentiometric gas detection element, with multiple internal reference electrodes and multiple sensing electrodes for determining the concentrations of gas components in a gaseous mixture. The sensor for gas detection comprises: a solid...... electrolyte, at least two sensing electrodes (SEs) in solid contact with the electrolyte, and at least two internal reference electrodes (IREs) in solid contact with the electrolyte, wherein each IRE comprises a composite material, comprising a binary mixture of a metal and a metal oxide dispersed to form...

  12. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  13. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  14. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  15. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Ivan K. [Center for Advanced Nanoscience and Physics Department, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Morales, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.morales@ehu.es [Department of Chemical-Physics & BCMaterials, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Batlle, Xavier [Departament Física Fonamental and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nowak, Ulrich [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78464 Konstanz (Germany); Güntherodt, Gernot [Physics Institute (IIA), RWTH Aachen University, Campus RWTH-Melaten, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    This “Critical Focused Issue” presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice. - Highlights: • We address the role of bulk antiferromagnetic spins in the exchange bias phenomenon. • Significant experiments on how bulk AFM spins determine exchange bias are highlighted. • We explain the model that accounts for experimental results.

  16. Biased liquid crystal infiltrated photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Scolari, Lara

    2009-01-01

    A simulation scheme for the transmission spectrum of a photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a nematic liquid crystal and subject to an external bias is presented. The alignment of the biased liquid crystal is simulated using the finite element method to solve the relevant system of coupled...... partial differential equations. From the liquid crystal alignment the full tensorial dielectric permittivity in the capillaries is derived. The transmission spectrum for the photonic crystal fiber is obtained by solving the generalized eigenvalue problem deriving from Maxwell’s equations using a vector...... element based finite element method. We demonstrate results for a splay aligned liquid crystal infiltrated into the capillaries of a four-ring photonic crystal fiber and compare them to corresponding experiments....

  17. Calibration biases in logical reasoning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Macbeth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to present an experimental study about calibration in deductive reasoning tasks. Calibration is defi ned as the empirical convergence or divergence between the objective and the subjective success. The underconfi dence bias is understood as the dominance of the former over the latter. The hypothesis of this study states that the form of the propositions presented in the experiment is critical for calibration phenomena. Affi rmative and negative propositions are distinguished in their cognitive processing. Results suggests that monotonous compound propositions are prone to underconfi dence. An heuristic approach to this phenomenon is proposed. The activation of a monotony heuristic would produce an illusion of simplicity that generates the calibration bias. These evidence is analysed in the context of the metacognitive modeling of calibration phenomena.

  18. Aging and attentional biases for emotional faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Mara; Carstensen, Laura L

    2003-09-01

    We examined age differences in attention to and memory for faces expressing sadness, anger, and happiness. Participants saw a pair of faces, one emotional and one neutral, and then a dot probe that appeared in the location of one of the faces. In two experiments, older adults responded faster to the dot if it was presented on the same side as a neutral face than if it was presented on the same side as a negative face. Younger adults did not exhibit this attentional bias. Interactions of age and valence were also found for memory for the faces, with older adults remembering positive better than negative faces. These findings reveal that in their initial attention, older adults avoid negative information. This attentional bias is consistent with older adults' generally better emotional well-being and their tendency to remember negative less well than positive information.

  19. Improving acousto-optical interaction by high aspect ratio electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard

    In recent years experiments have shown that optical waves in waveguides can be modulated by mechanical stresses from surface acoustic waves (SAW), which have most of their energy density concentrated at the surface. In these experiments the SAWs are generated in piezoelectric materials...... by conventional interdigital transducers consisting of thin electrodes deposited at the surface. In this work the finite element method is employed to investigate if the acousto-optical interaction can be enhanced by generating the SAWs by interdigital transducers consisting of high aspect ratio electrodes....... With a periodic model it is first shown that these tall electrodes introduce several new confined SAW modes with slow phase velocities because of mechanical energy storage in the electrodes. The periodic model is then extended to a finite model by using perfectly matched layers at the substrate borders...

  20. Estimating Production Potentials: Expert Bias in Applied Decision Making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. J. Matthews; L. K. Burggraf (ISU); W. J. Reece (INEEL)

    1998-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate how workers predict manufacturing production potentials given positively and negatively framed information. Findings indicate the existence of a bias toward positive information and suggest that this bias may be reduced with experience but is never the less maintained. Experts err in the same way non experts do in differentially processing negative and positive information. Additionally, both experts and non experts tend to overestimate production potentials in a positive direction. The authors propose that these biases should be addressed with further research including cross domain analyses and consideration in training, workplace design, and human performance modeling.

  1. Bias and Causation Models and Judgment for Valid Comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Weisberg, Herbert I

    2010-01-01

    A one-of-a-kind resource on identifying and dealing with bias in statistical research on causal effects. Do cell phones cause cancer? Can a new curriculum increase student achievement? Determining what the real causes of such problems are, and how powerful their effects may be, are central issues in research across various fields of study. Some researchers are highly skeptical of drawing causal conclusions except in tightly controlled randomized experiments, while others discount the threats posed by different sources of bias, even in less rigorous observational studies. Bias and Causation pre

  2. Contextual biases in the interpretation of auditory evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Nick D; Thomas, Rick P; Dana, Jason; Dawes, Robyn M

    2011-06-01

    Noisy recordings of dialogue often serve as evidence in criminal proceedings. The present article explores the ability of two types of contextual information, currently present in the legal system, to bias subjective interpretations of such evidence. The present experiments demonstrate that the general context of the legal system and the presence of transcripts of the recorded speech are both able to bias interpretations of degraded & benign recordings into interpretable & incriminating. Furthermore we demonstrate a curse of knowledge whereby people become miscalibrated to the true quality of degraded recordings when provided transcripts. Current methods of dealing with auditory evidence are insufficient to mollify the effects of biasing information within the criminal justice system.

  3. Biases from neutrino bias: to worry or not to worry?

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Verde, Licia; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The relation between the halo field and the matter fluctuations (halo bias), in the presence of massive neutrinos depends on the total neutrino mass, massive neutrinos introduce an additional scale-dependence of the bias which is usually neglected in cosmological analyses. We investigate the magnitude of the systematic effect on interesting cosmological parameters induced by neglecting this scale dependence, finding that while it is not a problem for current surveys, it is non-negligible for ...

  4. Gold electrodes from recordable CDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angnes; Richter; Augelli; Kume

    2000-11-01

    Gold electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry. The notable performance when used in stripping analysis of many ionic species and the extraordinary affinity of thio compounds for its surface make these electrodes very suitable for many applications. This paper reports a simple and novel way to construct gold electrodes (CDtrodes) using recordable CDs as the gold source. The nanometer thickness of the gold layer of recordable disks (50-100 nm) favors the construction of band nanoelectrodes with areas as small as 10(-6) cm2. The plane surface can be easily used for the construction of conventional-sized gold electrodes for batch or flow injection analysis or even to obtain electrodes as large as 100 cm2. The low price of commercial recordable CDs allows a "one way use". The evaluation and applicability of these electrodes in the form of nanoelectrodes, in batch and associated with flow cells, are illustrated in this paper.

  5. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica

    2017-03-30

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  6. In-situ Raman spectroscopy as a characterization tool for carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J.-C.; Joho, F.B.; Novak, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Lithium intercalation and de-intercalation into/from graphite electrodes in a nonaqueous electrolyte has been studied using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Our experiments give information on the electrode-electrolyte interface with improved spatial resolution. The spectra taken from the electrode surface change with electrode potential. In this way, information on the nature of the chemical species present during charging and discharging half cycles is gained. For the first time, mapping techniques were applied to investigate if lithium intercalation proceeds homogeneously on the carbon electrode. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs.

  7. Circumventing Traditional Conditioning Protocols in Polymer Membrane-Based Ion-Selective Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michelle; Mendecki, Lukasz; Mensah, Samantha T; Blanco-Martinez, Enrique; Armas, Stephanie; Calvo-Marzal, Percy; Radu, Aleksandar; Chumbimuni-Torres, Karin Y

    2016-09-06

    Preparation of ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) often requires long and complicated conditioning protocols limiting their application as tools for in-field measurements. Herein, we eliminated the need for electrode conditioning by loading the membrane cocktail directly with primary ion solution. This proof of concept experiment was performed with iodide, silver, and sodium selective electrodes. The proposed methodology significantly shortened the preparation time of ISEs, yielding functional electrodes with submicromolar detection limits. Moreover, it is anticipated that this approach may form the basis for the development of miniaturized all-solid-state ion-selective electrodes for in situ measurements.

  8. Excess success for three related papers on racial bias

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Three related articles reported that racial bias altered perceptual experience and influenced decision-making. These findings have been applied to training programs for law enforcement, and elsewhere, to mitigate racial bias. However, a statistical analysis of each of the three articles finds that the reported experimental results should be rare, even if the theoretical ideas were correct. The analysis estimates that the probability of the reported experimental success for the articles is 0.0...

  9. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  10. Jointed Holder For Welding Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Adjustable-angle holder enables use of standard straight electrode with custom-fabricated bent gas cup for welding in difficult-to-reach places. Electrode replaced easily, without removing cup, with aid of tool loosening miniature collet nut on holder. Consumes fewer electrodes for given amount of welding. Angle of holder continuously adjustable to fit angle of gas cup or geometry of part welded. Holder made double-jointed to accommodate gas cup having compound angles.

  11. Implementation of new dry electrodes and comparison with conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes for whole body electrical bioimpedance application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassonville, Y; Barthod, C; Passard, M

    2015-01-01

    Reusable electrodes, when embedded into devices, can provide new ways of physiological measurements, and improve the usability and comfort of monitoring systems using whole body electrical bioimpedance in the areas of medical, nutrition and sports. However, good electrical and mechanical contacts between electrode and skin are very important, as it defines the quality of the signal, requiring generally the use of consumable. This paper introduces innovative dry electrodes and compares their electrical behavior with those of a traditional Ag/AgCl electrolytic one. Thanks to the campaigns of measurements involving Caucasian healthy volunteers, three designs of experiments are conducted to lead to choose the optimized set: material, supply, using conditions.

  12. Ion-selective electrode reviews

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J D R

    1982-01-01

    Ion-Selective Electrode Reviews, Volume 3, provides a review of articles on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The volume begins with an article on methods based on titration procedures for surfactant analysis, which have been developed for discrete batch operation and for continuous AutoAnalyser use. Separate chapters deal with detection limits of ion-selective electrodes; the possibility of using inorganic ion-exchange materials as ion-sensors; and the effect of solvent on potentials of cells with ion-selective electrodes. Also included is a chapter on advances in calibration procedures, the d

  13. Electrodes for Semiconductor Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Pil

    2017-03-25

    The electrodes of semiconductor gas sensors are important in characterizing sensors based on their sensitivity, selectivity, reversibility, response time, and long-term stability. The types and materials of electrodes used for semiconductor gas sensors are analyzed. In addition, the effect of interfacial zones and surface states of electrode-semiconductor interfaces on their characteristics is studied. This study describes that the gas interaction mechanism of the electrode-semiconductor interfaces should take into account the interfacial zone, surface states, image force, and tunneling effect.

  14. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP correlates of decision bias in recognition memory judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hill

    Full Text Available Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure. Event related potentials (ERP correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias. In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320 that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500-700 ms poststimulus, bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions.

  15. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP) Correlates of Decision Bias in Recognition Memory Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Holger; Windmann, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure). Event related potentials (ERP) correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias) and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias). In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied) items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320) that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500–700 ms poststimulus), bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions. PMID

  16. Error covariance calculation for forecast bias estimation in hydrologic data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.

    2015-12-01

    To date, an outstanding issue in hydrologic data assimilation is a proper way of dealing with forecast bias. A frequently used method to bypass this problem is to rescale the observations to the model climatology. While this approach improves the variability in the modeled soil wetness and discharge, it is not designed to correct the results for any bias. Alternatively, attempts have been made towards incorporating dynamic bias estimates into the assimilation algorithm. Persistent bias models are most often used to propagate the bias estimate, where the a priori forecast bias error covariance is calculated as a constant fraction of the unbiased a priori state error covariance. The latter approach is a simplification to the explicit propagation of the bias error covariance. The objective of this paper is to examine to which extent the choice for the propagation of the bias estimate and its error covariance influence the filter performance. An Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) has been performed, in which ground water storage observations are assimilated into a biased conceptual hydrologic model. The magnitudes of the forecast bias and state error covariances are calibrated by optimizing the innovation statistics of groundwater storage. The obtained bias propagation models are found to be identical to persistent bias models. After calibration, both approaches for the estimation of the forecast bias error covariance lead to similar results, with a realistic attribution of error variances to the bias and state estimate, and significant reductions of the bias in both the estimates of groundwater storage and discharge. Overall, the results in this paper justify the use of the traditional approach for online bias estimation with a persistent bias model and a simplified forecast bias error covariance estimation.

  17. Magnetic bearings with zero bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Grodsinsky, Carlos M.

    1991-01-01

    A magnetic bearing operating without a bias field has supported a shaft rotating at speeds up to 12,000 rpm with the usual four power supplies and with only two. A magnetic bearing is commonly operated with a bias current equal to half of the maximum current allowable in its coils. This linearizes the relation between net force and control current and improves the force slewing rate and hence the band width. The steady bias current dissipates power, even when no force is required from the bearing. The power wasted is equal to two-thirds of the power at maximum force output. Examined here is the zero bias idea. The advantages and disadvantages are noted.

  18. MLE's bias pathology motivates MCMLE

    OpenAIRE

    Yatracos, Yannis G.

    2013-01-01

    Maximum likelihood estimates are often biased. It is shown that this pathology is inherent to the traditional ML estimation method for two or more parameters, thus motivating from a different angle the use of MCMLE.

  19. Cognitive biases and language universals

    CERN Document Server

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  20. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  1. A theoretical model for analysing gender bias in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Eva E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last decades research has reported unmotivated differences in the treatment of women and men in various areas of clinical and academic medicine. There is an ongoing discussion on how to avoid such gender bias. We developed a three-step-theoretical model to understand how gender bias in medicine can occur and be understood. In this paper we present the model and discuss its usefulness in the efforts to avoid gender bias. In the model gender bias is analysed in relation to assumptions concerning difference/sameness and equity/inequity between women and men. Our model illustrates that gender bias in medicine can arise from assuming sameness and/or equity between women and men when there are genuine differences to consider in biology and disease, as well as in life conditions and experiences. However, gender bias can also arise from assuming differences when there are none, when and if dichotomous stereotypes about women and men are understood as valid. This conceptual thinking can be useful for discussing and avoiding gender bias in clinical work, medical education, career opportunities and documents such as research programs and health care policies. Too meet the various forms of gender bias, different facts and measures are needed. Knowledge about biological differences between women and men will not reduce bias caused by gendered stereotypes or by unawareness of health problems and discrimination associated with gender inequity. Such bias reflects unawareness of gendered attitudes and will not change by facts only. We suggest consciousness-rising activities and continuous reflections on gender attitudes among students, teachers, researchers and decision-makers.

  2. Exposure to sexism can decrease implicit gender stereotype bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Miguel R.; Barreto, Manuela; Ellemers, Naomi; Moya, Miguel; Ferreira, Lucia; Calanchini, Jimmy

    Two studies examined the effect of exposure to sexism on implicit gender bias, focusing specifically on stereotypes of men as competent and women as warm. Male and female participants were exposed to sexism or no sexism. In both Experiment 1 (Implicit Association Task; N = 115) and Experiment 2

  3. Exposure to sexism can decrease implicit gender stereotype bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, Miguel R.; Barreto, Manuela; Ellemers, Naomi; Moya, Miguel; Ferreira, Lucia; Calanchini, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Two studies examined the effect of exposure to sexism on implicit gender bias, focusing specifically on stereotypes of men as competent and women as warm. Male and female participants were exposed to sexism or no sexism. In both Experiment 1 (Implicit Association Task; N = 115) and Experiment 2 (Go/

  4. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Ian M; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A; Smith, Jessi L

    2015-10-27

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women-or favoring men-within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women's underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments-two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible.

  5. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  6. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  7. The North Atlantic Cold Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greatbatch, Richard; Drews, Annika; Ding, Hui; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic cold bias, associated with a too zonal path of the North Atlantic Current and a missing "northwest corner", is a common problem in coupled climate and forecast models. The bias affects the North Atlantic and European climate mean state, variability and predictability. We investigate the use of a flow field correction to adjust the path of the North Atlantic Current as well as additional corrections to the surface heat and freshwater fluxes. Results using the Kiel Climate Model show that the flow field correction allows a northward flow into the northwest corner, largely eliminating the bias below the surface layer. A surface cold bias remains but can be eliminated by additionally correcting the surface freshwater flux, without adjusting the surface heat flux seen by the ocean model. A model version in which only the surface fluxes of heat and freshwater are corrected continues to exhibit the incorrect path of the North Atlantic Current and a strong subsurface bias. Removing the bias impacts the multi-decadal time scale variability in the model and leads to a better representation of the SST pattern associated with the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability than the uncorrected model.

  8. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A., E-mail: aelmusta@odu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 and The Applied Research Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Taus, Rhys [Department of Physics, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, California 90045 (United States); Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached −225 kV bias voltage while generating less than 100 pA of field emission (<10 pA) using a 40 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to field strength of 13.7 MV/m. Smaller gaps were studied to evaluate electrode performance at higher field strength with the best performing TiN-coated aluminum electrode reaching ∼22.5 MV/m with field emission less than 100 pA. These results were comparable to those obtained from our best-performing electrodes manufactured from stainless steel, titanium alloy and niobium, as reported in references cited below. The TiN coating provided a very smooth surface and with mechanical properties of the coating (hardness and modulus) superior to those of stainless steel, titanium-alloy, and niobium electrodes. These features likely contributed to the improved high voltage performance of the TiN-coated aluminum electrodes.

  9. Simultaneous comparison of 1 gel with 4 dry electrode types for electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziane, N; Yang, S; Shokoueinejad, M; Webster, J G; Attari, M; Eren, H

    2015-03-01

    We designed a spandex tank top with dry electrodes for continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. This pilot study determined the best fabric, the best electrode types, sizes, and locations. Optimal electrodes provide high signal to artifact ratio (SAR) and reliability by meeting the following criteria: 1) low baseline shift, 2) high adhesion, 3) good physical stability, 4) large effective area, 5) thin with high flexibility (Luo et al 1992). We compared electrodes from three main groups: Ag/AgCl gel electrode, commercial conductive rubber and foam-metal based electrodes. Ag/AgCl gel electrodes are easy to apply, make good body contact and do not slip during the course of an experiment. We found that higher SARs are obtained when electrode area is increased (40 mm diameter) and the two dry measurement electrodes are located on convex areas (over chest muscle) rather than concave areas (over sternum), so the spandex will apply light pressure to the dry electrode to yield good electrode to skin contact. We experimentally validated findings with 24 subjects: 12 men and 12 women wearing the tank top with gel and dry electrodes, by monitoring movements imitating daily life while continuously recording their ECGs.

  10. The estimation method of GPS instrumental biases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A model of estimating the global positioning system (GPS) instrumental biases and the methods to calculate the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver are presented. The calculated results of GPS instrumental biases, the relative instrumental biases of satellite and receiver, and total electron content (TEC) are also shown. Finally, the stability of GPS instrumental biases as well as that of satellite and receiver instrumental biases are evaluated, indicating that they are very stable during a period of two months and a half.

  11. Point Electrode Studies of the Solid Electrolyte-Electrode Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben

    \\parbox[t]{7.3cm}{Strong anodic activation due to computer communication error.} It is seen that as long as the electrode is kept at the equilibrium potential, the capacity pr.\\,unit area is constant, indicating a stable reaction zone. Polarising the electrode a decrease in this ratio is observed. Although......In the development of new electrode materials for high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells methods are needed for the electrochemical evaluation of the catalytic properties of the materials. A major problem in the comparison of materials is how to determine the geometry and the effective length...... of the active reaction zone, the triple phase boundary. One way of solving this is by the application of point electrodes where the electrode-electrolyte contact is assumed to be circular with a radius calculated from the high frequency impedance. The perimeter is the taken as the length of the reaction zone...

  12. Bias neglect: a blind spot in the evaluation of scientific results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Brent; Mercier, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Experimenter bias occurs when scientists' hypotheses influence their results, even if involuntarily. Meta-analyses have suggested that in some domains, such as psychology, up to a third of the studies could be unreliable due to such biases. A series of experiments demonstrates that while people are aware of the possibility that scientists can be more biased when the conclusions of their experiments fit their initial hypotheses, they robustly fail to appreciate that they should also be more sceptical of such results. This is true even when participants read descriptions of studies that have been shown to be biased. Moreover, participants take other sources of bias-such as financial incentives-into account, showing that this bias neglect may be specific to theory-driven hypothesis testing. In combination with a common style of scientific reporting, bias neglect could lead the public to accept premature conclusions.

  13. Bias polarity-sensitive electrical failure characteristics of ZnSe nanowire in metal-semiconductor-metal nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Tan; Yanguo Wang

    2014-01-01

    The effect of bias polarity on the electrical breakdown behavior of the single ZnSe nanowire (NW) in the metal-semiconductor-metal (M-S-M) nanostructure under high current density and high bias conditions has been studied in the present paper. The experimental results show that the failure of the ZnSe NW in M-S-M nanostructure was sensitive to bias polarity since the NW commonly collapsed at the negatively biased Au metal electrode due to high Joule heat produced in NW at the reversely biased Schottky barrier. Thus, the electrical breakdown behavior of the ZnSe NW was highly dominated by the cathode-controlled mode due to the high resistance of the depletion region of ZnSe NW at the reversely biased Schottky contact.

  14. Bias polarity-sensitive electrical failure characteristics of ZnSe nanowire in metal–semiconductor–metal nanostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bias polarity on the electrical breakdown behavior of the single ZnSe nanowire (NW in the metal–semiconductor–metal (M–S–M nanostructure under high current density and high bias conditions has been studied in the present paper. The experimental results show that the failure of the ZnSe NW in M–S–M nanostructure was sensitive to bias polarity since the NW commonly collapsed at the negatively biased Au metal electrode due to high Joule heat produced in NW at the reversely biased Schottky barrier. Thus, the electrical breakdown behavior of the ZnSe NW was highly dominated by the cathode-controlled mode due to the high resistance of the depletion region of ZnSe NW at the reversely biased Schottky contact.

  15. Disparity biasing in depth from monocular occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirlin, Inna; Wilcox, Laurie M; Allison, Robert S

    2011-07-15

    Monocular occlusions have been shown to play an important role in stereopsis. Among other contributions to binocular depth perception, monocular occlusions can create percepts of illusory occluding surfaces. It has been argued that the precise location in depth of these illusory occluders is based on the constraints imposed by occlusion geometry. Tsirlin et al. (2010) proposed that when these constraints are weak, the depth of the illusory occluder can be biased by a neighboring disparity-defined feature. In the present work we test this hypothesis using a variety of stimuli. We show that when monocular occlusions provide only partial constraints on the magnitude of depth of the illusory occluders, the perceived depth of the occluders can be biased by disparity-defined features in the direction unrestricted by the occlusion geometry. Using this disparity bias phenomenon we also show that in illusory occluder stimuli where disparity information is present, but weak, most observers rely on disparity while some use occlusion information instead to specify the depth of the illusory occluder. Taken together our experiments demonstrate that in binocular depth perception disparity and monocular occlusion cues interact in complex ways to resolve perceptual ambiguity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bias in parameter estimation of form errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhang, Hao; He, Xiaoying; Xu, Min

    2014-09-01

    The surface form qualities of precision components are critical to their functionalities. In precision instruments algebraic fitting is usually adopted and the form deviations are assessed in the z direction only, in which case the deviations at steep regions of curved surfaces will be over-weighted, making the fitted results biased and unstable. In this paper the orthogonal distance fitting is performed for curved surfaces and the form errors are measured along the normal vectors of the fitted ideal surfaces. The relative bias of the form error parameters between the vertical assessment and orthogonal assessment are analytically calculated and it is represented as functions of the surface slopes. The parameter bias caused by the non-uniformity of data points can be corrected by weighting, i.e. each data is weighted by the 3D area of the Voronoi cell around the projection point on the fitted surface. Finally numerical experiments are given to compare different fitting methods and definitions of the form error parameters. The proposed definition is demonstrated to show great superiority in terms of stability and unbiasedness.

  17. HVDC power transmission electrode siting and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.J. [NDT Engineering, Inc., Shrewbury, MA (United States); Dabkowski, J. [Electro-Sciences, Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States); Hauth, R.L. [New England Power Service Co., Westborough, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This research strives to shed light on the feasibility and practicality of using deep earth electrodes to permit their use for extended periods without adverse consequences. This report begins with a review of the fundamentals associated with current conduction in earth, including the various techniques available for measuring the earth`s electrical properties. The sources of existing data are discussed and some specific data for selected regions of the U.S. and Canada are reviewed as examples. Electrode technology and design issues are reviewed and recent experience gained by New England Power and Hydro-Quebec is discussed. The issues associated with direct current flowing in underground pipelines (and other facilities) are described and the present-day mitigation measures are evaluated. Suggestions are made for further R&D in the coordination of cathodic protection systems, an area that has evolved as an empirical, trial- and-error art more than a science.

  18. Restructuring of porous nickel electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhart, S.J.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pound, B.G.

    1984-08-01

    A transmission line model for the electrochemical impedance of porous electrodes was used to study the degradation of nickel battery plates throughout their cycle life. The model was shown to successfully account for changes in the observed electrode properties in terms of simultaneous restructuring of the active mass and rupture of particleparticle ohmic contacts.

  19. Ion-selective electrodes, 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pungor, E. (ed.)

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-two papers which were presented at the Third Symposium on Ion-Selective Electrodes are presented in this Proceedings. These papers dealt with standardization, fabrication, chemical properties of ion-selective electrodes and their application. Selected papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for the data base. (ATT)

  20. ELECTROCHEMISTRY OF FUEL CELL ELECTRODES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    optimization of fuel cell electrodes. Hydrogen oxidation and reduction, the reduction of oxygen, and the oxidation of formic acid, a soluble organic...substance, were selected for these studiees because of their relevance to fuel cell systems and because of their relative simplicity. The electrodes

  1. Making EDM Electrodes By Stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Philip A.

    1988-01-01

    Stereolithography is computer-aided manufacturing technique. Used to make models and molds of electrodes for electrical-discharge machining (EDM). Eliminates intermediate steps in fabrication of plastic model of object used in making EDM electrode to manufacture object or mold for object.

  2. Gel electrolytes and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Sven; Bunte, Christine; Mikhaylik, Yuriy V.; Viner, Veronika G.

    2017-09-05

    Gel electrolytes, especially gel electrolytes for electrochemical cells, are generally described. In some embodiments, the gel electrolyte layers comprise components a) to c). Component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer comprising polymerized units of: a1) at least one monomer containing an ethylenically unsaturated unit and an amido group and a2) at least one crosslinker. Component b) may be at least one conducting salt and component c) may be at least one solvent. Electrodes may comprise the components a), d) and e), wherein component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein. Component d) may be at least one electroactive layer and component e) may be at least one ceramic layer. Furthermore, electrochemical cells comprising component a) which may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein, are also provided.

  3. First minimum bias physics results at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Dettori, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first measurements of the LHCb experiment, as obtained from $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV recorded using a minimum bias trigger. In particular measurements of the absolute $K_S^0$ production cross section at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and of the $\\overline{\\Lambda/}\\Lambda$ ratio both at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV are discussed and preliminary results are presented

  4. Composite electrode/electrolyte structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Jacobson, Craig P.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    2004-01-27

    Provided is an electrode fabricated from highly electronically conductive materials such as metals, metal alloys, or electronically conductive ceramics. The electronic conductivity of the electrode substrate is maximized. Onto this electrode in the green state, a green ionic (e.g., electrolyte) film is deposited and the assembly is co-fired at a temperature suitable to fully densify the film while the substrate retains porosity. Subsequently, a catalytic material is added to the electrode structure by infiltration of a metal salt and subsequent low temperature firing. The invention allows for an electrode with high electronic conductivity and sufficient catalytic activity to achieve high power density in ionic (electrochemical) devices such as fuel cells and electrolytic gas separation systems.

  5. Electrode for a lithium cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2008-10-14

    This invention relates to a positive electrode for an electrochemical cell or battery, and to an electrochemical cell or battery; the invention relates more specifically to a positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell or battery when the electrode is used therein. The positive electrode includes a composite metal oxide containing AgV.sub.3O.sub.8 as one component and one or more other components consisting of LiV.sub.3O.sub.8, Ag.sub.2V.sub.4O.sub.11, MnO.sub.2, CF.sub.x, AgF or Ag.sub.2O to increase the energy density of the cell, optionally in the presence of silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrode and to improve the power capability of the cell or battery.

  6. Gas composition influence on ion energy distribution functions in an industrial ICP reactor with biased cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Shannon, Steven; Coumou, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    An industrial ICP reactor consisting of a top planar coil and RF biased lower electrode has been characterized using a hairpin resonator probe and gridded ion energy analyzer to measure electron density in the bulk plasma and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) at the surface of the biased cathode. Argon and oxygen were run at constant total flow with 20mTorr downstream pressure control with varying flow ratios between the two gases ranging from 0% to 100% oxygen content. ICP and bias power were adjusted to maintain constant electron density and sheath bias over this mixing matrix at four different setpoints reflecting high density / high bias, high density / low bias, low density / high bias, and low density / low bias. Although the fundamental parameters governing RF sheath behavior were held constant, several trends in ion energy distribution are observed with respect to gas composition (aside from the obvious influence of ion mass) that show considerable variation in measured IEDF particularly that can be attributed to ion collisions in the sheath as well as gas heating variation due to gas composition.

  7. Influence of high frequency pulse on electrode wear in micro-EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-peng Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electromagnetic coupling mathematical model is established by finite element method and is verified by the contrastive experiments of copper matrix Ni–TiN cylindrical coating electrode, copper electrode and Cu50W electrode. The wear mechanism of Ni–TiN/Cu composite electrode in the case of high-frequency pulse current is studied, and the influence of the fluctuation frequency of discharge current on electrode wear in micro-EDM is found out. Compared with the electrode made from homogeneous material, the high frequency electromagnetic properties of Ni–TiN composite layer can be used effectively to inhibit the effect of high frequency pulse on the electrode and improve the distribution trend of current density.

  8. Influence of high frequency pulse on electrode wear in micro-EDM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-peng LI; Yuan-gang WANG; Fu-ling ZHAO; Meng-hua WU; Yu LIU

    2014-01-01

    An electromagnetic coupling mathematical model is established by finite element method and is verified by the contrastive experiments of copper matrix NieTiN cylindrical coating electrode, copper electrode and Cu50W electrode. The wear mechanism of NieTiN/Cu composite electrode in the case of high-frequency pulse current is studied, and the influence of the fluctuation frequency of discharge current on electrode wear in micro-EDM is found out. Compared with the electrode made from homogeneous material, the high frequency electromagnetic properties of NieTiN composite layer can be used effectively to inhibit the effect of high frequency pulse on the electrode and improve the distribution trend of current density.

  9. Time and Causation in Discourse: Temporal Proximity, Implicit Causality, and Re-mention Biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dery, Jeruen E; Bittner, Dagmar

    2016-08-01

    Using referential processing in discourse featuring implicit causality verbs as a test case, we demonstrate how a discourse's causal and temporal dimensions interact. We show that referential processing is affected by multiple discourse biases, and that these biases do not have uniform effects. In three discourse continuation experiments, we show that the bias to re-mention a particular referent in discourse involving implicit causality verbs is not only affected by the verb's implicit causality bias, but also by the discourse's temporal structure, which at times, can even override the implicit causality bias. Our results add to the growing number of studies that show how various discourse dimensions interact in discourse processing.

  10. Lithium ion battery cells under abusive discharge conditions: Electrode potential development and interactions between positive and negative electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasnatscheew, Johannes; Börner, Markus; Streipert, Benjamin; Meister, Paul; Wagner, Ralf; Cekic Laskovic, Isidora; Winter, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Increasing specific energy of lithium ion battery cells (LIBs) and their cycle life requires deeper understanding of complex processes taking place during the cell operation. This work focuses on the electrode potential development and the interactions between negative and positive electrode in a quasi LIB full cell by applying over-discharge conditions. By analysis of the potential profiles, a characteristic potential plateau at ≈ 3.56 V vs. Li/Li+ was detected at the graphite negative electrode, which can be assigned to the Cu oxidation process of the negative electrode current collector. Also at the positive electrode, a time shifted potential plateau was observed, which could be attributed to a competitive reaction between conventional discharge (lithiation) and parasitic Cu reduction (plating) on the positive electrode surface. The proposed mechanism involving the presence of elemental Cu on the positive electrode surface was confirmed by SEM-EDX mapping experiments. The relevance of Cu dissolution and deposition as well as possible solution approaches are discussed.

  11. Understanding the tropical warm temperature bias simulated by climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brient, Florent; Schneider, Tapio

    2017-04-01

    The state-of-the-art coupled general circulation models have difficulties in representing the observed spatial pattern of surface tempertaure. A majority of them suffers a warm bias in the tropical subsiding regions located over the eastern parts of oceans. These regions are usually covered by low-level clouds scattered from stratus along the coasts to more vertically developed shallow cumulus farther from them. Models usually fail to represent accurately this transition. Here we investigate physical drivers of this warm bias in CMIP5 models through a near-surface energy budget perspective. We show that overestimated solar insolation due to a lack of stratocumulus mostly explains the warm bias. This bias also arises partly from inter-model differences in surface fluxes that could be traced to differences in near-surface relative humidity and air-sea temperature gradient. We investigate the role of the atmosphere in driving surface biases by comparing historical and atmopsheric (AMIP) experiments. We show that some differences in boundary-layer characteristics, mostly those related to cloud fraction and relative humidity, are already present in AMIP experiments and may be the drivers of coupled biases. This gives insights in how models can be improved for better simulations of the tropical climate.

  12. Comparative risk perception and foods: The impact of optimistic bias on risk communication and health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, S.; Frewer, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Optimistic bias is a phenomenon in which people believe they are less likely to experience negative events, and more likely to experience positive ones, than other people. There is evidence that optimistic bias reduces people's motivation to undertake self-protective behaviour, as well as reducing t

  13. Advantage of four-electrode over two-electrode defibrillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, J.; Šimić, A.; Laroze, D.; Elorza, J.

    2015-12-01

    Defibrillation is the standard clinical treatment used to stop ventricular fibrillation. An electrical device delivers a controlled amount of electrical energy via a pair of electrodes in order to reestablish a normal heart rate. We propose a technique that is a combination of biphasic shocks applied with a four-electrode system rather than the standard two-electrode system. We use a numerical model of a one-dimensional ring of cardiac tissue in order to test and evaluate the benefit of this technique. We compare three different shock protocols, namely a monophasic and two types of biphasic shocks. The results obtained by using a four-electrode system are compared quantitatively with those obtained with the standard two-electrode system. We find that a huge reduction in defibrillation threshold is achieved with the four-electrode system. For the most efficient protocol (asymmetric biphasic), we obtain a reduction in excess of 80% in the energy required for a defibrillation success rate of 90%. The mechanisms of successful defibrillation are also analyzed. This reveals that the advantage of asymmetric biphasic shocks with four electrodes lies in the duration of the cathodal and anodal phase of the shock.

  14. Bias in the Flesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Solomon; Jabon, Maria; Plaut, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    There is strong evidence linking skin complexion to negative stereotypes and adverse real-world outcomes. We extend these findings to political ad campaigns, in which skin complexion can be easily manipulated in ways that are difficult to detect. Devising a method to measure how dark a candidate appears in an image, this paper examines how complexion varied with ad content during the 2008 presidential election campaign (study 1). Findings show that darker images were more frequent in negative ads—especially those linking Obama to crime—which aired more frequently as Election Day approached. We then conduct an experiment to document how these darker images can activate stereotypes, and show that a subtle darkness manipulation is sufficient to activate the most negative stereotypes about Blacks—even when the candidate is a famous counter-stereotypical exemplar—Barack Obama (study 2). Further evidence of an evaluative penalty for darker skin comes from an observational study measuring affective responses to depictions of Obama with varying skin complexion, presented via the Affect Misattribution Procedure in the 2008 American National Election Study (study 3). This study demonstrates that darker images are used in a way that complements ad content, and shows that doing so can negatively affect how individuals evaluate candidates and think about politics. PMID:27257306

  15. Enhanced Deposition Uniformity via an Auxiliary Electrode in Massive Electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dezhi; Xiao, Zhiming; Deng, Lei; Sun, Yu; Tan, Qiulin; Dong, Linxi; Huang, Shaohua; Zhu, Rui; Liu, Yifang; Zheng, Wanxi; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Lingyun; Sun, Daoheng

    2016-07-22

    Uniform deposition of nanofibers in the massive electrospinning process is critical in the industrial applications of nanofibers. Tip-Induced Electrospinning (TIE) is a cost-effective large-scale nanofiber-manufacturing method, but it has poor deposition uniformity. An auxiliary conductive electrode connected to the emitting electrode was introduced to improve the deposition uniformity of the nanofibers. The effects of the auxiliary electrode shape, the tilted angles and the position of the boat-like electrode on the electric field distribution, the diameter of the nanofibers, the jet control and the deposition uniformity were explored by using finite element analysis of the electric field and experiments. Experiments showed that the boat-like electrode at 20 mm above the reservoir bottom with a 5° tilted angle helped to decrease the relative deposition error of nanofibers in the greatest extent to about 5.66%, indicating such an auxiliary electrode is a good candidate method to greatly improve the deposition uniformity of nanofibers in massive electrospinning.

  16. Protrusion of the Rod Electrode in the Electrospinning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Valtera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the influence of the protrusion of the rod electrode on critical voltage in the DC electrospinning process. On the testing and industrial DC electrospinning devices, electrodes of any kind are extended towards the counter electrode. This provides the maximal, that is, supercritical, electric field intensity on the spinning-electrode orifice that is found to be higher than on the other supplementary parts. The principal study and experiments with basic apparatus were carried out and presented by Taylor in 1966. This study is focused on the arrangement closely related to the design of the real electrospinning device with respect to the safety and technological aspects. Results of the carried out experiments of the rod spinning-electrode are compared with the electrostatic simulation and analytical calculation. The presented effect of the electrode protrusion on the potential difference and the critical field strength introduces valuable information for the designers of electrospinning machines as well as for the setting up of the optimal technological parameters for producing modern nonwoven textile products.

  17. Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pato, Miguel [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strigari, Louis E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Trotta, Roberto [Astrophysics Group and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: miguel.pato@tum.de, E-mail: strigari@stanford.edu, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the systematic bias on the dark matter mass and cross-section determination arising from wrong assumptions for its distribution function is of order ∼ 1σ. A much larger systematic bias can arise if wrong assumptions are made on the underlying Milky Way mass model. However, in both cases the bias is substantially mitigated by marginalizing over galactic model parameters. We additionally show that the velocity distribution can be reconstructed in an unbiased manner for typical dark matter parameters. Our results highlight both the robustness of the dark matter mass and cross-section determination using the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution and the importance of accounting for astrophysical uncertainties in a statistically consistent fashion.

  18. Exchange bias measurements of CoFe/IrMn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.; Dahlberg, E. Dan; Hou, C.

    2001-06-01

    The exchange bias anisotropy field in CoFe/IrMn ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers has been investigated by two different experimental probes. One was the traditional hysteresis loop shift technique and the other was a recently developed technique which monitors small reversible rotations of the magnetization with the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). All the samples show approximately twice the exchange bias anisotropy field measured with the AMR technique compared to that measured with the traditional hysteresis loop method. Based on similar experiments in other materials, there is a portion of the exchange bias uniaxial anisotropy which rotates in a hysteresis loop measurement. It is surmised it is this energy which the hysteresis loop technique neglects and that the AMR technique is a better measure of the exchange bias anisotropy energy. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Reflective Practice: How the World Bank Explored Its Own Biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2015-12-10

    While many international organisations have independent evaluations, including the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Health organization (WHO), uniquely the World Bank in its 2015 World Development Report sought to ascertain the potential biases that influence how its staff interpret evidence and influence policy. Here, we describe the World Bank's study design, including experiments to ascertain the impact on Bank staff's judgements of complexity, confirmation bias, sunk cost bias, and an understanding of the wishes of those whom they seek to help. We then review the Bank's proposed mechanisms to minimise the impact of the biases they identified. We argue that this approach, that we refer to as 'reflective practice,' deserves to be adopted more widely among institutions that seek to use evidence from research to inform policy and practice. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  20. The self-attribution bias and paranormal beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elk, Michiel

    2017-02-22

    The present study investigated the relation between paranormal beliefs, illusory control and the self-attribution bias, i.e., the motivated tendency to attribute positive outcomes to oneself while negative outcomes are externalized. Visitors of a psychic fair played a card guessing game and indicated their perceived control over randomly selected cards as a function of the congruency and valence of the card. A stronger self-attribution bias was observed for paranormal believers compared to skeptics and this bias was specifically related to traditional religious beliefs and belief in superstition. No relation between paranormal beliefs and illusory control was found. Self-report measures indicated that paranormal beliefs were associated to being raised in a spiritual family and to anomalous experiences during childhood. Thereby this study suggests that paranormal beliefs are related to specific cognitive biases that in turn are shaped by socio-cultural factors.

  1. Hindsight and confirmation biases in an exercise in telepathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudski, Jeffrey M

    2002-12-01

    Belief in the paranormal or claims of paranormal experiences may be, at least in part, associated with systematic cognitive biases. 48 undergraduate college students engaged in an exercise in telepathy in which the color of cards was 'sent' to them by the experimenter under two conditions. In a Hindsight-possible condition, participants recorded whether their choice was correct following the revelation of the color. In the Control condition participants committed to a particular response by writing it down before receiving feedback, thus eliminating ability to alter retrospectively what 'was known all along'. Consistent with a hindsight bias, participants performed significantly better under the Hindsight-possible condition. Moreover, a statisically significant correlation was found between paranormal belief assessed on Tobacyk's 1988 Revised Paranormal Belief Scale in the Hindsight-possible but not in the Control condition, suggesting a confirmation bias. Results are discussed in terms of interactions between hindsight and confirmation biases and how they might relate to paranormal beliefs.

  2. The electrochemical Peltier heat of the standard hydrogen electrode reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Zheng [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)], E-mail: zfang@csu.edu.cn; Wang Shaofen [School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha 410077 (China); Zhang Zhenghua [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Qiu Guanzhou [School of Minerals Processing and Bioengineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2008-07-10

    A method for measuring the electrochemical Peltier heat (EPH) of a single electrode reaction has been developed and an absolute scale is suggested to obtain EPH of the standard hydrogen electrode. The scale is based on {phi}{sub 0}* = 0 and {delta}S{sub 0}* = 0 for any electrode reaction at zero Kelvin, in accord with the third law of thermodynamics. The relationships between entropy, enthalpy and free energy changes on this scale and on the conventional scale are derived. Calorimetric experiments were made on the Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-}/Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4-} system at five different concentrations at 298.15 K, and EPH for the standard hydrogen electrode reaction is obtained. EPHs and the entropy change on the absolute scale for the studied redox are linearly related to concentration of electrolyte. The reversible electric work is almost concentration independent in the range of concentration studied.

  3. Recovery Of Electrodic Powder From Spent Lithium Ion Batteries (LIBs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin S.M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on recycling process newly proposed to recover electrodic powder enriched in cobalt (Co and lithium (Li from spent lithium ion battery. In addition, this new process was designed to prevent explosion of batteries during thermal treatment under inert atmosphere. Spent lithium ion batteries (LIBs were heated over the range of 300°C to 600°C for 2 hours and each component was completely separated inside reactor after experiment. Electrodic powder was successfully recovered from bulk components containing several pieces of metals through sieving operation. The electrodic powder obtained was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA and furthermore image of the powder was taken by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was finally found that cobalt and lithium were mainly recovered to about 49 wt.% and 4 wt.% in electrodic powder, respectively.

  4. Preset Electrodes for Electrical-Discharge Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Bill E.

    1987-01-01

    New electrode holder for electrical-discharge machining (EDM) provides for repeatable loading and setting of many electrodes. New holder is rotating-index tool carrying six, eight, or more electrodes. Before use, all electrodes set with aid of ring surrounding tool, and locked in position with screws. When electrode replaced, EDM operator pulls spring-loaded pin on tool so it rotates about center pin. Fresh electrode then rotated into position against workpiece.

  5. Gate-dependent asymmetric transport characteristics in pentacene barristors with graphene electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wang-Taek; Min, Misook; Jeong, Hyunhak; Kim, Dongku; Jang, Jingon; Yoo, Daekyung; Jang, Yeonsik; Kim, Jun-Woo; Yoon, Jiyoung; Chung, Seungjun; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Lee, Hyoyoung; Wang, Gunuk; Lee, Takhee

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the electrical characteristics and the charge transport mechanism of pentacene vertical hetero-structures with graphene electrodes. The devices are composed of vertical stacks of silicon, silicon dioxide, graphene, pentacene, and gold. These vertical heterojunctions exhibited distinct transport characteristics depending on the applied bias direction, which originates from different electrode contacts (graphene and gold contacts) to the pentacene layer. These asymmetric contacts cause a current rectification and current modulation induced by the gate field-dependent bias direction. We observed a change in the charge injection barrier during variable-temperature current-voltage characterization, and we also observed that two distinct charge transport channels (thermionic emission and Poole-Frenkel effect) worked in the junctions, which was dependent on the bias magnitude.

  6. Conduction channels at finite bias in single-atom gold contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandbyge, Mads; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Tsukada, Masaru

    1999-01-01

    We consider the effect of a finite voltage bias on the conductance of single-atom gold contacts. We employ a nonorthogonal spn-tight-binding Hamiltonian combined with a local charge neutrality assumption. The conductance and charge distributions for finite bias are calculated using the nonequilib......We consider the effect of a finite voltage bias on the conductance of single-atom gold contacts. We employ a nonorthogonal spn-tight-binding Hamiltonian combined with a local charge neutrality assumption. The conductance and charge distributions for finite bias are calculated using...... the nonequilibrium-Green-function formalism. We calculate the voltage drop through the contacts and find the main drop located near the negative electrode. We argue that this is due to the filled d-state resonances. The conduction is analyzed in terms of transmission eigenchannels and density of states...

  7. Giant self-biased magnetoelectric coupling in co-fired textured layered composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yongke; Zhou, Yuan; Priya, Shashank

    2013-02-01

    Co-fired magnetostrictive/piezoelectric/magnetostrictive laminate structure with silver inner electrode was synthesized and characterized. We demonstrate integration of textured piezoelectric microstructure with the cost-effective low-temperature co-fired layered structure to achieve strong magnetoelectric coupling. Using the co-fired composite, a strategy was developed based upon the hysteretic response of nickel-copper-zinc ferrite magnetostrictive materials to achieve peak magnetoelectric response at zero DC bias, referred as self-biased magnetoelectric response. Fundamental understanding of self-bias phenomenon in composites with single phase magnetic material was investigated by quantifying the magnetization and piezomagnetic changes with applied DC field. We delineate the contribution arising from the interfacial strain and inherent magnetic hysteretic behavior of copper modified nickel-zinc ferrite towards self-bias response.

  8. Perceptual memory drives learning of retinotopic biases for bistable stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidan Peter Murphy

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The visual system exploits past experience at multiple timescales to resolve perceptual ambiguity in the retinal image. For example, perception of a bistable stimulus can be biased towards one interpretation over another when preceded by a brief presentation of a disambiguated version of the stimulus (positive priming or through intermittent presentations of the ambiguous stimulus (stabilization. Similarly, prior presentations of unambiguous stimuli can be used to explicitly train a long-lasting association between a percept and a retinal location (perceptual association. These phenonema have typically been regarded as independent processes, with short-term biases attributed to perceptual memory and longer-term biases described as associative learning. Here we tested for interactions between these two forms of experience-dependent perceptual bias and demonstrate that short-term processes strongly influence long-term outcomes. We first demonstrate that the establishment of long-term perceptual contingencies does not require explicit training by unambiguous stimuli, but can arise spontaneously during the periodic presentation of brief, ambiguous stimuli. Using rotating Necker cube stimuli, we observed enduring, retinotopically specific perceptual biases that were expressed from the outset and remained stable for up to forty minutes, consistent with the known phenomenon of perceptual stabilization. Further, bias was undiminished after a break period of five minutes, but was readily reset by interposed periods of continuous, as opposed to periodic, ambiguous presentation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that perceptual biases can arise naturally and may principally reflect the brain’s tendency to favor recent perceptual interpretation at a given retinal location. Further, they suggest that an association between retinal location and perceptual state, rather than a physical stimulus, is sufficient to generate long-term biases in perceptual

  9. Gender bias in academic recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that women are underrepresented in the academic systems of many countries. Gender discrimination is one of the factors that could contribute to this phenomenon. This study considers a recent national academic recruitment campaign in Italy, examining whether women are subject...... to more or less bias than men. The findings show that no gender-related differences occur among the candidates who benefit from positive bias, while among those candidates affected by negative bias, the incidence of women is lower than that of men. Among the factors that determine success in a competition...... for an academic position, the number of the applicant’s career years in the same university as the committee members assumes greater weight for male candidates than for females. Being of the same gender as the committee president is also a factor that assumes greater weight for male applicants. On the other hand...

  10. Anchoring Bias in Online Voting

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Zimo; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather, as well as other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called \\emph{anchoring bias} is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with interval voting number in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgements, auctions, and so on.

  11. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  12. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  13. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  14. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  15. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  16. Codon Pair Bias Is a Direct Consequence of Dinucleotide Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Kunec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Codon pair bias is a remarkably stable characteristic of a species. Although functionally uncharacterized, robust virus attenuation was achieved by recoding of viral proteins using underrepresented codon pairs. Because viruses replicate exclusively inside living cells, we posited that their codon pair preferences reflect those of their host(s. Analysis of many human viruses showed, however, that the encoding of viruses is influenced only marginally by host codon pair preferences. Furthermore, examination of codon pair preferences of vertebrate, insect, and arthropod-borne viruses revealed that the latter do not utilize codon pairs overrepresented in arthropods more frequently than other viruses. We found, however, that codon pair bias is a direct consequence of dinucleotide bias. We conclude that codon pair bias does not play a major role in the encoding of viral proteins and that virus attenuation by codon pair deoptimization has the same molecular underpinnings as attenuation based on an increase in CpG/TpA dinucleotides.

  17. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  18. Probing Electrode Heterogeneity Using Fourier-Transformed Alternating Current Voltammetry: Application to a Dual-Electrode Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sze-Yin; Unwin, Patrick R; Macpherson, Julie V; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M

    2017-03-07

    Quantitative studies of electron transfer processes at electrode/electrolyte interfaces, originally developed for homogeneous liquid mercury or metallic electrodes, are difficult to adapt to the spatially heterogeneous nanostructured electrode materials that are now commonly used in modern electrochemistry. In this study, the impact of surface heterogeneity on Fourier-transformed alternating current voltammetry (FTACV) has been investigated theoretically under the simplest possible conditions where no overlap of diffusion layers occurs and where numerical simulations based on a 1D diffusion model are sufficient to describe the mass transport problem. Experimental data that meet these requirements can be obtained with the aqueous [Ru(NH3)6](3+/2+) redox process at a dual-electrode system comprised of electrically coupled but well-separated glassy carbon (GC) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes. Simulated and experimental FTACV data obtained with this electrode configuration, and where distinctly different heterogeneous charge transfer rate constants (k(0) values) apply at the individual GC and BDD electrode surfaces, are in excellent agreement. Principally, because of the far greater dependence of the AC current magnitude on k(0), it is straightforward with the FTACV method to resolve electrochemical heterogeneities that are ∼1-2 orders of magnitude apart, as applies in the [Ru(NH3)6](3+/2+) dual-electrode configuration experiments, without prior knowledge of the individual kinetic parameters (k(0)1 and k(0)2) or the electrode size ratio (θ1:θ2). In direct current voltammetry, a difference in k(0) of >3 orders of magnitude is required to make this distinction.

  19. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary Animal experimentation evokes strong emotional responses in people on both sides of the debate surrounding its ethical status. However, the true level of its usefulness to society may only be discerned by careful examination of reliable scientific evidence. My recent book, The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments, reviewed more than 500 relevant scientific publications. Recently in this journal, however, a reviewer essentially accused me of bias. Yet the conclusions of my book are based on sound reasoning and strong evidence, and no critic has yet provided any substantive evidence to refute them. Abstract My recent book entitled The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments seeks to answer a key question within animal ethics, namely: is animal experimentation ethically justifiable? Or, more precisely, is it justifiable within the utilitarian cost:benefit framework that fundamentally underpins most regulations governing animal experimentation? To answer this question I reviewed more than 500 scientific publications describing animal studies, animal welfare impacts, and alternative research, toxicity testing and educational methodologies. To minimise bias I focused primarily on large-scale systematic reviews that had examined the human clinical and toxicological utility of animal studies. Despite this, Dr. Susanne Prankel recently reviewed my book in this journal, essentially accusing me of bias. However, she failed to provide any substantive evidence to refute my conclusions, let alone evidence of similar weight to that on which they are based. Those conclusions are, in fact, firmly based on utilitarian ethical reasoning, informed by scientific evidence of considerable strength, and I believe they are robust. PMID:26486779

  20. Graphene based nanocomposite hybrid electrodes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphale, Ashish N.

    There is an unmet need to develop high performance energy storage systems (ESS), capable of storing energy from both renewable and non-renewable sources to meet the current energy crisis and depletion of non-renewable sources. Amongst many available ESS, supercapacitors (ECs) are the most promising because they exhibit a high charge/discharge rate and power density, along with a long cycle life. The possibility of exploring the use of atomically thin carbon allotropes like graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and electrically conducting polymers (ECPs) such as polypyrrole (PPy) has been studied as a high performance conducting electrodes in supercapacitor application. A novel templated sustainable nanocomposite electrode has been fabricated using cellulose extracted from Cladophora c. aegagropila algae as component of the assembled supercapacitor device which later has been transitioned to a unique template-less freestanding nanocomposite supercapacitor electrode. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-cellulose nanocomposite as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 91.5 F g -1 at the scan rate 50 m Vs-1 in the presence of 1M NaCl electrolyte. The open circuit voltage of the device with polypyrrole -graphene-cellulose electrode was found to be around 225 m V and that of the polypyrrole -cellulose device is only 53 m V without the presence of graphene in the nanocomposite electrode. Understanding the fundamentals by fabricating template nanocomposite electrode, it led to fabricate a unique nanocomposite template-less freestanding film which comprises of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT hybrid. Various experiments have been performed using different electrolytes such ascorbic acid, sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid in different scan rates. The specific capacitance of polypyrrole-graphene-CNT nanocomposite with 0.1 wt% of graphene-CNT, as calculated from cyclic voltammetry curve is 450 F g-1 at the scan rate 5 m V s-1. For the first time a nanofibrous membrane has

  1. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan A.; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  2. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Tuan A.; Striolo, Alberto, E-mail: a.striolo@ucl.ac.uk [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-28

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  3. Point Electrode Studies of the Solid Electrolyte-Electrode Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben

    In the development of new electrode materials for high temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells methods are needed for the electrochemical evaluation of the catalytic properties of the materials. A major problem in the comparison of materials is how to determine the geometry and the effective length...... of the active reaction zone, the triple phase boundary. One way of solving this is by the application of point electrodes where the electrode-electrolyte contact is assumed to be circular with a radius calculated from the high frequency impedance. The perimeter is the taken as the length of the reaction zone......$mm diameter) platinum electrodes mounted in a thin alumina tube resting on a polished 8 mol\\% yttria stabilized zirconia electrolyte at $1000^\\circ$C in air. The results where analysed in terms of the equivalent circuit $R_{YSZ}(R_r Q)$ in the frequency range 0.5MHz--1kHz. Fig.\\,1 shows...

  4. Cognitive bias in forensic anthropology: visual assessment of skeletal remains is susceptible to confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaeizadeh, Sherry; Dror, Itiel E; Morgan, Ruth M

    2014-05-01

    An experimental study was designed to examine cognitive biases within forensic anthropological non-metric methods in assessing sex, ancestry and age at death. To investigate examiner interpretation, forty-one non-novice participants were semi randomly divided into three groups. Prior to conducting the assessment of the skeletal remains, two of the groups were given different extraneous contextual information regarding the sex, ancestry and age at death of the individual. The third group acted as a control group with no extraneous contextual information. The experiment was designed to investigate if the interpretation and conclusions of the skeletal remains would differ amongst participants within the three groups, and to assess whether the examiners would confirm or disagree with the given extraneous context when establishing a biological profile. The results revealed a significant biasing effect within the three groups, demonstrating a strong confirmation bias in the assessment of sex, ancestry and age at death. In assessment of sex, 31% of the participants in the control group concluded that the skeleton remains were male. In contrast, in the group that received contextual information that the remains were male, 72% concluded that the remains were male, and in the participant group where the context was that the remains were of a female, 0% of the participants concluded that the remains were male. Comparable results showing bias were found in assessing ancestry and age at death. These data demonstrate that cognitive bias can impact forensic anthropological non-metric methods on skeletal remains and affects the interpretation and conclusions of the forensic scientists. This empirical study is a step in establishing an evidence base approach for dealing with cognitive issues in forensic anthropological assessments, so as to enhance this valuable forensic science discipline.

  5. Event-specific versus unitary causal accounts of optimism bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, F J; Job, R F

    1999-10-01

    Optimism bias is often assumed to have a unitary cause regardless of the event, however, factors causing it may actually be event-specific. In Experiment 1 (N = 23), subjects rated the importance of various causes for individual events. The results identified consistent differences in perceptions of causal factors across events. Experiment 2 (N = 190) employed the possible causal factors absent/exempt error and degree of motivation to investigate an event-specific theory of optimism bias in a manipulation design. Participants were encouraged to view one causal factor (absent/exempt or motivation) as either important or unimportant to future risk when they estimated their risk of absent/exempt-related, motivation-related and unrelated events (as determined in Experiment 1). A hanging control group received no manipulation. The event-specific theory's prediction that these manipulations would affect particular events and not others were not supported. However, discouraging the absent/exempt error reduced optimism bias across events, generally. Hence, a unitary and not an event-specific theory of optimism bias was supported. Furthermore, for the first time, the possible role of and confounding of cognitive manipulations of optimism bias by mood were evaluated, and not supported.

  6. The effect of GCM biases on global runoff simulations of a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Lamprini V.; Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Grillakis, Manolis G.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2017-09-01

    Global climate model (GCM) outputs feature systematic biases that render them unsuitable for direct use by impact models, especially for hydrological studies. To deal with this issue, many bias correction techniques have been developed to adjust the modelled variables against observations, focusing mainly on precipitation and temperature. However, most state-of-the-art hydrological models require more forcing variables, in addition to precipitation and temperature, such as radiation, humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. The biases in these additional variables can hinder hydrological simulations, but the effect of the bias of each variable is unexplored. Here we examine the effect of GCM biases on historical runoff simulations for each forcing variable individually, using the JULES land surface model set up at the global scale. Based on the quantified effect, we assess which variables should be included in bias correction procedures. To this end, a partial correction bias assessment experiment is conducted, to test the effect of the biases of six climate variables from a set of three GCMs. The effect of the bias of each climate variable individually is quantified by comparing the changes in simulated runoff that correspond to the bias of each tested variable. A methodology for the classification of the effect of biases in four effect categories (ECs), based on the magnitude and sensitivity of runoff changes, is developed and applied. Our results show that, while globally the largest changes in modelled runoff are caused by precipitation and temperature biases, there are regions where runoff is substantially affected by and/or more sensitive to radiation and humidity. Global maps of bias ECs reveal the regions mostly affected by the bias of each variable. Based on our findings, for global-scale applications, bias correction of radiation and humidity, in addition to that of precipitation and temperature, is advised. Finer spatial-scale information is also provided

  7. Biased evaluation and persistence in gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilovich, T

    1983-06-01

    Perhaps the most striking aspect of gambling behavior is that people continue to gamble despite persistent failure. One reason for this persistence may be that gamblers evaluate outcomes in a biased manner. Specifically, gamblers may tend to accept wins at face value but explain away or discount losses. Experiment 1 tested this hypothesis by recording subjects' explanations of the outcomes of their bets on professional football games. The results supported the hypothesis: Subjects spent more time explaining their losses than their wins. A content analysis of these explanations revealed that subjects tended to discount their losses but "bolster" their wins Finally, subjects remembered their losses better during a recall test 3 weeks later. Experiments 2 and 3 extended this analysis by demonstrating that a manipulation of the salience or existence of a critical "fluke" play in a sporting event had a greater impact on the subsequent expectations of those who had bet on the losing team than of those who had bet on the winning team. Both the implications and the possible mechanisms underlying these biases are discussed.

  8. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented.

  9. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nolen, Steven Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Terry R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Travis John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  10. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which is ...

  11. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  12. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  13. Attentional bias in math anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms. PMID:26528208

  14. Attentional Bias in Math Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orly eRubinsten

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math. Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of math anxiety and 13 with low levels of math anxiety were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of 6 types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, were presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks. Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in math anxiety. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words. These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense math anxiety symptoms.

  15. Sex Bias in Counseling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harway, Michele

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews findings of bias in counseling materials and presents results of three original studies. Indications are that textbooks used by practitioners present the sexes in stereotypical fashion, and a greater proportion of college catalog context is devoted to men than to women. (Author)

  16. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, J.D.; Thomas, T.; Berkum, van E.C.; Arem, van B.

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  17. Measurement Bias in Multilevel Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  18. Measurement bias in multilevel data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jak, S.; Oort, F.J.; Dolan, C.V.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement bias can be detected using structural equation modeling (SEM), by testing measurement invariance with multigroup factor analysis (Jöreskog, 1971;Meredith, 1993;Sörbom, 1974) MIMIC modeling (Muthén, 1989) or restricted factor analysis (Oort, 1992,1998). In educational research, data often

  19. Attentional bias in math anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsten, Orly; Eidlin, Hili; Wohl, Hadas; Akibli, Orly

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theory from the field of general anxiety suggests that the tendency to display attentional bias toward negative information results in anxiety. Accordingly, the current study aims to investigate whether attentional bias is involved in math anxiety (MA) as well (i.e., a persistent negative reaction to math). Twenty seven participants (14 with high levels of MA and 13 with low levels of MA) were presented with a novel computerized numerical version of the well established dot probe task. One of six types of prime stimuli, either math related or typically neutral, was presented on one side of a computer screen. The prime was preceded by a probe (either one or two asterisks) that appeared in either the prime or the opposite location. Participants had to discriminate probe identity (one or two asterisks). Math anxious individuals reacted faster when the probe was at the location of the numerical related stimuli. This suggests the existence of attentional bias in MA. That is, for math anxious individuals, the cognitive system selectively favored the processing of emotionally negative information (i.e., math related words). These findings suggest that attentional bias is linked to unduly intense MA symptoms.

  20. A procedure for eliminating additive bias from cross-cultural survey data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.; Brunsø, Karen

    2005-01-01

    additive bias from cross-cultural data. The procedure involves four steps: (1) embed a potentially biased item in a factor-analytic measurement model, (2) test for the existence of additive bias between populations, (3) use the factor-analytic model to estimate the magnitude of the bias, and (4) replace...... differences in the understanding of item wording or response category labels. However, experience suggests that additive bias can be found more often than not. Based on the concept of partial measurement invariance (Byrne, Shavelson and Muthén 1989), the present paper develops a procedure for eliminating......Measurement bias in cross-cultural surveys can seriously threaten the validity of hypothesis tests. Direct comparisons of means depend on the assumption that differences in observed variables reflect differences in the underlying constructs, and not an additive bias that may be caused by cultural...

  1. Fabrication and characterization of microsieve electrode array (µSEA) enabling cell positioning on 3D electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurink, B.; Tiggelaar, R. M.; Gardeniers, J. G. E.; Luttge, R.

    2017-01-01

    Here the fabrication and characterization of a novel microelectrode array for electrophysiology applications is described, termed a micro sieve electrode array (µSEA). This silicon based µSEA device allows for hydrodynamic parallel positioning of single cells on 3D electrodes realized on the walls of inverted pyramidal shaped pores. To realize the µSEA, a previously realized silicon sieving structure is provided with a patterned boron doped poly-silicon, connecting the contact electrodes with the 3D sensing electrodes in the pores. A LPCVD silicon-rich silicon nitride layer was used as insulation. The selective opening of this insulation layer at the ends of the wiring lines allows to generate well-defined contact and sensing electrodes according to the layout used in commercial microelectrode array readers. The main challenge lays in the simultaneously selective etching of material at both the planar surface (contact electrode) as well as in the sieving structure containing the (3D) pores (sensing electrodes). For the generation of 3D electrodes in the pores a self-aligning technique was developed using the pore geometry to our advantage. This technique, based on sacrificial layer etching, allows for the fine tuning of the sensing electrode surface area and thus supports the positioning and coupling of single cells on the electrode surface in relation to the cell size. Furthermore, a self-aligning silicide is formed on the sensing electrodes to favour the electrical properties. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the working principle of the µSEA using different types of neuronal cells. Capture efficiency in the pores was  >70% with a 70% survival rate of the cell maintained for up to 14 DIV. The TiSi2-boron-doped-poly-silicon sensing electrodes of the µSEA were characterized, which indicated noise levels of  <15 µV and impedance values of 360 kΩ. These findings potentially allow for future electrophysiological measurements using the µSEA.

  2. Thin film fuel cell electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, W. J.; Batzold, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Earlier work shows that fuel cell electrodes prepared by sputtering thin films of platinum on porous vycor substrates avoid diffusion limitations even at high current densities. The presented study shows that the specific activity of sputtered platinum is not unusually high. Performance limitations are found to be controlled by physical processes, even at low loadings. Catalyst activity is strongly influenced by platinum sputtering parameters, which seemingly change the surface area of the catalyst layer. The use of porous nickel as a substrate shows that pore size of the substrate is an important parameter. It is noted that electrode performance increases with increasing loading for catalyst layers up to two microns thick, thus showing the physical properties of the sputtered layer to be different from platinum foil. Electrode performance is also sensitive to changing differential pressure across the electrode. The application of sputtered catalyst layers to fuel cell matrices for the purpose of obtaining thin total cells appears feasible.

  3. Fractals in several electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunyong, E-mail: zhangchy@njau.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Suzhou Key Laboratory of Environment and Biosafety, Suzhou Academy of Southeast University, Dushuhu lake higher education town, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wu, Jingyu [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Fu, Degang [Suzhou Key Laboratory of Environment and Biosafety, Suzhou Academy of Southeast University, Dushuhu lake higher education town, Suzhou 215123 (China); State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Fractal geometry was employed to characterize three important electrode materials. • The surfaces of all studied electrodes were proved to be very rough. • The fractal dimensions of BDD and ACF were scale dependent. • MMO film was more uniform than BDD and ACF in terms of fractal structures. - Abstract: In the present paper, the fractal properties of boron-doped diamond (BDD), mixed metal oxide (MMO) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) electrode have been studied by SEM imaging at different scales. Three materials are self-similar with mean fractal dimension in the range of 2.6–2.8, confirming that they all exhibit very rough surfaces. Specifically, it is found that MMO film is more uniform in terms of fractal structure than BDD and ACF. As a result, the intriguing characteristics make these electrodes as ideal candidates for high-performance decontamination processes.

  4. Bias Adjusted Precipitation Threat Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mesinger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among the wide variety of performance measures available for the assessment of skill of deterministic precipitation forecasts, the equitable threat score (ETS might well be the one used most frequently. It is typically used in conjunction with the bias score. However, apart from its mathematical definition the meaning of the ETS is not clear. It has been pointed out (Mason, 1989; Hamill, 1999 that forecasts with a larger bias tend to have a higher ETS. Even so, the present author has not seen this having been accounted for in any of numerous papers that in recent years have used the ETS along with bias "as a measure of forecast accuracy".

    A method to adjust the threat score (TS or the ETS so as to arrive at their values that correspond to unit bias in order to show the model's or forecaster's accuracy in extit{placing} precipitation has been proposed earlier by the present author (Mesinger and Brill, the so-called dH/dF method. A serious deficiency however has since been noted with the dH/dF method in that the hypothetical function that it arrives at to interpolate or extrapolate the observed value of hits to unit bias can have values of hits greater than forecast when the forecast area tends to zero. Another method is proposed here based on the assumption that the increase in hits per unit increase in false alarms is proportional to the yet unhit area. This new method removes the deficiency of the dH/dF method. Examples of its performance for 12 months of forecasts by three NCEP operational models are given.

  5. Bayesian inference underlies the contraction bias in delayed comparison tasks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paymon Ashourian

    Full Text Available Delayed comparison tasks are widely used in the study of working memory and perception in psychology and neuroscience. It has long been known, however, that decisions in these tasks are biased. When the two stimuli in a delayed comparison trial are small in magnitude, subjects tend to report that the first stimulus is larger than the second stimulus. In contrast, subjects tend to report that the second stimulus is larger than the first when the stimuli are relatively large. Here we study the computational principles underlying this bias, also known as the contraction bias. We propose that the contraction bias results from a Bayesian computation in which a noisy representation of a magnitude is combined with a-priori information about the distribution of magnitudes to optimize performance. We test our hypothesis on choice behavior in a visual delayed comparison experiment by studying the effect of (i changing the prior distribution and (ii changing the uncertainty in the memorized stimulus. We show that choice behavior in both manipulations is consistent with the performance of an observer who uses a Bayesian inference in order to improve performance. Moreover, our results suggest that the contraction bias arises during memory retrieval/decision making and not during memory encoding. These results support the notion that the contraction bias illusion can be understood as resulting from optimality considerations.

  6. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Joshua L; Aronow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active.

  7. Electrochemistry at Very Small Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    Contract N00014-79-C-0862. This contract has a peculiar history. It originated in 1979. under the title "Studies in Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry and...The second category involved studies of cathodic stripping voltammetry of various materials, primarily at silver electrodes. Work carried out... Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry at a Rotating Disc Electrode", K. Shimizu and R.A. Osteryoung, February, 1981. * 4. "Electrochemical Behavior of Sulfide

  8. Reducing Prejudice With Labels: Shared Group Memberships Attenuate Implicit Bias and Expand Implicit Group Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroggins, W Anthony; Mackie, Diane M; Allen, Thomas J; Sherman, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-01

    In three experiments, we used a novel Implicit Association Test procedure to investigate the impact of group memberships on implicit bias and implicit group boundaries. Results from Experiment 1 indicated that categorizing targets using a shared category reduced implicit bias by increasing the extent to which positivity was associated with Blacks. Results from Experiment 2 revealed that shared group membership, but not mere positivity of a group membership, was necessary to reduce implicit bias. Quadruple process model analyses indicated that changes in implicit bias caused by shared group membership are due to changes in the way that targets are evaluated, not to changes in the regulation of evaluative bias. Results from Experiment 3 showed that categorizing Black targets into shared group memberships expanded implicit group boundaries.

  9. The New Theory of Ion-Selective Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernõ Pungor

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the anomalies of the former interpretation of the working mechanism of the ion-selective electrodes. It was thorougly discussed why the Donnan experiment could not be applied as the theoretical background of glass electrodes. It was assumed according to the Donnan interpretation that the measurable potential is produced by the transfer of the primary ion through the membrane. Since the 1960s, the author and coworkers have been investigating the problem of what can be the reason for the potential response of the electrodes. Practical measurements in connection with the response time, surface hindered reactions etc. were interpreted. Furthermore, the energy problems according to the Gibbs theory using two electrode components were investigated. It was established that the electrodes on which chemical reactions may occur with the primary ion have a surface reaction as the chemical basis of the response. For electrodes that work on the principle of the lyotropic series, surface reactions are also involved, but their response is not always Nernstian. The energy demand is covered by the charge separation at the electrodesolution interface.

  10. Effect of a direct current bias on the electrohydrodynamic performance of a surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator for airflow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijie; Yang, Liang; Qi, Xiaohua; Ren, Chunsheng

    2015-02-01

    The effect of a DC bias on the electrohydrodynamics (EHD) force induced by a surface dielectric barrier AC discharge actuator for airflow control at the atmospheric pressure is investigated. The measurement of the surface potential due to charge deposition at different DC biases is carried out by using a special designed corona like discharge potential probe. From the surface potential data, the plasma electromotive force is shown not affected much by the DC biases except for some reduction of the DC bias near the exposed electrode edge for the sheath-like configuration. The total thrust is measured by an analytical balance, and an almost linear relationship to the potential voltage at the exposed electrode edge is found for the direct thrust force. The temporally averaged ionic wind characteristics are investigated by Pitot tube sensor and schlieren visualization system. It is found that the ionic wind velocity profiles with different DC biases are almost the same in the AC discharge plasma area but gradually diversified in the further downstream area as well as the upper space away from the discharge plasma area. Also, the DC bias can significantly modify the topology of the ionic wind produced by the AC discharge actuator. These results can provide an insight into how the DC biases to affect the force generation.

  11. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    ’ recommendations. Using a large data of analysts’ recommendations from Asian emerging markets, we show that local analysts issue more optimistic recommendations than their foreign counterparts. However, optimism difference between the two groups is greater for firms with poor information environment. Our results......Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts...... show that optimism difference between the two groups is more than twice as much in firms with poor information environment than in firms with better information environment. We argue that poor information environment pose greater information asymmetries to foreign analysts regarding local firms...

  12. The Investigation of EDM Parameters on Electrode Wear Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Atefi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM is a well-established machining option for manufacturing geometrically complex or hard material parts that are extremely difficult-to-machine by conventional machining processes. The non-contact machining technique has been continuously evolving from a mere tool and die making process. In this study, the influence of different electro discharge machining parameters (current, pulse on-time, pulse off-time, arc voltage on the electrode wear ratio as a result of application copper electrode to hot work steel DIN1.2344 has been investigated. Design of the experiment was chosen as full factorial. Artificial neural network has been used to choose proper machining parameters and to reach certain electrode wear ratio. Finally a hybrid model has been designed to reduce the artificial neural network errors. The experiment results indicated a good performance of proposed method in optimization of such a complex and non-linear problems.

  13. Research on Frozen Soil Structure Influence over Transformer DC Magnetic Biasing in UHVDC Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yongming

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study studies the exciting current of transformer affected by DC bias in the Tibet frozen soil structure when the UHVDC system is working in monopole state. Firstly, the model of calculating the ground potential for a typical frozen soil of the Tuotuo River substation was described and then the ground potential around the UHVDC grounding electrode for five-layer soil in summer and winter was calculated. According to the soil parameters, the magnetic bias current of the transformer were calculated. Results indicate that the distance is less than about 4 km and the earth potential is variable in different season. The substation electrode design parameters are complex, so building substation is very inconvenient. And when the distance is adjusted from 4 km to 8km, the earth potential is changed from 400 to 200 V, the exciting current decreased from 45 to 5 mA, the waveform unbalance will also decrease.

  14. Macroscopic fibres of CNTs as electrodes for multifunctional electric double layer capacitors: from quantum capacitance to device performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senokos, E.; Reguero, V.; Palma, J.; Vilatela, J. J.; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present a combined electrochemical and mechanical study of mesoporous electrodes based on CNT fibres in the context of electric double layer capacitors. We show that through control of the synthetic and assembly processes of the fibres, it is possible to obtain an active material that combines a surface area of 250 m2 g-1, high electrical conductivity (3.5 × 105 S m-1) and mechanical properties in the high-performance range including toughness (35 J g-1) comparable to that of aramid fibre (e.g. Kevlar). These properties are a consequence of the predominant orientation of the CNTs, observed by wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, and to the exceptionally long CNT length on the millimetre scale. Cyclic voltammetry measurements in a three-electrode configuration and using 1-butyl-3-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (PYR14TFSI) ionic liquid electrolyte, show that the CNT fibres have a large quantum capacitance, evidenced by the near linear dependence of geometric capacitance (and conductivity) on potential bias. This reflects the low dimensionality of the CNT building blocks, which were purposely synthesised to have 1-5 layers and a high degree of graphitization. From the charge-discharge measurements of supercapacitor devices with symmetric CNT fibre electrodes we obtain power and energy densities as high as 58 kW kg-1 and 14 Wh kg-1, respectively. These record-high values for CNT fibre-based supercapacitors, are a consequence of the low equivalent series resistance due to the high conductivity of the fibres, the large contribution from quantum capacitance, and the wide stability window of the ionic liquid (3.5 V). Cycle life experiments demonstrate stable capacitance and energy retention over 10 000 cycles of charge-discharge at 3.5 V.In this work we present a combined electrochemical and mechanical study of mesoporous electrodes based on CNT fibres in the context of electric double layer capacitors. We show that through

  15. Penetrating microelectrode arrays with low-impedance sputtered iridium oxide electrode coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Stuart F; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D; Van Wagenen, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is a candidate low-impedance coating for neural stimulation and recording electrodes. SIROF on planar substrates has exhibited a high charge-injection capacity and impedance suitable for indwelling cortical microelectrode applications. In the present work, the properties of SIROF electrode coatings deposited onto multi-shank penetrating arrays intended for intracortical and intraneural applications were examined. The charge-injection properties under constant current pulsing were evaluated for a range of pulsewidths and current densities using voltage transients to determine maximum potential excursions in an inorganic model of interstitial fluid at 37 degrees C. The charge-injection capacity of the SIROFs was significantly improved by the use of positive potential biasing in the interpulse period, but even without bias, the SIROFs reversibly inject higher charge than other iridium oxides or platinum. Typical deliverable charge levels of 25 to 160 nC/phase were obtained with 2000 mum(2) electrodes depending on pulsewidth and interpulse bias. Similar sized platinum electrodes could inject 3 to 8 nC/phase.

  16. Stimulation and recording electrodes for neural prostheses

    CERN Document Server

    Pour Aryan, Naser; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    This book provides readers with basic principles of the electrochemistry of the electrodes used in modern, implantable neural prostheses. The authors discuss the boundaries and conditions in which the electrodes continue to function properly for long time spans, which are required when designing neural stimulator devices for long-term in vivo applications. Two kinds of electrode materials, titanium nitride and iridium are discussed extensively, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The influence of the counter electrode on the safety margins and electrode lifetime in a two electrode system is explained. Electrode modeling is handled in a final chapter.

  17. Assessment of Carbon/Salt/Adhesive Electrodes for Surface Electromyography Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada-Quintero, Hugo; Rood, Ryan; Burnham, Ken; Pennace, John; Chon, Ki

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of novel electrodes for surface electromyography (sEMG) measurements. The electrodes are based on the mixture of carbon powder, quaternary salt, and viscoelastic polymeric adhesive (carbon/salt/adhesive or simply CSA), which when combined, provide the unique advantages of having longer (theoretically infinite) shelf life and potentially lower cost than Ag/AgCl hydrogel electrodes, consistent with FLEXcon's Patent #8 673 184. The 20 subjects were recruited to collect simultaneous recordings of sEMG signals using Ag/AgCl and CSA electrodes, side-by-side on triceps brachii, tibial anterior muscles, biceps brachii, and quadriceps femoris. Although CSA sEMG electrodes showed higher electrode-skin contact impedance for the frequency range of 4 Hz-2 kHz, no significant differences were found in the signals' amplitude between the two electrodes either during relaxation or contraction stages. Furthermore, correlations of the computed linear envelopes (>0.91), rms value envelopes (>0.91), and power spectral densities (>0.95) of the signals were found to be high between the two media. Detected ON- and OFF-times of contraction were also highly correlated (>0.9) and interchangeable (ON-time: bias = -0.02, variance = 0.11; OFF-time: bias = -0.04, variance = 0.23) between the two media. However, CSA sEMG electrodes exhibited a significantly better response to noise (38.3 ± 10.6 dB versus 32.7 ± 15.6 dB) and motion artifacts (24.1 ± 12.1 dB versus 16.6 ± 8.52 dB), and a significantly lower spectral deformation (1.32 ± 0.2 versus 1.46 ± 0.4). Ag/AgCl electrodes showed a significantly more peaked and sensitive response to EMG amplitude (67.9 ± 13.9 dB versus 65.4 ± 14.6 dB). Given no significant differences in many of the measures described earlier and the fact that CSA electrodes have an infinite shelf-life are potentially lower cost, and are more resistant to motion artifacts, the new electrodes provide an attractive alternative to Ag

  18. Cognitive biases, linguistic universals, and constraint-based grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Jennifer; Smolensky, Paul; Wilson, Colin

    2013-07-01

    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology-the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages-and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial grammar experiments on noun-phrase word order (Culbertson, Smolensky, & Legendre, 2012). Our proposal has several novel properties that distinguish it from prior work in the domains of linguistic theory, computational cognitive science, and machine learning. This study illustrates how ideas from these domains can be synthesized into a model of language learning in which biases range in strength from hard (absolute) to soft (statistical), and in which language-specific and domain-general biases combine to account for data from the macro-level scale of typological distribution to the micro-level scale of learning by individuals. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Implanted electrodes for multi-month EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Thomas; Engdahl, Susannah; Kolls, Brad J; Wolf, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An implanted electroencephalogram (EEG) recorder would help diagnose infrequent seizure-like events. A proof-of-concept study quantified the electrical characteristics of the electrodes planned for the proposed recorder. The electrodes were implanted in an ovine model for eight weeks. Electrode impedance was less than 800 Ohms throughout the study. A frequency-domain determination of sedation performed similarly for surface versus implanted electrodes throughout the study. The time-domain correlation between an implanted electrode and a surface electrode was almost as high as between two surface electrodes (0.86 versus 0.92). EEG-certified clinicians judged that the implanted electrode quality was adequate to excellent and that the implanted electrodes provided the same clinical information as surface electrodes except for a noticeable amplitude difference. No significant issues were found that would stop development of the EEG recorder.

  20. Orientation- and position-controlled alignment of asymmetric silicon microrod on a substrate with asymmetric electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Akihide; Watanabe, Keiji; Sato, Takuya; Kotaki, Hiroshi; Schuele, Paul J.; Crowder, Mark A.; Zhan, Changqing; Hartzell, John W.; Nakatani, Ryoichi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the orientation-controlled alignment of asymmetric Si microrods on a glass substrate with an asymmetric pair of electrodes. The Si microrods have the shape of a paddle with a blade and a shaft part, and the pair of electrodes consists of a narrow electrode and a wide electrode. By applying AC bias to the electrodes, the Si microrods suspended in a fluid align in such a way to settle across the electrode pair, and over 80% of the aligned Si microrods have an orientation with the blade and the shaft of the paddle on the wide and the narrow electrodes, respectively. When Si microrods have a shell of dielectric film and its thickness on the top face is thicker than that on the bottom face, 97.8% of the Si microrods are aligned with the top face facing upwards. This technique is useful for orientation-controlled alignment of nano- and microsized devices that have polarity or a distinction between the top and bottom faces.

  1. Sequential injection of domain walls into ferroelectrics at different bias voltages: Paving the way for “domain wall memristors”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyte, J. R.; McQuaid, R. G. P.; Einsle, J. F.; Gregg, J. M., E-mail: m.gregg@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Nanostructured Media (CNM), School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Ashcroft, C. M. [Centre for Nanostructured Media (CNM), School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Canalias, C. [Department of Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Gruverman, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska 68588–0299 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    Simple meso-scale capacitor structures have been made by incorporating thin (∼300 nm) single crystal lamellae of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) between two coplanar Pt electrodes. The influence that either patterned protrusions in the electrodes or focused ion beam milled holes in the KTP have on the nucleation of reverse domains during switching was mapped using piezoresponse force microscopy imaging. The objective was to assess whether or not variations in the magnitude of field enhancement at localised “hot-spots,” caused by such patterning, could be used to both control the exact locations and bias voltages at which nucleation events occurred. It was found that both the patterning of electrodes and the milling of various hole geometries into the KTP could allow controlled sequential injection of domain wall pairs at different bias voltages; this capability could have implications for the design and operation of domain wall electronic devices, such as memristors, in the future.

  2. Improved analysis of bias in Monte Carlo criticality safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Thomas C.

    2000-08-01

    model is demonstrated. Simulations of the bias model development by a casual analyst are compared with the rigorously developed bias model. In particular, questions of benchmark critical experiment sample size and selection methods are examined.

  3. Market feedback does not eliminate biases in the perception of independence

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In individual decision making experiments I test the robustness of biases in the perception of independence and whether they survive feedback about the median decision in groups of five. I argue that the median decision reflects the market clearing price in an equivalent interactive market setting. Despite better experimental control, known biases are confirmed but also qualified. While feedback reduces biases it does not affect behavior significantly and no learning over the 98 repetition...

  4. Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pato, M.; Strigari, L.E.; Trotta, R.; Bertone, G.

    2013-01-01

    We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the

  5. Evaluating Gender Discrimination Claims: Is There a Gender Similarity Bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Teri J.; Phillips, James S.; Konopaske, Robert; Townsend, Joellyn

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the possible existence of a gender similarity bias in evaluations of gender discrimination allegations, using a laboratory experiment in which the strength of evidence against a defendant company and the gender of the plaintiff were manipulated. Participants were ethnically diverse undergraduate students. Although female mock jurors…

  6. Positive Illusory Bias in Children with ADHD in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Jason C.; Block, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder is a common developmental disorder that can cause a motor-skill delay in children. Positive illusory bias (PIB)--the belief that one is better at performing a task or a skill than one actually is--may be one cause of this delay. Although nearly everyone experiences a mild and healthy PIB, students with ADHD…

  7. Soft QCD, minimum bias and diffraction: results from ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonioli Pietro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report recent results from the ALICE experiment at the LHC for minimum bias pp collisions. This overview includes results on inelastic cross section, with analysis of single and double diffractive events; the study of hadron production mechanisms, both for inclusive and identified particles; Bose-Einstein correlations; and fluctuations in 〈PT〉.

  8. An experimental study of spider-related covariation bias in 8-to 13-year-old children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muris, P; de Jong, PJ; Meesters, C; Waterreus, B; van Lubeck, J

    2005-01-01

    Covariation bias can be defined as phobic subjects' tendency to overestimate the association between phobic stimuli and aversive outcomes. The current study presents two experiments that examined this type of cognitive bias in children aged 8-13 years (N = 147 in Experiment 1, N = 240 in Experiment

  9. Using mesoporous carbon electrodes for brackish water desalination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Linda; Li, Lixia; Song, Huaihe; Morris, Gayle

    2008-04-01

    Electrosorptive deionisation is an alternative process to remove salt ions from the brackish water. The porous carbon materials are used as electrodes. When charged in low voltage electric fields, they possess a highly charged surface that induces adsorption of salt ions on the surface. This process is reversible, so the adsorbed salt ions can be desorbed and the electrode can be reused. In the study, an ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) electrode was developed for electrosorptive desalination. The effects of pore arrangement pattern (ordered and random) and pore size distribution (mesopores and micropores) on the desalination performance was investigated by comparing OMC and activated carbon (AC). It were revealed from X-ray diffraction and N(2) sorption measurements that AC has both micropores and mesopores, whereas ordered mesopores are dominant in OMC. Their performance as potential electrodes to remove salt was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests at a range of electrolyte concentrations and sweep rates. It is deduced that under the same electrochemical condition the specific capacitance values of OMC electrode (i.e. 133 F/g obtained from CV at a sweep rate of 1 mV/s in 0.1M NaCl solution) are larger than those of AC electrode (107 F/g), suggesting that the former has a higher desalting capacity than the latter. Furthermore, the OMC electrode shows a better rate capacity than the AC electrode. In addition, the desalination capacities were quantified by the batch-mode experiment at low voltage of 1.2V in 25 ppm NaCl solution (50 micros/cm conductivity). It was found that the adsorbed ion amounts of OMC and AC electrodes were 11.6 and 4.3 micromol/g, respectively. The excellent electrosorptive desalination performance of OMC electrode might be not only due to the suitable pore size (average of 3.3 nm) for the propagation of the salt ions, but also due to the ordered mesoporous structure that facilitates desorption of the

  10. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases). Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A surface-electrode quadrupole guide for electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffrogge, Johannes Philipp

    2012-12-19

    This thesis reports on the design and first experimental realization of a surface-electrode quadrupole guide for free electrons. The guide is based on a miniaturized, planar electrode layout and is driven at microwave frequencies. It confines electrons in the near-field of the microwave excitation, where strong electric field gradients can be generated without resorting to resonating structures or exceptionally high drive powers. The use of chip-based electrode geometries allows the realization of versatile, microstructured potentials with the perspective of novel quantum experiments with guided electrons. I present the design, construction and operation of an experiment that demonstrates electron confinement in a planar quadrupole guide for the first time. To this end, electrons with kinetic energies from one to ten electron-volts are guided along a curved electrode geometry. The stability of electron guiding as a function of drive parameters and electron energy has been studied. A comparison with numerical particle tracking simulations yields good qualitative agreement and provides a deeper understanding of the electron dynamics in the guiding potential. Furthermore, this thesis gives a detailed description of the design of the surface-electrode layout. This includes the development of an optimized coupling structure to inject electrons into the guide with minimum transverse excitation. I also discuss the extension of the current setup to longitudinal guide dimensions that are comparable to or larger than the wavelength of the drive signal. This is possible with a modified electrode layout featuring elevated signal conductors. Electron guiding in the field of a planar, microfabricated electrode layout allows the generation of versatile and finely structured guiding potentials. One example would be the realization of junctions that split and recombine a guided electron beam. Furthermore, it should be possible to prepare electrons in low-lying quantum mechanical

  12. Theory of Water Desalination by Porous Electrodes with Immobile Chemical Charge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Suss, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    In capacitive deionization (CDI), water is desalinated by storing ions in electrical double layers (EDLs) within the micropores of charged porous carbon electrodes. Recent experiments using chemically modified electrodes have shown differing, novel phenomena such as "inverted CDI," "enhanced CDI,

  13. A Simple and Inexpensive Function Generator and a Four-Electrode Cell for Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahadily, F. N.; Mottola, Horacio A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes construction and operation of an inexpensive signal generator and a four-electrode electrochemical cell for use in voltammetric experiments. Also describes construction and operation of a four-electrode electrochemical cell used to illustrate elimination (or minimization) of background currents due to electrochemical reactions by species…

  14. A Simple and Inexpensive Function Generator and a Four-Electrode Cell for Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahadily, F. N.; Mottola, Horacio A.

    1986-01-01

    Describes construction and operation of an inexpensive signal generator and a four-electrode electrochemical cell for use in voltammetric experiments. Also describes construction and operation of a four-electrode electrochemical cell used to illustrate elimination (or minimization) of background currents due to electrochemical reactions by species…

  15. Extraction electrode geometry for a calutron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veach, A.M.; Bell, W.A. Jr.

    1975-09-23

    This patent relates to an improved geometry for the extraction electrode and the ground electrode utilized in the operation of a calutron. The improved electrodes are constructed in a partial-picture-frame fashion with the slits of both electrodes formed by two tungsten elongated rods. Additional parallel spaced-apart rods in each electrode are used to establish equipotential surfaces over the rest of the front of the ion source. (auth)

  16. Research on Gesture Definition and Electrode Placement in Pattern Recognition of Hand Gesture Action SEMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Chen, Xiang; Zhao, Zhang-Yan; Tu, You-Qiang; Yang, Ji-Hai; Lantz, Vuokko; Wang, Kong-Qiao

    The goal of this study is to explore the effects of electrode place-ment on the hand gesture pattern recognition performance. We have conducted experiments with surface EMG sensors using two detecting electrode channels. In total 25 different hand gestures and 10 different electrode positions for measuring muscle activities have been evaluated. Based on the experimental results, dependencies between surface EMG signal detection positions and hand gesture recognition performance have been analyzed and summarized as suggestions how to define hand gestures and select suitable electrode positions for a myoelectric control system. This work provides useful insight for the development of a medical rehabilitation system based on EMG technique.

  17. Design, modelling and preliminary characterisation of microneedle-based electrodes for tissue electroporation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Conor; Houlihan, Ruth; Grygoryev, Konstantin; Ning, Zhenfei; Williams, John; Moore, Tom

    2016-10-01

    We analysed the use of microneedle-based electrodes to enhance electroporation of mouse testis with DNA vectors for production of transgenic mice. Different microneedle formats were developed and tested, and we ultimately used electrodes based on arrays of 500 μm tall microneedles. In a series of experiments involving injection of a DNA vector expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and electroporation using microneedle electrodes and a commercially available voltage supply, we compared the performance of flat and microneedle electrodes by measuring GFP expression at various timepoints after electroporation. Our main finding, supported by both experimental and simulated data, is that needles significantly enhanced electroporation of testis.

  18. Probability biases as Bayesian inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre; C. R. Martins

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will show how several observed biases in human probabilistic reasoning can be partially explained as good heuristics for making inferences in an environment where probabilities have uncertainties associated to them. Previous results show that the weight functions and the observed violations of coalescing and stochastic dominance can be understood from a Bayesian point of view. We will review those results and see that Bayesian methods should also be used as part of the explanation behind other known biases. That means that, although the observed errors are still errors under the be understood as adaptations to the solution of real life problems. Heuristics that allow fast evaluations and mimic a Bayesian inference would be an evolutionary advantage, since they would give us an efficient way of making decisions. %XX In that sense, it should be no surprise that humans reason with % probability as it has been observed.

  19. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    CERN Document Server

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  20. Are temperature reconstructions regionally biased?

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, O

    2012-01-01

    Are temperature reconstructions possibly biased due to regionally differing density of utilized proxy-networks? This question is assessed utilizing a simple process-based forward model of tree growth in the virtual reality of two simulations of the climate of the last millennium with different amplitude of solar forcing variations. The pseudo-tree ring series cluster in high latitudes of the northern hemisphere and east Asia. Only weak biases are found for the full network. However, for a strong solar forcing amplitude the high latitudes indicate a warmer first half of the last millennium while mid-latitudes and Asia were slightly colder than the extratropical hemispheric average. Reconstruction skill is weak or non-existent for two simple reconstruction schemes, and comparison of virtual reality target and reconstructions reveals strong deficiencies. The temporal resolution of the proxies has an influence on the reconstruction task and results are sensitive to the construction of the proxy-network. Existing ...

  1. Development of a Compact Wireless Laplacian Electrode Module for Electromyograms and Its Human Interface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ichikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a compact wireless Laplacian electrode module for electromyograms (EMGs. One of the advantages of the Laplacian electrode configuration is that EMGs obtained with it are expected to be sensitive to the firing of the muscle directly beneath the measurement site. The performance of the developed electrode module was investigated in two human interface applications: character-input interface and detection of finger movement during finger Braille typing. In the former application, the electrode module was combined with an EMG-mouse click converter circuit. In the latter, four electrode modules were used for detection of finger movements during finger Braille typing. Investigation on the character-input interface indicated that characters could be input stably by contraction of (a the masseter, (b trapezius, (c anterior tibialis and (d flexor carpi ulnaris muscles. This wide applicability is desirable when the interface is applied to persons with physical disabilities because the disability differs one to another. The investigation also demonstrated that the electrode module can work properly without any skin preparation. Finger movement detection experiments showed that each finger movement was more clearly detectable when comparing to EMGs recorded with conventional electrodes, suggesting that the Laplacian electrode module is more suitable for detecting the timing of finger movement during typing. This could be because the Laplacian configuration enables us to record EMGs just beneath the electrode. These results demonstrate the advantages of the Laplacian electrode module.

  2. Competition and Commercial Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    A. Blasco; F. Sobbrio

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the empirical evidence on commercial media bias (i.e., advertisers influence over media accuracy) and then introduces a simple model to summarize the main elements of the theoretical literature. The analysis provides three main policy insights for media regulators: i) Media regulators should target their monitoring efforts towards news contents upon which advertisers are likely to share similar preferences; ii) In advertising industries characterized by high correlation in ...

  3. BEHAVIORAL BIASES IN TRADING SECURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcan Ciprian Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main thesis of this paper represents the importance and the effects that human behavior has over capital markets. It is important to see the link between the asset valuation and investor sentiment that motivate to pay for an asset a certain prices over/below the intrinsic value. The main behavioral aspects discussed are emotional factors such as: fear of regret, overconfidence, perseverance, loss aversion ,heuristic biases, misinformation and thinking errors, herding and their consequences.

  4. Giant rectification in graphene nanoflake molecular devices with asymmetric graphene nanoribbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Xiao-Li; Xie, Zhen; Zuo, Xi; Zhang, Guang-Ping, E-mail: zhangguangping@sdnu.edu.cn; Li, Zong-Liang; Wang, Chuan-Kui, E-mail: ckwang@sdnu.edu.cn

    2016-09-16

    By applying density functional theory based nonequilibrium Green's function method, we theoretically investigate the electron transport properties of a zigzag-edged trigonal graphene nanoflake (ZTGNF) sandwiched between two asymmetric zigzag graphene nanoribbon (zGNR) and armchair graphene nanoribbon (aGNR) electrodes with carbon atomic chains (CACs) as the anchoring groups. Significant rectifying effects have been observed for these molecular devices in low bias voltage regions. Interestingly, the rectifying performance of molecular devices can be optimized by changing the width of the aGNR electrode and the number of anchoring CACs. Especially, the molecular device displays giant rectification ratios up to the order of 10{sup 4} when two CACs are used as the anchoring group between the ZTGNF and the right aGNR electrode. Further analysis indicates that the asymmetric shift of the perturbed molecular energy levels and the spatial parity of the electron wavefunctions in the electrodes around the Fermi level play key roles in determining the rectification performance. And the spatial distributions of tunneling electron wavefunctions under negative bias voltages can be modified to be very localized by changing the number of anchoring CACs, which is found to be the origin of the giant rectification ratios. - Highlights: • The rectification properties of triangular Graphene nanoflakes are investigated. • The rectifying performance can be optimized by changing the width of the right arm-chaired GNR electrode. • The rectifying performance can also be tuned by varying the number of anchoring carbon atomic chains.

  5. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Lopes dos Santos, J M B [CFP and Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias Universidade do Porto, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Geim, A K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Peres, N M R [Centre of Physics and Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, P-4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Nilsson, Johan; Castro Neto, A H [Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Guinea, F [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-05

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and {gamma}{sub 4} (inter-layer), and the on-site energy {Delta}.

  6. Electronic properties of a biased graphene bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Eduardo V; Novoselov, K S; Morozov, S V; Peres, N M R; Lopes dos Santos, J M B; Nilsson, Johan; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Castro Neto, A H

    2010-05-01

    We study, within the tight-binding approximation, the electronic properties of a graphene bilayer in the presence of an external electric field applied perpendicular to the system-a biased bilayer. The effect of the perpendicular electric field is included through a parallel plate capacitor model, with screening correction at the Hartree level. The full tight-binding description is compared with its four-band and two-band continuum approximations, and the four-band model is shown to always be a suitable approximation for the conditions realized in experiments. The model is applied to real biased bilayer devices, made out of either SiC or exfoliated graphene, and good agreement with experimental results is found, indicating that the model is capturing the key ingredients, and that a finite gap is effectively being controlled externally. Analysis of experimental results regarding the electrical noise and cyclotron resonance further suggests that the model can be seen as a good starting point for understanding the electronic properties of graphene bilayer. Also, we study the effect of electron-hole asymmetry terms, such as the second-nearest-neighbour hopping energies t' (in-plane) and γ(4) (inter-layer), and the on-site energy Δ.

  7. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Knight

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available My recent book entitled The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments seeks to answer a key question within animal ethics, namely: is animal experimentation ethically justifiable? Or, more precisely, is it justifiable within the utilitarian cost:benefit framework that fundamentally underpins most regulations governing animal experimentation? To answer this question I reviewed more than 500 scientific publications describing animal studies, animal welfare impacts, and alternative research, toxicity testing and educational methodologies. To minimise bias I focused primarily on large-scale systematic reviews that had examined the human clinical and toxicological utility of animal studies. Despite this, Dr. Susanne Prankel recently reviewed my book in this journal, essentially accusing me of bias. However, she failed to provide any substantive evidence to refute my conclusions, let alone evidence of similar weight to that on which they are based. Those conclusions are, in fact, firmly based on utilitarian ethical reasoning, informed by scientific evidence of considerable strength, and I believe they are robust.

  8. Ombud’s Corner: defeating unconscious bias

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2016-01-01

    Do you have a tendency to switch off at meetings every time a particular colleague starts to speak? Is it obvious to you that your colleagues will never accept a peer as a project leader? And doesn’t that candidate from your own alma mater clearly have a definite edge over the others?   How do we come to these conclusions and what can we do to ensure that our decisions are based on objective criteria alone? Can we always be sure that we are not influenced by pre-conceived notions or prejudices that may unconsciously bias our thinking? Unconscious bias is a part of everyday life – it refers to the insidious influences that our backgrounds, cultural environments or personal experiences exert on the way in which we judge or assess people or situations. In the workplace, it has a negative impact on our goals and interactions when it causes us to make decisions based on generalisations or mental associations that we are not even aware of, and that have little or no bearing on the o...

  9. Measuring bias from unbiased observable

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon

    2014-01-01

    Since Kaiser introduced galaxies as a biased tracer of the underlying total mass field, the linear galaxies bias, b(z) appears ubiquitously both in theoretical calculations and in observational measurements related to galaxy surveys. However, the generic approaches to the galaxy density is a non-local and stochastic function of the underlying dark matter density and it becomes difficult to make the analytic form of b(z). Due to this fact, b(z) is known as a nuisance parameter and the effort has been made to measure bias free observable quantities. We provide the exact and analytic function of b(z) which also can be measured from galaxy surveys using the redshift space distortions parameters, more accurately unbiased observable \\beta \\sigma_{\\rm{gal}} = f \\sigma_8. We also introduce approximate solutions for b(z) for different gravity theories. One can generalize these approximate solutions to be exact when one solves the exact evolutions for the dark matter density fluctuation of given gravity theories. These...

  10. Response bias in plaintiffs' histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W; Zasler, N D; Marguilies, S; English, L T; Stevens, K B

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated response bias in self-reported history of factors relevant to the assessment of traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury and related emotional distress. Response bias refers to systematic error in self-report data. A total of 446 subjects (comprising 131 litigating and 315 non-litigating adults from five locations in the United States) completed a symptom questionnaire. Data were obtained from university faculty and students, from patients in clinics specializing in physiatry neurology, and family medicine, and from plaintiffs undergoing forensic neuropsychological evaluations. Comparisons were made for litigant and non litigant ratings of their past and current cognitive and emotional functioning, including life in general, ability to concentrate, memory, depression, anxiety, alcohol, drugs, ability to work or attend school, irritability, headaches, confusion, self-esteem, and fatigue. Although there is no basis for hypothesizing plaintiffs to be healthier than the general population, plaintiffs rated their pre-injury functioning superior to non-plaintiffs. These findings suggest that response biases need to be taken into account by forensic examiners when relying on litigants' self-reports of pre-injury status.

  11. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  12. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen E Allahverdyan

    Full Text Available Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science.We formulate a (non-Bayesian model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency or the first opinion (primacy -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties.The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  13. Bias-dependent model of the electrical impedance of ionic polymer-metal composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we analyze the charge dynamics of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) in response to voltage inputs composed of a large dc bias and a small superimposed time-varying voltage. The IPMC chemoelectrical behavior is described through the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck framework, in which steric effects are taken into consideration. The physics of charge build-up and mass transfer in the proximity of the high surface electrodes is modeled by schematizing the IPMC as the stacked sequence of five layers, in which the ionomeric membrane is separated from the metal electrodes by two composite layers. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a semianalytical solution for the concentration of mobile counterions and the electric potential in the IPMC, which is, in turn, used to establish an equivalent circuit model for the IPMC electrical response. The circuit model consists of the series connection of a resistor and two complex elements, each constituted by the parallel connection of a capacitor and a Warburg impedance. The resistor is associated with ion transport in the ionomeric membrane and is independent of the dc bias. The capacitors and the Warburg impedance idealize charge build-up and mass transfer in the vicinity of the electrodes and their value is controlled by the dc bias. The proposed approach is validated against experimental results on in-house fabricated IPMCs and the accuracy of the equivalent circuit is assessed through comparison with finite element results.

  14. Oscillatory motion of water droplets in kerosene above co-planar electrodes in microfluidic chips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Beránek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally observed oscillatory motion of water droplets in microfluidic systems with coplanar microelectrodes under imposed DC electric fields. Two-electrode arrangement with no bipolar electrode and eight-electrode arrangement with six bipolar microelectrodes were investigated. Kerosene was used as the continuous phase. We studied the dependences of the oscillation frequency on the electric field intensity and ionic strength of the water phase. We found that the electric field dependence is strongly nonlinear and discussed possible reasons of this phenomenon, e.g., the droplet deformation at electrode edges that affects the charge transfer between the electrode and droplet or the interplay between the Coulomb force on free charge and the dielectrophoretic force. Our experiments further revealed that the oscillation frequency decreases with growing salt concentration in the two-electrode arrangement, but increases in the eight-electrode arrangement, which was attributed to surface tension related processes and electrochemical processes on the bipolar electrodes. Finally, we analyzed the effects of the electric field on the oscillatory motion by means of a simplified mathematical model. It was shown that the electric force imposed on the droplet charge is the key factor to induce the oscillations and the dielectrophoretic force significantly contributes to the momentum transfer at the electrode edges. For the same electric field strength, the model is able to predict the same oscillation frequency as that observed in the experiments.

  15. Estimation and correction of different flavors of surface observation biases in ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Plazas, Raquel; Hacker, Josua P.; Collins, Nancy; Lee, Jared A.

    2017-04-01

    The impact of assimilating surface observations has been shown in several publications, for improving weather prediction inside of the boundary layer as well as the flow aloft. However, the assimilation of surface observations is often far from optimal due to the presence of both model and observation biases. The sources of these biases can be diverse: an instrumental offset, errors associated to the comparison of point-based observations and grid-cell average, etc. To overcome this challenge, a method was developed using the ensemble Kalman filter. The approach consists on representing each observation bias as a parameter. These bias parameters are added to the forward operator and they extend the state vector. As opposed to the observation bias estimation approaches most common in operational systems (e.g. for satellite radiances), the state vector and parameters are simultaneously updated by applying the Kalman filter equations to the augmented state. The method to estimate and correct the observation bias is evaluated using observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. OSSEs are constructed for the conventional observation network including radiosondes, aircraft observations, atmospheric motion vectors, and surface observations. Three different kinds of biases are added to 2-meter temperature for synthetic METARs. From the simplest to more sophisticated, imposed biases are: (1) a spatially invariant bias, (2) a spatially varying bias proportional to topographic height differences between the model and the observations, and (3) bias that is proportional to the temperature. The target region characterized by complex terrain is the western U.S. on a domain with 30-km grid spacing. Observations are assimilated every 3 hours using an 80-member ensemble during September 2012. Results demonstrate that the approach is able to estimate and correct the bias when it is spatially invariant (experiment 1). More

  16. RESISTANCE OF COATED ELECTRODES SUITABLE FOR RENOVATION OF TILLAGE TOOLS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with the abrasive wear resistance of additional materials. The resistance of individual materials was figured out by determining a proportional wear resistance on a grinding fabric. Results of the experiment confirmed an increase in welds abrasive wear resistance. Chosen coated electrodes are suitable for the renovation of tillage tools of agricultural machines.

  17. Human preferences for symmetry: subjective experience, cognitive conflict and cortical brain activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Evans

    Full Text Available This study examines the links between human perceptions, cognitive biases and neural processing of symmetrical stimuli. While preferences for symmetry have largely been examined in the context of disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and autism spectrum disorders, we examine various these phenomena in non-clinical subjects and suggest that such preferences are distributed throughout the typical population as part of our cognitive and neural architecture. In Experiment 1, 82 young adults reported on the frequency of their obsessive-compulsive spectrum behaviors. Subjects also performed an emotional Stroop or variant of an Implicit Association Task (the OC-CIT developed to assess cognitive biases for symmetry. Data not only reveal that subjects evidence a cognitive conflict when asked to match images of positive affect with asymmetrical stimuli, and disgust with symmetry, but also that their slowed reaction times when asked to do so were predicted by reports of OC behavior, particularly checking behavior. In Experiment 2, 26 participants were administered an oddball Event-Related Potential task specifically designed to assess sensitivity to symmetry as well as the OC-CIT. These data revealed that reaction times on the OC-CIT were strongly predicted by frontal electrode sites indicating faster processing of an asymmetrical stimulus (unparallel lines relative to a symmetrical stimulus (parallel lines. The results point to an overall cognitive bias linking disgust with asymmetry and suggest that such cognitive biases are reflected in neural responses to symmetrical/asymmetrical stimuli.

  18. Culture Moderates Biases in Search Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaratanakun, Jake A; Mak, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that people often search insufficiently in sequential-search tasks compared with the predictions of benchmark optimal strategies that maximize expected payoff. However, those studies were mostly conducted in individualist Western cultures; Easterners from collectivist cultures, with their higher susceptibility to escalation of commitment induced by sunk search costs, could exhibit a reversal of this undersearch bias by searching more than optimally, but only when search costs are high. We tested our theory in four experiments. In our pilot experiment, participants generally undersearched when search cost was low, but only Eastern participants oversearched when search cost was high. In Experiments 1 and 2, we obtained evidence for our hypothesized effects via a cultural-priming manipulation on bicultural participants in which we manipulated the language used in the program interface. We obtained further process evidence for our theory in Experiment 3, in which we made sunk costs nonsalient in the search task-as expected, cross-cultural effects were largely mitigated.

  19. Matrilateral Bias in Human Grandmothering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Daly

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Children receive more care and resources from their maternal grandmothers than from their paternal grandmothers. This asymmetry is the “matrilateral bias” in grandmaternal investment. Here, we synopsize the evolutionary theories that predict such a bias, and review evidence of its cross-cultural generality and magnitude. Evolutionists have long maintained that investing in a daughter’s child yields greater fitness returns, on average, than investing in a son’s child because of paternity uncertainty: the son’s putative progeny may have been sired by someone else. Recent theoretical work has identified an additional natural selective basis for the matrilateral bias that may be no less important: supporting grandchildren lightens the load on their mother, increasing her capacity to pursue her fitness in other ways, and if she invests those gains either in her natal relatives or in children of a former or future partner, fitness returns accrue to the maternal, but not the paternal, grandmother. In modern democracies, where kinship is reckoned bilaterally and no postmarital residence norms restrict grandmaternal access to grandchildren, many studies have found large matrilateral biases in contact, childcare, and emotional closeness. In other societies, patrilineal ideology and postmarital residence with the husband’s kin (virilocality might be expected to have produced a patrilateral bias instead, but the available evidence refutes this hypothesis. In hunter-gatherers, regardless of professed norms concerning kinship and residence, mothers get needed help at and after childbirth from their mothers, not their mothers-in-law. In traditional agricultural and pastoral societies, patrilineal and virilocal norms are common, but young mothers still turn to their natal families for crucial help, and several studies have documented benefits, including reduced child mortality, associated with access to maternal, but not paternal, grandmothers. Even

  20. Correcting circulation biases in a lower-resolution global general circulation model with data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Martin; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we aim at developing a new method of bias correction using data assimilation. This method is based on the stochastic forcing of a model to correct bias by directly adding an additional source term into the model equations. This method is presented and tested first with a twin experiment on a fully controlled Lorenz '96 model. It is then applied to the lower-resolution global circulation NEMO-LIM2 model, with both a twin experiment and a real case experiment. Sea surface height observations are used to create a forcing to correct the poorly located and estimated currents. Validation is then performed throughout the use of other variables such as sea surface temperature and salinity. Results show that the method is able to consistently correct part of the model bias. The bias correction term is presented and is consistent with the limitations of the global circulation model causing bias on the oceanic currents.

  1. Correcting circulation biases in a lower-resolution global general circulation model with data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canter, Martin; Barth, Alexander; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we aim at developing a new method of bias correction using data assimilation. This method is based on the stochastic forcing of a model to correct bias by directly adding an additional source term into the model equations. This method is presented and tested first with a twin experiment on a fully controlled Lorenz '96 model. It is then applied to the lower-resolution global circulation NEMO-LIM2 model, with both a twin experiment and a real case experiment. Sea surface height observations are used to create a forcing to correct the poorly located and estimated currents. Validation is then performed throughout the use of other variables such as sea surface temperature and salinity. Results show that the method is able to consistently correct part of the model bias. The bias correction term is presented and is consistent with the limitations of the global circulation model causing bias on the oceanic currents.

  2. Bias-correction in vector autoregressive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsted, Tom; Pedersen, Thomas Quistgaard

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the properties of various methods for bias-correcting parameter estimates in both stationary and non-stationary vector autoregressive models. First, we show that two analytical bias formulas from the existing literature are in fact identical. Next, based on a detailed simulation study......, we show that when the model is stationary this simple bias formula compares very favorably to bootstrap bias-correction, both in terms of bias and mean squared error. In non-stationary models, the analytical bias formula performs noticeably worse than bootstrapping. Both methods yield a notable...... improvement over ordinary least squares. We pay special attention to the risk of pushing an otherwise stationary model into the non-stationary region of the parameter space when correcting for bias. Finally, we consider a recently proposed reduced-bias weighted least squares estimator, and we find...

  3. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  4. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  5. Perspective taking combats automatic expressions of racial bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Andrew R; Bodenhausen, Galen V; Richeson, Jennifer A; Galinsky, Adam D

    2011-06-01

    Five experiments investigated the hypothesis that perspective taking--actively contemplating others' psychological experiences--attenuates automatic expressions of racial bias. Across the first 3 experiments, participants who adopted the perspective of a Black target in an initial context subsequently exhibited more positive automatic interracial evaluations, with changes in automatic evaluations mediating the effect of perspective taking on more deliberate interracial evaluations. Furthermore, unlike other bias-reduction strategies, the interracial positivity resulting from perspective taking was accompanied by increased salience of racial inequalities (Experiment 3). Perspective taking also produced stronger approach-oriented action tendencies toward Blacks (but not Whites; Experiment 4). A final experiment revealed that face-to-face interactions with perspective takers were rated more positively by Black interaction partners than were interactions with nonperspective takers--a relationship that was mediated by perspective takers' increased approach-oriented nonverbal behaviors (as rated by objective, third-party observers). These findings indicate that perspective taking can combat automatic expressions of racial biases without simultaneously decreasing sensitivity to ongoing racial disparities.

  6. A Pharmacological Primer of Biased Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Bradley T.

    2011-01-01

    Biased agonism is one of the fastest growing topics in G protein-coupled receptor pharmacology; moreover, biased agonists are used in the clinic today: carvedilol (Coreg®) is a biased agonist of beta-adrenergic receptors. However, there is a general lack of understanding of biased agonism when compared to traditional pharmacological terminology. Therefore, this review is designed to provide a basic introduction to classical pharmacology as well as G protein-coupled receptor signal transductio...

  7. A fundamental residue pitch perception bias for tone language speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitti, Elizabeth

    A complex tone composed of only higher-order harmonics typically elicits a pitch percept equivalent to the tone's missing fundamental frequency (f0). When judging the direction of residue pitch change between two such tones, however, listeners may have completely opposite perceptual experiences depending on whether they are biased to perceive changes based on the overall spectrum or the missing f0 (harmonic spacing). Individual differences in residue pitch change judgments are reliable and have been associated with musical experience and functional neuroanatomy. Tone languages put greater pitch processing demands on their speakers than non-tone languages, and we investigated whether these lifelong differences in linguistic pitch processing affect listeners' bias for residue pitch. We asked native tone language speakers and native English speakers to perform a pitch judgment task for two tones with missing fundamental frequencies. Given tone pairs with ambiguous pitch changes, listeners were asked to judge the direction of pitch change, where the direction of their response indicated whether they attended to the overall spectrum (exhibiting a spectral bias) or the missing f0 (exhibiting a fundamental bias). We found that tone language speakers are significantly more likely to perceive pitch changes based on the missing f0 than English speakers. These results suggest that tone-language speakers' privileged experience with linguistic pitch fundamentally tunes their basic auditory processing.

  8. Effects of sertraline, duloxetine, vortioxetine, and idazoxan in the rat affective bias test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Louise Konradsen; Haubro, Kia; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Affective biases seemingly play a crucial role for the onset and development of depression. Acute treatment with monoamine-based antidepressants positively influence emotional processing, and an early correction of biases likely results in repeated positive experiences that ultimately l...

  9. Emotion Regulation Predicts Attention Bias in Maltreated Children At-Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romens, Sarah E.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Child maltreatment is associated with heightened risk for depression; however, not all individuals who experience maltreatment develop depression. Previous research indicates that maltreatment contributes to an attention bias for emotional cues, and that depressed individuals show attention bias for sad cues. Method: The present study…

  10. The Accuracy of Metacomprehension Judgments: The Biasing Effect of Text Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderholm, Tracy; Wang, Xuesong; Therriault, David; Zhao, Qin; Jakiel, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Two experiments tested the hypothesis that relative metacomprehension accuracy is vulnerable when readers' cognitive efforts are biased by text order. It is proposed that the difficulty level of initial text information biases readers' estimates of text comprehension but is correctable when more cognitive effort is applied. Method:…

  11. Mediation of cognitive bias modification for alcohol addiction via stimulus-specific alcohol avoidance association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; Rinck, M.; Eberl, C.M.; Becker, E.S.; Lindenmeyer, J.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive bias modification (CBM) studies have provided evidence that cognitive biases play a causal role in alcohol use disorders. In this study, data from a CBM experiment in alcoholic patients were re-analyzed. In the original study, no mediation by associations measured with an Implic

  12. The Impact of Sexual of Orientation and Gender Expression Bias on African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majied, Kamilah F.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses sexual orientation and gender expression bias as they impact the educational experience of African American students. Sexual orientation and gender expression bias have a unique presentation in Black educational settings. The climate in such settings can be metagrobolized by the combination of distorted notions of Black…

  13. Attention Bias to Emotional Faces Varies by IQ and Anxiety in Williams Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Lauren M.; Oates, Joyce M.; Dai, Yael G.; Dodd, Helen F.; Waxler, Jessica; Clements, Caitlin C.; Weill, Sydney; Hoffnagle, Alison; Anderson, Erin; MacRae, Rebecca; Mullett, Jennifer; McDougle, Christopher J.; Pober, Barbara R.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) often experience significant anxiety. A promising approach to anxiety intervention has emerged from cognitive studies of attention bias to threat. To investigate the utility of this intervention in WS, this study examined attention bias to happy and angry faces in individuals with WS (N = 46). Results showed…

  14. Mediation of cognitive bias modification for alcohol addiction via stimulus-specific alcohol avoidance association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; Rinck, M.; Eberl, C.; Becker, E.S.; Lindenmeyer, J.; Wiers, R.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cognitive bias modification (CBM) studies have provided evidence that cognitive biases play a causal role in alcohol use disorders. In this study, data from a CBM experiment in alcoholic patients were re-analyzed. In the original study, no mediation by associations measured with an Impli

  15. Reflection-induced bias error in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber optic gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuchen; Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhihao; Song, Ningfang; Zhang, Chunxi

    2016-01-15

    Analysis of the bias error induced by reflections in an air-core photonic bandgap fiber gyroscope is performed by both simulation and experiment. The bias error is sinusoidally periodic under modulation, and its intensity is related to the relative positions of the reflection points. A simple and effective method for the suppression of the error is proposed, and it has been verified experimentally.

  16. Camera Perspective Bias in Videotaped Confessions: Evidence that Visual Attention Is a Mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lezlee J.; Lassiter, G. Daniel; Patterson, Stephen M.; Ransom, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Several experiments have demonstrated a "camera perspective bias" in evaluations of videotaped confessions: videotapes with the camera focused on the suspect lead to judgments of greater voluntariness than alternative presentation formats. The present research investigated potential mediators of this bias. Using eye tracking to measure visual…

  17. The Impact of Sexual of Orientation and Gender Expression Bias on African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majied, Kamilah F.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses sexual orientation and gender expression bias as they impact the educational experience of African American students. Sexual orientation and gender expression bias have a unique presentation in Black educational settings. The climate in such settings can be metagrobolized by the combination of distorted notions of Black…

  18. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E. Marissen; I.H.A. Franken; A.J. Waters; P. Blanken; W. van den Brink; V.M. Hendriks

    2006-01-01

    Aims Previous studies have shown that abstinent heroin addicts exhibit an attentional bias to heroin-related stimuli. It has been suggested that attentional bias may represent a vulnerability to relapse into drug use. In the present study, the predictive value of pre-treatment attentional bias on re

  19. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  20. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…